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Sample records for bacteremia

  1. Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Lunch Lines FDA Cracks Down on Antibacterial Soaps Health Tip: Schedule a Back-to-School Dental ... from the infected site, causing bacteremia. In some bacterial infections , such as pneumonia and skin abscesses , bacteria ...

  2. Recurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    OpenAIRE

    Maslow, J.N.; Mulligan, M E; Arbeit, R D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common gram-negative organism associated with bacteremia. While recurrent E. coli urinary tract infections are well-described, recurrent E. coli bacteremia appears to be uncommon, with no episodes noted in multiple series of patients with gram-negative bacteremias. We report on 5 patients with recurrent bloodstream infections identified from a series of 163 patients with E. coli bacteremia. For each patient, the isolates from each episode were analyzed by pulsed-f...

  3. Recurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, J N; Mulligan, M E; Arbeit, R D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common gram-negative organism associated with bacteremia. While recurrent E. coli urinary tract infections are well-described, recurrent E. coli bacteremia appears to be uncommon, with no episodes noted in multiple series of patients with gram-negative bacteremias. We report on 5 patients with recurrent bloodstream infections identified from a series of 163 patients with E. coli bacteremia. For each patient, the isolates from each episode were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping and for the presence of E. coli virulence factors. For each of four patients, the index and recurrent episodes of bacteremia represented the same strain as defined by PFGE, and the strains were found to carry one or more virulence factors. The remaining patient, with two episodes of bloodstream infection separated by a 4-year interval, was infected with two isolates that did not carry any virulence factors and that were clonally related by ribotype analysis but differed by PFGE. All five patients had either a local host defense defect (three patients) or impaired systemic defenses (one patient) or both (one patient). Thus, recurrent E. coli bacteremia is likely to represent a multifactorial process that occurs in patients with impaired host defenses who are infected with virulent isolates. Images PMID:7910828

  4. Decreasing incidence rates of bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, C; Jensen, T G;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have shown that the incidence rate of bacteremia has been increasing over time. However, few studies have distinguished between community-acquired, healthcare-associated and nosocomial bacteremia. METHODS: We conducted a population-based study among adults with first......-acquired, 50.0 for healthcare-associated and 66.7 for nosocomial bacteremia. During 2000-2008, the overall incidence rate decreased by 23.3% from 254.1 to 198.8 (3.3% annually, p < .001), the incidence rate of community-acquired bacteremia decreased by 25.6% from 119.0 to 93.8 (3.7% annually, p < .001) and the...... incidence rate of nosocomial bacteremia decreased by 28.9% from 82.2 to 56.0 (4.2% annually, p < .001). The incidence rate of healthcare-associated bacteremia remained stable. The most common microorganisms were Escherichia coli (28.3%), Staphylococcus aureus (12.3%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (10...

  5. Clostridium difficile Bacteremia, Taiwan1

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nan-Yao; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2010-01-01

    To determine clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with Clostridium difficile bacteremia (CDB), we identified 12 patients with CDB in 2 medical centers in Taiwan; all had underlying systemic diseases. Five had gastrointestinal diseases or conditions, including pseudomembranous colitis (2 patients); 4 recalled diarrhea, but only 5 had recent exposure to antimicrobial drugs. Ten available isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Five isolates had C. difficile toxin ...

  6. Bacteremia and candidemia in hematological malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, D; Skinhøj, P; Bangsborg, Jette Marie;

    1988-01-01

    171 episodes of bacteremia and candidemia in 142 patients were recorded during the period 1981-1985 in patients with hematological malignancies. Overall mortality, within 1 week of onset of bacteremia, was 20%. Increased mortality was found in patients with poor disease-prognosis (39%), with...

  7. Bacteremia Caused by Group G Streptococci, Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Chun-Hsing; Liu, Liang-Chun; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Teng, Lee-Jeng; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective observational study in Taiwan, 1998–2004, identified 92 patients with group G streptococcal bacteremia; 86 had Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. The most common diagnosis was cellulitis (48 cases), followed by primary bacteremia (34 cases). Infection recurred in 9 patients. Mortality rate was low (3.3%); resistance to quinupristin-dalfopristin was high.

  8. Klebsiella pneumoniae Bacteremia and Capsular Serotypes, Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Chun-Hsing; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Cheng-Yu; Chu, Fang-Yeh; Hsu, Meng-Shiuan; Hsu, Hsin-Sui; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2011-01-01

    Capsular serotypes of 225 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in Taiwan were identified by using PCR. Patients infected with K1 serotypes (41 isolates) had increased community-onset bacteremia, more nonfatal diseases and liver abscesses, lower Pittsburgh bacteremia scores and mortality rates, and fewer urinary tract infections than patients infected with non–K1/K2 serotypes (147 isolates).

  9. Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latos, D L; Stone, W J; Alford, R H

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen male hemodialysis patients developed 21 episodes of S. aureus bacteremia. Infections involving vascular access were responsible for 65% of initial bacteremias. The arteriovenous fistula was the most prevalent type of access used, and thus was responsible for the majority of these illnesses. Phage typing indicated that recurrent episodes were due to reinfection rather than relapse. Complications included endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic embolism, and pericarditis. One patient died of infectious complications. It is recommended that hemodialysis patients developing bacteremia due to S. aureus receive at least 6 weeks of beta lactamase-resistant antimicrobial therapy. PMID:608860

  10. Macrophage serum markers in pneumococcal bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren K; Weis, Nina;

    2006-01-01

    probability of survival when sCD163 and CRP were known (p = .25). CONCLUSIONS: Macrophage marker response in pneumococcal bacteremia was compromised in old age. In patients <75 yrs old, sCD163 was superior to other markers, including C-reactive protein, in predicting fatal disease outcome....... pneumococcal bacteremia. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Five university hospitals in Denmark. PATIENTS: A total of 133 patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (positive blood culture) and 133 age- and gender-matched controls. INTERVENTIONS: Samples were collected for biochemical...

  11. Actinomyces turicensis Bacteremia Secondary to Pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Ogawa, Hiroko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kimura, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Kan; Otsuka, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    We herein present a rare case of Actinomyces turicensis bacteremia that was caused by pyometra. The patient was successfully treated with transvaginal drainage and antibiotic therapy. A literature review in MEDLINE showed that there have been only 8 previously reported cases of A. turicensis bacteremia. This infection frequently occurs in patients with visceral abscesses, and blood culture examinations usually reveal a polymicrobial pattern. However, the prognosis of such patients has been reported to generally be benign. Due to difficulties in performing bacterial identification and the wide-spectrum clinical pictures associated with this bacteremia, no comprehensive understanding of the clinical features of each Actinomyces species has yet been established. PMID:26521910

  12. Retrospective analysis of bacteremia because of Enterobacter cloacae compared with Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanjuan, D; Zhiyong, Z; Xiaoju, L; Yali, X; Xihai, Z; Zhenzhen, L

    2007-04-01

    A total of 52 patients of Enterobacter cloacae bacteremia from a University hospital during the period from January 2000 to June 2005 were analysed and compared with a reference group comprising 52 patients of Escherichia coli bacteremia. Overall, E. cloacae ranked the tenth in all pathogens of bacteremia accounting for 2.8% of the total patients. Although the incidence of E. cloacae bacteremia was low, the attributable mortality rate till achieved 13.5%. Most patients (86.5%) with E. cloacae bacteremia were hospital-acquired. The overwhelming majority of patients (92.3%) were men, while almost half of the patients (48.1%) were from the Department of Urological Surgery with underlying diseases such as urinal obstruction, kidney transplantation and kidney tumours. Possible risks factors associated with E. cloacae bacteremia included immunocompromised status, long-term hospitalisation and invasive procedures or surgeries. E. cloacae bacteremia significantly differed from E. coli bacteremia in a number of clinical aspects, including underlying diseases, portal of entry, infection type, risks factors, laboratory findings and appropriateness of empirical antibiotic therapy. Besides the high prevalence of resistance to cephalosporins, most E. cloacae blood isolates were also resistant to ciprofloxacin (resistance rate, 67.3%), gentamicin (73.1%) and tobramycin (73.1%). Based on the findings of the present study, E. cloacae is probably an important pathogen of bacteremia occurring in male patients with underlying urinal system illnesses. PMID:17394432

  13. Clinical Characteristics of Ochrobactrum anthropi Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Maki, Miyako; Watanabe, Naoto; Murase, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    The clinical picture of Ochrobactrum anthropi infection is not well described because the infection is rare in humans and identification of the pathogen is difficult. We present a case of O. anthropi bacteremia that was initially misidentified as Ralstonia paucula and later identified by 16S rRNA sequencing and recA analysis.

  14. Vibrio cholerae bacteremia associated with gastrectomy.

    OpenAIRE

    Toeg, A; Berger, S A; Battat, A; Hoffman, M.; Yust, I

    1990-01-01

    Bacteremia due to Vibrio cholerae is rare. Each of 15 cases previously reported in the English language literature occurred in the setting of immune deficiency. We describe an instance of non-serogroup O1 V. cholerae septicemia in an otherwise healthy patient. Susceptibility to such infection may have been enhanced by a prior gastrectomy for duodenal ulcer.

  15. The incidence and prognosis of patients with bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg

    2015-07-01

    Bacteremia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and ranks among the top seven causes of death in Europe and North America. The occurrence of bacteremia has increased for decades while short-term prognosis has remained unchanged or improved only slightly. Consequently, we are facing an increased number of bacteremia survivors for whom we know little about long-term survival and causes of death. Contemporary knowledge on the epidemiology and outcome of bacteremia is important to assess its impact on public health and is a prerequisite for any effective prevention and improvement of prognosis. This thesis is based on data from a bacteremia database (The Danish Observational Registry of Infectious Syndromes) comprising all bacteremias in Funen County, Denmark, between May 1999 and December 2008. Data on bacteremias were cross-linked with various administrative and research healthcare registries and we conducted 3 studies on adult bacteremia patients with the aims: to investigate the occurrence of and trends in first-time bacteremia and distribution of microorganisms in the general population; overall and by place of acquisition (study I), to investigate the overall and daily incidences of bacteremia among hospitalized patients (study II), to investigate and compare long-term mortality and causes of death after bacteremia with the general population (study III). Study I: In a population-based observational study, we identified 7786 residents of Funen County with first-time bacteremia for an overall incidence rate of 215.7 per 100,000 person years including 99.0 for community-acquired, 50.0 for healthcare-associated and 66.7 for nosocomial bacteremia. The overall incidence rate decreased by 23.3% (95% CI, 17.8%-28.4%) from year 2000 to 2008 (3.3% per year, p 65 years), and patients initially admitted to the Departments of Hematology, Nephrology, Internal Medicine, Urology or Oncology. The daily incidence was highest on the day of admission and declined

  16. Outbreak of Pseudomonas fluorescens Bacteremia among Oncology Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene; Pan, Hui-Ju; Chen, Yu-Chi; Sun, Chun-Chuan; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    1998-01-01

    From 7 to 24 March 1997, four patients developed Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteremia at the hospital; one on the oncology ward and the other three in the chemotherapy room. These patients all had underlying malignancies and had the Port-A-Cath (Smiths Industries Medical Systems, Deltec, Inc., St. Paul, Minn.) implants. Three patients had primary bacteremia, and one had Port-A-Cath-related infection. None of these patients had received a blood transfusion before the episodes of bacteremia. All ...

  17. Factors Associated with Non-typhoidal Salmonella Bacteremia versus Typhoidal Salmonella Bacteremia in Patients Presenting for Care in an Urban Diarrheal Disease Hospital in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    K M Shahunja; Leung, Daniel T.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Ahmed, Dilruba; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi bacteremia are the causes of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a paucity of data regarding NTS bacteremia in South Asia, a region with a high incidence of typhoidal bacteremia. We sought to determine clinical predictors and outcomes associated with NTS bacteremia compared with typhoidal bacteremia. Methodology We performed a retrospective age-matched case-control study of patients admitted t...

  18. Clinical implications of species identification in monomicrobial Aeromonas bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Jung Wu

    Full Text Available Advances in Aeromonas taxonomy have led to the reclassification of aeromonads. Hereon, we aimed to re-evaluate the characteristics of Aeromonas bacteremia, including those of a novel species, Aeromonas dhakensis.A retrospective study of monomicrobial Aeromonas bacteremia at a medical center in southern Taiwan from 2004-2011 was conducted. Species identification was based on rpoB sequencing. Of bacteremia of 153 eligible patients, A. veronii (50 isolates, 32.7%, A. dhakensis (48, 31.4%, A. caviae (43, 28.1%, and A. hydrophila (10, 6.5% were the principal causative species. A. dhakensis and A. veronii bacteremia were mainly community-acquired and presented as primary bacteremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, or skin and soft-tissue infection, whereas A. caviae was associated with hospital-onset bacteremia. The distribution of the AmpC β-lactamase and metallo-β-lactamase genes was species-specific: bla(AQU-1, bla(MOX, or bla(CepH was present in A. dhakensis, A. caviae, or A. hydrophila, respectively, and bla(CphA was present in A. veronii, A. dhakensis, and A. hydrophila. The cefotaxime resistance rates of the A. caviae, A. dhakensis, and A. hydrophila isolates were higher than that of A. veronii (39.5%%, 25.0%, and 30% vs. 2%, respectively. A. dhakensis bacteremia was linked to the highest 14-day sepsis-related mortality rate, followed by A. hydrophila, A. veronii, and A. caviae bacteremia (25.5%, 22.2%, 14.0%, and 4.7%, respectively; P = 0.048. Multivariate analysis revealed that A. dhakensis bacteremia, active malignancies, and a Pitt bacteremia score ≥ 4 was an independent mortality risk factor.Characteristics of Aeromonas bacteremia vary between species. A. dhakensis prevalence and its associated poor outcomes suggest it an important human pathogen.

  19. Solobacterium moorei Bacteremia: Identification, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Clinical Characteristics▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Rune Micha; Holt, Hanne Marie; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    We present five cases of Solobacterium moorei bacteremia. The isolates were identified with 16S rRNA gene sequencing and were susceptible to common antibiotics used for anaerobic infections. Bacteremia with S. moorei seems to be associated with debilitating conditions, but the prognosis of the infection appears to be good.

  20. Solobacterium moorei bacteremia: identification, antimicrobial susceptibility, and clinical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micha Pedersen, Rune; Holt, Hanne Marie; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    We present five cases of Solobacterium moorei bacteremia. The isolates were identified with 16S rRNA gene sequencing and were susceptible to common antibiotics used for anaerobic infections. Bacteremia with S. moorei seems to be associated with debilitating conditions, but the prognosis of the in...

  1. Clinical characteristics and significance of Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia and Streptococcus bovis bacteremia: a prospective 16-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredoira, J C; Alonso, M P; García, J F; Casariego, E; Coira, A; Rodriguez, A; Pita, J; Louzao, C; Pombo, B; López, M J; Varela, J

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of Streptococcus salivarius isolates recovered from blood cultures and compare them with isolates of Streptococcus bovis biotypes I and II. Seventeen of the 52 (32%) S. salivarius isolates recovered were considered clinically significant, compared with 62 of the 64 (97%) S. bovis isolates (p<0.0001). Bacteremia caused by S. salivarius occurred mostly in patients who showed relevant disruption of the mucous membranes and/or serious underlying diseases. Patients with S. salivarius bacteremia were younger than those with S. bovis bacteremia (57 vs. 67 years; p<0.01). Patients with S. salivarius bacteremia and patients with S. bovis II bacteremia had similar rates of endocarditis, colon tumors, and non-colon cancer. On the other hand, when compared with S. bovis I bacteremia, S. salivarius bacteremia was associated with lower rates of endocarditis (18% vs. 74%, respectively) (p<0.01) and colon tumors (0% vs. 57%, respectively) (p<0.005) and higher rates of non-colon cancer (53% vs. 9.5%, respectively) (p<0.01). Bacteremia caused by S. bovis II had a hepatobiliary origin in 50% of the patients, while, in contrast, that due to S. salivarius or S. bovis I was less frequently associated with a hepatobiliary origin (12% and 5%, respectively) (p<0.00001). The rate of penicillin resistance was 31% among S. salivarius isolates and 0% among S. bovis isolates (p<0.0001). In conclusion, the clinical characteristics of S. salivarius bacteremia and S. bovis II bacteremia are similar, and the isolation of S. salivarius in blood should not be systematically regarded as contamination. PMID:15902530

  2. The incidence and prognosis of patients with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg

    2015-01-01

    an increased number of bacteremia survivors for whom we know little about long-term survival and causes of death. Contemporary knowledge on the epidemiology and outcome of bacteremia is important to assess its impact on public health and is a prerequisite for any effective prevention and improvement......, Staphylococcus aureus, co-agulasenegative staphylococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae, and increased for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and enterococci species (p<0.05 for all the mentioned microorganisms). Regard-less of place of acquisition, the proportion of bacteremias caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci...

  3. Bacteremia during quinsy and elective tonsillectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, Tejs Ehlers; Henriksen, Jens-Jacob; Rusan, Maria;

    2012-01-01

    prophylaxis recommendations to patients at high risk of infective endocarditis who are undergoing tonsillectomy. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 80 patients undergoing elective tonsillectomy and 36 patients undergoing acute tonsillectomy due to peritonsillar abscess. Blood cultures, tonsillar...... swabs, core tissue, and pus aspirates were analyzed by standard microbiological techniques. Results: Bacteremia was detected in 73% of patients during elective tonsillectomy compared to 56% during quinsy tonsillectomy (P ¼ .089, Fishers exact test). Significantly more blood culture bottles were positive...... prophylaxis recommendation only to patients undergoing procedures to treat an established infection. To provide full empiric coverage, including coverage for Staphylococcus aureus, we advocate the use of amoxicillin with clavulanic acid in patients at high risk of infective endocarditis....

  4. Raoultella Planticola Bacteremia Following Consumption of Seafood

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    Philip W Lam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Raoultella planticola is a Gram-negative bacillus commonly found in water, soil and aquatic environments. There have only been 16 cases of R planticola infection documented in the literature to date. R planticola possesses the ability to convert histidine to histamine and can produce symptoms of scombroid poisoning when poorly prepared seafood is consumed in large amounts. The present report describes a case involving a 56-year-old woman who presented with R planticola bacteremia and symptoms consistent with cholangitis four days after consuming a seafood salad containing squid and octopus. She was successfully treated with intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral ciprofloxacin. Recent chemotherapy, proton pump inhibitor use and altered biliary flow secondary to hepatic metastases may have been contributing factors to the pathogenesis of disease.

  5. Classification of Healthcare-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Søgaard, Mette; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether different definitions of healthcare-associated infection influenced the prevalence, characteristics, and mortality of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. With different definitions, the proportion of patients classified as having healthcare-associated S. aureus...

  6. Bacteremia causes hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Leib, S.L.; Rowland, Ian J;

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bacteremia and systemic complications both play important roles in brain pathophysiological alterations and the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. Their individual contributions to the development of brain damage, however, still remain to be defined. METHODS: Using an adult...... rat pneumococcal meningitis model, the impact of bacteremia accompanying meningitis on the development of hippocampal injury was studied. The study comprised of the three groups: I. Meningitis (n=11), II. meningitis with attenuated bacteremia resulting from iv injection of serotype......-specific pneumococcal antibodies (n=14), and III. uninfected controls (n=6). RESULTS: Pneumococcal meningitis resulted in a significantly higher apoptosis score 0.22 (0.18-0.35) compared to uninfected controls (0.02 (0.00-0.02), Mann Whitney test, P=0.0003). Also, meningitis with an attenuation of bacteremia by...

  7. OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Causing Bacteremia, United Arab Emirates

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    Chulsoo Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OXA-48-producing isolates were identified in approximately 4% and less than 1% of ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae causing bacteremia at the largest tertiary hospital in Abu Dhabi.

  8. Impact of bacteremia on the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian; Peters, David Alberg; Liptrot, Matthew George;

    2008-01-01

    Background. Bacteremia plays a major role in the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. This experimental study investigated how bacteremia influences the pathophysiologic profile of the brain. Methods. Rats with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis were randomized to 1 of 3 groups of infected study ....... The different end points affected by the systemic and local infectious processes should be addressed in future studies. © 2008 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved....

  9. Bacteremias caused by Selenomonas artemidis and Selenomonas infelix.

    OpenAIRE

    Bisiaux-Salauze, B; Perez, C; Sebald, M; Petit, J C

    1990-01-01

    We report two different cases of bacteremia caused by two recently described Selenomonas species, Selenomonas artemidis and Selenomonas infelix. Both species are normally found in human buccal flora. S. artemidis bacteremia appeared in a patient (number 1) who presented with an air-fluid pulmonary cavity and clinical conditions consistent with an anaerobic lung abscess. While the patient improved with antibiotic therapy, cultures of respiratory secretions yielded Mycobacterium tuberculosis. T...

  10. Staphylococcus saprophyticus bacteremia after ESWL in an immunocompetent woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmans, M; Boel, A; Van Vaerenbergh, K; De Beenhouwer, H

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a well-known cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections, especially in young and sexually active women. Presence in blood cultures is rare and often attributed to contamination. When bacteremia is significant, it occurs mostly in patients with hematologic malignancies and is predominantly catheter-related. However, we describe a case of significant bacteremia with S. saprophyticus associated with urinary tract infection after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of an ureterolithiasis in an otherwise healthy patient. PMID:25523318

  11. Bacteremia in burned patients admitted to Sina Hospital, Tabriz, Iran

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    Parviz Saleh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in burn wards is infection, and it is the major reason of death in burn injuries. There are several reasons that make burn victims predisposed to infection. The current study aimed to investigate the role of different factors that have an effect on bacteremia occurrence in burn patients and factors which are relevant to mortality in these patients. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study conducted in a 1 year period in Sina Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, and 81 burn were included. We collected patients’ data about their age, body weight, cause of burn, lesion color, place and percentage of burn by getting history and studying of their files. Then we documented all interventions. Blood tests and cultures and colonies criteria were recorded. Results: In this study, 39 patients were male (48.1%, and 42 was female (51.9%. Mean age was 32.06 ± 17.46 years. In patients without bacteremia, 57 patients did not need catheterization (89.1%, however in patients with bacteremia 9 patients demanded catheter insertion (52.9%. In patients with bacteremia 12 patients survived (70.9%, however in the without bacteremia group 56 patients survived (92.2%. Then, the relationship between type of burn, wound infection and bacterial species investigated, (P = 0.650, P = 0.210 and P = 0.110 respectively. Conclusion: We concluded, invasive interventions increased bacteremia susceptibility in our studied burned patients. Mortality rate is directly related to bacteremia prevalence and increased by extent of burn area in these patients. The three most frequent microbial agents responsible for bacteremia were Pseudomona aeruginosa, Klebsiella and Staphylococcus aureus.

  12. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  13. Bacteremias por bacilos gram-negativos

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    Adrelírio J. R. Gonçalves

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados 31 casos de bacteremia por gram-negativos, assunto que vem merecendo muita atenção dos pesquisadores nos últimos anos. Os organismos etiológicos mais importantes que apareceram em igualdade de freqüência foram Escherichia coli e Klebsiella-Aerobacter, sendo responsáveis por 58% do total das infecções, seguidos por Pseudomonas. A porta de entrada mais freqüente foi o trato urinário em 61,3% dos casos. A infecção foi mais comum no sexo masculino e a faixa etária de 50 a 60 anos predominou. O uso prévio de antibióticos foi um fator predisponente muito importante, seguido pelo uso de esteróides e citostáticos. As principais doenças predisponentes foram diabetes mellitus e neoplasias malignas. Os principais fatores precipitantes foram a manipulação do aparelho urinário, com infecção prévia ou desencadeada, cirurgia do aparelho digestivo, uronatia obstrutiva e obstrução biliar. As principais manifestações clínicas foram a presença de febre, calafrios e hipotensão arterial. A complicação mais freqüente foi o choque bacteriano que incidiu em 58% dos casos, aproximadamente três vêzes aquela relatada na literatura. As outras foram a insuficiência renal aguda, superinfecção e infecção pulmonar metastática. Considerações terapêuticas gerais e esquemas de antibióticos são propostos para estes casos. A mortalidade da bacteremia simples foi de 30,7% e quando associada ao choque elevou-se para 72,2% . As infecções por Pseudomonas foram 100% fatais.

  14. Clinical characteristics associated with mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Takumi; Hamada, Yukihiro; Yamagishi, Yuka; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-06-01

    The presence of anaerobes in the blood stream is known to be associated with a higher rate of mortality. However, few prognostic risk factor analyses examining whether a patient's background characteristics are associated with the prognosis have been reported. We performed a retrospective case-controlled study to assess the prognostic factors associated with death from anaerobic bacteremia. Seventy-four patients with anaerobic bacteremia were treated between January 2005 and December 2014 at Aichi Medical University Hospital. The clinical information included drug susceptibility was used for analysis of prognostic factors for 30-day mortality. Multivariate logistic analyses revealed an association between the 30-day mortality rate and malignancy (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: 1.08-12.31) and clindamycin resistance (OR: 7.93, 95% CI: 2.33-27.94). The result of Kaplan-Meier analysis of mortality showed that the 30-day survival rate was 83% in clindamycin susceptible and 38.1% in clindamycin resistant anaerobes causing bacteremia. The result of log-rank test also showed that susceptibility to clindamycin affected mortality (P < 0.001). Our results indicated that malignancy and clindamycin susceptibility could be used to identify subgroups of patients with anaerobic bacteremia with a higher risk of 30-day mortality. The results of this study are important for the early and appropriate management of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. PMID:26903282

  15. Bacteremia during adenoidectomy: a comparison of suction diathermy adenoid ablation and adenoid curettage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casserly, Paula

    2010-08-01

    Transient bacteremia is induced by adenoidectomy when the integrity of the nasopharyngeal membrane is broken. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of bacteremia in patients undergoing adenoidectomy, to identify the causative organisms, and to compare the incidences of bacteremia between the two techniques suction diathermy and curettage.

  16. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Plasma endotoxin was more related to GN than to Gram-positive bacteremia, and that endotoxin level was species dependent, but PCT level remained relatively more stable within the GN bacteria caused bacteremia. Both GN and positive bacteria caused bacteremia in the ICU patients in different regions of China. And PCT is a more valuable biomarker than endotoxin in the diagnosis of bacteremia.

  17. Clostridium glycolicum Bacteremia in a Bone Marrow Transplant Patient▿

    OpenAIRE

    Elsayed, Sameer; Zhang, Kunyan

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of Clostridium glycolicum bacteremia and septic shock in an adult woman with a recent bone marrow transplant for relapsed Hodgkin's disease. The bacterium was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This is the first published report of the recovery of this organism from human clinical material.

  18. Rahnella aquatilis bacteremia from a suspected urinary source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tash, Kaley

    2005-05-01

    A 76-year-old male with prostatic hyperplasia presented with acute pyelonephritis. Blood cultures yielded Rahnella aquatilis. Treatment with intravenous followed by oral levofloxacin resulted in cure. Important characteristics of this organism include its biochemical similarities to Enterobacter agglomerans, its apparent ability to cause bacteremia from a renal focus, and its response to quinolone therapy. PMID:15872303

  19. Eggerthella lenta Bacteremia Complicated by Spondylodiscitis, Psoas Abscess, and Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, B. J.; Korman, T. M.; Junckerstorff, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta bacteremia is uncommon and generally associated with abdominal sepsis. The organism and its clinical significance have not been well characterized due to historical difficulties with identification. We report a case of severe infection in a paraplegic man complicated by psoas abscess, osteomyelitis, and meningitis and discuss treatment challenges.

  20. Increased risk of arterial thromboembolic events after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejer, N; Gotland, N; Uhre, M L;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An association between infection and arterial thromboembolic events (ATE) has been suggested. Here we examined the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and other ATE after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). METHODS: Danish register-based nation-wide observational cohort study...

  1. Recurrent Aeromonas Bacteremia Due to Contaminated Well Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Morgan J.; Parrish, Nicole M.; Belani, Anusha; Shah, Maunank

    2015-01-01

    Although they are ubiquitous to aquatic environments, Aeromonas species have traditionally been considered nonvirulent; however, in the past 30 years, they have emerged as important human pathogens that can cause a wide spectrum of disease. In this study, we describe a case of recurrent Aeromonas bacteremia in an immunocompetent patient, and this exposure was linked to the patient's home well water supply. PMID:26495324

  2. Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with lower leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domínguez, H.; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone;

    1996-01-01

    The first Danish cases of Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with chronic lower leg ulcers are reported. Both patients were admitted to the hospital during the same month of a very warm summer and had been exposed to the same marine environment, thereby suggesting the same source of......'Etoile, France), but further genetic and physiological analyses identified them as Shewanella alga....

  3. Bacteremia in Children Hospitalized with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia-Grande, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Pinnock, Elli; Salas, Antonio; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of bacteremia is considered low in children with acute bronchiolitis. However the rate of occult bacteremia in infants with RSV infection is not well established. The aim was to determine the actual rate and predictive factors of bacteremia in children admitted to hospital due to confirmed RSV acute respiratory illness (ARI), using both conventional culture and molecular techniques. Methods A prospective multicenter study (GENDRES-network) was conducted between 2011–2013 in children under the age of two admitted to hospital because of an ARI. Among those RSV-positive, bacterial presence in blood was assessed using PCR for Meningococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, in addition to conventional cultures. Results 66 children with positive RSV respiratory illness were included. In 10.6% patients, bacterial presence was detected: H. influenzae (n = 4) and S. pneumoniae (n = 2). In those patients with bacteremia, there was a previous suspicion of bacterial superinfection and had received empirical antibiotic treatment 6 out of 7 (85.7%) patients. There were significant differences in terms of severity between children with positive bacterial PCR and those with negative results: PICU admission (100% vs. 50%, P-value = 0.015); respiratory support necessity (100% vs. 18.6%, P-value < 0.001); Wood-Downes score (mean = 8.7 vs. 4.8 points, P-value < 0.001); GENVIP scale (mean = 17 vs. 10.1, P-value < 0.001); and length of hospitalization (mean = 12.1 vs. 7.5 days, P-value = 0.007). Conclusion Bacteremia is not frequent in infants hospitalized with RSV respiratory infection, however, it should be considered in the most severe cases. PMID:26872131

  4. The daily risk of bacteremia during hospitalization and associated 30-day mortality evaluated in relation to the traditional classification of bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Kolmos, Hans Jørn;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the overall and daily incidence of bacteremia among hospitalized patients and evaluated the traditional classification of bacteremia (community-onset vs nosocomial based on a 48-hour time window) by means of the daily incidence and associated 30-day mortality. METHODS...

  5. Rhodococcus bacteremia in cancer patients is mostly catheter related and associated with biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94% central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI. Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%. Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated.

  6. Risk Factors of Endocarditis in Patients with Enterococcus faecalis Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Lauridsen, Trine K; Arpi, Magnus;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  The NOVA score is a recently developed diagnostic tool to identify patients with increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE) among patients with Enterococcus faecalis (EF) bacteremia. We aim to validate an adapted version of the NOVA score and to identify risk factors for IE in......, unknown origin of infection 4 points, prior valve disease 2 points and heart murmur 1 point. RESULTS:  IE was diagnosed in 78 patients (12%). Monomicrobial EF bacteremia (HR 3.60; CI95% 1.6-8.0), prosthetic heart valve (HR 6.2; CI95% 3.8-10.1), male sex (HR 2.0; CI95% 1.1-3.8), and community acquisition...

  7. Prospective observational study of Klebsiella bacteremia in 230 patients: outcome for antibiotic combinations versus monotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Korvick, J A; Bryan, C. S.; Farber, B.; Beam, T R; Schenfeld, L; Muder, R R; Weinbaum, D.; Lumish, R; Gerding, D.N.; Wagener, M M

    1992-01-01

    Combination antimicrobial agent therapy has been advocated for treatment of gram-negative bacteremia, including that caused by Klebsiella spp. We performed a prospective, observational, 10-hospital collaborative study to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotic combination therapy versus that of monotherapy for 230 consecutive patients with Klebsiella bacteremia. The species involved were K. pneumoniae (82%), K. oxytoca (15%), and K. ozaenae (0.4%). Of the bacteremias, 26% were polymicrobial in na...

  8. Bacteremia in burned patients admitted to Sina Hospital, Tabriz, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Parviz Saleh; Hamid Noshad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in burn wards is infection, and it is the major reason of death in burn injuries. There are several reasons that make burn victims predisposed to infection. The current study aimed to investigate the role of different factors that have an effect on bacteremia occurrence in burn patients and factors which are relevant to mortality in these patients. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study conducted in a 1...

  9. Bacteremia and "Endotipsitis" following transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting

    OpenAIRE

    Mizrahi Meir; Roemi Lilach; Shouval Daniel; Adar Tomer; Korem Maya; Moses Alon; Bloom Alan; Shibolet Oren

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify all cases of bacteremia and suspected endotipsitis after Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting (TIPS) at our institution and to determine risk factors for their occurrence. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed records of all patients who underwent TIPS in our institution between 1996 and 2009. Data included: indications for TIPS, underlying liver disease, demographics, positive blood cultures after TIPS, microbiological characteristics, treatment and outcome. RESUL...

  10. Meteorological effects on the incidence of pneumococcal bacteremia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Thomsen, Reimar W.;

    The seasonal nature of invasive pneumococcal disease with peak incidences during winter months is well recognized (Dowell 2003, Talbot 2005, Watson 2006). However few detailed studies of the temporal relationship between actual climatic changes and subsequent pneumococcal disease are available. We...... perform an 8-year longitudinal population-based ecological study in a Danish county to examine whether foregoing changes in meteorological parameters, including temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, and wind velocity, predicted variations in pneumococcal bacteremia (PB) incidence....

  11. Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients with Persistent or Recurrent Bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, especially with persistent (PB or recurrent bacteremia (RB.

  12. Genome Sequences of Sequence Type 45 (ST45) Persistent Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Bacteremia Strain 300-169 and ST45 Resolving MRSA Bacteremia Strain 301-188

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, David; Seidl, Kati; Corvaglia, Anna-Rita; Bayer, Arnold S.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Francois, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (positive blood cultures after ≥7 days) represents a challenging subset of invasive MRSA infections. The comparison of genome sequences of persistent (300-169) and resolving (301-188) MRSA bacteremia isolates with similar genetic background (sequence type 45 [ST45]) will help us to better understand underlying mechanisms of persistent MRSA bacteremia.

  13. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Wang; Yun-Liang Cui; Zhao-Fen Lin; De-Chang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both procalcitonin (PCT) and plasma endotoxin levels cannot be solely used for a definite diagnosis of bacteremia or sepsis, and there has been few study comparing the values of the two biomarkers for the diagnosis of bacteremia. The aim of this study was to identify bacteria causing bacteremia and evaluate the role of the two biomarkers in the diagnosis of bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Methods: The medical records of 420 patients in ICU were retrospectively reviewed...

  14. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Tao; Cui, Yun-Liang; Lin, Zhao-fen; Chen, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both procalcitonin (PCT) and plasma endotoxin levels cannot be solely used for a definite diagnosis of bacteremia or sepsis, and there has been few study comparing the values of the two biomarkers for the diagnosis of bacteremia. The aim of this study was to identify bacteria causing bacteremia and evaluate the role of the two biomarkers in the diagnosis of bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Methods: The medical records of 420 patients in ICU were retrospectively reviewed. P...

  15. Bacteremia in Cancer Patients: A Two Center Experience of Isolates and Spectrum of Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Naseh; Marashi; Asgari; Aghabarari; Mahmudi; Asadi; Hatami; Kalantar

    2015-01-01

    Background; Bacteremia is a frequent condition in cancer patients with a significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, which is a medical crisis that needs broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. Objectives This study examined bacteremia in cancer patients from two medical centers regarding isolates and spectrum of antibiotic resistance pattern. Patients and Methods This was a prospe...

  16. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R; Reed, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones. PMID:27533890

  17. Chronic Liver Disease Impairs Bacterial Clearance in a Human Model of Induced Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Ashare, Alix; Stanford, Clark; Hancock, Patricia; Stark, Donna; Lilli, Kathleen; Birrer, Emily; Nymon, Amanda; Doerschug, Kevin C.; Hunninghake, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    Sepsis often causes impaired hepatic function. Patients with liver disease have an increased risk of bacteremia. This is thought to be secondary to impaired reticuloendothelial system function. However, this has not been demonstrated clinically. Since transient bacteremia occurs following toothbrushing, we hypothesized that subjects with cirrhosis would have impaired bacterial clearance following toothbrushing compared with subjects with pulmonary disease and healthy controls. After baseline ...

  18. Increase in hippocampal water diffusion and volume during experimental pneumococcal meningitis is aggravated by bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon G; Brandt, Christian T; Leib, Stephen L;

    2014-01-01

    pneumococci. The study comprised of four experimental groups. I. Uninfected controls (n = 8); II. Meningitis (n = 11); III. Meningitis with early onset bacteremia by additional i.v. injection of live pneumococci (n = 10); IV. Meningitis with attenuated bacteremia by treatment with serotype-specific anti...

  19. Bacteremia with Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius: clinical correlates of more accurate identification of isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, K L; Miller, S I; Garner, C V; Ferraro, M J; Calderwood, S B

    1989-01-01

    Two biotypes of Streptococcus bovis can be identified by laboratory testing and can be distinguished from the phenotypically similar organism Streptococcus salivarius. We assessed the clinical relevance of careful identification of these organisms in 68 patients with streptococcal bacteremia caused by these similar species. S. bovis was more likely to be clinically significant when isolated from blood (89%) than was S. salivarius (23%). There was a striking association between S. bovis I bacteremia and underlying endocarditis (94%) compared with that of S. bovis II bacteremia (18%). Bacteremia with S. bovis I was also highly correlated with an underlying colonic neoplasm (71% of patients overall, 100% of those with thorough colonic examinations) compared with bacteremia due to S. bovis II or S. salivarius (17% overall, 25% of patients with thorough colonic examinations). We conclude that careful identification of streptococcal bacteremic isolates as S. bovis biotype I provides clinically important information and should be more widely applied. PMID:2915024

  20. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI.

  1. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jaehyung; Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-Yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo; Bae, In-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI. PMID:27433385

  2. Macrophage serum markers in pneumococcal bacteremia: Prediction of survival by soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; K. Moestrup, Søren; Wejse, Christian;

    2006-01-01

    probability of survival when sCD163 and CRP were known (p = .25). CONCLUSIONS: Macrophage marker response in pneumococcal bacteremia was compromised in old age. In patients <75 yrs old, sCD163 was superior to other markers, including C-reactive protein, in predicting fatal disease outcome....... pneumococcal bacteremia. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Five university hospitals in Denmark. PATIENTS: A total of 133 patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (positive blood culture) and 133 age- and gender-matched controls. INTERVENTIONS: Samples were collected for biochemical...

  3. Bacteremia due to Aeromonas hydrophila in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeromonas hydrophila (A. hydrophila) is a low virulent organism but may cause devastating fatal infections in immunocompromised host especially in liver cirrhosis. It is rarely reported to cause septicemia in a patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). The mortality rate of septicemia due to A. hydrophila is 29% to 73%. We report a case of 59-year-old female patient who was a known case of ALL, presented with the complaints of fever, lethargy and generalized weakness for one month. After taking blood samples for investigations, empirical antimicrobial therapy was started. She did not improve after 48 hours of therapy. Meanwhile blood culture revealed pure growth of A. hydrophila. After sensitivity report was available, ciprofloxacin was started. Patient became afebrile after 48 hours of treatment with ciprofloxacin. It is very vital to correctly identified and treat bacteremia due to A. hydrophila especially in the underlying leukemic patient. (author)

  4. Bartonella spp. bacteremia in blood donors from Campinas, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Helena Urso Pitassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella species are blood-borne, re-emerging organisms, capable of causing prolonged infection with diverse disease manifestations, from asymptomatic bacteremia to chronic debilitating disease and death. This pathogen can survive for over a month in stored blood. However, its prevalence among blood donors is unknown, and screening of blood supplies for this pathogen is not routinely performed. We investigated Bartonella spp. prevalence in 500 blood donors from Campinas, Brazil, based on a cross-sectional design. Blood samples were inoculated into an enrichment liquid growth medium and sub-inoculated onto blood agar. Liquid culture samples and Gram-negative isolates were tested using a genus specific ITS PCR with amplicons sequenced for species identification. Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana antibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. B. henselae was isolated from six donors (1.2%. Sixteen donors (3.2% were Bartonella-PCR positive after culture in liquid or on solid media, with 15 donors infected with B. henselae and one donor infected with Bartonella clarridgeiae. Antibodies against B. henselae or B. quintana were found in 16% and 32% of 500 blood donors, respectively. Serology was not associated with infection, with only three of 16 Bartonella-infected subjects seropositive for B. henselae or B. quintana. Bartonella DNA was present in the bloodstream of approximately one out of 30 donors from a major blood bank in South America. Negative serology does not rule out Bartonella spp. infection in healthy subjects. Using a combination of liquid and solid cultures, PCR, and DNA sequencing, this study documents for the first time that Bartonella spp. bacteremia occurs in asymptomatic blood donors. Our findings support further evaluation of Bartonella spp. transmission which can occur through blood transfusions.

  5. Time to positivity in blood cultures of adults with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Ansorena Luis; Garrido Jose; Rodríguez-Lera María; Peralta Galo; Roiz María

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background previous studies have established that bacterial blood concentration is related with clinical outcome. Time to positivity of blood cultures (TTP) has relationship with bacterial blood concentration and could be related with prognosis. As there is scarce information about the usefulness of TTP, we study the relationship of TTP with clinical parameters in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia. Methods TTP of all cases of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia, detec...

  6. Treatment of Haemophilus bacteremia with benzylpenicillin is associated with increased (30-day) mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Thønnings Sara; Østergaard Christian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Optimal antibiotic treatment strategies of Haemophilus infections are still needed. Therefore, 30-day case fatality rate (CFR) of Haemophilus bacteremia and efficacy of various antibiotic treatment regimes were studied. Methods All episodes of Haemophilus bacteremia in the former Copenhagen County during the period 2000-9 were included in the study. Clinical and biochemical findings and outcome were collected retrospectively from medical records. Results 105 consecutive ep...

  7. A quantitative analysis of the interactions of antipneumococcal antibody and complement in experimental pneumococcal bacteremia.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, E J; Hosea, S W; Hammer, C H; Burch, C G; Frank, M M

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of protection of type-specific antipneumococcal antibody and complement in bacteremia was investigated with purified rabbit antibody and a guinea pig model of pneumococcal bacteremia. IgG and IgM were isolated from the sera of rabbits immunized with type 7 pneumococci (Pn), and their binding to Pn was quantitated. The number of antibody-binding sites on the pnuemococcal capsule was also determined. Pn were incubated with various amounts of the immunoglobulin preparations before ...

  8. Population-Based Surveillance for Hypermucoviscosity Klebsiella pneumoniae Causing Community-Acquired Bacteremia in Calgary, Alberta

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Peirano; Johann DD Pitout; Laupland, Kevin B; Bonnie Meatherall; Gregson, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of hypermucoviscosity isolates among Klebsiella pneumoniae causing community-acquired bacteremia were investigated. The hypermucoviscous phenotype was present in 8.2% of K pneumoniae isolates, and was associated with rmpA and the K2 serotype; liver abscesses were the most common clinical presentation. The present analysis represents the first population-based surveillance study of hypermucoviscosity among K pneumoniae causing bacteremia.

  9. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan

  10. Evaluation of the incidence of occult bacteremia among children with fever of unknown origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitan Naaman Berezin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the incidence of occult bacteremia, to identify the most frequent etiological agents of bacteremias in otherwise healthy children from one month to 10 years old, who had fever of unknown origin attended at the emergency ward of an urban, university-affiliated pediatric referral center. This was a retrospective medical record review, evaluating children with fever. Data were collected from the initial visit, when blood cultures, hematological properties and hemosedimentation rates were examined. Fever was considered as the highest temperature assessed in the hospital or reported by the responsible adult. Occult bacteremia was discovered in 1.4% of the 1,051 children evaluated, and the most common etiologic agent was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Total leukocyte count and blood sedimentation rates greater than 30 mm³ were not predictive factors for occult bacteremia. Fever greater than 39ºC was the most important factor for predicting occult bacteremia (P<0.001. The presence of occult bacteremia was significantly correlated with patient hospitalization.

  11. [A Case of Bacteremia Caused by Ochrobacterium intermedium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Jun; Yamagishi, Yuka; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Koizumi, Yusuke; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-03-01

    We report herein on a case of bacteremia caused by Ochrobactrum intermedium (O. intermedium) identified with biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). An 86-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with paralysis of the right side of the body and dysphagia. He was diagnosed as having a pontine infarction based on the brain MRI findings and was admitted to hospital to have anti-platelet therapy. Three days after admission, he had a fever. Although he had redness and swelling at the peripheral venous catheter insertion site, he was diagnosed as having aspiration pneumonia, since he had fine crackles on auscultation. Soon after taking two sets of blood cultures and removal of the peripheral venous catheter, sulbactam/ampicillin (SBT/ABPC) was administrated. Fifty three hours after incubation, gram-negative bacilli was detected from an aerobic bottle and identified as O. intermedium with MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker MS). Antimicrobial chemotherapy was changed to meropenem (MEPM). He was treated for a total of seven days, and recovered without relapse. Infection caused by O. intermedium has been very uncommon, however, O. intermedium has been recognized as an emerging pathogen in immunodeficient and immunocompetent patients. Since identification of Ochrobactrum species by biochemical methods could be difficult, MALDI-TOF MS might be helpful to clarify Ochrobactrum species just as in the present case. PMID:27197440

  12. Simplified risk stratification criteria for identification of patients with MRSA bacteremia at low risk of infective endocarditis: implications for avoiding routine transesophageal echocardiography in MRSA bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitron de la Vega, P; Tandon, P; Qureshi, W; Nasr, Y; Jayaprakash, R; Arshad, S; Moreno, D; Jacobsen, G; Ananthasubramaniam, K; Ramesh, M; Zervos, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia with low risk of infective endocarditis (IE) who might not require routine trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE). We retrospectively evaluated 398 patients presenting with MRSA bacteremia for the presence of the following clinical criteria: intravenous drug abuse (IVDA), long-term catheter, prolonged bacteremia, intra-cardiac device, prosthetic valve, hemodialysis dependency, vertebral/nonvertebral osteomyelitis, cardio-structural abnormality. IE was diagnosed using the modified Duke criteria. Of 398 patients with MRSA bacteremia, 26.4 % of cases were community-acquired, 56.3 % were health-care-associated, and 17.3 % were hospital-acquired. Of the group, 44 patients had definite IE, 119 had possible IE, and 235 had a rejected diagnosis. Out of 398 patients, 231 were evaluated with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) or TEE. All 44 patients with definite IE fulfilled at least one criterion (sensitivity 100 %). Finally, a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was obtained to evaluate the total risk score of our proposed criteria as a predictor of the presence of IE, and this was compared to the ROC curve of a previously proposed criteria. The area under the ROC curve for our criteria was 0.710, while the area under the ROC curve for the criteria previously proposed was 0.537 (p < 0.001). The p-value for comparing those 2 areas was less than 0.001, indicating statistical significance. Patients with MRSA bacteremia without any of our proposed clinical criteria have very low risk of developing IE and may not require routine TEE. PMID:26676855

  13. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Cui, Yun-Liang; Lin, Zhao-Fen; Chen, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both procalcitonin (PCT) and plasma endotoxin levels cannot be solely used for a definite diagnosis of bacteremia or sepsis, and there has been few study comparing the values of the two biomarkers for the diagnosis of bacteremia. The aim of this study was to identify bacteria causing bacteremia and evaluate the role of the two biomarkers in the diagnosis of bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Methods: The medical records of 420 patients in ICU were retrospectively reviewed. Patients (n = 241) who met the inclusion criteria were subjected to blood culture (BC) for the analysis of the endotoxin or PCT levels. The exclusion criteria included the presence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus and/or AIDS, neutropenia without sepsis, pregnancy, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies, or blood diseases such as hematological tumors. Patients’ BC episodes were divided into BC negative, Gram-negative (GN) bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups. The PCT and plasma endotoxin levels were compared in the different groups. Results: A total of 241 patients with 505 episodes of BC were analyzed. The GN bacteria group showed higher levels of PCT and endotoxin than the BC negative, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups. GN bacteremia was more prevalent than Gram-positive bacteremia. The GN bacteremia caused by non-Enterobacteriaceae infection presented higher endotoxin level than that by Enterobacteriaceae, but no significant difference in PCT levels was observed between the two groups. The plasma endotoxin significantly differed among different groups and was bacterial species dependent. Conclusions: Plasma endotoxin was more related to GN than to Gram-positive bacteremia, and that endotoxin level was species dependent, but PCT level remained relatively more stable within the GN bacteria caused bacteremia. Both GN and positive bacteria caused bacteremia in the ICU patients in different regions of China. And PCT is a more valuable

  14. Recent changes in bacteremia in patients with cancer: a systematic review of epidemiology and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montassier, E; Batard, E; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; de La Cochetière, M F

    2013-07-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complication in patients with cancer. Significant changes in the spectrum of microorganisms isolated from blood culture have been reported in cancer patients over the past years. The aim of our systematic review was to inventory the recent trends in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms causing bacteremia in cancer patients. Data for this review was identified by searches of Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Library for indexed articles and abstracts published in English since 2008. The principal search terms were: "antimicrobial resistance", "bacteremia", "bacterial epidemiology", "bloodstream infection", "cancer patients", "carbapenem resistance", "Escherichia coli resistance", "extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli", "febrile neutropenia", "fluoroquinolone resistance", "neutropenic cancer patient", "vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus", and "multidrug resistance". Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR) were also used in succession to narrow and widen the search. Altogether, 27 articles were selected to be analyzed in the review. We found that Gram-negative bacteria were the most frequent pathogen isolated, particularly in studies with minimal use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Another important trend is the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains associated with increased risk of morbidity, mortality and cost. This increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance has been reported in Gram-negative bacteria as well as in Gram-positive bacteria. This exhaustive review, reporting the recent findings in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacteremia in cancer patients, highlights the necessity of local continuous surveillance of bacteremia and stringent enforcement of antibiotic stewardship programs in cancer patients. PMID:23354675

  15. Infection and T lymphocyte subpopulations: changes associated with bacteremia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, J A; Martell, K M; Rubin, R H

    1983-01-01

    Patients with bacteremia, bacterial endocarditis, or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were prospectively studied using monoclonal antibody reagents to assess alterations in T-lymphocyte subpopulations. Patients with endocarditis had significantly higher ratios of T-helper (OKT4+) to T-suppressor-cytotoxic (OKT8+) cells than did patients with bacteremia alone. Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis patients had a mean ratio of 8.49 (range 4.73-22.36) while S aureus bacteremia had a mean ratio of 2.75 (range 2.15 to 3.21). Similar results were found with Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis (mean 1.62) and bacteremia (mean 1.23). Klebsiella pneumoniae endocarditis (5.10) and sepsis (4.32), and E coli bacteremia (2.15). Nine male patients with AIDS had markedly depressed ratios (mean 0.25, range 0.04 to 0.67) while eight male homosexuals with unexplained lymphadenopathy ("pre-AIDS") had normal or increased ratios. Bacteremic infections are associated with an increased OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio with the degree of increase dependent upon virulence, location, and duration of infection. The immunomodulating effects of infection are manifested in changes in T-cell subsets, and these measurements can be useful in clinical management. PMID:6094086

  16. Clinical manifestations of bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species in southern Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Jen Tang

    Full Text Available This study is conducted to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species.Patients with bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species during the period 2009 to 2013 were identified from a computerized database of a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed.A total of 91 patients with bacteremia due to Aeromonas species were identified. In addition to 16 (17.6% primary bacteremia, the most common source of secondary infection is peritonitis (n = 27, 29.7%, followed by biliary tract infection (n = 18, 19.8%, and SSTI (n = 12, 13.2%, pneumonia (n = 9, 9.9%, catheter-related bloodstream infection (n =  5, 5.5%, and genitourinary tract infection (n = 4, 4.4%. A. hydrophila (n = 35, 38.5% was the most common pathogen, followed by A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 31, 34.1%, A. caviae (n = 14, 15.4%, and A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 9, 9.9%. Forty-three (47.3% patients were classified as healthcare-associated infections (HCAI causes by Aeromonas species, and patients with HCAI were more likely to have cancer, and receive immunosuppressant than patients with community-acquired bacteremia. The overall outcomes, including rate of ICU admission, acute respiratory failure, and mortality were 33.3%, 28.6%, and 23.1%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the in-hospital day mortality was significantly associated only with underlying cancer (P <.001, and initial shock (P <.001.Aeromonas species should be considered one of the causative pathogens of healthcare-associated bacteremia, especially in immunocompromised patients. In addition, it can be associated with high fatality. Cancer and initial shock were the poor prognostic factors.

  17. Importance of Molecular Methods to Determine Whether a Probiotic is the Source of Lactobacillus Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroutcheva, Alla; Auclair, Julie; Frappier, Martin; Millette, Mathieu; Lolans, Karen; de Montigny, Danielle; Carrière, Serge; Sokalski, Stephen; Trick, William E; Weinstein, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the use of probiotic products for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Bio-K+(®) is a commercial probiotic product comprising three strains of lactobacilli-Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285(®), Lact. casei LBC80R(®) and Lact. rhamnosus CLR2(®)-that have been applied to prevent CDI. Generally considered as safe, lactobacilli have potential to cause bacteremia, endocarditis and other infections. The source of Lactobacillus bacteremia can be normal human flora or lactobacilli-containing probiotic. The aim of this study was to assess whether probiotic lactobacilli caused bacteremia and to show the value of molecular identification and typing techniques to determine probiotic and patient strain relatedness. We report an episode of Lactobacillus bacteremia in a 69-year-old man admitted to a hospital with severe congestive heart failure. During his hospitalization, he required long-term antibiotic therapy. Additionally, the patient received Bio-K+(®) probiotic as part of a quality improvement project to prevent CDI. Subsequently, Lactobacillus bacteremia occurred. Two independent blinded laboratory evaluations, using pulse field gel electrophoresis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA fingerprint analysis (rep-PCR), were performed to determine whether the recovered Lact. acidophilus originated from the probiotic product. Ultimately, the patient strain was identified as Lact. casei and both laboratories found no genetic relation between the patient's strain and any of the probiotic lactobacilli. This clinical case of lactobacillus bacteremia in the setting of probiotic exposure demonstrates the value of using discriminatory molecular methods to clearly determine whether there were a link between the patient's isolate and the probiotic strains. PMID:26915093

  18. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, Fatma Deniz; Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia. PMID:27195164

  19. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Deniz Aygun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia.

  20. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia. PMID:27195164

  1. Acute Pyelonephritis with Bacteremia Caused by Enterococcus hirae: A Rare Infection in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pãosinho, Ana; Azevedo, Telma; Alves, João V.; Costa, Isabel A.; Carvalho, Gustavo; Peres, Susana R.; Baptista, Teresa; Borges, Fernando; Mansinho, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are one of the usual residents of the microflora in humans. In the last decade this genus has been reported as the third most common cause of bacteremia. We present the case of a 78-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room because of nausea, lipothymia, and weakness. She was diagnosed with a pyelonephritis with bacteremia, with the isolation in blood and urine cultures of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus hirae. This last microorganism is a rarely isolated pathogen in humans. Currently it is estimated to represent 1–3% of all enterococcal species isolated in clinical practice.

  2. Elizabethkingia meningoseptica bacteremia in immunocompromised hosts: The first case series from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ghafur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although Elizabethkingia meningoseptica (Chryseobacterium meningosepticum infections in immunocompromised hosts have been recognised, clinical data detailing these infections remain limited, especially from India. Antimicrobial susceptibility data on E. meningoseptica remain very limited, with no established breakpoints by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. The organism is usually multidrug resistant to antibiotics usually prescribed for treating Gram-negative bacterial infections, a serious challenge to the patient and the treating clinicians. Materials and Methods: The analysis was done in a tertiary care oncology and stem cell transplant center. Susceptibility testing and identification of E. meningoseptica was done using Vitek auto analyzer. Records of immunocompromised patients with E. meningoseptica bacteremia were analysed from January 2009 to March 2012. Results: A total of 29 E. meningoseptica bacteremia cases were documented between 2009 and 2012. Eleven patients were immunocompromised. Three were post stem cell transplant and one was post cord blood transplant. The mean age of the patients was 48.4 years. Mean Charlson′s comorbidity index was 5.7. Four had solid organ malignancies, five had hematological malignancies, and two had lymphoreticular malignancy. Eight patients had received chemotherapy. Mean Apache II score was 18. Mean Pitts score for bacteremia was 4.7. Two were neutropenic (one post SCT, one MDS post chemo with a mean white blood cell (WBC count of 450/mm 3 . Ten had a line at the time of bacteremia. Mean duration of the line prior to bacteremia was 8 days. Eight had line-related bacteremia. Three had pneumonia with secondary bacteremia. All received combination therapy with two or more antibiotics which included cotrimoxazole, rifampicin, piperacillin-tazobactam, tigecycline, or cefepime-tazobactam. All the isolates showed in vitro resistance to ciprofloxacin. Five patients died, but a

  3. First clinical description of Eggerthia catenaformis bacteremia in a patient with dental abscess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kordjian, Hayarpi H; Schultz, Joyce D J H; Rosenvinge, Flemming Schønning;

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Eggerthia catenaformis bacteremia originating from a dental abscess and imitating necrotizing fasciitis in a previously healthy adult. The isolates were easily identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The clinical course, surgical and antibiotic treatment as well as the successful outcome...

  4. Catheter-related bacteremia due to Kocuria kristinae in a patient with ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaglia, G; Carretto, E; Barbarini, D; Moras, L; Scalone, S; Marone, P; De Paoli, P

    2002-01-01

    We report on the first case of a catheter-related recurrent bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae, a gram-positive microorganism belonging to the family Micrococcaceae, in a 51-year-old woman with ovarian cancer. This unusual pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in patients with severe underlying diseases. PMID:11773142

  5. Catheter-Related Bacteremia Due to Kocuria kristinae in a Patient with Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    G. Basaglia; Carretto, E.; Barbarini, D.; Moras, L.; Scalone, S.; Marone, P.; De Paoli, P

    2002-01-01

    We report on the first case of a catheter-related recurrent bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae, a gram-positive microorganism belonging to the family Micrococcaceae, in a 51-year-old woman with ovarian cancer. This unusual pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in patients with severe underlying diseases.

  6. Changing epidemiology of pediatric Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in Denmark from 1971 through 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Marianne Sjølin; Espersen, Frank; Frimodt-Møller, Niels;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is known to be a leading cause of bacteremia in childhood, and is associated with severe morbidity and increased mortality. To determine developments in incidence and mortality rates, as well as risk factors associated with outcome, we analyzed data from 1971 thr...

  7. Catheter-related Rahnella aquatilis bacteremia in a pediatric bone marrow transplant recipient.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoppe, J E; Herter, M.; Aleksic, S; Klingebiel, T; Niethammer, D

    1993-01-01

    Rahnella aquatilis, a rarely encountered member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, was twice isolated from the blood of a pediatric bone marrow transplant recipient. This is the first report of a pediatric case of R. aquatilis bacteremia, and it was probably related to inappropriate handling of a Hickman catheter.

  8. Successive bacteremias with "Campylobacter cinaedi" and "Campylobacter fennelliae" in a bisexual male.

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, V L; Hadley, W K; Fennell, C L; Flores, B. M.; Stamm, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    A bisexual human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive male had successive bacteremias with "Campylobacter cinaedi" and "Campylobacter fennelliae." Because final identification of both isolates was not completed until 1 month after the last admission of the patient, a novel and nonstandardized antimicrobial susceptibility testing method was useful in guiding timely antimicrobial therapy.

  9. Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Host with a Liver Graft and Ulcerative Colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Verstreken, Isabel; Laleman, Wim; Wauters, Georges; Verhaegen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Desulfovibrio spp. are anaerobic, sulfate-reducing, nonfermenting, Gram-negative bacteria found in the digestive tract of humans. Identification of these species with conventional methods is difficult. The reported case of a Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteremia occurring in an immunocompromised host with ulcerative colitis confirms that this organism may be a possible opportunistic human pathogen.

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Sunita; Siegfried, Justin; Dubrovskaya, Yanina; Rahimian, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin. PMID:27418986

  11. Salmonella enterica Serovar Virchow Bacteremia Presenting as Typhoid-Like Illness in an Immunocompetent Patient ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Eckerle, Isabella; Zimmermann, Stefan; Kapaun, Annette; Junghanss, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We report a typhoid-like illness with fever and altered consciousness in a 22-year-old man with growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Virchow in blood and stool culture. Bacteremia and invasive disease due to non-typhoid salmonellae (NTS) are known in severely immunocompromised patients, but so far have not been described in immunocompetent adults.

  12. C-reactive protein level as a predictor of mortality in liver disease patients with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Sine H; Søvsø, Morten; Gradel, Kim O; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Nielsen, Henrik Ib

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective. C-reactive protein (CRP) is synthesized in the liver in response to inflammation, and CRP is a widely used marker of sepsis. In bacteremia the initial CRP level is an independent predictor of mortality. Since the CRP response in patients with chronic liver disease...

  13. NUTRITIONALLY VARIANT STREPTOCOCCI BACTEREMIA IN CANCER PATIENTS: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY, 1999-2014

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    Abraham Tareq Yacoub

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgoundNutritionally variant Streptococci (NVS, Abiotrophia and Granulicatella are implicated in causing endocarditis and blood stream infections more frequently than other sites of infection. Neutropenia and mucositis are the most common predisposing factors for infection with other pathogens in cancer patients. In this study we investigated the clinical characteristics of NVS bacteremia in cancer patients and identified risk factors and outcomes associated with these infections. Materials and MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed all cases of NVS bacteremia occurring from June 1999 to April 2014 at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. The computerized epidemiology report provided by the microbiology laboratory identified thirteen cancer patients with NVS bacteremia. We collected data regarding baseline demographics and clinical characteristics such as age, sex, underlying malignancy, neutropenic status, duration of neutropenia, treatment, and outcome.ResultsThirteen patients were identified with positive NVS blood stream infection. Ten patients (77% had hematologic malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL (1, multiple myeloma (MM (1, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML (4, and non Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL (4.  The non-hematologic malignancies included esophageal cancer (2 and bladder cancer (1.ConclusionNVS should be considered as a possible agent of bacteremia in cancer patients with neutropenia and a breach in oral, gastrointestinal and genitourinary mucosa (gingivitis/mucositis.

  14. Incidence of bacteremia after chewing, tooth brushing and scaling in individuals with periodontal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, F.L.; Kilian, Mogens; Holmstrup, P.

    2006-01-01

    higher in periodontitis than in gingivitis patients and healthy control individuals. In periodontitis patients, the magnitude of bacteremia was associated with gingival index, plaque index and number of sites with bleeding on probing, but not with probing pocket depth measurements. Practical implications...

  15. Incidence of bacteremia after chewing, tooth brushing and scaling in individuals with periodontal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forner, Lone; Larsen, Tove; Kilian, Mogens;

    2006-01-01

    higher in periodontitis than in gingivitis patients and healthy control individuals. In periodontitis patients, the magnitude of bacteremia was associated with gingival index, plaque index and number of sites with bleeding on probing, but not with probing pocket depth measurements. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS...

  16. Clinical importance and cost of bacteremia caused by nosocomial multi drug resistant acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba Arslan Gulen

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that the occurrence of MDR A.baumannii bacteremia was related with the usage of the wide spectrum antibiotics, and mortality rates were increased in patients that high SAPS II scores, long term hospitalization. Infection control procedures and limited antibiotic usage are very important for prevent nosocomial infections.

  17. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Merchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin.

  18. Course and Outcome of Bacteremia Due to Staphylococcus Aureus: Evaluation of Different Clinical Case Definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Lautenschlager; C. Herzog; W. Zimmerli

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn a retrospective survey of patients hospitalized in the University Hospital of Basel, Switzerland, the course and outcome of 281 cases of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus over a 7-year period were analyzed. The main purpose was to evaluate different case definitions. In 78%

  19. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Yun-Liang Cui; Zhao-Fen Lin; De-Chang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both procalcitonin (PCT) and plasma endotoxin levels cannot be solely used for a definite diagnosis ofbacteremia or sepsis, and there has been few study comparing the values of the two biomarkers for the diagnosis of bacteremia.The aim of this study was to identify bacteria causing bacteremia and evaluate the role of the two biomarkers in the diagnosis ofbacteremia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU).Methods: The medical records of 420 patients in ICU were retrospectively reviewed.Patients (n =241) who met the inclusion criteria were subjected to blood culture (BC) for the analysis of the endotoxin or PCT levels.The exclusion criteria included the presence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus and/or AIDS, neutropenia without sepsis, pregnancy, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies, or blood diseases such as hematological tumors.Patients' BC episodes were divided into BC negative, Gram-negative (GN) bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups.The PCT and plasma endotoxin levels were compared in the different groups.Results: A total of 241 patients with 505 episodes of BC were analyzed.The GN bacteria group showed higher levels of PCT and endotoxin than the BC negative, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups.GN bacteremia was more prevalent than Gram-positive bacteremia.The GN bacteremia caused by non-Enterobacteriaceae infection presented higher endotoxin level than that by Enterobacteriaceae, but no significant difference in PCT levels was observed between the two groups.The plasma endotoxin significantly differed among different groups and was bacterial species dependent.Conclusions: Plasma endotoxin was more related to GN than to Gram-positive bacteremia, and that endotoxin level was species dependent, but PCT level remained relatively more stable within the GN bacteria caused bacteremia.Both GN and positive bacteria caused bacteremia in the ICU patients in different regions of China.And PCT is a more valuable biomarker than endotoxin

  20. Comparison of radiometric and conventional culture systems in detecting Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteremia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the efficiency of detecting Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteremia by the BACTEC radiometric system and a conventional Trypticase soy broth blood culture system, the authors developed an in vivo model of bacteremia in rats. After intravenous injection of 50 to 200 CFU into adult rats, there was a linear logarithmic increase in CFU per milliliter of rat blood during the first 10 h (r = 0.98), allowing accurate prediction of the level of bacteremia with time. Culture bottles were inoculated with 0.5 ml of blood obtained by cardiac puncture and processed as clinical samples in the microbiology laboratory with RS and conventional protocols. They found the following. (i) The first detection of bacteremia by RS was similar to that by TSB if a Gram stain of the TSB was done on day 1 and was superior if that smear was omitted (P less than 0.01). (ii) The detection times in both systems were comparable at different magnitudes of bacteremia (10(1) to 10(4) CFU/ml). (iii) Supplementation of inoculated bottles with 2 ml of sterile rat blood interfered with Gram stain detection in TSB but resulted in increased 14CO2 production in RS. (iv) No difference in detection time was found between RS and TSB for four different clinical isolates. These studies show that, in a biologically relevant model, the detection of positive blood cultures for H. influenzae type b by RS was comparable to or better than detection by TSB when blood was processed analogously to clinical specimens

  1. Time to positivity in blood cultures of adults with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansorena Luis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background previous studies have established that bacterial blood concentration is related with clinical outcome. Time to positivity of blood cultures (TTP has relationship with bacterial blood concentration and could be related with prognosis. As there is scarce information about the usefulness of TTP, we study the relationship of TTP with clinical parameters in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia. Methods TTP of all cases of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia, detected between January 1995 and December 2004 using the BacT/Alert automated blood culture system in a teaching community hospital was analyzed. When multiple cultures were positive only the shortest TTP was selected for the analysis. Results in the study period 105 patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia were detected. Median TTP was 14.1 hours (range 1.2 h to 127 h. Immunosuppressed patients (n = 5, patients with confusion (n = 19, severe sepsis or shock at the time of blood culture extraction (n = 12, those with a diagnosis of meningitis (n = 7 and those admitted to the ICU (n = 14 had lower TTP. Patients with TTP in the first quartile were more frequently hospitalized, admitted to the ICU, had meningitis, a non-pneumonic origin of the bacteremia, and a higher number of positive blood cultures than patients with TTP in the fourth quartile. None of the patients with TTP in the 90th decile had any of these factors associated with shorter TTP, and eight out of ten patients with TTP in the 10th decile had at least one of these factors. The number of positive blood cultures had an inverse correlation with TTP, suggesting a relationship of TTP with bacterial blood concentration. Conclusion Our data support the relationship of TTP with several clinical parameters in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia, and its potential usefulness as a surrogate marker of outcome.

  2. Role of nasopharyngeal colonization with and without bacteremia in the protection of infant rats against Haemophilus influenzae type b challenge.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilsdorf, J R; Ferrieri, P

    1985-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal colonization of infant rats with Haemophilus influenzae type b was investigated by two methods of intranasal inoculation. After traumatic instillation of the bacteria, 100% of the animals became colonized, compared with 75.5% of animals after atraumatic instillation. Among colonized rats, significantly more animals in the traumatic group developed bacteremia compared with those in the atraumatic group. Rats in the traumatic group had an onset of bacteremia at a mean of 2.6 days...

  3. The neglected role of antibody in protection against bacteremia caused by nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella in African children

    OpenAIRE

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Kingsley, Robert A.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; White, Sarah A; Goodall, Margaret; Pickard, Derek J.; Graham, Stephen M.; Dougan, Gordon; Hart, C. Anthony; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Drayson, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella (NTS) are a common cause of bacteremia among African children. Cell-mediated immune responses control intracellular infection, but they do not protect against extracellular growth of NTS in the blood. We investigated whether antibody protects against NTS bacteremia in Malawian children, because we found this condition mainly occurs before 2 years of age, with relative sparing of infants younger than 4 months old. Sera from all healthy Malawian children teste...

  4. Evaluating antibiotic stewardship programs in patients with bacteremia using administrative data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boel, J; Søgaard, M; Andreasen, V;

    2015-01-01

    When introducing new antibiotic guidelines for empirical treatment of bacteremia, it is imperative to evaluate the performance of the new guideline. We examined the utility of administrative data to evaluate the effect of new antibiotic guidelines and the prognostic impact of appropriate empirical...... (8 days) did not differ by regimen and neither did the proportion of those receiving appropriate empirical treatment (84.1 % vs. 85.5 %). However, fewer patients with the new regimen were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU; 3.8 % vs. 12.0 %) and they had lower 30-day mortality (16.4 % vs. 23.......87–1.25) for the new versus the old regimen. This study demonstrates that administrative data can be useful for evaluating the effect and quality of new bacteremia treatment guidelines...

  5. Successful Delivery Following Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia after In Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Ho; Yun, Na Ra; Kim, Dong-Min; Kim, Soo Ah

    2015-04-01

    A 30-year-old, 16-week primipara woman visited with complaints of lower back pain over the past 3 weeks. She had a history of ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte retrieval for in vitro fertilization (IVF) 14 weeks earlier. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging showed infectious spondylitis and the results of blood and spinal biopsy cultures showed Staphylococcus aureus. Intravenous cefazolin was continued for 6 weeks, and 4 months later, she delivered a healthy girl. This is the first reported case of successful term delivery following S. aureus bacteremia with vertebral osteomyelitis after IVF and embryo transfer. It should be considered that S. aureus bacteremia can be a serious complication of IVF. PMID:25914881

  6. Risk and Prognosis of Bacteremia and Fungemia among Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Lars S; Nørgaard, Mette; Povlsen, Johan V;

    2016-01-01

    ♦ Background: The incidence of bacteremia and fungemia (BAF) is largely unknown in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients initiating peritoneal dialysis (PD). ♦ Objective: The main objective was to estimate and compare incidence rates of first episodes of BAF in incident PD patients and a compar......♦ Background: The incidence of bacteremia and fungemia (BAF) is largely unknown in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients initiating peritoneal dialysis (PD). ♦ Objective: The main objective was to estimate and compare incidence rates of first episodes of BAF in incident PD patients.......3%). Escherichia coli (27.3%) also ranked first among population controls. Thirty-day mortality following BAF was 20.8% (95% CI, 12.6 - 31.0) and 20.7% (95% CI, 16.3 - 25.9) among PD patients and population controls, respectively. ♦ Conclusions: Peritoneal dialysis patients are at markedly higher risk of BAF than...

  7. Treating Central Catheter-Associated Bacteremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Beyond Vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Shannon; Thompson-Brazill, Kelly A; Sparks, E Ryan; Lipetzky, Juliana

    2016-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of hospital-associated infections, including central catheter-associated bacteremia. Vancomycin has been the drug of choice for treating this type of bacteremia for decades in patients who have no contraindications to the antibiotic. However, resistance to vancomycin is an emerging problem. Newer antibiotics approved by the Food and Drug Administration have activity against methicillin-resistant S aureus Some of the antibiotics also have activity against strains of S aureus that are intermediately susceptible or resistant to vancomycin. This article uses a case study to highlight the clinical signs of vancomycin failure and describes the indications for and appropriate use of alternative antimicrobials such as ceftaroline, daptomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, and telavancin. (Critical Care Nurse 2016;36[4]:46-57). PMID:27481801

  8. [Rare infection--prolonged A. naeslundii bacteremia caused by severe caries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abozaid, Said; Peretz, Avi; Nasser, Wael; Zarfin, Yehoshua

    2013-07-01

    Actinomyces is an anaerobic, gram positive, rod shape bacteria that doesn't create spores. Actinomyces is part of the mouth, intestines, vagina and upper respiratory system flora. The infection appears mostly on the face, neck, abdomen and pelvis in cases of mucosa injury and most common in immunosuppressed patients. The spread of Actinomyces through the blood system is rare. In this article we present a 9 year old male patient with no history of diseases who was diagnosed with prolonged bacteremia of A. naeslundii without specific infection excluding severe caries. Characterization of bacteria from the blood culture was performed by molecular biology and the patient was treated with Ampicillin and tooth extraction that led to the disappearance of the bacteremia. PMID:23957079

  9. Serum procalcitonin elevation in critically ill patients at the onset of bacteremia caused by either gram negative or gram positive bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prin Sébastien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the ICU, bacteremia is a life-threatening infection whose prognosis is highly dependent on early recognition and treatment with appropriate antibiotics. Procalcitonin levels have been shown to distinguish between bacteremia and noninfectious inflammatory states accurately and quickly in critically ill patients. However, we still do not know to what extent the magnitude of PCT elevation at the onset of bacteremia varies according to the Gram stain result. Methods Review of the medical records of every patient treated between May, 2004 and December, 2006 who had bacteremia caused by either Gram positive (GP or Gram negative (GN bacteria, and whose PCT dosage at the onset of infection was available. Results 97 episodes of either GN bacteremia (n = 52 or GP bacteremia (n = 45 were included. Procalcitonin levels were found to be markedly higher in patients with GN bacteremia than in those with GP bacteremia, whereas the SOFA score value in the two groups was similar. Moreover, in the study population, a high PCT value was found to be independently associated with GN bacteremia. A PCT level of 16.0 ng/mL yielded an 83.0% positive predictive value and a 74.0% negative predictive value for GN-related bacteremia in the study cohort (AUROCC = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.71–0.88. Conclusion In a critically ill patient with clinical sepsis, GN bacteremia could be associated with higher PCT values than those found in GP bacteremia, regardless of the severity of the disease.

  10. Prospective study of bacteremia rate after elective band ligation and sclerotherapy with cyanoacrylate for esophageal varices in patients with advanced liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Danielle Queiroz Bonilha; Lucianna Motta Correia; Marie Monaghan; Luciano Lenz; Marcus Santos; Ermelindo Della Libera

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: Band ligation (BL) is the most appropriate endoscopic treatment for acute bleeding or prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. Sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (CY) can be an alternative for patients with advanced liver disease. Bacteremia is an infrequent complication after BL while the bacteremia rate following treatment with CY for esophageal varices remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare the incidence of transient bacteremia between cirrhotic patients ...

  11. International travel and the risk of hospitalization with non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia. A Danish population-based cohort study, 1999-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Mølbak Kåre; Ethelberg Steen; Holt Hanne M; Kristensen Brian; Koch Kristoffer; Schønheyder Henrik C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Information is sparse regarding the association between international travel and hospitalization with non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion, risk factors and outcomes of travel-related non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia. Methods We conducted a 10-year population-based cohort study of all patients hospitalized with non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia in three Danish counties (population 1.6 million). We used denominator ...

  12. Bacteremia in nursing home patients. Prevalence among patients presenting to an emergency department.

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, D.; Svendsen, A.; Marrie, T

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the prevalence of bacteremia and any correlation between signs and symptoms, risk factors, and laboratory data in elderly patients. DESIGN: Prospective analysis. All patients were contacted by the study nurse at 48 hours and 7 days after study entry. SETTING: Adult tertiary care hospital with an emergency department managing 48,000 visits yearly in a metropolitan area of 250,000. PARTICIPANTS: Members of the study population referred to the emergency department for medic...

  13. Minocycline-EDTA Lock Solution Prevents Catheter-Related Bacteremia in Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Rodrigo Peixoto; do Nascimento, Marcelo Mazza; Chula, Domingos Candiota; Riella, Miguel Carlos

    2011-01-01

    There is growing concern about the development of antibacterial resistance with the use of antibiotics in catheter lock solutions. The use of an antibiotic that is not usually used to treat other serious infections may be an alternative that may reduce the clinical impact should resistance develop. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare a solution of minocycline and EDTA with the conventional unfractionated heparin for the prevention of catheter-related bacteremia in hemodialys...

  14. Staphylococcus pettenkoferi Bacteremia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulaziz Ahmed Hashi; Johannes Andries Delport; Sameer Elsayed; Michael Seth Silverman

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pettenkoferi is a relatively recently described coagulase-negative staphylococci species first described in 2002. Since then, nine additional cases of infection caused by this species have been reported in various countries around the world, including Germany, Belgium, France, South Korea, Italy, Brazil and Mexico. The present report describes a case of S pettenkoferi peripheral line-associated bacteremia. To our knowledge, the present report is the first description of human i...

  15. Nasal Carriage as a Source of agr-Defective Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Smyth, Davida S.; Kafer, Jared M.; Wasserman, Gregory A.; Velickovic, Lili; Mathema, Barun; Robert S Holzman; Knipe, Tiffany A.; Becker, Karsten; von Eiff, Christof; Peters, Georg; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Novick, Richard P.; Shopsin, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus virulence regulator agr are associated with worse outcomes in bacteremic patients. However, whether agr dysfunction is primarily a cause or a consequence of early bacteremia is unknown. Analysis of 158 paired S. aureus clones from blood and nasal carriage sites in individual patients revealed that recovery of an agr-defective mutant from blood was usually predicted by the agr functionality of carriage isolates. Many agr-positive blood isolat...

  16. A rare bacteremia caused by Cedecea davisae in patient with chronic renal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Peretz, Avi; Simsolo, Claudia; Farber, Evgeny; Roth, Anna; Brodsky, Diana; Nakhoul, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 77 Final Diagnosis: Bacteremia Symptoms: Chills • diarrhea • fever • nausea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: X-Ray • CBC • urine and blood cultur Specialty: Infectious diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Cedecea davisae is a gram negative, oxidase negative bacilli that include 5 species. In the medical literature there are very few reports that describe infections caused by different species of the Cedecea genus. Case Report: In this paper we report a fourth case of...

  17. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Aygun, Fatma Deniz; Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case ...

  18. A Cluster of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia Cases among Injection Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Linda MN Hoang; Romney, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A...

  19. Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: what is the impact of oxacillin resistance on mortality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.C. Cassettari

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyse the impact of oxacillin resistance on the mortality of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, and to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility of community-acquired strains in two large university hospitals (the Instituto do Coração do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo and the Instituto Central do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, we carried out a four-month-long prospective cohort study, which included 163 consecutive cases of S. aureus bacteremia. Of these, 140 (85.9% were hospital-acquired, 9 (5.5% were community-acquired and 14 (8.6% were of indeterminate origin. No cases of community-acquired infection by oxacillin-resistant S. aureus was identified. Among hospital-acquired infections, oxacillin-resistant S. aureus was responsible for 64.3% of cases. Mortality up to 15 days after diagnosis of bacteremia was 27% (18/67 for infections caused by susceptible strains and 33% (32/96 for infections caused by oxacillin-resistant strains (p=0.10. The following independent risk factors for the acquisition of oxacillin-resistant S. aureus were identified in multiple logistical regression analysis: age over 60 years, use of corticoids; presence of a central vascular catheter, and previous use of antibiotics.

  20. PBP-2 Negative Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Bacteremia from a Prostate Abscess: An Unusual Occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Chandni; Villanueva, Daphne-Dominique; Lalani, Ishan; Eng, Margaret; Kang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. schleiferi is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus which has been described as a pathogen responsible for various nosocomial infections including bacteremia, brain abscess, and infection of intravenous pacemakers. Recently, such bacteria have been described to be found typically on skin and mucosal surfaces. It is also believed to be a part of the preaxillary human flora and more frequently found in men. It is very similar in its pathogenicity with Staphylococcus aureus group and expresses a fibronectin binding protein. Literature on this pathogen reveals that it commonly causes otitis among dogs because of its location in the auditory meatus of canines. Also, it has strong association with pyoderma in dogs. The prime concern with this organism is the antibiotic resistance and relapse even after appropriate treatment. Very rarely, if any, cases have been reported about prostatic abscess (PA) with this microbe. Our patient had a history of recurrent UTIs and subsequent PA resulting in S. schleiferi bacteremia in contrast to gram negative bacteremia commonly associated with UTI. This organism was found to be resistant to methicillin, in spite of being negative for PBP2, which is a rare phenomenon and needs further studies. PMID:27092283

  1. [Case of Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis leading to discovery of early gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijyuuin, Toshiro; Umehara, Fujio

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year old man was brought to our hospital because of acute onset of fever and consciousness disturbance. He had been hemodialyzed three times a week because of chronic renal failure since 13 years ago. Neurological examination revealed deteriorated consciousness and neck stiffness. A lumbar puncture yielded clouded fluid with a WBC 7,912/mm³ (polymorphonuclear cells 88%, mononuclear cells 12%), 786 mg/dl of protein and 4 mg/dl of glucose (blood glucose 118 mg/dl). Brain CT and MRI were unremarkable. He was treated with ceftriaxone and ampicillin. Streptococcus salivarius was isolated from the blood sample, but not from cerebrospinal fluid. The patient responded promptly to antibiotics therapy (ampicillin 3g/day, ceftriaxone 1g/day), and within several days he became lucid and afebrile. Isolated S. salivarius was sensitive for ampicillin and ceftriaxone. We diagnosed this case as S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis. A gastrointestinal diagnostic workup revealed an asymptomatic gastric adenocarcinoma. S. salivarius is a common inhabitant of the oral mucosa that has been associated with infection in different sites. Meningeal infection by S. salivarius generally related to neoplasia of colon or iatrogenia, has been described on few occasions. This is the first report of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis associated with gastric neoplasm. Neurologist should be aware of the association of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis and gastrointestinal disease. PMID:22688117

  2. BRIEF HYPOXIA PRECEDING E. COLI BACTEREMIA DOWNREGULATES HEPATIC TNF-α PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Hepatic TNF-α production following gram-negative bacteremia or hypovolemic shock predisposes to acute lung injury. However, TNF-α expression may be modified by the manner in which the hepatic O2 supply is reduced and equally important, its timing relative to bacteremia. Brief secondary hypoxic stress of buffer-perfused rat livers downregulates E. Coli (EC)-induced TNF-α expression whereas low-flow ischemia preceding EC increases subsequent TNF-α production owing to reactive O2 species (ROS). Here we determined whether 30 min of constant-flow hypoxia preceding 109 intraportal EC likewise increases antigenic and bioactive TNF-α protein concentrations during reoxygenation via production of ROS. Multiple groups (n=38) were studied over 180 minutes, circulation antigenic TNF-α decreased in H/R+EC vs. EC controls (1 939±640 vs. 12 407±2 476 μg/L at t=180 min; P<0.01, along with TNF-α bioactivity). TNF-α protein were not restored to control levels in ALLO+H/R+EC. Thus, EC-induced hepatic TNF-α production and export is strongly O2-dependent in intact liver regardless of the generation of ROS or the sequence of bacteremia and modest hypoxic stress.

  3. Beta Lactamase Producing Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an Elderly Man with Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is associated with adverse outcomes. Known risk factors include chronic kidney disease, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal disease. We present a 74-year-old man admitted with confusion, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Exam revealed tachycardia, hypotension, lethargy, distended abdomen, and cold extremities. He required intubation and aggressive resuscitation for septic shock. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, and elevated lipase. CT scan of abdomen revealed acute pancreatitis and small bowel ileus. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Initial blood cultures were positive for C. perfringens on day five. Metronidazole and clindamycin were added to the regimen. Repeat CT (day 7 revealed pancreatic necrosis. The patient developed profound circulatory shock requiring multiple vasopressors, renal failure requiring dialysis, and bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hemodynamic instability precluded surgical intervention and he succumbed to multiorgan failure. Interestingly, our isolate was beta lactamase producing. We review the epidemiology, risk factors, presentation, and management of C. perfringens bacteremia. This case indicates a need for high clinical suspicion for clostridial sepsis and that extended spectrum beta lactam antibiotic coverage may be inadequate and should be supplemented with use of clindamycin or metronidazole if culture is positive, until sensitivities are known.

  4. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Michael A; McManus, Kathleen A; Wispelwey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention. PMID:26998370

  5. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Millard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention.

  6. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and multiple brain abscesses during acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Jordan R; Phillips, Marianne; Cole, Catherine; Francis, Joshua; Blyth, Christopher C; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious infections in immunosuppressed patients. This population may be susceptible to B. cereus pneumonia, bacteremia, cellulitis, and rarely cerebral abscess. Here we report an 8-year-old boy undergoing induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed multifocal B. cereus cerebral abscesses, highlighting the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscesses. A review of the literature over the past 25 years identified another 11 cases (3 children and 8 adults) of B. cereus cerebral abscess in patients undergoing cancer therapy. B. cereus cerebral abscesses were associated with a high mortality rate (42%) and significant morbidity. Notably, B. cereus bacteremia with concomitant cerebral abscess was associated with induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia in both children and adults (10 of 12 case reports). Our case report and review of the literature highlights the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscess(es). Therefore, early consideration for neuroimaging should be given for any neutropenic cancer patient identified with B. cereus bacteremia, in particular those with acute leukemia during induction therapy. PMID:23619116

  7. Differing burden and epidemiology of non-Typhi Salmonella bacteremia in rural and urban Kenya, 2006-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Tabu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS bacteremia in Africa will likely evolve as potential co-factors, such as HIV, malaria, and urbanization, also change. METHODS: As part of population-based surveillance among 55,000 persons in malaria-endemic, rural and malaria-nonendemic, urban Kenya from 2006-2009, blood cultures were obtained from patients presenting to referral clinics with fever ≥38.0°C or severe acute respiratory infection. Incidence rates were adjusted based on persons with compatible illnesses, but whose blood was not cultured. RESULTS: NTS accounted for 60/155 (39% of blood culture isolates in the rural and 7/230 (3% in the urban sites. The adjusted incidence in the rural site was 568/100,000 person-years, and the urban site was 51/100,000 person-years. In both sites, the incidence was highest in children 85% of blood NTS isolates in both sites, but only 21% (urban and 64% (rural of stool NTS isolates. Overall, 76% of S. Typhimurium blood isolates were multi-drug resistant, most of which had an identical profile in Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis. In the rural site, the incidence of NTS bacteremia increased during the study period, concomitant with rising malaria prevalence (monthly correlation of malaria positive blood smears and NTS bacteremia cases, Spearman's correlation, p = 0.018 for children, p = 0.16 adults. In the rural site, 80% of adults with NTS bacteremia were HIV-infected. Six of 7 deaths within 90 days of NTS bacteremia had HIV/AIDS as the primary cause of death assigned on verbal autopsy. CONCLUSIONS: NTS caused the majority of bacteremias in rural Kenya, but typhoid predominated in urban Kenya, which most likely reflects differences in malaria endemicity. Control measures for malaria, as well as HIV, will likely decrease the burden of NTS bacteremia in Africa.

  8. Risk factors for multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia in patients with colonization in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Se

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemic outbreaks of multi-drug resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii (AB in intensive care units (ICUs are increasing. The incidence of MDR AB bacteremia, which develops as a result of colonization, is increasing through widespread dissemination of the pathogen, and further colonization. We sought to determine risk factors for MDR AB bacteremia in patients colonized with MDR AB in the ICU. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational study of 200 patients colonized with MDR AB in the ICU at Severance Hospital, South Korea during the outbreak period between January 2008 and December 2009. Results Of the 200 patients colonized with MDR AB, 108 developed MDR AB bacteremia, and 92 did not. APACHE II scores were higher in bacteremic than non-bacteremic patients at the time of ICU admission and colonization (24.0 vs. 21.6; P = 0.035, 22.9 vs. 16.8; P P = 0.923, but the duration of time at risk was shorter in bacteremic patients (12.1 vs. 6.0 days; P = 0.016. A recent invasive procedure was a significant risk factor for development of bacteremia (odds ratio = 3.85; 95% CI 1.45-10.24; P = 0.007. Multivariate analysis indicated infection and respiratory failure at the time of ICU admission, maintenance of mechanical ventilation, maintenance of endotracheal tube instead of switching to a tracheostomy, recent central venous catheter insertion, bacteremia caused by other microorganism after colonization by MDR AB, and prior antimicrobial therapy, were significant risk factors for MDR AB bacteremia. Conclusions Patients in the ICU, colonized with MDR AB, should be considered for minimizing invasive procedures and early removal of the invasive devices to prevent development of MDR AB bacteremia.

  9. Analysis of Comorbidity of the Patients Affected by Staphylococcal Bacteremia/Sepsis in the Last Ten Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovac, Enra; Koluder-Cimic, Nada; Hadzovic-Cengic, Meliha; Baljic, Rusmir; Hadzic, Amir; Gojak, Refet

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY CONFLICT OF INTEREST: none declared. Introduction Staphylococcal bacteremia/sepsis is one of the most serious bacterial infections around the world. In individuals with pre-existing diseases, there is always an increased risk of infections occurring due to impaired immune system, a variety of drug therapy, exposure to a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and frequent hospitalizations. Objectives To analyze the prevalence of comorbidity in a patient with the staphylococcal bacteremia/sepsis according to the diagnosis, the site of infection and according to the isolated agent. Patients and methods We analyzed the patients affected by the staphylococcal bacteremia/sepsis and treated in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases during a ten-year period. Results 87 patients were included, out of whom 20 (23%) with clinical signs of the bacteremia and 67 (77%) of sepsis. In the analyzed sample, in 36 (41.4%) were not registered comorbidity. Hospital infections are represented by the previous antibiotic, corticosteroid and chemo therapy, pressure ulcers, and different implants. In all comorbidity, the most common isolated bacteria was S. aureus primarily strain MSSA followed by MRSA strain which is more frequent in patients who were surgically treated (comorbidity–various implants). Conclusion The results suggest the importance of being mindful of the staphylococcal etiology of the bacteremia/sepsis in patients with comorbidities due to the selection of an adequate initial empirical therapy and reducing the risks of the septic shock. PMID:24493989

  10. Polymorphism in a lincRNA Associates with a Doubled Risk of Pneumococcal Bacteremia in Kenyan Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautanen, Anna; Pirinen, Matti; Mills, Tara C; Rockett, Kirk A; Strange, Amy; Ndungu, Anne W; Naranbhai, Vivek; Gilchrist, James J; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Band, Gavin; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Edkins, Sarah; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Pearson, Richard D; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Macharia, Alex W; Uyoga, Sophie; Ndila, Carolyne; Mturi, Neema; Njuguna, Patricia; Mohammed, Shebe; Berkley, James A; Mwangi, Isaiah; Mwarumba, Salim; Kitsao, Barnes S; Lowe, Brett S; Morpeth, Susan C; Khandwalla, Iqbal; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; Palmer, Colin N A; Plomin, Robert; Sawcer, Stephen J; Trembath, Richard C; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Wood, Nicholas W; Deloukas, Panos; Peltonen, Leena; Williams, Thomas N; Scott, J Anthony G; Chapman, Stephen J; Donnelly, Peter; Hill, Adrian V S; Spencer, Chris C A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteremia (bacterial bloodstream infection) is a major cause of illness and death in sub-Saharan Africa but little is known about the role of human genetics in susceptibility. We conducted a genome-wide association study of bacteremia susceptibility in more than 5,000 Kenyan children as part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 (WTCCC2). Both the blood-culture-proven bacteremia case subjects and healthy infants as controls were recruited from Kilifi, on the east coast of Kenya. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of bacteremia in Kilifi and was thus the focus of this study. We identified an association between polymorphisms in a long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) gene (AC011288.2) and pneumococcal bacteremia and replicated the results in the same population (p combined = 1.69 × 10(-9); OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.84-3.31). The susceptibility allele is African specific, derived rather than ancestral, and occurs at low frequency (2.7% in control subjects and 6.4% in case subjects). Our further studies showed AC011288.2 expression only in neutrophils, a cell type that is known to play a major role in pneumococcal clearance. Identification of this novel association will further focus research on the role of lincRNAs in human infectious disease. PMID:27236921

  11. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima eMoghnieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO-associated bacteremia.This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012.It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP, and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN. GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias. Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms and Klebsiellapneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/ tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p value<0.05.

  12. Seasonal Variation of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteremia According to Acquisition and Patient Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, Court; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Østergaard, Christian; Arpi, Magnus; Jensen, Thøger Gorm; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Søgaard, Mette; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    Seasonal variation analysis. METHODS In 3 Danish health regions (2.3 million total inhabitants), patients with bacteremia were identified from 2000 through 2011 using information from laboratory information systems. Analyses were confined to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus...... pneumoniae. Additional data were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry for the construction of admission histories and calculation of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Bacteremias were categorized as community acquired, healthcare associated (HCA), and hospital acquired. We defined multiple....... coli, 6,924 S. aureus, and 4,884 S. pneumoniae bacteremia cases. For E. coli, the seasonal variation was highest for community-acquired cases (PTT ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.17-1.32), was diminished for HCA (PTT ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.25), and was missing for hospital-acquired cases. No seasonal...

  13. Clostridium difficile bacteremia and meningitis as a complication of prolonged cephalosporin therapy in a case of staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abhrajit Ganguly; Saibal Das; Jayanta Kumar Dey; Somnath Mondal

    2012-01-01

    With increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, several extra-intestinal manifestations of the organism have been unmasked which include-bacteremia, brain abscess, pericarditis etc. We report a rare and interesting case of C. difficile bacteremia and subsequent meningitis in a 10 year old child. The child was immune competent, which further raises the question about the virulent possibilities of the organism and its implications in the near future. The condition resulted from a prolonged treatment with intravenous (I.V.) cefotaxime for staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis. The child recovered from the septic arthritis but on the 7th day post-admission developed features of bacteremia. The child was later treated with intravenous metronidazole and vancomycin and he was discharged on the 21st day post-admission. No recurrence of symptoms was noted.

  14. Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in liver transplantation candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Manjushree; Chopra, Kapil B; Douglas, David D; Stewart, Rebecca A; Kusne, Shimon

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial infections are a serious complication of end-stage liver disease (ESLD) that occurs in 20% to 60% of patients. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients with ESLD who were identified by our microbiology laboratory as having Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia. Of 592 patients listed for transplantation between January 1998 and January 2006, 9 (1.5%) had 10 episodes of S salivarius bacteremia. Of 2 patients already receiving quinolone prophylaxis for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), 1 later presented with a second episode. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.2. Medians for age, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, and Child-Turcotte-Pugh score were 50 years, 17, and 10, respectively. Presenting symptoms and signs in 10 episodes of infection were ascites (in 8 episodes), elevated temperature (6), abdominal pain (5), and encephalopathy (4). Median laboratory values included: white blood cell count, 15.1 x 10(9)/L; creatinine, 0.9 mg/dL; albumin, 3.1 gm/dL; aspartate aminotransferase, 64 U/L; alanine aminotransferase, 52.5 U/L; ammonia, 67 mug/dL; and prothrombin time, 17.3 seconds. Ascitic fluid in patients with peritonitis showed a median white blood cell count of 466 cells/mm(3) (range, 250-12,822 cells/mm(3)), with 66% polymorphs, protein of 0.9 gm/dL, and albumin of 0.4 gm/dL. S salivarius may cause primary bacteremia and SBP in liver transplantation candidates despite quinolone prophylaxis. PMID:17969206

  15. Group A Streptococcus bacteremia among infants: A study from tertiary health care center of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Singla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is paucity of data on the invasive group A Streptococcal disease in children, especially from the developing countries. As an infection in children could take a life-threatening course, an early diagnosis and prompt treatment can go a long way in achieving positive therapeutic outcome. In the present study, 3 infants were detected to have bacteremia due to group A Streptococcus as per their positive blood cultures. There is need to create an awareness among clinicians regarding prevalence of GAS infections. The increasing isolation of organisms in this era of anti-microbial drug resistance necessitates regular epidemiological monitoring of invasive GAS infections in developing countries also.

  16. Rapid diagnosis of bacteremia in adults using acridine orange stained buffy coat smears

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Mark; Mendelson, Jack

    1990-01-01

    The use of acridine orange stained buffy coat smears was assessed as a rapid screening test for bacteremia in adults. A total of 356 consecutive blood cultures were submitted with simultaneous anticoagulated blood samples, from which a buffy coat smear was prepared and stained with acridine orange (100 mg/L; pH 3.0). Forty-one of 356 blood samples (12%) yielded organisms in the blood culture system. Compared to blood culture, the overall sensitivity of acridine orange stained buffy coat smear...

  17. The effect of S. pneumoniae bacteremia on cerebral blood flow autoregulation in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael; Brandt, Christian T.; Knudsen, Gitte Moos;

    2008-01-01

    during incremental reductions in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by controlled hemorrhage. Autoregulation was preserved in all rats without meningitis (groups A and E) and was lost in 24 of 25 meningitis rats (groups B, C, and D) (P<0.01). In group A, the lower limit was higher than that of group E (P......<0.05). The slope of the CBF/CPP regression line differed between the meningitis groups (P<0.001), being steeper for group B than groups C and D, with no difference between these two groups. The results suggest that pneumococcal bacteremia in rats triggers cerebral vasodilation, which right shifts...

  18. O antigens of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris strains isolated from patients with bacteremia.

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, P

    1980-01-01

    During the period of 1971 to 1979, 172 Proteus mirabilis and 17 Proteus vulgaris strains were collected from blood cultures. Of these strains, 144 could be grouped into 25 O antigens. The most common antigens were O3, O23, O10, O30, and O24, which represented 46.1% of all strains. The O antigen distribution of strains isolated from blood cultures did not differ significantly from that of fecal and urinary strains. No particular O antigen could thus be defined as a virulence factor in bacteremia.

  19. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Noopur; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients. PMID:27433362

  20. Future challenges and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with emphasis on MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Fowler, Vance G; Skov, Robert;

    2011-01-01

    . Compounding this problem is the growing prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the dwindling efficacy of vancomycin, long the treatment of choice for this pathogen. Despite the recent availability of several new antibiotics for S. aureus, new strategies for treatment and prevention......Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an urgent medical problem due to its growing frequency and its poor associated outcome. As healthcare delivery increasingly involves invasive procedures and implantable devices, the number of patients at risk for SAB and its complications is likely to grow...

  1. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda Mn; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided. PMID:26015795

  2. Bacteremia due to Achromobacter xylosoxidans in neonates: clinical features and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozden Turel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We report an outbreak of Achromobacter xylosoxidans at a neonatal intensive care unit. We aimed to present clinical, laboratory and treatment data of the patients. Materials and METHODS: All consecutive episodes of bacteremia due to A. xylosoxidans at our neonatal intensive care unit, beginning with the index case detected at November 2009 until cessation of the outbreak in April 2010, were evaluated retrospectively. RESULTS: Thirty-four episodes of bacteremia occurred in 22 neonates during a 6-month period. Among the affected, 90% were preterm newborns with gestational age of 32 weeks or less and 60% had birth weight of 1000 g or less. Endotracheal intubation, intravenous catheter use, total parenteral nutrition and prolonged antibiotic therapy were the predisposing conditions. Presenting features were abdominal distention, thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. The mortality rate was 13.6% and the majority of isolates were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam, carbapenems and trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole, and resistant to gentamycin. More than half were breakthrough infections. Despite intensive efforts to control the outbreak by standard methods of hand hygiene, patient screening and isolation, containment could be achieved only after the neonatal intensive care unit was relocated. The investigation was not able to single out the source of the outbreak. CONCLUSION: A. xylosoxidans has the potential to cause serious infections in premature babies. More studies are needed to determine the importance of different sources of infection in hospital units.

  3. Bacteremia among Jordanian children at Princess Rahmah Hospital: Pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mohammad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate microorganisms causing bacteremia in Jordanian children and to assess their sensitivity to various groups of antimicrobials."nMethods: A retrospective study was conducted on positive blood cultures taken from 378 children aged below 15 year, who sought medical attention at Princess Rahmah Hospital between January and December/2008."nResults: Out of 4475 tested blood samples, 378 isolates were recovered from blood cultures. The male to female isolate ratio was (1.26:1.0. The most frequent pathogen found was Staphylococcus aureus (86.2%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (9%, Escherichia coli (1.9%, Streptococcus spp. (1.9%, Pseudomonas spp. (0.8%, and Acinetobacter sp. was found in only one culture (0.3%. The susceptibility rate of S. aureus was recorded the highest (99.6% for vancomycin, and the lowest susceptibility rate (3.2% was recorded for aztreonam."nConclusions: Staphylococcus aureus was the main isolate in bacteremic children, with all isolates demonstrating susceptibility to vancomycin. Overall, aztreonam resistance was near 97%, and this rate was not affected by sex and blood isolate type. This information should be considered when empirical therapy is recommended or prescribed for children with bacteremia.

  4. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Michael Z

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided.

  5. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Ryan; Bares, Sara; David, Michael Z

    2011-01-01

    Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided. PMID:21864336

  6. Campylobacter fetus Bacteremia Revealed by Cellulitis without Gastrointestinal Symptoms in the Context of Acquired Hypogammaglobulinemia: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souleymane Brah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter fetus bacteremia is rare and occurs mainly in patients with immunosuppression. This infection, which often involves secondary localizations has already been reported in some primary humoral immune deficiencies. We describe three cases of severe infection due to C. fetus with cellulitis at presentation, but without any gastrointestinal symptoms, occurring in patients with acquired hypogammaglobulinemia.

  7. Recurrent Bacteremia, a Complication of Cyanoacrylate Injection for Variceal Bleeding: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Pialoux, G; Faure, K; Durand, F.; F. Delisle; Said Ibrahim, T.; Lescure, F. X.; G. Béraud; Venon, M. D.; Flateau, C.; T. Galperine; Guery, B.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first description of recurrent bacteremia in two patients after cyanoacrylate injection for gastric varices bleeding treated with antibiotics alone. Adapted and prolonged antibiotic treatment allowed a complete resolution of the infection with no relapse after more than 6 months. According to recent data, prophylactic antibiotics should be further investigated for patients with bleeding varices undergoing cyanoacrylate injection.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia diagnosed in an HIV-negative patient in Brazil: a rare or an under-reported event?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Hadad

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia in an HIV negative immunodepressed patient was described using the BACTEC 460 TB system. This bacterium should be investigated in the blood of immunodepressed non-HIV infected patients with prolonged fever.

  9. Isolation of Yokenella regensburgei ("Koserella trabulsii") from a patient with transient bacteremia and from a patient with a septic knee.

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, S L; Janda, J M

    1994-01-01

    Yokenella regensburgei ("Koserella trabulsii") was isolated from a 74-year-old male with a septic knee and from a 35-year-old immunocompromised female whose transient bacteremia occurred without overt signs of sepsis. Neither strain was correctly identified by laboratories using a variety of techniques.

  10. Presence of the KPC carbapenemase gene in Enterobacteriaceae causing bacteremia, and the correlation with in vitro carbapenem susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    During six months, we obtained Enterobacteriaceae isolates from patients with Gram-negative bacteremia at a 1250-bed teaching hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, and compared carbapenem susceptibility with the presence of blaKPC, a transferable carbapenemase gene. Three (1.2%) out of 243 isolates were ...

  11. Early vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) bacteremia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is associated with a rapidly deteriorating clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, R; Kalaycio, M; Pohlman, B; Sobecks, R; Kuczkowski, E; Andresen, S; Mossad, S; Shamp, J; Curtis, J; Kosar, J; Sands, K; Serafin, M; Bolwell, B

    2005-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal (VRE) infection is a growing threat. We studied the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of early-onset VRE bacteremia in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. We carried out a chart review of 281 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients from 1997-2003, including preparative regimen, diagnosis, status of disease, graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis, antimicrobial therapy, and survival. VRE bacteremia developed in 12/281 (4.3%) recipients; 10 (3.6%) were within 21 days of transplant. Diagnoses were acute leukemia (7), NHL (2), and MDS (1). In all, 70% had refractory/relapsed disease; 30% were in remission. In total, 50% had circulating blasts. Nine of 10 had matched unrelated donors (7/9 with CD8+ T-cell depletion). The average time to positive VRE cultures was 15 days; average WBC was 0.05, and 80% had concomitant infections. Despite treatment, all patients died within 73 days of VRE bacteremia. Intra-abdominal complications were common. Causes of death included bacterial or fungal infection, multiorgan failure, VOD, ARDS, and relapse. A total of 60% of patients engrafted neutrophils, but none engrafted platelets. Early VRE bacteremia after allogeneic bone marrow transplant is associated with a rapidly deteriorating clinical course, although not always directly due to VRE. Early VRE may be a marker for the critical condition of these high-risk patients at the time of transplant. PMID:15640812

  12. Serial and panel analyses of biomarkers do not improve the prediction of bacteremia compared to one procalcitonin measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, M.; Lansdorp, B.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; Klein Gunnewiek, J.M.; Kullberg, B.J.; Pickkers, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the value of a single biomarker, biomarker panels, biomarkers combined with clinical signs of sepsis, and serial determinations of biomarkers in the prediction of bacteremia in patients with sepsis. Methods Adult patients visiting the emergency department because of a susp

  13. Serial and panel analyses of biomarkers do not improve the prediction of bacteremia compared to one procalcitonin measurement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, M.; Lansdorp, B.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; Gunnewiek, J.M.; Kullberg, B.J.; Pickkers, P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the value of a single biomarker, biomarker panels, biomarkers combined with clinical signs of sepsis, and serial determinations of biomarkers in the prediction of bacteremia in patients with sepsis. METHODS: Adult patients visiting the emergency department because of a suspe

  14. Comparative antimicrobial susceptibility of aerobic and facultative bacteria from community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Chang-Phone

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ertapenem is a once-a-day carbapenem and has excellent activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic, facultative, and anaerobic bacteria. The susceptibility of isolates of community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem has not been reported yet. The present study assesses the in vitro activity of ertapenem against aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired bacteremia by determining and comparing the MICs of cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin. The prevalence of extended broad spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL producing strains of community-acquired bacteremia and their susceptibility to these antibiotics are investigated. Methods Aerobic and facultative bacteria isolated from blood obtained from hospitalized patients with community-acquired bacteremia within 48 hours of admission between August 1, 2004 and September 30, 2004 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Taiwan, were identified using standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by Etest according to the standard guidelines provided by the manufacturer and document M100-S16 Performance Standards of the Clinical Laboratory of Standard Institute. Antimicrobial agents including cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin were used against the bacterial isolates to test their MICs as determined by Etest. For Staphylococcus aureus isolates, MICs of oxacillin were also tested by Etest to differentiate oxacillin-sensitive and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus. Results Ertapenem was highly active in vitro against many aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens commonly recovered from patients with community-acquired bacteremia (128/159, 80.5 %. Ertapenem had more potent activity than ceftriaxone, piperacillin

  15. Comparative effectiveness of nafcillin or cefazolin versus vancomycin in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGregor Jessina C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA has led clinicians to select antibiotics that have coverage against MRSA, usually vancomycin, for empiric therapy for suspected staphylococcal infections. Clinicians often continue vancomycin started empirically even when methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA strains are identified by culture. However, vancomycin has been associated with poor outcomes such as nephrotoxicity, persistent bacteremia and treatment failure. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of vancomycin versus the beta-lactam antibiotics nafcillin and cefazolin among patients with MSSA bacteremia. The outcome of interest for this study was 30-day in-hospital mortality. Methods This retrospective cohort study included all adult in-patients admitted to a tertiary-care facility between January 1, 2003 and June 30, 2007 who had a positive blood culture for MSSA and received nafcillin, cefazolin or vancomycin. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent mortality hazards comparing nafcillin or cefazolin versus vancomycin. Similar methods were used to estimate the survival benefits of switching from vancomycin to nafcillin or cefazolin versus leaving patients on vancomycin. Each model included statistical adjustment using propensity scores which contained variables associated with an increased propensity to receive vancomycin. Results 267 patients were included; 14% (38/267 received nafcillin or cefazolin, 51% (135/267 received both vancomycin and either nafcillin or cefazolin, and 35% (94/267 received vancomycin. Thirty (11% died within 30 days. Those receiving nafcillin or cefazolin had 79% lower mortality hazards compared with those who received vancomycin alone (adjusted hazard ratio (HR: 0.21; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.09, 0.47. Among the 122 patients who initially received vancomycin empirically, those who were switched to nafcillin or cefazolin (66

  16. Bacteremia due to Acinetobacter ursingii in infants: Reports of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakut, Nurhayat; Kepenekli, Eda Kadayifci; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Akkoc, Gulsen; Demir, Sevliya Ocal; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter ursingii is an aerobic, gram-negative, opportunistic microorganism which is rarely isolated among Acinetobacter species. We present two immunocompetent infants who developed bacteremia due to A. ursingii. The first patient is a two -month- old boy who had been hospitalized in pediatric surgery unit for suspected tracheo-esophageal fistula because of recurrent aspiration pneumonia unresponsive to antibiotic therapy. The second patient is a fourteen -month- old boy with prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. A. ursingii was isolated from their blood cultures. They were successfully treated with ampicillin-sulbactam. Although A. ursingii has recently been isolated from a clinical specimen; reports of infection with A. ursingii in children are rare. A. ursingii should be kept in mind as an opportunistic microorganism in children. PMID:27347282

  17. Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae bacteremia: A multi-national population-based assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laupland, Kevin B; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Østergaard, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of invasive infection but contemporary data in non-selected populations is limited. METHODS: Population-based surveillance for Haemophilus influenzae bacteremia was conducted in seven regions in Australia, Canada, and Denmark during 2000......-2008. RESULTS: The overall annual incidence rate was 1.31 per 100,000 population and type specific rates were 0.08 for H. influenzae serotype b (Hib), 0.22 for H. influenzae serotypes a, c-f (Hiac-f), and 0.98 per 100,000 for non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi). Very young and old patients were at highest risk......%. Factors independently associated with death at 30-days in logistic regression analysis included male gender, hospital-onset disease, older age, and lower respiratory tract, central nervous system, or unknown focus of infection. CONCLUSIONS: Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of morbidity and...

  18. A Lethal Case of Sphingomonas paucimobilis Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardjo Lugito, Nata Pratama; Cucunawangsih; Kurniawan, Andree

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis is a yellow-pigmented, glucose nonfermenting, aerobic, Gram negative bacillus of low pathogenicity. This organism was found in the implantation of indwelling catheters, sterile intravenous fluid, or contaminated hospital environment such as tap and distilled water, nebulizer, ventilator, and hemodialysis device. A 55-year-old female was hospitalized for diabetic foot ulcer in the presence of multiple comorbidities: diabetes mellitus, colonic tuberculosis, end-stage renal disease, and indwelling catheters for central venous catheter and hemodialysis. The patient passed away on the 44th day of admission due to septic shock. The organism found on blood culture on the 29th day of admission was multidrug resistant S. paucimobilis. Severe infection and septic shock due to S. paucimobilis have been reported particularly in immunocompromised patients, but there has been only one reported case of death in a premature neonate with septic shock. This is the first reported lethal case of S. paucimobilis bacteremia in an adult patient. PMID:27088020

  19. Nosocomial pneumonia and bacteremia caused by delftia acidovorans related to arterial catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekin Taş

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Delftia acidovorans, formerly called as Comamonas acidovorans,is a non-fermentative gram-negative bacteria.A 79 year-old male with chronic obstructive pulmonarydisease was hospitalized in the intensive care unit. Bilateralrespiratory sounds were diminished, he had roughrhonchi. He was started sulbactam/ampicilline. On theseventh day of hospitalization, White Blood Cells increasedand infiltration was occured on the left lung,blood and deep tracheal aspirate culture samples weretaken; ceftriaxone was replaced. Cultures revealed D. acidovorans.Meropenem was started for septicemia due toD. acidovorans on the 11th day of admission. On followup,the patient died on the 17th day.Key words: Delftia acidovorans, bacteremia, pneumonia,

  20. Elevated soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) predicts mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mölkänen, T; Ruotsalainen, E; Thorball, C W;

    2011-01-01

    the first positive blood culture for S. aureus, suPAR levels were higher in 19 fatalities (median 12.3; range 5.7-64.6 ng/mL) than in 40 survivors (median 8.4; range 3.7-17.6 ng/mL, p = 0.002). This difference persisted for 10 days. The presence of deep infection focus was not associated with elevated su...... are scarce. To elucidate the role of suPAR in a common bacteremic infection, the serum suPAR levels in 59 patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) were measured using the suPARnostic ELISA assay and associations to 1-month mortality and with deep infection focus were analyzed. On day three, after...

  1. Bacteremia following T-tube cholangiography: Injection by hand versus gravity-infusion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-four patients were evaluated to determine if the method of performing T-tube cholangiography had bearing on the development of bacteremia. Fifteen patients underwent cholangiography after hand injection (HI) of contrast medium and 12 patients cholangiogrpahy after gravity infusion of contrast medium. In three patients both techniques were used. Injection pressures were monitored and blood and bile samples were obtained for culture. In four of the 11 patients (36%) in the HI group who were not taking antibiotics, pathogens were cultured from blood drawn immediately after cholangiographic. The remaining four patients in this group were taking antibiotics and had negative blood cultures. None of the 12 patients in the GI group had positive blood cultures. There was a correlation between the higher injection pressures generated using the HI technique and positive blood cultures

  2. Comparison of B.melitensis and B.abortus Bacteremias with Respect to Diagnostic Laboratory Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmet Aliskan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Brucellosis are most commonly caused by the Brucella species Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus. This study was aimed to determine the differences in the routine diagnostic tests (serological tests and blood culture positivity that differentiate bacteremias caused by B. melitensis and B. abortus. Material and Method: This study included a total of 42 patients from whose blood cultures Brucella sp. were isolated between January 2010 and April 2014. A 8-10 ml blood sample was put into BACTEC plus/Aerobic F culture bottles after being drawn from patients (n:42 with suspected brucellosis. The obtained samples were incubated in BACTEC 9240 device (BD Diagnostic, Maryland, USA for 21 days. Sera of the blood samples taken simultaneously with the blood culture were studied with the Rose Bengal and Standard Tube Agglutination (STA tests. Results: In patients with acute brucellosis, B. melitensis and B. abortus species showed no significant differences with respect to time to positive signal in blood cultures (for hours p=0.850; for days p=0.696 and the mean time to positivity. The earliest signal in the device was delivered at day 2., 44th hour and the latest at day 6., 123rd hour. No significant difference was noted between the two species with respect to the mean time to positivity. Discussion: This study did not show any significant differences between B. melitensis (n=22 and B. abortus (n=20 bacteremias with respect to age, sex, time to blood culture positivity, and STA test titer level.

  3. Recurrent bacteremia after injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate for treatment of bleeding gastric varices: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Randi, Bruno A.; Ninomiya, Daniel A.; Nicodemo, Elizabeth L.; Lopes, Beatriz C.; Eduardo R. Cançado; Levin, Anna S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bleeding from gastric varices has high mortality rate, and obliteration using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is the treatment of choice. Recurrent bacteremia is rarely reported following the procedure. We aimed to report a case of recurrent bacteremia after N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate treatment and to review published cases. Case presentation and review In May 2014, a 43-year-old Brazilian male presented with lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopy showed active bleeding from gastric varix...

  4. Ongoing Horizontal and Vertical Transmission of Virulence Genes and papA Alleles among Escherichia coli Blood Isolates from Patients with Diverse-Source Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, James R.; O'Bryan, Timothy T.; Kuskowski, Michael; Maslow, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    The phylogenetic distributions of multiple putative virulence factors (VFs) and papA (P fimbrial structural subunit) alleles among 182 Escherichia coli blood isolates from patients with diverse-source bacteremia were defined. Phylogenetic correspondence among these strains, the E. coli Reference (ECOR) collection, and other collections of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) was assessed. Although among the 182 bacteremia isolates phylogenetic group B2 predominated, exhibited the greate...

  5. Significância clínica, epidemiologia e microbiologia das bacteremias por estafilococos coagulase-negativos em Hospital de Ensino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Góngora-Rubio F.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Os estafilococos coagulase-negativos (ECN são importantes agentes etiológicos das bacteremias hospitalares e freqüentemente considerados como contaminantes de hemoculturas. No período de outubro de 1990 a setembro de 1992, foram estudadas 300 hemoculturas positivas para ECN no Hospital São Paulo, sendo 141 bacteremias consideradas de origem hospitalar. Com o objetivo de diferenciar as bacteremias hospitalares verdadeiras das contaminantes por ECN, foram definidos critérios clínicos e microbiológicos. Apenas 20,6% das bacteremias hospitalares por ECN foram consideradas como verdadeiras. A maior freqüência de recém-nascidos internados na unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal, a presença de cateter intravascular e a utilização de nutrição parenteral foram achados significativos. Não houve diferença significante quanto a resistência a oxacilina e produção de SLIME entre os ECN isolados das bacteremias verdadeiras e contaminantes. O critério clínico e a positividade da hemocultura até 48 horas após a incubação, utilizados em nossa definição, foram úteis para caracterizar as bacteremias verdadeiras por ECN.

  6. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism detected by FDG PET/CT in a patient with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Thomassen, Anders; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2013-01-01

    We report incidental FDG PET/CT findings of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a patient with bacteremia. In this patient, diagnosis of thromboembolism was not considered until FDG PET/CT imaging was performed, and the findings prompted immediate anticoagulant therapy. The role of F...... PET/CT in venous thromboembolism is not yet well established, but the potential benefit must be kept in mind when interpreting FDG PET/CT images regardless of the underlying disease.......We report incidental FDG PET/CT findings of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a patient with bacteremia. In this patient, diagnosis of thromboembolism was not considered until FDG PET/CT imaging was performed, and the findings prompted immediate anticoagulant therapy. The role of FDG...

  7. Successful treatment of a neonate with persistent vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia with a daptomycin-containing regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneri, Christy A; Nicolau, David P; Seiden, Howard S; Rubin, Lorry G

    2008-01-01

    Infections caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) may be difficult to treat because of the limited armamentarium of antimicrobial agents. The difficulty is compounded in pediatric patients in general and neonates in particular because many of the newer antimicrobials have not been studied or approved for children. We report a 3-week-old infant who developed enterococcal bacteremia on post-operative day 10 after a surgical palliation for complex congenital heart disease that was complicated by acute renal failure. Despite removal of vascular catheters and antimicrobial regimens that included linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, ampicillin/sulbactam, rifampin, and gentamicin, bacteremia persisted. It was not cleared until daptomycin (in combination with doxycycline) was started. This is the first case of successful treatment of probable endocarditis due to VRE in a neonate using a daptomycin-containing regimen. PMID:21694874

  8. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by vancomycin-tolerant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: Experience with teicoplanin plus fosfomycin combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Sen; Chen, Yen-Chuo; Chen, Hung-Ping; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Cheng, Chung-Yi

    2016-08-01

    An 85-year-old female presented with fever and consciousness disturbance for 3 days. The patient's blood culture subsequently revealed persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia despite the administration of vancomycin or teicoplanin monotherapy. Gallium inflammation scan and magnetic resonance image of the spine disclosed osteomyelitis and discitis at the level of L4-5. Surgical debridement was not feasible in this debilitated patient. Because of the creeping minimal inhibitory concentration of vancomycin of the causative isolate (1.5 μg/mL) and clinical failure with glycopeptide monotherapy, we changed the antibiotic therapy to a fosfomycin and teicoplanin combination therapy. The patient showed improved clinical response in terms of her enhanced consciousness as well as subsidence of persisted bacteremia. Despite the potential side effects of fosfomycin (such as diarrhea and hypernatremia), it combined with a glycopeptide may be an alternative therapy for invasive refractory MRSA infections. PMID:24269007

  9. Kytococcus schroeteri Bacteremia in a Patient with Hairy Cell Leukemia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Amaraneni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kytococcus genus formerly belonged to Micrococcus. The first report of a Kytococcus schroeteri infection was in 2002 in a patient diagnosed with endocarditis. We report a case of central line associated Kytococcus schroeteri bacteremia in a patient with underlying Hairy Cell Leukemia. Kytococcus schroeteri is an emerging infection in the neutropenic population and in patients with implanted artificial tissue. It is thought to be a commensal bacterium of the skin; however, attempts to culture the bacteria remain unsuccessful. There have been a total of 5 cases (including ours of K. schroeteri bacteremia in patients with hematologic malignancies and neutropenia and only 18 documented cases in any population. Four of the cases of bacteria in neutropenic patients have been fatal, but early detection and treatment could make a difference in clinical outcomes.

  10. β-Lactams Enhance Vancomycin Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Compared to Vancomycin Alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Thomas J.; Ibrahim, Omar; Hall, Pamela; Sliwinski, Jora; Walraven, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Vancomycin (VAN) is often used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia despite a high incidence of microbiological failure. Recent in vitro analyses of β-lactams in combination with VAN demonstrated synergistic activity against MRSA. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of combination therapy with VAN and a β-lactam (Combo) on the microbiological eradication of MRSA bacteremia compared to VAN alone. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with MRSA bacteremia who received Combo therapy or VAN alone. Microbiological eradication of MRSA, defined as a negative blood culture obtained after initiation of therapy, was used to evaluate the efficacy of each regimen. A total of 80 patients were included: 50 patients in the Combo group and 30 patients in the VAN-alone group. Microbiological eradication was achieved in 48 patients (96%) in the Combo group compared to 24 patients (80%) in the VAN-alone group (P = 0.021). In a multivariable model, the Combo treatment had a higher likelihood of achieving microbiological eradication (adjusted odds ratio, 11.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 144.3; P = 0.01). In patients with infective endocarditis (n = 22), 11/11 (100%) who received Combo therapy achieved microbiological eradication compared to 9/11 (81.8%) treated with VAN alone, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.20). Patients with MRSA bacteremia who received Combo therapy were more likely to experience microbiological eradication of MRSA than patients who received VAN alone. PMID:24145519

  11. Comparison of cefazolin versus oxacillin for treatment of complicated bacteremia caused by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Julius; Echevarria, Kelly L; Hughes, Darrel W; Cadena, Jose A; Bowling, Jason E; Lewis, James S

    2014-09-01

    Contrary to prior case reports that described occasional clinical failures with cefazolin for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections, recent studies have demonstrated no difference in outcomes between cefazolin and antistaphylococcal penicillins for the treatment of MSSA bacteremia. While promising, these studies described low frequencies of high-inoculum infections, such as endocarditis. This retrospective study compares clinical outcomes of cefazolin versus oxacillin for complicated MSSA bacteremia at two tertiary care hospitals between January 2008 and June 2012. Fifty-nine patients treated with cefazolin and 34 patients treated with oxacillin were included. Osteoarticular (41%) and endovascular (20%) sources were the predominant sites of infection. The rates of clinical cure at the end of therapy were similar between cefazolin and oxacillin (95% versus 88%; P=0.25), but overall failure at 90 days was higher in the oxacillin arm (47% versus 24%; P=0.04). Failures were more likely to have received surgical interventions (63% versus 40%; P=0.05) and to have an osteoarticular source (57% versus 33%; P=0.04). Failures also had a longer duration of bacteremia (7 versus 3 days; P=0.0002), which was the only predictor of failure. Antibiotic selection was not predictive of failure. Rates of adverse drug events were higher in the oxacillin arm (30% versus 3%; P=0.0006), and oxacillin was more frequently discontinued due to adverse drug events (21% versus 3%; P=0.01). Cefazolin appears similar to oxacillin for the treatment of complicated MSSA bacteremia but with significantly improved safety. The higher rates of failure with oxacillin may have been confounded by other patient factors and warrant further investigation. PMID:24936596

  12. AEROMONAS SPP BACTEREMIA OF RAINBOW TROUT FRY (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS): BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CAUSATIVE ORGANISM AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Damir Kapetanović; Emin Teskeredžić

    2004-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila and other members of Aeromonas genus are ubiquitus in aquatic environment and make part of normal bacterial flora of rainbow trout. Aeromonas spp. infections are worldwide registered. Here we present our experience and knowledge on Aeromonas bacteremia, which causes mortality of rainbow trout fry. Rainbow trout fry, 7 month old, started to die in November 2003. Fish samples (17 samples) of dead and moribund fish were delivered to the Laboratory for aquaculture. With Api 2...

  13. Risk and prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among individuals with and without end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lise Have; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Benfield, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    delineated. METHODS: In this Danish nationwide, population-based cohort study patients with end-stage renal disease and matched population controls were observed from end-stage renal disease diagnosis/sampling until first episode of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, death, or end of study period......BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections among hemodialysis patients and of exit-site infections among peritoneal dialysis patients. However, the risk and prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among end-stage renal disease patients have not been...... bacteremia was very high for end-stage renal disease patients (35.7 per 1,000 person-years; 95% CI, 33.8-37.6) compared to population controls (0.5 per 1,000 person-years; 95% CI, 0.5-0.6), yielding a relative risk of 65.1 (95% CI, 59.6-71.2) which fell to 28.6 (95% CI, 23.3-35.3) after adjustment for sex...

  14. [Three Cases of Bacteremia due to Helicobacter cinaedi Infection and the Usefulness of Gene Analysis of Isolated Bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Yosuke; Noguchi, Shingo; Orihashi, Takeshi; Shimabukuro, Ikuko; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yoshii, Chiharu; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi is typically isolated from immunocompromised patients. Some reports of infection caused by H.cinaedi have been found in recent years. We experienced three cases of H.cinaedi bacteremia in one year and ten months in our hospital, although the detection of H.cinaedi in blood cultures is extremely rare. In case 1, a 77-year-old female had been treated with a steroid and immunosuppressive agent for interstitial pneumonia. In cases 2 and 3, two 71-year-old men had been treated with chemotherapy for lung cancer. Although the identification of the bacteria could not be performed by the culture method in the three cases, H.cinaedi bacteremia was diagnosed by a 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis in case 1, and by nested PCR in cases 2 and 3. H.cinaedi bacteremia often tends to recur and also requires prolonged antimicrobial therapy. We believe that gene analysis is useful in the identification of H.cinaedi. PMID:26667196

  15. Bacteriemia en pacientes internados con celulitis Bacteremia in patients hospitalized with cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan S. Lasa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available La celulitis es una inflamación aguda de la dermis y tejido celular subcutáneo de causa bacteriana, que generalmente complica a heridas, úlceras y dermatosis, aunque de manera frecuente no existe sitio de entrada. Se recomienda la realización de cultivo de punción de piel y partes blandas (PPB. Los hemocultivos raramente dan resultados positivos. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de bacteriemia en pacientes internados en nuestra institución con diagnóstico de celulitis. Se analizaron retrospectivamente los registros clínicos de los pacientes con este diagnóstico al ingreso entre junio de 2007 y marzo de 2010. Se evaluaron los datos poblacionales, presencia de comorbilidades, y resultados de los cultivos. En ese período, se internaron 140 pacientes con diagnóstico de celulitis y a todos ellos se les realizó hemocultivo y cultivos de PPB. Setenta y cuatro eran varones (52.8%. La edad promedio: 47.5 ± 19.7 años (rango 16-94. El 40% tuvo cultivos positivos de PPB, en los que el Staphylococcus aureus meticilino resistente (SAMR fue el germen más frecuentemente aislado (35.7%; la prevalencia de bacteriemia fue del 8.6%, en donde el germen más frecuente fue Streptoccocus Beta hemolítico, grupo G (33% del total de hemocultivos positivos. La bacteriemia se asoció significativamente a mayor estadía hospitalaria (10.5 ± 8.9 vs. 4.9 ± 6, p = 0.004. Se asoció con mayor riesgo de hemocultivo positivo a ser diabético, tener cultivo de PPB positivo, consumo de alcohol y/o enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica.Cellulitis is an acute inflammation of dermis and subcutaneous tissue, usually complicating wounds, ulcers, or dermatosis. Even though in these cases it is recommended to perform culture from skin and soft tissue samples, the utility of blood cultures remains controversial due to the low frequency of positive results. Here we report the prevalence of bacteremia in patients with cellulitis admitted in our

  16. Bacteremia in cirrhotic patients submitted to endoscopic band ligation of esophageal varices Bacteremia em pacientes cirróticos submetidos a ligadura elástica endoscópica de varizes esofágicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Balzano Maulaz

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endoscopic procedures can develop bacteremia. Patients with chronic liver disease are more predisposed to undergo bacteremia and infections because they are immunocompromised. AIMS: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of bacteremia in cirrhotics submitted to endoscopic variceal ligation. METHODS: Three groups of 40 patients each were studied. One group was made up of patients with cirrhosis who were submitted to ligation, a second group was composed of cirrhotics who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy only, and a third group was composed of patients without liver disease who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Blood was sampled from all patients for culture, both in aerobic and in anaerobic mediums, immediately before endoscopy and at 5 and 30 minutes after its completion. RESULTS: Blood culture was positive in 6 samples. In 4 of these, the bacteria (Staphylococcus hominis hominis, Staphylococcus auricularis, Acinetobacter lwoffii, and coagulase-negative staphylococcus were isolated before the endoscopic procedure and thus were considered as contamination. In the ligation group, a streptococcus of the viridans group was isolated 5 minutes after the procedure, and in the cirrhosis without ligation group, a Staphylococcus epidermidis was isolated at 30 minutes. None of the patients showed clinical evidence of infection. CONCLUSIONS: The bacteremia incidence in cirrhotic patients submitted to variceal ligation was 2.5%, showing no difference from the control groups.RACIONAL: Os procedimentos endoscópicos são passíveis de favorecerem o desenvolvimento de bacteremia. Por serem imunodeprimidos, os hepatopatas crônicos estão mais predispostos a essa complicação e, conseqüentemente, a infecções. OBJETIVO: Determinar a incidência de bacteremia em pacientes cirróticos submetidos a ligadura elástica endoscópica de varizes esofágicas. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Foram estudados prospectivamente 120 pacientes

  17. Relationship between time to positivity of blood culture with clinical characteristics and hospital mortality in patients with Escherichia coli bacteremia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO Shi-ning; BO Jian; NING Yong-zhong; ZHAO Yu; LU Xiao-lin; YANG Ji-yong; ZHU Xi; YAO Gai-qi

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicated that the time to positivity (TTP) of blood culture is a parameter correlating with degree of the bacteremia and outcome in patients with bloodstream infections caused by Escherichia coli (E.co/i). The objective of this study was to further investigate the diagnostic and prognostic power of using TTP to predict E. coli bacteremia.Methods A retrospective cohort study at two university hospitals was conducted. We retrieved all the medical records of those with E. coli bloodstream infection according to the records generated by their microbiology departments.Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to identify clinical factors correlating with fast bacterial growth and significant prognostic factors for hospital mortality.Results Medical records of 353 episodes of E. coli bacteremia diagnosed between January 1,2007 and December 31,2009 were retrieved in the investigation. Univariate analysis demonstrated that the TTP≤7 hours group is associated with higher incidence of active malignancies (41.7% vs. 27.2%, P=0.010), neutropenia (30% vs.14.3%, P=0.007), primary bacteremia (55.0% vs. 33.4%, P=0.002), and poorer outcome (hospital mortality 43.3% vs.11.9%, P=0.000) than the TTP >7 hours group. Multivariate analysis revealed that the significant predictors of hospital mortality, in rank order from high to low, were TTP (for TTP <7 hours, odds ratio (OR): 4.886; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.572-9.283; P=0.000),neutropenia (OR: 2.800; 95% CI:1.428-5.490; P=0.003), comedication of steroids or immunosuppressive agents (OR:2.670; 95% CI: 0.971-7.342; P=0.057).Conclusions Incidence of malignancies, neutropenia and primary bacterernia correlates with fast bacterial growth in patients with E. coli bacteremia. The parameter of TTP has been identified as a variable of highest correlation to hospital mortality and therefore can be potentially utilized as a mortality prognostic marker.

  18. Serum procalcitonin: Early detection of neonatal bacteremia and septicemia in a tertiary healthcare facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibeh Isaiah Nnanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The benefits of procalcitonin measurement in neonatal bacteremia/septicemia with suspected nosocomial infection are unclear and unresearched. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess procalcitonin value as an early or first line diagnosis/prognosis for bacterial neonatal septicemic infection in selected critically ill neonates. Patients and Methods: An observational cohort study in a 10-bed intensive care unit was performed. Sixty neonates, with either proven or clinically suspected, but not confirmed, bacterial neonatal septicemic infection were included. Procalcitonin measurements were obtained on the day when the infection was suspected. Neonates with proven septicemic infection were compared to those without. The diagnostic value of procalcitonin was determined through the area under the corresponding receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROCC. In addition, the predictive value of procalcitonin variations preceding the clinical suspicion of infection was also assessed. Results: Procalcitonin was the best early predictor of proven infection in this population of neonates with a clinical suspicion of septicemia (AUROCC = 0.80; 91.6% CI, 0.68-0.91. In contrast, CRP elevation, leukocyte count and fever had a poor predictive value in our population. Conclusion: PCT monitoring could be helpful in the early diagnosis of neonatal septicemic infection in the intensive care unit. Both absolute values and variations should be considered and evaluated in further studies.

  19. Serum procalcitonin: Early detection of neonatal bacteremia and septicemia in a tertiary healthcare facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibeh Isaiah Nnanna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The benefits of procalcitonin measurement in neonatal bacteremia/septicemia with suspected nosocomial infection are unclear and unresearched. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess procalcitonin value as an early or first line diagnosis/prognosis for bacterial neonatal septicemic infection in selected critically ill neonates. Patients and Methods: An observational cohort study in a 10-bed intensive care unit was performed. Sixty neonates, with either proven or clinically suspected, but not confirmed, bacterial neonatal septicemic infection were included. Procalcitonin measurements were obtained on the day when the infection was suspected. Neonates with proven septicemic infection were compared to those without. The diagnostic value of procalcitonin was determined through the area under the corresponding receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROCC. In addition, the predictive value of procalcitonin variations preceding the clinical suspicion of infection was also assessed. Results: Procalcitonin was the best early predictor of proven infection in this population of neonates with a clinical suspicion of septicemia (AUROCC = 0.80; 91.6% CI, 0.68–0.91. In contrast, CRP elevation, leukocyte count and fever had a poor predictive value in our population. Conclusion: PCT monitoring could be helpful in the early diagnosis of neonatal septicemic infection in the intensive care unit. Both absolute values and variations should be considered and evaluated in further studies.

  20. Chronic heart failure and mortality in patients with community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Adelborg, Kasper; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich;

    2016-01-01

    analysis, we computed hazard ratios as estimates of mortality rate ratios (MRRs) overall and stratified by CHF-related conditions (e.g., cardiomyopathy and valvular heart disease), CHF severity (defined by daily dosage of loop-diuretics), and CHF duration while adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS...... patients with valvular heart disease (aMRR = 1.73 (95 % CI, 1.26-2.38)), patients with daily loop-diuretic dosages of 81-159 mg/day (aMRR = 1.55 (95 % CI, 1.11-2.14)) and ≥160 mg/day (aMRR = 1.62 (95 % CI, 1.21-2.18)), and among patients with <3 years of CHF duration (aMRR = 1.43 (95 % CI, 1......BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) may experience higher mortality of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) than patients without CHF due to insufficient cardiovascular responses during systemic infection. We investigated 90-day mortality in SAB patients with and without CHF...

  1. August 2014 Tucson critical care journal club: bacteremia in cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hypes C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is an uncommon, but important, condition encountered in the emergency department (ED. While cardiac arrest represents the final common pathway of multiple conditions, early evaluation often focuses on cardiac abnormalities. However, observed associations between infection, particularly pneumonia, and in-hospital cardiac arrest led Coba et al. (1 to investigate the incidence of bacteremia among OHCA patients. The study prospectively investigated 250 adult patients who presented to an academic ED with OHCA between 2007 and 2009. Two blood culture samples were drawn during resuscitation or shortly after return of spontaneous circulation through vascular devices placed for clinical purposes. Children, pregnant women, victims of trauma were excluded. To minimize false positive results, patients were classified as bacteremic if one sample was positive for a typical pathogen or both samples were positive for the same skin colonizing organism. Patients in whom only 1 sample was positive for suspected skin contaminant ...

  2. Bacteremia due to anaerobic bacteria: epidemiology in a northern Bari Hospital, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonietta Distasi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anaerobic bacteria are part of the commensal bacterial flora of skin and mucosae. Iatrogenic and pathological conditions altering this commensal relationship cause life-threatening diseases. Materials and Methods. We analysed the blood cultures sent to the microbiology of our hospital between 2008 and the first quarter of 2013 to measure the frequency of bacteraemia caused by anaerobia. We examined 3138 vials of blood cultures for anaerobia, inoculated following in-house standard procedures. The colonies grown in absence of air were subjected to biochemical analysis. The MICs of metronidazole for 23 of the 26 organisms was tested. Results. Twelve bacteria of the Bacteroides genus were identified, 9 Propionibacterium acnes, 1 Peptosctreptococcus micros, 1 Lactobacillus acidophilus, 1 Clostridium perfringens, 1 Prevotella oralis, 1 Eubacterium lentum. Conclusions. The analysis of the results suggests that the incidence of cultures positive to anaerobia was constant across the years. We note that advanced age, altered mucocutaneous tropism, alterations to the oral and intestinal bacterial flora intensify the risk of anaerobial pathogenicity. The analysis of the metronidazole-determined MIC suggests that the intestinal anaerobic flora responds well to therapy and prophylaxis with Metronidazole, while the anaerobic bacteria residing on skin and other mucosae are resistant. It is however hard to determine the clinical impact of anaerobic bacteremiae and their effect on the outcome of the patient, due to the scarcity of available clinical data.

  3. Brucella suis bacteremia misidentified as Ochrobactrum anthropi by the VITEK 2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Andrea; Pagella, Hugo; Vera Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Ochrobactrum and Brucella are genetically related genera of the family Brucellaceae, sharing 98.8% rRNA similarity. Because of their phenotypic similarity, Ochrobactrum can be miscoded as Brucella by automated identification systems. The misidentification on blood cultures (BCs) of B. suis as O. anthropi by the VITEK 2 system is herein described. A 67-year-old male with a prosthetic mitral valve and fever was admitted with bacteremia due to a Gram-negative coccobacillus identified as O. anthropi by VITEK 2. The patient's fever persisted along with positive blood cultures despite specific antimicrobial treatment. Due to this adverse outcome, the patient was interrogated again and admitted having domestic swine. Serological tests were positive for acute brucellosis. Polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of BC strains identified B. suis biovar 1. Timely identification of Brucella is essential for providing proper treatment to the patient and for advising safe handling of laboratory cultures in biological safety cabinets to prevent laboratory-acquired infection. Countries where brucellosis is endemic must be aware of this possibility. PMID:27131010

  4. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulohoma, Benard W; Cornick, Jennifer E; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R; Gray, Katherine J; Kiran, Anmol M; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Parkhill, Julian; Faragher, Brian E; Everett, Dean B; Bentley, Stephen D; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. PMID:26259813

  5. Serum Level of YKL-40 is Elevated in Patients with Streptococcus Pneumonial Bacteremia and is Associated with the Outcome of the Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, G; Østergaard, C; Weis, Nina Margrethe; Nielsen, H; Obel, N; Pedersen, SS; Price, PA; Johansen, J

    2002-01-01

    YKL40 is secreted by activated macrophages and neutrophils. Elevated serum concentrations of YKL40 are found in patients with diseases characterized by inflammation or ongoing fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum YKL-40 levels in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia...... and to correlate these levels with clinical findings and outcomes. YKL40 was determined by ELISA and 89 patients were included in the study. Serum YKL-40 levels were significantly higher in patients with S. pneumoniae bacteremia (median 342 microg/l; range 20-20,400 microg/l) than in age...... was an independent prognostic factor of survival in logistic multivariate regression analysis (p = 0.002). In conclusion, high serum levels of YKL40 indicated a poorer prognosis for patients with S. pneumoniae bacteremia....

  6. Serum level of YKL-40 is elevated in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia and is associated with the outcome of the disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Ostergaard, Christian; Nielsen, Henrik; Obel, Niels; Pedersen, Svend S; Price, Paul A; Johansen, Julia S; Weis, Nina

    2002-01-01

    YKL40 is secreted by activated macrophages and neutrophils. Elevated serum concentrations of YKL40 are found in patients with diseases characterized by inflammation or ongoing fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum YKL-40 levels in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia...... and to correlate these levels with clinical findings and outcomes. YKL40 was determined by ELISA and 89 patients were included in the study. Serum YKL-40 levels were significantly higher in patients with S. pneumoniae bacteremia (median 342 microg/l; range 20-20,400 microg/l) than in age...... was an independent prognostic factor of survival in logistic multivariate regression analysis (p = 0.002). In conclusion, high serum levels of YKL40 indicated a poorer prognosis for patients with S. pneumoniae bacteremia....

  7. Increasing incidence of hospital-acquired and healthcare-associated bacteremia in northeast Thailand: a multicenter surveillance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliwan Hongsuwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the epidemiology of nosocomial bloodstream infections in public hospitals in developing countries. We evaluated trends in incidence of hospital-acquired bacteremia (HAB and healthcare-associated bacteremia (HCAB and associated mortality in a developing country using routinely available databases. METHODS: Information from the microbiology and hospital databases of 10 provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand was linked with the national death registry for 2004-2010. Bacteremia was considered hospital-acquired if detected after the first two days of hospital admission, and healthcare-associated if detected within two days of hospital admission with a prior inpatient episode in the preceding 30 days. RESULTS: A total of 3,424 patients out of 1,069,443 at risk developed HAB and 2,184 out of 119,286 at risk had HCAB. Of these 1,559 (45.5% and 913 (41.8% died within 30 days, respectively. Between 2004 and 2010, the incidence rate of HAB increased from 0.6 to 0.8 per 1,000 patient-days at risk (p<0.001, and the cumulative incidence of HCAB increased from 1.2 to 2.0 per 100 readmissions (p<0.001. The most common causes of HAB were Acinetobacter spp. (16.2%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.9%, and Staphylococcus aureus (13.9%, while those of HCAB were Escherichia coli (26.3%, S. aureus (14.0%, and K. pneumoniae (9.7%. There was an overall increase over time in the proportions of ESBL-producing E. coli causing HAB and HCAB. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a high and increasing incidence of HAB and HCAB in provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand, increasing proportions of ESBL-producing isolates, and very high associated mortality.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria as a prognosticator for outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinstein Robert A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, we evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Methods A case-control study was performed at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County among adult inpatients during January 2002-December 2006. Cases and controls had positive and negative urine cultures, respectively, for S. aureus, within 72 hours of positive blood culture for S. aureus. Controls were sampled randomly in a 1:4 ratio. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were done. Results Overall, 59% of patients were African-American, 12% died, 56% of infections had community-onset infections, and 58% were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA. Among 61 cases and 247 controls, predictors of S. aureus bacteriuria on multivariate analysis were urological surgery (OR = 3.4, p = 0.06 and genitourinary infection (OR = 9.2, p = 0.002. Among patients who died, there were significantly more patients with bacteriuria than among patients who survived (39% vs. 17%; p = 0.002. In multiple Cox regression analysis, death risks in bacteremic patients were bacteriuria (hazard ratio 2.9, CI 1.4-5.9, p = 0.004, bladder catheter use (2.0, 1.0-4.0, p = 0.06, and Charlson score (1.1, 1.1-1.3, p = 0.02. Neither length of stay nor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection was a predictor of S. aureus bacteriuria or death. Conclusions Among patients with S. aureus bacteremia, those with S. aureus bacteriuria had 3-fold higher mortality than those without bacteriuria, even after adjustment for comorbidities. Bacteriuria may identify patients with more severe bacteremia, who are at risk of worse outcomes.

  9. Risk factors for long-term mortality of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, D; Yassin, S; Shaked, H; Goldberg, E; Bishara, J; Paul, M; Leibovici, L

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is a fatal disease. We aimed to describe risk factors for long-term mortality with SAB. We analyzed data from a retrospectively collected database including 1,692 patients with SAB. We considered variables of infection and background conditions for the analysis of long-term survival. The Kaplan-Meier procedure was used for analysis of long-term survival. Variables significantly associated with mortality were analyzed using a Cox regression model. We included 1,692 patients in the analysis. Patients were followed for up to 22 years. Within one year, 62% of patients died and within 5 years 72% died. A total of 82% of patients aged 65 years and older died within 5 years. Independent predictors of long-term mortality were older age (Hazard ratio 1.029, 95% confidence interval 1.022-1.036), female gender (HR 1.302, 95% CI 1.118-1.517), pneumonia or primary/ unknown source of infection (HR 1.441, 95% CI 1.230-1.689), dementia (HR 1.234, 95% CI 1.004-1.516), higher Charlson score (HR 1.155, 95% CI 1.115-1.196), shock at onset (HR 1.776, 95% CI 1.430-2.207) and arrival to hospitalization from an institution (HR 1.319, 95% CI 1.095-1.563). Long-term survival of patients older than 65 years and of women with SAB is severely curtailed. PMID:26873381

  10. Chlorhexidine-based antiseptic solutions effectively reduce catheter-related bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Ali Mirza; Chandar, Jayanthi; Billings, Anthony; Diaz, Rosa; Francoeur, Denise; Abitbol, Carolyn; Zilleruelo, Gaston

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate if the application of chlorhexidine-based solutions (ChloraPrep) to the exit site and the hub of long-term hemodialysis catheters could prevent catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) and prolong catheter survival when compared with povidone-iodine solutions. There were 20,784 catheter days observed. Povidone-iodine solutions (Betadine) were used in the first half of the study and ChloraPrep was used in the second half for all the patients. Both groups received chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings at the exit sites. The use of ChloraPrep significantly decreased the incidence of CRB (1.0 vs 2.2/1,000 catheter days, respectively, P = 0.0415), and hospitalization due to CRB (1.8 days vs 4.1 days/1,000 catheter days, respectively, P = 0.0416). The incidence of exit site infection was similar for the two groups. Both the period of overall catheter survival (207.6 days vs 161.1 days, P = 0.0535) and that of infection-free catheter survival (122.0 days vs 106.9 days, P = 0.1100) tended to be longer for the catheters cleansed with ChloraPrep, with no statistical significance. In conclusion, chlorhexidine-based solutions are more effective for the prevention of CRB than povidone-iodine solutions. This positive impact cannot be explained by decreased number of exit site infections. This study supports the notion that the catheter hub is the entry site for CRB. PMID:19296135

  11. Natural mutations in a Staphylococcus aureus virulence regulator attenuate cytotoxicity but permit bacteremia and abscess formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudip; Lindemann, Claudia; Young, Bernadette C; Muller, Julius; Österreich, Babett; Ternette, Nicola; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Paprotka, Kerstin; Reinhardt, Richard; Förstner, Konrad U; Allen, Elizabeth; Flaxman, Amy; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Rollier, Christine S; van Diemen, Pauline; Blättner, Sebastian; Remmele, Christian W; Selle, Martina; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Vogel, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut; Crook, Derrick W; Massey, Ruth; Wilson, Daniel J; Rudel, Thomas; Wyllie, David H; Fraunholz, Martin J

    2016-05-31

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen, which causes severe blood and tissue infections that frequently emerge by autoinfection with asymptomatically carried nose and skin populations. However, recent studies report that bloodstream isolates differ systematically from those found in the nose and skin, exhibiting reduced toxicity toward leukocytes. In two patients, an attenuated toxicity bloodstream infection evolved from an asymptomatically carried high-toxicity nasal strain by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor repressor of surface proteins (rsp). Here, we report that rsp knockout mutants lead to global transcriptional and proteomic reprofiling, and they exhibit the greatest signal in a genome-wide screen for genes influencing S. aureus survival in human cells. This effect is likely to be mediated in part via SSR42, a long-noncoding RNA. We show that rsp controls SSR42 expression, is induced by hydrogen peroxide, and is required for normal cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Rsp inactivation in laboratory- and bacteremia-derived mutants attenuates toxin production, but up-regulates other immune subversion proteins and reduces lethality during experimental infection. Crucially, inactivation of rsp preserves bacterial dissemination, because it affects neither formation of deep abscesses in mice nor survival in human blood. Thus, we have identified a spontaneously evolving, attenuated-cytotoxicity, nonhemolytic S. aureus phenotype, controlled by a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator/noncoding RNA virulence regulatory system, capable of causing S. aureus bloodstream infections. Such a phenotype could promote deep infection with limited early clinical manifestations, raising concerns that bacterial evolution within the human body may contribute to severe infection. PMID:27185949

  12. Prospective study of bacteremia rate after elective band ligation and sclerotherapy with cyanoacrylate for esophageal varices in patients with advanced liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Queiroz Bonilha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Band ligation (BL is the most appropriate endoscopic treatment for acute bleeding or prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. Sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (CY can be an alternative for patients with advanced liver disease. Bacteremia is an infrequent complication after BL while the bacteremia rate following treatment with CY for esophageal varices remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare the incidence of transient bacteremia between cirrhotic patients submitted to diagnostic endoscopy, CY and BL for treatment of esophageal varices. METHODS: A prospective study comprising the period from 2004 to 2007 was conducted at Hospital of Universidade Federal de São Paulo, UNIFESP, SP, Brazil. Cirrhotic patients with advanced liver disease (Child-Pugh B or C were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups according treatment: BL Group (patients undergoing band ligation, n = 20 and CY Group (patients receiving cyanoacrylate injection for esophageal variceal, n = 18. Cirrhotic patients with no esophageal varices or without indication for endoscopic treatment were recruited as control (diagnostic group n = 20. Bacteremia was evaluated by blood culture at baseline and 30 minutes after the procedure. RESULTS: After 137 scheduled endoscopic procedures, none of the 58 patients had fever or any sign suggestive of infection. All baseline cultures were negative. No positive cultures were observed after CY or in the control group - diagnostic endoscopy. Three (4.6 % positive cultures were found out of the 65 sessions of band ligation (P = 0.187. Two of these samples were positive for coagulase-negative staphylococcus, which could be regarded as a contaminant. The isolated microorganism in the other case was Klebsiella oxytoca. The patient in this case presented no evidence of immunodeficiency except liver disease. CONCLUSIONS: There was no significant difference in bacteremia rate between these three groups. BL or CY

  13. Differing Burden and Epidemiology of Non-Typhi Salmonella Bacteremia in Rural and Urban Kenya, 2006–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Collins Tabu; Breiman, Robert F.; Benjamin Ochieng; Barrack Aura; Leonard Cosmas; Allan Audi; Beatrice Olack; Godfrey Bigogo; Juliette R Ongus; Patricia Fields; Eric Mintz; Deron Burton; Joe Oundo; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS) bacteremia in Africa will likely evolve as potential co-factors, such as HIV, malaria, and urbanization, also change. METHODS: As part of population-based surveillance among 55,000 persons in malaria-endemic, rural and malaria-nonendemic, urban Kenya from 2006-2009, blood cultures were obtained from patients presenting to referral clinics with fever ≥38.0°C or severe acute respiratory infection. Incidence rates were adjusted based on ...

  14. Differing Burden and Epidemiology of Non-Typhi Salmonella Bacteremia in Rural and Urban Kenya, 2006–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Tabu, Collins; Breiman, Robert F.; Ochieng, Benjamin; Aura, Barrack; Cosmas, Leonard; Audi, Allan; Olack, Beatrice; Bigogo, Godfrey; Ongus, Juliette R.; Fields, Patricia; Mintz, Eric; Burton, Deron; Oundo, Joe; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS) bacteremia in Africa will likely evolve as potential co-factors, such as HIV, malaria, and urbanization, also change. Methods As part of population-based surveillance among 55,000 persons in malaria-endemic, rural and malaria-nonendemic, urban Kenya from 2006–2009, blood cultures were obtained from patients presenting to referral clinics with fever ≥38.0°C or severe acute respiratory infection. Incidence rates were adjusted based on pe...

  15. Correlation of tumor necrosis factor-β and interleukin-1 gene cluster polymorphism with susceptibility to bacteremia in patients undergoing kidney transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-xia; WAN Qi-quan; YE Qi-fa; ZHOU Jian-dang

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacteremia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after kidney transplantation.This study was conducted to investigate whether the polymorphisms of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-β,interleukin (IL)-1β,and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) gene predicted the susceptibility to bacteremia within the first 6 months after kidney transplantation.Methods Subjects comprised 82 infected kidney transplant recipients and 60 non-infected kidney transplant recipients.Bacteremia was diagnosed in 16 of the 82 infected recipients.Genomic DNA from these 142 kidney transplant recipients was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes.Regions containing the Ncol polymorphic site at position +252 of TNF-βgene and the Aval polymorphic site at position-511 of IL-1β gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently digested with Ncol and Aval restriction enzymes,respectively.The polymorphic regions within intron 2 of IL-1ra gene containing variable numbers of a tandem repeat (VNTR) of 86 base pairs were amplified by PCR.Results Genotypic and allelic frequencies were similar between infected recipients and non-infected ones.Individual locus analysis showed that recipient TNF-β and IL-1ra gene polymorphisms were not associated with the presence of bacteremia (P=0.684 and P=0.567,respectively).However,genotype analysis revealed that recipient IL-1β-511CC genotype was strongly associated with susceptibility to develop bacteremia (P=0.003).Recipient IL-1β-511CC genotype (odds ratio 5.242,95% confidence intervals 1.645-16.706,P=0.005) independently predicted the risk for bacteremia within the first 6 months after kidney transplantation.Conclusions These findings indicate a critical role of IL-1β gene polymorphisms in susceptibility to bacteremia after kidney transplantation,which may be useful to screen for patients at higher risk for post-transplant bacteremias.Thus,the identified individuals can benefit from preventive treatment and a

  16. Epidemiology of extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Enterobacter bacteremia in a brazilian hospital Epidemiologia de bacteremia causadas por Enterobacter produtores de β-lactamases de espectro estendido em um hospital brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Francisco Tuon

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Enterobacter can be included in the group of extended spectrum β-lactamases (EBSL-producing bacteria, though few studies exist evaluating risk factors associated with this microorganism. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to determine risk factors associated with ESBL-producing-Enterobacter and mortality METHODS: A retrospective cohort study with 58 bacteremia caused by ESBL-producing-Enterobacter (28 cases and non-ESBL (30 cases RESULTS: Risk factors associated with ESBL-Enterobacter were trauma, length of hospitalization, admission to the intensive care unit, urinary catheter and elective surgery (pINTRODUÇÃO: Enterobacter pode ser incluído no grupo de bactérias produtoras de β-lactamases de espectro estendido (ESBL, mas existem poucos estudos avaliando fatores de risco para ESBL. Nós realizamos uma coorte retrospective para determiner fatores de risco associados com Enterobacter produtores de ESBL MÉTODOS: Uma coorte retrospectiva com 58 bacteremias por Enterobacter ESBL (28 casos e não-ESBL (30 casos RESULTADOS: Fatores de risco para ESBL-Enterobacter foram trauma, tempo de internação, admissão em UTI, sonda vesical e cirurgia eletiva (p<0.05. A mortalidade foi similar entre ESBL e não-ESBL CONCLUSÕES: Enterobacter produtor de ESBL é prevalente e a curva de mortalidade foi semelhante com o grupo não-ESBL.

  17. Clinical prediction rules in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia demonstrate the usefulness of reporting likelihood ratios in infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, A D; Showler, A; Burry, L; Steinberg, M; Tomlinson, G A; Bell, C M; Morris, A M

    2016-09-01

    Infectious diseases specialists often use diagnostic tests to assess the probability of a disease based on knowledge of the diagnostic properties. It has become standard for published studies on diagnostic tests to report sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Likelihood ratios are often omitted. We compared published clinical prediction rules in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia to illustrate the importance of likelihood ratios. We performed a narrative review comparing published clinical prediction rules used for excluding endocarditis in S. aureus bacteremia. Of nine published clinical prediction rules, only three studies reported likelihood ratios. Many studies concluded that the clinical prediction rule could safely exclude endocarditis based on high sensitivity and high negative predictive value. Of the studies with similar high sensitivity and high negative predictive value, calculated negative likelihood ratios were able to differentiate and identify the best clinical prediction rule for excluding endocarditis. Compared to sensitivity, specificity and predictive values, likelihood ratios can be more directly used to interpret diagnostic test results to assist in ruling in or ruling out a disease. Therefore, a new standard should be set to include likelihood ratios in reporting of diagnostic tests in infectious diseases research. PMID:27357965

  18. [Invasive pneumococcal disease in two non-vaccinated pediatric cases: pleural empyema and bacteremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanık Yüksek, Saliha; Gülhan, Belgin; Tezer, Hasan; Özkaya Parlakay, Aslınur; Uzun Kenan, Bahriye; Sayed Oskovi, Hülya; Nar Ötgün, Selin

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive diplococcus, is the causative agent of invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs) characterized by severe infections such as bacteraemia, sepsis and meningitis. S.pneumoniae and IPDs are situated in the focus of the vaccine studies because of being encompassed of a significant burden of disease in the world, severe mortality and morbidities, and location in vaccine-preventable diseases group. Although S.pneumoniae has more than 90 defined serotypes, certain serotypes are often identified as the cause of IPDs. Individuals with comorbid and chronic diseases, primary or secondary immune deficiencies, and 65 years of age are at increased risk for IPDs. Currently, a 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine and also 7, 10 and 13 valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV) have been produced for pneumococci. Phase studies of protein based vaccines, which will provide protection independent of serotypes, and 15-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine are still ongoing. In Turkey, in November 2008 PCV7 and in April 2011 PCV13 have been implemented in the national immunization program. First case of the pneumococcal unvaccinated cases presented in this report was a 6-year-old girl patient with pneumonia and pleural empyema due to S.pneumoniae serotype 1, without any underlying risk factors. The other case is a 52-days-old male patient, who had a history of pneumococcal septicemia in the newborn period and was followed for bacteremia associated S.pneumoniae serotype 12B and diagnosed as complement deficiency on follow-up. S.pneumoniae serotype 1 is within serotypes covered by 10 and 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine that are in use today, and is a highly invasive strain often isolated in pneumococcal lobar pneumonia and empyema. S.pneumoniae serotype 12B is a non-vaccine serotype not included in any of conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines, and usually obtained in respiratory infections and

  19. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: Case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    David Michael Z; Bares Sara; Dunn Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided.

  20. Impact of empirical treatment in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. A multicentric cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta Galo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to analyze the factors that are associated with the adequacy of empirical antibiotic therapy and its impact in mortality in a large cohort of patients with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL - producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. Methods Cases of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E bacteremia collected from 2003 through 2008 in 19 hospitals in Spain. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate logistic regression. Results We analyzed 387 cases ESBL-E bloodstream infections. The main sources of bacteremia were urinary tract (55.3%, biliary tract (12.7%, intra-abdominal (8.8% and unknown origin (9.6%. Among all the 387 episodes, E. coli was isolated from blood cultures in 343 and in 45.71% the ESBL-E was multidrug resistant. Empirical antibiotic treatment was adequate in 48.8% of the cases and the in hospital mortality was 20.9%. In a multivariate analysis adequacy was a risk factor for death [adjusted OR (95% CI: 0.39 (0.31-0.97; P = 0.04], but not in patients without severe sepsis or shock. The class of antibiotic used empirically was not associated with prognosis in adequately treated patients. Conclusion ESBL-E bacteremia has a relatively high mortality that is partly related with a low adequacy of empirical antibiotic treatment. In selected subgroups the relevance of the adequacy of empirical therapy is limited.

  1. Case of recurrent Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia associated with an implanted central venous catheter (Port-A-Cath): assessment of clonality by arbitrarily primed PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    Verhasselt, B; Claeys, G; Elaichouni, A; Verschraegen, G; Laureys, G; Vaneechoutte, M

    1995-01-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremias, which occurred immediately after the flushing or use of an implanted central venous catheter (Port-A-Cath) in two patients at the same pediatric ward, were studied by arbitrarily primed PCR. We conclude that the colonization of the Port-A-Cath with F. oryzihabitans described here lasted for several months.

  2. Serum Level of YKL-40 is Elevated in Patients with Streptococcus Pneumonial Bacteremia and is Associated with the Outcome of the Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, G; Østergaard, C; Weis, Nina Margrethe; Nielsen, H; Obel, N; Pedersen, SS; Price, PA; Johansen, J

    2002-01-01

    and to correlate these levels with clinical findings and outcomes. YKL40 was determined by ELISA and 89 patients were included in the study. Serum YKL-40 levels were significantly higher in patients with S. pneumoniae bacteremia (median 342 microg/l; range 20-20,400 microg/l) than in age-matched...

  3. Oral antibiotics increase blood neutrophil maturation and reduce bacteremia and necrotizing enterocolitis in the immediate postnatal period of preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Fuglsang, Eva; Jiang, Pingping;

    2016-01-01

    Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity and...... delay gut bacterial colonization and thereby protect preterm neonates against both NEC and bacteremia in the immediate postnatal period. Preterm pigs were given formula and administered saline (CON) or broad-spectrum antibiotics orally (ORA) or systemically (SYS) for 5 d after birth. Temporal changes in...... blood parameters and bacterial composition in the intestine, blood and immune organs were analyzed. Newborn preterm pigs had few blood neutrophils and a high frequency of progenitor cells. Neutrophils gradually matured after preterm birth with increasing CD14 and decreasing CD172a expressions. Preterm...

  4. No specific time window distinguishes between community-, healthcare-, and hospital-acquired bacteremia, but they are prognostically robust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, Court;

    2014-01-01

    transitions unanimously distinguished between community and hospital acquisition with regard to sex, comorbidity, or microorganisms, and no difference in 30-day mortality was seen for HCA patients in relation to a 30- or 90-day time window. ORs decreased consistently in the order of hospital acquisition, HCA......Objective. We examined whether specific time windows after hospital admission reflected a sharp transition between community and hospital acquisition of bacteremia. We further examined whether different time windows to distinguish between community acquisition, healthcare association (HCA), and......) curve for 30-day mortality, adjusting for sex, age, comorbidity, and microorganisms. Results. For 56,606 bacteremic episodes, no sharp transitions were detected on a specific day after admission. Among the 8 combined time windows, ORs for 30-day mortality varied from 1.30 (95% confidence interval [CI...

  5. Emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in blood isolates causing bacteremia: molecular epidemiology and microbiologic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Min Kyeong; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, So Hyun; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Among 127 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates causing bacteremia, 41 (32.3%) were nonsusceptible to levofloxacin, in which four sequence types and 24 diverse allelic profiles were detected. The most prevalent ST was ST77 (n = 8, 19.5%), followed by ST28 (n = 3, 7.3%). Amino acid substitutions were found in the gyrB and parC genes of 10 and 1 isolates, respectively. No amino acid substitutions were identified in gyrA. Twenty-three (56.1%) isolates showed amino acid substitutions in the parE gene. These results suggest that quinolone resistance-determining regions of parE may not be the primary targets, but an important determining factor of high levels of fluoroquinolone resistance. PMID:27117514

  6. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia without endocarditis: rapid identification from positive blood culture by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Principe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Three forms have been classified: a localized cutaneous form (erysipeloid caused by traumatic penetration of E. rhusiopathiae, a generalized cutaneous form and a septicemic form. The latter type of disease has been previously associated with a high incidence of endocarditis. Here we report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a 74- year-old man, probably started from an erysipeloid form, in which endocarditis did not develop. This case presents some particular and uncommon features: i no correlation with animal source; ii correlation between bacteremia and erysipeloid lesion; iii absence of endocarditis. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry allowed to obtain a rapid identification (within 4 hours from bottle positivity of E. rhusiopathiae. Together with direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing, this approach could improve the rate of appropriate therapy for bloodstream infections due to this fastidious pathogen.

  7. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Bacteremia without Endocarditis: Rapid Identification from Positive Blood Culture by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, Luigi; Bracco, Silvia; Mauri, Carola; Tonolo, Silvia; Pini, Beatrice; Luzzaro, Francesco

    2016-03-21

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Three forms have been classified: a localized cutaneous form (erysipeloid) caused by traumatic penetration of E. rhusiopathiae, a generalized cutaneous form and a septicemic form. The latter type of disease has been previously associated with a high incidence of endocarditis. Here we report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a 74-year-old man, probably started from an erysipeloid form, in which endocarditis did not develop. This case presents some particular and uncommon features: i) no correlation with animal source; ii) correlation between bacteremia and erysipeloid lesion; iii) absence of endocarditis. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry allowed to obtain a rapid identification (within 4 hours from bottle positivity) of E. rhusiopathiae. Together with direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing, this approach could improve the rate of appropriate therapy for bloodstream infections due to this fastidious pathogen. PMID:27103974

  8. A Propensity Score Analysis Shows that Empirical Treatment with Linezolid Does Not Increase the Thirty-Day Mortality Rate in Patients with Gram-Negative Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Mateos-Díaz, Ana-María; Martinez, Jose-Antonio; Almela, Manel; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Morata, Laura; De-la-Calle, Cristina; Sala, Marta; Mensa, Josep; Soriano, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The role of linezolid in empirical therapy of suspected bacteremia remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of empirical use of linezolid or glycopeptides in addition to other antibiotics on the 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. For this purpose, 1,126 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia in the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona from 2000 to 2012 were included in this study. In order to compare the mortality rates between patients who received linezolid or glycopeptides, the propensity scores on baseline variables were used to balance the treatment groups, and both propensity score matching and propensity-adjusted logistic regression were used to compare the 30-day mortality rates between the groups. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 16.0% during the study period. Sixty-eight patients received empirical treatment with linezolid, and 1,058 received glycopeptides. The propensity score matching included 64 patients in each treatment group. After matching, the mortality rates were 14.1% (9/64) in patients who received glycopeptides and 21.9% (14/64) in those who received linezolid, and a nonsignificant association between empirical linezolid treatment and mortality rate (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69 to 3.82; P = 0.275, McNemar's test) was found. This association remained nonsignificant when variables that remained unbalanced after matching were included in a conditional logistic regression model. Further, the stratified propensity score analysis did not show any significant relationship between empirical linezolid treatment and the mortality rate after adjustment by propensity score quintiles or other variables potentially associated with mortality. In conclusion, the propensity score analysis showed that empirical treatment with linezolid compared with that with glycopeptides was not associated with 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:25199780

  9. Pneumococcal Bacteremia Requiring Hospitalization in Rural Thailand: An Update on Incidence, Clinical Characteristics, Serotype Distribution, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility, 2005-2010.

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    Julia Rhodes

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in Southeast Asia, but regional data is limited. Updated burden estimates are critical as pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV is highly effective, but not yet included in the Expanded Program on Immunization of Thailand or neighboring countries.We implemented automated blood culture systems in two rural Thailand provinces as part of population-based surveillance for bacteremia. Blood cultures were collected from hospitalized patients as clinically indicated.From May 2005- March 2010, 196 cases of pneumococcal bacteremia were confirmed in hospitalized patients. Of these, 57% had clinical pneumonia, 20% required mechanical ventilation, and 23% (n = 46 died. Antibiotic use before blood culture was confirmed in 25% of those with blood culture. Annual incidence of hospitalized pneumococcal bacteremia was 3.6 per 100,000 person-years; rates were higher among children aged <5 years at 11.7 and adults ≥65 years at 14.2, and highest among infants <1 year at 33.8. The median monthly case count was higher during December-March compared to the rest of the year 6.0 vs. 1.0 (p<0.001. The most common serotypes were 23F (16% and 14 (14%; 61% (74% in patients <5 years were serotypes in the 10-valent PCV (PCV 10 and 82% (92% in <5 years in PCV 13. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin, but non-susceptibility was high for co-trimoxazole (57%, erythromycin (30%, and clindamycin (20%.We demonstrated a high pneumococcal bacteremia burden, yet underestimated incidence because we captured only hospitalized cases, and because pre-culture antibiotics were frequently used. Our findings together with prior research indicate that PCV would likely have high serotype coverage in Thailand. These findings will complement ongoing cost effectiveness analyses and support vaccine policy evaluation in Thailand and the region.

  10. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia without endocarditis: rapid identification from positive blood culture by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Principe; Silvia Bracco; Carola Mauri; Silvia Tonolo; Beatrice Pini; Francesco Luzzaro

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Three forms have been classified: a localized cutaneous form (erysipeloid) caused by traumatic penetration of E. rhusiopathiae, a generalized cutaneous form and a septicemic form. The latter type of disease has been previously associated with a high incidence of endocarditis. Here we report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a 74- year-old man, probably started from an ery...

  11. Genetic polymorphism of the C-reactive protein (CRP) gene and a deep infection focus determine maximal serum CRP level in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Mölkänen, T.; Rostila, A.; Ruotsalainen, E.; Alanne, M.; Perola, M.; Järvinen, A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract C-reactive protein (CRP) is widely used in early detection of sepsis or organ dysfunction. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene are shown to be associated with variability of basal CRP. To clarify the effect of these SNPs to CRP response in systemic infections, we compared genetic and clinical data on patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). Six SNPs in the CRP gene region (rs2794521, rs30912449, rs1800947, rs1130864, rs1205 and rs309...

  12. Seasonal Variation of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteremia According to Acquisition and Patient Characteristics: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, Court; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Østergaard, Christian; Arpi, Magnus; Jensen, Thøger Gorm; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Søgaard, Mette; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Seasonal variation is a characteristic of many infectious diseases, but relatively little is known about determinants thereof. We studied the impact of place of acquisition and patient characteristics on seasonal variation of bacteremia caused by the 3 most common pathogens. DESIGN Seasonal variation analysis. METHODS In 3 Danish health regions (2.3 million total inhabitants), patients with bacteremia were identified from 2000 through 2011 using information from laboratory information systems. Analyses were confined to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Additional data were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry for the construction of admission histories and calculation of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Bacteremias were categorized as community acquired, healthcare associated (HCA), and hospital acquired. We defined multiple subgroups by combining the following characteristics: species, acquisition, age group, gender, CCI level, and location of infection. Assuming a sinusoidal model, seasonal variation was assessed by the peak-to-trough (PTT) ratio with a 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS In total, we included 16,006 E. coli, 6,924 S. aureus, and 4,884 S. pneumoniae bacteremia cases. For E. coli, the seasonal variation was highest for community-acquired cases (PTT ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.17-1.32), was diminished for HCA (PTT ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.25), and was missing for hospital-acquired cases. No seasonal variation was observed for S. aureus. S. pneumoniae showed high seasonal variation, which did not differ according to acquisition (overall PTT ratio, 3.42; 95% CI, 3.10-3.83). CONCLUSIONS Seasonal variation was mainly related to the species although the place of acquisition was important for E. coli. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:946-953. PMID:27142942

  13. Acute abdomen due to group A streptococcus bacteremia caused by an isolate with a mutation in the csrS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Masahiko; Maruta, Masaki; Shikata, Hisaharu; Hanayama, Masakazu; Ikebe, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) is an aerobic gram-positive coccus that causes infections ranging from non-invasive pharyngitis to severely invasive necrotizing fasciitis. Mutations in csrS/csrR and rgg, negative regulator genes of group A streptococcus, are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, which is a severe, invasive infection characterized by sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure, resulting in a high mortality rate. Here we present a case of group A streptococcal bacteremia in a 28-year-old Japanese woman with no relevant previous medical history. The patient developed progressive abdominal symptoms that may have been due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, followed by a state of shock, which did not fulfill the proposed criteria for streptococcal toxic shock. The isolate was found to harbor a mutation in the negative regulator csrS gene, whereas the csrR and rgg genes were intact. It was noteworthy that this strain carrying a csrS mutation had caused group A streptococcal bacteremia characterized by acute abdomen as the presenting symptom in a young individual who had been previously healthy. This case indicates that group A streptococcus with csrS mutations has potential virulence factors that are associated with the onset of group A streptococcal bacteremia that does not meet the diagnostic criteria for streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. PMID:26231317

  14. High rate of pneumococcal bacteremia in a prospective cohort of older children and adults in an area of high HIV prevalence in rural western Kenya

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    Oundo Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although causing substantial morbidity, the burden of pneumococcal disease among older children and adults in Africa, particularly in rural settings, is not well-characterized. We evaluated pneumococcal bacteremia among 21,000 persons ≥5 years old in a prospective cohort as part of population-based infectious disease surveillance in rural western Kenya from October 2006-September 2008. Methods Blood cultures were done on patients meeting pre-defined criteria - severe acute respiratory illness (SARI, fever, and admission for any reason at a referral health facility within 5 kilometers of all 33 villages where surveillance took place. Serotyping of Streptococcus pneumoniae was done by latex agglutination and quellung reaction and antibiotic susceptibility testing was done using broth microdilution. We extrapolated incidence rates based on persons with compatible illnesses in the surveillance population who were not cultured. We estimated rates among HIV-infected persons based on community HIV prevalence. We projected the national burden of pneumococcal bacteremia cases based on these rates. Results Among 1,301 blood cultures among persons ≥5 years, 52 (4% yielded pneumococcus, which was the most common bacteria isolated. The yield was higher among those ≥18 years than 5-17 years (6.9% versus 1.6%, p 95%. The crude rate of pneumococcal bacteremia was 129/100,000 person-years, and the adjusted rate was 419/100,000 person-years. Nineteen (61% of 31 patients with HIV results were HIV-positive. The adjusted rate among HIV-infected persons was 2,399/100,000 person-years (Rate ratio versus HIV-negative adults, 19.7, 95% CI 12.4-31.1. We project 58,483 cases of pneumococcal bacteremia will occur in Kenyan adults in 2010. Conclusions Pneumococcal bacteremia rates were high among persons ≥5 years old, particularly among HIV-infected persons. Ongoing surveillance will document if expanded use of highly-active antiretroviral

  15. AEROMONAS SPP BACTEREMIA OF RAINBOW TROUT FRY (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS: BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CAUSATIVE ORGANISM AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

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    Damir Kapetanović

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas hydrophila and other members of Aeromonas genus are ubiquitus in aquatic environment and make part of normal bacterial flora of rainbow trout. Aeromonas spp. infections are worldwide registered. Here we present our experience and knowledge on Aeromonas bacteremia, which causes mortality of rainbow trout fry. Rainbow trout fry, 7 month old, started to die in November 2003. Fish samples (17 samples of dead and moribund fish were delivered to the Laboratory for aquaculture. With Api 20 NE tests Aeromonas hydrophila / caviae type I was identified with an average probability of 99.9 % (one test against, as well as Aeromonas hydrophila / caviae type II with an average probability of 99.5 % (one test against from liver, spleen, kidney, intestines and damaged eye. All of isolated and identified samples were tested for antibiotic susceptibility by disc diffusion method. The test showed that specimens were most sensitive on flumequin, and relatively less sensitive on chloramphenicol and enrofloxacin. Therapy was successfully applied with Flubactin®.

  16. Does C-reactive protein independently predict mortality in adult community-acquired bacteremia patients with known sepsis severity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim O; Jensen, Thøger G; Kolmos, Hans J;

    2013-01-01

    characteristic curve (AUC) to evaluate 30-day mortality in four models: (i) age, gender, comorbidity, bacteria, and ward. (ii) Model 1 and sepsis severity. (iii) Model 1 and CRP. (iv) Model 1, sepsis severity, and CRP. Altogether, 416 of 1999 patients died within 30 days. CRP independently predicted 30-day...... mortality [Model 4, odds ratio (95% CIs) for 100 mg/L: 1.16 (1.06-1.27)], but it did not contribute to the AUC (Model 2 vs Model 4: p = 0.31). In the 963 non-severe sepsis patients, CRP independently predicted 30-day mortality [Model 4: 1.42 (1.20-1.69)] and it increased the AUC (Model 2 vs Model 4: p = 0......We evaluated whether sepsis severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level on admission prognostically corroborated or annulled each other in adult patients with incident community-acquired bacteremia (Funen, Denmark, 2000-2008). We used logistic regression and area under the receiver operating...

  17. Risk factors for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus bacteremia and its influence on survival after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavadze, M; Rybicki, L; Mossad, S; Avery, R; Yurch, M; Pohlman, B; Duong, H; Dean, R; Hill, B; Andresen, S; Hanna, R; Majhail, N; Copelan, E; Bolwell, B; Kalaycio, M; Sobecks, R

    2014-10-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) is a well-known infectious complication among immunocompromised patients. We performed a retrospective analysis to identify risk factors for the development of VRE bacteremia (VRE-B) within 15 months after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) and to determine its prognostic importance for other post-transplant outcomes. Eight hundred consecutive adult patients who underwent alloHCT for hematologic diseases from 1997 to 2011 were included. Seventy-six (10%) developed VRE-B at a median of 46 days post transplant. Year of transplant, higher HCT comorbidity score, a diagnosis of ALL, unrelated donor and umbilical cord blood donor were all significant risk factors on multivariable analysis for the development of VRE-B. Sixty-seven (88%) died within a median of 1.1 months after VRE-B, but only four (6%) of these deaths were attributable to VRE. VRE-B was significantly associated with worse OS (hazard ratio 4.28, 95% confidence interval 3.23-5.66, P<0.001) in multivariable analysis. We conclude that the incidence of VRE-B after alloHCT has increased over time and is highly associated with mortality, although not usually attributable to VRE infection. Rather than being the cause, this may be a marker for a complicated post-transplant course. Strategies to further enhance immune reconstitution post transplant and strict adherence to infection prevention measures are warranted. PMID:25111516

  18. Bacteremia with the bovis group streptococci: species identification and association with infective endocarditis and with gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmolin, Ea S; Hartmeyer, Gitte N; Christensen, Jens J; Nielsen, Xiaohui C; Dargis, Rimtas; Skov, Marianne N; Knudsen, Elisa; Kemp, Michael; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2016-06-01

    DNA sequencing of the intergenic spacer (ITS) region was used to identify 53 blood culture isolates that had previously been designated to the bovis group streptococci and clinical data was collected retrospectively from patients' records using a standardized protocol. ITS sequencing identified 19 (35.8%) isolates as Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus, 12 (22.6%) as S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus, two (3.8%) as S. gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus, seven (13.2%) as S. infantarius subsp. infantarius, 12 (22.6%) as S. lutetiensis and one (1.9%) as S. equinus. The association of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus with colorectal neoplasia and with infective endocarditis and the association between S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus and pancreatic cancer were found to be clinically important. Also, a very high 1-year mortality rate with S. lutetiensis (66.7%) and S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus (58.7%) bacteremia calls for intensive investigation for underlying disease focusing on the pancreas and the hepatobiliary system. PMID:27117515

  19. A case report of bacteremia manifesting as an overwhelming postsplenectomy infection due to Streptococcus pneumoniae post vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Kosuke; Okabe, Hirohisa; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Ikegami, Toru; Harimoto, Norifumi; Itoh, Shinji; Kimura, Koichi; Baba, Hideo; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted for acute epigastralgia and high-grade fever of over 39 °C. The patient had undergone splenectomy for idiopathic portal hypertension 1 year ago and vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae immediately post operation. She developed localized peritoneal irritation and abdominal distension. Her serum creatinine had increased to 1.5 mg/dL and procalcitonin was 12.5 ng/ml. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed edematous large intestine and increased ascites. From these results, the patient was considered to have spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). Vancomycin (VCM) and doripenem (DRPM) were administered to control the infection. Unexpectedly, S. pneumoniae was detected in the blood culture. Hence, ampicillin/sulbactam was administered after discontinuing VCM. The patient recovered without any life-threatening complications and was discharged after 10 days. In conclusion, overwhelming postsplenectomy infection (OPSI) due to S. pneumoniae could develop in patient with splenectomy even after vaccination. Although the bacteremia probably due to SBP and acute renal dysfunction was accompanied by OPSI, our patient recovered rapidly. PMID:27221131

  20. Active immunization with an octa-valent Staphylococcus aureus antigen mixture in models of S. aureus bacteremia and skin infection in mice.

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    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Proteomic studies with different Staphylococcus aureus isolates have shown that the cell surface-exposed and secreted proteins IsaA, LytM, Nuc, the propeptide of Atl (pro-Atl and four phenol-soluble modulins α (PSMα are invariantly produced by this pathogen. Therefore the present study was aimed at investigating whether these proteins can be used for active immunization against S. aureus infection in mouse models of bacteremia and skin infection. To this end, recombinant His-tagged fusions of IsaA, LytM, Nuc and pro-Atl were isolated from Lactococcus lactis or Escherichia coli, while the PSMα1-4 peptides were chemically synthesized. Importantly, patients colonized by S. aureus showed significant immunoglobulin G (IgG responses against all eight antigens. BALB/cBYJ mice were immunized subcutaneously with a mixture of the antigens at day one (5 μg each, and boosted twice (25 μg of each antigen with 28 days interval. This resulted in high IgG responses against all antigens although the response against pro-Atl was around one log lower compared to the other antigens. Compared to placebo-immunized mice, immunization with the octa-valent antigen mixture did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in blood, lungs, spleen, liver, and kidneys in a bacteremia model in which the animals were challenged for 14 days with a primary load of 3 × 10(5 CFU. Discomfort scores and animal survival rates over 14 days did not differ between immunized mice and placebo-immunized mice upon bacteremia with S. aureus USA300 (6 × 10(5 CFU. In addition, this immunization did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in mice with skin infection. These results show that the target antigens are immunogenic in both humans and mice, but in the used animal models do not result in protection against S. aureus infection.

  1. Campylobacter fetus infection presenting with bacteremia and cellulitis in a 72-year-old man with an implanted pacemaker: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledina Dragan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Campylobacter is an important causative agent of intestinal infections in humans. Bacteremia is detected in less than 1% of patients, mainly in immunocompromised patients and in extreme age groups. Cellulitis is a relatively common manifestation of Campylobacter infection, but concomitant bacteremia is a rare event. Infections of the pacemaker area are caused primarily by staphylococci, followed by fungi, streptococci and Gram-negative rods. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of pacemaker pocket infection and bacteremia caused by Campylobacter fetus. Case presentation A 72-year-old Croatian Caucasian man with myelodysplasia, impaired fasting glucose levels and a recently implanted permanent pacemaker was admitted to hospital after six days of fever, development of red swelling of the pacemaker pocket area and worsening of his general condition. No antibiotic therapy was introduced in the outpatient setting. He denied any recent gastrointestinal disturbances. With the exception of an elevated leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein and blood glucose levels, other laboratory findings were normal. Treatment with vancomycin plus netilmicin was introduced, and a surgical incision with drainage of the pacemaker pocket was performed. The entire pacemaker system was removed and a new one re-implanted after 14 days of antibiotic therapy. Transesophageal echocardiography showed no pathological findings. Three subsequent blood cultures obtained on admission as well as swab culture of the incised pacemaker area revealed Campylobacter fetus; stool and pacemaker lead cultures were negative. According to the microbiological results, antibiotic therapy was changed to ciprofloxacin plus netilmicin. A clinical examination and the results of a laboratory analysis performed after two weeks of therapy were within normal limits. Conclusion Myelodysplasia, impaired fasting glucose levels

  2. Prevalência de produção de beta-lactamases de espectro estendido em bacteremias por Klebsiella pneumoniae e Escherichia coli

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    Zavascki, Alexandre Prehn

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: avaliar a prevalência da produção de beta-lactamases de espectro estendido (extendedspectrum beta-lactamases – ESBL por Klebsiella pneumoniae e Escherichia coli isoladas de pacientes adultos hospitalizados e descrever as características clínicas dos pacientes. Métodos: em estudo transversal retrospectivo, foram revisados os prontuários de pacientes adultos que apresentaram bacteremia por Klebsiella pneumoniae e Escherichia coli no Hospital São Lucas da PUCRS, no período de junho de 2004 a março de 2006. Resultados: um total de 145 pacientes foram incluídos no estudo; destes, em 51 (35,2% foi isolada uma bactéria produtora de ESBL; a prevalência de ESBL foi maior em Klebsiella pneumoniae (45 isolados, 55,6% do que em Escherichia coli (6 isolados, 9,4% p<0,001. O uso de antimicrobianos beta-lactâmicos dentro dos 14 dias prévios ao isolamento foi mais comum no grupo ESBL (50 pacientes, 98% que no grupo não-ESBL (15 pacientes, 16%; p<0,001. O imipenem foi a droga com maior taxa de eficácia in vitro contra isolados produtores de ESBL (100%. Conclusões: o estudo demonstrou uma elevada prevalência de produção de ESBL em bacteremias por K. pneumoniae. Pacientes com bacteremia por isolados produtores de ESBL apresentaram maior mortalidade e o uso prévio de beta-lactâmicos esteve fortemente associado à produção dessa enzima. É necessária a vigilância contínua da prevalência de ESBL em enterobactérias, para definição de esquemas terapêuticos e políticas de controle de infecção.

  3. Epidemiology, microbiology and mortality associated with community-acquired bacteremia in northeast Thailand: a multicenter surveillance study.

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    Manas Kanoksil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: National statistics in developing countries are likely to underestimate deaths due to bacterial infections. Here, we calculated mortality associated with community-acquired bacteremia (CAB in a developing country using routinely available databases. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Information was obtained from the microbiology and hospital database of 10 provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand, and compared with the national death registry from the Ministry of Interior, Thailand for the period between 2004 and 2010. CAB was defined in patients who had pathogenic organisms isolated from blood taken within 2 days of hospital admission without a prior inpatient episode in the preceding 30 days. A total of 15,251 CAB patients identified, of which 5,722 (37.5% died within 30 days of admission. The incidence rate of CAB between 2004 and 2010 increased from 16.7 to 38.1 per 100,000 people per year, and the mortality rate associated with CAB increased from 6.9 to 13.7 per 100,000 people per year. In 2010, the mortality rate associated with CAB was lower than that from respiratory tract infection, but higher than HIV disease or tuberculosis. The most common causes of CAB were Escherichia coli (23.1%, Burkholderia pseudomallei (19.3%, and Staphylococcus aureus (8.2%. There was an increase in the proportion of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL producing E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae over time. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated that national statistics on causes of death in developing countries could be improved by integrating information from readily available databases. CAB is neglected as an important cause of death, and specific prevention and intervention is urgently required to reduce its incidence and mortality.

  4. An affinity adsorption media that mimics heparan sulfate proteoglycans for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.

    2016-06-01

    Removal of several drug-resistant bacteria from blood by affinity adsorption onto a heparin-functional media is reported. Heparin is a chemical analogue of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans, found on transmembrane proteins of endothelial cells. Many blood-borne human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi have been reported to target HS as an initial step in their pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrate the binding and removal of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Extended-Spectrum Betalactamase Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL), and two Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (both CRE Escherichia coli and CRE K. pneumoniae) using 300 μm polyethylene beads surface modified with end-point-attached heparin. Depending on the specific bacteria, the amount removed ranged between 39% (ESBL) and 99.9% (CRE). The total amount of bacteria adsorbed ranged between 2.8 × 105 and 8.6 × 105 colony forming units (CFU) per gram of adsorption media. Based on a polymicrobial challenge which showed no competitive binding, MRSA and CRE apparently utilize different binding sequences on the immobilized heparin ligand. Since the total circulating bacterial load during bacteremia seldom exceeds 5 × 105 CFUs, it appears possible to significantly reduce bacterial concentration in infected patients by multi-pass recirculation of their blood through a small extracorporeal affinity filter containing the heparin-functional adsorption media. This 'dialysis-like therapy' is expected to improve patient outcomes and reduce the cost of care, particularly when there are no anti-infective drugs available to treat the infection.

  5. Ongoing Horizontal and Vertical Transmission of Virulence Genes and papA Alleles among Escherichia coli Blood Isolates from Patients with Diverse-Source Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James R.; O'Bryan, Timothy T.; Kuskowski, Michael; Maslow, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    The phylogenetic distributions of multiple putative virulence factors (VFs) and papA (P fimbrial structural subunit) alleles among 182 Escherichia coli blood isolates from patients with diverse-source bacteremia were defined. Phylogenetic correspondence among these strains, the E. coli Reference (ECOR) collection, and other collections of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) was assessed. Although among the 182 bacteremia isolates phylogenetic group B2 predominated, exhibited the greatest concentration of individual VFs, and contained the largest number of familiar virulent clones, other phylogenetic groups exhibited greater concentrations of certain VFs than did group B2 and included several additional virulent clones. Certain of the newly detected VF genes, e.g., fyuA (yersiniabactin; 76%) and focG (F1C fimbriae; 25%), were as prevalent or more prevalent than their more familiar traditional counterparts, e.g., iut (aerobactin; 57%) and sfaS (S fimbriae; 14%), thus possibly offering additional useful targets for preventive interventions. Considerable diversity of VF profiles was observed at every level within the phylogenetic tree, including even within individual lineages. This suggested that many different pathways can lead to extraintestinal virulence in E. coli and that the evolution of ExPEC, which involves extensive horizontal transmission of VFs and continuous remodeling of pathogenicity-associated islands, is a highly active, ongoing process. PMID:11500406

  6. Bacteriemia relacionada a catéter por Ochrobactrum anthropi Catheter-associated bacteremia caused by Ochrobactrum anthropi

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    Rolando Soloaga

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ochrobactrum anthtropi es un bacilo gram negativo aeróbico, no fermentador de la glucosa, anteriormente conocido como Achromobacter sp o CDC grupo Vd. Ha sido aislado del medio ambiente y de infecciones en seres humanos que generalmente presentaban algún tipo de inmunocompromiso. Las infecciones por este microorganismo fueron bacteriemias relacionadas a catéteres y en ocasiones endoftalmitis, infecciones urinarias, meningitis, endocarditis, absceso hepático, osteocondritis, absceso pelviano y absceso pancreático. Se presenta el caso de un paciente de sexo masculino, de 69 años de edad, que consultó a la guardia por hipotensión sostenida y síndrome febril de cuatro días de evolución, escalofrío, sudoración profusa y deterioro del sensorio. El paciente tenía diabetes de tipo 2 y antecedente de accidente cerebrovascular. Debido a insuficiencia renal crónica presentaba un catéter de doble lumen para la diálisis. Se documentó una bacteriemia relacionada a catéter por cultivo de sangre a través de catéter y de vena periférica, utilizando el sistema automatizado de hemocultivos Bact-Alert y la metodología de tiempo diferencial (>120min. La confirmación se realizó, una vez removido el catéter, por la técnica semicuantitativa de Maki (> 15 UFC. El microorganismo fue identificado por API 20NE y Vitek 1 como Ochrobactrum anthropi.Ochrobactrum anthropi is a non-glucose fermentative, aerobic gram-negative bacillus, formerly known as Achromobacter sp or CDC group Vd. It has been isolated from the environment and from infections in usually immunocompromised human beings. The documented infections frequently involved catheter related bacteremia whereas endophthalmitis, urinary infections, meningitis, endocarditis, hepatic abscess, osteochondritis, pelvic abscess and pancreatic abscess were rarely involved. Here it is presented the case of a male patient aged 69 years with sustained hypotension, four day febrile syndrome, chill, lavish

  7. Bacteremia após a colangiopancreatografia retrógrada endoscópica, com e sem procedimento terapêutico: freqüência, fatores associados e significado clínico

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    Campos G.M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a freqüência, os fatores associados e a manifestação clínica de bacteremia em pacientes submetidos à colangiopancreatografia retrógrada endoscópica (CPRE, associada ou não à realização de procedimento terapêutico. CASUÍSTICA. Foram analisadas prospectivamente 46 colangiopancreatografias retrógradas endoscópicas (CPREs realizadas em 42 pacientes. Os pacientes foram divididos em três subgrupos na dependência da utilização de antibióticos, da presença de obstrução do ducto biliar e/ou pancreático e da realização de procedimentos terapêuticos. MÉTODO. A pesquisa de bacteremia foi realizada mediante coleta de hemoculturas seriadas antes e após a CPRE. Foram utilizados, como meio para as hemoculturas, frascos tipo Bactec®, capazes de receber maiores volumes de sangue e com resinas para adsorção de antibióticos. A análise de positividade das hemoculturas foi realizada no sistema Bactec 9240®, e a identificação das bactérias, por meio de rotina do Laboratório Central da instituição e com o sistema autoScan®/Microscan® . RESULTADOS. Foi detectada bacteremia após sete exames; entretanto, em dois os microrganismos isolados foram considerados contaminantes. Em cinco exames ocorreu bacteremia verdadeira (freqüência, 10,9%. Foram identificados os microrganismos: Streptococcus viridans, Corynebacterium sp., Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella oxytoca e Enterobacter aerogenes. Os episódios de bacteremia foram detectados com maior freqüência nas hemoculturas realizadas imediatamente após os exames (p<0,05, e foram restritos aos pacientes que não estavam utilizando antibióticos (p=0,0192. Não houve manifestação clínica dos episódios de bacteremia. CONCLUSÕES. Concluiu-se que os episódios de bacteremia ocorreram exclusivamente nos pacientes que não estavam utilizando antibióticos e foram transitórios e completamente assintomáticos.

  8. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J S; Jensen, T G; Kolmos, H J;

    2012-01-01

    severe sepsis, and 11 (3 %) were in septic shock. Overall, the 30-day mortality was 16 %. Mortality increased with the severity of sepsis. There was no association between the focal diagnosis of SPB or the number of diagnoses and mortality. Nosocomial infection, male sex, increasing age, and increasing...

  9. Serum level of YKL-40 is elevated in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia and is associated with the outcome of the disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Gitte; Ostergaard, Christian; Weis, Nina;

    2002-01-01

    -matched healthy subjects (44 microg/l; 20-184; p < 0.001). Serum YKL-40 levels were related to the severity of the infection, with significantly higher serum YKL-40 levels being observed in patients who needed hemodialysis (p < 0.001), pharmacological treatment of hypotension (p < 0.001) and mechanical...... ventilation (p = 0.003) compared to those in patients who did not need this supportive treatment. Nineteen patients died and these patients had significantly higher serum YKL-40 levels (980 microg/l; 88-20,400 microg/l) than those of survivors (256 microg/l; 20-9,100 microg/l; p < 0.001). Serum YKL40 level...... was an independent prognostic factor of survival in logistic multivariate regression analysis (p = 0.002). In conclusion, high serum levels of YKL40 indicated a poorer prognosis for patients with S. pneumoniae bacteremia....

  10. Relationship between pathogenic, clinical, and virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus in infective endocarditis versus uncomplicated bacteremia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-García, M M; Sánchez-Espín, G; Ivanova-Georgieva, R; Ruíz-Morales, J; Rodríguez-Bailón, I; Viñuela González, V; García-López, M V

    2016-05-01

    Pathogenic factors of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) in the development of infective endocarditis (IE) have not been sufficiently investigated. The purpose of this study was to analyze the pathogenesis and virulence factors of SA in patients with IE as compared to patients with uncomplicated bacteremia (un-BAC). This is a retrospective case-control study (2002-2014) performed at a tertiary hospital in Spain. Clinical and epidemiological factors were analyzed. We assessed the presence of toxin genes [toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (tst-1) and enterotoxins A (etA), B (etB), and D (etD)] and the potential relationship between accessory gene regulator (agr) groups and the development of IE confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Twenty-nine patients with IE were compared with 58 patients with uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia (SAB). As many as 75.9 % of patients had community-acquired IE (p infection and severe sepsis or septic shock and IE. Also, a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin ≥1.5 μg/ml was found to be associated with IE. The agr group I was prevalent (55.2 % vs. 31.0 %; p = 0.030). No association was observed between toxin genes (tst-1, etA, etB, and etD) and IE. The superantigen (SAg) most frequently found in SA isolates was tst-1 (12.6 %). We found no association between toxin genes and IE, probably due to the small sample size. However, a direct relationship was found between agr I and the development of IE, which suggests that agr I strains may have more potential to cause IE. PMID:26951263

  11. Fatal outcome in bacteremia is characterized by high plasma cell free DNA concentration and apoptotic DNA fragmentation: a prospective cohort study.

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    Reetta Huttunen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have shown that apoptosis plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. High plasma cell free DNA (cf-DNA concentrations have been shown to be associated with sepsis outcome. The origin of cf-DNA is unclear. METHODS: Total plasma cf-DNA was quantified directly in plasma and the amplifiable cf-DNA assessed using quantitative PCR in 132 patients with bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, ß-hemolytic streptococcae or Escherichia coli. The quality of cf-DNA was analyzed with a DNA Chip assay performed on 8 survivors and 8 nonsurvivors. Values were measured on days 1-4 after positive blood culture, on day 5-17 and on recovery. RESULTS: The maximum cf-DNA values on days 1-4 (n = 132 were markedly higher in nonsurvivors compared to survivors (2.03 vs 1.26 ug/ml, p1.52 ug/ml remained an independent risk factor for case fatality in a logistic regression model. Qualitative analysis of cf-DNA showed that cf-DNA displayed a predominating low-molecular-weight cf-DNA band (150-200 bp in nonsurvivors, corresponding to the size of the apoptotic nucleosomal DNA. cf-DNA concentration showed a significant positive correlation with visually graded apoptotic band intensity (R = 0.822, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma cf-DNA concentration proved to be a specific independent prognostic biomarker in bacteremia. cf-DNA displayed a predominating low-molecular-weight cf-DNA band in nonsurvivors corresponding to the size of apoptotic nucleosomal DNA.

  12. Active surveillance to determine the impact of methicillin resistance on mortality in patients with bacteremia and influences of the use of antibiotics on the development of MRSA infection

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    Juliana Pena Porto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is among the most important pathogens of nosocomial infections, mainly in intensive care units (ICUs, and accounts for 40-60% of all healthcare-associated S. aureus infections. We evaluated the incidence of nosocomial infection by S. aureus, identified the risk factors for MRSA infection, and evaluated the effect of resistance to methicillin on mortality in patients. Methods We conducted MRSA surveillance at a university hospital in Brazil from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2010, and performed a retrospective case-control matched study to evaluate the frequency of subsequent MRSA bacteremia and death among patients. We evaluated and compared the risk factors between patients with MRSA and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA infection. Results Sepsis was the most common cause of infection (17.7/1,000 patient-days, followed by surgical site (11.4/1,000 patient-days, pneumonia (4.1/1,000 patient-days, and urinary tract infection (2.4/1,000 patient-days. The significant risk factors were time of hospitalization, use of central vascular catheter (CVC, urinary catheter, nasogastric tube, parenteral nutrition, tracheostomy, mechanical ventilation, and previous antibiotic administration, the latter of which was the only independent risk factor for MRSA infection. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with MRSA. The number of antibiotics tested was not related to increases in the frequency of MRSA/1,000 patient-days. The incidence of mortality attributable to MRSA (bloodstream infection BSI was 50%. Conclusions Surveillance results showed that the use of high levels of antibiotics was directly related to the development of MRSA infection, and the mortality attributable to MRSA in patients with bacteremia was significant.

  13. Incidencia de bacteriemia y neumonía nosocomial en una unidad de pediatría Incidence of nosocomial bacteremia and pneumonia in a pediatric ward

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    Gerardo Martínez-Aguilar

    2001-12-01

    és de este artículo está disponible en: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlObjective. To determine the incidence of catheter-related bacteremia and ventilator-associated pneumonia in children admitted to a secondary care hospital. Material and Methods. A prospective active surveillance system was conducted from January 1999 to June 2000, at the Hospital General of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Durango, Mexico. Daily visits to the pediatric ward were conducted to detect episodes of bacteremia and pneumonia, according to the Official Mexican Norm. Hospitalized patients under mechanical ventilation and/or with a central venous catheter, were followed from the first day of exposure, until a nosocomial infection was detected, or until the invasive device was removed. Blood and tracheal aspirate cultures were obtained from all exposed patients. Incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for ventilator-associated pneumonia and bacteremia/sepsis per 1000 exposure days. Also, the monthly infection rate is presented for days of exposure, using statistical control graphs. Results. A total of 47 episodes of bacteremia/sepsis and 44 of ventilator associated pneumonia were recorded. The incidence rate of pneumonia and bacteremia/sepsis was 28 and 26 cases respectively, per 1000 days of exposure to and invasive device. The gram-positive rods (61.11% were more common than the gram negative rods (38.88%. Conclusions. The most striking finding of this study was the higher incidence of these two nosocomial infections in children, as compared to that reported elsewhere. These findings call for preventive strategies and guidelines for handling intravenous catheters and mechanical ventilation in Mexico. The English version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  14. Value of soluble TREM-1, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein serum levels as biomarkers for detecting bacteremia among sepsis patients with new fever in intensive care units: a prospective cohort study

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    Su Longxiang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic value of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (sTREM-1, procalcitonin (PCT, and C-reactive protein (CRP serum levels for differentiating sepsis from SIRS, identifying new fever caused by bacteremia, and assessing prognosis when new fever occurred. Methods We enrolled 144 intensive care unit (ICU patients: 60 with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and 84 with sepsis complicated by new fever at more than 48 h after ICU admission. Serum sTREM-1, PCT, and CRP levels were measured on the day of admission and at the occurrence of new fever (>38.3°C during hospitalization. Based on the blood culture results, the patients were divided into a blood culture-positive bacteremia group (33 patients and blood culture-negative group (51 patients. Based on 28-day survival, all patients, both blood culture-positive and -negative, were further divided into survivor and nonsurvivor groups. Results On ICU day 1, the sepsis group had higher serum sTREM-1, PCT, and CRP levels compared with the SIRS group (P P Conclusions Serum sTREM-1, PCT, and CRP levels each have a role in the early diagnosis of sepsis. Serum sTREM-1, with the highest sensitivity and specificity of all indicators studied, is especially notable. sTREM-1, PCT, and CRP levels are of no use in determining new fever caused by bacteremia in ICU patients, but sTREM-1 levels reflect the prognosis of bacteremia. Trial registration ClinicalTrial.gov identifier NCT01410578

  15. Effect of application of a PVP-iodine solution before and during subgingival ultrasonic instrumentation on post-treatment bacteremia: A randomized single-center placebo-controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sahrmann, P; Manz, A.; Attin, T.; Zbinden, R.; Schmidlin, P R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the effect of concomitant subgingival rinsing with 10% PVP-iodine during subgingival instrumentation on the prevalence and magnitude of bacteremia of oral origin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Subgingival instrumentation was performed with water or PVP-iodine rinse in patients with periodontitis. Prior to instrumentation, subjects gargled for 1 min with the allocated liquid. Pockets were then rinsed for 1 min and subgingivally instrumented with liquid-cooled (water/PVP-iodin...

  16. Malaria-associated L-arginine deficiency induces mast cell-associated disruption to intestinal barrier defenses against nontyphoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Jennifer Y; Tiffany, Caitlin M; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Lawrence, Jessica A; Pakpour, Nazzy; Mooney, Jason P; Lokken, Kristen L; Caughey, George H; Tsolis, Renee M; Luckhart, Shirley

    2013-10-01

    Coinfection with malaria and nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can cause life-threatening bacteremia in humans. Coinfection with malaria is a recognized risk factor for invasive NTS, suggesting that malaria impairs intestinal barrier function. Here, we investigated mechanisms and strategies for prevention of coinfection pathology in a mouse model. Our findings reveal that malarial-parasite-infected mice, like humans, develop L-arginine deficiency, which is associated with intestinal mastocytosis, elevated levels of histamine, and enhanced intestinal permeability. Prevention or reversal of L-arginine deficiency blunts mastocytosis in ileal villi as well as bacterial translocation, measured as numbers of mesenteric lymph node CFU of noninvasive Escherichia coli Nissle and Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, the latter of which is naturally invasive in mice. Dietary supplementation of malarial-parasite-infected mice with L-arginine or L-citrulline reduced levels of ileal transcripts encoding interleukin-4 (IL-4), a key mediator of intestinal mastocytosis and macromolecular permeability. Supplementation with L-citrulline also enhanced epithelial adherens and tight junctions in the ilea of coinfected mice. These data suggest that increasing L-arginine bioavailability via oral supplementation can ameliorate malaria-induced intestinal pathology, providing a basis for testing nutritional interventions to reduce malaria-associated mortality in humans. PMID:23690397

  17. Relatedness of strains of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus colonizing hospital personnel and producing bacteremias in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, C H; John, J F; Levkoff, A H; Atkins, L M

    1992-11-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus as a major bacterial pathogen in neonatal intensive care units has stimulated interest in the epidemiology of spread of the organism. During a 12-month "epidemic" of bacteremias with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus we compared the characteristics of bacteremic and personnel nasally-carried strains by traditional and biomolecular methods. Sixty-two percent of neonatal intensive care unit nurses were colonized with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus with similar speciation to bacteremic strains. Inspection of plasmid profiles revealed a moderate degree of similarity between bacteremic and colonizing strains although genomic DNA restriction patterns showed diversity. Ribotype patterns were highly conserved (90%) in personnel strains. A 2.6-kilobase plasmid DNA probe hybridized to similarly sized plasmids and larger plasmids in one-half of the strains. We hypothesize that related methicillin-resistant strains may be transferred among personnel and neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit. Epidemiologic studies of coagulase-negative staphylococci should consider multiple molecular techniques to relate strains. PMID:1454435

  18. Campy lobacter jejuni isolated from a patient with bacteremia in Guizhou Province, China%贵州省首例空肠弯曲菌菌血症病例病原鉴定和亚种分型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦小瑜; 田克诚; 游旅; 唐光鹏; 王定明

    2014-01-01

    目的:对贵州省1例菌血症患儿血液中分离的疑似空肠弯曲菌进行鉴定。方法运用传统细菌学方法和分子生物学方法,对从菌血症患者血液分离的可疑空肠弯曲菌进行鉴定和亚种分型。结果来自菌血症患儿血液的可疑菌株,经传统生化鉴定为空肠弯曲菌空肠亚种,特异性多重PCR方法鉴定为弯曲菌属空肠弯曲菌,NAP-mPCR方法鉴定为空肠弯曲菌空肠亚种。结论分离自贵州省菌血症患儿血液的菌株确认为空肠弯曲菌空肠亚种,NAP-mPCR方法可将空肠弯曲菌鉴定到亚种水平。%To identify the isolated suspicious strain of Campylobacter jejuni from the blood of bacteremia patient in Guizhou Province ,China ,conventional and molecular techniques (specific mPCR and NAP-mPCR) were used to identify suspi-cious bacteria strains .Results showed that Campylobacter jejuni suspicious colonies were cultured in bacteremia patient blood samples .The strain was identified as Campylobacter jejuni ssp . jejuni by conventional tests and was identified as Campy-lobacter jejuni by genus specific mPCR .Then the strain was classified as Campylobacter jejuni ssp . jejuni by subspecies NAP-mPCR .The strain was identified as Campylobacter jejuni ssp .jejuni isolated from the blood of bacteremia patient and Campylobacter jejuni can be identified subspecies by NAP-mPCR .

  19. The Epidemiologic, Microbiologic and Clinical Picture of Bacteremia among Febrile Infants and Young Children Managed as Outpatients at the Emergency Room, before and after Initiation of the Routine Anti-Pneumococcal Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovitz, Eugene; David, Nuphar; Ribitzky-Eisner, Haya; Abo Madegam, Mouner; Abuabed, Said; Chodick, Gabriel; Maimon, Michal; Fruchtman, Yariv

    2016-01-01

    We described the occult bacteremia (OB) and bacteremia with diagnosed focus (BwF) picture among children managed as outpatients at the pediatric emergency room (PER) in southern Israel, before and after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) introduction in a retrospective study enrolling all three- to 36-month-old patients with fever >38.0 °C during 2005–2014. Of 511 (0.82% of all febrile patients) true bacteremias, 230 (45%) were managed as outpatients; 96 of 230 (41.7%) had OB and 134 (3.59%) had BwF. OB and BwF rates were 0.22% and 3.02%, respectively. A significant decrease was noted in OB and BwF rates (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.02, respectively). S. pneumoniae (SP, 37.5%), K. kingae (11.4%) and Brucella spp. (8.7%) were the most common OB pathogens and SP (29.8%), S. viridans (13.4%), and Brucella spp. (12.7%) were the most common in BwF patients. PCV13 serotypes were not found among the serotypes isolated post-PCV13 introduction. During 2010–2014 there was an increase in non-PCV13 serotype isolation (p = 0.005). SP was the main pathogen isolated among patients with pneumonia, acute otitis media (AOM) and periorbital cellulitis (62.5%, 33.3% and 60%, respectively). OB and BwF decreased following the introduction of PCVs and SP was the main pathogen in both conditions. Vaccine-SP serotypes were not isolated in OB after PCV13 introduction and non-vaccine serotypes increased significantly. PMID:27447651

  20. Estudio de un brote de bacteremia secundaria asociada con nutrición parenteral en una unidad de recién nacidos de tercer nivel.

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    Jaime A. del Río

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Ante la evidencia de un brote de bacteremia secundaria neonatal, en la Unidad de Recién Nacidos, Hospital de Caldas, Manizales, se realizó un estudio de casos y controles 1:4, para determinar la asociación de factores de riesgo importantes para los pediatras como nutrición parenteral, terapia respiratoria, tubo orotraqueal, cámara cefálica, parto vaginal, la aplicación de hemoderivado, remisión de otra unidad, leche materna por sonda, peso y edad. Como definición de caso se adoptó la clínica con por lo menos dos hemocultivos positivos, patógeno de piel hemocultivado y germen aislado en sangre sin foco definido. Los 19 controles se tomaron al azar de los recién nacidos que se encontraban hospitalizados por otras causas diferentes o relacionadas con la patología. Se realizó una regresión logística paso a paso, para determinar los eventos causales. Los gérmenes hemocultivados fueron Escherichia coli, Enterobacter gergoviae, E. aerogenes y E. cloacae. La edad promedio de los casos fue 30.6 semanas, en los controles 36.6 meses (p 0.2 NS. Peso promedio de los casos 1,385 g contra 2,621 g en los controles. Se encontró asociada la nutrición parenteral con el brote OR=15 (IC=1-482 p 0.027 S. Otros factores como la edad y el peso fueron de confusión. En cuanto a la nutrición parenteral, se corroboró su implicación, porque al revisar de inmediato el proceso de nutrición parenteral se encontró que los productos sobrantes se estaban almacenando y reutilizando hasta por 30 días.

  1. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteremia in a university hospital in Taiwan, 2001-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Yan, Jing-Jou; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Teng, Ching-Hao; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from bacteremia in Taiwan in 2001-2015. During the study period, 248 (21.2%) of 1171 isolates were identified as levofloxacin-resistant. The results of phylogenetic group analysis showed that 38.7% of the FQ-resistant isolates belonged to phylogenetic group B2, 23.4% to group B1, 22.6% to groupA, 14.9% to group D, and 0.4% belonged to group F. FQ-resistant isolates were highly susceptible to cefepime (91.5%), imipenem (96.0%), meropenem (98.8%), amikacin (98.0%), and fosfomycin (99.6%), as determined by the agar dilution method. β-lactamases, including blaTEM (66.1%), blaCMY-2 (16.5%), blaCTX-M (5.2%), blaDHA-1 (1.6%), and blaSHV-12 (1.6%), were found in FQ-resistant isolates. The results of PCR and direct sequencing showed that 37 isolates (14.9%) harbored plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. qnrB2, qnrB4, qnrS1, coexistence of qnrB4 and qnrS1, oqxAB, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were found in 1, 4, 4, 1, 15, and 14 isolates, respectively. PMQR genes were successfully transfered for 11 (29.7%) of the 37 PMQR-harboring isolates by conjugation to E. coli C600. These findings indicate that qnr genes remained rare in E. coli but demonstrate the potential spread of oqxAB and aac(6')-Ib-c in Taiwan. PMID:27573927

  2. Control de bacteriemia nosocomial pediátrica mediante un programa de cultivo de soluciones parenterales en uso Pediatric nosocomial bacteremia control program based on culturing in use parenteral infusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Muñoz

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Dado que Klebsiella, Enterobacter y Serratia se multiplican en soluciones parenterales y son responsables de una elevada proporción de bacteriemias en los hospitales de México, se propone una estrategia de control mediante la vigilancia microbiológica de las soluciones en uso. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Hospital de enseñanza de segundo nivel con 193 camas. Atiende principalmente pacientes de escasos recursos. En 1992 se inició la vigilancia de la esterilidad de las soluciones parenterales en los servicios pediátricos mediante cuatro estrategias: durante la primera etapa se cultivó el total de soluciones en uso. Durante la segunda se cultivaron muestras aleatoriamente elegidas. Tercera y cuarta etapas con muestreo controlado y dirigido, respectivamente. RESULTADOS. Se han cultivado 1940 infusiones. Se ha observado una reducción de la tasa de contaminación (de 29.6% en 1992 a 12.9% en 1997, pOBJECTIVES. As Klebsiella, Enterobacter and Serratia are capable of growth in IV fluids and these bacteria are commonly implicated in nosocomial bacteremia, a control strategy through microbiological surveilance of in-use parenteral solutions is proposed. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A second level general teaching hospital, serving low-income patients. Through four consecutive strategies, a continous surveillance program of IV fluids sterility in pediatric wards was stablished in 1992. During the first stage all of the in -use solutions were cultured. During the second stage randomly selected samples were studied. Third stage was designed as a case-control study. The last stage included samples drawn in convenience. Positive cultures point out eventual infusion mishandling, as well as high-risk areas and patients. RESULTS. After culturing 1940 parenteral solutions, infusion contamination rates decreased from 29.6% in 1992 to 12.9% in 1997 (p< 0.001. The proportion of Gram-negative rods isolated from blood cultures went from 72.7% to 40.85% (p< 0

  3. Investigation of PCT,WBC and CRP for auxiliary diagnosing value of bacteremia%PCT、WBC和CRP对菌血症的辅助诊断价值探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁栋伟; 张振洪; 黄勤; 黄平

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the auxiliary diagnostic value of PCT,WBC and CRP for bacteremia. Methods 202 patients were given blood culture, PCT,WBC and CRP detection.According to the results of blood culture, the patients were divided into the positive group and the negative group, then PCT,WBC and CRP results of the two groups were statistically analyzed. Results Except for PCT,there was no statistical difference of WBC and CRP value in the two groups (P>0.05).According to the data of ROC curve,diagnostic critical value,sensitivity and specificity of PCT were 1.28 ng/ml,53.5%and 79.8%. Conclusion PCT is helpful for the diagnosis of bacteremia.%目的:探讨PCT、WBC和CRP对菌血症的辅助诊断价值。方法对202例患者进行血培养、PCT、WBC和CRP检测。根据血培养结果,将患者分成阳性组与阴性组,然后对两组的PCT、WBC和CRP结果进行统计分析。结果除PCT外,两组的WBC、CRP比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。根据ROC曲线数据可知,PCT的诊断临界值是1.28 ng/ml,灵敏度为53.5%,特异度为79.8%。结论 PCT对菌血症有辅助诊断价值。

  4. Impact of inappropriate antimicrobial therapy on patients with bacteremia in intensive care units and resistance patterns in Latin America Impacto de la terapia antimicrobiana inapropiada en pacientes con bacteriemia en unidades de cuidado intensivo y patrones de resistencia en América Latina

    OpenAIRE

    J.A. Cortés; D. C. Garzón; J. A. Navarrete; K. M. Contreras

    2010-01-01

    Patient care in an intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with an increased risk of developing nosocomial infections. Bacteremia is responsible for a great number of cases, 23% of which have attributable mortality in developed countries and can affect up to 52% of ICU patients. The main cause of mortality is inadequate and inappropriate antimicrobial empirical therapy. The incorrect use of antimicrobials is a major risk for identifying multidrug resistant microorganisms, thereby involving in...

  5. Mortality among critically ill patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a multicenter cohort study in Colombia Mortalidad en pacientes gravemente enfermos con bacteriemia por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina: un estudio multicéntrico de cohortes en Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Juan S. Castillo; Aura L Leal; Jorge A. Cortes; Alvarez, Carlos A; Ricardo Sanchez; Giancarlo Buitrago; Liliana I. Barrero; Andrés L. Gonzalez; Daibeth H. Henriquez

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risk factors associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia emergence, its prognosis, and mortality-determining factors in critically ill patients in Colombia. METHODS: A multicenter, retrospective cohort study conducted in 2005-2008 at 16 public and private reference health care institutions in Bogotá, Colombia, that form part of a national epidemiological surveillance network and a hospital network with 4 469 beds. Methicillin-resistant ...

  6. [Recommendations for prevention of community-acquired pneumonia with bacteremia as the leading form of invasive pneumococcal infections in the population of people over 50 years of age and risk groups above 19 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Piotr; Antczak, Adam; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Bernatowska, Ewa; Stompór, Tomasz; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Gyrczuk, Ewa; Imiela, Jacek; Jedrzejczak, Wiesław; Windak, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a main cause of mortality associated with pneumococcal infections. Although, IPD is regarding mainly small children and persons in the age > 65 years, the investigations showed that because of IPD exactly sick persons are burdened with the greatest mortality in the older age, rather than of children. The most frequent form of IPD is community acquired pneumonia (CAP) with the bacteremia. The presence of even a single additional risk factor is increasing the probability of the unfavorable descent of pneumococcal infection. The risk factors for IPD and/or pneumonia with bacteremia apart from the age are among others asthma (> 2 x), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sarcoidosis (4 x), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (5 x), bronchiectases (2 x), allergic alveolitis (1.9 x) and pneumoconiosis (2 x), type 1 diabetes (4.4 x), type 2 diabetes (1.2 x), autoimmune diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis (4.2 to 14.9 x), kidney failure with the necessity to dialysis (12 x), immunosuppression, cardiovascular disease, alcoholism and cancers. Examinations show that the best method of IPD and CAP preventing are pneumococcal vaccinations. On the market for ages 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is available covering close the 90% of IPD triggering stereotypes. Her role in preventing CAP is uncertain and the immunological answer after vaccination at older persons and after revaccination is weak. Widely discussed disadvantageous effects of growing old of the immunological system show on the benefit from applying the immunization inducing the immunological memory, i.e. of conjugated vaccines which are activating the T-dependent reply and are ensuring the readiness for the effective secondary response. Examinations so far conducted with conjugated 7-valent and 13-valent (PCV13) vaccines at persons in the age > 50 years are confirming these expectations. Also sick persons can take benefits from PCV13 applying back from so-called IPD

  7. Bacteremia and candidemia in hematological malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, B; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Hovgaard, D;

    1988-01-01

    The microorganisms isolated in 1981-1985 from 171 cases of septicemia in patients with hematological malignancies were on the whole the same as those found in 1970-1972. The distribution between species was also quite similar for the two periods except within staphylococci, where the isolation rate...

  8. Staphylococcus hyicus Bacteremia in a Farmer ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Casanova, Carlo; Iselin, Lukas; von Steiger, Niklaus; Droz, Sara; Sendi, Parham

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria known in animal infectious diseases can cause challenges in human diagnostic laboratories. We present pitfalls in the identification and susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus hyicus, a pathogen that typically causes exudative epidermitis in pigs. In this case, the coagulase-positive staphylococcus isolated from a septic patient was misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus.

  9. Bacteremia with the bovis group streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marmolin, Ea S; Hartmeyer, Gitte N; Christensen, Jens J;

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing of the intergenic spacer (ITS) region was used to identify 53 blood culture isolates that had previously been designated to the bovis group streptococci and clinical data was collected retrospectively from patients' records using a standardized protocol. ITS sequencing identified 19...

  10. Prediction of bacteremia in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Kristine Jessen; Mackenhauer, Julie; Hvass, Anne Mette Sondrup Wulff;

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to validate a previously published clinical decision rule for predicting a positive blood culture in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection on the basis of major and minor criteria and a total score (Shapiro et al., J Emerg Med, 2008...... bacteremia’. Data on clinical history, comorbid illnesses, physical observations, and laboratory tests were used to evaluate the application of the clinical decision rule. We report the sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve. Results Among 1526 patients, 105 (6.9%) patients were classified with...... and is likely to be a useful supplement to clinical judgment....

  11. Mortalidad por bacteriemia causada por Escherichia coli y Klebsiella spp. productoras de beta lactamasas de espectro extendido: cohorte retrospectiva en un hospital de Lima, Perú Mortality caused by bacteremia Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. extended-spectrum beta-lactamase- producers: a retrospective cohort from a hospital in Lima, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Adrianzén

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos. Evaluar los factores asociados a la mortalidad causada por bacteriemias por Escherichia coli y Klebsiella spp. productoras de beta lactamasas de espectro extendido (BLEE. Materiales y Métodos. Se realizó un estudio de cohortes retrospectivo, que incluyó 85 pacientes mayores de 16 años con diagnóstico de bacteriemia por Escherichia coli o Klebsiella spp. hospitalizados entre 2006 y 2008 en el Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Las cohortes se clasificaron de acuerdo a la producción de BLEE según los resultados de los hemocultivos. Se evaluaron los factores asociados a la mortalidad cruda y atribuible empleando regresión de Poisson en un modelo multivariado, con lo que se obtuvo riesgos relativos ajustados (RRa. Además, se construyeron curvas de mortalidad. Resultados. Se encontró que el 35,3% de las bacteriemias fueron debidas a cepas productoras de BLEE. El análisis de la mortalidad cruda mostró una mayor mortalidad en el grupo de cepas productoras de BLEE (63,3%. El RRa fue de 1,5 (IC95%: 1,02-2,3. En el caso de mortalidad atribuible, la proporción también fue mayor (63,3%, el RRa fue de 1,9 (IC95%: 1,2-2,9. El uso de catéter venoso central fue otro factor asociado tanto a la mortalidad cruda (RRa= 2,4; IC95%: 1,2- 4,8 como a la mortalidad atribuible (RRa= 3,8; IC95%: 1,6-8,8. Conclusiones. La producción de BLEE es un factor de riesgo independiente para mortalidad por bacteriemia causada por E. coli y Klebsiella spp. Su presencia debe evaluarse tras la sospecha diagnóstica y la elaboración de la terapéutica inicial, lo que podría disminuir la mortalidad por esta causaObjectives. To evaluate the factors associated to mortality caused by bacteremia due to Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. producers of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL. Materials and methods. We performed a retrospective cohort study, including 85 patients older than 16 and diagnosed with bacteremia by Escherichia coli or Klebsiella spp

  12. Soft Tissue Infection and Bacteremia Caused by Shewanella putrefaciens

    OpenAIRE

    Pagani, Leonardo; Lang, Adolf; Vedovelli, Claudio; Moling, Oswald; Rimenti, Giovanni; Pristerà, Raffaele; Mian, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is as yet rarely responsible for clinical syndromes in humans. However, a case involving multiple organs in an elderly male under treatment with appropriate steroids confirms that attention should be devoted to unusual pathogens.

  13. Detection of bacteremia by Difco ESP blood culture system.

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, J A; Leitch, C; Nitz, S.; Dyke, J W; Andruszewski, M; Maier, G.; Landau, W.; Beard, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    In a multicenter study, the Difco ESP blood culture system (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.) was compared with the BACTEC NR660 system (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems, Sparks, Md.). The ESP system monitors each blood culture bottle every 12 to 24 min to detect changes in oxygen consumption and gas production by microbes. Equal volumes of blood were inoculated into aerobic ESP-80A and BACTEC 6A, 16A, or PEDS Plus broths and anaerobic ESP-80N and BACTEC 7A or 17A broths and w...

  14. Plesiomonas shigelloides bacteremia in a healthy girl with mild gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, R; Siitonen, A.; Kärkkäinen, P

    1990-01-01

    A previously healthy 15-year-old girl fell ill with febrile gastroenteritis; Plesiomonas shigelloides was isolated from the blood 6 h after she had received one tablet of trimethoprim-sulfadiazine on the third day of symptoms. She recovered uneventfully. P. shigelloides may be isolated from the blood in immunocompetent patients with mild, uncomplicated gastroenteritis.

  15. Leuconostoc Spp. Bacteremia in a Patient with Sigmoid Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havva Avcikucuk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Leuconostoc species are opportunistic pathogens that rarely encountered as an infection agent. It has been reported that, this pathogen could cause infections especially in immunsupressive patients, after invasive procedures and antibiotic treatment. In this report, we aim to present a case with intrinsically vancomycin resistant Leuconostoc spp. that was isolated in blood culture. Fifty six years old male patient with type II diabetes mellitus and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had been operated for sigmoid colon cancer one a half years ago. He was taken radiotherapy and chemotherapy right after the operation. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of stenosis in colostomy opening. Empiricial treatment was started for high fever. Gram positive coccus was reported in the blood culture(Bactec 9050, Becton-Dickinson, USA. The isolate was identified as Leuconostoc spp. with API 20 Strep (BioMerieux, French kit. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed by the disk diffusion method according to CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. The isolate was found susceptible to linezolid and quinupristin-dalfopristine, while it was resistant to penicilin, ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, vancomycin and teicoplanin by the disk diffusion method. Vancomycin resistance was confirmed by E-test (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden.

  16. Bacteremia secondary to Alloscardovia omnicolens urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiko; Koizumi, Akira; Kasahara, Kei; Lee, Sang-Tae; Yamada, Yuki; Nakano, Ryuichi; Yano, Hisakazu; Mikasa, Keiichi

    2016-06-01

    A 70-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with malaise, bilateral leg edema, and oliguria. She had a history of advanced uterine cancer. Bilateral double-J catheters were inserted because growth of intra-abdominal metastases led to bilateral ureteral stricture and hydronephrosis. Two days later, she suddenly developed high fever. Thin gram-positive bacilli of moderate length were detected in the anaerobic blood culture bottles. We performed 16S ribosomal RNA analysis of the isolate and it showed 100% match with Alloscardovia omnicolens DSM 21503(T). She was successfully treated with cefmetazole in addition to percutaneous nephrostomy. PMID:26829996

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to acute right leg cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Wahab, Asrul; Rahman, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacillus that causes wide spectrum clinical infections. However, it is most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infection. In this case a 58-year-old male with underlying hypertension and dyslipidaemia was admitted for acute right leg cellulitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was identified from the case, though it was not a usual suspected organism. It might be due to community-acquired infection.

  18. Bacteremia and conventional diagnosis of Sphingobacterium spiritivorum. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Jesús Núñez Tamayo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of septicaemia due to Sphingobacterium Spiritovirum that caused acute symmetric acronecrosis in a previously healthy man who received medical assistance at the University Hospital ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ from Cienfuegos province in November 2002. The clinical symptoms were: fever, lumbar pain and chills which evolved to shock with general malaise, accompanied with paresthesia, symptoms of distal necrosis in the four members, nose and ear. Sphingobacterium Spiritovirum was diagnosed by the conventional diagnosis of growing in the marrow tests and serial blood cultures. Susceptibility antimicrobial tests were sensible to sulphametoxazole – trimetropin and resistant to tetracycline, aztreonam, ceftriaxone and imipenem. The bibliography consulted did not evidence any previous isolation in Cuba .

  19. Bacteriemia en pacientes internados con celulitis Bacteremia in patients hospitalized with cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan S. Lasa; María L. Fernández Recalde; Bárbara C. Finn; Julio E. Bruetman; José Peroni; Pablo Young

    2012-01-01

    La celulitis es una inflamación aguda de la dermis y tejido celular subcutáneo de causa bacteriana, que generalmente complica a heridas, úlceras y dermatosis, aunque de manera frecuente no existe sitio de entrada. Se recomienda la realización de cultivo de punción de piel y partes blandas (PPB). Los hemocultivos raramente dan resultados positivos. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de bacteriemia en pacientes internados en nuestra institución con diagnóstico de celuliti...

  20. Bacteremia in free-ranging Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas, with fibropapillomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Wolcott, M.; Morris, R.

    2003-01-01

    Past studies of free-ranging green turtles Chelonia mydas with fibropapillomatosis (FP) in Hawaii have shown that animals become immunosuppressed with increasing severity of this disease. Additionally, preliminary clinical examination of moribund turtles with FP revealed that some animals were also bacteraemic. We tested the hypothesis that bacteraemia in sea turtles is associated with the severity of FP. We captured free-ranging green turtles from areas in Hawaii where FP is absent, and areas where FP has been endemic since the late 1950s. Each turtle was given an FP severity score ranging from 0 (no tumours) to 3 (severely affected). A fifth category included turtles that were stranded ashore and moribund with FP. We found that the percentage of turtles with bacteraemia increased with the severity of FP, and that the majority of bacteria cultured were Vibrio spp. Turtles with severe FP were more susceptible to bactaeremia, probably in part due to immunosuppression. The pattern of bacteraemia in relation to severity of disease strengthens the hypothesis that immunosuppression is a sequel to FP.

  1. Complicated septic shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans bacteremia in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jasser A M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans cause significant morbidity and mortality in debilitated individuals. Eradication of these infections requires prolonged therapy with antimicrobial agents and removal of any infected central venous catheter. The outcome is usually poor in patients with high risk malignancy, septic complications, and/or multi-organ dysfunction

  2. Immunotherapeutic modification of Escherichia coli peritonitis and bacteremia by Tinospora cordifolia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatte U

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here the protective effects of an Indian medicinal plant Tinospora cordifolia as compared to gentamicin in E. Coli induced peritonitis. Pretreatment with tinospora cordifolia or gentamicin reduced mortality in mice injected with 1 x 10(8 E. coli intraperitoneally from 100% in controls to 17.8% and 11.1% respectively. This was associated with significantly improved bacterial clearance as well as improved phagocytic and intracellular bactericidal capacities of neutrophils in the Tinospora cordifolia treated group. In the gentamicin treated mice although bacterial clearance was rapid, polymorph phagocytosis was depressed. Tinospora cordifolia did not possess in vitro bactericidal activity. The results demonstrate that a "prohost approach" may be beneficial in the therapy of peritonitis.

  3. Immunotherapeutic modification of Escherichia coli peritonitis and bacteremia by Tinospora cordifolia.

    OpenAIRE

    Thatte U; Kulkarni M; Dahanukar S

    1992-01-01

    We present here the protective effects of an Indian medicinal plant Tinospora cordifolia as compared to gentamicin in E. Coli induced peritonitis. Pretreatment with tinospora cordifolia or gentamicin reduced mortality in mice injected with 1 x 10(8) E. coli intraperitoneally from 100% in controls to 17.8% and 11.1% respectively. This was associated with significantly improved bacterial clearance as well as improved phagocytic and intracellular bactericidal capacities of n...

  4. Ecthyma gangrenosum in the periorbital region in a previously healthy immunocompetent woman without bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Somenath; Patra, Arnab Kumar; Mondal, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) is a cutaneous lesion classically associated with potentially fatal Pseudomonas septicemia in immunocompromised patients. Other bacterial and fungal pathogens have also been implicated. Although EG typically occurs in immunocompromised or neutropenic patients, it may occasionally affect a previously healthy person. The cutaneous findings are characteristic with small indurated papulovesicles progressing rapidly to necrotic ulcers with surrounding erythema and a central black Eschar. While lesions can occur at any site, most are commonly found over the buttocks, perineum, limbs, and axillae. We describe a case of EG in periorbital region in a previously healthy woman who responded to appropriate antibiotic treatment for Pseudomonas. It is very important to establish the diagnosis early so that appropriate systemic antibiotic therapy can be initiated to reduce morbidity and potential mortality. PMID:26955586

  5. Nosocomial pneumonia and bacteremia caused by delftia acidovorans related to arterial catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Tekin Taş; Abdulkadir Küçükbayrak; Esra Koçoğlu; Şeyda Özsoy; Özlem Bucak; Ümit Yaşar Tekelioğlu; İsmail Necati Hakyemez

    2012-01-01

    Delftia acidovorans, formerly called as Comamonas acidovorans,is a non-fermentative gram-negative bacteria.A 79 year-old male with chronic obstructive pulmonarydisease was hospitalized in the intensive care unit. Bilateralrespiratory sounds were diminished, he had roughrhonchi. He was started sulbactam/ampicilline. On theseventh day of hospitalization, White Blood Cells increasedand infiltration was occured on the left lung,blood and deep tracheal aspirate culture samples weretaken; ceftriaxo...

  6. Nosocomial pneumonia and bacteremia caused by delftia acidovorans related to arterial catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Taş, Tekin; KÜÇÜKBAYRAK, Abdulkadir; Koçoğlu, Esra; ÖZSOY, Şeyda; Bucak, Özlem; Tekelioğlu, Ümit Yaşar; Hakyemez, İsmail Necati

    2012-01-01

    Delftia acidovorans, formerly called as Comamonas acidovorans, is a non-fermentative gram-negative bacteria. A 79 year-old male with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was hospitalized in the intensive care unit. Bilateral respiratory sounds were diminished, he had rough rhonchi. He was started sulbactam/ampicilline. On the seventh day of hospitalization, White Blood Cells increased and infiltration was occured on the left lung, blood and deep tracheal aspirate culture samples were taken; ...

  7. 螺杆菌属细菌菌血症%Bacteremia caused by helicobactor bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐祖胜; 范学工

    2004-01-01

    关于螺杆菌属细菌菌血症的报道并非罕见,认识其临床表现及引起螺杆菌菌血症的可能机制在临床上有十分重要的意义.本文就螺杆菌菌血症的研究情况及其临床意义作一简要介绍.

  8. Does antibiotic lock therapy prevent catheter-associated bacteremia in hemodialysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheter-related blood stream infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease treated with hemodialysis. Antibiotic lock solutions can be effective in preventing this complication in patients with hemodialysis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening more than twenty databases, we identified eight systematic reviews including seventeen randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded that antibiotic lock solutions probably decrease catheter-related blood stream infection in hemodialysis patients.

  9. Simple models do not explain early dynamics of H. influenzae bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xinxian; Levin, Bruce; Nemenman, Ilya

    2015-03-01

    There is an abundance of largely qualitative information about the physiological and molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. However, little is known about population dynamic processes by which bacteria colonize hosts and invade cells and tissues and thereby cause disease. Classic experiment of Moxon and Murphy observed that, when inoculated intranasally with a mixture of equally virulent strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b(Hib), neonatal rats develop a bacteremic infection that often is dominated by only one random competing strain. A common qualitative explanation for this phenomenon is that the bacteria must switch stochastically into a rapidly growing phenotype to start the full-fledged invasion. Then the first bacterium to switch activates the host immune response, which in turn 'shuts the door' in front of the second strain. We implemented this model computationally and analytically, and we conclude that this model cannot explain the data, specifically, the observed dependence of the rate of infections on the inoculum size. New experiments are needed to identify mechanisms underlying the dependence.

  10. Ecthyma gangrenosum in the periorbital region in a previously healthy immunocompetent woman without bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somenath Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG is a cutaneous lesion classically associated with potentially fatal Pseudomonas septicemia in immunocompromised patients. Other bacterial and fungal pathogens have also been implicated. Although EG typically occurs in immunocompromised or neutropenic patients, it may occasionally affect a previously healthy person. The cutaneous findings are characteristic with small indurated papulovesicles progressing rapidly to necrotic ulcers with surrounding erythema and a central black Eschar. While lesions can occur at any site, most are commonly found over the buttocks, perineum, limbs, and axillae. We describe a case of EG in periorbital region in a previously healthy woman who responded to appropriate antibiotic treatment for Pseudomonas. It is very important to establish the diagnosis early so that appropriate systemic antibiotic therapy can be initiated to reduce morbidity and potential mortality.

  11. A Rare Cause of Bacteremia in a Pediatric Patient with Down Syndrome: Sphingomonas Paucimobilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özdemir, Sevgi Pekcan, Mehmet Emin Demircili, Fatma Esenkaya Taşbent, Bahadır Feyzioğlu, Şerife Pirinç, Mahmut Baykan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingomonas paucimobilis, is a yellow-pigmented, aerobic, non fermentative, gram negative motile bacillus. S. paucimobilis which is widely found in nature and hospital environments rarely cause serious or life threatening infections. In this report, a case of hospital acquired bloodstream infection due to S. paucimobilis in a patient with Down syndrome who was on treatment for presumed pneumonia is presented.A one year-old child patient who was a known case of Down syndrome and had previously experienced cardiac surgery was hospitalized and treated for pneumonia. On the 12th day of hospitalization, blood cultures were taken because of a high body temperature. One of the blood cultures was positive for gram-negative rods. After 48 hour of incubation, the sub-cultures on blood agar medium yielded pure growth of a yellow, non-fermentative, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium. The microorganism was positive for oxidase, and esculin hydrolysis, while negative for urea and nitrate reduction, citrate utilisation and motility. The isolate had been identified as S. paucimobilis by using Vitek 2 system. The antibiotic susceptibility test was also performed with the same system and the strain was found to be susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and other antibiotics. Treatment with intravenous piperacilin-tazobactam (150 mg/kg/day was initiated. He responded well to the treatment and was discharged after 10 days. This case is reported to emphasize that S. paucimobilis should be kept in mind as a nosocomial infectious agent in patients with Down syndrome and immunosuppressive patients and the infections should be treated according to the sensitivity test results.

  12. Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and Bartonella henselae bacteremia in a father and daughter with neurological disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Christopher W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii is an important, emerging, intravascular bacterial pathogen that has been recently isolated from immunocompetent patients with endocarditis, arthritis, neurological disease and vasoproliferative neoplasia. Vector transmission is suspected among dogs and wild canines, which are the primary reservoir hosts. This investigation was initiated to determine if pets and family members were infected with one or more Bartonella species. Methods PCR and enrichment blood culture in Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM was used to determine infection status. Antibody titers to B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotypes I-III and B. henselae were determined using a previously described indirect fluorescent antibody test. Two patients were tested sequentially for over a year to assess the response to antibiotic treatment. Results Intravascular infection with B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype II and Bartonella henselae (Houston 1 strain were confirmed in a veterinarian and his daughter by enrichment blood culture, followed by PCR and DNA sequencing. Symptoms included progressive weight loss, muscle weakness, lack of coordination (the father and headaches, muscle pain and insomnia (the daughter. B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype II was also sequenced from a cerebrospinal fluid BAPGM enrichment culture and from a periodontal swab sample. After repeated courses of antibiotics, post-treatment blood cultures were negative, there was a decremental decrease in antibody titers to non-detectable levels and symptoms resolved in both patients. Conclusions B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and B. henselae are zoonotic pathogens that can be isolated from the blood of immunocompetent family members with arthralgias, fatigue and neurological symptoms. Therapeutic elimination of Bartonella spp. infections can be challenging, and follow-up testing is recommended. An increasing number of arthropod vectors, including biting flies, fleas, keds, lice, sandflies and ticks have been confirmed or are suspected as the primary mode of transmission of Bartonella species among animal populations and may also pose a risk to human beings.

  13. Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and Bartonella henselae bacteremia in a father and daughter with neurological disease

    OpenAIRE

    Woods Christopher W; Hegarty Barbara C; Lantos Paul M; Maggi Ricardo G; Breitschwerdt Edward B; Bradley Julie M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii is an important, emerging, intravascular bacterial pathogen that has been recently isolated from immunocompetent patients with endocarditis, arthritis, neurological disease and vasoproliferative neoplasia. Vector transmission is suspected among dogs and wild canines, which are the primary reservoir hosts. This investigation was initiated to determine if pets and family members were infected with one or more Bartonella species. Methods ...

  14. Virulence factors profiles and ESBL production in Escherichia coli causing bacteremia in Peruvian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Noemí; Gomes, Cláudia; Riveros, Maribel; García, Wilfredo; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Mateu, Judit; García, Coralith; Jacobs, Jan; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-09-01

    The presence of 25 virulence genes (VGs), genetic phylogroups, quinolone-resistance and Extended Spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-production was assessed in 65 Escherichia coli isolates from blood cultures in children Quinolone-susceptible (22 isolates - 33.8%) and ESBL-negative (31 isolates - 47.7%) isolates carried more VGs that their respective counterparts (5.7 vs. 4.7 and 5.3 vs. 4.4 respectively); the frequency of the fyuA, aat, aap, and hly genes significantly differed between quinolone-resistant and quinolone-susceptible isolates. Neonatal sepsis isolates tended to be more quinolone-resistant (P = 0.0697) and ESBL-producers (P = 0.0776). Early-onset neonatal sepsis isolates possessed a high number of VGs (5.2 VGs), especially in neonates of ≤1 day (5.9 VGs). PMID:27345125

  15. BRIEF HYPOXIA PRECEDING E.COLI BACTEREMIA DOWNREGULATES HEPATIC TNF-α PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈周谋; 施秉银

    1999-01-01

    Earlyaftergram-negativebacteremia(GNB),defectiveregulationofendotoxin-inducedinflammatoryresponsesoftencul-minatesinprogressi...

  16. Temsirolimus therapy and small bowel perforation in a pediatric patient with Clostridium septicum bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Anne Herrin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Temsirolimus has been demonstrated to result in significant disease stabilization in children with high-grade glioma, neuroblastoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. While mucositis has been reported as a common adverse effect of temsirolimus therapy in adult and pediatric patients, bowel perforation is an infrequent and life-threatening side effect of temsirolimus in adults and has not previously been reported in children. We present a child treated with temsirolimus for recurrent metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma who underwent ileocecectomy and small bowel resection for perforation with frank necrosis. His presentation was complicated by Clostridium septicum infection, a rare, frequently fatal, gastrointestinal pathogen associated with malignancy and bowel ischemia.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to acute right leg cellulitis: case of community-acquired infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wahab, Asrul Abdul; Rahman, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacillus that causes wide spectrum clinical infections. However, it is most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infection. In this case a 58-year-old male with underlying hypertension and dyslipidaemia was admitted for acute right leg cellulitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was identified from the case, though it was not a usual suspected organism. It might be due to community-acquired infection.

  18. Future challenges and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with emphasis on MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Fowler, Vance G; Skov, Robert;

    2011-01-01

    . Compounding this problem is the growing prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the dwindling efficacy of vancomycin, long the treatment of choice for this pathogen. Despite the recent availability of several new antibiotics for S. aureus, new strategies for treatment and prevention are...

  19. Mortalidad de la bacteremia causada por Staphyloccoccus aureus resistente a meticilina en pacientes críticamente enfermos de la red distrital / Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccoccus aureus bacteremia mortality in critically ill patients in the a city healthcare network

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo Londoño, Juan Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    Introducción: La resistencia bacteriana constituye uno de los principales problemas de la atención hospitalaria para el sistema de salud Distrital. La emergencia y diseminación de bacterias resistentes ha mostrado impacto en la morbilidad y mortalidad de los pacientes y en el consumo de recursos económicos. Conocer el fenómeno y sus consecuencias es un paso fundamental para lograr la movilización de los actores implicados en su contención. En nuestro país existe poca informació...

  20. Bacteriemia y absceso hepático causado por Yersinia enterocolitica Bacteremia and hepatic abscess caused by Yersinia enterocolitica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Navascués

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia enterocolitica es un cocobacilo gram negativo de amplia distribución mundial cuyo reservorio natural se encuentra en una gran variedad de animales. La transmisión a los humanos se realiza principalmente a través de la vía fecal-oral aunque también se han descrito casos de transmisión a través de transfusiones sanguíneas. Su aislamiento se realiza habitualmente dentro de un cuadro gastrointestinal y rara vez produce trastornos extraintestinales como bacteriemia, abscesos, manifestaciones cutáneas, etc. Éstos se han asociado a diferentes enfermedades de base como alteraciones del metabolismo del hierro, diabetes mellitus, alcoholismo, malnutrición, tumores, terapia inmunosupresora y cirrosis. Presentamos el caso de un paciente diabético que desarrolló bacteriemia asociada a abscesso hepático por Yersinia enterocolitica.Yersinia enterocolitica is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that is distributed world-wide and whose natural reservoire is found in a great variety of animals. Transmission to humans mainly occurs through the faecal-oral path although cases have been described of transmission through blood transfusions. It is isolated within a gastro-intestinal clinical picture and it rarely produces extra-intestinal disorders such as bacteraemia, abscesses, cutaneous signs, etc. The latter have been associated with different underlying diseases such as alterations of the iron metabolism, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, malnutrition, tumours, immunosuppressant therapy and cirrhosis. We present the case of a diabetic patient who developed bacteraemia associated with hepatic abscess due to Yersinia enterocolitica.

  1. Bacteremia due to Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter). Report of infection in a pregnant women and her stillborn fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, P M

    1996-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter) is usually a plant pathogen, but is isolated occasionally from human clinical specimens, frequently along with other bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter) has been isolated from blood, central intravenous catheters, peritoneal fluid, urine, and cellulitis aspirates, often in immunocompromised individuals. This report details the isolation of A. tumefaciens (radiobacter) from the blood of a pregnant woman, as well as from the blood of her stillborn, premature fetus. It is, to our knowledge, the first report of such an occurrence. PMID:8988763

  2. The duration of hypotension determines the evolution of bacteremia-induced acute kidney injury in the intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Janssen van Doorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exploration of the impact of severe hypotension on the evolution of acute kidney injury in septic patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: We reviewed the hemodynamic parameters of 137 adults with septic shock and proven blood stream infection in the ICU. Severe hypotension was defined as a mean arterial blood pressure (MAP ≤65 mmHg. The influence of the duration of severe hypotension on the evolution of acute kidney injury was evaluated according to the RIFLE classification, with day 0 defined as the day of a positive blood stream infection. After bloodstream infection, the probability for a patient to be in Failure was significantly higher than before blood stream infection (OR = 1.94, p = 0.0276. Patients have a significantly higher risk of evolving to Failure if the duration of severe hypotension is longer (OR = 1.02 for each 10 minutes increase in duration of a MAP <65 mmHg, p = 0.0472. A cut-off of at least 51 minutes of severe hypotension (<65 mmHg or at least 5.5 periods of severe hypotension within 1 day identified patients with increased risk to evolve to Failure. CONCLUSIONS: There is a significant influence of both the duration and the number of periods of severe hypotension on the evolution to Failure. Blood stream infection has a significantly negative effect on the relationship between severe hypotension and Failure.

  3. Outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteremia in a chemotherapy day care unit due to intrinsic contamination of an antiemetic drug

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, T.; Shah, S.; Naik, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the end of 2009, a large number of patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy at the day care unit of a private hospital in Mumbai, India developed Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) blood stream infection (BSI). Objective: The objectives were to identify the source of the outbreak and terminate the outbreak as rapidly as possible. Materials and Methods: All infection control protocols and processes were reviewed. Intensive training was started for all nursing staff involved ...

  4. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Christensen, Thomas; Benfield, Thomas; Espersen, Frank; Hougaard, David M; Ostergaard, Christian

    The role of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the evolution of the pathophysiological changes that occur in bacterial meningitis is unclear. Here, we investigate how leukocyte recruitment to the CSF, modulated by the leukocyte blocker fucoidin, affects the extent of brain...

  5. A recommendation to perform a blood culture before the administration of intravenous antibiotics increased the detection of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Jogenfors, A.; Stark, L.; Svefors, J.; Löfgren, S; Malmvall, B.-E.; Matussek, A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2004, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign was launched to increase awareness and improve the outcome of severe sepsis. Accordingly, in Jönköping County, Sweden, a strong recommendation to perform a blood culture before the start of intravenous antibiotic treatment was introduced in 2007. Moreover, a reminder was included in the laboratory report to consult an infectious disease specialist when Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from a blood culture. Retrospectively, patients with at least one bl...

  6. Impact of microbiology cascade reporting on antibiotic de-escalation in cefazolin-susceptible Gram-negative bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L S; Patel, D; King, E A; Maslow, J N

    2016-07-01

    Cascade reporting (CR) involves reporting the susceptibilities of broad-spectrum agents only when the organism is resistant to more narrow-spectrum agents. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of CR on antibiotic de-escalation practices and to characterize the impact of CR on clinical outcomes. CR rules were implemented in the microbiology laboratory at Atlantic Health System (AHS) in June 2013. A retrospective chart review was conducted at two community teaching hospitals in adult patients who had a blood culture positive for a Gram-negative organism susceptible to cefazolin and who were empirically treated with broad-spectrum beta-lactam (BSBL) antibiotics. De-escalation practices were compared in the pre-CR (July 2012-December 2012) and post-CR (July 2013-December 2013) periods. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients whose BSBL agent was de-escalated to agents listed on the post-CR antibiotic susceptibility report within 48 h of the final report. Secondary endpoints include the difference in pre-CR and post-CR periods in terms of hospital length of stay, in-hospital mortality, 30-day readmission, Clostridium difficile infections, and re-initiation of a BSBL agent within 7 days. A total of 73 patients were included; 31 in the pre-CR and 42 in the post-CR period. Patients had similar baseline characteristics. Therapy was de-escalated in 48 % of pre-CR vs 71 % of post-CR patients (p = 0.043). No significant differences were observed in secondary endpoints between patients in the pre-CR and post-CR periods. CR resulted in significant improvements in de-escalation practices without affecting safety outcomes. PMID:27130036

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia causing diarrhea leading to mortality:an unusual disease course in a 10 month old

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepa balachandran; WANG Suo-ying; SUN Bing-wei; LI Yu-qin; Krishna kumar.A

    2010-01-01

    @@ Ten months old female infant was admitted with three days history of fever and loose stools. The patient was initially treated with suspicion of viral infection. Interferon 10 μg was given IM and antipyretics were prescribed before the patient was brought to our hospital. Previous investigation showed neutropenia[WBC 7.88×109 /L, Neutrophils 0.39×109 /L, Lymphocytes 6.26×109 /L, PLT 264×109 /L, Hemoglobin level 108.10 g/L].

  8. Outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteremia in a chemotherapy day care unit due to intrinsic contamination of an antiemetic drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the end of 2009, a large number of patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy at the day care unit of a private hospital in Mumbai, India developed Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC blood stream infection (BSI. Objective: The objectives were to identify the source of the outbreak and terminate the outbreak as rapidly as possible. Materials and Methods: All infection control protocols and processes were reviewed. Intensive training was started for all nursing staff involved in patient care. Cultures were sent from the environment (surfaces, water, air, intravenous fluids, disinfectants and antiseptics and opened/unopened medication. Results: A total of 13 patients with cancer with tunneled catheters were affected with BCC BSI. The isolates were of similar antimicrobial sensitivity. No significant breach of infection control protocols could be identified. Cultures from the prepared intravenous medication bags grew BCC. Subsequently, culture from unused vials of the antiemetic granisetron grew BCC, whereas those from the unopened IV fluid bag and chemotherapy medication were negative. On review, it was discovered that the outbreak started when a new brand of granisetron was introduced. The result was communicated to the manufacturer and the brand was withdrawn. There were no further cases. Conclusions: This outbreak was thus linked to intrinsic contamination of medication vials. We acknowledge a delay in identifying the source as we were concentrating more on human errors in medication preparation and less on intrinsic contamination. We recommend that in an event of an outbreak, unopened vials be cultured at the outset.

  9. Controlled evaluation of supplemented peptone and Bactec blood culture broths for the detection of bacteremia and fungemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Reimer, L G; McDaniel, J D; Mirrett, S.; Reller, L B; Wang, W L

    1985-01-01

    Comparison of conventional blood culture media with newer formulations of Bactec media for radiometric detection are lacking. Therefore, we compared the yield and speed of detection of clinically important microorganisms with supplemented peptone broth (SPB) and Bactec aerobic (6B) and anaerobic (7C or 7D) broths in 7,627 blood samples from adult patients. Acridine orange stains from SPB, radiometric readings from Bactec, and routine subcultures from all bottles were done at the same time int...

  10. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels;

    2005-01-01

    damage and outcome in pneumococcal meningitis in rats treated with ceftriaxone from 28 h after infection. Rats treated with fucoidin from time of infection had an excess risk of a fatal outcome compared to rats not receiving fucoidin (25/63 versus 5/34, p=0.012), whereas the risk of cortical damage in......, blocking leukocyte entry to the central nervous system in experimental pneumococcal meningitis compromises the survival prognosis but does not affect the risk of brain damage or level of infection in this compartment. Conversely, poorer prognosis was associated with an increase in bacterial load in blood...

  11. Whole-genome sequencing identifies emergence of a quinolone resistance mutation in a case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Theodore R; Altman, Deena R; Attie, Oliver; Sebra, Robert; Hamula, Camille L; Lewis, Martha; Deikus, Gintaras; Newman, Leah C; Fang, Gang; Hand, Jonathan; Patel, Gopi; Wallach, Fran; Schadt, Eric E; Huprikar, Shirish; van Bakel, Harm; Kasarskis, Andrew; Bashir, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Whole-genome sequences for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia serial isolates from a bacteremic patient before and after development of levofloxacin resistance were assembled de novo and differed by one single-nucleotide variant in smeT, a repressor for multidrug efflux operon smeDEF. Along with sequenced isolates from five contemporaneous cases, they displayed considerable diversity compared against all published complete genomes. Whole-genome sequencing and complete assembly can conclusively identify resistance mechanisms emerging in S. maltophilia strains during clinical therapy. PMID:26324280

  12. Inhalational anthrax (Ames aerosol in naive and vaccinated New Zealand rabbits: characterizing the spread of bacteria from lung deposition to bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford eGutting

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to better understand inhalational anthrax in relevant animal models. This understanding could aid risk assessment, help define therapeutic windows, and provide a better understanding of disease. The aim here was to characterize and quantify bacterial deposition and dissemination in rabbits following exposure to single high aerosol dose (>100LD50 of Bacillus anthracis (Ames spores immediately following exposure through 36 hours. The primary goal of collecting the data was to support investigators in developing computational models of inhalational anthrax disease. Rabbits were vaccinated prior to exposure with the human vaccine (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA or were sham-vaccinated, and were then exposed in pairs (1 sham and 1 AVA so disease kinetics could be characterized in equally-dosed hosts where one group is fully protected and is able to clear the infection (AVA-vaccinated, while the other is susceptible to disease, in which case the bacteria are able to escape containment and replicate uncontrolled (sham-vaccinated rabbits. Between 4-5% of the presented aerosol dose was retained in the lung of sham- and AVA-vaccinated rabbits as measured by dilution plate analysis of homogenized lung tissue or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. After 6 and 36 hours, >80% and >96%, respectively, of the deposited spores were no longer detected in BAL, with no detectable difference between sham- or AVA-vaccinated rabbits. Thereafter, differences between the two groups became noticeable. In sham-vaccinated rabbits the bacteria were detected in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN 12 hours post exposure and in the circulation at 24 hours, a time point which was also associated with dramatic increases in vegetative CFU in the lung tissue of some animals. In all sham-vaccinated rabbits, bacteria increased in both TBLN and blood through 36 hours at which point in time some rabbits succumbed to disease. In contrast, AVA-vaccinated rabbits showed sma

  13. Constructing Unit-Specific Empiric Treatment Guidelines for Catheter-Related and Primary Bacteremia by Determining the Likelihood of Inadequate Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Megan E.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Sharpe, Michelle; Chen, Luke F.; Drew, Richard H

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using likelihood of inadequate therapy (LIT), a parameter calculated by using pathogen frequency and in vitro susceptibility for determination of appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy for primary bloodstream infections. Our study demonstrates that LIT may reveal differences in traditional antibiograms.

  14. Fatal Nocardia farcinica Bacteremia Diagnosed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome Treated with Corticosteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Amedeo; Guercini, Francesco; Cardaccia, Angela; Furbetta, Leone; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bistoni, Francesco; Mencacci, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is a Gram-positive weakly acid-fast filamentous saprophytic bacterium, an uncommon cause of human infections, acquired usually through the respiratory tract, often life-threatening, and associated with different clinical presentations. Predisposing conditions for N. farcinica infections include hematologic malignancies, treatment with corticosteroids, and any other condition of immunosuppression. Clinical and microbiological diagnoses of N. farcinica infections are troublesome, and the isolation and identification of the etiologic agent are difficult and time-consuming processes. We describe a case of fatal disseminated infection in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome, treated with corticosteroids, in which N. farcinica has been isolated from blood culture and identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. The patient died after 18 days of hospitalization in spite of triple antimicrobial therapy. Nocardia farcinica infection should be suspected in patients with history of malignancy, under corticosteroid therapy, suffering from subacute pulmonary infection,and who do not respond to conventional antimicrobial therapy. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry can be a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of nocardiosis. PMID:23690786

  15. Fatal Nocardia farcinica Bacteremia Diagnosed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome Treated with Corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Leli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocardia farcinica is a Gram-positive weakly acid-fast filamentous saprophytic bacterium, an uncommon cause of human infections, acquired usually through the respiratory tract, often life-threatening, and associated with different clinical presentations. Predisposing conditions for N. farcinica infections include hematologic malignancies, treatment with corticosteroids, and any other condition of immunosuppression. Clinical and microbiological diagnoses of N. farcinica infections are troublesome, and the isolation and identification of the etiologic agent are difficult and time-consuming processes. We describe a case of fatal disseminated infection in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome, treated with corticosteroids, in which N. farcinica has been isolated from blood culture and identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. The patient died after 18 days of hospitalization in spite of triple antimicrobial therapy. Nocardia farcinica infection should be suspected in patients with history of malignancy, under corticosteroid therapy, suffering from subacute pulmonary infection,and who do not respondto conventional antimicrobial therapy. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry can be a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of nocardiosis.

  16. Fatal Nocardia farcinica Bacteremia Diagnosed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome Treated with Corticosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Leli; Amedeo Moretti; Francesco Guercini; Angela Cardaccia; Leone Furbetta; Giancarlo Agnelli; Francesco Bistoni; Antonella Mencacci

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is a Gram-positive weakly acid-fast filamentous saprophytic bacterium, an uncommon cause of human infections, acquired usually through the respiratory tract, often life-threatening, and associated with different clinical presentations. Predisposing conditions for N. farcinica infections include hematologic malignancies, treatment with corticosteroids, and any other condition of immunosuppression. Clinical and microbiological diagnoses of N. farcinica infections are troubles...

  17. Mortality and hospital stay associated with resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteremia: estimating the burden of antibiotic resistance in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlieke E A de Kraker

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relative importance of human diseases is conventionally assessed by cause-specific mortality, morbidity, and economic impact. Current estimates for infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are not sufficiently supported by quantitative empirical data. This study determined the excess number of deaths, bed-days, and hospital costs associated with blood stream infections (BSIs caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (G3CREC in 31 countries that participated in the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The number of BSIs caused by MRSA and G3CREC was extrapolated from EARSS prevalence data and national health care statistics. Prospective cohort studies, carried out in hospitals participating in EARSS in 2007, provided the parameters for estimating the excess 30-d mortality and hospital stay associated with BSIs caused by either MRSA or G3CREC. Hospital expenditure was derived from a publicly available cost model. Trends established by EARSS were used to determine the trajectories for MRSA and G3CREC prevalence until 2015. In 2007, 27,711 episodes of MRSA BSIs were associated with 5,503 excess deaths and 255,683 excess hospital days in the participating countries, whereas 15,183 episodes of G3CREC BSIs were associated with 2,712 excess deaths and 120,065 extra hospital days. The total costs attributable to excess hospital stays for MRSA and G3CREC BSIs were 44.0 and 18.1 million Euros (63.1 and 29.7 million international dollars, respectively. Based on prevailing trends, the number of BSIs caused by G3CREC is likely to rapidly increase, outnumbering the number of MRSA BSIs in the near future. CONCLUSIONS: Excess mortality associated with BSIs caused by MRSA and G3CREC is significant, and the prolongation of hospital stay imposes a considerable burden on health care systems. A foreseeable shift in the burden of antibiotic resistance from Gram-positive to Gram-negative infections will exacerbate this situation and is reason for concern.

  18. Incidencia de bacteriemia y neumonía nosocomial en una unidad de pediatría Incidence of nosocomial bacteremia and pneumonia in a pediatric ward

    OpenAIRE

    Gerardo Martínez-Aguilar; María del Carmen Anaya-Arriaga; Carlos Avila-Figueroa

    2001-01-01

    Objetivo. Determinar la incidencia de bacteriemia relacionada con catéter y neumonía asociada a ventilador en niños hospitalizados. Material y métodos. Estudio prospectivo. En el servicio de Pediatría del Hospital General Regional (HGR) No 1 del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), de Durango, México, durante 18 meses, de enero de 1999 a junio del 2000, se implementó un sistema de vigilancia epidemiológica activa para identificar episodios de neumonía y bacteriemia nosocomial de acuer...

  19. Microbiological Analysis of Nontyphoidal Salmonella Strains Causing Distinct Syndromes of Bacteremia or Enteritis in HIV/AIDS Patients in San Diego, California

    OpenAIRE

    Preziosi, Michael J.; Kandel, Sean M.; Guiney, Donald G.; Browne, Sara H

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection is an AIDS-defining illness that has become less common in the developed world in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), while it has emerged as a major public health problem in developing countries, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. We retrospectively analyzed Salmonella (NTS) infection in HIV/AIDS patients from June 2003 until December 2009 at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Medical Center. Bacterial...

  20. Effects of vancomycin versus nafcillin in enhancing killing of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus causing bacteremia by human cathelicidin LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, J; Dam, Q; Schweizer, M; Thienphrapa, W; Nizet, V; Sakoulas, G

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that anti-staphylococcal beta-lactam antibiotics, like nafcillin, render methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) more susceptible to killing by innate host defense peptides (HDPs), such as cathelicidin LL-37. We compared the effects of growth in 1/4 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nafcillin or vancomycin on the LL-37 killing of 92 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. For three randomly selected strains among these, we examined the effects of nafcillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid on LL-37 killing and autolysis. Growth in the presence of subinhibitory nafcillin significantly enhanced LL-37 killing of MSSA compared to vancomycin and antibiotic-free controls. Nafcillin also reduced MSSA production of the golden staphylococcal pigment staphyloxanthin in 39 % of pigmented strains vs. 14 % for vancomycin. Among the antibiotics tested, only nafcillin resulted in significantly increased MSSA autolysis. These studies point to additional mechanisms of anti-staphylococcal activity of nafcillin beyond direct bactericidal activity, properties that vancomycin and other antibiotic classes do not exhibit. The ability of nafcillin to enhance sensitivity to innate HDPs may contribute to its superior effectiveness against MSSA, as suggested by studies comparing clinical outcomes to vancomycin treatment. PMID:27234592

  1. Potential Misclassification of Urinary Tract-Related Bacteremia Upon Applying the 2015 Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Surveillance Definition From the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Fakih, Mohamad G; Saint, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated the surveillance definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection to include only urine culture bacteria of at least 1×105 colony-forming units/mL. Our findings suggest that the new surveillance definition may fail to capture clinically meaningful catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):469-471. PMID:26778287

  2. Anaplasma marginale infection with persistent high-load bacteremia induces a dysfunctional memory CD4+ T lymphocyte response but sustained high IgG titers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of blood-borne infections is dependent on antigen-specific effector and memory T cells and high-affinity IgG responses. In chronic infections characterized by a high antigen load, it has been shown that antigen-specific T and B cells are vulnerable to downregulation and apoptosis. Anaplasma ...

  3. Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimias from 1980 to 1993: Impact of Intravascular Devices and Methicillin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Steinberg; C.C. Clarke; B.O. Hackman

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe rate of nosocomial bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus has increased over the past decade, but trends in community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia are less certain. This hospital-based observational study compares nosocomial and community-acquired S. aureus bacteremias during 1980-

  4. Metabolic response to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in an experimental rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangcong Dong

    Full Text Available Bacteremia, the presence of viable bacteria in the blood stream, is often associated with several clinical conditions. Bacteremia can lead to multiple organ failure if managed incorrectly, which makes providing suitable nutritional support vital for reducing bacteremia-associated mortality. In order to provide such information, we investigated the metabolic consequences of a Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae infection in vivo by employing a combination of (1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis. K. pneumoniae was intravenously infused in rats; urine and plasma samples were collected at different time intervals. We found that K. pneumoniae-induced bacteremia stimulated glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle and also promoted oxidation of fatty acids and creatine phosphate to facilitate the energy-demanding host response. In addition, K. pneumoniae bacteremia also induced anti-endotoxin, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidization responses in the host. Furthermore, bacteremia could cause a disturbance in the gut microbiotal functions as suggested by alterations in a range of amines and bacteria-host co-metabolites. Our results suggest that supplementation with glucose and a high-fat and choline-rich diet could ameliorate the burdens associated with bacteremia. Our research provides underlying pathological processes of bacteremia and a better understanding of the clinical and biochemical manifestations of bacteremia.

  5. Telavancin Observational Use Registry (TOUR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    Hospital Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia; Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections; Ventilator Associated Bacterial Pneumonia; Gram Positive Infection; Complicated Bacteremia; Endocarditis; Bone and Joint Infections

  6. Disease: H01157 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omised or chronically debilitated hosts and patients with indwelling catheters. C...Edwards MS Agrobacterium radiobacter bacteremia in pediatric patients: case report and review. Pediatr Infec...t L, Andre M, Lonchay C, Holemans X, Maton JP, Canon JL Agrobacterium radiobacter bacteremia in oncologic and geriatric patients

  7. Fatal myocardial microabscesses caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a burn patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Wei Huang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia- or sepsis-associated myocardial abscess is often an incidental postmortem diagnosis in patients who die of overwhelming septicemia. Myocardial abscess is more rarely the immediate cause of death as a consequence of abscess rupture or the cause of arrhythmia. We report a 66-year-old female who succumbed to sudden cardiac death with a hemodynamically stable methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA bacteremia, while in recovery after an accidental thermal burn. Autopsy revealed extensive myocardial abscesses and an abscess in the pineal gland. Myocardial microabscesses should be considered a rare cause of sudden cardiac death in patients with hemodynamically stable MRSA bacteremia.

  8. An Extraordinary Cause of the Sucking Difficulty: Ecthyma Gangrenosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Nihat; Kocaman, Selami; Peker, Erdal; Tuncer, Oğuz

    2016-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum is a cutaneous lesion often associated with pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia, even though it may develop without bacteremia and may originate from other bacterial and fungal organisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia or sepsis, which mainly affects immunocompromised patients, frequently occurs in hospitals. This lesion typically occurs on the extremities and gluteal and perineal regions. In this report we present a case of ecthyma gangrenosum in a premature newborn occurring secondary to pseudomonas sepsis causing sucking dysfunction due to tissue loss in the lip, soft palate, and tongue. PMID:27143976

  9. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR – a possible biomarker for bacteremia in sepsis / Forma solubilă a receptorului pentru activatorul de plasminogen de tip urokinază (suPAR – un biomarker posibil pentru bacteriemie în sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgescu Anca-Meda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducere. Validarea unor noi biomarkeri în sepsis poate contribui la diagnosticul mai precoce al acestuia şi la iniţierea mai rapidă a terapiei. Scopul acestui studiu este acela de a evalua capacitatea formei solubile a rolului său în evaluarea prognosticului. Material şi metodă. Am realizat un studiu pilot, prospectiv pe 49 de pacienţi cu sindrom de răspuns inflamator sistemic (SIRS internaţi în Clinica de Terapie Intensivă, care au fost împărţiţi, în funcţie de existenţa bacteriemiei, în lotul A (SIRS cu bacteriemie, n=14 şi lotul B (SIRS fără bacteriemie, n=35. S-au recoltat în prima zi probe sanguine pentru determinarea suPAR, proteina C reactivă (CRP, procalcitonina (PCT şi hemocultura. Am urmărit identificarea unor valori de cut-off cu semnificaţie statistică în estimarea bacteriemiei şi a mortalităţii la pacienţii septici. Rezultate. În lotul A valorile suPAR au fost de 14,3 ng/mL (interval 10-45,5 ng/mL iar în lotul B, de 9,85 ng/mL (interval 3,4-48 ng/mL, p=0,008. Aria de sub curbă (AUC pentru suPAR a fost de 0,745 (95% CI: 0,600-0,859; pentru CRP, AUC a fost de 0,613 (95% CI: 0,522-0,799; pentru PCT, AUC a fost de 0,718 (95% CI: 0,477-0,769. Valoarea de cut-off a suPAR în predicţia bacteriemiei a fost de 9,885 ng/mL, cu sensibilitate de 100% şi specificitate de 51,43%. Mortalitatea în lotul A a fost de 85,7% (12/14, iar în lotul B de 74,3% (26/39, p>0,05. AUC pentru suPAR a fost de 0,750 (95% CI: 0,455-0,936; pentru CRP, AUC a fost de 0,613 (95% CI: 0,413-0,913; pentru PCT, AUC a fost de 0,618 (95% CI: 0,373-0,888. Valoarea de cut-off a suPAR în predicţia mortalităţii a fost de 11,5 ng/mL, cu sensibilitate de 66,67% şi specificitate de 100%.

  10. Disease: H01350 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g surgery. Morganella morganii can cause bacteremia and lead to major clinical problems, which are usually associated with common cau...ses of catheter-associated bacteriuria, infections of th

  11. Clinical significance and taxonomy of Actinobacillus hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Alice; Christensen, J J; Fussing, V;

    2001-01-01

    Clinical findings in 36 immunosuppressed patients with lower respiratory tract infection or bacteremia with Actinobacillus hominis are described. Animal contact was only recorded for three patients; nine patients died despite appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Although infections with this micr...

  12. Disease: H00309 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available roblem as a nosocomial pathogen in hospitalized patients. It can cause bacteremia, pneumonia, meningitis, ur...to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in patients without cystic fibrosis. Antimicrob Agents Chemoth

  13. Group B Strep Infection in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms. Bacteremia and sepsis (blood infections) symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumonia (lung infection) symptoms include: Fever ... in the infected area and might also include: Fever Chills Swilling Stiffness or inability to use affected limb ...

  14. Disease: H00301 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ons caused by extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: risk factors, molecular epidemiology, and clinical...bsiella pneumoniae hospital acquired bacteremia. Risk factors and clinical outcome. Saudi Med J 25:1871-6 (2004) ...

  15. Disease: H01049 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available imi LA, Yawetz S, Lasker BA, Bolcen SJ, Brown JM, Marty FM Gordonia bronchialis bacteremia and pleural infection: case report and rev...iew of the literature. J Clin Microbiol 49:1662-6 (2011) ...

  16. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius Kills Streptococcus pneumoniae Planktonic Cells and Pneumococcal Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Sharmila J Talekar; Sopio Chochua; Katie Nelson; Klugman, Keith P.; Quave, Cassandra L; Vidal, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribe...

  17. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children

    OpenAIRE

    Anselm Chi-wai Lee; Nellie Dawn Siao-ping Ong

    2011-01-01

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses a...

  18. Clinical and Pathologic Evaluation of Chronic Bartonella henselae or Bartonella clarridgeiae Infection in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Kordick, Dorsey L.; Brown, Talmage T.; Shin, KwangOk; Edward B Breitschwerdt

    1999-01-01

    Human Bartonella infections result in diverse medical presentations, whereas many cats appear to tolerate chronic bacteremia without obvious clinical abnormalities. Eighteen specific-pathogen-free cats were inoculated with Bartonella henselae- and/or Bartonella clarridgeiae-infected cat blood and monitored for 454 days. Relapsing bacteremia did not correlate with changes in protein profiles or differences in antigenic protein recognition. Intradermal skin testing did not induce a delayed type...

  19. An adult case of urinary tract infection with Kingella kingae: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ramana KV; SK Mohanty

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Kingella kingae, though part of the normal upper respiratory tract and genitourinary tract, is increasingly being recognized as an important human pathogen. During the past decade, it has emerged as a significant pathogen in the pediatric age group primarily causing bacteremia and osteoarticular infections. Adult infection usually occurs in individuals who are severely immunocompromised and most infections have taken the form of septicemia or septic arthritis. Bacteremia...

  20. The Role of the spv Genes in Salmonella Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Guiney, Donald G.; Fierer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella strains cause three main types of diseases in people: gastroenteritis, enteric (typhoid) fever, and non-typhoid extra-intestinal disease with bacteremia. Genetic analysis indicates that each clinical syndrome requires distinct sets of virulence genes, and Salmonella isolates differ in their constellation of virulence traits. The spv locus is strongly associated with strains that cause non-typhoid bacteremia, but are not present in typhoid strains. The spv region contains three gene...

  1. Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Infection in New Zealand White Rabbits: Natural History and Intravenous Levofloxacin Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, Steven B.; Hatkin, Joshua M; Dyer, David N; Orr, Steven A.; Pitt, M. Louise M.

    2010-01-01

    The natural history for inhalational Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain) exposure in New Zealand white rabbits was investigated to better identify potential, early biomarkers of anthrax. Twelve SPF Bordetella-free rabbits were exposed to 150 LD50 aerosolized B. anthracis spores, and clinical signs, body temperature, complete blood count, bacteremia, and presence of protective antigen in the blood (that is, antigenemia) were examined. The development of antigenemia and bacteremia coincided and pr...

  2. A Case of Neck Abscess Caused by Salmonella Serotype D in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Mee-Hye; Kang, Mi-Il; Chun, Ji-Young; Lim, Hyun-Woo; Yeum, Yoon-Sik; Kang, Young-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young Keun

    2009-01-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis, which is increasing nowadays in Korea as well as in the developed countries, is manifested as enteritis in most cases, but it also encompasses bacteremia, intraabdominal infections, and bone, joint and soft tissue infections. These rare diseases are known to result from primary gastrointestinal infection and subsequent bacteremia with or without symptoms. We experienced a case of neck abscess caused by Salmonella serotype D, which is a rare but important different...

  3. Fatal cerebritis and brain abscesses following a nontraumatic subdural hematoma in a chronic hemodialyzed patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Maria; Damry, Nasroolla; Gazagnes, Marie D

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bacteremia in hemodialysis-dependent patients that can lead to metastatic abscesses with poor outcome. We report a case of a 65-year-old chronic hemodialyzed male patient who developed cerebritis and brain abscesses complicating a spontaneous subdural hematoma, following Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia related to infected arteriovenous fistula. In spite of adequate antibiotherapy and several surgical brain drainages, our patient did not survive. Prevention of S. aureus is highly important in hemodialysis patients. PMID:19090864

  4. Metabolomic Profiling of Plasma from Melioidosis Patients Using UHPLC-QTOF MS Reveals Novel Biomarkers for Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K. P. Lau

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To identify potential biomarkers for improving diagnosis of melioidosis, we compared plasma metabolome profiles of melioidosis patients compared to patients with other bacteremia and controls without active infection, using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis (PCA showed that the metabolomic profiles of melioidosis patients are distinguishable from bacteremia patients and controls. Using multivariate and univariate analysis, 12 significant metabolites from four lipid classes, acylcarnitine (n = 6, lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LysoPE (n = 3, sphingomyelins (SM (n = 2 and phosphatidylcholine (PC (n = 1, with significantly higher levels in melioidosis patients than bacteremia patients and controls, were identified. Ten of the 12 metabolites showed area-under-receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC >0.80 when compared both between melioidosis and bacteremia patients, and between melioidosis patients and controls. SM(d18:2/16:0 possessed the largest AUC when compared, both between melioidosis and bacteremia patients (AUC 0.998, sensitivity 100% and specificity 91.7%, and between melioidosis patients and controls (AUC 1.000, sensitivity 96.7% and specificity 100%. Our results indicate that metabolome profiling might serve as a promising approach for diagnosis of melioidosis using patient plasma, with SM(d18:2/16:0 representing a potential biomarker. Since the 12 metabolites were related to various pathways for energy and lipid metabolism, further studies may reveal their possible role in the pathogenesis and host response in melioidosis.

  5. Ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella septicemia and osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James S; Laber, Damian A

    2006-06-01

    The majority of data evaluating Salmonella infections in sickle cell anemia (SCD) comes from studies performed in children. We report a SCD adult who presented with ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella bacteremia. After appropriate initial therapy, persistent back pain prompted evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging of the spine, which revealed osteomyelitis and a psoas abscess. The patient responded to percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. This report summarizes some of the findings of large SCD studies evaluating Salmonella bacteremia and osteomyelitis, focusing on adults. Our case exemplifies the need for antibiotic coverage for Salmonella species in adult SCD patients with septicemia. We argue that imaging studies looking for osteomyelitis should be done routinely in SCD patients with Salmonella bacteremia. PMID:16800421

  6. Emphasize the diagnosis and treatment of infective endocarditis in patients with severe burn%重视严重烧伤患者感染性心内膜炎的诊断和治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郇京宁

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with severe burn remain high,which are attributed to invasive procedures,bacteremia,and wound infection after burns.Clinical clues for IE in burns are usually masked by burn-related manifestations,so the diagnosis of IE may be delayed or missed.For burned patients with persistent bacteremia of unknown source,especially Staphylococcus aureus -induced bacteremia,the diagnosis of IE should be considered according to the Duke criteria,and early echocardiography performance is particularly important.Antibiotic therapy is the mainstay initial management,and early surgical intervention is strongly recommended once IE is clearly diagnosed in patients with burns.In order to lower the incidence and mortality of IE in burns,it is very important to take prophylactic procedures along with the whole course of burn management.

  7. First description of Bartonella bovis in cattle herds in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoler, Nir; Rasis, Michal; Sharir, Benny; Novikov, Anna; Shapira, Gregory; Giladi, Michael

    2014-09-17

    Bartonella bovis has been described in beef and dairy cattle worldwide, however the reported prevalence rates are inconsistent, with large variability across studies (0-89%). This study describes the first isolation and characterization of B. bovis among cattle herds in the Middle East. Blood samples from two beef cattle herds (each sampled thrice) and one dairy herd (sampled twice) in Israel were collected during a 16-months period. Overall, 71 of 95 blood samples (75%) grew Bartonella sp., with prevalence of 78% and 59% in beef and dairy cattle, respectively. High level bacteremia (≥100,000 colony forming units/mL) was detected in 25 specimens (26%). Such high-level bacteremia has never been reported in cattle. Two dairy cows and one beef cow remained bacteremic when tested 60 or 120 days apart, respectively, suggesting that cattle may have persistent bacteremia. One third of animals were infested with ticks. Sequence analysis of a gltA fragment of 32 bacterial isolates from 32 animals revealed 100% homology to B. bovis. Species identification was confirmed by sequence analysis of the rpoB gene. Phylogenetic analysis based on the concatenated sequences of gltA and rpoB demonstrated that the isolates described herein form a monophyletic group with B. bovis strains originating from cattle worldwide. Taken together, the high prevalence of bacteremia, including high-level bacteremia, in beef and dairy cattle, the potential to develop prolonged bacteremia, the exposure of cattle to arthropod vectors, and proximity of infected animals to humans, make B. bovis a potential zoonotic agent. PMID:25096531

  8. Biodistribution of the radionuclides (18)F-FDG, (11)C-methionine, (11)C-PK11195, and (68)Ga-citrate in domestic juvenile female pigs and morphological and molecular imaging of the tracers in hematogenously disseminated Staphylococcus aureus lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia Maria Tullia; Nielsen, Ole L; Alstrup, Aage Ko;

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 5-7% of acute-care patients suffer from bacteremia. Bacteremia may give rise to bacterial spread to different tissues. Conventional imaging procedures as X-ray, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and ultrasound are often first-line imaging methods for......-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to PET with tracers that potentially could improve uncovering of infectious lesions in soft tissues. We chose (11)C-methionine, (11)C-PK11195, and (68)Ga-citrate as tracers and besides presenting their bio-distribution we validated their diagnostic utility in pigs with...

  9. Human Neonatal Peripheral Blood Leukocytes Demonstrate Pathogen-Specific Coordinate Expression of TLR2, TLR4/MD2 and MyD88 During Bacterial Infection In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jin-Ping; Yang, Yi(Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, ROC); Levy, Ofer; Chen, Chao

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play important roles in infection. We have previously reported TLR2 is up-regulated in neonatal Gram-positive (G+) bacteremia whereas TLR4 is up-regulated in neonatal Gram-negative (G−) bacteremia. For functional signaling, TLR4 requires MD-2 and both TLR2 and TLR4 signal need MyD88. However, it is unknown whether newborns can enhance expression of MD-2 and MyD88 with bacterial infection in coordination with TLR expression. We characterized neonatal peripheral blood...

  10. Burkholderia fungorum Septicemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gerrits, G. Peter; Klaassen, Corné; Coenye, Tom; Vandamme, Peter; Meis, Jacques F

    2005-01-01

    We report the first case of community-acquired bacteremia with Burkholderia fungorum, a newly described member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex. A 9-year-old girl sought treatment with septic arthritis in her right knee and ankle with soft tissue involvement. Commercial identification systems did not identify the causative microorganism.

  11. Morphological and molecular imaging of hematogenously inoculated and disseminated Staphylococcus aureus lesions in domestic juvenile female pigs by PET/CT. The bio-distribution of the radionuclides 18F-FDG, 11C-methionine, 11C-PK11195, and 68Ga-citrate in pigs is presented

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen;

    2016-01-01

    . Bacteremia may give rise to bacterial spread to different tissues such as e.g. heart, joints, spleen, bones, and skin/soft tissue. Staphylococcus aureus is a conditional pathogen: it is carried on many humans and animals without symptoms, but it is also able to cause serious diseases like osteomyelitis...

  12. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Joseph; Rivera-Bonilla, Tomas; Loli, Akil; Blattman, Negin N

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess. PMID:25648998

  13. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Orme; Tomas Rivera-Bonilla; Akil Loli; Blattman, Negin N.

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Clinical Streptococcus salivarius Strain CCHSS3 ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Delorme, Christine; Guédon, Eric; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Almeida, Mathieu; Kennedy, Sean P.; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a commensal species commonly found in the human oral cavity and digestive tract, although it is also associated with human infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and bacteremia. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. salivarius strain CCHSS3, isolated from human blood.

  15. Disease: H01084 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e cause of bacteremia, pertussis-like respiratory tract infection, and endocarditis predominantly in patients... FR, Bruisten S, Linde I, Reubsaet F, Heuvelman K, van der Lee S, J King A Characterization of Bordetella holmesii isolates from pati...ents with pertussis-like illness in the Netherlands. FEM

  16. A Review of Pneumococcal Vaccines: Current Polysaccharide Vaccine Recommendations and Future Protein Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, Calvin C.; Rogers, P. David; Shelton, Chasity M.

    2016-01-01

    This review describes development of currently available pneumococcal vaccines, provides summary tables of current pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in children and adults, and describes new potential vaccine antigens in the pipeline. Streptococcus pneumoniae, the bacteria responsible for pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis and bacteremia, remains a cause of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults. Introductions of unconjugated and conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine...

  17. Disease: H01166 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ntensive care unit. Indian Pediatr 48:723-5 (2011) PMID:21960744 (description, drug) Ozdemir M, Pekcan S, De...mircili ME, Tasbent FE, Feyzioglu B, Pirinc S, Baykan M A rare cause of bacteremia in a pediatric patient with Down syndrome: Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Int J Med Sci 8:537-9 (2011) ...

  18. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anselm Chi-Wai; Siao-Ping Ong, Nellie Dawn

    2011-08-31

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14%) episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets. PMID:22184532

  19. Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Aortitis in a transplant patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-typhoidal salmonella bacteremia may result in extra gastrointestinallocalization of infection. Aortitis due to non-typhoidal salmonella wasreported to be the cause of 38-42% of all infected abdominal aortitis.Underlying atherosclerosis is a frequent site for salmonella aortitis. Wedescribe here a case of possible salmonella aortitis in a renal transplantpatient. (author)

  20. Roseomonas gilardii Infection: Case Report and Review

    OpenAIRE

    Shokar, Navkiran K.; Shokar, Gurjeet S; Islam, Jamal; Cass, Alvah R

    2002-01-01

    Roseomonas gilardii is a bacterium that has been indicated as a rare cause of human infections. The case of a patient presenting with cellulitis and bacteremia secondary to R. gilardii is described together with the clinical characteristics of infection with this organism obtained from a review of cases previously reported.

  1. Source, pattern and antibiotic resistance of blood stream infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucositis developing as a result of myelo-ablative high dose therapy administered prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with the risk of bacteremia. The aim of the present study was to detect the pattern of bacteremia coinciding with the present practice of HSCT, to study the contribution of health-care associated infection (HAI) to the pattern of infection, in the context of the problem of antibiotic resistance in HSCT recipients. Patients and methods: This is a retrospective, single center study including patients who developed febrile neutropenia (FN) among HSCT recipients in one year duration. Results: Ninety FN episodes were recorded in 50 patients. Out of 39 positive blood cultures, Gram negative rods (GNR) were the predominant pathogens, constituting 67% (n =26) of isolated organisms, while 33% of infections were caused by gram positive cocci (GPC) (n= 13). Bacteremia was significantly associated with central venous line (CVL) infections and gastroenteritis (diarrhea and vomiting) with a p-value 0.024, 0.20 and 0.0001, respectively. Multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs) were identified in 27 (69%) of the 39 positive blood cultures. Conclusion: In one year duration, gram negative pathogens were the predominant causes of infection in HSCT recipients with high rates of MDROs in our institution. Gastroenteritis and central venous line infections are the main sources of bacteremia

  2. Fatal Wound Infection Caused by Chromobacterium violaceum in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam▿

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Stephen; Campbell, James I.; Stabler, Richard; Nguyen, Hoang V. M.; To, Diep S.; Dung V. Nguyen; Farrar, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a proteobacterium found in soil and water in tropical regions which rarely causes infection in humans. Here, we report a fatal bacteremia caused by Chromobacterium violaceum in Vietnam. We describe a number of clinical, microbiological, and molecular aspects associated with this bacterial infection.

  3. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Chi-wai Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14% episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets.

  4. Nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli infections in a tertiary care hospital in Kolar, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Malini

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion : P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii were the common NFGNB isolated in our study from patients of, urinary tract infection, bacteremia, surgical site infections, and ventilator associated pneumonia. P. aeruginosa showed good sensitivity to imipenem, amikacin, and cefoperazone while A. baumannii showed good sensitivity to imipenem and piperacillin.

  5. Complete Genome Sequences of Aerococcus christensenii CCUG 28831T, Aerococcus sanguinicola CCUG 43001T, Aerococcus urinae CCUG 36881T, Aerococcus urinaeequi CCUG 28094T, Aerococcus urinaehominis CCUG 42038 BT, and Aerococcus viridans CCUG 4311T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carkaci, Derya; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen;

    2016-01-01

    Strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus are causative agents of human and animal infections, including urogenital infections, bacteremia/septicemia, and infective endocarditis. This study reports the first fully closed and complete genome sequences of six type strains belonging to the genus Aer...... Aerococcus using a combination of Illumina HiSeq and PacBio sequencing technologies....

  6. Increasing Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Causing Nosocomial Infections at a University Hospital in Taiwan from 1986 to 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene; Chen, Wen-Hwei; Pan, Huei-Ju; Chen, Mei-Lin; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Luh, Kwen-Tay; Lin, Fang-Yue

    2004-01-01

    A rapid emergence of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection (from 26.3% in 1986 to 77% in 2001) was found. The susceptibility of 200 nonduplicate blood isolates of MRSA and 100 MRSA isolates causing refractory bacteremia to 22 antimicrobial agents disclosed that glycopeptides, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and linezolid remained the most active agents.

  7. The fecal microbiome in pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changes in the intestinal microbiome of patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) are thought to significantly affect clinical outcome. These changes may not only delay enteral diet advancement but may also predispose patients to bacterial translocation, bacteremia, and liver disease. Patients with S...

  8. Streptococcus agalactiae endogenous endophthalmitis

    OpenAIRE

    Saffra, Norman; Rakhamimov, Aleksandr; Husney, Robert; Ghitan, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (SA) is a Group B Streptococcus, which is a common pathogen implicated in neonatal and geriatric sepsis. Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE) is a condition that results from haematogenous seeding of the globe, during transient or persistent bacteremia. We document a case of a non-septic geriatric patient, who developed EBE after a transient bacteraemia with SA.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Clinical Streptococcus salivarius Strain CCHSS3 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Christine; Guédon, Eric; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Almeida, Mathieu; Kennedy, Sean P.; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a commensal species commonly found in the human oral cavity and digestive tract, although it is also associated with human infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and bacteremia. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. salivarius strain CCHSS3, isolated from human blood. PMID:21742894

  10. Complete genome sequence of the clinical Streptococcus salivarius strain CCHSS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Christine; Guédon, Eric; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Almeida, Mathieu; Kennedy, Sean P; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a commensal species commonly found in the human oral cavity and digestive tract, although it is also associated with human infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and bacteremia. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. salivarius strain CCHSS3, isolated from human blood. PMID:21742894

  11. Prevalence of Fragilysin Gene in Bacteroides fragilis Isolates from Blood and Other Extraintestinal Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Foulon, Ina; Piérard, Denis; Muyldermans, Gaëtan; Vandoorslaer, Kristof; Soetens, Oriane; Rosseel, Paul; Lauwers, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    Of 166 Bacteroides fragilis isolates, 26.2% of 103 isolates from blood and 20.6% of 63 extraintestinal isolates harbored the fragilysin gene (difference not statistically significant). Clinical characteristics and evolution were comparable in patients with B. fragilis bacteremia with or without this enterotoxin. Fragilysin seems not to be an important virulence factor in B. fragilis disease.

  12. Arthropod venom Hyaluronidases: biochemical properties and potential applications in medicine and biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Bordon, Karla C. F.; Wiezel, Gisele A.; Amorim, Fernanda G.; Arantes, Eliane C

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that mainly degrade hyaluronan, the major glycosaminoglycan of the interstitial matrix. They are involved in several pathological and physiological activities including fertilization, wound healing, embryogenesis, angiogenesis, diffusion of toxins and drugs, metastasis, pneumonia, sepsis, bacteremia, meningitis, inflammation and allergy, among others. Hyaluronidases are widely distributed in nature and the enzymes from mammalian spermatozoa, lysosomes and animal ven...

  13. Rapid identification and classification of Staphylococcus aureus by attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important bacterium that can cause serious infections in humans such as pneumonia and bacteremia. Rapid detection of this pathogen is crucial in food industries and clinical laboratories to control S. aureus food poisoning and human infections. In this study, fourier tran...

  14. Immunofluorescent Detection of Intraerythrocytic Bartonella henselae in Naturally Infected Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Rolain, J. M.; La Scola, B; Liang, Z.; B. Davoust; D. Raoult

    2001-01-01

    To determine the presence of Bartonella henselae bacteremia in six cats, we compared isolation using blood culture with direct immunofluorescence on blood smears. Three cats that were positive by blood culture were also positive by direct immunofluorescence, and laser confocal microscopy confirmed the intraerythrocytic location of B. henselae.

  15. Stepwise decrease in daptomycin susceptibility in clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with an initial mutation in rpoB and a compensatory inactivation of the clpX gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn; Thøgersen, Louise; Mogensen, René G.;

    2015-01-01

    resistance and other phenotypic changes often remain unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate this issue using a genetically characterized series of four isogenic clinical MRSA strains derived from a patient with bacteremia, before and during daptomycin treatment. The first strain obtained...

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Aerococcus christensenii CCUG 28831T, Aerococcus sanguinicola CCUG 43001T, Aerococcus urinae CCUG 36881T, Aerococcus urinaeequi CCUG 28094T, Aerococcus urinaehominis CCUG 42038 BT, and Aerococcus viridans CCUG 4311T

    OpenAIRE

    Carkaci, Derya; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Skovgaard, Ole; Fuursted, Kurt; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus are causative agents of human and animal infections, including urogenital infections, bacteremia/septicemia, and infective endocarditis. This study reports the first fully closed and complete genome sequences of six type strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus using a combination of Illumina HiSeq and PacBio sequencing technologies.

  17. Left-Sided Endocarditis Associated with Multi-Drug Resistance Acinetobacter Lwoffii

    OpenAIRE

    Naghmeh Moshtaghi; Abbasali Karimi; Maryam Sotoudeh Anvari; Mohammad Ali Boroumand; Hossein Ahmadi

    2009-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii, an important nosocomial pathogen, is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus that is a component of the normal flora on the skin, oropharynx, and perineum of about 20-25% of healthy individuals. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with combined mitral and aortic valve endocarditis associated with multi-drug resistance acinetobacter lowffii bacteremia.

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Aerococcus christensenii CCUG 28831T, Aerococcus sanguinicola CCUG 43001T, Aerococcus urinae CCUG 36881T, Aerococcus urinaeequi CCUG 28094T, Aerococcus urinaehominis CCUG 42038 BT, and Aerococcus viridans CCUG 4311T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carkaci, Derya; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Skovgaard, Ole; Fuursted, Kurt; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus are causative agents of human and animal infections, including urogenital infections, bacteremia/septicemia, and infective endocarditis. This study reports the first fully closed and complete genome sequences of six type strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus using a combination of Illumina HiSeq and PacBio sequencing technologies. PMID:27103727

  19. Multi-omics approaches to deciphering a hypervirulent strain of Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Campylobacter jejuni clone SA recently emerged as the predominant cause of sheep abortion in the U.S. and is also associated with foodborne gastroenteritis in humans. A distinct phenotype of this clone is its ability to induce bacteremia and abortion. To facilitate understanding the path...

  20. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  1. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem.

  2. Endocarditis Due to Rare and Fastidious Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    2001-01-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of infective endocarditis is easily made in the presence of continuous bacteremia with gram-positive cocci. However, the blood culture may contain a bacterium rarely associated with endocarditis, such as Lactobacillus spp., Klebsiella spp., or nontoxigenic Corynebacterium, Salmonella, Gemella, Campylobacter, Aeromonas, Yersinia, Nocardia, Pasteurella, Listeria, or Erysipelothrix spp., that requires further investigation to establish the relationship with endocarditis, ...

  3. Ecthyma gangrenosum caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a patient with astrocytoma treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.Y.F.L. de Vos; T.A. Middelburg (Tom); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractEcthyma gangrenosum, presenting as embolic lesions caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, has distinct pathognomonic features and a high mortality rate in patients with bacteremia, but when recognized early is easily treated. In this case report we describe this disseminated infecti

  4. KPC-2-Producing Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas putida Coinfection in a Liver Transplant Recipient▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jason W Bennett; Herrera, Monica L.; Lewis, James S.; Wickes, Brian W.; James H Jorgensen

    2008-01-01

    Carbapenemases are among the newest resistance mechanisms to emerge in some gram-negative bacteria. We describe bacteremia in a critically ill liver transplant recipient infected with KPC-2-producing Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas putida. Although this enzyme has been previously described in Enterobacter spp., this is the first report of KPC carbapenemase in P. putida.

  5. Fatal Relapse of a Purulent Pleurisy Caused by Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Bartizel, Christine; Gin, Thomas; Colin, Jean-Pierre; Fadel, Nicolas; Holler, C.; Pollet, J.; Megraud, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus is associated with invasive disease, while other Campylobacter species, such as C. coli and C. jejuni, are a common cause of bacterial diarrhea. Bacteremia has been well described, but pleurisy remains very uncommon. We report the recurrent isolation of a C. fetus subsp. fetus strain during two episodes of pleural effusion with a fatal outcome.

  6. Fatal relapse of a purulent pleurisy caused by Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Bartizel, Christine; Gin, Thomas; Colin, Jean-Pierre; Fadel, Nicolas; Holler, C; Pollet, J; Megraud, Francis

    2007-07-01

    Campylobacter fetus is associated with invasive disease, while other Campylobacter species, such as C. coli and C. jejuni, are a common cause of bacterial diarrhea. Bacteremia has been well described, but pleurisy remains very uncommon. We report the recurrent isolation of a C. fetus subsp. fetus strain during two episodes of pleural effusion with a fatal outcome. PMID:17507518

  7. Fatal Relapse of a Purulent Pleurisy Caused by Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Bartizel, Christine; Gin, Thomas; Colin, Jean-Pierre; Fadel, Nicolas; Holler, C.; Pollet, J.; Megraud, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus is associated with invasive disease, while other Campylobacter species, such as C. coli and C. jejuni, are a common cause of bacterial diarrhea. Bacteremia has been well described, but pleurisy remains very uncommon. We report the recurrent isolation of a C. fetus subsp. fetus strain during two episodes of pleural effusion with a fatal outcome. PMID:17507518

  8. A Fatal Case of Klebsiella pneumoniae Mycotic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Ming Chao; Kun-Kuang Lee; Chia-Sheng Wang; Ping-Jen Chen; Tsung-Chih Yeh

    2011-01-01

    Mycotic aneurysm is a serious clinical condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella species are the most common causative pathogens. Klebsiella pneumoniae was rarely reported as a possible pathogen causing mycotic aneurysm; therefore, we describe a K. pneumoniae-related fatal bacteremia mycotic aneurysm in a patient in spite of appropriate antimicrobial agents and surgical management.

  9. Nosocomial Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimia among Nasal Carriers of Methicillin- Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ariza (Javier); J. Ayats (Josefina); M.A. Dominguez; F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To determine the relevance of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, either methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) or methicillinresistant (MRSA), as a risk factor for the development of nosocomial S aureus bacteremia during an MRSA outbreak. patients and methods: In this prospective

  10. Fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever in adults: emphasizing the evolutionary pre-fatal clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing-Kit Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A better description of the clinical and laboratory manifestations of fatal patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF is important in alerting clinicians of severe dengue and improving management. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Of 309 adults with DHF, 10 fatal patients and 299 survivors (controls were retrospectively analyzed. Regarding causes of fatality, massive gastrointestinal (GI bleeding was found in 4 patients, dengue shock syndrome (DSS alone in 2; DSS/subarachnoid hemorrhage, Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis/bacteremia, ventilator associated pneumonia, and massive GI bleeding/Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia each in one. Fatal patients were found to have significantly higher frequencies of early altered consciousness (≤24 h after hospitalization, hypothermia, GI bleeding/massive GI bleeding, DSS, concurrent bacteremia with/without shock, pulmonary edema, renal/hepatic failure, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among those experienced early altered consciousness, massive GI bleeding alone/with uremia/with E. faecalis bacteremia, and K. pneumoniae meningitis/bacteremia were each found in one patient. Significantly higher proportion of bandemia from initial (arrival laboratory data in fatal patients as compared to controls, and higher proportion of pre-fatal leukocytosis and lower pre-fatal platelet count as compared to initial laboratory data of fatal patients were found. Massive GI bleeding (33.3% and bacteremia (25% were the major causes of pre-fatal leukocytosis in the deceased patients; 33.3% of the patients with pre-fatal profound thrombocytopenia (<20,000/µL, and 50% of the patients with pre-fatal prothrombin time (PT prolongation experienced massive GI bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: Our report highlights causes of fatality other than DSS in patients with severe dengue, and suggested hypothermia, leukocytosis and bandemia may be warning signs of severe dengue. Clinicians should be alert to the potential development of massive GI bleeding

  11. Clinical indicators for bacterial co-infection in Ghanaian children with P. falciparum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Maja Verena; Amemasor, Solomon; Agyekum, Alex; Loag, Wibke; Marks, Florian; Sarpong, Nimako; Dekker, Denise; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; May, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious causes in severely ill children is essential but challenging in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to determine clinical indicators that are able to identify bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children in rural Ghana. In total, 1,915 severely ill children below the age of 15 years were recruited at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in Ghana between May 2007 and February 2011. In 771 (40%) of the children malaria parasites were detected. This group was analyzed for indicators of bacterial co-infections using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses with 24 socio-economic variables, 16 terms describing medical history and anthropometrical information and 68 variables describing clinical symptoms. The variables were tested for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. In 46 (6.0%) of the children with malaria infection, bacterial co-infection was detected. The most frequent pathogens were non-typhoid salmonellae (45.7%), followed by Streptococcus spp. (13.0%). Coughing, dehydration, splenomegaly, severe anemia and leukocytosis were positively associated with bacteremia. Domestic hygiene and exclusive breastfeeding is negatively associated with bacteremia. In cases of high parasitemia (>10,000/μl), a significant association with bacteremia was found for splenomegaly (OR 8.8; CI 1.6-48.9), dehydration (OR 18.2; CI 2.0-166.0) and coughing (OR 9.0; CI 0.7-118.6). In children with low parasitemia, associations with bacteremia were found for vomiting (OR 4.7; CI 1.4-15.8), severe anemia (OR 3.3; CI 1.0-11.1) and leukocytosis (OR 6.8 CI 1.9-24.2). Clinical signs of impaired microcirculation were negatively associated with bacteremia. Ceftriaxone achieved best coverage of isolated pathogens. The results demonstrate the limitation of clinical symptoms to determine bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children. Best clinical indicators are dependent on the parasitemia

  12. Risk of Infections in Patients with Chronic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mor, Anil; Thomsen, Reimar W.

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...... tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk of...... bacteremia. Conclusions: Increased infection surveillance and unmeasured confounding factors among diabetic patients may contribute to the observed increased infection risk, yet outcomes following infection are similar or worse in diabetes patients. In conclusion, there is epidemiological evidence that...

  13. Increased plasma levels of IL-6 in bacteremic periodontis patients after scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forner, Lone; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Bendtzen, Klaus;

    2006-01-01

    exacerbation of atherosclerosis. The present study tested the hypothesis that bacteremia occurring after scaling in periodontitis patients results in altered plasma levels of cytokines. Twenty periodontitis patients were subjected to scaling. Blood samples at baseline and at 0.5, 10 and 30 minutes postscaling...... were examined for bacteremia whereas baseline and eight-hour postscaling blood samples were examined for the levels of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12p70. IL-6 levels were significantly increased eight hours after scaling, while IL-8 was significantly decreased. No systematic changes...... occurred in the levels of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-10 and IL-2p70. IL-6 levels may be increased while IL-8 may be decreased due to scaling, which may have implications for general health....

  14. Subclavian Arteritis and Pseudoaneurysm Formation Secondary to Stent Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technically uncomplicated percutaneous angioplasty and stent placement of a left subclavian artery stenosis was performed in a 56-year-old man for treatment of subclavian steal syndrome and vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Six days later the patient was readmitted with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and stigmata of septic emboli isolated to the ipsilateral hand. Nine days later he had computed tomography (CT) evidence of a contrast-enhancing phlegmon surrounding the stent. Despite clinical improvement and resolution of bacteremia on intravenous antibiotic therapy, the phlegmon progressed, and at day 21 a pseudoaneurysm was angiographically confirmed. The patient underwent surgical removal of the stented arterial segment and successful autogenous arterial reconstruction. The possible contributory factors leading to stent infection were prolonged right femoral artery access and an infected left arm venous access. Although the role of prophylactic antibiotics remains to be defined, it may be important in cases where the vascular access sheath remains in place for a prolonged period of time

  15. Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection through solid organ transplantation: confirmation via whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, J M; Kaul, D; Limbago, B M; Ramesh, M; Cohle, S; Denison, A M; Driebe, E M; Rasheed, J K; Zaki, S R; Blau, D M; Paddock, C D; McDougal, L K; Engelthaler, D M; Keim, P S; Roe, C C; Akselrod, H; Kuehnert, M J; Basavaraju, S V

    2014-11-01

    We describe two cases of donor-derived methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia that developed after transplantation of organs from a common donor who died from acute MRSA endocarditis. Both recipients developed recurrent MRSA infection despite appropriate antibiotic therapy, and required prolonged hospitalization and hospital readmission. Comparison of S. aureus whole genome sequence of DNA extracted from fixed donor tissue and recipients' isolates confirmed donor-derived transmission. Current guidelines emphasize the risk posed by donors with bacteremia from multidrug-resistant organisms. This investigation suggests that, particularly in the setting of donor endocarditis, even a standard course of prophylactic antibiotics may not be sufficient to prevent donor-derived infection. PMID:25250717

  16. A rare case of listeriosis, acute cholecystitis and multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Thais O; Alothman, Sara; Depaz, Hector; Ramcharan, Alexius

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is an aerobic, motile, intracellular gram-positive bacterium. Most invasive systemic infections caused by LM are commonly seen in patients at both extremes of age, during pregnancy or in immunocompromised hosts. Common clinical manifestations of LM infection in immunocompromised adults are bacteremia, infections of central nervous system, such as meningitis, and self-limiting febrile gastroenteritis. Focal infections of listeria are rare, especially cholecystitis, with only few cases reported in the last 33 years. A 62-year-old man presented with multiple myeloma, cholecystitis and LM bacteremia. Due to prompt surgical treatment and antibiotics (amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid and gentamycin), this high-risk patient recovered without any complications. PMID:27170703

  17. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the documented twelve cases of Fusobacterium pylephlebitis. Recanalization of the porto-mesenteric veins and relief of the extrahepatic portal hypertension were achieved with early empiric antibiotic and local thrombolytic therapy. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of suppurative PVT after disruption of the gastrointestinal mucosa following an acute intraabdominal infectious process. Early treatment of this condition using anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis as adjunctive therapies may prevent PVT complications.

  18. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhrass, Fadi Al; Abdallah, Lina; Berger, Steven; Sartawi, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT) following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the documented twelve cases of Fusobacterium pylephlebitis. Recanalization of the porto-mesenteric veins and relief of the extrahepatic portal hypertension were achieved with early empiric antibiotic and local thrombolytic therapy. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of suppurative PVT after disruption of the gastrointestinal mucosa following an acute intraabdominal infectious process. Early treatment of this condition using anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis as adjunctive therapies may prevent PVT complications. PMID:26793462

  19. EDIN-B Promotes the Translocation of Staphylococcus aureus to the Bloodstream in the Course of Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Courjon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is crucial to define risk factors that contribute to host invasion by Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we demonstrate that the chromosomally encoded EDIN-B isoform from S. aureus contributes to the onset of bacteremia during the course of pneumonia. Deletion of edinB in a European lineage community-acquired methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA strain (ST80-MRSA-IV dramatically decreased the frequency and magnitude of bacteremia in mice suffering from pneumonia. This deletion had no effect on the bacterial burden in both blood circulation and lung tissues. Re-expression of wild-type EDIN-B, unlike the catalytically inactive mutant EDIN-R185E, restored the invasive characteristics of ST80-MRSA-IV.

  20. Caudal anesthesia in a patient with peritonitis: Is it safe??

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kako, H; Hakim, M; Kundu, A; Tobias, T D

    2016-01-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia combined with general anesthesia has become a widely accepted method of providing effective postoperative analgesia and decreasing intraoperative anesthetic needs in the pediatric population. In clinical practice, there still appears to be hesitancy for the use of a neuraxial technique (spinal or epidural) in patients at risk for bacteremia or with an on-going systemic infection. However, evidence-based medicine lacks any data to support an increase in the risk of infectious complications following neuraxial anesthesia. We present two pediatric patients with intra-abdominal infectious processes who received caudal epidural blockade for postoperative operative analgesia. The use of neuraxial techniques in patients at risk for bacteremia is reviewed, evidence-based medicine regarding the risks of infection discussed, and the potential favorable effects of neuraxial blockade on the neurohumoral response to sepsis and the systemic inflammatory responses presented. PMID:27051378

  1. Should patients with hip joint prosthesis receive antibiotic prophylaxis before dental treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Ingar; Snorrason, Finnur; Lingaas, Egil

    2010-01-01

    The safety committee of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) recommended in 2009 that clinicians should consider antibiotic prophylaxis for all patients with total joint replacement before any invasive procedure that may cause bacteremia. This has aroused confusion and anger among dentists asking for the evidence. The present review deals with different aspects of the rationale for this recommendation giving attention to views both in favor of and against it. Keywords: hip joint...

  2. Pyogenic abscesses and parasitic diseases Abscessos piogênicos e doenças parasitárias

    OpenAIRE

    Lambertucci, José Roberto; RAYES Abdunnabi Ahmed; Serufo, José Carlos; Nobre, Vandack

    2001-01-01

    Parasitic diseases which during their course in the host switch the immune system from a T helper 1 to a T helper 2 response may be detrimental to the host, contributing to granuloma formation, eosinophilia, hyper-IgE, and increased susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections. Patients and animals with acute schistosomiasis and hyper-IgE in their serum develop pyogenic liver abscess in the presence of bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The Salmonella-S. mansoni association has ...

  3. Influence of papain in biofilm formed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna Lara da Cruz Dinéas de Oliveira; Maria Emília de Castro Kling Fleming; Patrícia Vollu Silva; Geraldo Renato de Paula; Débora Omena Futuro; Guillermo Coca Velarde; Luciana Maria Ramires Esper; Lenise Arneiro Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus (MRSHa) are important coagulase-negative staphylococci. They are often isolated from bacteremia in humans mainly due to their ability to form biofilm on the surfaces of medical devices. Papain is a complex mixture of proteolytic enzymes and peroxidases extracted from the latex of Carica papaya and it is recognized by accelerating the healing process of wounds. This study aimed to eval...

  4. Microbiological analysis of the central venous catheter tips from hospitalized patients at Hospital Universitário of Universidade Estadual de Londrina
    Análise microbiológica de pontas de cateteres venosos centrais provenientes de pacientes internados no Hospital Universitário da Universidade Estadual de Londrina

    OpenAIRE

    Jacinta Sanchez Pelayo; Leandro Augusto Calixto; Ligia Maira dos Santos Rogeri; Raquel Girardello; Regina Mariuza Borsato Quesada; Claudia Ross

    2006-01-01

    Central Venous Catheters (CVC) are used in intravenous therapy in order to facilitate diagnosis and treatment. They allow medicine administration, parenteral nutrition and also vascular access in hemodialysis. However, the use of these catheters offers risks of systemic and local infection, including endocarditis and bacteremia. The aim of this study was to isolate microorganisms from CVC utilizing the semiquantitative culture technique, and to identify them through conventional biochemical t...

  5. Kocuria kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Edmond CH; Lai Kristi TW; Wong Chris LP; Ma Edmond SK; Yam WC; Chan Angus CW

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Kocuria, previously classified into the genus of Micrococcus, is commonly found on human skin. Two species, K. rosea and K. kristinae, are etiologically associated with catheter-related bacteremia. Case presentation We describe the first case of K. kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis. The microorganism was isolated from the bile of a 56-year old Chinese man who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. He developed post-operative fever that resolved readi...

  6. Kocuria varians infection associated with brain abscess: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai Tai-Hsin; Chou Yu-lin; Cheng Yu-Hsin; Su Shou-hsin; Tsai Cheng-Yu; Lieu Ann-Shung

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Kocuria, established by Stackebrandt et al., previously was classified into Micrococcus. Only two species, K. rosea and K. kristinae are reported to be associated as pathogenic and found with catheter-related bacteremia and acute cholecystitis. Case presentation We herein report the first case of brain abscess caused by Kocuria varians, a gram-positive microorganism, in a 52-year-old man. Hematogenous spread is the probable pathogenesis. Conclusions This report presents a ...

  7. Outils diagnostiques pour la reconnaissance des infections bactériennes sévères chez les nourrissons fébriles âgés de moins de trois mois consultant aux urgences pédiatriques

    OpenAIRE

    Milcent, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of severe bacterial infections (SBI),mainly represented by urinary tract infections is relatively high in infants less than three months of age and particularly those more invasive (IBI) that are meningitis and bacteremia. Current strategies to distinguish young infants with SBIs from those with viral infections are not absolutely reliable and their cost-effectiveness and the associated iatrogenic morbidity have not been extensively evaluated.The purposes of the study were to c...

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis Participates in Pathogenesis of Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Neutrophil Activation. Proof of Concept in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Delbosc, Sandrine; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Journe, Clement; Louedec, Liliane; Castier, Yves; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Ruimy, Raymond; Rossignol, Patrick; Bouchard, Philippe; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Background Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAAs) represent a particular form of atherothrombosis where neutrophil proteolytic activity plays a major role. We postulated that neutrophil recruitment and activation participating in AAA growth may originate in part from repeated episodes of periodontal bacteremia. Methods and Findings Our results show that neutrophil activation in human AAA was associated with Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) formation in the IntraLuminal Thrombus, leading to the ...

  9. Attenuation of the bacterial load in blood by pretreatment with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor protects rats from fatal outcome and brain damage during Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Lund, Søren Peter;

    2004-01-01

    postinfection did not alter the clinical or histological outcome relative to that for non-G-CSF-treated rats. The magnitude of bacteremia and pretreatment with G-CSF were found to be prognostic factors for both outcome and brain damage. In summary, elevated neutrophil levels prior to the development of...... meningitis result in reduced risks of death and brain damage. This beneficial effect is most likely achieved through improved control of the systemic disease....

  10. Safety and efficacy of high-dose daptomycin as salvage therapy for severe gram-positive bacterial sepsis in hospitalized adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Chung-Chih

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing the dosage of daptomycin may be advantageous in severe infection by enhancing bactericidal activity and pharmacodynamics. However, clinical data on using daptomycin at doses above 6 mg/kg in Asian population are limited. Methods A retrospective observational cohort study of all hospitalized adult patients treated with daptomycin (> 6 mg/kg for at least 72 hours was performed in Taiwan. Results A total of 67 patients (40 males with a median age of 57 years received a median dose of 7.61 mg/kg (range, 6.03-11.53 mg/kg of daptomycin for a median duration of 14 days (range, 3–53 days. Forty-one patients (61.2% were in intensive care units (ICU. Sites of infections included complicated skin and soft tissue infections (n = 16, catheter-related bacteremia (n = 16, endocarditis (n = 11, primary bacteremia (n = 10, osteomyelitis and septic arthritis (n = 9, and miscellaneous (n = 5. The median Pitt bacteremia score among the 54 (80.6% patients with bacteremia was 4. The most common pathogen was methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n = 38. Fifty-nine patients (88.1% were treated with daptomycin after glycopepetide use. Overall, 52 (77.6% patients achieved clinical success. The all-cause mortality rate at 28 day was 35.8%. In multivariate analysis, the significant predictors of in-hospital mortality in 54 bacteremic patients were malignancies (P = 0.01 and ICU stay (P = 0.02. Adverse effects of daptomycin were generally well-tolerated, leading to discontinuation in 3 patients. Daptomycin-related creatine phosphokinase (CPK elevations were observed in 4 patients, and all received doses > 8 mg/kg. Conclusions Treatment with high dose daptomycin as salvage therapy was generally effective and safe in Taiwan. CPK level elevations were more frequent in patients with dose > 8 mg/kg.

  11. Ceftaroline Fosamil Use in 2 Pediatric Patients With Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Amanda W.; Newman, Patrick M; Ocheltree, Sara; Beaty, Rachel; Hassoun, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the most common pathogens causing pediatric infections including skin and soft tissue infections, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and septic shock. For decades, patients were treated with antibiotics such as vancomycin and clindamycin, but there is an increasing incidence of resistance to these traditional therapies. We describe 2 cases of patients with CA-MRSA invasive infections with bacteremia who exper...

  12. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuta Yonezawa; Tsukasa Kuwana; Kengo Kawamura; Yasuji Inamo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL...

  13. Musculoskeletal Sepsis Associated with Deep Vein Thrombosis in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Ying; Lee, Yu-Sheng; Tsao, Pei-Chen; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Soong, Wen-Jue

    2016-06-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a rare disease in pediatric patients. We report a pediatric patient who developed DVT in association with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia complicated with septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and myositis extensively. It is crucial to consider musculoskeletal infection associated with DVT in any child who presents with severe swollen limbs and limitations of motion. Prompt antibiotic and anticoagulant treatments should be initiated to reduce the risk of fatal complications. PMID:24279976

  14. Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens - An unusual case report of bacteremic pneumonia after lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dromer Claire

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung transplant recipients have an increased risk for actinomycetales infection secondary to immunosuppressive regimen. Case presentation A case of pulmonary infection with bacteremia due to Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens in a 54-year old man who underwent a double lung transplantation four years previously is presented. Conclusion The identification by conventional biochemical assays was unsuccessful and hsp gene sequencing was used to identify Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens.

  15. Periodontitis as a Risk Factor of Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jirina Bartova; Pavla Sommerova; Yelena Lyuya-Mi; Jaroslav Mysak; Jarmila Prochazkova; Jana Duskova; Tatjana Janatova; Stepan Podzimek

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the amount of evidence corroborating an association between dental plaque bacteria and coronary diseases that develop as a result of atherosclerosis has increased. These findings have brought a new aspect to the etiology of the disease. There are several mechanisms by which dental plaque bacteria may initiate or worsen atherosclerotic processes: activation of innate immunity, bacteremia related to dental treatment, and direct involvement of mediators activated by de...

  16. Fusobacterial head and neck infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2015-07-01

    Fusobacterium species are increasingly recognized as a cause of head and neck infections in children. These infections include acute and chronic otitis, sinusitis, mastoiditis, and tonsillitis; peritonsillar and retropharyngeal abscesses; Lemierre syndrome; post-anginal cervical lymphadenitis; and periodontitis. They can also be involved in brain abscess and bacteremia associated with head and neck infections. This review describes the clinical spectrum of head and neck fusobacterial infection in children and their management. PMID:25980688

  17. Detection of suPAR in the Saliva of Healthy Young Adults: Comparison with Plasma Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Gustafsson; Vjosa Ajeti; Lennart Ljunggren

    2011-01-01

    The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has been detected in blood, plasma, serum, urine, ovarian cystic fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid. Elevated suPAR levels in plasma have been associated with negative outcomes in various diseases, such as bacteremia, sepsis, SIRS, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and tuberculosis. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether suPAR can be detected in saliva from healthy individuals and thus, if saliva suPAR can be related to ...

  18. A case of brucellosis complicated with acute pyelonephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Cemal Üstün; Tümer Güven

    2010-01-01

    Brucellosis, is an endemic disease in our country, may lead to bacteremia and cause different clinic manifestations.A 44-year-old male patient admitted to our policlinic with high fever, shivering, chilling, pollacuria, and left costovertebral pain, and interned with diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis. Subsequently, acute pyelonephritis due to acute brucellosis was detected in the clinical and laboratoryexamination. Antibiotic treatment for brucellosis was given to patient for eight week and a...

  19. Psoas Abscess Caused by Non-Typhoid Salmonella in a Patient with Severe Aplastic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Chin-Chi; Ku, Shih-Chi; Wang, Jann-Tay; Tsai, Ching-Wei; Wu, Vin-Cent; Chou, Wen-Chien

    2010-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of infections caused by non-typhoid Salmonella spp. includes gastroenteritis, enteric fever, bacteremia, and extraintestinal localized complications, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Here we report a patient with severe aplastic anemia developing left iliopsoas abscess caused by non-typhoid Salmonella (NTS), which was successfully treated by prolonged antibiotic treatment and repeated debridement. Our data indicate that aplastic anemia is a risk factor for infectio...

  20. Campylobacteremia in stage IV gliosarcoma with bevacizumab treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary campylobacter enteritis with secondary bacteremia was diagnosed in an immunocompromised patient with stage IV gliosarcoma. She developed mild diarrhea followed by systemic symptoms with transient generalized weakness and fever. She was treated with azithromycin and had a full recovery and without relapse through 2 months of follow-up. Her diagnosis was confirmed by a positive stool culture for Campylobacter sp. and blood culture for Campylobacter jejuni/coli.

  1. Detection of an Infected N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate Plug by F-18 FDG PET/CT Scan in a Patient Who Received Endoscopic Intervention for Gastric Variceal Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Joo, Kowoon; Hyun, In Young; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Chung, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate has been used successfully for treatment of gastric variceal bleeding. Bacteremia after injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is well known, however, the method for diagnosis of infected endovascular injected material has remained uncertain. This is the first case reporting use of F-18 FDG PET/CT in detection of the source of infection after control of endoscopic bleeding with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

  2. Growth and survival of Serratia marcescens under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of materials from blood bags.

    OpenAIRE

    Szewzyk, U; Szewzyk, R; Stenström, T A

    1993-01-01

    Several patients receiving blood transfusions during the summer of 1991 developed bacteremia after the transfusion. In all cases, the infection was caused by Serratia marcescens. The same strain of Serratia marcescens was isolated from the patients and from the outer surface of unfilled blood bags. The transport containers for the blood bags were made anoxic by using a catalyst in order to prevent microbial growth. The survival and growth of S. marcescens K202, which was isolated from the blo...

  3. [Refinement of presumptive antimicrobial therapy based on initial microbiological information on positive blood culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yosuke

    2010-05-01

    Positive blood culture represents either true bacteremia or contaminants of the normal skin flora. The number of positive bottles, rapidity with which blood culture turns positive, and appropriate interpretation of Gram-stain findings usually assist physicians or technologists in deciding whether it reflects true-positive results or contamination. In the case of true bacteremia, two aspects of the Gram-stain findings, Gram-positive or negative, cocci or rod, are important initial findings that safely guide physicians to select appropriate antimicrobial agents. Gram-positive cocci in clusters strongly suggest Staphylococci, and "in-chains" indicates Streptococci or Enterococci. Although distinction between the latter two organisms is occasionally difficult, glycopeptide should be the first choice, especially in critically ill patients. Gram-positive rods, when first reported, also require the empiric administration of glycopeptides, and sometimes their false Gram-negative staining could result in errors of pathogen identification, resulting in the inappropriate choice of antibiotics. The detection of gas production by Gram-negative rods, which indicates Enterobacteriaceae, is helpful initial information to start cephalosporin antibiotics, whereas the absence of gas would suggest nonfirmentative rod bacteremia, for which the administration of anti-pseudomonal agents is strongly warranted. Gram-negative cocci, such as Moraxella or Acinetobacter sp., may initially be reported as Gram-positive, so empiric antimicrobial drugs should be carefully selected taking into account these pitfalls and patients' conditions, and the situation regarding the development of diseases (community-acquired vs. nosocomial). The rapid and appropriate treatment of bacteremia thus requires careful interepretation of Gram-stain findings as described above, and should always be integrated with pathognomonic features of individual patients. PMID:20560459

  4. Characterization of Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Strains Involved in Maternal-Fetal Colonization: Prevalence of E. coli ST131

    OpenAIRE

    Birgy, André; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Bidet, Philippe; Doit, Catherine; Genel, Nathalie; Courroux, Céline; Arlet, Guillaume; Bingen, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    Maternal-fetal Escherichia coli infections, such as neonatal bacteremia and meningitis, are important causes of morbidity and mortality. From 2006 to 2010, we studied newborns and their mothers who were colonized with E. coli in a French hospital in order to document (i) the epidemiology and genetic characteristics of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli strains, (ii) the prevalence of associated virulence genes, (iii) the prevalence of clone sequence type 131 (ST131), an...

  5. New vaccines for the prevention of pneumococcal infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Käyhty, H; Eskola, J.

    1996-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of acute otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Because in recent years antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal strains have been emerging throughout the world, vaccination against pneumococcal infections has become more urgent. The capsular polysaccharide vaccine that has been available is neither immunogenic nor protective in young children and other immunocompromised patients. Several pneumococcal proteins have been proposed as candidate va...

  6. Antibody responses in patients with invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsson, G; Colque-Navarro, P.; Gustafsson, E.; Andersson, R.; Möllby, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Correlation between antibody response and clinical outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia has yielded conflicting results. Immunization schedules have failed in clinical trials. Is the humoral response toward S. aureus of protective nature? A prospective study was performed in patients with invasive S. aureus (ISA) infections during the period 2003?2005. The antibody levels were determined at the beginning and at the end of treatment and one month later (n?=?96, n?=?7...

  7. Infection Mobilizes Hematopoietic Stem Cells through Cooperative NOD-like Receptor and Toll-like Receptor Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Burberry, Aaron; Zeng, Melody Y.; Ding, Lei; Wicks, Ian; Inohara, Naohiro; Morrison, Sean J; Núñez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in specialized niches within the bone marrow under steady-state conditions and mobilized for extramedullary hematopoiesis during periods of stress such as bacterial infections. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We show that systemic infection of mice with Escherichia coli, commonly associated with bacteremia in humans, mobilizes functional HSCs to the spleen. Accumulation of splenic HSCs (CD150+CD48-Lin−/lowScal1+cKit+) was di...

  8. Treatment of experimental endocarditis caused by a beta-lactamase-producing strain of Enterococcus faecalis with high-level resistance to gentamicin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hindes, R G; Willey, S H; Eliopoulos, G M; Rice, L B; Eliopoulos, C T; Murray, B.E. (Brendan); Moellering, R C

    1989-01-01

    Several antimicrobial regimens were evaluated in the treatment of experimental enterococcal endocarditis due to a beta-lactamase-producing, highly gentamicin-resistant strain of Enterococcus faecalis. Ampicillin alone cleared bacteremia in the majority of rats and reduced titers of bacteria within vegetations (6.84 versus 8.80 log10 CFU/g in controls) but did not sterilize valves. Ampicillin-sulbactam combinations, vancomycin, daptomycin, and imipenem each reduced residual bacterial titers wi...

  9. Predictors and outcomes of mycobacteremia among HIV-infected smear- negative presumptive tuberculosis patients in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Nakiyingi, Lydia; Ssengooba, Willy; Nakanjako, Damalie; Armstrong, Derek; Holshouser, Molly; Bruce J Kirenga; Shah, Maunank; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Moses L Joloba; Ellner, Jerrold J; Susan E Dorman; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sputum smear microscopy for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis lacks sensitivity in HIV-infected symptomatic patients and increases the likelihood that mycobacterial infections particularly disseminated TB will be missed; delays in diagnosis can be fatal. Given the duration for MTB growth in blood culture, clinical predictors of MTB bacteremia may improve early diagnosis of mycobacteremia. We describe the predictors and mortality outcome of mycobacteremia among HIV-infected sputum smear-n...

  10. Safety and Shedding of an Attenuated Strain of Listeria monocytogenes with a Deletion of actA/plcB in Adult Volunteers: a Dose Escalation Study of Oral Inoculation

    OpenAIRE

    Angelakopoulos, Haroula; Loock, Katharina; Sisul, David M.; Jensen, Eric R.; Miller, Jeff F; Hohmann, Elizabeth L.

    2002-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular bacterial pathogen which causes bacteremia and has a tropism for the central nervous system and a propensity to cause maternofetal infection. L. monocytogenes has been shown to be an effective prophylactic and a therapeutic vaccine vector for viral and tumor antigens in animal models. L. monocytogenes mutants lacking the ActA protein, which is essential for intracellular movement, are attenuated but retain immunogenicity in mice. Given the pathogenic...

  11. [Destructive endocarditis caused by Streptococcus sanguis on normal valves after gastroduodenoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimone, F; Del Corso, L; Borelli, A; Riccioni, S; Salvatore, L

    1991-06-01

    In recent years, epidemiological and clinical patterns in infective endocarditis are changed: mean age of patients, sex, underlying cardiac diseases, source of bacteremia, availability of better diagnostic methods--specially two-dimensional and doppler echocardiography--and surgical options. The Authors report a paradigmatic case of a young man without cardiac disease, who developed a destructive endocarditis complicated by refractory congestive heart failure; the cause was an organism of low pathogenicity, Streptococcus sanguis, that entered the bloodstream after gastroduodenoscopy. PMID:1961444

  12. Disruption of Tight Junctions during Traversal of the Respiratory Epithelium by Burkholderia cenocepacia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jason Y.; Sajjan, Umadevi S.; Krasan, Graham P.; LiPuma, John J.

    2005-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic bacterial species capable of causing life-threatening respiratory tract infection in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). Unlike most other pathogens in CF, which typically remain confined to the endobronchial spaces, B. cenocepacia can traverse airway epithelium to cause bacteremia and sepsis. The mechanisms by which this occurs, however, are unknown. We examined the transmigration of B. cenocepacia through polarized respiratory epithelium. Represen...

  13. Cattle experimentally infected by Anaplasma marginale: Influence of splenectomy on disease pathogenesis, oxidative profile, and antioxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Rovaina L; França, Raqueli T; Oliveira, Camila B; Rezer, João F P; Klafke, Guilherme M; Martins, João R; Santos, Andrea P; do Nascimento, Naíla C; Mesick, Joanne B; Lopes, Sonia T A; Leal, Daniela B R; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Andrade, Cinthia M

    2016-06-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis is caused by the obligate intraerythrocytic bacteria Anaplasma marginale. These bacteria are transmitted by tick species such as Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, blood-sucking insects, and fomites (needles, clippers, and other blood contaminated equipment). During the acute phase of infection, animals may develop fever, anemia, jaundice, and hepatosplenomegaly. The aims of this study are to quantify the bacteremia by quantitative PCR in eight naïve calves experimentally infected by A. marginale [splenectomized (n = 4), and intact/non-splenectomized (n = 4)], and to correlate these findings with markers of oxidative stress on days 0, 8, 15, 21 and 23 post-infection. Complete blood counts (CBC) were performed in both groups. Lipid peroxidation was estimated by quantifying thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS); and non-enzymatic antioxidants were assessed by erythrocyte content of non-protein thiols (NPSH). There were no significant differences in complete blood counts (CBC) between the two groups. However, both groups had a slight decrease on packet cell volume (PCV), erythrocytes and hemoglobin concentration, as well as an increase in total leukocyte counts due to elevated lymphocytes when comparing pre and post-infection with A. marginale. Progressive increase on TBARS levels and concomitant decrease on NPSH content were observed in all animals, without significant differences between splenectomized and intact animals. A positive correlation between bacteremia and TBARS, and a negative correlation between bacteremia and NPSH were observed in both groups with higher correlation for NPSH in splenectomized animals. A negative correlation between TBARS and NPSH levels was observed in both groups indicating lipid peroxidation without a non-enzymatic antioxidant response. The results of experimental infection by A. marginale in cattle showed that bacteremia has an impact on lipid peroxidation regardless of the splenectomy. PMID

  14. Effect of growth in biofilms upon antibiotic and chlorine susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare

    OpenAIRE

    Steed, Keesha

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare are environmental opportunistic pathogens whose source for human infection is water and soil. M. avium and M. intracellulare cause pulmonary infections (tuberculosis) in immunocompetent individuals and bacteremia in immunodeficient individuals (e.g. AIDS). One factor likely influencing the lack of success of antibiotic therapy in patients would be their ability to form biofilms. Growth in biofilms might result in antimicrob...

  15. A Knowledge Based System for Diagnosing Nosocomial Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Landry, Gail; Beyt, B. Eugene; Delcambre, Lois M.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a knowledge based prototype for diagnosing nosocomial infections. The prototype uses a consultative session to diagnose three major types of infection: urinary tract infection, bacteremia, and surgical wound infection. The system evaluates the results of microbiology and laboratory testing, includes rules based on clinical events, and determines onset dates. The prototype was implemented in Prolog and was tested for its abilit...

  16. Identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in multidrug-resistant clinical Bacteroides fragilis isolates by whole genome shotgun sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Thomas Vognbjerg; Sóki, József; Hasman, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis constitutes the most frequent anaerobic bacterium causing bacteremia in humans. The genetic background for antimicrobial resistance in B. fragilis is diverse with some genes requiring insertion sequence (IS) elements inserted upstream for increased expression. To evaluate whole...... genome shotgun sequencing as a method for predicting antimicrobial resistance properties, one meropenem resistant and five multidrug-resistant blood culture isolates were sequenced and antimicrobial resistance genes and IS elements identified using ResFinder 2.1 (http...

  17. An usual approach to treatment of a case of multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis: parenteral and intraperitoneal aminoglycosides and parenteral colistin

    OpenAIRE

    Ian May; Maha Abu-Khdeir; Roland Alexander Blackwood

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming more common and increasingly more difficult to treat due to the continued development of drug resistance. While sensitivity to colistin (polymyxin E) is well known, it is frequently avoided due to concerns of nephrotoxicity. Reported here is a case of a multi-drug resistance pseudomonal typhlitis, bacteremia and pleural cavity infection that required significant intensive care, and serial abdominal washouts. Intra-peritoneal tobramycin ...

  18. Septic Shock Due to Candidemia: Outcomes and Predictors of Shock Development

    OpenAIRE

    Guzman, Jorge A.; Tchokonte, Ronny; Sobel, Jack D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The present report describes the outcomes of a cohort of patients with Candida induced septic shock. Methods Retrospective analysis of individuals who had at least one positive blood culture for Candida species ≥ 48 h after ICU admission. Data from patients that developed septic shock within 48 hr of the positive blood culture were compared to non-shock candidemic patients. Patients with a concomitant bacteremia and/or endocarditis were excluded. Results Fifteen patients with Candi...

  19. Indium-111 leukocyte localization in infected prosthetic graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infective endocarditis can be difficult to prove, even in the face of strong clinical suspicion. A case in which standard methods of diagnosis failed to demonstrate endocarditis in a patient with recurrent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and porcine aortic valve is reported. An In-111 labelled leukocyte SPECT study demonstrated uptake in the aortic root and leaflets, and autopsy demonstrated vegetations on the leaflets. In-111 may prove useful in demonstrating endocarditis in patients with prosthetic valve infection

  20. Treatment of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcal Infections in the Immunocompromised Host: Quinupristin-Dalfopristin in Combination with Minocycline

    OpenAIRE

    Raad, Issam; Hachem, Ray; Hanna, Hend; Girgawy, Essam; Rolston, Kenneth; Whimbey, Estella; Husni, Rola; Bodey, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Between February 1994 and November 1998, 56 oncology patients infected with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) were treated with quinopristin-dalfopristin (Q-D) plus minocycline (MIN). Infections included bacteremia, urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and wound infection. The response rate was 68%, and the most frequent adverse event was arthralgia or myalgia (36%). Q-D–MIN is effective for VRE infection in cancer patients but is associated with a substantial frequency of arthralgia or m...

  1. Adult polycystic disease of kidneys: A potential cause of false-positive 67Ga images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 56-year-old man with adult polycystic disease of the kidneys complicated by renal failure, hypertension, and bacteremia underwent bilateral nephrectomy because the enlarged kidneys compromised his gastrointestinal function and respiratory capacity. A scan using sup(99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate demonstrated nonfunctioning kidneys, bilaterally. An unusual radioactivity pattern in the bowel in 67Ga scintigraphy was due to extreme renal enlargement and should be kept in mind to avoid misinterpretation. (orig.)

  2. A nonhuman primate scrub typhus model: protective immune responses induced by pKarp47 DNA vaccination in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Daniel H; Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D; Day, Nicholas P J; Richards, Allen L

    2015-02-15

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi-specific, IFN-γ-producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine-induced immune

  3. Case report: Infective endocarditis caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Tun-Chieh; Chen Yen-Hsu; Yang Mei-Li; Lin Wei-Ru; Lin Chun-Yu; Lu Po-Liang

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background There are few reports in the literature of invasive infection caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis in patients without immunosuppression or other predisposing factors. The choice of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia caused by the pathogen requires more case experience to be determined. Case presentation The case of a 40-year-old previously healthy man with subacute endocarditis proposed to be contributed from an occult dental abscess is described. The infection was found...

  4. Malaria impairs resistance to Salmonella through heme- and heme oxygenase-dependent dysfunctional granulocyte mobilization

    OpenAIRE

    Cunnington, A. J.; de Souza, J.B.; Walther, R-M.; Riley, E M

    2011-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, invasive non-Typhoid Salmonella (NTS) is a common and often fatal complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mediates tolerance to the cytotoxic effects of heme during malarial hemolysis but might impair resistance to NTS by limiting production of bactericidal reactive oxygen species. We show that co-infection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL (Py17XNL) and S. typhimurium causes acute, fatal bacteremia with increased bacteri...

  5. Evidence for T Cell-dependent Immunity to Bacteroides fragilis in an Intraabdominal Abscess Model

    OpenAIRE

    Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Markham, Richard B.; Zaleznik, Dori F.; Cisneros, Ronald L.; Dennis L Kasper

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that active immunization of rats with the capsular polysaccharide of Bacteroides fragilis protects these animals against abscess development following intraperitoneal challenge with this species. Passive transfer of hyperimmune globulin from immunized animals to nonimmune recipients provided protection against B. fragilis bacteremia in challenged animals, but did not confer protection against abscess development. On the other hand, adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immu...

  6. Septic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Achong, Michael R.

    1980-01-01

    Septic shock is a dynamic syndrome of inadequate tissue perfusion caused by invasion of the blood by micro-organisms. Gram-negative rod bacteremia accounts for about two-thirds of patients with this syndrome. The fully developed syndrome of high fever, chills, cold, moist extremities, hypotension and oliguria is easy to recognize. However, the initial features of the syndrome may be quite non-specific and subtle, particularly in elderly patients. Treatment is aimed at eliminating the infectio...

  7. [Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.D.; Lind, J.W.; Bruun, B.

    2009-01-01

    Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection are presented: a three-week-old boy with meningitis and a 62-year-old woman with arthritis and bacteremia. Since 1993 vaccination against H. influenzae type b (Hib) has been offered to Danish children. The result has been a remarkable...... decrease in invasive Hib disease. However, physicians need to be aware of the existence of non-type b invasive H. influenzae disease Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/19...

  8. To tilfaelde af invasive infektioner med Haemophilus influenzae type f

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Jens Wentzel; Bruun, Britta; Nielsen, Jette Dettmann;

    2009-01-01

    Two cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type f infection are presented: a three-week-old boy with meningitis and a 62-year-old woman with arthritis and bacteremia. Since 1993 vaccination against H. influenzae type b (Hib) has been offered to Danish children. The result has been a remarkable...... decrease in invasive Hib disease. However, physicians need to be aware of the existence of non-type b invasive H. influenzae disease. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jan...

  9. Dental Plaque Streptococci and Their Amoxicillin Resistance in Children with Congenital Heart Anomalies: Results of a Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Aida Rexhepi; Raimonda Niko; Agim Begzati; Mergime Prekazi Loxha; Vjosa Krasniqi; Zana Agani; Blerta Xhemajli; Teuta Kutllovci; Urata Tahiri

    2014-01-01

    Children with congenital heart diseases (CHD) are considered to be at higher risk of development of a Bacterial Endocarditic (BE) from infectious diseases of the oral cavity and following dental treatments. They represent the largest group of patients with special medical needs who appear in the daily dental practice. Maintenance of oral health and oral hygiene is suitable to reduce the incidence of bacteremia. Oral hygiene is more important in reducing the risk of BE than the administration ...

  10. Bacterial Infections in Myd88-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Villano, Jason S; Rong, Fang; Cooper, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Three breeding colonies of Myd88−/− mice had a history of significant morbidity and mortality. Although strain-specific poor reproductive performance might explain neonatal death and dystocia, mice were found dead or required euthanasia because of moribundity, distended abdomen, head tilt, and seizures. Histopathology results included bacteremia, placentitis, metritis, peritonitis with abscess formation, and suppurative meningoencephalitis. Intralesional gram-negative coccobacilli were presen...

  11. Clinical Impact of Laboratory Implementation of Verigene BC-GN Microarray-Based Assay for Detection of Gram-Negative Bacteria in Positive Blood Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tamar; Dumadag, Sandrea; Lee, Christine Jiyoun; Lee, Seung Heon; Bender, Jeffrey M; Cupo Abbott, Jennifer; She, Rosemary C

    2016-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteremia is highly fatal, and hospitalizations due to sepsis have been increasing worldwide. Molecular tests that supplement Gram stain results from positive blood cultures provide specific organism information to potentially guide therapy, but more clinical data on their real-world impact are still needed. We retrospectively reviewed cases of Gram-negative bacteremia in hospitalized patients over a 6-month period before (n = 98) and over a 6-month period after (n = 97) the implementation of a microarray-based early identification and resistance marker detection system (Verigene BC-GN; Nanosphere) while antimicrobial stewardship practices remained constant. Patient demographics, time to organism identification, time to effective antimicrobial therapy, and other key clinical parameters were compared. The two groups did not differ statistically with regard to comorbid conditions, sources of bacteremia, or numbers of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, active use of immunosuppressive therapy, neutropenia, or bacteremia due to multidrug-resistant organisms. The BC-GN panel yielded an identification in 87% of Gram-negative cultures and was accurate in 95/97 (98%) of the cases compared to results using conventional culture. Organism identifications were achieved more quickly post-microarray implementation (mean, 10.9 h versus 37.9 h; P < 0.001). Length of ICU stay, 30-day mortality, and mortality associated with multidrug-resistant organisms were significantly lower in the postintervention group (P < 0.05). More rapid implementation of effective therapy was statistically significant for postintervention cases of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms (P = 0.049) but not overall (P = 0.12). The Verigene BC-GN assay is a valuable addition for the early identification of Gram-negative organisms that cause bloodstream infections and can significantly impact patient care, particularly when resistance markers are detected. PMID:27098961

  12. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase ...

  13. Comparison of different PCR approaches for characterization of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia isolates.

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, P. Y.; Shi, Z Y; Lau, Y J; HU, B S; Shyr, J M; Tsai, W S; Lin, Y. H.; Tseng, C Y

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated three PCR methods for epidemiological typing of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia--PCR-ribotyping, arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR)--and compared them with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The analysis was performed with 31 isolates of B. cepacia, comprising 23 epidemiologically unrelated isolates and 8 isolates collected from the same patient during two episodes of bacteremia. Pulsed-fiel...

  14. Bartonella henselae Invasion of Feline Erythrocytes In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Mehock, Jane R.; Greene, Craig E.; Gherardini, Frank C.; Hahn, Tae-Wook; Krause, Duncan C.

    1998-01-01

    Bartonella henselae, the causative agent of cat scratch disease, establishes long-term bacteremia in cats, in which it attaches to and invades feline erythrocytes (RBC). Feline RBC invasion was assessed in vitro, based on gentamicin selection for intracellular bacteria or by laser confocal microscopy and digital sectioning. Invasion rates ranged from 2 to 20% of the inoculum, corresponding to infection of less than 1% of the RBC. Invasion was a slow process, requiring >8 h before significant ...

  15. Multilocus Sequencing Typing of Invasive Haemophilus influenzae strains Isolated in Portugal in the Pre-vaccination Period (1989-2001)

    OpenAIRE

    Veiga, Elisabete; Gomes, Sandra; Bettencourt, Célia; Bajanca-Lavado, Maria Paula

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Haemophilus influenzae can cause life-threatening infections in children and adults, such as pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis, despite de availability of the H. influenzae type b vaccine. Six capsular types, a-f, have been identified to date. Non-capsulated (NC) H. influenzae have also been described. Multilocus Sequencing Typing (MLST) is a powerful method that allows a precise and unambiguous characterization of H. influenzae genotypes. Aim: Identification of the maj...

  16. Apramycin treatment affects selection and spread of a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain able to colonize the human gut in the intestinal microbiota of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Zachariasen, Camilla; Hansen, Monica Hegstad;

    2016-01-01

    The effect of apramycin treatment on transfer and selection of an Escherichia coli strain (E. coli 912) in the intestine of pigs was analyzed through an in vivo experiment. The strain was sequenced and assigned to the sequence type ST101 and serotype O11. It carried resistance genes to apramycin......-resistant E. coli. Since gentamicin is a first-choice drug for human bacteremia, this is of concern....

  17. Antibiogram and Genotypic Analysis using 16S rDNA after Biofield Treatment on Morganella morganii

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi; Gopal Nayak; Alice Branton; Dahryn Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    Morganella morganii (M. morganii) is one of the important nosocomial pathogen associated with the urinary tract infections and bacteremia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment on M. morganii in the lyophilized as well as revived state for antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, biochemical characteristics, biotype number and genotype. M. morganii cells were procured from MicroBioLogics Inc., USA in sealed packs bearing the American Ty...

  18. Cepacia Syndrome in a Non-Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Naomi Hauser; Jose Orsini

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) cepacia complex is a known serious threat to patients with cystic fibrosis, in whom it has the potential to cause the fatal combination of necrotizing pneumonia, worsening respiratory failure, and bacteremia, known as Cepacia syndrome. The potential for this pathogen to infect non-cystic fibrosis patients is limited and its epidemiology is poorly understood. Previously reported cases of severe Burkholderia cepacia complex lung infection in immunocompetent h...

  19. Functional characterization of "Bartonella" effector protein - BepE during "in vivo" and "in vitro" infection

    OpenAIRE

    Okujava, Rusudan

    2013-01-01

    The bartonellae is a family of gram-negative, fastidious, facultative intracellular, zoonotic bacteria. Most of the Bartonella species are highly adapted to establish asymptomatic bacteremia of their reservoir host within which the bacteria colonize erythrocytes as privileged host niche and develop long-lasting persistent infections. Bartonella uses a VirB type IV secretion system (T4SS) to translocate Bartonella effector proteins (Beps) into the infected cells. By using such a tool box it su...

  20. Internalization of Proteus mirabilis by human renal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Chippendale, G R; Warren, J W; Trifillis, A. L.; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common agent of bacteriuria in humans, causes acute pyelonephritis and bacteremia. Renal epithelium provides a barrier between luminal organisms and the renal interstitium. We have hypothesized that P. mirabilis may be internalized into renal epithelium. To test this hypothesis, we added suspensions of three P. mirabilis strains (10(8) CFU) to confluent monolayers of primary cultures of human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HRPTEC) and, after 3 h, found the bacte...

  1. Draft Genome Assemblies of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 and Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132

    OpenAIRE

    Minogue, T. D.; Daligault, H. E.; Davenport, K. W.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Coyne, S. R.; Chertkov, O.; Freitas, T.; Frey, K. G.; Jaissle, J.; Koroleva, G. I.; Ladner, J. T.; Palacios, G. F.; Redden, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    The pleomorphic swarming bacilli of the genus Proteus are common human gut commensal organisms but also the causative agents of recurrent urinary tract infections and bacteremia. We sequenced and assembled the 3.99-Mbp genome of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 (accession no. JOVJ00000000) and the 3.97-Mbp genome of Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132 (accession no. JPIX00000000), both of which are commonly used reference strains.

  2. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae: identification, isolation, and characterization of a new ambient-temperature fimbria.

    OpenAIRE

    Massad, G; Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Urinary tract infections involving Proteus mirabilis may lead to complications including bladder and kidney stones, acute pyelonephritis, and bacteremia. This bacterium produces a number of fimbriae, two of which, MR/P fimbria and P. mirabilis fimbria, have been shown to contribute to the ability of this pathogen to colonize the bladder and kidney. We have now purified and characterized a previously undescribed fimbria of P. mirabilis, named ambient-temperature fimbria (ATF). Electron microsc...

  3. Contribution of Panton-Valentine leukocidin in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh An Diep

    Full Text Available Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA strains typically carry genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL. We used wild-type parental and isogenic PVL-deletion (Delta pvl strains of USA300 (LAC and SF8300 and USA400 (MW2 to test whether PVL alters global gene regulatory networks and contributes to pathogenesis of bacteremia, a hallmark feature of invasive staphylococcal disease. Microarray and proteomic analyses revealed that PVL does not alter gene or protein expression, thereby demonstrating that any contribution of PVL to CA-MRSA pathogenesis is not mediated through interference of global gene regulatory networks. Inasmuch as a direct role for PVL in CA-MRSA pathogenesis remains to be determined, we developed a rabbit bacteremia model of CA-MRSA infection to evaluate the effects of PVL. Following experimental infection of rabbits, an animal species whose granulocytes are more sensitive to the effects of PVL compared with the mouse, we found a contribution of PVL to pathogenesis over the time course of bacteremia. At 24 and 48 hours post infection, PVL appears to play a modest, but measurable role in pathogenesis during the early stages of bacteremic seeding of the kidney, the target organ from which bacteria were not cleared. However, the early survival advantage of this USA300 strain conferred by PVL was lost by 72 hours post infection. These data are consistent with the clinical presentation of rapid-onset, fulminant infection that has been associated with PVL-positive CA-MRSA strains. Taken together, our data indicate a modest and transient positive effect of PVL in the acute phase of bacteremia, thereby providing evidence that PVL contributes to CA-MRSA pathogenesis.

  4. Polymicrobial multiple intraabdominal infections, a rare complication of colonoscopy in a cirrhotic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Amer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 58 year old male with past medical history of advanced cirrhosis, hepatitis C and alcohol abuse who present-ed with bacteremia ultimately leading to sepsis following upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy procedure that was done to evaluate his symptoms of abdominal pain and melena. This case highlights the catastrophic sequelae that might arise following esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD and colonoscopy that are usually considered safe.

  5. Mersin İlinde Tüketime Sunulan Etlerden İzole Edilen Enterokok Türlerinin Prevalansı ve Tiplendirilmesi

    OpenAIRE

    BAYRAM, Gül; DELİALİOĞLU, Nuran; Emekdaş, Gürol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Prevelance and Identification of Enterococcus spp. from Consumed Meats in Mersin City Aim: Enterococci, members of human and animal intestinal flora, can cause intra-abdominal infections, endocarditis, uriner system infection and bacteremia. Recently, the number of nosocomial infection cases have shown increase all over the world because of enterococci developing multiple antibiotic resistance against to antimicrobial agents. Enterococci strains with antibiotics resistance are comm...

  6. Spread of Enterococcal Surface Protein in Antibiotic Resistant Entero-coccus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis isolates from Urinary Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Kafil, Hossein S; Mobarez, Ashraf M.

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci rank among leading cause of nosocomial bacteremia and urinary tract infection in hospital and community acquired infections. Several traits that may contribute to enhanced virulence have been identified in Enterococci. Extracellular surface protein (Esp) is a virulence factor that contributes in biofilm formation and resistance to environmental stresses. In this study we aimed to determine occurrence of esp in E. faecium and E. faecalis isolates isolated from urinary tract infecti...

  7. Kinetics of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Metapopulation Movement during Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, Matthew S.; Lane, M. Chelsea; Vigil, Patrick D.; Smith, Sara N.; Seth T. Walk; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The urinary tract is one of the most frequent sites of bacterial infection in humans. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and are responsible for greater than 80% of uncomplicated cases in adults. Infection of the urinary tract occurs in an ascending manner, with colonization of the bladder leading to possible kidney infection and bacteremia. The goal of this study was to examine the population dynamics of UPEC in viv...

  8. Recommendation for use of the newly introduced pneumococcal protein conjugate vaccines in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Eun Hwa Choi; Kyung Hyo Kim; Yae Jean Kim; Jong Hyun Kim; Su Eun Park; Hoan Jong Lee; Byung Wook Eun; Dae Sun Jo; Kyong Min Choi; Young Jin Hong

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a leading cause of invasive infections including bacteremia and meningitis, as well as mucosal infections such as otitis media and pneumonia among children and adults. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was licensed for use among infants and young children in many countries including Korea. The routine use of PCV7 has resulted in a decreased incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) by the vaccine serotypes among the vaccinees and substa...

  9. Biofield Treatment: An Alternative Approach to Combat Multidrug-Resistant Susceptibility Pattern of Raoultella ornithinolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella ornithinolytica is belongs to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, a Gram-negative encapsulated aerobic bacillus associated with bacteremia and urinary tract infections. As biofield therapy is increasingly popular in biomedical heath care, so present study aimed to evaluate the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment on antimicrobial sensitivity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), biochemical study, and biotype number of multidrug resistant strain of R. ornithinolytica. ...

  10. Biofield Treatment: An Alternative Approach to Combat Multidrug-Resistant Susceptibility Pattern of Raoultella ornithinolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella ornithinolytica is belongs to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, a Gram-negative encapsulated aerobic bacillus associated with bacteremia and urinary tract infections. As biofield therapy is increasingly popular in biomedical heath care, so present study aimed to evaluate the impact of Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment on antimicrobial sensitivity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), biochemical study, and biotype number of multidrug resistant strain of R. ornithinolytica. Clinic...

  11. Kinase Inhibitors that Increase the Sensitivity of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Vornhagen; Kellie Burnside; Christopher Whidbey; Jessica Berry; Xuan Qin; Lakshmi Rajagopal

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are Gram-positive bacteria that are the leading cause of recurrent infections in humans that include pneumonia, bacteremia, osteomyelitis, arthritis, endocarditis, and toxic shock syndrome. The emergence of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) has imposed a significant concern in sustained measures of treatment against these infections. Recently, MRSA strains deficient in expression of a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1 or PknB) were described to exhibit increased...

  12. TRIF Licenses Caspase-11-Dependent NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Gram-Negative Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Rathinam, Vijay A. K.; Vanaja, Sivapriya Kailasan; Waggoner, Lisa; Sokolovska, Anna; Becker, Christine; Stuart, Lynda M; Leong, John M.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic infections with Gram-negative bacteria are characterized by high mortality rates due to the “sepsis syndrome,” a widespread and uncontrolled inflammatory response. Though it is well recognized that the immune response during Gram-negative bacterial infection is initiated after the recognition of endotoxin by Toll-like receptor 4, the molecular mechanisms underlying the detrimental inflammatory response during Gram-negative bacteremia remain poorly defined. Here, we identify a TRIF pa...

  13. Phlebitis associated with peripheral intravenous catheters and nursing carePeriferik intravenöz kateterle ilişkili flebit ve hemşirelik bakımı

    OpenAIRE

    Sarı, Dilek; Eşer, İsmet; Akbıyık, Ayşe

    2016-01-01

    Phlebitis, defined as inflammation of the tunica intima, is most important of complications associated with peripheral intravenous catheters and, occurs between 0.1% and 63.3% of patients with peripheral intravenous catheter.  Phlebitis can be originated mechanical, chemical and, bacterial.  Whatever the reason, phlebitis extends the duration of hospitalization, raise the cost of treatment, causes bacteremia. There are reported to be effective some factors such as  type of catheter material, ...

  14. Association of Three Plasmid-Encoded spv Genes Among Different Salmonella Serotypes Isolated from Different Origins

    OpenAIRE

    Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Firouzi, Roya; Khoshbakht, Rahem

    2012-01-01

    The virulence plasmid associated Salmonella plasmid virulence (spv) locus is strongly concomitant with strains that cause non typhoid bacteremia. The spv region contains three genes required for the virulence, the positive transcriptional regulator spvR and two structural genes spvB and spvC. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of these three genes among salmonella serotypes isolated from different sources. A collection of 60 salmonella serotypes from different sources w...

  15. Left-Sided Endocarditis Associated with Multi-Drug Resistance Acinetobacter Lwoffii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Moshtaghi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter lwoffii, an important nosocomial pathogen, is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus that is a component of the normal flora on the skin, oropharynx, and perineum of about 20-25% of healthy individuals. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with combined mitral and aortic valve endocarditis associated with multi-drug resistance acinetobacter lowffii bacteremia.

  16. Anthrax Meningitis - Report Of An Autopsied Case

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan A; Panda K. M; Khanna N; Swamy H S; Yasha T. C

    1999-01-01

    Anthrax is a rare cause of hemorrhagic meningitis in man. This report illustrates the characteristic hemorrhagic manifestations in the brain of a patient dying of anthrax meningitis secondary to overwhelming bacteremia. Gross examination of the brain revealed a thick dense subarachnoid hemorrhage with numerous petechial hemorrhages in the cortex. Histologically, meningoencephalitis with vascular necrosis, edema, perivascular cortical hemorrhages and clumps of Gram positive bacilli in the v...

  17. The Study of Inhibition Effects Satureja khuzestaniea Essence against Gene Expression bap Acinetobacter baumannii with Real time PCR Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Bahador; Hossein Saghii; Ramezal Ataee; Davoud Esmaeili

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Acinetobacter baumannii a major hospital pathogens and causes outbreaks of infections and associated to nosocomial infections, including bacteremia, pneumonia, meningitis, urinary tract infection, and wound infections. Satureja khuzestaniea province the group Nnayyan and Carvacrol and thymol are antimicrobial activity of this plant. Biofilm-related genes (bap)-specific proteins on the cell surface generate a direct role in biofilm formation and infection of the bacteria is...

  18. Prevalence of multi drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the clinical samples from Tertiary Care Hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Begum, Shahzeera; Hasan, Fariha; Hussain, Shagufta; Ali Shah, Aamer

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Acinetobacter baumannii can cause a wide range of infections, including bacteremia, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, peritonitis, etc. This organism is becoming resistant to a large group of antibiotics, especially β-lactam antibiotics. The reason for multi-drug resistance may be the production of extended- spectrum β-lactamses (ESBLs), carbapenemases/metallo β-lactamases or AmpC β-lactamases. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of multi-dr...

  19. Phenotypes and Virulence among Staphylococcus aureus USA100, USA200, USA300, USA400, and USA600 Clonal Lineages

    OpenAIRE

    King, Jessica M.; Kulhankova, Katarina; Stach, Christopher S.; Vu, Bao G.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus diseases affect ~500,000 individuals per year in the United States. Worldwide, the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages cause many of the life-threatening S. aureus infections, such as bacteremia, infective endocarditis, pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome, and surgical site infections. However, the virulence mechanisms associated with these clonal lineages, in particular the USA100 and USA600 isolates, have been severely understudied. We investigated the vir...

  20. Bacteriophage Therapy Rescues Mice Bacteremic from a Clinical Isolate of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Biswajit; Adhya, Sankar; Washart, Paul; Paul, Brian; Trostel, Andrei N.; Powell, Bradford; Carlton, Richard; Merril, Carl R.

    2002-01-01

    Colonization of the gastrointestinal tract with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) has become endemic in many hospitals and nursing homes in the United States. Such colonization predisposes the individual to VRE bacteremia and/or endocarditis, and immunocompromised patients are at particular risk for these conditions. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains requires the exploration of alternative antibacterial therapies, which led our group to study the ability of...

  1. Case Report of Granulicatella adiacens as a Cause of Bacterascites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotta, Molly C; Coffey, K C; Moonah, Shannon N; Uppal, Dushant; Hughes, Molly A

    2015-01-01

    Granulicatella adiacens is a Gram-positive coccus, formerly grouped with nutritionally variant Streptococcus, often found as commensal bacteria of the human oral cavity, urogenital tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Prior case reports have demonstrated Granulicatella spp. as a pathogen that can cause bacteremia and infective endocarditis particularly of prosthetic valves and pacemaker leads. Here, we report on a unique case of Granulicatella adiacens bacterascites in a 50-year-old male. PMID:26618012

  2. Pestilence, persistence and pathogenicity: infection strategies of Bartonella

    OpenAIRE

    Minnick, Michael F.; Battisti, James M.

    2009-01-01

    It has been nearly two decades since the discovery of Bartonella as an agent of bacillary angiomatosis in AIDS patients and persistent bacteremia and ‘nonculturable’ endocarditis in homeless people. Since that time, the number of Bartonella species identified has increased from one to 24, and 10 of these bacteria are associated with human disease. Although Bartonella is the only genus that infects human erythrocytes and triggers pathological angiogenesis in the vascular bed, the group remains...

  3. Differential Expression and Roles of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Determinants during Colonization and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Amy; Diep, Binh An; Mai, Thuy T.; Vo, Nhung H.; Warrener, Paul; Suzich, Joann; Stover, C. Kendall; Sellman, Bret R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium known to asymptomatically colonize the human skin, nares, and gastrointestinal tract. Colonized individuals are at increased risk for developing S. aureus infections, which range from mild skin and soft tissue infections to more severe diseases, such as endocarditis, bacteremia, sepsis, and osteomyelitis. Different virulence factors are required for S. aureus to infect different body sites. In this study, virulence gene ex...

  4. Impact of Vancomycin on sarA-Mediated Biofilm Formation: Role in Persistent Endovascular Infections Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelhady, W; Bayer, A S; Seidl, K; Moormeier, D E; Bayles, K W; Cheung, A.; Yeaman, M R; Xiong, Y Q

    2014-01-01

    Background. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of endovascular infections. The staphylococcal accessory regulator A locus (sarA) is a major virulence determinant that may potentially impact methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) persistence in such infections via its influence on biofilm formation. Methods. Two healthcare-associated MRSA isolates from patients with persistent bacteremia and 2 prototypical community-acquired MRSA strains, as well as their respective isogenic sar...

  5. Bacterial Coinfections in Travelers with Malaria: Rationale for Antibiotic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sandlund, Johanna; Naucler, Pontus; Dashti, Saduddin; Shokri, Akhar; Eriksson, Sara; Hjertqvist, Marika; Karlsson, Lillemor; Capraru, Teodor; Färnert, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Malaria predisposes children in areas where malaria is endemic to concurrent bacteremia, often with severe outcomes. The importance of bacterial coinfections in patients diagnosed with malaria in nonendemic settings has, however, not been reported. A retrospective analysis of microbiology data was performed in 755 travelers diagnosed with malaria in Sweden. Bacterial cultures from blood and other locations were correlated to clinical outcome and antibiotic treatment. Blood cultures were drawn...

  6. The Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Development and Severity of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, Michel J.; Hermie J M Harmsen; Eveline S. J. M. de Bont; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, th...

  7. The role of intestinal microbiota in the development and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, Michel J.; Hermie J M Harmsen; Eveline S. J. M. de Bont; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, th...

  8. Bacterial infections in patients with liver cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Preveden Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Liver cirrhosis is characterized by a reduced defensive reaction to bacterial infections and patients with cirrhosis are at increased risk of developing infections, sepsis and death. The most common bacterial infections in these patients are spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, urinary tract infection, pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infection and bacteremia. The most common causes are Gram negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to determi...

  9. The effect of improved hand hygiene on nosocomial MRSA control

    OpenAIRE

    Marimuthu, Kalisvar; Pittet, Didier; Harbarth, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine studies that have assessed the association between hand hygiene enhancement and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) rates and to explore controversies surrounding this association. Many studies have been published confirming the link between improved hand hygiene compliance and reduction in MRSA acquisition and infections, including bacteremia. These studies have also shown the cost-beneficial nature of these programmes. Despite consider...

  10. Daptomycin-nonsusceptible, vancomycin-intermediate, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Yu; Dale, Suzanne E; Deborah Yamamura; Vida Stankus; Christine Lee

    2012-01-01

    Due to the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus with reduced vancomycin susceptibility, newer antibiotics, including daptomycin, have been used to treat methicillin-resistant S aureus infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is approved to treat S aureus bacteremia and right-sided endocarditis, and reports of S aureus with reduced susceptibility to daptomycin are infrequent. To our knowledge, the present report describes the first Canadian case of daptomycin-nonsusceptible, vancomyci...

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae as an agent of nosocomial infection: treatment in the era of penicillin-resistant strains

    OpenAIRE

    F. Paradisi; Corti, G.; R. Cinelli

    2001-01-01

    Abstract. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a well-known agent of community-acquired infections such as sinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, bacterial meningitis, bacteremia, and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. However, the role of S.pneumoniae as a cause of nosocomial infections of respiratory tract, bloodstream, and central nervous system is more and more recognised, primarily in high-risk patients with depression of their immune function. Therapy of pneumococcal infections is made diff...

  12. Exposure of Thomsen-Friedenreich Antigen in Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection is Dependent on Pneumococcal Neuraminidase A**

    OpenAIRE

    Coats, Mamie T.; Murphy, Trudy; James C Paton; Gray, Barry; Briles, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome is recognized in a small portion of otherwise healthy children who have or have recently had Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, including severe pneumonia, meningitis, and bacteremia. As in other types of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), pneumococcal HUS is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia, usually with extensive kidney damage. Although not demonstrated in vivo, the pathogenesis of pneumococcal HUS has been attri...

  13. INFECTIONS ET PROPHYLAXIES ANTIINFECTIEUSES DANS LA DRÉPANOCYTOSE

    OpenAIRE

    Lepage, P; DRESSE, Marie-Françoise; Forget, Patricia; Schmitz, V; Hoyoux, Claire

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among young children with sickle cell susceptibility to infections is mainly observed in homozygous sickle cell disease. The incidence of bacteremias in children under 3 years of age is ~8 events/100 patient-years among homozygous subjects and ~5 events/100 patient-years among those with SC hemoglobinopathy. Pneumococci and Salmonellae are the most frequently isolated bacteria. Severe clinical manifestations include se...

  14. Fibrinogen acts as a bridging molecule in the adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to cultured human endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, A L; Krishnan, M.; Jaffe, E A; Fischetti, V A

    1991-01-01

    The propensity of Staphylococcus aureus to cause acute endovascular infections during transient bacteremia is poorly understood. To examine the events leading to the attachment of staphylococci to endothelium, adherence assays were developed to study the role of blood factors in the mediation of staphylococcal adherence to cultured human umbilical vein endothelium in vitro. Results indicate that the preferential attachment of S. aureus to endothelial cells is mediated by fibrinogen adsorbed f...

  15. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok; Eom, Joong Sik

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave...

  16. Inflammatory Cytokine Response to Bacillus anthracis Peptidoglycan Requires Phagocytosis and Lysosomal Trafficking▿

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Janaki K.; Khurana, Taruna; Langer, Marybeth; West, Christopher M.; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Metcalf, Jordan P.; Merkel, Tod J.; Coggeshall, K. Mark

    2010-01-01

    During advanced stages of inhalation anthrax, Bacillus anthracis accumulates at high levels in the bloodstream of the infected host. This bacteremia leads to sepsis during late-stage anthrax; however, the mechanisms through which B. anthracis-derived factors contribute to the pathology of infected hosts are poorly defined. Peptidoglycan, a major component of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria, can provoke symptoms of sepsis in animal models. We have previously shown that peptidoglycan of...

  17. Low serum mannose-binding lectin level increases the risk of death due to pneumococcal infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisen, Damon P; Dean, Melinda M; Boermeester, Marja A;

    2008-01-01

    MBL-deficient patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection (odds ratio, 5.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-24.92) after adjustment for bacteremia, comorbidities, and age. CONCLUSIONS: We defined a serum level for MBL deficiency that can be used with confidence in future studies of MBL disease...... associations. The risk of death was increased among MBL-deficient patients with severe pneumococcal infection, highlighting the pathogenic significance of this innate immune defence protein....

  18. Bartonellae in animals and vectors in New Caledonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Davoust, B.; Cabre, O; Rolain, J. M.; Raoult, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Bartonellae are gram-negative facultative intracellular alpha-proteobacteria from the family Bartonellaceae. The natural history of bartonellae consists of a reservoir/host, which is a vertebrate with chronic intravascular infection with sustained bacteremia, and a vector (usually an arthropod) that transfers the bacteria from the reservoir to a susceptible yet uninfected host. In order to reveal the sources and reservoirs of Bartonella infection in animals and vectors in New Caledonia, we co...

  19. Pantoea agglomerans, a Plant Pathogen Causing Human Disease▿

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Andrea T; Cazacu, Andreea C.; Allen, Coburn H.

    2007-01-01

    We present 53 pediatric cases of Pantoea agglomerans infections cultured from normally sterile sites in patients seen at a children's hospital over 6 years. Isolates included 23 from the bloodstream, 14 from abscesses, 10 from joints/bones, 4 from the urinary tract, and 1 each from the peritoneum and the thorax. P. agglomerans was most associated with penetrating trauma by vegetative material and catheter-related bacteremia.

  20. Enteric fistulous communication with an aortobifemoral graft permitting for Eggerthella lenta colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Jehangir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of an aortoenteric fistula following aortobifemoral graft repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is associated with a high probability of infection leading to clinically significant bacteremia. We report a case of an aortoenteric fistula that developed two years after initial aortic grafting resulting in colonization with the anaerobe, Eggerthella lenta. This dangerous bacterium is difficult to culture, associated with high mortality and the patient may have mild symptoms on presentation.

  1. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis

    OpenAIRE

    Fadi Al Akhrass; Lina Abdallah; Steven Berger; Rami Sartawi

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT) following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the docume...

  2. Case Report of Haemophilus parainfluenzae Sepsis in a Newborn Infant Following Water Birth and a Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Manu; Bober, Brittany; Eisenfeld, Leonard; Hussain, Naveed

    2015-10-01

    Water birth has grown in popularity over the recent years. Although beneficial for mothers, there are concerns for the infants. There are previous reports of infection following water birth. The information regarding infection with Haemophilus parainfluenzae is limited. We report a case of a neonate with H. parainfluenzae bacteremia following water birth. The child was successfully treated with both antibiotic and supportive care. Previous reports of neonatal H. parainfluenzae infection are reviewed. PMID:26495182

  3. Comparison of the standard pour plate procedure and the ATP and Limulus amebocyte lysate procedures for the detection of microbial contamination in intravenous fluids.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, R L; Highsmith, A K; Holland, B W

    1986-01-01

    The intrinsic and extrinsic microbial contamination of large-volume parenterals has been associated with bacteremias in hospitalized patients. When epidemiologic data suggest the association of contaminated intravenous (i.v.) fluids with disease, appropriate laboratory methods must be devised to analyze quickly the suspect fluid. A study was undertaken to compare three laboratory test methods (standard pour plate [SPP] technique, ATP procedure, and Limulus amebocyte lysate [LAL] assay) for de...

  4. A multi-omic analysis of an Enterococcus faecium mutant reveals specific genetic mutations and dramatic changes in mRNA and protein expression

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, De; Zhu, Yuanfang; An, Li; Liu, Jinwen; Su, Longxiang; Guo, Yinghua; Chen, Zhenhong; Wang, Yajuan; Wang, Li; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Fang, Xiangqun; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Ruifu; Liu, Changting

    2013-01-01

    Background For a long time, Enterococcus faecium was considered a harmless commensal of the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract and was used as a probiotic in fermented foods. In recent decades, E. faecium has been recognised as an opportunistic pathogen that causes diseases such as neonatal meningitis, urinary tract infections, bacteremia, bacterial endocarditis and diverticulitis. E. faecium could be taken into space with astronauts and exposed to the space environment. Thus, it is necess...

  5. Solitary supratentorial Listeria monocytogenes brain abscess in an immunocompromised patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Anthony R.; Martinez, Lauren C.; Opatowsky, Michael J.; Spak, Cedric W.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an 81-year-old man receiving azacitidine monotherapy for myelodysplastic syndrome who was improving from Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia after receiving antibiotic therapy during an earlier hospital admission. Shortly after discharge he developed new-onset seizure activity, with brain imaging on subsequent admissions demonstrating a posterior right frontal lobe mass. Specimen cultures after resection of the mass revealed this to be a cerebral abscess related to L. monocytogenes. Brain abscesses related to this organism are rare. PMID:26130881

  6. Preseptal and Orbital Cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Akçay; Gamze Dereli Can; Nurullah Çağıl

    2014-01-01

    Preseptal cellulitis (PC) is defined as an inflammation of the eyelid and surrounding skin, whereas orbital cellulitis (OC) is an inflammation of the posterior septum of the eyelid affecting the orbit and its contents. Periorbital tissues may become infected as a result of trauma (including insect bites) or primary bacteremia. Orbital cellulitis generally occurs as a complication of sinusitis. The most commonly isolated organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. epid...

  7. Solitary supratentorial Listeria monocytogenes brain abscess in an immunocompromised patient

    OpenAIRE

    West, James A.; Onofrio, Anthony R.; Martinez, Lauren C.; Opatowsky, Michael J.; Spak, Cedric W.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an 81-year-old man receiving azacitidine monotherapy for myelodysplastic syndrome who was improving from Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia after receiving antibiotic therapy during an earlier hospital admission. Shortly after discharge he developed new-onset seizure activity, with brain imaging on subsequent admissions demonstrating a posterior right frontal lobe mass. Specimen cultures after resection of the mass revealed this to be a cerebral abscess related to L. monocytogenes....

  8. Draft genome sequence of blaVeb-1, blaoxa-10producing multi-drug resistant (MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosastrain VRFPA09 recovered from bloodstream infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandagopal Murugan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa bacteremia causes significant mortality rate due to emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR nosocomial infections. We report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain VRFPA09, a human bloodstream isolate, phenotypically proven as MDR strain. Whole genome sequencing on VRFPA09, deciphered betalactamase encoding blaveb-1 and blaOXA-10genes and multiple drug resistance, virulence factor encoding genes.

  9. Draft genome sequence of blaVeb-1, blaoxa-10 producing multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain VRFPA09 recovered from bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Nandagopal; Malathi, Jambulingam; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Madhavan, Hajib NarahariRao

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteremia causes significant mortality rate due to emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) nosocomial infections. We report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain VRFPA09, a human bloodstream isolate, phenotypically proven as MDR strain. Whole genome sequencing on VRFPA09, deciphered betalactamase encoding blav(eb-1) and bla(OXA-10) genes and multiple drug resistance, virulence factor encoding genes. PMID:26413042

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mandibular osteomyelitis in an extremely low birth weight preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Silvia; Tumietto, Fabio; Sciutti, Rita; Greco, Laura; Faldella, Giacomo; Corvaglia, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an established nosocomial pathogen with frequent multidrug resistance. The immaturity of the immune system along with intravascular lines and empirical antibiotic treatments place hospitalized preterm infants at major risk of MRSA infection.We report a case of MRSA mandibular osteomyelitis complicating a persistent S. aureus bacteremia in a 23-week preterm infant. From the first weeks of life, the infant showed recurrent C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation, associated with S. aureus bacteremia. Antibiotic courses, including vancomycin and linezolid, were performed with transitory normalization of blood parameters. On day 74, the infant suddenly deteriorated and showed a significant increase of both CRP and procalcitonin. Empiric vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam treatment was started; nevertheless, she developed a progressive hard swelling of neck and mandible. Radiological evaluation revealed a mandibular osteomyelitis complicated by an abscess, whose culture grew MRSA. Vancomycin was thus changed to teicoplanin and complete clinical and radiological healing was gradually achieved.In the presence of major risk factors, persistent bacteremia and nonspecific symptoms, a localized focus of infection should be suspected. Microbiological diagnosis should always be attempted and antibiotic treatment should be guided by both susceptibility results and clinical response. PMID:26239708

  11. Mast cells and histamine alter intestinal permeability during malaria parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Rashaun A; Tiffany, Caitlin M; Pakpour, Nazzy; Lokken, Kristen L; Tiffany, Connor R; Cheung, Kong; Tsolis, Renée M; Luckhart, Shirley

    2016-03-01

    Co-infections with malaria and non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) can present as life-threatening bacteremia, in contrast to self-resolving NTS diarrhea in healthy individuals. In previous work with our mouse model of malaria/NTS co-infection, we showed increased gut mastocytosis and increased ileal and plasma histamine levels that were temporally associated with increased gut permeability and bacterial translocation. Here, we report that gut mastocytosis and elevated plasma histamine are also associated with malaria in an animal model of falciparum malaria, suggesting a broader host distribution of this biology. In support of mast cell function in this phenotype, malaria/NTS co-infection in mast cell-deficient mice was associated with a reduction in gut permeability and bacteremia. Further, antihistamine treatment reduced bacterial translocation and gut permeability in mice with malaria, suggesting a contribution of mast cell-derived histamine to GI pathology and enhanced risk of bacteremia during malaria/NTS co-infection. PMID:26626201

  12. Pentraxin 3 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Systemic Inflammation or Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siguan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a key component of the humoral arm of the innate immune system. PTX3 is produced locally in response to proinflammatory stimuli. We reviewed the usefulness of systemic levels of PTX3 in critically ill patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, sepsis, and bacteremia, focusing on its diagnostic and prognostic value. Methods. A PubMed search on PTX3 was conducted. The list of papers was narrowed to original studies of critically ill patients. Eleven papers on original studies of critically ill patients that report on PTX3 in SIRS, sepsis, or bacteremia were identified. Results. Systematic levels of PTX3 have little diagnostic value in critically ill patients with SIRS, sepsis, or bacteremia. Systemic levels of PTX3, however, have superior prognostic power over other commonly used biological markers in these patients. Systemic levels of PTX3 correlate positively with markers of organ dysfunction and severity-of-disease classification system scores. Finally, systemic levels of PTX3 remain elevated in the acute phase and decreased on recovery. Notably, the age of the patients and underlying disease affect systemic levels of PTX3. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of PTX3 is low in patients with sepsis. Systemic levels of PTX3 have prognostic value and may add to prognostication of patients with SIRS or sepsis, complementing severity-of-disease classification systems and other biological markers.

  13. Efficacy of Single and Combined Antibiotic Treatments of Anthrax in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shay; Altboum, Zeev; Glinert, Itai; Schlomovitz, Josef; Sittner, Assa; Bar-David, Elad; Kobiler, David; Levy, Haim

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory anthrax is a fatal disease in the absence of early treatment with antibiotics. Rabbits are highly susceptible to infection with Bacillus anthracis spores by intranasal instillation, succumbing within 2 to 4 days postinfection. This study aims to test the efficiency of antibiotic therapy to treat systemic anthrax in this relevant animal model. Delaying the initiation of antibiotic administration to more than 24 h postinfection resulted in animals with systemic anthrax in various degrees of bacteremia and toxemia. As the onset of symptoms in humans was reported to start on days 1 to 7 postexposure, delaying the initiation of treatment by 24 to 48 h (time frame for mass distribution of antibiotics) may result in sick populations. We evaluated the efficacy of antibiotic administration as a function of bacteremia levels at the time of treatment initiation. Here we compare the efficacy of treatment with clarithromycin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (Augmentin), imipenem, vancomycin, rifampin, and linezolid to the previously reported efficacy of doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. We demonstrate that treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, imipenem, vancomycin, and linezolid were as effective as doxycycline and ciprofloxacin, curing rabbits exhibiting bacteremia levels of up to 10(5) CFU/ml. Clarithromycin and rifampin were shown to be effective only as a postexposure prophylactic treatment but failed to treat the systemic (bacteremic) phase of anthrax. Furthermore, we evaluate the contribution of combined treatment of clindamycin and ciprofloxacin, which demonstrated improvement in efficacy compared to ciprofloxacin alone. PMID:26392505

  14. Clinical presentation of infective endocarditis caused by different groups of non-beta haemolytic streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, B; Olaison, L; Rasmussen, M

    2016-02-01

    Streptococci are common causes of infective endocarditis (IE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has provided a practical tool for their species determination. We aimed to investigate if particular groups of non-beta heamolytic streptococci were associated with IE or to specific presentations thereof. The Swedish Registry of Infective Endocarditis was used to identify cases of IE caused by streptococci and a local database to identify cases of streptococcal bacteremia. The bacteria were grouped using MALDI-TOF MS and the clinical characteristics of IE caused by different groups were compared. We identified a group of 201 streptococcal IE isolates: 18 isolates belonged to the anginosus, 19 to the bovis, 140 to the mitis, 17 to the mutans, and seven to the salivarius groups. The mitis and mutans groups were significantly more common and the anginosus group less common among IE cases as compared to all cause bacteremia. Patients infected with the bovis group isolates were older, had more cardiac devices, and had more commonly prosthetic valve IE compared to IE caused by streptococci of the other groups. Twenty-one percent of patients needed surgery, and in-hospital mortality was 8% with no significant differences between the groups. Grouping of non-beta haemolytic streptococci using MALDI-TOF MS can provide a basis for decision-making in streptococcal bacteremia. IE caused by bovis group isolates have clinical characteristics distinguishing them from IE caused by other groups of Streptococcus. PMID:26610338

  15. Aeromonas dhakensis, an Increasingly Recognized Human Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Lin; Lamy, Brigitte; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas dhakensis was first isolated from children with diarrhea in Dhaka, Bangladesh and described in 2002. In the past decade, increasing evidence indicate this species is widely distributed in the environment and can cause a variety of infections both in human and animals, especially in coastal areas. A. dhakensis is often misidentified as A. hydrophila, A. veronii, or A. caviae by commercial phenotypic tests in the clinical laboratory. Correct identification relies on molecular methods. Increasingly used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) may be able to identify Aeromonas specie rapidly and accurately. A. dhakensis has shown its potent virulence in different animal models and clinical infections. Although several virulence factors had been reported, no single mechanism is conclusive. Characteristically A. dhakensis is the principal species causing soft tissue infection and bacteremia, especially among patients with liver cirrhosis or malignancy. Of note, A. dhakensis bacteremia is more lethal than bacteremia due to other Aeromonas species. The role of this species in gastroenteritis remains controversial. Third generation cephalosporins and carbapenems should be used cautiously in the treatment of severe A. dhakensis infection due to the presence of AmpC ββ-lactamase and metallo-β-lactamase genes, and optimal regimens may be cefepime or fluoroquinolones. Studies of bacterial virulence factors and associated host responses may provide the chance to understand the heterogeneous virulence between species. The hypothesis A. dhakensis with varied geographic prevalence and enhanced virulence that compared to other Aeromonas species warrants more investigations. PMID:27303382

  16. Aeromonas dhakensis, an increasingly recognized human pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Lin eChen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas dhakensis was first isolated from children with diarrhea in Dhaka, Bangladesh and described in 2002. In the past decade, increasing evidence indicate this species is widely distributed in the environment and can cause a variety of infections both in human and animals, especially in coastal areas. A. dhakensis is often misidentified as A. hydrophila, A. veronii or A. caviae by commercial phenotypic tests in the clinical laboratory. Correct identification relies on molecular methods. Increasingly used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS may be able to identify Aeromonas specie rapidly and accurately. A. dhakensis has shown its potent virulence in different animal models and clinical infections. Although several virulence factors had been reported, no single mechanism is conclusive. Characteristically A. dhakensis is the principal species causing soft tissue infection and bacteremia, especially among patients with liver cirrhosis or malignancy. Of note, A. dhakensis bacteremia is more lethal than bacteremia due to other Aeromonas species. The role of this species in gastroenteritis remains controversial. Third generation cephalosporins and carbapenems should be used cautiously in the treatment of severe A. dhakensis infection due to the presence of AmpC β-lactamase and metallo-β-lactamase genes, and optimal regimens may be cefepime or fluoroquinolones. Studies of bacterial virulence factors and associated host responses may provide the chance to understand the heterogeneous virulence between species. The hypothesis A. dhakensis with varied geographic prevalence and enhanced virulence that compared to other Aeromonas species warrants more investigations.

  17. Clinical significance of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morad Asaad, Ahmed; Ansar Qureshi, Mohamed; Mujeeb Hasan, Syed

    2016-05-01

    Background Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) as nosocomial pathogens or contaminants is significant for microbiologists and clinicians. This study aimed to determine the frequency of isolation and antimicrobial resistance patterns of CoNS isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) and to identify risk factors associated with true bacteremia caused by these emerging pathogens in a Saudi tertiary care hospital. Methods All CoNS-positive cultures from inpatients were identified using the standard methods during a 10-month period. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using the reference broth microdilution method. Results A total of 208 isolates were identified; of these 75 (32.2%) were considered infection associated, and 133 (67.8%) were considered contamination. S. epidermidis accounted for 34.7% of bacteremia cases, followed by S. hominis (21.3%), S. haemolyticus (16%), and S. saprophyticus (12%). Central venous catheters (p ≤ 0.0001), prior antibiotic therapy (p ≤ 0.0001), the occurrence of more than one positive blood culture (p ≤ 0.0001), and intensive care unit (ICU) admission (p = 0.007) were all independently associated with CoNS bacteremia. Overall, all isolates were highly resistant to penicillin (94.7%), oxacillin (90.7%), and erythromycin (85.3%). The rates of susceptibility to vancomycin, daptomycin, and teicoplanin were 98.7%, 98.7%, and 93.3%, respectively. Conclusions Our results further highlight that accurate identification and susceptibility testing of CoNS isolates from nosocomial BSIs are crucial to minimize excessive antibiotic use and unnecessary catheter removal. In addition, daptomycin may be an efficient alternative therapeutic option for CoNS resistant to oxacillin and other commonly used antibiotics. PMID:26666168

  18. Staphylococcus-Infected Tunneled Dialysis Catheters: Is Over-the-Wire Exchange an Appropriate Management Option?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Over-the-wire exchange of tunneled dialysis catheters is the standard of care per K/DOQI guidelines for treating catheter-related bacteremia. However, Gram-positive bacteremia, specifically with staphylococcus species, may compromise over-the-wire exchange due to certain biological properties. This study addressed the effectiveness of over-the-wire exchange of staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters compared with non-staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters. Methods: Patients who received over-the-wire exchange of their tunneled dialysis catheter due to documented or suspected bacteremia were identified from a QA database. Study patients (n = 61) had positive cultures for Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, or coagulase-negative staphylococcus not otherwise specified. Control patients (n = 35) received over-the-wire exchange of their tunneled dialysis catheter due to infection with any organism besides staphylococcus. Overall catheter survival and catheter survival among staphylococcal species were assessed. Results: There was no difference in tunneled dialysis catheter survival between study and control groups (P = 0.46). Median survival time was 96 days for study catheters and 51 days for controls; survival curves were closely superimposed. There also was no difference among the three staphylococcal groups in terms of catheter survival (P = 0.31). The median time until catheter removal was 143 days for SE, 67 days for CNS, and 88 days for SA-infected catheters. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in tunneled dialysis catheter survival between over-the-wire exchange of staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters and those infected with other organisms.

  19. The Role of the spv Genes in Salmonella Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiney, Donald G; Fierer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella strains cause three main types of diseases in people: gastroenteritis, enteric (typhoid) fever, and non-typhoid extra-intestinal disease with bacteremia. Genetic analysis indicates that each clinical syndrome requires distinct sets of virulence genes, and Salmonella isolates differ in their constellation of virulence traits. The spv locus is strongly associated with strains that cause non-typhoid bacteremia, but are not present in typhoid strains. The spv region contains three genes required for the virulence phenotype in mice: the positive transcriptional regulator spvR and two structural genes spvB and spvC. SpvB and SpvC are translocated into the host cell by the Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 type-three secretion system. SpvB prevents actin polymerization by ADP-ribosylation of actin monomers, while SpvC has phosphothreonine lyase activity and has been shown to inhibit MAP kinase signaling. The exact mechanisms by which SpvB and SpvC act in concert to enhance virulence are still unclear. SpvB exhibits a cytotoxic effect on host cells and is required for delayed cell death by apoptosis following intracellular infection. Strains isolated from systemic infections of immune compromised patients, particularly HIV patients, usually carry the spv locus, strongly suggesting that CD4 T cells are required to control disease due to Salmonella that are spv positive. This association is not seen with typhoid fever, indicating that the pathogenesis and immunology of typhoid have fundamental differences from the syndrome of non-typhoid bacteremia. PMID:21716657

  20. Effect of diltiazem on skeletal muscle 3-O-methylglucose transport in bacteremic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined whether alterations in cellular Ca2+ regulation contribute to previously observed changes in skeletal muscle sugar transport during bacteremia. Fasted male rats received saline (control) or bacteria (4 X 10(10) Escherichia coli/kg) intraperitoneally. Twelve hours later, basal and insulin-mediated 3-O-methylglucose (3MG) transport was measured in isolated soleus muscles. Measurements of 3MG transport in the presence of cytochalasin b or at a low temperature (0.5 degree C) indicated that altered sugar transport in bacteremic rat muscles was not due to nonspecific membrane permeability changes. To determine the role of Ca2+ in the pathogenesis of altered sugar transport during bacteremia, rats were treated with the Ca2+ antagonist diltiazem (DZ, 0.6-2.4 mg/kg) at various times (0, 0 + 7.5, 10 h) after saline or bacterial injection. In bacteremic rats given 2.4 mg/kg DZ at 10 h, basal and insulin-mediated transport were similar to control values. This dose of DZ had little effect on control muscles. The addition of 20 microM DZ to the incubation media did not affect basal or insulin-mediated 3MG transport in bacteremic rat muscles. Addition of the Ca2+ agonist BAY K 8644 to the incubation media had no effect on sugar transport in bacteremic rat muscles but caused alterations in control rat muscles that were comparable to those observed in bacteremia. These results suggest that alterations in Ca2+ regulation could contribute to the previously observed changes in sugar transport in skeletal muscles from bacteremic rats