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Sample records for backwaters

  1. Particulate trace metals in Cochin backwaters: Distribution of seasonal indices

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Joseph, T.

    A seasonal analysis of particulate trace metals, viz. iron, manganese, zinc, copper, cobalt and nickel collected from 4 stations in Cochin backwaters are presented. The spatial trend for cobalt, iron and nickel was stationary at surface whereas...

  2. Nutrients from the mangrove areas of Cochin backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sheeba, P.; Devi, K.S.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Nutrient like ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and inorganic phosphate and some hydrographic parameters were estimated for one year from two distinct mangrove ecosystems of Cochin backwaters viz. Puduvypeen and Nettoor. The ammonia values showed higher...

  3. Discharge estimation in a backwater affected meandering river

    OpenAIRE

    Hidayat, H.; Vermeulen, B.; Sassi, M.G.; Torfs, P. J. J. F.; A. J. F. Hoitink

    2011-01-01

    Variable effects of backwaters complicate the development of rating curves at hydrometric measurement stations. In areas influenced by backwater, single-parameter rating curve techniques are often inapplicable. To overcome this, several authors have advocated the use of an additional downstream level gauge to estimate the longitudinal surface level gradient, but this is cumbersome in a lowland meandering river with considerable transverse surface level gradients. Recent developments allow riv...

  4. Chlorophyll a and inorganic suspended solids in backwaters of the upper Mississippi River system: Backwater lake effects and their associations with selected environmental predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala, James T.; Gray, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    The Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) uses a stratified random sampling design to obtain water quality statistics within selected study reaches of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS). LTRMP sampling strata are based on aquatic area types generally found in large rivers (e.g., main channel, side channel, backwater, and impounded areas). For hydrologically well-mixed strata (i.e., main channel), variance associated with spatial scales smaller than the strata scale is a relatively minor issue for many water quality parameters. However, analysis of LTRMP water quality data has shown that within-strata variability at the strata scale is high in off-channel areas (i.e., backwaters). A portion of that variability may be associated with differences among individual backwater lakes (i.e., small and large backwater regions separated by channels) that cumulatively make up the backwater stratum. The objective of the statistical modeling presented here is to determine if differences among backwater lakes account for a large portion of the variance observed in the backwater stratum for selected parameters. If variance associated with backwater lakes is high, then inclusion of backwater lake effects within statistical models is warranted. Further, lakes themselves may represent natural experimental units where associations of interest to management may be estimated.

  5. Wetland Conversion: The Case of Backwater Reclamation in Kerala

    OpenAIRE

    Jeena T S

    2000-01-01

    Wetlands in their natural state bring substantial benefits to society. Nevertheless, there is growing concern over conversion of wetlands. This study examines the case of coastal wetland conversion in Kerala, known as backwater reclamation. The conversion of wetlands involves not only irreversibility in the environmental or ecological processes but also uncertainty. The study points to the need for incorporating the option value of wetlands in any cost - benefit calculation regarding the conv...

  6. Backwaters in the upper reaches of reservoirs produce high densities of age-0 crappies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagel, Jonah D.; Miranda, Leandro E.

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir backwaters are aquatic habitats in floodplains of reservoir tributaries that are permanently or periodically flooded by the reservoir. Like many reservoir arms, backwaters are commonly shallow, littoral habitats, but they differ from arms in various respects, including their support of primarily wetland plant assemblages that are tolerant to flooding. Elsewhere, the reservoir floods mainly upland plants that are less tolerant to flooding, producing a band of barren shoreline along the fluctuation zone. We investigated differences in relative abundance of age-0 crappies Pomoxis spp. in backwaters and arms of widely fluctuating flood control reservoirs, examined the effect of water level, and estimated the likelihood and timing with which these habitats are flooded annually. Higher catch rates of age-0 crappies were obtained in backwater habitats than in arm habitats. When inundated during the crappie spawning season, backwaters provided vegetated habitat at lower water levels than arms. Backwaters flooded earlier than arms and remained flooded longer to provide prolonged nursery habitat. Whereas vegetated habitat was inundated almost yearly in backwaters and arms, inundation that was timed to the onset of spawning occurred less regularly. Because of differences in water elevation, vegetated habitats were flooded in time for crappie spawning about every other year in backwaters but only every third year in arms. Recruitment of age-0 crappies was inversely correlated with high water levels during the months preceding the spawning period, perhaps because early flooding degraded the vegetation. Our results suggest that water levels may be managed during late winter and spring to regularly flood wetland vegetation communities in backwaters; however, water levels should be maintained at or below normal pool and should only irregularly flood upland vegetation in reservoir arms to promote the preservation of such vegetation. Furthermore, management efforts to

  7. Cochin backwaters: An introduction to the system, prior studies, historical trends and future implication

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Devi, K.S.

    Studies over the last 2 decades in the Cochin backwater system in India are reviewed to have an integrated profile with a point to evaluate future development projects in terms of potential consequences to the estuarine ecosystem. The trends...

  8. Benthic fauna of Kakinada bay and backwaters, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rathod, V.; Ansari, Z.A.; Parulekar, A.H.

    . Nematodes, polychaetes, foraminifera and turbellarians were the major groups constituting the bulk of meiofauna, both in the backwaters and near-shore region. Macrofaunal diversity was higher in the near-shore region. Impoverishment of fauna...

  9. Occurrence of fungi in the primary film on glass slides submerged in Cochin backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Meenakumari, B.; Gupta, R.; Nair, N.B.

    Occurrence of fungal mycelia was observed on the glass slides after 48 h of submersion in the Cochin backwaters (Kerala, India). The fungus Curoularia lunata (Wakker) Boedijn was found throughout the year while Aspergillus terreus thom., Trichoderma...

  10. Chlorophyll 'a' particulate organic carbon and suspended load from the mangrove areas of Cochin backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sheeba, P.; Devi, K.S.; Balasubramanian, T.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Chlorophyll 'a' Particulate Organic Carbon and suspended load were estimated for one year from two distinct mangrove areas of Cochin backwaters, viz. Puthuvypeen and Nettoor. Environmental parameters like tau degrees C, S ppt and pH were also...

  11. Foraminiferal fauna from the Cochin backwaters: Biological indicators of man-made changes in the environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.

    life as a result of deepening of the navigational channel by dredging. Navertheless, further reclamation of marshes/wetlands will have a very adverse effect on backwater habitats rich in foraminiferal fauna....

  12. Non-conservative controls on distribution of dissolved silicate in Cochin Backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Joseph, T.; Nair, M.

    Cochin backwater system was studied with regard to dissolved silicate (DSi) to understand its seasonal distribution and behaviour during estuarine mixing. Silicate had a linear relationship with salinity during the high river discharge period...

  13. A new genus and species of Heteromysini (Crustacea- Mysidacea) from the backwater of Kochi (Kerala, India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Panampunnayil, S.U.; Buju, A.

    Order] At: 10:52 24 October 2007 A new genus and species of Heteromysini (Crustacea- Mysidacea) from the backwater of Kochi (Kerala, India) S.U. PANAMPUNNAYIL & A. BIJU National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre, Kochi, India (Accepted 3 May... 2007) Abstract Kochimysis pillaii, a new genus and species of Heteromysini collected from the backwater of Kochi, is described. The new genus is closely related to the genus Deltamysis but is distinguishable from the latter by the following characters...

  14. Computation of backwater and discharge at width constrictions of heavily vegetated flood plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, V.R.; Board, J.W.; Colson, B.E.; Lee, F.N.; Druffel, Leroy

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, cooperated with the Federal Highway Administration and the State Highway Departments of Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana, to develop a proposed method for computing backwater and discharge at width constrictions of heavily vegetated flood plains. Data were collected at 20 single opening sites for 31 floods. Flood-plain width varied from 4 to 14 times the bridge opening width. The recurrence intervals of peak discharge ranged from a 2-year flood to greater than a 100-year flood, with a median interval of 6 years. Measured backwater ranged from 0.39 to 3.16 feet. Backwater computed by the present standard Geological Survey method averaged 29 percent less than the measured, and that computed by the currently used Federal Highway Administration method averaged 47 percent less than the measured. Discharge computed by the Survey method averaged 21 percent more then the measured. Analysis of data showed that the flood-plain widths and the Manning 's roughness coefficient are larger than those used to develop the standard methods. A method to more accurately compute backwater and discharge was developed. The difference between the contracted and natural water-surface profiles computed using standard step-backwater procedures is defined as backwater. The energy loss terms in the step-backwater procedure are computed as the product of the geometric mean of the energy slopes and the flow distance in the reach was derived from potential flow theory. The mean error was 1 percent when using the proposed method for computing backwater and 3 percent for computing discharge. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Study on the heavy metals having effect on the water biocenoses in the backwaters at Alpar and Lakitelek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekete, E.

    1984-01-01

    Heavy metals which have an effect on the water biocenosis were determined monthly during 1982 in the Tisza backwaters at Alpar and Lakitelek, Hungary. Copper, cadmium, zinc, chromium, and mercury contents of the water were determined. Organic matter, ammonium, nitrate, pH, sodium and potassium content were determined jointly with the studies of the heavy metals. On the basis of water quality indexes, the water quality of Lakitelek backwater is more stable than that of the Alpar backwater. Correlations were observed between the zinc and copper content and aquatic life. The two backwaters have significant mercury content, which is due to agricultural runoff. It is striking that cadmium does not occur in significant concentrations in the backwaters. Samples originating from the bottom sediments should be included in the studies on heavy metals, to obtain complete information on equilibrium and transport process taking place in the backwaters. 13 references, 12 figures.

  16. Pesticide trapping efficiency of a modified backwater wetland using a simulated runoff event

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the trapping efficiency of a modified backwater wetland amended with a mixture of three pesticides, atrazine, metolachlor, and fipronil, using a simulated runoff event. The 700 m long, 25 m wide wetland, located along the Coldwater River in Tunica County, Mississippi, was modifie...

  17. Ecological evaluation of two prawn culture fields in the Cochin Backwater based on premonsoon diurnal observations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balasubramanian, T.; Viswakumar, M.; Venugopal, P.

    of prawns as these ponds are maintained in the autotrophic range with a P/R ratio greater than one under high production and respiration rates. Previous authors found a higher P/R ratio for the main backwater system, but without fulfilling the latter...

  18. Spatio-temporal variations in water quality of Muttukadu Backwaters, Tamilnadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kalpana; Natesan, Usha

    2013-07-01

    Muttukadu Backwater, located on the east coast of Tamilnadu, is one of healthiest estuarine environments in the region. A study pertaining to seasonal variations in physico-chemical properties in water was conducted at nine sites of Muttukadu Backwater for a period of one year (January to December 2009). Multivariate statistical techniques, such as cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA), were applied to evaluate the variation in water quality of Muttukadu Backwater and to identify pollution sources. In order to analyze water quality, a geographic information systems (GIS) software package, Arc GIS version 9.3, was used (Esri, Redlands, California). An interpolation technique, inverse distance weighting, was used to produce the spatial distribution of water quality parameters over the backwater. The purpose of the technique was to aid in protection of the environment and ecology of the estuary and aid in effective management. In the present study, observed values of salinity, nitrite, nitrate, ammonia, total nitrogen, phosphate, and silicate were significantly high in the estuarine zone. PCA resulted in three factors explaining 75.9% of the total variance. Principal component 1 exhibited a high correlation with significant physico-chemical variables representing the influence of tidal action and sandbar formation. Principal component 2 represented natural pollution as a result of surface runoff. Principal component 3 represented natural pollution as a result of nutrient pollution. PMID:23944141

  19. Experimental river delta size set by multiple floods and backwater hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ganti, Vamsi; Chadwick, Austin J.; Hassenruck-Gudipati, Hima J.; Fuller, Brian M.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    River deltas worldwide are currently under threat of drowning and destruction by sea-level rise, subsidence, and oceanic storms, highlighting the need to quantify their growth processes. Deltas are built through construction of sediment lobes, and emerging theories suggest that the size of delta lobes scales with backwater hydrodynamics, but these ideas are difficult to test on natural deltas that evolve slowly. We show results of the first laboratory delta built through successive deposition...

  20. Amplified Msf tides at Kochi backwaters on the southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Balachandran, K.K.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; VijayKumar, K.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Revichandran, C.; Dabholkar, N.

    plays an addi- tional role in the Msf tidal amplification. Keywords: Amplification, bed materials, Kochi back- waters, nonlinear frictional interaction, shallowness, tides. NOTICEABLE transformations occur in the pattern and range of tides... during their propagation from the open ocean into continental shelves and further into shallower coastal waters, broad lagoons and backwaters. Such trans- formations, caused by a myriad of topographical and bathymetric influences, are indicated...

  1. [Seasonal variation of phytoplankton community in Xiaojiang backwater area during the preliminary operation stage of the Three Gorges Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-song; Sheng, Jin-ping; Li, Zhe; Gao, Xu; Fang, Fang; Zhou, Hong

    2010-07-01

    According to one year's continuous observation on algae in the Xiaojiang backwater area in Three Gorges Reservoir, our group analyzed algae community and its succession in the Xiaojiang backwater area at the beginning of the function of the reservoir. The algae cell density and biomass are the highest in spring and the lowest in winter. The maximal value of cell density is 421.64 x 10(3) cells x L(-1), and the minimal value is 2.06 x 10(5) cells x L(-1); and maximal value of biomass is 39,231.84 microg x L(-1), and the minimal value is 226.17 microg x L(-1). From May 2007 to May 2008, there are 7 phylum, 101 category, 262 genus appeared in the Xiaojiang backwater area, in which 51 categories are Chlorophyta accounting for 50.5%, 22 categories are Bacillariophyta accounting for 21.8%, 18 categories are Cyanophyta accounting for 17.8%, and 4 categories are Dinophyta, 2 categories are Cryptophyta, 3 categories are Euglenophyta, 1 category is Xanthophyta and others. Cryptomonas, Chlorella, Cyclotella, Scenedesmus, Oocystis, Chlamydomonas, Schroederia, Aulacoseira, Stephanodiscus and Fragilaria are familiar categories in the Xiaojiang backwater area. Asterionnella, Aulacoseira, Coelastrunm, Chlorella, Scenedesmus, Aclinastnrum, Dictyosphaerium, Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Merismopedia, Ceratium, Peridinium and Cryptomonas are the preponderant categories in the Xiaojiang backwater area. PMID:20825015

  2. Annual dynamics of the fish stock in a backwater of the River Dyje

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lusk, Stanislav; Halačka, Karel; Lusková, Věra; Horák, Václav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 17, 4-5 (2001), s. 571-581. ISSN 0886-9375. [International Symposium on Regulated Streams /8./. Toulouse, 17.07.2000-21.07.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/99/1519; GA ČR GA206/00/0668; GA AV ČR IBS6093007; GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : backwater * fish communities * River Dyje Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.169, year: 2001

  3. Exploring the Application of Optical Remote Sensing as a Method to Estimate the Depth of Backwater Nursery Habitats of the Colorado Pikeminnow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Yuki [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); LaGory, Kirk E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Low-velocity channel-margin habitats serve as important nursery habitats for the endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) in the middle Green River between Jensen and Ouray, Utah. These habitats, known as backwaters, are associated with emergent sand bars, and are shaped and reformed annually by peak flows. A recent synthesis of information on backwater characteristics and the factors that influence inter-annual variability in those backwaters (Grippo et al. 2015) evaluated detailed survey information collected annually since 2003 on a relatively small sample of backwaters, as well as reach-wide evaluations of backwater surface area from aerial and satellite imagery. An approach is needed to bridge the gap between these detailed surveys, which estimate surface area, volume, and depth, and the reach-wide assessment of surface area to enable an assessment of the amount of habitat that meets the minimum depth requirements for suitable habitat.

  4. Dissolved organic matter processing within the Atchafalaya basin: from river to backwater swamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. N.; Edwards, B.; Keim, R.; Scott, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrologic complexity in large floodplains makes examining the fate of nutrients and carbon challenging. We used a combination of stable isotopes (δ18O-H2O, δD-H2O, δ13C-DOC, and δ13C-DIC) and carbon characterization (PARAFAC modeling, SUVA, flurescence index) to identify the fate of both allochthonous (externally produced) and autochthonous (internally produced) dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Atchafalaya swamp. Three separate synoptic sampling campaigns were completed across an annual flood pulse (rising limb, peak, and falling limb), in which the stable isotopic content of water was used to quantify the gradient of hydrologic connectivity from river to backwater swamp. The carbon characterization and isotopic content provided insight into sources and processing of DOM along that gradient. Results reveal autochthonous and allochthonous carbon signatures across the gradient from backwater swamp to river water during the rising limb. However, as sites become hydrologically connected during the peak, DOM was dominated by allochthonous sources. Following the flood pulse, we expect to once again see stratification across the sites altering the DOM sources, composition, and bioavailability.

  5. Experimental river delta size set by multiple floods and backwater hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganti, Vamsi; Chadwick, Austin J; Hassenruck-Gudipati, Hima J; Fuller, Brian M; Lamb, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    River deltas worldwide are currently under threat of drowning and destruction by sea-level rise, subsidence, and oceanic storms, highlighting the need to quantify their growth processes. Deltas are built through construction of sediment lobes, and emerging theories suggest that the size of delta lobes scales with backwater hydrodynamics, but these ideas are difficult to test on natural deltas that evolve slowly. We show results of the first laboratory delta built through successive deposition of lobes that maintain a constant size. We show that the characteristic size of delta lobes emerges because of a preferential avulsion node-the location where the river course periodically and abruptly shifts-that remains fixed spatially relative to the prograding shoreline. The preferential avulsion node in our experiments is a consequence of multiple river floods and Froude-subcritical flows that produce persistent nonuniform flows and a peak in net channel deposition within the backwater zone of the coastal river. In contrast, experimental deltas without multiple floods produce flows with uniform velocities and delta lobes that lack a characteristic size. Results have broad applications to sustainable management of deltas and for decoding their stratigraphic record on Earth and Mars. PMID:27386534

  6. The Riverbed Evolution, Avulsions and Backwater Hydrodynamics on the Huanghe River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Z.; Ganti, V.; Lamb, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Huanghe River is known for high suspended sediment concentration and resultant heavy sedimentation and frequent channel-shifting among major rivers in the world. This plain coastal river is the main contributor of terrestrial sediment to the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea. Since 1855, there have been 11 major avulsions (versus 4 avulsions on the Mississippi River during the Holocene) on the lower reach with an recurrence interval of ~10 years, developing individual lobes that build up the modern Huanghe River delta. We summarize the main features of riverbed evolution on the delta with a database of measured data. The observed avulsions on the delta often occurred along a persistent spatial node, whose distance from the shoreline scales with the computed backwater length. In order to explain the avulsion locations on the delta, and meanwhile to test the viewpoint of river backwater controls on avulsion locations on deltas, we simulate the long profile evolution of the riverbed on the delta considering river discharge, river plume spreading, land subsidence and sea level rise, with a 1D fluvial morphodynamic model. The main results from the numerical simulations provide insights into how the long profile of the river on the delta evolves at the time scales of flood events and avulsions.

  7. Experimental river delta size set by multiple floods and backwater hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganti, Vamsi; Chadwick, Austin J.; Hassenruck-Gudipati, Hima J.; Fuller, Brian M.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    River deltas worldwide are currently under threat of drowning and destruction by sea-level rise, subsidence, and oceanic storms, highlighting the need to quantify their growth processes. Deltas are built through construction of sediment lobes, and emerging theories suggest that the size of delta lobes scales with backwater hydrodynamics, but these ideas are difficult to test on natural deltas that evolve slowly. We show results of the first laboratory delta built through successive deposition of lobes that maintain a constant size. We show that the characteristic size of delta lobes emerges because of a preferential avulsion node—the location where the river course periodically and abruptly shifts—that remains fixed spatially relative to the prograding shoreline. The preferential avulsion node in our experiments is a consequence of multiple river floods and Froude-subcritical flows that produce persistent nonuniform flows and a peak in net channel deposition within the backwater zone of the coastal river. In contrast, experimental deltas without multiple floods produce flows with uniform velocities and delta lobes that lack a characteristic size. Results have broad applications to sustainable management of deltas and for decoding their stratigraphic record on Earth and Mars. PMID:27386534

  8. Seasonal Abundance of Micro Algae in Pandi Backwaters of Godavari Estuary, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geddada Mohan NARASIMHA RAO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gautami branch of Godavari River is a typical positive estuary and is in tidal communication with the open sea upto a point near Kapileswarapuram. This branch flows southwest and opens into Bay of Bengal at two places, namely Bhiravapalem and Kothapalem. The Gautami branch of Godavari is also connected to Pandi backwaters by a channel known as Pedderu, which starts at Kothapalem, Balusutippa area and enters Pandi back water system. Two stations were selected for collection of data. Hydrographical data were collected for one year from July 2006 to 2007 and the data on distribution of phytoplankton was studied in three seasons during 2006-2007. Hydrographical features of the two stations showed that lower values were recorded during October to February months, while higher values were reported from the month of March to September. A total 57 species of phytoplankton were identified from the two study sites of the Pandi backwaters Composition of phytoplankton varied seasonally in relation to salinity fluctuations and showed that two peak periods, one in June-July and another in between December and March. Present study indicates that diatoms are the dominant group followed by the Chlorophyceae and others. This study will aid the baseline data for aqua-culturists in nearby regions.

  9. Evaluation of melioration area damage on the river Danube caused by the hydroelectric power plant 'Djerdap 1' backwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic, P; Andjelic, L; Urosevic, U; Polomcic, D

    2014-01-01

    Construction of the hydroelectric power plant (HPP) 'Djerdap 1' formed a backwater effect on the Danube and its tributaries, which had an inevitable influence on groundwater level, causing it to rise and thus creating additional threats to all melioration areas on more than 300 km of the Danube riversides, as well as on the riversides of its tributaries: the Sava (100 km) and the Tisa (60 km). In this paper, the HPP 'Djerdap 1' backwater effect on some characteristic melioration areas (34 in all) has been analyzed. In most of these areas intensive agricultural activity has always been present. An assessment of agricultural production damage was carried out by complex hydrodynamic calculations (60 calculation profiles) for different backwater regimes, with the aim to precisely quantify the HPP 'Djerdap 1' backwater effect on groundwater piezometric levels. Combining them with complex agroeconomic analyses, the aim is to quantify agricultural production damage and to consider the perspective of melioration area users. This method, which combines two different, but compatible, aspects of the melioration area threat assessment (hydrodynamic and agroeconomic), may present a quality base for further agricultural production threat assessment on all melioration areas on the Danube riversides, with the final aim to consider the economic effects and the importance of its further protection. PMID:25051487

  10. Effects of an atrazine, metolachlor, and fipronil mixture on Hyalella azteca (Saussure) in a modified backwater wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the toxicity mitigation efficiency of a hydrologically modified backwater wetland amended with a mixture of three pesticides, atrazine, metolachlor, and fipronil, using 96 h survival bioassays with Hyalella azteca. Significant H. azteca 96 h mortality occurred within the first two hours...

  11. Artificial tide generation and its effects on the water environment in the backwater of Three Gorges Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yukun; Wei, Yongping; Li, Weipeng; Fan, Jihui; Cheng, Genwei

    2015-09-01

    Since the water impounding of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in 2003, the water stage in the backwater region increased from 65 m before water impounding to 145 m, and the velocity of the stream flow decreased significantly. The outflows of the tributaries that flow into TGR were also obstructed by the backwater. Stopping the stream flow prevented the pollutants from diffusing and transporting themselves into the water body, hence polluting the water in several tributaries. The authors proposed an artificial tide generation approach to solve this problem. The man-made flood peak in the downstream and the waves of the water stage in the upstream of the TGR can be produced by operating hydropower generators daily to deal with peak-and-bottom variations in the electricity demand. These waves will propagate upwards and form artificial tides in the backwater area. The water stage variation will intensify the flow exchange between the main stem and the tributaries as well as enhance the diffusion of pollutants, which will subsequently decrease the eutrophication of the water body in the outlet of branches as well as relieve the algal bloom problem in the region. The daily operations in the reservoir were simulated and tested by using the proposed hydrodynamic model of TGR. The hydropower operation for the peak load of electricity demand will produce artificial tides in the backwater area of TGR as well as increase the water stage variation from 0.30 m to 0.50 m within a day. This periodic fluctuation of water stage waves will intensify the water exchange between the main reach of Changjiang (Yangtze River) and its tributaries with an additional inflow or outflow of up to 300-500 m3/s, which is equivalent to the average discharge of these tributaries during the summer. The artificial tide generation can enhance the internal exchange of backwater as well as improve the water environment condition in the backwater area. This operation approach provides a new technology

  12. Impact of eutrophication on the occurrence of Trichodesmium in the Cochin backwaters, the largest estuary along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Martin, G.D.; Jyothibabu, R.; Madhu, N.V.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, M.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Arun, P.K.; Haridevi, C.K.; Revichandran, C.

    during extremely low saline conditions (Menon et al. 2000). Among various size classes of phytoplankton in the backwaters, nano-size fraction contributes majority of the primary standing stock and production all through the year (Menon et al. 2000...

  13. Biodiversity of Three Backwaters in the South West Coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beslin Leena Grace

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the conservation of biodiversity, it is not sufficient to preserve the living organisms or their gametes alone, because keeping fishes in aquaria or their gametes in freezers cannot conserve the full range of biodiversity which is due to the loss of the ecological complexity in their original habitats. For promoting richer biodiversity in the future, more complexity in biological communities is essential in their natural environments. In order to prevent depletion of biodiversity due to environmental alterations or other ways, it is necessary to understand how the diversity of life particularly at the species level is maintained and it is equally necessary to know how the terminal extinction of species takes place under natural conditions. Moreover, a database on fishery resources of the concerned environment is essential to make decision about specific programmes on conservation of fish germplasm resources. Hence, the present study aims to quantify the fish and shellfish resources of the selected backwaters such as Kadinamkulam, Veli, and Poonthura to know the real stocks present in such environments.

  14. Monsoonal impact on planktonic standing stock and abundance in a tropical estuary (Cochin backwaters - India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, N. V.; Jyothibabu, R.; Balachandran, K. K.; Honey, U. K.; Martin, G. D.; Vijay, J. G.; Shiyas, C. A.; Gupta, G. V. M.; Achuthankutty, C. T.

    2007-06-01

    Environmental studies in the Cochin backwaters (CBW), a tropical estuary along the southwest coast of India showed that seasonal fluctuations in salinity created by the monsoonal rainfall and associated run off is a major factor controlling the distribution and abundance of micro- and mesozooplankton. During premonsoon season, the CBW was characterized by warm waters (av. 32.6 ± 0.6 °C) with relatively high salinity (>23; except in the lower estuary). On the other hand, fresh water was found to dominate the entire area during monsoon and postmonsoon seasons. The enormous input of nutrients (nitrate, phosphate and silicate) into the estuary from various sources (industries, agriculture and domestic) was responsible for the high phytoplankton biomass (av. 10.4 ± 10.1 mg m -3) irrespective of seasons. The phytoplankton community was, in general, dominated by diatoms (av. 88 ± 12%), and proliferation of multiple species of diatoms ( Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira subtilis and Nitzschia closterium - 1600 × 10 3 cells L -1) at different locations were observed especially during high saline condition. In case of zooplankton (micro- and meso), high standing stocks (micro av. 81.4 ± 48.1 mg C m -3; meso av. 88 ± 125 mg C m -3, respectively) were recorded during the premonsoon season. Copepods (e.g. Calanoids) formed the abundant group (av. 75 ± 18%) in the mesozooplankton community irrespective of seasons. The ratio of carbon content between phytoplankton and zooplankton ( P: Z) was quite high (>100) during monsoon and postmonsoon seasons, but became low during premonsoon season (<5). Hence, it is suggested that during the periods of fresh water dominance, the trophic food web of Cochin estuarine system is characterized by substantial amount of unconsumed carbon at primary level owing to the reduction in phytoplankton grazers (zooplankton).

  15. 2008 High-Flow Experiment at Glen Canyon Dam-Morphologic Response of Eddy-Deposited Sandbars and Associated Aquatic Backwater Habitats along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Paul E.; Schmidt, John C.; Andersen, Matthew E.

    2010-01-01

    The March 2008 high-flow experiment (HFE) at Glen Canyon Dam resulted in sandbar deposition and sandbar reshaping such that the area and volume of associated backwater aquatic habitat in Grand Canyon National Park was greater following the HFE. Analysis of backwater habitat area and volume for 116 locations at 86 study sites, comparing one month before and one month after the HFE, shows that total habitat area increased by 30 percent to as much as a factor of 3 and that volume increased by 80 percent to as much as a factor of 15. These changes resulted from an increase in the area and elevation of sandbars, which isolate backwaters from the main channel, and the scour of eddy return-current channels along the bank where the habitat occurs. Because of this greater relief on the sandbars, backwaters were present across a broader range of flows following the HFE than before the experiment. Reworking of sandbars during diurnal fluctuating flow operations in the first 6 months following the HFE caused sandbar erosion and a reduction of backwater size and abundance to conditions that were 5 to 14 percent greater than existed before the HFE. In the months following the HFE, erosion of sandbars and deposition in eddy return-current channels caused reductions of backwater area and volume. However, sandbar relief was still greater in October 2008 such that backwaters were present across a broader range of discharges than in February 2008. Topographic analyses of the sandbar and backwater morphologic data collected in this study demonstrate that steady flows are associated with a greater amount of continuously available backwater habitat than fluctuating flows, which result in a greater amount of intermittently available habitat. With the exception of the period immediately following the HFE, backwater habitat in 2008 was greater for steady flows associated with dam operations of relatively lower monthly volume (about 227 m3/s) than steady flows associated with dam operations

  16. Summer nitrate uptake and denitrification in an upper Mississippi River backwater lake: The role of rooted aquatic vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiling, Rebecca M.; Richardson, W.B.; Cavanaugh, J.C.; Bartsch, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    In-stream nitrogen processing in the Mississippi River has been suggested as one mechanism to reduce coastal eutrophication in the Gulf of Mexico. Aquatic macrophytes in river channels and flood plain lakes have the potential to temporarily remove large quantities of nitrogen through assimilation both by themselves and by the attached epiphyton. In addition, rooted macrophytes act as oxygen pumps, creating aerobic microsites around their roots where coupled nitrification-denitrification can occur. We used in situ 15N-NO3- tracer mesocosm experiments to measure nitrate assimilation rates for macrophytes, epiphyton, and microbial fauna in the sediment in Third Lake, a backwater lake of the upper Mississippi River during June and July 2005. We measured assimilation over a range of nitrate concentrations and estimated a nitrate mass balance for Third Lake. Macrophytes assimilated the most nitrate (29.5 mg N m-2 d-1) followed by sediment microbes (14.4 mg N m-2 d-1) and epiphytes (5.7 mg N m-2d-1. Assimilation accounted for 6.8% in June and 18.6% in July of total nitrate loss in the control chambers. However, denitrification (292.4 mg N m-2 d-1) is estimated to account for the majority (82%) of the nitrate loss. Assimilation and denitrification rates generally increased with increasing nitrate concentration but denitrification rates plateaued at about 5 mg N L-1. This suggests that backwaters have the potential to remove a relatively high amount of nitrate but will likely become saturated if the load becomes too large. ?? 2010 US Government.

  17. Toxic Metals Enrichment in the Surficial Sediments of a Eutrophic Tropical Estuary (Cochin Backwaters, Southwest Coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations and distributions of trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in surficial sediments of the Cochin backwaters were studied during both monsoon and pre-monsoon periods. Spatial variations were in accordance with textural charaterstics and organic matter content. A principal component analysis distinguished three zones with different metal accumulation capacity: (i highest levels in north estuary, (ii moderate levels in central zone, and (iii lowest levels in southern part. Trace metal enrichments are mainly due to anthropogenic contribution of industrial, domestic, and agricultural effluents, whose effect is enhanced by settling of metals due to organic flocculation and inorganic precipitation associated with salinity changes. Enrichments factors using Fe as a normalizer showed that metal contamination was the product of anthropogenic activities. An assessment of degree of pollution-categorized sediments as moderately polluted with Cu and Pb, moderately-to-heavily polluted with Zn, and heavily-to-extremely polluted with Cd. Concentrations at many sites largely exceed NOAA ERL (e.g., Cu, Cr, and Pb or ERM (e.g., Cd, Ni, and Zn. This means that adverse effects for benthic organisms are possible or even highly probable.

  18. Nitrification in Kochi backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Miranda, J.; Balachandran, K.K.; Ramesh, R.; Wafar, M.

    , were measured in Kochi back- 166 nmol N L C01 h C01 in the water column and up to 17 nmol N (g wet (2008) 291e300 www.elsevier.com/locate/ecss and receive also untreated sewage (260 m 3 day C01 ) from Kochi city (Balachandran et al., 2005), besides... in the relation between salinity and nitrification in non- monsoon months where lowest rates at lowest salinities Shelf Science 78 (2008) 291e300 increased to highest rates at intermediate salinities. At higher salinities, the nitrifying activity actually...

  19. Influence of backwater on bulk flotation of a porphyry copper-molybdenum ore%某斑岩型铜钼矿尾矿回水对混合浮选的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王怀; 郑晔; 郝福来; 宋超

    2016-01-01

    为分析某斑岩型铜钼矿尾矿回水对混合浮选的影响,以回水组分为研究对象进行了矿石中铜钼硫矿物可浮性的研究。结果表明:回水导致浮选精矿产率增大,铜、钼可浮性降低,硫被强烈抑制;回水中高浓度钙离子和APAM的联合作用,能有效地抑制矿石中的黄铁矿;浮选药剂以及 APAM 的累积,使浮选矿浆粘度增加,微细粒金属矿物夹杂在絮团之中而未能上浮。%In order to analyze the influence of backwater on bulk flotation of a porphyry copper‐molybdenum ore ,flotation tests were carried out to study the floatability of metallic minerals in the water containing different constituents .The results showed that the concentrate yield increase dramatically ,and the floatability of copper and molybdenum decline significantly under the condition of backwater flotation , however ,the pyrite is strongly inhibited that the high concentrations of calcium and APAM in backwater are the main causes .The slurry viscosity tends to rise with the cumulation of flotation reagents and APAM in backwater ,which lead to the loss of fine‐grained minerals wrapped in floccules .

  20. Characterization of submicron particles in an environmentally-relevant water: Backwater from a sanitary landfill on a uranium mine tailing at Freital, Saxony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy for characterizing submicron particles in environmental waters based on filtration, centrifugation and photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) is proposed. Filtration and centrifugation are not used here as methods for particle characterization but serve merely as techniques of a rough separation of the sample. They are applied as cautiously and non-invasively as possible and are only aimed at separating the sample sufficiently for measurements by primarily PCS. The separation should unmask small particles that scatter little light and divide the sample into populations of particles that have monomodal or bimodal size distributions. In this way, the strategy optimizes subsequent particle-size determinations by PCS and minimizes the influence of sample preparation on the samples. A further essential feature of this strategy is the parallel application of complementary methods for both sample preparation and particle characterization (filtration/centrifugation, PCS/SEM, gravimetry/ICP-MS etc.). This facilitates the validation of results and increases the probability for recognizing artifacts. Based on our experimental experience, a guideline for PCS measurements on low-concentration colloids with the BI 90/Correlator BI 9000 AT system from Brookhaven Instruments Corp. was developed. This guideline is aimed at obtaining autocorrelation functions of sufficiently good photon counting statistics which is crucial in PCS on colloidal solutions poor in particles. A measuring campaign on an environmentally-relevant water (backwater from a sanitary landfill on a uranium mine tailing at Freital, Saxony) showed the presence of about 1 to 2 mg/l of submicron particles having a particle size of 30 to 300 nm and of about 5 mg/l of suspended matter (>1000 nm). In spite of the lower mass concentration, the submicron particles likely represent a larger surface than the suspended matter due to the particle size relation between the two classes of particles. (orig.)

  1. Hydrocarbons degrading yeasts from Cochin backwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prabhakaran, N.; Sivadas, P.

    stream_size 5 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name J_Mar_Biol_Assoc_India_37_226.pdf.txt stream_source_info J_Mar_Biol_Assoc_India_37_226.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  2. Cochin backwaters: A sad story of manipulation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.

    to those in more 'developed' similar ecosystems worldwide and recognizing the importance of the significant role played in the socio-economic aspects of the region, it is emphasised that investigations with a thrust on modern sediment budget techniques only...

  3. The backwaters of glory and hardship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book starts the background of this writing, the letter to his father, a brief summary of his career. It is Dr. Kim Dong Hun's an autobiographical report about introduction into nuclear power, building TRIGA Mark-III and propel the business of research reactor, establishing nuclear safe center, beginning and president Lee, Seung Man, passion over TRIGA. It deals with carrying out building the HANARO about background, the process of the business.

  4. Breathing Cochin backwaters: Need for conservation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, K.K.C.

    , and in particular, Cochin is one of the prime locations prone to trigger it. Being the second largest city along the West Coast, the coastal circulation of this region is critical because, as compared to the Mumbai coast where the mean tidal height is > 3 m... the carrying capacity or assimilative capacity of any coastal waters, it is imperative to critically examine the residual tidal effect of any eventual pollutant in their waters. Cochin, the biggest city along the west coast of India after Mumbai, has...

  5. Phytoplankton distribution in Cochin backwaters - a seasonal study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Kumaran, S.; Vijayan, M.

    Skeletonema costatum was the most abundant species in alt the 3 stations. The distribution of Asterionella japonica was least consistent than that of Nitzs-chia closterium which was most consistent at Station 1. At station 2,29.3% of the species...

  6. Analysis on partial pressure of CO2 and influencing factors during spring phytoplankton bloom in the backwater area of Xiaojiang River in Three Gorges Reservoir%三峡水库澎溪河春季水华期p(CO2)及影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭劲松; 蒋滔; 李哲; 陈永柏; 孙志禹

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of the partial pressure of CO2 (p( C02) ) was conducted in the backwater area of Xiaojiang River in Three Gorges Reservoir. Water samples were taken from the five cross sections in the Quma-Heikou reach of Xiaojiang River during the spring phytoplankton bloom from April 10 through May 25, 2010. Results show that there are obvious stratifications of chlorophyll a ( Chla) , dissolved oxygen ( DO), and p( CO2) in water columns. The value for p( CO2) is low in surface water due to phytoplankton photosynthesis effects. The surface water can be the CO2 sink if sufficient sunshine presents. A minimum value of 4. 3 Pa for p ( C02) was observed from the cross section of Shuangjiang on April 25, with an absorption flux of -0.28 mmol/mVh. The value forp(C02) increases vertically with the water depth, and will be stabilized in the 10 - 15m layer of water. The partial least squares regression analysis reveals that the growth and metabolism of phytoplankton in the surface water are the key factors controlling p ( CO2). A negative relationship between the water temperature and />(CO2) has been found, but its influence on p ( CO2) is minimum. Using the indices of Excess p ( CO2) ( Ep ( CO2) ) and apparent oxygen utilization ( AD0 ), a three-stage bloom of phytoplankton in the Xiaojiang River was observed, during which, the surface water had gone through a sink-source-sink cycle for C02.%在三峡水库澎溪河回水区春季水华连续暴发期间(2010年4月10日至5月25日),对渠马至河口总计5个采样断面进行监测.结果表明水华期间水体叶绿素a(Chla),溶解氧(DO)及CO2分压(p(CO2))分层现象明显,表层水体受浮游植物光合作用的影响p(CO2)较低,并且日照充足时,水体为CO2的汇.研究期间表层水体p(CO2)最小值出现在4月25日双江断面,为4.3Pa,吸收通量为-0.28 mmoL/(m2·h).P(CO2)随水深迅速增加,并在10~15m趋于稳定.偏最小二乘回归分析(PLS)表明澎溪河水华期间,浮游植物

  7. Communities and coexistence of benthos in northern limb of Cochin Backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, K.S.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Venugopal, P.

    and the size of the clusters show a steady decline from sts 1 to 8. Maximum affinity is for adjacent stations and never exceeded 60%. Negative affinity indices obtained are deemed indicative of the varied environmental conditions. Results indicate limited...

  8. Monsoonal impact on planktonic standing stock and abundance in a tropical estuary (Cochin backwaters - India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhu, N.V.; Jyothibabu, R.; Balachandran, K.K.; Honey, U.K.; Martin, G.D.; Vijay, J.G.; Shiyas, C.A.; Gupta, G.V.M.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    ; Madhupratap et al., 1975; Qasim, 2003). Being eutrophic, primary production in the estuary is always high and is mainly constituted by nano plankton (<20? m) community (Qasim, 1974). Considering the planktonic grazers, a recent study has found that micro...., 2005). The high concentration of chlorophyll a (>20mgm-3) observed at few stations (2, 7 & 8) was primarily due to the massive growth of nano plankton (<20? diatom). 11 The productivity pattern in CBW has shown that nano plankton contributes a...

  9. Effects of contaminated sediments on a backwater restoration project in the Mississippi River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Success of any aquatic restoration project is based on the assumptions that physical features can be manipulated in such a way as to improve habitat, water quality or both. An additional assumption is that there is nothing inherent about the site that would prevent the target community from exploit...

  10. Benthos and substratum characteristics of prawn culture fields in and around the Cochin backwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aravindakshan, P.N.; Balasubramanian, T.; Devi, C.B.L.; Nair, K.K.C.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Kutty, M.K.

    significant component of food of prawns. Substratum characteristics, bottom temperature, salinity, pH, oxygen. Eh and organic carbon content of the mud are the parameters examined for identifying the governing factors controlling the benthic abundance...

  11. Synechococcus as an indicator of trophic status in the Cochin backwaters, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajaneesh, K.M.; Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A.C.; Sawant, S.S.

    anthropogenic wastes. Trophic status index (TRIX) scores showed that CB is highly eutrophic with a high phytoplankton biomass. Synechococcus was the dominant PP observed in the study area. Seasonal and spatial salinity variations influenced the PP distribution...

  12. Variations in zooplankton density in the Cochin backwater consequent to environmental changes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Stephen, R.

    stream_size 2 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Proc_Kerala_Sci_Cong_1991_57.pdf.txt stream_source_info Proc_Kerala_Sci_Cong_1991_57.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  13. Salinity-induced survival strategy of Vibrio cholerae associated with copepods in Cochin backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thomas, K.U.; Joseph, N.; Raveendran, O.; Nair, S.

    Oxidase test + 71 Catalase + 65 Mannitol + 50 Sucrose + 67 Arabinose C0 45 Lactose C0 67 Nitrate reduction + 55 Arginine C0 47 Methyl red NA NA Voges–Proskauer + 56 Esculin C0 47 NaCl (0%) C0 79 NaCl (6%) C0 63 NaCl (8%) C0 26 Table 2 Distribution of V...

  14. Restoration of a river backwater and its influence on fish assemblage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hohausová, Eva; Jurajda, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 10 (2005), s. 473-482. ISSN 1212-1819 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/93/0734; GA ČR(CZ) GA206/97/0162; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6087503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : rehabilitation and restoration * long-term monitoring * colonisation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.254, year: 2005 http://www.cazv.cz/attachments/CJAS_50_473_482.pdf

  15. Application of 2-D sediment model to fluctuating backwater area of Yangtze River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong FAN

    2009-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of backflow,a two-dimensional mathematical model of sediment movement was established.The complexity of the watercourse boundary at the confluence of the main stream and the tributary was dealt with using a boundary-fitting orthogonal coordinate system.The basic equation of the two-dimensional total sediment load model,the numerical calculation format,and key problems associated with using the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discussed.Water and sediment flow in the Chongqing reach of the Yangtze River were simulated.The calculated water level,flow velocity distribution,amount of silting and scouring,and alluvial distribution are found to be in agreement with the measured data,which indicates that the numerical model and calculation method are reasonable.The model can be used for calculation of flow in a relatively complicated river network.

  16. Observed thermohaline structure and cooling of Kochi backwaters and adjoining southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Mehra, P.; Prabhudesai, R.G.; Sivadas, T.K.; Balachandran, K.K.; Vijaykumar, K.; Revichandran, C.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Francis, R.; Martin, G.D.

    and vane (model: 05103) measured speed and direction with an accu- racy of ±0.2 m/s and ±3° respectively. Honeywell’s silicon piezo-resistive pressure sensor (model: HPB) measured barometric pressure with an accuracy of ±0.4 mb. Capaci- tive polymer...

  17. Activity of soil fungi of Mangalvan, the mangrove ecosystem of Cochin backwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prabhakaran, N.; Gupta, R.

    by sterilized cork borer from actively grow ing petri plate cultures, were used. All the plates were incubated in the dark at 28 ± ZoC for five days. For ceUulase activity the tubes were in cubated atZ8 ± ZoC for 35 days. Each analysis was carried out...

  18. Impact of freshwater influx on microzooplankton mediated food web in a tropical estuary (Cochin backwaters - India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothibabu, R.; Madhu, N.V.; Jayalakshmi, K.V.; Balachandran, K.K.; Shiyas, C.C.; Martin, G.D.; Nair, K.K.C.

    and evenness of microzooplankton also showed similar trends as that of abundance and biomass. Grazing experiment showed that microzooplankton consumes 43 ± 1% of the daily phytoplankton standing stock during the high saline condition (27.5). Low abundance...

  19. Hydrographic Surveys of the Missouri River at Langdon backwater, 2011-13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An Innerspace 456 single-beam echosounder in conjunction with a Trimble® differential Global Positioning System (DGPS), HYPACK® navigation software, and Ashtech...

  20. Hydrographic Surveys of the Missouri River at Ponca backwater, 2011-13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An Innerspace 456 single-beam echosounder in conjunction with a Trimble® differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and HYPACK® navigation software, and...

  1. Hydrographic Surveys of the Missouri River at Plattsmouth backwater, 2011-13

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An Innerspace 456 single-beam echosounder in conjunction with a Trimble® differential Global Positioning System (DGPS), HYPACK® navigation software, and Ashtech...

  2. Application of 2-D sediment model to fluctuating backwater area of Yangtze River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong FAN

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the characteristics of backflow, a two-dimensional mathematical model of sediment movement was established. The complexity of the watercourse boundary at the confluence of the main stream and the tributary was dealt with using a boundary-fitting orthogonal coordinate system. The basic equation of the two-dimensional total sediment load model, the numerical calculation format, and key problems associated with using the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system were discussed. Water and sediment flow in the Chongqing reach of the Yangtze River were simulated. The calculated water level, flow velocity distribution, amount of silting and scouring, and alluvial distribution are found to be in agreement with the measured data, which indicates that the numerical model and calculation method are reasonable. The model can be used for calculation of flow in a relatively complicated river network.

  3. Vulnerability of Cochin Backwaters to meteorological disturbances with special reference to tidal propagation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Balachandran, K.K.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; Dabholkar, N.; Kumar, V.; Revichandran, C.; Agarvadekar, Y.

    characteristics of a tropical estuarine ecosystem (Vembanad Lake — southwest coast of India) and features of tidal propagation, Water Research (communicated). Madhu, N. V., R. Jyothibabu, K. K. Balachandran, U. K. Honey, G. D. Martin, J...

  4. Distribution, reproductive biology and biochemical composition of Rhopalophthalmus indicus (Crustacea: Mysida) from a tropical estuary (Cochin backwater) in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Biju, A; Gireesh, R.; Panampunnayil, S.U.

    males and females attain sexual maturity at a length of 8.4 mm. Seasonality is observed in biochemical composition, as mature males and females had higher protein contents, immature stages contained high carbohydrate content and brooding females...

  5. Eutrophication induced changes in benthic community structure of a flow-restricted tropical estuary (Cochin backwaters), India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Martin, G.D.; Nisha, P.A.; Balachandran, K.K.; Madhu, N.V.; Nair, M.; Shaiju, P.; Joseph, T.; Srinivas, K.; Gupta, G.V.M.

    , where dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN > 210 mu M) and phosphorus (DIP > 6.5 mu M) have caused high abundance of chlorophyll a (up to 73 mg m sup(-3)) and accumulation of organic carbon in sediments (up to 5%). Principal component analysis distinguished...

  6. Foraging behaviour and diving pattern of Little Cormorant Phalacrocorax niger (Vieillot (Pelecaniformes: Phalacrocoracidae at Kallampara backwaters, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zeenath

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The foraging behaviour and diving patterns of Little Cormorant Phalacrocorax niger were studied during August 2005 to March 2006 by direct observation of individuals foraging at Kallampara River (11009’25.5”N & 75051’02.0”E, near the Kadalundy Bird Sanctuary, Kozhikode District, Kerala, India. The individuals observed, foraged solitarily in shallow waters and displayed relatively short diving bouts composed of several dives (25.3 � plus or minus 5.75. The dive duration was positively related to surface resting time. Also, duration of dives decreased with increase in the number of dive cycles per bout. The mean diving efficiency was within the range reported for Phalacrocoracidae. Little Cormorants are opportunistic foragers utilizing the availability of prey to the maximum depending on tidal cycles. This study shows a specific relation between body mass, dive duration and diving efficiency.

  7. Seasonal fluctuation in the distribution of eggs and larvae of flat fishes (Pleuronectiformes - Pisces) in the Cochin Backwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, C.B.L.

    Attempts have been made to correlate the abundance of eggs and larvae of flat fishes belonging to families Cynoglossidae and Soleidae with the hydrographical parameters of the environment, particularly the salinity. The eggs and larvae were found...

  8. Sediment Oxygen Demand in Cochin backwaters, a tropical estuarine system in the south-west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Abhilash, K.R.; Raveendran, T.V.; LimnaMol, V.P.; Deepak, M.P.

    ) h sup(−1)) was almost twice that of the wet season (1431.28 mu O sub(2) m sup(−2) h sup(−1)), presumably due to higher discharge during the latter season. The observed pockets of net oxygen release indicate that the CBS still retains certain...

  9. Short-term variability of water quality and its implications on phytoplankton production in a tropical estuary (Cochin backwaters - India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhu, N.V.; Balachandran, K.K.; Martin, G.D.; Jyothibabu, R.; Thottathil, S.D.; Nair, M.; Joseph, T.; Kusum, K.K.

    , the densities of major nano- diatoms were also less during the PM (Fig. 5c). Besides diatoms and dinoflagellates, fresh water green algae and blue green algae were commonly found in 10 study area during the PM as compared to the PRM (Table 2), which showed...

  10. Distribution and food habits of young-of-the-year fishes in a backwater lake of the upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, L.E.; Huston, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution patterns and food habits of young-of-the-year (YOY) fishes in a lentic area adjacent to the main channel of Pool 7 of the upper Mississippi River were studied. Habitats sampled grouped distinctly based on percent composition and abundance of YOY fishes with those having submergent vegetation dominated by a number of important sport species. In late spring, the grouping of stations depended on the presence or absence of newly transformed northern pike (Esox lucius). In early summer, stations did not differ as distinctly in composition, but in total abundance of young. Those stations with submergent vegetation had total catches which were more than double those elsewhere. By late summer, submergent and mixed vegetation stations formed a distinct assemblage influenced by the preponderance of three species of sunfishes. (DBO).

  11. Backwater manipulations for endangered fishes: Management implications of selenium on National Wildlife Refuges of the Lower Colorado River

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Many studies have evaluated selenium in the lower Colorado River, but none have reviewed selenium levels after river water has been directed into previously...

  12. Plankton food web and its seasonal dynamics in a large monsoonal estuary (Cochin backwaters, India)-significance of mesohaline region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sooria, P.M.; Jyothibabu, R.; Anjusha, A.; Vineetha, G.; Vinita, J.; Lallu, K.R.; Paul, M.; Jagadeesan, L.

    al. 2000). The displacement volume of zooplankton was converted into dry weight using a factor of 0.075 g. dry wt. ml-1 and then to carbon biomass following the standard conversion factor of Madhupratap et al. (1981). 2.7. Analysis of Variance... 1987; Qasim 2003; Jyothibabu et al. 2006). Conversely, during the Spring Intermonsoon/Pre-Monsoon (March - May), low freshwater inflow of rivers allows active salinity incursion and, as a result, the downstream of the CBW transforms into an extension...

  13. Toxic metals enrichment in the surficial sediments of a eutrophic tropical estuary (Cochin Backwaters, Southwest coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Martin, G.D.; Rejomon G.; Shaiju, P.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Nair, S.M.; Chandramohanakumar, N.

    ′ E) extends between the cities of Azhikode in the north and Alleppey in the south, running parallel to the Arabian Sea (Figure 1). The estuarine system has two permanent openings, one at Cochin bar and the other at Azhikode. The Cochin bar mouth...–25% in the winter monsoon (November-December) [15, 16]. The human intervention in the Cochin Estuary dates back to 1836 but has accelerated during the last five decades. The booming city of Cochin, which is the largest in the west coast of India after Mumbai, has a...

  14. Seasonal abundance, ecology, reproductive biology, and biochemical composition of Mesopodopsis orientalis W.M. Tattersall (Mysidacea) from a tropical estuary (Cochin Backwater) in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Biju, A; Gireesh, R.; Jayalakshmi, K.J.; Haridevi, C.K.; Panampunnayil, S.U.

    to increase with the size of the female. Egg size varied between 0.39 and 0.47 mm, with no correlation with length of the female, and size difference was observed in the same brood. Males and females attain sexual maturity after reaching a total length of 5 mm...

  15. The complex estuarine formation of six rivers (Cochin backwaters system on west coast of India) - Sources and distribution of trace metals and nutrients

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Joseph, T.; Nair, K.K.C.; Nair, M.; Joseph, P.S.

    sediment had shown a post-monsoon enrichment of Zn, Pb, Cu and in the northern and southern limbs of the estuary. The dissolved iron had an opposite tend to that of it in the sediments. Significant correlation of iron with other metals (except Mn) indicates...

  16. 1992 Sediment Quality Report for Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge, Illinois, Iowa and Missouri

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment quality was assessed in 1992 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at six backwater sites along the Upper Mississippi River. Five of the backwater sites...

  17. Monitorování úrovně hladin akumulovaných vod v Dole Jeroným

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lednická, Markéta; Kaláb, Zdeněk; Knejzlík, Jaromír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2012), s. 54-68. ISSN 1803-1447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/09/0089 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : mining backwater * water level fluctuation * dynamics of backwater Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure http://www.caag.cz/egrse/2012-2/07_lednicka-r.pdf

  18. Kondolf Diagram for River Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehabilitation, protection, and management of riverine backwaters (floodplain aquatic habitats that are seasonally or periodically connected to the main channel) are becoming increasingly common. General criteria for selecting restoration goals and evaluating alternative designs are lacking. An app...

  19. Influence of salinity on the life table demography of a rare Cladocera Latonopsis australis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Haridevan, G.; Jyothibabu, R.; Arunpandi, N.; Jagadeesan, L.; Biju, A

    Latonopsis australis is a rare Cladocera inhabiting the entire stretch of the Cochin backwaters, the largest monsoonal estuary along the West Coast of India, during the summer monsoon, but restricted to the upper reaches during the non...

  20. Drainage report for Delair Division of Great River NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Obstacles such as ground seepage, inefficient water control structures, and backwater in the Sny Ditch are all contributing to drainage problems at the Delair...

  1. Seagrasses - The forgotton marine habitat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jagtap, T.G.; Rodrigues, R.S.

    Seagrasses, a specialized group of flowering plants, submerged in the marine, estuarine, bay and backwater regions of the world. Though seagrass beds are of great ecological and socio economic importance, they are mostly unknown to Indians. Seagrass...

  2. Estuarine biology and management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Parulekar, A.H.

    large dosage of industrial effluents and domestic sewage. India is blessed with a large number of rivers and estuaries, but very few have received scientific attention or proper management. The case of the Cochin backwaters which has been fairly well...

  3. Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge Keithsburg Division Water and Sediment Quality Summary Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service surveyed environmental quality at a backwater system of the Upper Mississippi River between 1994 and 1996. The...

  4. Upper Mississippi River Floodplain water quality for Keithsburg Division, Illinois, Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service surveyed environmental quality at a backwater system of the Upper Mississippi River between 1994 and 1996. The...

  5. Conflicting interests in the use of Kerala's penaeid shrimp resources: A case question

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Stephen, D.; David, J.; Anand, P.E.V.

    In the drive to increase foreign exchange on the shrimp resource base, the development strategy has been to bring additional backwater area under the open semi-intensive culture system. Apparently, the nature of the shrimp resource complex...

  6. Diseases and parasites of laboratory reared and wild population of banded pearl spot Etroplus suratensis (Cichlidae) in Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rattan, P.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Banded Pearl spot Etroplus suratensis, the inhabitant of coastal backwaters and lagoons is one among the few finfish species identified for brackishwater farming. Common diseases and parasites from the wild population of Goa and from the laboratory...

  7. Habitat Restoration of a Constructed Ohio River Embayment

    OpenAIRE

    Rennaker, Caleb Michael

    2013-01-01

    Backwater habitats of large rivers provide habitat for aquatic biota and influence important predator-prey interactions in fishes and other aquatic organisms. However, these areas often exhibit turbid conditions and lack habitat complexity. Restoration of lentic habitats through direct habitat manipulations has shown success in prior efforts, but these methods have not been tested in backwater habitats of large rivers. I attempted to create habitat in an Ohio River embayment by establishing f...

  8. Human interreference along the coast of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    in development, discusses integrated rural development. environmental conservation and measures for the improvement in the quality of life. Although these documents were published in public interest, they are not readily available for public reference... and backwaters. No Development Zones (NDZ) which had to be measured from the High Tide Line (HTL) were notified for beaches, rivers and backwaters. Accordingly, all coastal states of India were bound to formulate coastal zone management (CZM) plans 150...

  9. The impact of a dam reservoir-induced base-level rise on mountain river morphology. New insight from the gravel-bed Smolnik River in the Polish Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liro, Maciej

    2016-04-01

    River reaches upstream from dam reservoirs, where water level fluctuations occur due to backwater effects, may be utilized as a field laboratory of base-level rise effects on river morphology. Here I present the results of the aerial photo-based (1963-2012) reconstruction of the long-term morphological adjustments of the small, gravel-bed Smolnik River in the backwater of the Rożnów Reservoir (1941) (Southern Poland). Channel narrowing and the formation of a relatively stable single-thread, high sinuosity channel with densely vegetated banks were observed in this zone due to forced fine and coarse sediments deposition connected with the backwater effects of the reservoir. This study has shown that specific river morphology may relatively quickly develop in the backwater zones of dam reservoirs as an effect of disturbances in the sediment and water transport connected with the base-level rise. This study also suggests that long-term river morphological adjustments in the backwater seem to be significantly controlled by the dynamic feedback between the fine sediments deposition and vegetation expansion that facilitate the development and maintenance of a single-thread, high sinuosity channel.

  10. Impact of dam construction on river banks evolution and sediment dynamics. A case study from the Po River (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, V.; Pellegrini, C.; Crose, L.; Del Bianco, F.; Mercorella, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers draining densely populated landscapes are extremely impacted by modern human engineering: armored beds, artificial levees and dams modified natural fluvial dynamics, and consequently, the evolution of alluvial plains, deltas and coastal environments. Dams, in particular, segmented the longitudinal continuity of the river and reduced (or even interrupted) the export of sediment toward the sea. Here we investigate the impact of the Isola Serafini dam on the upstream portion of the Po River (Italy) influenced by backwater, by using an integrated approach of aerial and satellite images, longitudinal cross-sections, grain size analysis, backscatter data and multibeam bathymetry. The analysis of aerial photographs, acquired every 10 yr since the dam construction in 1960, and of longitudinal cross-sections, allows understanding how the river adjusts its profile in response to the backwater and quantifying areas of net river banks erosion and deposition in meanders. The drowning of the reaches influenced by backwater reduced the progradation of point bars and promoted the deposition of fine grained sediments, as highlighted by grain size analysis on surficial sediment sampled across and along the river course. Calibrated back-scatter data with grain-size distributions of two selected meanders, under the backwater effect and beyond, show how sands are progressively replaced by fine-grained sediments in the meander belt and in the river axis, mainly reflecting the reduction of flow velocity, inferred also by river bed roughness. The understanding of river and sediment dynamics under the influence of backwater due to dam construction is useful when studying pristine systems in which natural backwater affects their evolution, as in the case of the formation of standing water bodies during the drowning of an incised valley.

  11. 75 FR 43479 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ....; Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376... Street. Summet Brook (Backwater effects from Approximately 2,800 None +363 Town of Shrewsbury. Big Bummet... available for inspection at the Town Hall, 127 Elm Street, Millbury, MA 01527. Town of Shrewsbury Maps...

  12. Aspects of productivity of mangroves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, S.

    The term 'mangroves' refers to an assemblage of different flowering plants which can grow in saline brackish water areas like creeks, backwaters, estuaries and deltas. Mangrove forest cover in the tropical area is about 0.5 million km sup(2...

  13. Dispersal phenology of hydrochorous plants in relation to discharge, seed release time and buoyancy of seeds: the flood pulse concept supported

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G.; Bakker, J.P.; Brinke, A. Ten; Groenendael, J.M. van; Soesbergen, M.

    2004-01-01

    1 Restored floodplains and backwaters lacking a viable propagule bank, may need flood pulses to facilitate inward dispersal of diaspores. Temporal patterns of hydrochorous plant dispersal are, however, not well known. 2 Diversity and abundance of diaspores dispersed in a water body over 12 months we

  14. Dispersal phenology of hydrochorous plants in relation to discharge, seed release time and buoyancy of seeds : the flood pulse concept supported

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G; Bakker, JP; Ten Brinke, A; Van Groenendael, JM; Soesbergen, M

    2004-01-01

    1 Restored floodplains and backwaters lacking a viable propagule bank, may need flood pulses to facilitate inward dispersal of diaspores. Temporal patterns of hydrochorous plant dispersal are, however, not well known. 2 Diversity and abundance of diaspores dispersed in a water body over 12 months we

  15. Assessing predation risks for small fish in a large river ecosystem between contrasting habitats and turbidity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodrill, Michael J.; Yard, Mike; Pine, William E., III

    2016-01-01

    This study examined predation risk for juvenile native fish between two riverine shoreline habitats, backwater and debris fan, across three discrete turbidity levels (low, intermediate, high) to understand environmental risks associated with habitat use in a section of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, AZ. Inferences are particularly important to juvenile native fish, including the federally endangered humpback chub Gila cypha. This species uses a variety of habitats including backwaters which are often considered important rearing areas. Densities of two likely predators, adult rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and adult humpback chub, were estimated between habitats using binomial mixture models to examine whether higher predator density was associated with patterns of predation risk. Tethering experiments were used to quantify relative predation risk between habitats and turbidity conditions. Under low and intermediate turbidity conditions, debris fan habitat showed higher relative predation risk compared to backwaters. In both habitats the highest predation risk was observed during intermediate turbidity conditions. Density of likely predators did not significantly differ between these habitats. This information can help managers in Grand Canyon weigh flow policy options designed to increase backwater availability or extant turbidity conditions.

  16. 75 FR 19328 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. Sec. 67.4 2. The tables.... River to approximately 0.6 mile downstream of CSX Railroad. Possum Run (Backwater effects from From...

  17. The Beautiful Way of Luring Investment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Most people had never heard of Zheng’an until its involvement in abeauty pageant put the Guizhou county backwater on the map,for all the wrong reasons.On April 2,four departments directly under the Zheng’an County Government

  18. Effectiveness Using Circular Fibre Steel Flap Gate As a Control Structure Towards the Hydraulic Characteristics in Open Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, M. R. M.; Amirza, A. R. M.; Wardah, T.; Junaidah, A.

    2016-07-01

    Hydraulic control gate structure plays an important role in regulating the flow of water in river, canal or water reservoir. One of the most appropriate structures in term of resolving the problem of flood occured is the construction of circular fibre steel flap gate. Therefore, an experiment has been conducted by using an open channel model at laboratory. In this case, hydraulic jump and backwater were the method to determined the hydraulic characteristics of circular fibre steel flap gate in an open channel model. From the experiment, the opening angle of flap gate can receive discharges with the highest flow rate of 0.035 m3/s with opening angle was 47°. The type of jump that occurs at the slope of 1/200 for a distance of 5.0 m is a standing jump or undulating wave. The height of the backwater can be identified based on the differences of specific force which is specific force before jump, F1 and specific force after jump, F2 from the formation of backwater. Based on the research conducted, the tendency of incident backwater wave occurred was high in every distance of water control location from water inlet is flap slope and the slope of 1/300 which is 0.84 m/s and 0.75 m/s of celerity in open channel model.

  19. Statistical forecasting of met-ocean parameters in the Cochin estuarine system, southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, K.; Revichandran, C.; DineshKumar, P.K.

    , Cochin backwaters: A sad story of manipulations, Ambio, 26 (1997) 249-260. 10 Srinivas K, Coherence between interannual variability of sea level with some surface met-ocean parameters at Cochin, southwest coast of India, Indian J. Mar. Sci., 31 (2002...

  20. 75 FR 29268 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ..., 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR 19367, 3 CFR, 1979 Comp., p. 376. ] Sec. 67.4 2. The tables.... Taylor Creek (Backwater effects from From the confluence None +375 Unincorporated Areas of Lake Barkley... +925 +924 upstream of Frederick Avenue. North Tributary to Blacksnake Creek. At the confluence...

  1. Flow dynamics in lowland rivers and influence on fluvial-deltaic stratigraphy: Comparing the modern Mississippi River system to the Campanian Castlegate Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, J. A.; Petter, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Where rivers enter the coastal zone, gradually varied non-uniform flow conditions develop in the river channel. The section of the river affected by non-uniform flow is commonly referred to as the backwater segment, and for large lowland rivers, backwater flow can extend many tens to hundreds of kilometers upstream of the river outlet. Here we show the results of field-observation and modeling studies from the modern Mississippi River that document the persistence of backwater hydrodynamics, which influence sediment mobility through the lower five-hundred kilometers of the river. Reach-average shear stress varies temporally in the backwater segment, in accordance with the annual hydrograph, thereby affecting the timing, magnitude, and grain size of sediment in transport. Importantly, a net reduction in shear stress restricts the movement of the coarse-grain sediment in the Mississippi River, to the extent that this portion of the river's sediment load does not reach the ocean receiving basin. Instead, coarse sediment is caught at the backwater hydrodynamic transition and is sequestered in the river channel, thereby producing channel bed aggradation. We use this information in conjunction with stratigraphic data collected from the Campanian Castlegate Sandstone (Utah) to present a theoretical framework for the movement of coarse sediment from a river to the receiving basin: over time, channel bed aggradation will push the backwater transition toward the ocean outlet, thereby facilitating the downstream movement of coarse sediment into the receiving basin. However, an aggrading channel bed will also promote super elevation of the channel bed and therefore facilitate avulsions, whereby the active channel is abandoned in favor of an alternative path to the ocean basin. Given an avulsion event, the abandoned, inactive channel and its coarse-grain sediment fill are incorporated into the long-term stratigraphy of the river's distributary system. Therefore, the tendency

  2. Floodflow characteristics of Filbin Creek for pre- and post-construction conditions, 1986, at North Charleston, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C.L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A study to determine the effect of the construction of a shopping and business center, and of the construction and improvement of several highways on floodflow in the Filbin Creek drainage basin near North Charleston, South Carolina was performed. Discharge hydrographs were synthesized using computerized U.S. Soil Conservation Service unit hydrograph methods and routed using reservoir, step backwater, and culvert flow programs. Construction of the shopping and business center, according to plans of July 1986, will raise the water surface elevations upstream of Interstate Highway 26 by about 2.0 ft for runoff from 100-yr rainfall. Structures at Seaboard Railroad downstream of U.S. Highway 52, U.S. Highway 52, and Virginia Avenue would cause about 2.0, 2.6, and 4.1 ft of backwater, respectively. (Author 's abstract)

  3. 10 years After The Largest River Restoration Project In Northern Europe:Hydromorphological changes on multiple scales in River Skjern

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Esben; Kronvang, Brian; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Thodsen, Hans; Nielsen, Carsten Brian; Amor, E.; Friberg, Nikolai; Pedersen, Morten Lauge; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette

    2014-01-01

    The lower river Skjern (Denmark) historically contained a large variation in habitats and the river ran through large areas with wetlands, many backwaters, islands and oxbow lakes. During the 1960s the river was channelized and the wetland drained. A restoration during 2001–2002 transformed 19 km of channelized river into 26 km meandering river. The short-term effects of this restoration have previously been reported and for this study we revisited the river and with new data evaluated the lo...

  4. Recovery of an estuary in the southwest coast of India from tsunami impacts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Laluraj, C.M.; Kesavadas, V.; Balachandran, K.K.; Gerson, V.J.; Martin, G.D.; Shaiju, P.; Revichandran, C.; Joseph, T.; Nair, M.

    coast of India, Tsunami impacts, Water quality Author Version Environ. Monit. Assess.: 125(1-3); 2007; 41-45 Introduction: The great Indian Ocean Tsunami of December 2004 generated due to the Earthquake off the west coast of Sumatra..., for the encouragement and help. We are grateful to ICMAM-PD, Chennai for the financial support provided under the project ?Ecosystem modeling of Cochin backwaters?. We thank Cochin Port Trust, Cochin for providing the automatic tide gauge data. The positive journal...

  5. Transferring technical knowledge and innovating in Europe, c.1200-c.1800

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Stephan R.

    2005-01-01

    The role of technology in the transition from premodern to modern economies in late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europe is among the major questions in economic history, but it is still poorly understood. A plausible explanation of premodern European technological development must account for why Europe industrialised in advance of the great Asian civilisations, despite still being a comparative backwater in the twelfth century. What appears to set Western Europe apart is not that techn...

  6. Diverzita stojatých vod v nivách řek a procesy jejího vzniku a udržování

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pithart, David

    Vol. 3. Olomouc: Univerzita Palackého v Olomouci, 2005 - (Měkotová, J.; Štěrba, O.), s. 287-293 ISBN 80-244-1162-8. [Říční krajina /3./. Olomouc (CZ), 05.10.2005-06.10.2005] R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SL/1/6/04 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : biodiversity * plankton * polls * backwater * dynamics Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology

  7. Effects of a native and a non-native macrophyte species of Hydrocharitaceae on Chironomidae and Oligochaeta assemblages structure doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v35i3.10855

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Cristina Rosin; Alice Michiyo Takeda; Janielly Carvalho Camargo; Mariana Carolina Teixeira; Sue Ellen Prata Fernandes; Rômulo Diego de Lima Behrend

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the structure of the Oligochaeta and Chironomidae assemblages associated with monospecific stands of two submerged macrophyte species: Egeria najas and Hydrilla verticillata. Samplings were carried out in Leopoldo Backwater and Paraná river, in August 2008. To assess the structure of Oligochaeta and Chironomidae assemblage in each macrophyte we calculated: species density, richness, diversity, and evenness. A detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) was used to summariz...

  8. Relationship between banana plant cultivation and stream macroinvertebrate communities Relação entre cultivo de banana e a comunidade de macroinvertebrados aquáticos

    OpenAIRE

    Priscila Kleine; Susana Trivinho-Strixino; Juliano José Corbi

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: The present study describes the influence of banana plant cultivation on macroinvertebrate communities of streams located in the southeastern region of São Paulo state in the Atlantic Forest (four located in areas of banana cultivation and four in preserved areas); METHODS: Sampling was performed during October and November of 2005. The fauna was collected with Surber sampler and a D-aquatic net (both with mesh of 0.25 mm) in rapids and backwaters. Simultaneously, an environmental chara...

  9. Minireview: Role of Glia in Neuroendocrine Function

    OpenAIRE

    García-Segura, Luis M.; McCarthy, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    Long relegated to the backwaters of neuroendocrinology, it is becoming increasingly apparent that glial cells of the central and peripheral nervous system are key participants because they are capable of both sending and receiving hormonal signals. Hormones are also a critical component of neuronal/glial cross talk, leading to neuromodulatory and neurotrophic actions under physiological and pathological conditions. In the peripheral nervous system, hormonal actions on Schwann cells and hormon...

  10. Using remote sensing and gis techniques for detecting land cover changes of mangrove habitats in Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagi, H.M.; Rodrigues, R.S.; ManiMurali, R.; Jagtap, T.G.

    mining practices during last four decades have resulted in deteriorating terrestrial and marine ecosystems. The increase in open mudflats (Figure 5d) from the low lying regions influenced by estuaries and backwaters could also be attributed... around the world are currently experiencing the impact of human activities dealing with economic, land use, and resource development. India in particular is facing increasing stress as a result of cumulative environmental changes driven by urbanization...

  11. Tourism Marketing: A Service Marketing perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kannan, Srinivasan

    2009-01-01

    Tourism is a service sector which earns a substantial foreign exchange to developing countries. In India, Kerala is one of the important destination for the international tourists with its unique nature beauty with backwaters, mountains and beaches. To make the tourism a great success one has to take advantage of the modern technology to full extent. Present paper is an attempt to market tourism by adapting the service marketing approach for achieving great success.

  12. Multi-element analysis of sediments, coal samples and gemstones by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) is one of the best analytical methods for the determination of most of the Rare Earth Elements (REEs) and other trace elements. INAA is more effective for trace elemental analysis in the presence of other elements in varying matrices. Multi elemental analysis of the sediments of Gosthani River Estuary, Balacheruvu Backwaters, Kothagudem coal deposits and Chrysoberyl, chrysoberyl cat's eye and Alexandrite gemstones were carries out by INAA. (author)

  13. Morphology, growth pattern, feeding and reproductive biology of Mystus gulio (Hamilton-Buchanan, 1822) (Siluriformes: Bagridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Sandipan Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Mystus gulio is a euryhaline fish, occurring mostly in freshwater; it has also been found to thrive in backwaters of low salinity. It is a popular food fish due to its good taste and recently it has also been reported to be exported as indigenous ornamental fish from India. Number of workers earlier has studied morphology, age, growth pattern, food and feeding habit and reproductive biology of this fish species; but no such collective documentation on these aspects is available. With this vie...

  14. Potential effects of four Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operational scenarios on the fishes of the Green River, Utah and Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    Aerial videography and modeling were used to evaluate the impacts of four hydropower operational scenarios at Flaming Gorge Dam, Utah, on trout and native fishes in the Green River, Utah and Colorado. The four operational scenarios studied were year-round high fluctuations, seasonally adjusted high fluctuations, seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuations, and seasonally adjusted steady flows. Impacts on trout were evaluated by examining differences among scenarios in the areas of inundated substrates that serve as spawning and feeding habitat. All scenarios would provide at least 23 acres per mile of habitat for spawning and food production; seasonally adjusted operations would provide additional areas during periods of sustained high release. Seasonally adjusted high fluctuations would increase inundated areas by 12 to 26% for a short period in winter and spring, but food production and reproduction would not be expected to increase. Seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuations and steady flows would produce similar increases in area, but the longer period of inundation could also result in increased food production and provide additional spawning sites for trout. Impacts on native fishes were assessed by examining daily changes in backwater nursery areas. Compared with year-round high fluctuations, the daily changes in backwater area would decrease by about 47, 89, and 100% under the seasonally adjusted high fluctuation, moderate fluctuation, and steady flow scenarios, respectively. Similarly, daily stage fluctuations during the nursery period would decrease by 72, 89, and 100% under the seasonally adjusted high fluctuation, moderate fluctuation, and steady flow scenarios, respectively. These reductions in daily fluctuations in backwater area and stage would improve conditions in nursery habitats and could in turn improve recruitment and overwinter survival. Introduced fish species could also benefit from the seasonally adjusted operational scenarios.

  15. Accumulation of heavy metals in sediments of marine environments along the southwest coast of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to estimate the rate of excessive sediment accumulation that causes navigational problems and the impacts of urban and industrial development on sediment quality, concentrations of Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ca, and radioactivity levels of 210Pb and 137 Cs have been measured in nineteen sediment cores from estuarine, lagoonal, marsh, backwater and inner shelf areas along the southwest coast of India. Sediment accumulation rates in estuarine, lagoonal, marshy areas of the Karnataka coast (ELMKC) and Cochin Backwaters (CBw) are three to six times higher than those in the adjacent inner shelf areas, consistent with the deposition of terrigenous sediments in the river-sea interaction zones. Hydrogen sulphide was detected in most of the samples; sediment colour varied from shades of gray to dark green. Sediments have lower elemental concentrations and element enrichment factors (EFs) particularly for redox sensitive elements such as Mn due to prevalence of reducing conditions in the sedimentary column. Sediments of ELMKC and CBw have a predominantly terrigenous source. They contain low Ca contents, characteristic of tropical river sediments. In contrast, a higher Ca content of inner shelf sediments off both Karnataka State (ISKS-1) and Kerala State (ISKS-2) implies the importance of additional sediment (CaCO3) flux from the marine biota. Measured Cu, Ni and Zn concentrations are generally low, perhaps reflecting the pristine nature of sediments. However, higher concentrations of Cr at all stations and of Zn at CBw indicate the input of Cr enriched minerals like amphibole and pyroxene from the catchment as well as Zn from anthropogenic sources. Heavy metal accumulation rates are high in estuarine, lagoonal, marsh and backwater areas along the southwest coast of India. This is not only due to the proximity of sources, but also due to high sediment accumulation rates because of the reduction of river flow in river-sea interaction zones owing to particle

  16. EXAMINING THE TAPI PIPELINE AND ITS IMPACT ON REGIONAL AND CROSS-REGIONAL RIVALRY

    OpenAIRE

    FARAJI RAD ABDOL REZA; Moradi, Heydar

    2012-01-01

    Before 1991, the states of Central Asia were marginal backwaters, republics of the Soviet Union that played neither a major role in the Cold War relations between the U.S.S.R. and the United States, nor in the Soviet Union's relations with the principal regional powers of Turkey, Iran, and China. But in the 1990s, the dissolution of the Soviet Union coincided with rediscovery of the energy resources of the Caspian Sea, attracting a wide range of international oil companies, including American...

  17. Welcome to the 11th International Integrated Care Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Nick Goodwin; Lourdes Ferrer

    2011-01-01

    On behalf of the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Integrated Care (IJIC) it gives us great pleasure to welcome you to Odense for the 11th Annual Conference on Integrated Care. This year, IJIC celebrates its 10th anniversary. When IJIC was founded we recognised that the pursuit of better care co-ordination for patients was an ‘age-old’ theme, yet pondered on why care systems were so resistant to change. Today, however, it is clear that integrated care has moved from a backwater ...

  18. The Assessment of Stream Discharge Models for an Environmental Monitoring Site on the Virginia Tech Campus

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Mark Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the Spring of 2012, hydraulic data was collected to calibrate three types of discharge models: stage-discharge, single-regression and multi-regression index velocity models. Unsteady flow conditions were observed at the site (â H/â t = 0.75 cm/min), but the data did not indicate hysteresis nor variable backwater effects on the stage-discharge relation. Furthermore, when corrected with a datum offset (α) value of -0.455, the stage-discharge relation r2 was equal to 0.98. While the multi...

  19. Development of sediment slug upstream from the Czorsztyn Reservoir (southern Poland) and its interaction with river morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liro, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The effects of base-level rising upstream of dam reservoirs on in-channel sedimentation and interaction of the stored sediments with the gravel-bed channel morphology have received little attention so far. Previous studies, however, suggested that the feedback mechanism between in-channel sedimentation and bank erosion may affect channel morphology. Here, the pattern of the bar area, bank erosion, and morphology of the gravel-bed Dunajec River upstream from the Czorsztyn Reservoir (CR), constructed in 1997 in southern Poland were analyzed from aerial images (1982-2012) and LiDAR data (2013). In the part of the post-dam period with a large flood, the average bar area increased significantly in the backwater section, and at some distance upstream, and then extended in the upstream direction at an average rate of above 40 m/y, reaching 2.2 km upstream from the CR in 2012. The bar area variation was 40% and 77% explained by local bank erosion in the periods of large and low to moderate floods, respectively. The sum of bank erosion from the post-dam period explained 80% of the variation in the present width/depth ratio, significantly increased in the backwater section. The results showed that the large floods in 1997, in conjunction with backwater inundation, initiated intensive bank erosion and bar growth. Subsequently, in the period with low and moderate floods, the localized bar-bank interaction, connected with the flow divergence around the deposited bar, led to localized bank erosion and additional bar growth promoting bend development. These processes, propagating in the upstream direction, were facilitated by the existence of a large amount of easily remobilized sediment stored in the floodplain connected with the sedimentation zone from the end of the nineteenth century. Bend development was controlled by valley confinement causing downstream bend translation in the narrower valley-confined section and its extension in the wider unconfined section of past

  20. Taking the Pulse of a River System: Research on the Upper Mississippi River System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Jennifer; Johnson, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Mark Twain raved about the Mississippi River basin as, 'the body of the Nation'. The 'upper body', upstream of the confluence with the Ohio River, includes commercially navigable reaches and branching tributaries that are recreationally and environmentally important. Together they feed and shelter an array of fish and wildlife in their flowing channels, floodplain lakes, backwaters, wetlands, and floodplain forests. Effective river management requires knowledge about factors controlling the dynamics and interactions of important ecosystem components. The Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) is the prized diagnostic tool in the Environmental Management Program for the Upper Mississippi River System that provides critical information about the status and trends of key environmental resources.

  1. Summer monsoon onset-induced changes of autotrophic pico- and nanoplankton in the largest monsoonal estuary along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohan, A.P.; Jyothibabu, R.; Jagadeesan, L.; Lallu, K.R.; Karnan, C.

        Environ. Monit. Assess., vol.188; 2016; no.93 doi: 10.1007/s10661-016-5096-7 Summer Monsoon Onset -induced Changes of Autotrophic Pico - and Nano - plankton in the Largest Monsoonal Estuary along the West Coast of India Arya P. Mohan, Jyothibabu, R...: Phytoplankton, Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, Picoeukaryotes, Cochin Backwaters  2    1. Introduction Smaller autotrophic plankton consist of pico - (0.2 - 2 μm) and nano - (2 - 20 μm) size ranges inhabiting the euphotic ocean surface layer. Earlier studies...

  2. Ichthyofaunal diversity of the Adyar Wetland complex, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, southern India

    OpenAIRE

    M.E. Ramanujam; K.R. Devi; T.J. Indra

    2014-01-01

    Most parts of the Adyar wetland complex—Chembarampakkam Tank, Adyar River, Adyar Estuary and Adyar backwater (including a wetland rehabilitation site)-—were sampled for ichthyofaunal diversity from March 2007 to June 2011. A total of 3,732 specimens were collected and 98 taxa were identified. Twenty-two new records are reported from the estuarine reach. Forty-nine species were recorded at Chembarampakkam Tank. In the upriver stretch 42 species were recorded. In the middle stretch 25 species w...

  3. The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It

    OpenAIRE

    Zittrain, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This extraordinary book explains the engine that has catapulted the Internet from backwater to ubiquity—and reveals that it is sputtering precisely because of its runaway success. With the unwitting help of its users, the generative Internet is on a path to a lockdown, ending its cycle of innovation—and facilitating unsettling new kinds of control. IPods, iPhones, Xboxes, and TiVos represent the first wave of Internet-centered products that can’t be easily modified by anyone except th...

  4. Nutrient biogeochemistry of the eastern Arabian Sea during the southwest monsoon retreat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    George, R.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Martin, G.D.; Sabu, P.; Gerson, V.J.; Dineshkumar, P.K.; Nair, S.M.; Chandramohanakumar, N.; Nair, K.K.C.

    agricultural field draining to Kochi backwater) alone is reported to be 20,240 t year-1 (Anonymous 1998). Naqvi et al. (2006) also reported a riv- erine flux (0.1 Tg N year-1) of dissolved inorganic nitrogen to the Arabian Sea. Earlier hydrographic studies... and phosphate inputs of 37.6 9 103 and 42.4 9 103 mol day-1 from the major rivers draining through the agricultural fields, with an export of nitrate and phosphate to the coastal waters off Kochi of 24.0 9 103 and 28.2 9 103 mol day-1, respectively (Naik 2000...

  5. Some observations on the state of coastal environment of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    luxuriant growth of mangroves (some of which are degraded) and associated swamps can be observed in most water bodies. The most prominent and extensive backwaters with mangroves are located east of the capital city of Panjim. The coastal plain of Goa varies... reclamation is seen on the eastern outskirts of the capital city of Panjim. 6. Shoreline constructions: Construction of structures along the water line of open sea coast as well as rivers are multiplying rapidly. The Mandovi estuary is one such example. 207 7...

  6. A catastrophic flood caused by drainage of a caldera lake at Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska, and implications for volcanic hazards assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C.F.; Walder, J.S.; McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Aniakchak caldera, located on the Alaska Peninsula of southwest Alaska, formerly contained a large lake (estimated volume 3.7 ?? 109 m3) that rapidly drained as a result of failure of the caldera rim sometime after ca. 3400 yr B.P. The peak discharge of the resulting flood was estimated using three methods: (1) flow-competence equations, (2) step-backwater modeling, and (3) a dam-break model. The results of the dam-break model indicate that the peak discharge at the breach in the caldera rim was at least 7.7 ?? 104 m3 s-1, and the maximum possible discharge was ???1.1 ?? 106 m3 s-1. Flow-competence estimates of discharge, based on the largest boulders transported by the flood, indicate that the peak discharge values, which were a few kilometers downstream of the breach, ranged from 6.4 ?? 105 to 4.8 ?? 106 m3 s-1. Similar but less variable results were obtained by step-backwater modeling. Finally, discharge estimates based on regression equations relating peak discharge to the volume and depth of the impounded water, although limited by constraining assumptions, provide results within the range of values determined by the other methods. The discovery and documentation of a flood, caused by the failure of the caldera rim at Aniakchak caldera, underscore the significance and associated hydrologic hazards of potential large floods at other lake-filled calderas.

  7. Can large rivers be restored? Most restoration projects are only attempts to rehabilitate selected river sections to a predetermined structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, J.A. [The Conservancy, Naples, FL (United States); Shields, F.D. Jr. [Dept. of Agriculture, Oxford, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Riverine ecosystems are remarkably resilient in their ability to recover from physical and chemical disturbances. If the disturbance occurs as a pulse, recover to the ecosystems`s original condition often occurs. However, if the disturbance is sustained and causes complete loss of critical habitat elements, ecological integrity cannot be maintained. Because running water ecosystems are so intimately tired to physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur throughout the catchment restoration is a complex and difficult task. Restoration and rehabilitation projects on small streams and rivers have been common practice for many years; however, restoration and rehabilitation projects for large river systems are far less common, and there is little ability to predict success or monitor recovery. Renewal of physical and biological interactions between the main channel, backwaters, and flood plains is central to rehabilitation. This article discusses the following topics in some detail: River channel manipulations; Backwater treatments; riparian zone and floodplain alterations; flow regulation; predicting recovery rates. 66 refs., 6 figs. 2 tabs.

  8. Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

  9. Geomorphic adjustment to hydrologic modifications along a meandering river: Implications for surface flooding on a floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Brandon L.; Keim, Richard F.; Johnson, Erin L.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Marre, Saraline; King, Sammy L.

    2016-09-01

    Responses of large regulated rivers to contemporary changes in base level are not well understood. We used field measurements and historical analysis of air photos and topographic maps to identify geomorphic trends of the lower White River, Arkansas, USA, in the 70 years following base-level lowering at its confluence with the Mississippi River and concurrent with flood control by dams. Incision was identified below a knickpoint area upstream of St. Charles, AR, and increases over the lowermost ~90 km of the study site to ~2 m near the confluence with the Mississippi River. Mean bankfull width increased by 30 m (21%) from 1930 to 2010. Bank widening appears to be the result of flow regulation above the incision knickpoint and concomitant with incision below the knickpoint. Hydraulic modeling indicated that geomorphic adjustments likely reduced flooding by 58% during frequent floods in the incised, lowermost floodplain affected by backwater flooding from the Mississippi River and by 22% above the knickpoint area. Dominance of backwater flooding in the incised reach indicates that incision is more important than flood control on the lower White River in altering flooding and also suggests that the Mississippi River may be the dominant control in shaping the lower floodplain. Overall, results highlight the complex geomorphic adjustment in large river-floodplain systems in response to anthropogenic modifications and their implications, including reduced river-floodplain connectivity.

  10. Development of flood profiles and flood-inundation maps for the Village of Killbuck, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a reach of Killbuck Creek near the Village of Killbuck, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Holmes County, Ohio. The inundation maps depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage Killbuck Creek near Killbuck (03139000) and were completed as part of an update to Federal Emergency Management Agency Flood-Insurance Study. The maps were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning system that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. The digital maps also have been submitted for inclusion in the data libraries of the USGS interactive Flood Inundation Mapper. Data from the streamgage can be used by emergency-management personnel, in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps, to help determine a course of action when flooding is imminent. Flood profiles for selected reaches were prepared by calibrating a steady-state step-backwater model to an established streamgage rating curve. The step-backwater model then was used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for 10 flood stages at the streamgage with corresponding streamflows ranging from approximately the 50- to 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities. The computed flood profiles were used in combination with digital elevation data to delineate flood-inundation areas.

  11. Impacts of the Three Gorges Dam on microbial structure and potential function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qingyun; Bi, Yonghong; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Shi, Zhou; Li, Jinjin; Wang, Xi; Hu, Zhengyu; Yu, Yuhe; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    The Three Gorges Dam has significantly altered ecological and environmental conditions within the reservoir region, but how these changes affect bacterioplankton structure and function is unknown. Here, three widely accepted metagenomic tools were employed to study the impact of damming on the bacterioplankton community in the Xiangxi River. Our results indicated that bacterioplankton communities were both taxonomically and functionally different between backwater and riverine sites, which represent communities with and without direct dam effects, respectively. There were many more nitrogen cycling Betaproteobacteria (e.g., Limnohabitans), and a higher abundance of functional genes and KEGG orthology (KO) groups involved in nitrogen cycling in the riverine sites, suggesting a higher level of bacterial activity involved in generating more nitrogenous nutrients for the growth of phytoplankton. Additionally, the KO categories involved in carbon and sulfur metabolism, as well as most of the detected functional genes also showed clear backwater and riverine patterns. As expected, these diversity patterns all significantly correlated with environmental characteristics, confirming that the bacterioplankton communities in the Xiangxi River were really affected by environmental changes from the Three Gorges Dam. This study provides a first comparative metagenomic insight for evaluating the impacts of the large dam on microbial function. PMID:25721383

  12. Effect of changes in flow runoff on the elevation of Tongguan in Sanmenxia Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Baosheng; WANG Guangqian; WANG Zhaoyin; XIA Junqiang

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the variation of the elevation of Tongguan, which is located in the backwater zone of the Sanmenxia Reservoir, in response to changes in flow runoff. The analysis indicated that the rise of the elevation of Tongguan, which is defined as the stage corresponding to a discharge of 1000 m3/s at Tongguan station, is controlled by the stream energy. A close relationship existed between the elevation of Tongguan and the superimposed stream energy that integrates the current and the preceding years' flow and dam operation conditions. When the flow runoff remains relatively constant and the pool level of the dam has a relatively large range of variations, then the elevation of Tongguan is primarily controlled by the dam operation conditions.On the other hand, if the flow runoff has a relatively large range of variations and the pool level of the dam remains relatively constant, then the elevation of Tongguan is primar ily controlled by the flow conditions. These findings are of importance for optimizing the dam operation in order to lower and control the elevation of Tongguan, and therefore to minimize the backwater effect of the dam operation.

  13. Modeling complex flow dynamics of fluvial floods exacerbated by sea level rise in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Yamazaki, Dai; Kiguchi, Masashi; Koirala, Sujan; Nagano, Takanori; Kotera, Akihiko; Kanae, Shinjiro

    2015-12-01

    Global warming is likely to exacerbate future fluvial floods in the world’s mega-delta regions due to both changing climate and rising sea levels. However, the effects of sea level rise (SLR) on fluvial floods in such regions have not been taken into account in current global assessments of future flood risk, due to the difficulties in modeling channel bifurcation and the backwater effect. We used a state-of-the-art global river routing model to demonstrate how these complexities contribute to future flood hazard associated with changing climate and SLR in the world’s largest mega-delta region, the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Delta. The model demonstrated that flood water in the main channels flows into tributaries through bifurcation channels, which resulted in an increase in inundation depth in deltaic regions. We found that there were large areas that experienced an increase in inundation depth and period not directly from the SLR itself but from the backwater effect of SLR, and the effect propagated upstream to locations far from the river mouth. Projections under future climate scenarios as well as SLR indicated that exposure to fluvial floods will increase in the last part of the 21st century, and both SLR and channel bifurcation make meaningful contributions.

  14. Changes in the concentration of selected metals in sediments of the River Chotla in northwest Poland in its section affected by various anthropogenic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodarczyk Małgorzata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to assess the changes in the concentration of selected metals in the bottom sediment and interstitial water of the River Chotla in northwest Poland. The research was conducted on the river section flowing through Zaspy Małe and a salmonid fish breeding farm. Samples of water and bottom sediment were taken in four control and measurement points, located above and below the village and on a backwater above the trouteries and below the fish breeding ponds. The pH and the concentration of the metals potassium, iron, calcium, manganese and zinc were determined in the water and sediment samples. The lowest concentrations of the metals were found in the samples collected above and below Zaspy Małe, while the highest concentrations of metals in the water and sediment were found in the samples taken in the backwater, above the fish breeding ponds. Exceptions were calcium and potassium, with the highest concentrations of metals in the water being found in the samples taken below the fish breeding ponds. The content of metals in sediments of the analysed section of the River Chotla was mainly determined by the content of organic matter, which varied as it is dependent on water accumulation processes and the operation of nearby fishery facilities. The slightly alkaline pH facilitated long-lasting accumulation of metals in sediments.

  15. The state of pollution levels of Karachi harbour and adjoining coastal water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was carried out to determine the pollution level of waters in the Karachi harbour and adjoining backwaters. Nine locations were selected, four in the backwaters, two on the seaside, and three in the main navigable channel. Four of these locations were deliberately selected to coincide with those of a previous study conducted in 1982 by Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (PCSIR) so that the values for the concentration of different pollutants could be compared. Analysis was conducted for pH, bicarbonate, total solids, volatile matter in total solids, Chlorides, Sulphates, Calcium, Magnesium, Sodium and Potassium. The results indicate that the composition of sea water as far as the concentration of above constituents is concerned has not changed much since the time of the PCSIR study, viz 1982, except that the organic matter concentration has increased. The reasons for this increase in organic loading and its possible impact are discussed in this paper. The main increase in organic pollutants seems to come from an increase in harbour activity resulting in high discharge of waste waters, oil spillages and oil washings from tankers. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Distribuição de Heteroptera Aquáticos (Insecta em Diferentes Tipos de Substratos de Córregos do Cerrado Matogrossense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Dias-Silva

    2013-07-01

    Abstract. The Heteroptera community of Cerrado streams in east of Mato Grosso was analyzed to determine the types of substrate that contemplate the largest variation in species composition. Samples were performed in the leaf litter substrates from rapids and backwaters, root, gravel, stone (boulder, sand and on the water surface (surface tension layer of springs, mean stretches and mouths of the Santo Antônio and Colher streams on December/2004 and July/2005, with six subsamples each substrate. Were collected 333 specimens distributed in 11 families, 20 genus and 30 morphospecies (17 Nepomorpha and 13 Gerromorpha, being Gerromorpha the most abundant (172 specimens. The estimated richness of Gerromorpha in the substrates was higher in samples from water surface, while Nepomorpha showed higher richness in root, followed by gravel and leaf litter from rapids. The inorganic substrates (stone and sand showed lower richness of Heteroptera. Among Gerromorpha, Limnogonus aduncus aduncus Drake & Harris, Rhagovelia elegans Uhler, Neogerris lubricus White and Brachymetra sp.1 were associated to surface samples and Stridulivelia anta Polhemus & Spangler to root substrate. In Nepomorpha, Martarega chinai Hynes was associated to surface samples, while Ambrysus sp. 1 showed association to leaf litter from rapids, backwaters, root and surface. The results suggest that studies which aim for rapid surveys of Heteroptera community should prioritize surface samples for Gerromorpha and root samples for Nepomorpha, because these substrates shelter the greatest richness of each infra-order, contemplating 83% and 64% of species richness in these groups respectively.

  17. Relationship of weed shiner and young-of-year bluegill and largemouth bass abundance to submersed aquatic vegetation in Navigation Pools 4, 8, and 13 of the Upper Mississippi River, 1998-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLain, Steven A.; Popp, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic vegetation provides food resources and shelter for many species of fish. This study found a significant relationship between increases in submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) in four study reaches of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) and increases in catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) of weed shiners (Notropis texanus) and age-0 bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) when all of the study reaches were treated collectively using Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) vegetation and fish data for 1998–2012. The selected fishes were more abundant in study reaches with higher SAV frequencies (Pool 8 and Lower Pool 4) and less abundant in reaches with lower SAV frequencies (Pool 13 and Upper Pool 4). When each study reach was examined independently, the relationship between SAV frequency and CPUE of the three species was not significant in most cases, the primary exception being weed shiners in Lower Pool 4. Results of this study indicate that the prevalence of SAV does affect relative abundance of these vegetation-associated fish species. However, the poor annual relationship between SAV frequency and age-0 relative abundance in individual study reaches indicates that several other factors also govern age-0 abundance. The data indicate that there may be a SAV frequency threshold in backwaters above which there is not a strong relationship with abundance of these fish species. This is indicated by the high annual CPUE variability of the three selected fishes in backwaters of Pool 8 and Lower Pool 4 when SAV exceeded certain frequencies.

  18. 浅谈湍河渡槽结构形式比选%Comparison of Structure Form in Tuanhe Aqueduct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱清帅; 马永征; 王玉岭; 张阳阳; 邹华

    2014-01-01

    湍河渡槽是南水北调中线一期工程的一种交叉渠系建筑物,针对其跨度大、流量大、结构复杂等特点,综合分析后提出采用双槽矩形断面形式。通过对比4种方案,从槽下净空、上游雍水、应力控制、施工、投资等5个方面分析计算,认为“U”型槽为最优方案,但也需要调整槽跨才能满足壅水高度标准。%Tuanhe aqueduct is one of the cross canal structures of the first phase of South-to-North Water Transfer Project .Due to its characteristics of large structure span ,great discharge ,and complex structure ,double chamfer rectangle section is selected for the aqueduct .Four schemes were compared from the five following aspects :net space below chamfer ,upstream backwater , stress control ,construction ,and investment ,and“U”-type aqueduct scheme was considered as the best .However ,the structure span has to be adjusted to meet the backwater height requirements .

  19. Geometric properties of river cross sections and associated hydrodynamic implications in Wuhan-Jiujiang river reach, the Yangtze River%长江中游武汉-九江河段河道形态及水动力学特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 施雅风; 熊明

    2009-01-01

    Based on measured hydrological data by using ship-mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instrument, we analyzed shapes of river cross sections of the middle Yangtze River basin (mainly focusing on Makou and Tianjiazhen river reach). Hydrodynamic properties of river channels were also discussed. The research results indicate that nonlinear relationships can be identified between river-width/river-depth ratio (W/D ratio), sizes of cross section and mean flow velocity. Positive relations are detected between W/D ratio and mean flow velocity when W/D<1; and negative relations are observed when W/D>1. Adverse relationships can be obtained between W/D ratio and cross-section area. Geomorphologic and geologic survey indicates different components of river banks in the wider and narrower river reaches respectively. These may be the main driving factors causing unique hydrological properties of river channels in the middle Yangtze River basin. Narrower river cross sections tend to raise water level in the upstream river reach near narrower river channel, giving rise to backwater effects. River knots can cause serious backwater effects, which is harmful for flood mitigation. However river knots will also stabilize river channel and this will be beneficial for river channel management. The results of this paper may be helpful for flood mitigation and river channel management in the middle Yangtze River basin.

  20. Sampling benthic macroinvertebrates in a large flood-plain river: Considerations of study design, sample size, and cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, L.A.; Richardson, W.B.; Naimo, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of benthic macroinvertebrate populations over large spatial scales is difficult due to the high variability in abundance and the cost of sample processing and taxonomic analysis. To determine a cost-effective, statistically powerful sample design, we conducted an exploratory study of the spatial variation of benthic macroinvertebrates in a 37 km reach of the Upper Mississippi River. We sampled benthos at 36 sites within each of two strata, contiguous backwater and channel border. Three standard ponar (525 cm(2)) grab samples were obtained at each site ('Original Design'). Analysis of variance and sampling cost of strata-wide estimates for abundance of Oligochaeta, Chironomidae, and total invertebrates showed that only one ponar sample per site ('Reduced Design') yielded essentially the same abundance estimates as the Original Design, while reducing the overall cost by 63%. A posteriori statistical power analysis (alpha = 0.05, beta = 0.20) on the Reduced Design estimated that at least 18 sites per stratum were needed to detect differences in mean abundance between contiguous backwater and channel border areas for Oligochaeta, Chironomidae, and total invertebrates. Statistical power was nearly identical for the three taxonomic groups. The abundances of several taxa of concern (e.g., Hexagenia mayflies and Musculium fingernail clams) were too spatially variable to estimate power with our method. Resampling simulations indicated that to achieve adequate sampling precision for Oligochaeta, at least 36 sample sites per stratum would be required, whereas a sampling precision of 0.2 would not be attained with any sample size for Hexagenia in channel border areas, or Chironomidae and Musculium in both strata given the variance structure of the original samples. Community-wide diversity indices (Brillouin and 1-Simpsons) increased as sample area per site increased. The backwater area had higher diversity than the channel border area. The number of sampling sites

  1. Analytical approach for determining the mean water level profile in an estuary with substantial fresh water discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huayang; Savenije, Hubert H. G.; Jiang, Chenjuan; Zhao, Lili; Yang, Qingshu

    2016-03-01

    The mean water level in estuaries rises in the landward direction due to a combination of the density gradient, the tidal asymmetry, and the backwater effect. This phenomenon is more prominent under an increase of the fresh water discharge, which strongly intensifies both the tidal asymmetry and the backwater effect. However, the interactions between tide and river flow and their individual contributions to the rise of the mean water level along the estuary are not yet completely understood. In this study, we adopt an analytical approach to describe the tidal wave propagation under the influence of substantial fresh water discharge, where the analytical solutions are obtained by solving a set of four implicit equations for the tidal damping, the velocity amplitude, the wave celerity, and the phase lag. The analytical model is used to quantify the contributions made by tide, river, and tide-river interaction to the water level slope along the estuary, which sheds new light on the generation of backwater due to tide-river interaction. Subsequently, the method is applied to the Yangtze estuary under a wide range of river discharge conditions where the influence of both tidal amplitude and fresh water discharge on the longitudinal variation of the mean tidal water level is explored. Analytical model results show that in the tide-dominated region the mean water level is mainly controlled by the tide-river interaction, while it is primarily determined by the river flow in the river-dominated region, which is in agreement with previous studies. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the effect of the tide alone is most important in the transitional zone, where the ratio of velocity amplitude to river flow velocity approaches unity. This has to do with the fact that the contribution of tidal flow, river flow, and tide-river interaction to the residual water level slope are all proportional to the square of the velocity scale. Finally, we show that, in combination with extreme

  2. Integrating Interdisciplinary Studies Across a Range of Spatiotemporal Scales for the Design of Effective Flood Mitigation and Habitat Restoration Strategies, Green Valley Creek, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobor, J. S.; O'Connor, M. D.; Sherwood, M. N.

    2014-12-01

    Green Valley Creek provides some of the most critical habitat for endangered coho salmon in the Russian River Watershed. Extensive changes in land-use over the past century have resulted in a dynamic system characterized by ongoing incision in the upper watershed and deposition and increased flood risk in the lower watershed. Effective management requires a watershed-scale understanding of the underlying controls on sediment erosion and transport as well as site-specific studies to understand local habitat conditions and flood dynamics. Here we combine an evaluation of historical changes in watershed conditions with a regional sediment source assessment and detailed numerical hydraulic and sediment transport models to find a sustainable solution to a chronic flooding problem at the Green Valley Road bridge crossing. Ongoing bank erosion in the upper watershed has been identified as the primary source of coarse sediment being deposited in the rapidly aggrading flood-prone reach upstream of the bridge. Efforts at bank stabilization are part of the overall strategy, however elevated sediment loads can be expected to continue in the near-term. The cessation of historical vegetation removal and maintenance dredging has resulted in a substantial increase in channel roughness as riparian cover has expanded. A positive feedback loop has been developed whereby increased vegetation roughness reduces sediment transport capacity, inducing additional deposition, and providing fresh sediment for continued vegetation recruitment. Our analysis revealed that traditional engineering approaches are ineffective. Dredging is not viable owning to the habitat impacts and short timeframes over which the dredged channel would be maintained. Roadway elevation results in a strong backwater effect increasing flood risk upstream. Initial efforts at designing a bypass channel also proved ineffective due to backwater effects below the bridge. The only viable solution involved reducing the

  3. Macrozoobenthos as an indicator of ecological conditions of streams in the Cerova Vrchovina Mts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrobiological research on macrozoobenthos of streams in the Cerova Vrchovina Mts. was carried out within several biotopes in years 2000-2001. The structure of communities reflects the extreme hydrological conditions in this area. In the summer period, low flows, high temperatures of water, a decline of O2 concentration and increase of conductivity cause disappearance of some groups of insects. The species spectrum of stoneflies (Plecoptera) is limited. Predators of the families Perlidae, Perlodidae and Chloroperlidae are absent. Conditions are suitable for several species of caddisflies (Trichoptera) of backwaters and periodic waters. We used a dynamic model for bioassessment of ecological conditions of the streams based on reference conditions. A multimetric index assigns the streams into one of 5 classes according to level of organic pollution. The communities of the streams situated in a nature reservation seem to be untouched (class 1-2), whereas streams out of the reservation are anthropologically affected (class 3-4). (author)

  4. Hydrogeochemistry and spatio-temporal changes of a tropical coastal wetland system: Veli-Akkulam Lake, Thiruvananthapuram, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajinkumar, K. S.; Revathy, A.; Rani, V. R.

    2015-09-01

    The backwater of Veli-Akkulam, adjoining the Arabian Sea in the south-west part of Indian Peninsula, is a coastal wetland system and forms an integral part of the local ecosystem. In addition to the usual marine interactions, this water body is subjected to anthropogenic interference due to their proximity to the Thiruvananthapuram City urban agglomeration. This paper showcases how an urban agglomeration alters wetland system located within a tropical monsoonal environment. Water samples from this lake together with different feeder streams reveal that the lake is under the threat to eutrophication. A spatio-temporal analysis has shown that the lake and adjacent wetlands are shrinking in a fast pace. Over a period of about seven decades, the lake has shrunk by 28.05 % and the wetlands by 37.81 %. And hence, there is a pressing requirement of eco-management practices to be adopted to protect this lake.

  5. Analysis of Flood Control Evaluation of Poplar Ditch Bridge%杨树沟大桥防洪评价分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文桢涵

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the basic situation of the river with Poplar Ditch Bridge, and calculates the flood level of the bridge section, such as backwater calculation, scouring calculation, etc. This article also analyzes the impact of poplar ditch bridge construction on the river, and puts forward re-asonable suggestions for the problems that may occur.%本文介绍了杨树沟大桥所在河流的基本情况,推求了桥位断面的洪水位,进行了壅水计算、冲刷计算等。并分析了杨树沟大桥的修建对所在河段各方面的影响,通过分析,对可能出现的问题提出了合理化建议。

  6. Morphology, growth pattern, feeding and reproductive biology of Mystus gulio (Hamilton-Buchanan, 1822 (Siluriformes: Bagridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipan Gupta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mystus gulio is a euryhaline fish, occurring mostly in freshwater; it has also been found to thrive in backwaters of low salinity. It is a popular food fish due to its good taste and recently it has also been reported to be exported as indigenous ornamental fish from India. Number of workers earlier has studied morphology, age, growth pattern, food and feeding habit and reproductive biology of this fish species; but no such collective documentation on these aspects is available. With this view, the current review work has been made to document all available information along with noting down those which are lacking and will be beneficial for future fishery and management of this fish species.

  7. Morphometry, benthos, and sedimentation rates of a floodplain lake in Pool 9 of the Upper Mississippi River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Big Lake is a shallow (mean depth = 0.89 m in 1973) 256-ha backwater lake on the floodplain of the Mississippi River in NE Iowa. During the summers of 1973 and 1974 Sphaerium and Hexagenia made up 81% of the benthic macroinvertebrate abundance and 92% of the benthic biomass; both taxa had greatly reduced abundance and biomass within stands of emergent Sagittaria along the lake margin. During July 1974 the Sagittaria net productivity was about 19 g/m2/day. Cesium-137 levels were determined in sediment samples showing that between 1896 and 1973 about 76 cm of sediment had accumulated in Big Lake, and the recent sedimentation rate (1964-1974) was about 1.7 cm/year. The calculated annual reduction in lake volume of about 37,400 m3/year suggests that the physical and biological components of this productive aquatic habitat will be greatly modified during the next few decades

  8. Estimated flood-inundation mapping for the Lower Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, 2003-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Rydlund, Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Kansas City, Missouri, began a study in 2003 of the lower Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, from Gregory Boulevard to the mouth at the Missouri River to determine the estimated extent of flood inundation in the Blue River valley from flooding on the lower Blue River and from Missouri River backwater. Much of the lower Blue River flood plain is covered by industrial development. Rapid development in the upper end of the watershed has increased the volume of runoff, and thus the discharge of flood events for the Blue River. Modifications to the channel of the Blue River began in late 1983 in response to the need for flood control. By 2004, the channel had been widened and straightened from the mouth to immediately downstream from Blue Parkway to convey a 30-year flood. A two-dimensional depth-averaged flow model was used to simulate flooding within a 2-mile study reach of the Blue River between 63rd Street and Blue Parkway. Hydraulic simulation of the study reach provided information for the design and performance of proposed hydraulic structures and channel improvements and for the production of estimated flood-inundation maps and maps representing an areal distribution of water velocity, both magnitude and direction. Flood profiles of the Blue River were developed between Gregory Boulevard and 63rd Street from stage elevations calculated from high water marks from the flood of May 19, 2004; between 63rd Street and Blue Parkway from two-dimensional hydraulic modeling conducted for this study; and between Blue Parkway and the mouth from an existing one-dimensional hydraulic model by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Twelve inundation maps were produced at 2-foot intervals for Blue Parkway stage elevations from 750 to 772 feet. Each map is associated with National Weather Service flood-peak forecast locations at 63rd Street, Blue Parkway, Stadium Drive, U.S. Highway 40, 12th Street, and the Missouri River

  9. On the Connections Between Surficial Processes and Stratigraphy in River Deltas

    CERN Document Server

    Puma, Michael J; Paola, Chris; Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    We explore connections between surficial deltaic processes (e.g. avulsion, deposition) and the stratigraphic record using a simple numerical model of delta-plain evolution, with the aim of constraining these connections and thus improving prediction of subsurface features. The model represents channel dynamics using a simple but flexible cellular approach, and is unique in that it explicitly includes backwater effects that are known to be important in low-gradient channel networks. The patterns of channel deposits in the stratigraphic record vary spatially due to variation in avulsion statistics with radial distance from the delta's source of water and sediment. We introduce channel residence time as an important statistical measure of the surface channel kinematics. The model suggests that the mean channel residence time anywhere within the delta is nicely described by a power law distribution showing a cutoff that depends on radial distance. Thicknesses of channel deposits are not uniquely determined by the...

  10. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON A NEW TYPE OF AERATOR IN SPILLWAY WITH LOW FROUDE NUMBER AND MILD SLOPE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Pei-lan; LIAO Hua-sheng; QIU Yue; LI Chen-juan

    2009-01-01

    Experimental study on aeration characteristics of various aeration devices was conducted in the spillway tunnel of the Pubugou hydropower project, Sichuan Province, China. It is shown by comparison that the new type of aeration device, namely, the aerator with a trapezoidal-shaped slot and a steep-slope section(ATSS), can avoid water accumulation in the cavity of the aeration device in the project, thus can effectively solve the backwater problems arising from this project and be used for a wide range of different water levels, without any drain facilities. Above the water level of 840 m, the water contained in the cavity can be eliminated completely, which means that the recommended new type of aerator can meet the aeration demands in the spillway of the project with low Froude number and may be of practical significance and of interest to other projects with similar types of aeration devices.

  11. The Story of Helium and the Birth of Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Biman B

    2013-01-01

    Biman Nath The Story of Helium and the Birth of Astrophysics Helium was the first element ever discovered by astronomers. Its presence was first indicated in the Sun and not on Earth. Further, its discovery marked the birth of the new science of astrophysics. However, it turns out that the events leading to the discovery of helium have been rather misrepresented in books, journals, and even encyclopedias. The usual story about its joint discovery during a solar eclipse in 1868 by French astronomer Pierre Janssen and late in England by Norman Lockyer, is far from the truth. Janssen never mentioned any new spectral line in his reports. The actual story turns out to be as dramatic as in fiction. This book tells the story without jargon, using the words of the scientists themselves (from their letters and reports), and rescues the real story from the backwaters of history.

  12. Software sensors based on the grey-box modelling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, J.; Harremoës, P.; Strube, Rune

    1996-01-01

    In recent years the grey-box modelling approach has been applied to wastewater transportation and treatment Grey-box models are characterized by the combination of deterministic and stochastic terms to form a model where all the parameters are statistically identifiable from the on......-box model for the specific dynamics is identified. Similarly, an on-line software sensor for detecting the occurrence of backwater phenomena can be developed by comparing the dynamics of a flow measurement with a nearby level measurement. For treatment plants it is found that grey-box models applied to on......-line measurements. With respect to the development of software sensors, the grey-box models possess two important features. Firstly, the on-line measurements can be filtered according to the grey-box model in order to remove noise deriving from the measuring equipment and controlling devices. Secondly, the grey...

  13. Development of a flood-warning network and flood-inundation mapping for the Blanchard River in Ottawa, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T.

    2011-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps of the Blanchard River in Ottawa, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Village of Ottawa, Ohio. The maps, which correspond to water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Ottawa (USGS streamgage site number 04189260), were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning Network that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. Flood profiles were computed by means of a step-backwater model calibrated to recent field measurements of streamflow. The step-backwater model was then used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for 12 flood stages with corresponding streamflows ranging from less than the 2-year and up to nearly the 500-year recurrence-interval flood. The computed flood profiles were used in combination with digital elevation data to delineate flood-inundation areas. Maps of the Village of Ottawa showing flood-inundation areas overlain on digital orthophotographs are presented for the selected floods. As part of this flood-warning network, the USGS upgraded one streamgage and added two new streamgages, one on the Blanchard River and one on Riley Creek, which is tributary to the Blanchard River. The streamgage sites were equipped with both satellite and telephone telemetry. The telephone telemetry provides dual functionality, allowing village officials and the public to monitor current stage conditions and enabling the streamgage to call village officials with automated warnings regarding flood stage and/or predetermined rates of stage increase. Data from the streamgages serve as a flood warning that emergency management personnel can use in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps by to determine a course of action when flooding is imminent.

  14. Hydrologic Controls over Water Use in a Forested Floodplain Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S. T.; Cochran, J. W.; Keim, R.; King, S. L.; Krauss, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrologic variability is a primary driver of wetland forest physiological function and structure. Spatial variations in forest composition co-occur with hydrologic variations, generally assumed to be due to differences in tolerance to flooding and drought. To develop a process-level understanding of water table effects on wetland tree function, we measured transpiration of dominant bottomland hardwood species and analyzed how transpiration responded to spatial and temporal water table variations. Sap flow was measured with Granier-style heat dissipation probes in twenty-six trees (Celtis laevigata and Quercus lyrata) at two sites in the White River floodplain in Arkansas, USA (July - October, 2013). Hydrology at one site is controlled by headwater flooding driven by precipitation events. The other site is controlled by Mississippi River backwater flooding, where artificial levees cause high flood levels with rapid recession. Both sites have alluvial clay soils. At the backwater site, the receding water table corresponded with a steady reduction in transpiration throughout the growing season, suggesting that precipitation recharge of soil moisture did not satisfy demands despite the humid climate. In contrast, at the headwater site, precipitation events repeatedly raised the water table, which were mirrored by increases in transpiration. These results suggest preferential uptake from the free water surface over more tightly bound soil water, and that subsurface flood subsidies enable a longer effective growing season. Despite divergent growth strategies between the two monitored species, differences among the temporal patterns of transpiration depended more on microtopographic position rather than species. Recharge events by precipitation provided greater benefit for trees in microtopographic lows compared to those on ridges, evident by relatively higher sapflow rates, during the groundwater recession limb. Despite the similar species composition between sites

  15. River bed morphology evolution following a streamside landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copertino, Vito; Fortunato Dal Sasso, Silvano; Giosa, Luciana; Scavone, Giuseppina; Sole, Aurelia; Telesca, Vito

    2010-05-01

    River bed morphology and hydraulic transport processes can suffer modifications at different time and spatial scale because of landslides interaction with river networks during hydrological events, increasing the hydraulic risk for anthropic works and infrastructures. In this work, the Authors describe the investigations carried out on a single thread alluvial reach in the middle valley of the Noce River in Basilicata (Italy), characterized by a narrow and confined bed, which was interested by a progressive morfo-hydrodynamic change caused by a landslide mobilized from the right side slope of the basin in July 2007. Different river morphological scenarios were observed in the first year following the landslide. After a partial and then total blockage of the water course (respectively July 2007 and November 2007), with the formation of a little backwater lake upstream, the following floods avoided the landslide bottom, producing an avulsion with incision of a bend on the left floodplain, thus promoting a process of emptying of the backwater. The new river morphological configuration triggered an alteration of the sediments budget with a progressive erosion of floodplain, bringing to light cyclopean boulders next to the outside bank of the bend. Landslide interference induced some morpho-hydrodinamic changes also in the upstream reach, because of sediments deposition, with the formation of an alternate bars sequence. Instead, in downstream reaches clayey and cohesive material flowed from the hillslope. This material, erodible in a very long time and transportable mainly in suspension, together with the modesty of rainfall following the landslide event, didn't produce significant morphological variations. River bed dynamics and morphological alterations were observed and measured by field observations and topographic surveys and were referred to particular rainfall events occurred during the monitoring period. Information deriving from topographic data was compared

  16. Sources of error and uncertainties in palaeoflood reconstruction from dendrogeomorphological evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Herrero, Andres; Eguibar, Miguel Angel; Bodoque, Jose Maria; Ballesteros-Canovas, Juan Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Dendrogeomorphology is being used since three decades ago to estimate the order of magnitude of the paleoflood peak-flows; and since few years ago to compute palaeoflood discharges with more precision and detail. To this end hydraulic-hydrodynamic models, either 1D or 2D, have been calibrated using as observed references external dendrogeomorphic evidence (e.g. corrosion scarring). However, the palaeodischarges defined to date from this approach are potentially misleading since the flow behaviour due to the interference between trees and flow has not been considered. Trees cause an obstruction of water flow, drag forces and turbulence, which cause energy loss and result in water level variations. When the flow is subcritical a rise in water surface occurs upstream of the tree; whereas around the trunk there is a local decrease in the water surface. If supercritical flow occurs, the tree provokes a rise in water surface downstream of the tree, and local increase of the water surface around the trunk. With regard to this, in order to take in count these sources of uncertainties, we have calculated variations in water surface by applying an approach similar to the Yarnell equation. It is an empirical equation broadly applied to predict the change in water surface from just downstream of a given bridge to just upstream of the bridge. We have applied this equation to estimate the backwater rise as a result of the presence of trees on the river banks and floodplain, since hydraulic behaviour in this context is very similar to that empirically demonstrated for bridges. Here, we have estimated errors made in the palaeodischarges estimated so far. To this end, we have compared the existing deviations between palaeodischarges estimated from the standard dendrogeomorphic method and those derived from the approach proposed in this work. These findings do not invalidate the usefulness of dendrogeomorphology for assessing palaeodischarges, although they do show the need for

  17. Prediction of surface flow hydrology and sediment retention upslope of a vetiver buffer strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Janet; Yu, Bofu; Ghadiri, Hossein; Rose, Calvin

    2007-05-01

    SummaryVegetated buffer strips are widely used to reduce fluxes of eroding soil and associated chemicals, from hillslopes into waterways. Sediment retention by buffers is time-dependent, with its effectiveness changing with the deposition process. Our research focuses on settling of sediment upslope of stiff grass buffers at three slopes, under subcritical flow conditions. A new model is developed which couples the hydraulics, sediment deposition and subsequent adjustment to topography in order to predict water and sediment profiles upslope of a buffer with time. Experiments to test the model were carried out in the Griffith University Tilting-Flume Simulated Rainfall facility using subcritical flows at 1%, 3% and 5% slopes. Water and sediment profiles were measured at different times as Vertisol sediment was introduced upslope of a vetiver grass strip. A region of increased flow depth (backwater) was produced upslope of the strip which increased in depth and decreased in length with increasing slope. Backwater height could be predicted from flow rates and thus could be used as an input for the model in the absence of experimental data. As slope increased, sediment was deposited closer to the grass strip, moving into the grass strip itself at 5% slope. The grass strip was less effective in reducing sediment in the outflow as slope increased and differences between slopes were significant. Model prediction of water and sediment profiles compared reasonably well with measured data, giving low root mean square errors and high coefficients of model efficiency. Masses of deposited sediment were generally simulated within 20% of measured values. However, simulated particle size distributions of deposited sediment were less accurate.

  18. A finite-element model study of the impact of the proposed I-326 crossing on flood stages of the Congaree River near Columbia, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.K.; Bennett, C. S., III

    1981-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite element surface water model was used to study the hydraulic impact of the proposed Interstate Route 326 crossing of the Congaree River near Columbia, SC. The finite element model was assessed as a potential operational tool for analyzing complex highway crossings and other modifications of river flood plains. Infrared aerial photography was used to define regions of homogeneous roughness in the flood plain. Finite element networks approximating flood plain topography were designed using elements of three roughness types. High water marks established during an 8-yr flood that occurred in October 1976 were used to calibrate the model. The maximum flood of record, an approximately 100-yr flood that occurred in August 1908, was modeled in three cases: dikes on the right bank, dikes on the left bank, and dikes on both banks. In each of the three cases, simulations were performed both without and with the proposed highway embankments in place. Detailed information was obtained about backwater effects upstream from the proposed highway embankments, changes in flow distribution resulting from the embankments, and local velocities in the bridge openings. On the basis of results from the model study, the South Carolina Department of Highways and Public Transportation changed the design of several bridge openings. A simulation incorporating the new design for the case with dikes on the left bank indicated that both velocities in the bridge openings and backwater were reduced. A major problem in applying the model was the difficulty in predicting the network detail necessary to avoid local errors caused by roughness discontinuities and large depth gradients. (Lantz-PTT)

  19. Viruses and bacteria in floodplain lakes along a major Amazon tributary respond to distance to the Amazon River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Marques Almeida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of the massive water volume of the Amazon River, the Amazon tributaries have their water backed up by hundreds of kilometers upstream their mouth. This backwater effect is part of the complex hydrodynamics of Amazonian surface waters, which in turn drives the variation in concentrations of organic matter and nutrients, and also regulates planktonic communities such as viruses and bacteria. Viruses and bacteria are commonly tightly coupled, and their ecological role in aquatic food webs has been increasingly recognized. Here, we surveyed viral and bacterial abundances in 26 floodplain lakes along the Trombetas River, the largest clear-water tributary of the Amazon River’s north margin. We correlated viral and bacterial abundances with temperature, pH, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, phosphorus, nitrogen, turbidity, water transparency, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2, phytoplankton abundance and distance from the lake mouth until the confluence of the Trombetas with the Amazon River. We hypothesized that both bacterial and viral abundances would change along a latitudinal gradient, as the backwater effect becomes more intense with increased proximity to the Amazon River; different flood duration and intensity among lakes and waters with contrasting sources would cause spatial variation. Our measurements were performed during the low water period, when floodplain lakes are in their most lake-like conditions. Viral and bacterial abundances, DOC, pCO2 and water transparency increased as distance to the Amazon River increased. Most viruses were bacteriophages, as viruses were strongly linked to bacteria, but not to phytoplankton. We suggest that bacterial abundances increase in response to DOC quantity and possibly quality, consequently leading to increased viral abundances. Our results highlight that hydrodynamics plays a key role in the regulation of planktonic viral and bacterial communities in

  20. Acoustic Doppler current profiler applications used in rivers and estuaries by the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected streamflow information for the Nation's streams since 1889. Streamflow information is used to predict floods, manage and allocate water resources, design engineering structures, compute water-quality loads, and operate water-control structures. The current (2007) size of the USGS streamgaging network is over 7,400 streamgages nationwide. The USGS has progressively improved the streamgaging program by incorporating new technologies and techniques that streamline data collection while increasing the quality of the streamflow data that are collected. The single greatest change in streamflow measurement technology during the last 100 years has been the development and application of high frequency acoustic instruments for measuring streamflow. One such instrument, the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), is rapidly replacing traditional mechanical current meters for streamflow measurement (Muste and others, 2007). For more information on how an ADCP works see Simpson (2001) or visit http://hydroacoustics.usgs.gov/. The USGS has used ADCPs attached to manned or tethered boats since the mid-1990s to measure streamflow in a wide variety of conditions (fig. 1). Recent analyses have shown that ADCP streamflow measurements can be made with similar or greater accuracy, efficiency, and resolution than measurements made using conventional current-meter methods (Oberg and Mueller, 2007). ADCPs also have the ability to measure streamflow in streams where traditional current-meter measurements previously were very difficult or costly to obtain, such as streams affected by backwater or tides. In addition to streamflow measurements, the USGS also uses ADCPs for other hydrologic measurements and applications, such as computing continuous records of streamflow for tidally or backwater affected streams, measuring velocity fields with high spatial and temporal resolution, and estimating suspended-sediment concentrations. An overview

  1. Comparison of two methods for detection of fecal indicator bacteria used in water quality monitoring of the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaodan; Xiao, Guosheng; Zhou, Nong; Qi, Wenhua; Han, Lin; Ruan, Yu; Guo, Dongqin; Zhou, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Scientifically sound methods to rapidly measure fecal indicator bacteria are important to ensure safe water for drinking and recreational purposes. A total of 200 water samples obtained from the Three Gorges Reservoir during three successive one-year study periods (October 2009 to September 2012) were analyzed using multiple-tube fermentation (MTF) and most probable numbers combined with polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR). The MPN-PCR method was found to be significantly more sensitive than the MTF method for detecting Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp., and of equal sensitivity for detecting total coliforms when all surface water samples were grouped together. The two analytical methods had a strong, significant relationship, but MPN-PCR took only 12-18hr, compared with the 3-8days needed using the MTF method. Bacterial concentrations varied per sampling site but were significantly lower in the mainstream of the Yangtze River than those in the backwater areas of tributaries. The water quality of 85.8% of water samples from the mainstream was suitable for use as a centralized potable water source, while the water quality of 52.5% of water samples from the backwater areas was unsuitable for recreational activities. Relationships between fecal indicator bacteria showed significant correlation (r=0.636-0.909, ptemperature, daily inflow, and total dissolved solids (r=0.237-0.532, p<0.05, n=200). The study indicated that MPN-PCR is a rapid and easily performed deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based method for quantitative detection of viable total coliforms, E. coli, and Enterococcus spp. in surface water. PMID:26702967

  2. Three Gorges Reservoir Area: soil erosion under natural condition vs. soil erosion under current land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbrodt, Sarah; Behrens, Thorsten; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Apparently, the current most prominent human-induced example for large scale environmental impact is the Three Gorges Dam in China. The flooding alongside the Yangtze River, and its tributaries results in a vast loss of settlement and farmland area with productive, fertile valley soils. Due to the associated high land use dynamic on uphill-sites, the soil resources are underlying high land use pressure. Within our study, the soil erosion under natural conditions is compared to the soil erosion under current land use after the impoundment. Both were modeled using the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) which is able to predict long-term annual soil loss with limited data. The database consists of digital terrain data (45 m resolution DEM, erosive slope length based on Monte-Carlo-Aggregation according to Behrens et al. (2008)), field investigations of recent erosion forms, and literature studies. The natural disposition to soil erosion was calculated considering the USLE factors R, S, and K. The soil erosion under current land use was calculated taking into account all USLE factors. The study area is the catchment of the Xiangxi River in the Three Gorges Reservoir area. Within the Xiangxi Catchment (3,200 km²) the highly dynamic backwater area (580 km²), and two micro-scale study sites (Xiangjiaba with 2.8 km², and Quyuan with 88 km²) are considered more detailed as they are directly affected by the river impoundment. Central features of the Xiangxi Catchment are the subtropical monsoon climate, an extremely steep sloping relief (mean slope angle 39°, SD 22.8°) artificially fractured by farmland terraces, and a high soil erodibility (mean K factor 0.37, SD 0.13). On the catchment scale the natural disposition to soil erosion makes up to mean 518.0 t ha-1 a-1. The maximum potential soil loss of 1,730.1 t ha-1 a-1 under natural conditions is reached in the Quyuan site (mean 635.8 t ha-1 a-1) within the backwater area (mean 582.9 t ha-1 a-1). In the

  3. A Combined Approach to Measure Micropollutant Behaviour during Riverbank Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driezum, Inge; Saracevic, Ernis; Derx, Julia; Kirschner, Alexander; Sommer, Regina; Farnleitner, Andreas; Blaschke, Alfred Paul

    2016-04-01

    Riverbank filtration (RBF) systems are widely used as natural treatment process. The advantages of RBF over surface water abstraction are the elimination of for example suspended solids, biodegradable compounds (like specific micropollutants), bacteria and viruses (Hiscock and Grischek, 2002). However, in contrast to its importance, remarkably less is known on the respective external (e.g. industrial or municipal sewage) and the internal (e.g. wildlife and agricultural influence) sources of contaminants, the environmental availability and fate of the various hazardous substances, and its potential transport during soil and aquifer passage. The goal of this study is to get an insight in the behaviour of various micropollutants and microbial indicators during riverbank filtration. Field measurements were combined with numerical modelling approaches. The study area comprises an alluvial backwater and floodplain area downstream of Vienna. The river is highly dynamic, with discharges ranging from 900 m3/s during low flow to 11000 m3/s during flood events. Samples were taken in several monitoring wells along a transect extending from the river towards a backwater river in the floodplain. Three of the piezometers were situated in the first 20 meters away from the river in order to obtain information about micropollutant behaviour close to the river. A total of 9 different micropollutants were analysed in grab samples taken under different river flow conditions (n=33). Following enrichment using SPE, analysis was performed using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Faecal indicators (E. coli and enterococci) and bacterial spores were enumerated in sample volumes of 1 L each using cultivation based methods (ISO 16649-1, ISO 7899-2:2000 and ISO 6222). The analysis showed that some compounds, e.g. ibuprofen and diclofenac, were only found in the river. These compounds were already degraded in the first ten meters away from the river. Analysis of

  4. Experimental evaluation of the effect of storm movement on peak discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Liang; Charles S. Melching

    2015-01-01

    abstract The hypothesis that downstream moving storms with storm length less than watershed length (Ls/L o 1.0) magnify the peak discharges as indicated by kinematic-wave models in previous studies was evaluated in an analysis of the dimensionless peak discharge and dimensionless storm velocity. Previously unpublished experimental data collected for a V-shaped watershed in the Watershed Experimentation System (WES) at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, were used in comparison with the simulation results of a kinematic-wave model. It is found that downstream moving storms with Ls/L o 1.0 increase the peak discharges to a limited extent compared to stationary storms, and the kinematic-wave model overstates the increase in the peak flows resulting from downstream moving storms with Ls/L o 1.0. To evaluate the importance of the backwater effects in the experimental watershed, the accuracy of kinematic-wave and dynamic-wave models for the simulation of surface runoff resulting from upstream and downstream moving storms was evaluated utilizing the same experimental data. The kinematic-wave model simulates the upstream moving storms pretty well, i.e. Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of model fit efficiency equal to 0.948 and 0.831 for storms lengths equal to and not equal to the watershed length, respectively. Whereas, the kinematic wave model substantially overestimates the peak discharge of downstream moving storms, and yields generally poorer fits than for upstream moving storm, i.e. NSE equal to 0.867 and 0.674 for storms with lengths equal to and not equal to the watershed length, respectively. The dynamic-wave model simulates the downstream moving storms pretty well, i.e. NSE equal to 0.843 and 0.879 for storms with lengths equal to and not equal to the watershed length, respectively, indicating backwater significantly affects runoff for even this simple experimental watershed. Considering that storm movement did not substantially magnify peak discharge

  5. Experiments in dam removal, sediment pulses and channel evolution on the Clark Fork River, MT and White Salmon River, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Two recent dam removals on tributaries to the Columbia River in the northwestern United States present contrasting examples of how dam removal methods, reservoir contents, and geomorphic settings influence system responses. The 2008 removal of Milltown Dam, from the Clark Fork River (CFR), Montana, and the 2011 removal of Condit Dam from the White Salmon River (WSR), Washington (Table 1), represent two of the largest dam removals to date. The Milltown Dam removal was notable because the dam stored millions of cubic meters of contaminated mine tailings, a portion of which were excavated as part of Superfund remediation but a portion of which flowed downstream after the removal. On the CFR, post-breach high flows in 2008 produced reservoir erosion and downstream deposition in bed interstices, along bars, and on the floodplain, but above-average (3-15 year recurrence interval) floods since then have remobilized this material and have, to a large extent, erased signs of downstream sedimentation. The Condit Dam removal entailed dynamiting of a 4m by 5.5m hole at the base of the dam, which produced rapid and dramatic draining of fine reservoir sediments within hours of the blast. Downstream of Condit Dam, the initial hyperconcentrated flows and sediment pulse draped the WSR with fine sediment, filled pools, and, in an unconfined reach influenced by the Columbia River's backwater, caused meters of aggradation and new bar formation. In the confined, bedrock-dominated reach downstream of the Condit site, pool-riffle structure has started to reemerge as of summer 2012 and the finest bed materials have been evacuated from the main channel, although sediment storage in pools and eddies persists. Whereas post-breach geomorphic responses on the CFR have been largely driven by hydrology, the post-breach evolution of the WSR has been predominantly influenced by antecedent geomorphic conditions (slope, confinement, and Columbia River backwater). On both the CFR and WSR, the pace of

  6. Punctuated sand transport in the lowermost Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.; Mohrig, David; Allison, Mead

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of sand flux and water flow in the Mississippi River are presented for a portion of the system 35-50 km upstream from the head of its subaerial delta. These data are used to provide insight into how nonuniform flow conditions, present in the lower reaches of large alluvial rivers, affect the timing and magnitude of sand transport near the river outlet. Field surveys during both low and high water discharge include (1) sequential digital bathymetric maps defining mobile river bottom topography which were used to estimate bed material flux, (2) multiple water velocity profiles, and (3) multiple suspended sediment profiles collected using a point-integrated sampler. These data show that total sand transport increases by two orders of magnitude over the measured range in water discharge (11,300 to 38,400 m3 s-1). During low water discharge no sand is measured in suspension, and sand discharge via bed form migration is minimal. During high water discharge 54% of the sand discharge is measured in suspension while 46% of the sand discharge is part of bed form migration. The component of boundary shear stress associated with moving this sediment is estimated using a set of established sediment transport algorithms, and values for the total boundary shear stress are predicted by fitting logarithmic velocity functions to the measured profiles. The estimates of boundary shear stress, using measurements of suspended sand transport, bed form transport, and downstream oriented velocity profiles are internally consistent; moreover, the analyses show that boundary shear stress increases by nearly 10-fold over the measured water discharge range. We show how this increase in shear stress is consistent with backwater flow arising where the river approaches its outlet. The hydrodynamic properties of backwater flow affect the timing and magnitude of sand flux and produce punctuated sand transport through the lowermost Mississippi River. Our field data are used to evaluate

  7. Modeling delta growth and channel geometry on Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana. Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viparelli, E.; Czapiga, M. J.; Li, C.; Shaw, J. B.; Parker, G.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model of delta growth, in which the distributary channels are assumed to have self-constructed their cross sections, is validated on Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana. As in previous laterally averaged models of delta growth, the delta is divided in a low slope delta top, a steep delta front and a low slope basement. The flow on the delta top is assumed steady, and a backwater formulation is implemented. Since one or more channels can actively transport water and sediment on the delta top during floods, we simplify the problem by assuming that the bed material is transported in one rectangular channel, with width and depth roughly equal to the sum of the active channel widths, and to the average depth of the active channels. The problem is characterized by one equation (i.e. the backwater equation) in two unknowns, the channel width and depth. Another equation is thus needed to close the problem. Under the assumptions that 1) the system is at bankfull flow, and 2) the Shields number in the channels is equal to its channel formative value, our closure relation is a channel-formative criterion. In particular, a recently derived relation to estimate the formative (bankfull) Shields number as a function of the friction slope is implemented. Recent field work on Wax Lake Delta shows that the distributary channels are incising into a relatively stiff basement. In our model we do not attempt to directly model channel incision, but we implicitly account for it with a modified formulation to compute the shoreline migration rate. In this formulation the bed material at the shoreline is trapped in the non-channelized portion of the delta front only. Measured and numerical shoreline migration rates, longitudinal profiles of delta elevation, and channel geometry, i.e. width and depth, are compared. In the relatively near future we plan to 1) use our model to estimate land-building potential of engineered diversions of the Mississippi River, and 2) couple the present model

  8. Hydrodynamic controls on the downstream elimination of gravel, and implications for fluvial-deltaic stratigraphy: two end-member case studies from the Selenga River, Russia, and the Mississippi River, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The downstream termination of gravel is measured for two fluvial-deltaic systems: the Selenga and Mississippi rivers. These end-members vary by an order of magnitude for slope, water and sediment discharge, and delta area. Moreover, the contrast between the tectonic regimes of the receiving basins is stark: the Selenga delta is located along the deep-water margin of Lake Baikal, which is an active half-graben rift basin, while the Mississippi discharges onto a passive margin with little tectonic influence. Nevertheless, the two rivers share a striking sedimentological similarity: near the delta apex, gravel is eliminated from the downstream dispersal system, and so sediment reaching the land-water interface is exclusively sand and mud. Field data for both rivers, including sediment samples and water discharge and flow velocity measurements, are used to validate morphodynamic models that assess the downstream changes in fluid stress and gravel transport. The analyses show that there are two distinct mechanisms that drive gravel deposition and prohibit dispersal throughout the delta. For the Selenga, water partitioning among bifurcating channels produces a non-linear reduction in shear stress and gravel deposition. For the Mississippi, backwater flow arrests the downstream movement of gravel during low and moderate water discharges, and although floods overcome backwater and produce uniform flow to the outlet, the duration of floods is too short to disperse gravel throughout the delta. Given sufficient time, model results indicate that both rivers should approach morphodynamic equilibrium, whereby aggradation due to sediment deposition raises local bed slope and sediment transport capacity, thereby facilitating downstream gravel movement. However, both systems possess unique characteristics that prevent this process from occurring. For the Selenga, tectonically induced movements regularly down drop portions of the delta below base level, forcing renewed delta

  9. Stage-discharge rating curves based on satellite altimetry and modeled discharge in the Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Adrien; Dias de Paiva, Rodrigo; Santos da Silva, Joecila; Medeiros Moreira, Daniel; Calmant, Stephane; Garambois, Pierre-André; Collischonn, Walter; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Seyler, Frederique

    2016-05-01

    In this study, rating curves (RCs) were determined by applying satellite altimetry to a poorly gauged basin. This study demonstrates the synergistic application of remote sensing and watershed modeling to capture the dynamics and quantity of flow in the Amazon River Basin, respectively. Three major advancements for estimating basin-scale patterns in river discharge are described. The first advancement is the preservation of the hydrological meanings of the parameters expressed by Manning's equation to obtain a data set containing the elevations of the river beds throughout the basin. The second advancement is the provision of parameter uncertainties and, therefore, the uncertainties in the rated discharge. The third advancement concerns estimating the discharge while considering backwater effects. We analyzed the Amazon Basin using nearly one thousand series that were obtained from ENVISAT and Jason-2 altimetry for more than 100 tributaries. Discharge values and related uncertainties were obtained from the rain-discharge MGB-IPH model. We used a global optimization algorithm based on the Monte Carlo Markov Chain and Bayesian framework to determine the rating curves. The data were randomly allocated into 80% calibration and 20% validation subsets. A comparison with the validation samples produced a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (Ens) of 0.68. When the MGB discharge uncertainties were less than 5%, the Ens value increased to 0.81 (mean). A comparison with the in situ discharge resulted in an Ens value of 0.71 for the validation samples (and 0.77 for calibration). The Ens values at the mouths of the rivers that experienced backwater effects significantly improved when the mean monthly slope was included in the RC. Our RCs were not mission-dependent, and the Ens value was preserved when applying ENVISAT rating curves to Jason-2 altimetry at crossovers. The cease-to-flow parameter of our RCs provided a good proxy for determining river bed elevation. This proxy was validated

  10. INTERACTION BETWEEN NATIVE AND ALIEN SPECIES OF CRAYFISH IN AUSTRIA: CASE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PÖCKL M.

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available In Austria, three indigenous crayfish species occur: the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus, the stone crayfish (Austropotamobius torrentium, and the white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes. It is not known if Astacus leptodactylus is autochthonous in the very eastern part of Austria, near the border with Hungary and Slovakia. In other parts of Austria the Turkish crayfish has been transplanted into several gravel pits and ponds. Up to now, the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii is not known to occur in the wild, but can be bought alive in fish markets, restaurants, and the aquarium trade. The Nearctic spiny-cheek crayfish (Orconectes limosus and the signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus have been introduced since the 1970s by crayfish farmers because these species are resistant to the crayfish plague fungus (Aphanomyces astaci. There are just a few populations of O. limosus, and the species is not spreading actively. However, P. leniusculus is widespread all over Austria, and was illegally introduced from one water body to another. It can be characterized as an aggressive, invasive North American species, spreading actively and acting as a vector of the crayfish plague. Unfortunately the habitat requirements of the native noble crayfish and the alien signal crayfish are nearly the same. Case studies are given in the following chapters: the first group of examples refers to water bodies where the alien signal crayfish is most probably the cause of displacement of the indigenous noble crayfish: 1 Hintersee, 2 Irrsee (« Zeller See », 3 north-western Lower Austria (« Waldviertel », 4 Merzenstein (aquacultural enterprise, 5 Neufelder See. The second group of examples refers to water bodies where alien and indigenous species are able to coexist: a the confluence of the main course of the Danube River, the Ölhafen and the Neue Donau in the southeast part of Vienna, b the Schönauer Wasser, a backwater of the Danube River downstream

  11. Stratigraphic architecture, bedload extraction, and mass balance of Holocene fluvial sediments in a tectonically subsiding basin within the Ganges-Brahmaputra River delta, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincavage, R.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Pickering, J.; Wilson, C.; Paola, C.; Hossain, S.; Steckler, M. S.; Seeber, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Brahmaputra River occupied the tectonically active Sylhet Basin in eastern Bangladesh three times during the Holocene. With samples from more than 200 closely-spaced (3-5 km) boreholes, we take advantage of these discrete channel occupations and the high trapping efficiency of the subsiding basin to investigate dispersal of fluvial sediments. Experiment and theory suggest that depositional units transition from channels to lobes as transported sediment mass declines below ~30% of the total measured at the basin head. We test these ideas by reconstructing the geometry and grain size distributions of a large (30 m thick x 80 km wide) sand lobe formed during the mid-Holocene occupation (~7000-4000 years BP) of Sylhet Basin. Based on estimates of modern sediment discharge in the system, the volume of this sediment lobe is insufficient to account for the entire sediment budget. The smaller sediment volume is likely a consequence of reduced sediment discharge during a weakened monsoon. Additional sediment is likely to have also been routed out of the basin via an outlet located approximately along the modern Meghna River channel. Facies within Sylhet Basin can be characterized as stacked braidbelt sands in the proximal portion of the system, with isolated sand lenses further downstream, indicating a transition from a highly mobile braidbelt to a less mobile distributary system. The majority of bed load is extracted within a distance of ~150 km from the avulsion node, approximately coincident with the regional backwater reach of the Bengal Basin, suggesting a link between the hydraulic and "morphodynamic" backwater reaches of the system. Downstream fining is more rapid in sediments associated with the long-term occupation of Sylhet Basin, for which sediment is trapped over a relatively short distance within the sand wedge of central Sylhet Basin, than those from the early- and late-Holocene occupations, for which sediment is distributed over a longer path that follows

  12. Constraint of the limited information content of discharge measurements on the benefits of rating curve models with increased complexities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eerdenbrugh, Katrien; Verhoest, Niko; De Mulder, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Discharge assessment through rating curves is a widespread technique in the field of hydrologic monitoring. In practical applications, this technique often consists of the use of one or multiple power laws, based on rather stringent assumptions concerning the nature of the prevailing flow conditions. In reality, those assumptions are regularly violated, inducing considerable uncertainties in the calculated discharges. It is thus important to estimate the effect of those simplifications when performing an overall uncertainty analysis of rating curve discharges. In this study, different rating curve formulations are compared based on both results of a hydrodynamic model and measured water levels and discharges. The results of a hydrodynamic model are used to justify the applicability of several rating curve models with increased complexity as an alternative for a single power law equation. With the hydrodynamic model, situations are simulated that correspond to steady state conditions and to minimal effect of downstream boundaries. Comparison of simulations results with those of measurement-driven simulations leads to an increased understanding of the rating curve dynamics. It allows for evaluation of rating curve formulations accounting for the influences of hysteresis and backwater effects which are neglected in power law rating curves. Subsequently, the performance of those rating curve models and the identifiability of their parameters are assessed based on available stage-discharge measurements and their accompanying uncertainties as described in literature. This assessment is performed based on the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE). Rejection criteria to distinguish behavioural from non-behavioural models are defined by uncertainties on both water levels and discharge measurements that envelop measured data points. The results of the hydrodynamic model clearly indicate benefits of adding complexity to the rating curve model, mainly by

  13. Early life history of the northern pikeminnow in the lower Columbia River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadomski, D.M.; Barfoot, C.A.; Bayer, J.M.; Poe, T.P.

    2001-01-01

    The northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis is a large, native cyprinid in the Columbia River basin that has persisted in spite of substantial habitat alterations. During the months of June to September 1993-1996, we investigated the temporal and spatial patterns of northern pikeminnow spawning, along with describing larval drift and characterizing larval and early juvenile rearing habitats in the lower Columbia River (the John Day and Dalles reservoirs and the free-flowing section downstream of Bonneville Dam) as well as in the lower sections of two major tributaries (the John Day and Deschutes rivers). The density of newly emerged drifting larvae was higher in dam tailraces (a mean of 7.7 larvae/100 m3 in surface tows) than in the lower reservoirs (0.3 larvae/100 m3), indicating that tailraces were areas of more intense spawning. Density was particularly high in the Bonneville Dam tailrace (15.1 larvae/100 m3), perhaps because adult northern pikeminnow are abundant below Bonneville Dam and this is the first tailrace and suitable main-stem spawning habitat encountered during upriver spawning migrations. Spawning also occurred in both of the tributaries sampled but not in a backwater. Spawning in the Columbia River primarily took place during the month of June in 1993 and 1994, when the water temperature rose from 14??C to 18??C, but occurred about 2 weeks later in 1995 and 1996, possibly because of cooler June water temperature (14-15??C) in these years. The period of drift was brief (about 1-3 d), with larvae recruiting to shallow, low-velocity shorelines of main-channel and backwater areas to rear. Larvae reared in greatest densities at sites with fine sediment or sand substrates and moderate- to high-density vegetation (a mean density of 92.1 larvae/10 m3). The success of northern pikeminnow in the Columbia River basin may be partly attributable to their ability to locate adequate spawning and rearing conditions in a variety of main-stem and tributary

  14. Urban impacts on the water quality of selected water bodies in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lucas; Holbach, Andreas; Wei, Hu; Wang, Lijing; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Binghui; Norra, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Urban systems belong to the major input sources for pollutants into aquatic systems. In China, the rising urbanisation and industrialisation causes a growing pressure on rivers, lakes and estuaries. With the recent impoundment of the Yangtze River by the Three Gorges Dam, the newly formed Three Gorges Reservoir is additionally experiencing drastic changes in the flow regime [1]. In the frame of the Sino-German "Yangtze-Project" [2] samples were taken from the water bodies in proximity to the Cities of Chongqing, Kaixian and Wushan during a field campaign in April 2011. Water samples were analysed for inorganic contents in suspended solids and the dissolved phase to assess the impact of these cities on the water quality of the reservoir. Results show that input from urban sources, together with the effects from the impoundment of the Yangtze River, deteriorates the quality of water and sediments in the Three Gorges Reservoir. Water in the Wushan Lake is trapped in by the Yangtze River flowing by, which leads to longer retention times of effluent water from the city. The chemical composition of the lake water is also measurable upstream in the Daninghe itself and might be due to the backwater effect. In the Xiaojiang River near Kaixian the low flow velocity from the backwater effect of the Yangtze, together with influences from the city have led to problems with algal blooms. High metal concentrations at Chongqing indicate a strong impact of this megacity on the water quality of the Three Gorges Reservoir and the sediments of the Yangtze River. Acknowledgements: Financial support by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany (BMBF), the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (MOST) and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). References: [1] Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People's Republic of China, 2010: Bulletin on the Ecological and Environmental Monitoring Results of the Three Gorges Project 2010 [2

  15. Reshaping of the hyporheic zone beneath river restoration structures: Flume and hydrodynamic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Endreny, Theodore A.

    2013-08-01

    In-channel stream restoration structures readjust surface water hydraulics, streambed pressure, and subsurface hyporheic exchange characteristics. In this study, we conducted flume experiments (pool-riffle amplitude of 0.03 m and wavelengths of 0.5 m) and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations to quantify how restoration structures impacted hyporheic penetration depth, Dp, and hyporheic vertical discharge rate, Qv. Restoration structures were channel-spanning vanes with subsurface footers placed in the gravel bed at each riffle. Hyporheic vertical discharge rate was estimated by analyzing solute concentration decay data, and maximum hyporheic penetration depth was measured as the interface between hyporheic water and groundwater using dye tracing experiments. The CFD was verified with literature-based flume hydraulic data and with Dp and Qz observations, and the CFD was then used to document how Dp and Qz varied with flume discharge, Q, ranging from 1 to 15 L/s (3E + 03 < Re < 5E + 04). Flume experiments and CFD simulations showed that restoration structures increased Qz and decreased Dp, creating a shallower but higher flux hyporheic zone. Qz had a positive linear relationship with Q, while Dp initially grew as Q increased, but then shrunk when a hydraulic jump with low streambed pressured formed downstream of the structure. The restoration structures created counter-acting forces of increased downwelling head due to backwater effects, and increased upwelling due to low streambed pressure and standing waves downstream of the structure.

  16. Effects of flooding and tamarisk removal on habitat for sensitive fish species in the San Rafael River, Utah: implications for fish habitat enhancement and future restoration efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Daniel L; Laub, Brian G; Birdsey, Paul; Dean, David J

    2014-09-01

    Tamarisk removal is a widespread restoration practice on rivers in the southwestern USA, but impacts of removal on fish habitat have rarely been investigated. We examined whether tamarisk removal, in combination with a large spring flood, had the potential to improve fish habitat on the San Rafael River in southeastern Utah. We quantified habitat complexity and the distribution of wood accumulation in a tamarisk removal site (treated) and a non-removal site (untreated) in 2010, 1 year prior to a large magnitude and long-duration spring flood. We used aerial imagery to analyze river changes in the treated and untreated sites. Areas of channel movement were significantly larger in the treated site compared to the untreated site, primarily because of geomorphic characteristics of the channel, including higher sinuosity and the presence of an ephemeral tributary. However, results suggest that tamarisk removal on the outside of meander bends, where it grows directly on the channel margins, can promote increased channel movement. Prior to the flood, wood accumulations were concentrated in sections of channel where tamarisk had been removed. Pools, riffles, and backwaters occurred more frequently within 30 m upstream and downstream of wood accumulations compared to areas within 30 m of random points. Pools associated with wood accumulations were also significantly larger and deeper than those associated with random points. These results suggest that the combination of tamarisk removal and wood input can increase the potential for channel movement during spring floods thereby diversifying river habitat and improving conditions for native fish. PMID:24993795

  17. FLOOD ROUTING MODELS IN CONFLUENT AND DIVIDING CHANNELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范平; 李家春; 刘青泉

    2004-01-01

    By introducing a water depth connecting formula, the hydraulic equations in the dividing channel system were coupled and the relation of discharge distribution between the branches of the dividing channels can be yielded. In this manner, a numerical model for the confluent channels was established to study the variation of backwater effects with the parameters in the channel junction. The meeting of flood peaks in the mainstream and tributary can be analyzed with this model. The flood peak meeting is found to be a major factor for the extremely high water level in the mainstream during the 1998 Yangtze River flood. Subsequently the variations of discharge distribution and water level with channel parameters between each branch in this system were studied as well. As a result, flood evolution caused by Jingjiang River shortcut and sediment deposition in the entrance of dividing channels of the Yangtze River may be qualitatively elucidated. It is suggested to be an effective measure for flood mitigation to enhance regulation capability of reservoirs available upstream of the tributaries and harness branch entrance channels.

  18. Effects on the upstream flood inundation caused from the operation of Chao Phraya Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Visutimeteegorn

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During the flooding events, the operation of Chao Phraya Dam to control downstream water discharge is one of the causes of the inundation occuring over the upstream area. The purposes of this research are to study the effects of the operation of Chao Phraya Dam upon the upstream flood inundation and to find out the new measures of the flood mitigation in the upstream areas of Chao Phraya Dam by using a hydrodynamic model. The results show that Manning's n in the Chao Phraya River and its tributaries is 0.030-0.035 in the main channels and 0.050-0.070 in the flood plain areas. The backwater due to the operation of the Chao Praya dam affects as far as 110 kilometers upstream. New methods of water diversion can mitigate the flood inundation without the effect on the floating rice fields. The construction of reservoirs in the Upper Sakaekang River Basin and the Upper Yom River Basin will mitigate the flood not only in their own basins but also in the Lower Chao Phraya River Basin. The coordinated operation of the Chao Phraya Dam, the regulators and the upper basin reservoirs will efficiently mitigate the flood inundation.

  19. Fish fauna of the lower reaches of the River Drava and surrounding marshland habitats near Donji Miholjac (Eastern Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Ćaleta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A field research of ichthyofauna of the lower reaches of the River Drava near Donji Miholjac was made during 2006 using fishing nets and electrofisher. Additional data was collected from the local anglers to present all caught species in this area. Sampling was conducted on all types of water habitats including side arms, artificial channels, backwater arms and the main river channel. A total of 44 fish species were reported. Six species were documented from the catch of local anglers. The family Cyprinidae is represented by 24 species, Percidae by 4, Cobitidae by 3, Gobiidae and Centrarchidae by 2, while the remaining families were represented by 1 species. The most abundant species in this part of the River Drava is roach (Rutilus rutilus. The largest part of total biomass belongs to bream (Abramis brama. Other important species according to abundance in the examined area are: bitterling (Rhodeus amarus, European perch (Perca fluviatilis, silver bream (Blicca bjoerkna and common bleak (Alburnus alburnus. According to the ichthyofauna composition, the explored area is classified as a typical bream zone which is characteristic for the lower part of the river.

  20. Geomorphic response of sandbars to the March 2008 high-flow experiment on the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Paul E.; Hazel, Joseph E.; Schmidt, John C.; Kaplinski, Matt; Wright, Scott A.; Topping, David J.; Melis, Theodore S.

    2010-01-01

    The completion of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963 drastically altered the downstream flow regime and resulted in more than a 90 percent reduction of sand supply to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. Sandbars that were maintained by annual floods and a large sediment supply are now fewer in number and smaller in area and volume. Efforts to maintain sandbars in the current era of dam management utilize controlled floods timed to occur during brief periods of sediment enrichment that result from tributary floods. Repeat surveys of 22 sandbars made before and after controlled floods conducted in 1996, 2004, and 2008 document changes in sandbar volume; and repeat surveys at more than 100 sites document changes in sandbar elevation and morphology for the 2008 event. Each of the controlled floods resulted in sandbar deposition that was followed by erosion in the 6-month post-flood period. Erosion rates are positively correlated with post-flood dam release volumes and negatively correlated with post-flood tributary sediment supply volume. October 2008 sandbar volume was similar or larger than sandbar volume in February 1996, before the first of the three controlled floods. Deposition during the 2008 controlled flood was also associated with increases in the quantity of backwater habitat, which is used by native and non-native fish.

  1. Providing Aquatic Organism Passage in Vertically Unstable Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JanineM Castro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic organism passage barriers have been identified as one of the key impediments to recovery of salmonids and other migratory aquatic organisms in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. As such, state and federal agencies invest millions of dollars annually to address passage barriers. Because many barriers function as ad hoc grade control structures, their removal and/or replacement can unwittingly set off a cascade of effects that can negatively impact the very habitat and passage that project proponents seek to improve. The resultant vertical instability can result in a suite of effects that range from floodplain disconnection and loss of backwater and side channel habitat, to increased levels of turbidity. Risk assessment, including an evaluation of both the stage of stream evolution and a longitudinal profile analysis, provides a framework for determining if grade control is warranted, and if so, what type of structure is most geomorphically appropriate. Potential structures include placement of large wood and roughness elements, and constructed riffles, step-pools, and cascades. The use of structure types that mimic natural reach scale geomorphic analogues should result in improved aquatic organism passage, increased structural resilience, and reduced maintenance.

  2. Construction and maintenance of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta: linking process, morphology, and stratigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Carol A; Goodbred, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    We present a review of the processes, morphology, and stratigraphy of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta (GBMD), including insights gained from detailed elevation data. The review shows that the GBMD is best characterized as a composite system, with different regions having morphologic and stratigraphic attributes of an upland fluvial fan delta; a lowland, backwater-reach delta; a downdrift tidal delta plain; and an offshore subaqueous-delta clinoform. These distinct areas of upland and lowland fluvial reaches and tidal dominance vary in time and space, and we distinguish late-Holocene phases of delta construction, maintenance, and decline similar to delta-lobe cycling in other systems. The overall stability of the GBMD landform, relative to many deltas, reflects the efficient, widespread dispersal of sediment by the large monsoon discharge and high-energy tides that affect this region. However, we do identify portions of the delta that are in decline and losing elevation relative to sea level owing to insufficient sediment delivery. These areas, some of which are well inland of the coast, represent those most at risk to the continued effect of sea-level rise. PMID:25251271

  3. Large-scale Modeling of Inundation in the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X.; Li, H. Y.; Getirana, A.; Leung, L. R.; Tesfa, T. K.

    2015-12-01

    Flood events have impacts on the exchange of energy, water and trace gases between land and atmosphere, hence potentially affecting the climate. The Amazon River basin is the world's largest river basin. Seasonal floods occur in the Amazon Basin each year. The basin being characterized by flat gradients, backwater effects are evident in the river dynamics. This factor, together with large uncertainties in river hydraulic geometry, surface topography and other datasets, contribute to difficulties in simulating flooding processes over this basin. We have developed a large-scale inundation scheme in the framework of the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART) river routing model. Both the kinematic wave and the diffusion wave routing methods are implemented in the model. A new process-based algorithm is designed to represent river channel - floodplain interactions. Uncertainties in the input datasets are partly addressed through model calibration. We will present the comparison of simulated results against satellite and in situ observations and analysis to understand factors that influence inundation processes in the Amazon Basin.

  4. Hydrodynamic and Sediment Responses of Open Channels to Exposed Pipe Encasements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Q Mao

    Full Text Available The effects of exposed pipe encasements on the local variation of hydrodynamic and sediment conditions in a river channel are examined. Laboratory experiments are performed to assess the response of water level, flow regime and bed deformation to several representative types of concrete encasements. The experimental conditions considered are: three types of exposed pipe encasements exposed on the bed, including trapezoidal shape, circular-arc shape and polygonal shape, and three sets of discharges, including annual discharge, once-in-3-year flood, and once-in-50-year flood. Our experiments show that: (1 the amount of backwater definitely depends on the encasement geometric shape and the background discharge; (2 smaller discharges generally tend to induce local scour of river bed downstream of the encasement, and the order of sensitivity of bed deformation to the encasement geometric shape is trapezoidal > circular-arc > polygonal; (3 comparatively speaking, the polygonal encasement may be considered as a suitable protective structure for pipelines across alluvial rivers, with relatively modest effects on the local hydrodynamic conditions and bed stabilization.

  5. Use of aerial videography to evaluate the effects of Flaming Gorge Dam operations on natural resources of the Green River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peaking hydropower operations can profoundly alter natural stream flow and thereby affect the natural resources dependent on these flows. In this paper, we describe how aerial videography was used to collect environmental data and evaluate impacts of hydropower operations at Flaming Gorge Dam on natural resources of the Green River. An airborne multispectral video/radiometer remote sensing system was used to collect resource data under four different flow conditions from seven sites (each about one mile in length) located downstream from the dam. Releases from Flaming Gorge Dam during data collection ranged from approximately 800 to 4,000 cubic feet/sec (cfs), spanning most of the normal operating range for this facility. For each site a series of contiguous, non-overlapping images was prepared from the videotapes and used to quantify surface water area, backwater habitats, and areas of riparian vegetation under varying flow conditions. From this information, relationships between flow and habitat parameters were developed and used in conjunction with hydrologic modeling and ecological information to evaluate impacts of various modes of operation

  6. Feeding Activity, Rate of Consumption, Daily Ration and Prey Selection of Major Predators in John Day Reservoir, 1985: Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Douglas E.; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; National Fishery Research Center (U.S.)

    1986-10-01

    This report summarizes activities in 1985 to determine the extent of predation on juvenile salmonids in John Day Reservoir. To estimate consumption of juvenile salmonids we used the composition of the natural diet of predators and in the laboratory determined rate of gastric evacuation by predators. Salmonids were the single most important food item for northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) at McNary tailrace during all sampling periods and at John Day forebay during July. Salmonids accounted for 11.6% of the diet of walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) in 1985 which was about twice that found in previous years. Salmonids contributed little to smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) diet but comprised about 25% of the diet of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Composition of prey taxa in beach seine catches in 1985 was similar to 1983 and 1984 with chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha), northern squawfish, largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus), and sand roller (Percopsis transmontana) dominating the catch at main channel stations and crappies (Pomoxis spp.) and largescale sucker dominating at backwater stations. Preliminary results of beach seine efficiency studies suggest that seine efficiency varied significantly among prey species and between substrate types in 1985. Results of digestion rate experiments indicate that gastric evacuation in northern squawfish can be predicted using water temperature, prey weight, predator weight and time. 19 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. Simulation modelling: educational development roles for learning technologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Riley

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulation modelling was in the mainstream of CAL development in the 1980s when the late David Squires introduced this author to the Dynamic Modelling System. Since those early days, it seems that simulation modelling has drifted into a learning technology backwater to become a member of Laurillard's underutilized, 'adaptive and productive' media. Referring to her Conversational Framework, Laurillard constructs a pedagogic case for modelling as a productive student activity but provides few references to current practice and available resources. This paper seeks to complement her account by highlighting the pioneering initiatives of the Computers in the Curriculum Project and more recent developments in systems modelling within geographic and business education. The latter include improvements to system dynamics modelling programs such as STELLA®, the publication of introductory textbooks, and the emergence of online resources. The paper indicates several ways in which modelling activities may be approached and identifies some educational development roles for learning technologists. The paper concludes by advocating simulation modelling as an exemplary use of learning technologies - one that realizes their creative-transformative potential.

  8. White spot syndrome virus infection: Threat to crustacean biodiversity in Vembanad Lake, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toms C. Joseph

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Vembanad Lake located on the south-west coast of India, an ecological hotspot is the nursing ground of many economically important crustaceans. The prevalence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV among crustaceans from farmed, estuarine and marine environments surrounding the Vembanad Lake, India was detected using PCR. A total of 308 samples from aquaculture ponds consisting of six species of crustaceans collected from five different farms were tested for the presence of WSSV. Of these, 67% were found to carry the virus. A total of 258 samples of crustaceans from the Cochin backwater system that forms a part of the Vembanad lake viz., Metapenaeus dobsoni, Metapenaeus monoceros, Penaeus monodon and Penaeus indicus were found to contain WSSV in 62% of the samples. Fifteen species of crustaceans caught from the seas off Cochin were also screened for the presence of WSSV. Out of these, twelve species had WSSV incidence levels ranging from 6–23%. WSSV was not detected from three species of deep sea crustaceans tested. The black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon had the highest incidence of WSSV among the species screened in farmed, estuarine and marine environments.

  9. A checklist of the vertebrates of Kerala State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Nameer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the first publication on vertebrates of India (Blanford 1888–1890, a huge wealth of information has been compiled on the vertebrate fauna of various biogeographic zones of the country, especially the Western Ghats.  The state of Kerala comprising of a land area of 38,863km2, 590km coastline, an intricate system of backwaters along the coast, tropical moist forests of the Western Ghats, the highly undulating terrain, and the tropical monsoon is a unique geographical and environmental entity rich in biodiversity.  A region-specific checklist that summarises and documents the current status of vertebrate diversity provides benchmark data for documentation and appreciation of biodiversity at regional level.  Further, with the current rate of global biodiversity loss and concordant conservation efforts, the taxonomic community has a greater responsibility to make scientific information available to scientists, policy makers, politicians, research students and all relevant stakeholders, an attempt that has been made in the present paper.  The State of Kerala has 1847 species of vertebrates in 330 families and 81 orders, of which 386 are endemic to the Western Ghats region (of the Western Ghats - Sri Lanka Hotspot, and 205 species as threatened. Six hundred and eighty species of vertebrates of Kerala have been listed in the various schedules of the Indian Wildlife (Protection Act, while 148 are listed in the different appendices of CITES.  

  10. Flood inundation map library, Fort Kent, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    Severe flooding occurred in northern Maine from April 28 to May 1, 2008, and damage was extensive in the town of Fort Kent (Lombard, 2010). Aroostook County was declared a Federal disaster area on May 9, 2008. The extent of flooding on both the Fish and St. John Rivers during this event showed that the current Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Study (FIS) and Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) (Federal Emergency Management Agency, 1979) were out of date. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study to develop a flood inundation map library showing the areas and depths for a range of flood stages from bankfull to the flood of record for Fort Kent to complement an updated FIS (Federal Emergency Management Agency, in press). Hydrologic analyses that support the maps include computer models with and without the levee and with various depths of backwater on the Fish River. This fact sheet describes the methods used to develop the maps and describes how the maps can be accessed.

  11. Flood-inundation Maps for the Deerfield River, Franklin County, Massachusetts, from the Confluence with the Cold River Tributary to the Connecticut River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.; Bent, Gardner C.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey developed flood elevations in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for a 30-mile reach of the Deerfield River from the confluence of the Cold River tributary to the Connecticut River in the towns of Charlemont, Buckland, Shelburne, Conway, Deerfield, and Greenfield in Franklin County, Massachusetts to assist land owners, and emergency management workers prepare for and recover from floods. Peak flows with 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities were computed for the reach from updated flood-frequency analyses. These peak flows were routed through a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic model to obtain the corresponding peak water-surface elevations and to place the tropical storm Irene flood of August 28, 2011 into historical context. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using current [2015] stage-discharge relations at two U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the study reach—Deerfield River at Charlemont, MA (01168500) and Deerfield River near West Deerfield, MA (01170000)—and from documented high-water marks from the tropical storm Irene flood, which had between a 1- and 0.2-percent AEP.

  12. Flood-Inundation Maps for the North River in Colrain, Charlemont, and Shelburne, Massachusetts, From the Confluence of the East and West Branch North Rivers to the Deerfield River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Gardner C.; Lombard, Pamela J.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of 10 digital flood-inundation maps were developed for a 3.3-mile reach of the North River in Colrain, Charlemont, and Shelburne, Massachusetts, by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The coverage of the maps extends from the confluence of the East and West Branch North Rivers to the Deerfield River. Peak-flow estimates at the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities were computed for the reach from updated flood-frequency analyses. These peak flows were routed through a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic model to obtain the corresponding peak water-surface elevations and to place the tropical storm Irene flood of August 28, 2011, into historical context. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current [2015] stage-discharge relation at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage North River at Shattuckville, MA (station number 01169000), and from documented high-water marks from the tropical storm Irene flood, which had a peak flow with approximately a 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability.

  13. Flood-inundation map and water-surface profiles for floods of selected recurrence intervals, Consumnes River and Deer Creek, Sacramento County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Joel R.; Harmon, Jerry G.; McPherson, Kelly R.

    1998-01-01

    The damage caused by the January 1997 floods along the Cosumnes River and Deer Creek generated new interest in planning and managing land use in the study area. The 1997 floodflow peak, the highest on record and considered to be a 150-year flood, caused levee failures at 24 locations. In order to provide a technical basis for floodplain management practices, the U.S. Goelogical Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, completed a flood-inundation map of the Cosumnes River and Deer Creek drainage from Dillard Road bridge to State Highway 99. Flood frequency was estimated from streamflow records for the Cosumnes River at Michigan Bar and Deer Creek near Sloughhouse. Cross sections along a study reach, where the two rivers generally flow parallel to one another, were used with a step-backwater model (WSPRO) to estimate the water-surface profile for floods of selected recurrence intervals. A flood-inundation map was developed to show flood boundaries for the 100-year flood. Water-surface profiles were developed for the 5-, 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods.

  14. Development of a Flood-Warning System and Flood-Inundation Mapping for the Blanchard River in Findlay, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2009-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps of the Blanchard River in Findlay, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Findlay, Ohio. The maps, which correspond to water levels at the USGS streamgage at Findlay (04189000), were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning system that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. The USGS reestablished one streamgage and added another on the Blanchard River upstream of Findlay. Additionally, the USGS established one streamgage each on Eagle and Lye Creeks, tributaries to the Blanchard River. The stream-gage sites were equipped with rain gages and multiple forms of telemetry. Data from these gages can be used by emergency management personnel to determine a course of action when flooding is imminent. Flood profiles computed by means of a step-backwater model were prepared and calibrated to a recent flood with a return period exceeding 100 years. The hydraulic model was then used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for 11 flood stages with corresponding streamflows ranging from approximately 2 to 100 years in recurrence interval. The simulated flood profiles were used in combination with digital elevation data to delineate the flood-inundation areas. Maps of Findlay showing flood-inundation areas overlain on digital orthophotographs are presented for the selected floods.

  15. Flood-inundation maps for the Hoosic River, North Adams and Williamstown, Massachusetts, from the confluence with the North Branch Hoosic River to the Vermont State line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.; Bent, Gardner C.

    2015-01-01

    A series of nine digital flood-inundation maps were developed for an 8-mile reach of the Hoosic River in North Adams and Williamstown, Massachusetts, by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The coverage of the maps extends from the confluence with the North Branch Hoosic River to the Vermont State line. Peak flows with 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities were computed for the reach from updated flood-frequency analyses. These peak flows were routed through a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic model to obtain the corresponding peak water-surface elevations, and to place the tropical storm Irene flood of August 28, 2011 into historical context. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current (2014) stage-discharge relation at the USGS streamgage Hoosic River near Williamstown, Massachusetts (01332500), and from documented high-water marks from the tropical storm Irene flood, which had approximately a 1-percent annual exceedance probability.

  16. Large dams and alluvial rivers in the Anthropocene: The impacts of the Garrison and Oahe Dams on the Upper Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalak, Katherine; Benthem, Adam J.; Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Galloway, Joel M.; Nustad, Rochelle A.; Wiche, Gregg J.

    2013-01-01

    The Missouri River has had a long history of anthropogenic modification with considerable impacts on river and riparian ecology, form, and function. During the 20th century, several large dam-building efforts in the basin served the needs for irrigation, flood control, navigation, and the generation of hydroelectric power. The managed flow provided a range of uses, including recreation, fisheries, and habitat. Fifteen dams impound the main stem of the river, with hundreds more on tributaries. Though the effects of dams and reservoirs are well-documented, their impacts have been studied individually, with relatively little attention paid to their interaction along a river corridor. We examine the morphological and sedimentological changes in the Upper Missouri River between the Garrison Dam in ND (operational in 1953) and Oahe Dam in SD (operational in 1959). Through historical aerial photography, stream gage data, and cross sectional surveys, we demonstrate that the influence of the upstream dam is still a major control of river dynamics when the backwater effects of the downstream reservoir begin. In the “Anthropocene”, dams are ubiquitous on large rivers and often occur in series, similar to the Garrison Dam Segment. We propose a conceptual model of how interacting dams might affect river geomorphology, resulting in distinct and recognizable morphologic sequences that we term “Inter-Dam sequence” characteristic of major rivers in the US.

  17. Drainage-basis-scale geomorphic analysis to determine refernce conditions for ecologic restoration-Kissimmee River, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, A.G.; Toth, L.A.; White, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    Major controls on the retention, distribution, and discharge of surface water in the historic (precanal) Kissimmee drainage basin and river were investigated to determine reference conditions for ecosystem restoration. Precanal Kissimmee drainage-basin hydrology was largely controlled by landforms derived from relict, coastal ridge, lagoon, and shallow-shelf features; widespread carbonate solution depressions; and a poorly developed fluvial drainage network. Prior to channelization for flood control, the Kissimmee River was a very low gradient, moderately meandering river that flowed from Lake Kissimmee to Lake Okeechobee through the lower drainage basin. We infer that during normal wet seasons, river discharge rapidly exceeded Lake Okeechobee outflow capacity, and excess surface water backed up into the low-gradient Kissimmee River. This backwater effect induced bankfull and peak discharge early in the flood cycle and transformed the flood plain into a shallow aquatic system with both lacustrine and riverine characteristics. The large volumes of surface water retained in the lakes and wetlands of the upper basin maintained overbank flow conditions for several months after peak discharge. Analysis indicates that most of the geomorphic work on the channel and flood plain occurred during the frequently recurring extended periods of overbank discharge and that discharge volume may have been significant in determining channel dimensions. Comparison of hydrogeomorphic relationships with other river systems identified links between geomorphology and hydrology of the precanal Kissimmee River. However, drainage-basin and hydraulic geometry models derived solely from general populations of river systems may produce spurious reference conditions for restoration design criteria.

  18. Construction of a policy arena: the case of public health in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Henri; Nathanson, Constance A

    2012-02-01

    In this article we examine the transformation over the past two decades of public health as a policy arena in France from a backwater of little interest to politicians, bureaucrats, the media, and the public into a central preoccupation of the state. Recent dramatic health crises (the scandal over HIV-contaminated blood, mad cow disease, etc.) have substantially raised the political profile of (and corresponding state investment in) public health in France, offering opportunities and incentives for political actors not traditionally associated with public health to enter the field and challenging more traditional actors to galvanize themselves and compete for this newly attractive policy terrain. We use the occasion of the passage of a public health law in 2004, labeled by its proponents as the "first" public health law in one hundred years, to show how, in a context of national struggle to contain both risks and costs, "public health" -- chameleonlike -- has taken on various meanings and forms to serve highly conflicting political interests. PMID:22003098

  19. Seasonal evolution of subglacial drainage pathways within a soft bedded anastomosing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Jane; Young, David; Martinez, Kirk

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the dynamic annual subglacial behavior associated with Skálafellsjökull, Iceland, a temperate glacier resting on a deformable sediment layer, using subglacial wireless probes to measure till water pressure and tilt, surface installations to measure glacier motion, and a camera to measure river discharge. We argue that the subglacial hydrology system changes throughout the year from a fast connected system in the spring and autumn (with balanced inputs and outputs), to a duel system in summer with fast channels and slow moving storage (with greater inputs than outputs). In winter there is an episodic fast system associated with high meltwater input accompanied by changes in till water pressure and ice velocity and releases of water from a heterogeneous storage sources to produce some of the largest annual discharges. We develop models to relate the observed summer and winter discharges to daily ice surface melt. We demonstrate that there is a subglacial anastomosing system, consisting of water sheets at the ice-bed interface, bedrock cavities, braided channels with associated back-water reservoir areas, which has the ability to rapidly change channel form depending on melt-water inputs, and easily access water stored within a series of linked subglacial reservoirs.

  20. Seasonal variation of tidal prism and energy in the Changjiang River estuary: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Townend, Ian Howard; Cai, Huayang; Zhou, Yunxuan

    2016-01-01

    Tidal rivers are intrinsically complex because tidal propagation is influenced by river discharge. This study aims to examine the seasonal variation of tidal prism and energy variance in the tidal river of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary in China. In order to quantify the behaviour of river and tide, we use numerical modelling that has been validated using measured data. We conduct our analysis by quantifying the discharge and energy variance in separate components for both the river and the tide, during wet and dry seasons. We note various definitions of tidal prism and explore the difference between tidal discharge on the flood and ebb and tidal storage volume. The results show that the river discharge attenuates the tidal motion and reduces the tidal flood discharge but the tidal storage volume is approximately constant with different riverine discharge since part of the fresh water discharge is intercepted and captured in the estuary due to the backwater effect. It appears that the tidal discharge adjusts according to the variation of river discharge to keep a constant tidal storage volume. An analysis of the hydraulics shows that the transition from tidal dominance (at the mouth) to river dominance (upstream) depends on the location of tidal current reversal which varies from wet season to dry season. Duringthe wet season, the Changjiang River estuary is totally dominated by energy from fresh water discharge.

  1. THE OPERATION MODE OF "STORING THE CLEAR WATER AND DISCHARGING THE MUDDY FLOW" FOR RESERVOIRS BUILT ON HEAVILY SILT-LADEN RIVERS--A CASE STUDY OF THE SANMENXIA RESERVOIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxue LI; Yuanfeng ZHANG; Cuiping ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Observation of the operation of the Sanmenxia Reservoir on the Yellow River has led to the conclusion that to preserve a certain effective storage volume for reservoirs built on heavily silt-laden rivers is feasible if the reservoir is operated according to the principle known as "storing the clear water and discharging the muddy flow". The relative stability of the bed elevation at the end of the backwater and the reservoir's erosion and deposition equilibrium depend on the compatibility of the pool level maintained in non-flood seasons with the conditions of flow and sediment load during flood seasons. Operating the reservoir to regulate the flood and sediment load during flood seasons can reduce the rate of aggradation in the Lower Yellow River. The basic condition for applying the operation mode of "storing the clear water and discharging the muddy flow" is that a sufficient amount of water should be used for discharging sediment during flood seasons. Under the condition of extremely low flow years, reservoir sedimentation cannot be avoided even if this operation mode is adopted.

  2. Vegetation history and salinity gradient during the last 3700 years in Pichavaram estuary, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyoti Srivastava; Anjum Farooqui; S M Hussain

    2012-10-01

    Palaeoclimate, palaeoecological and palaeoshoreline studies were carried out for a 2.5 m deep sediment core deposited since ∼3700 yrs BP in the central part of Pichavaram mangrove wetland, Cauvery river delta. Presently, the study area is dominated by Avicennia officinalis, A. marina and Suaeda sp. with fringes of Rhizophora sp. along the backwater channel. Based on sedimentology, palynological and thecamoebian analysis, it is inferred that since 2100 yrs BP the climate amelioration took place from warm and humid with strengthened monsoon to a dry and arid climate coupled with weakened monsoon condition inducing changes in ecology vulnerable for mangroves. Consequently, the vegetation too evolved from moist deciduous/evergreen forest to mixed deciduous forest and a reduction in mangrove diversity. The qualitative and quantitative study show a decline in the mangroves since the last millennium which may be attributed to the increased salinity along with enhanced anthropogenic activities in Pichavaram estuary. This is reflected by the dominance of salt tolerant mangrove associates since the last millennium.

  3. An intercomparison of remote sensing river discharge estimation algorithms from measurements of river height, width, and slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, M.; Gleason, C. J.; Garambois, P. A.; Bjerklie, D.; Smith, L. C.; Roux, H.; Rodriguez, E.; Bates, P. D.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Monnier, J.; Chen, X.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Fiset, J.-M.; Flipo, N.; Frasson, R. P. d. M.; Fulton, J.; Goutal, N.; Hossain, F.; Humphries, E.; Minear, J. T.; Mukolwe, M. M.; Neal, J. C.; Ricci, S.; Sanders, B. F.; Schumann, G.; Schubert, J. E.; Vilmin, L.

    2016-06-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission planned for launch in 2020 will map river elevations and inundated area globally for rivers >100 m wide. In advance of this launch, we here evaluated the possibility of estimating discharge in ungauged rivers using synthetic, daily "remote sensing" measurements derived from hydraulic models corrupted with minimal observational errors. Five discharge algorithms were evaluated, as well as the median of the five, for 19 rivers spanning a range of hydraulic and geomorphic conditions. Reliance upon a priori information, and thus applicability to truly ungauged reaches, varied among algorithms: one algorithm employed only global limits on velocity and depth, while the other algorithms relied on globally available prior estimates of discharge. We found at least one algorithm able to estimate instantaneous discharge to within 35% relative root-mean-squared error (RRMSE) on 14/16 nonbraided rivers despite out-of-bank flows, multichannel planforms, and backwater effects. Moreover, we found RRMSE was often dominated by bias; the median standard deviation of relative residuals across the 16 nonbraided rivers was only 12.5%. SWOT discharge algorithm progress is therefore encouraging, yet future efforts should consider incorporating ancillary data or multialgorithm synergy to improve results.

  4. Mario Bunge, Systematic Philosophy and Science Education: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2012-10-01

    Mario Bunge was born in Argentina in 1919 and is now in his mid-90s. He studied atomic physics and quantum mechanics with Guido Beck (1903-1988), an Austrian refugee and student of Heisenberg. Additionally he studied modern philosophy in an environment that was a philosophical backwater becoming the first South American philosopher of science to be trained in science. His publications in physics, philosophy, psychology, sociology and the foundations of biology, are staggering in number, and include a massive 8-volume Treatise on Philosophy. The unifying thread of his scholarship is the constant and vigorous advancement of the Enlightenment Project, and criticism of cultural and academic movements that deny or devalue the core planks of the project: namely its naturalism, the search for truth, the universality of science, the value of rationality, and respect for individuals. At a time when specialisation is widely decried, and its deleterious effects on science, philosophy of science, educational research and science teaching are recognised, and at a time when `grand narratives' are thought both undesirable and impossible—it is salutary to appraise the fruits of one person's pursuit of the `Big' scientific and philosophical picture or grand narrative. In doing so this special issue brings together philosophers, physicists, biologists, sociologists, logicians, cognitive scientists, economists and mathematicians to examine facets of Mario Bunge's systematic philosophy and to appraise its contribution to important issues in current philosophy and, by implication, education.

  5. Sedimentation in the Three Gorges Dam and its impact on the sediment flux from the Changjiang (Yangtze River, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Q. Hu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available After the operation of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD in 2003, the mean annual sediment load at Yichang station, 44 km downstream of the TGD, decreased drastically by 84% of that in the pre-TGD period (1986–2002. Annually, about 162 million tons (Mt sediment was trapped by the TGD in 2003–2007, of which 92% was deposited within the region from Cuntan to TGD site; the remaining 8% deposited in the upstream of Cuntan owing to the effect of the extended backwater region of TGD. The theoretical trapping efficiency of the cascade reservoir on the lower Jinshajiang was calculated and its impact on the Changjiang sediment in the coming decades discussed. The results show that the cascade reservoir will trap up to 91% of the sediment discharge coming from the Jinshajiang tributary, and then the sediment discharge from the Changjiang to the sea will continuously decrease to less than 90 Mt/yr in the coming decades. In the presence of low sediment discharge, profound impacts on the morphology of estuary, delta and coastal sea are expected.

  6. Diet of otters (Lutra lutra) in various habitat types in the Pannonian biogeographical region compared to other regions of Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanszki, József; Lehoczky, István; Kotze, Antoinette; Somers, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the effect of habitat type and region on diet and feeding behaviours of a species facilitates a better understanding of factors impacting populations, which contributes to effective conservation management. Using spraint analysis and relative frequency of occurrence data from the literature, we described the dietary patterns of Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra) in 23 study sites within the Pannonian biogeographical region in Hungary. Our results indicated that diet composition varied by habitat type and is therefore context dependant. The differences among habitat types were however lower than expected. We noticed a decline in the fish consumption with a concomitant increase in trophic niche breadth and amphibian consumption in rivers, ponds (fish farms), backwaters, marshes and small watercourses. The main differences in diet were not attributed to the consumption of primary and secondary food types (fish and amphibians), but rather to differences in other, less important food types (mammals, birds). Using hierarchical cluster analysis, rivers and ponds could clearly be separated from other habitat types. We found the main fish diet of otters in most of these areas consisted of small (invasive species. Dietary studies from 91 sites in six European biogeographical regions showed that fish are consumed most frequently in the Atlantic and Boreal, less in the Continental and Pannonian, and least in the Alpine and Mediterranean regions. Comparative analysis indicated that the Mediterranean region (with frequent crayfish consumption) and Alpine region (frequent amphibian consumption) cluster separate from the other regions. PMID:27602262

  7. SCARDINIUS GENUS IN MOLECULAR STUDIES – A REVIEW

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    Ovidiu Popescul

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Scardinius is a genus of ray-finned fish in the Cyprinidae family commonly called rudds. The common rudd(Scardinius erithrophthalmus is a bentho-pelagic freshwater fish that occurs mainly in nutrient-rich, well vegetatedlowland rivers, backwaters, oxbows, ponds and lakes and it is widespread in Europe and middle Asia. It has a mediumlength of 20-30 cm, but it can reach 50 cm. The classification of cyprinids has always been controversial the morphologicaltraits have an unclear homology this led to the idea that the recognized monophyletic groups are surely misinterpreted. Thispaper aims to assess the current level of molecular data regarding Scardinius genera. Some of the molecular data obtainedfor Scardinius genus is from DNA barcoding studies on fresh water fishes, but studies regarding this genus and Cyprinidaefamily used mitochondrial genes like cytochrome b (cyt b and cytochrome oxidase (CO, but nuclear genes or nuclearmicrosatellites were also used. We found that molecular data exists for both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, but this genuswasn’t studied separately and as many of the researchers suggest more taxonomic studies are required in order to solve theuncertainties within it.

  8. Thresholds in the response of free-floating plant abundance to variation in hydraulic connectivity, nutrients, and macrophyte abundance in a large floodplain river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Shawn M.; Houser, Jeffrey N.; Sullivan, John F.; Langrehr, H.A.; Rogala, James T.; Campbell, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Duckweed and other free-floating plants (FFP) can form dense surface mats that affect ecosystem condition and processes, and can impair public use of aquatic resources. FFP obtain their nutrients from the water column, and the formation of dense FFP mats can be a consequence and indicator of river eutrophication. We conducted two complementary surveys of diverse aquatic areas of the Upper Mississippi River as an in situ approach for estimating thresholds in the response of FFP abundance to nutrient concentration and physical conditions in a large, floodplain river. Local regression analysis was used to estimate thresholds in the relations between FFP abundance and phosphorus (P) concentration (0.167 mg l−1L), nitrogen (N) concentration (0.808 mg l−1), water velocity (0.095 m s−1), and aquatic macrophyte abundance (65 % cover). FFP tissue concentrations suggested P limitation was more likely in spring, N limitation was more likely in late summer, and N limitation was most likely in backwaters with minimal hydraulic connection to the channel. The thresholds estimated here, along with observed patterns in nutrient limitation, provide river scientists and managers with criteria to consider when attempting to modify FFP abundance in off-channel areas of large river systems.

  9. Multiple sclerosis: Prospects and promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Stephen L; Chan, Jonah R; Oksenberg, Jorge R

    2013-09-01

    We have entered a golden era in multiple sclerosis (MS) research. Two decades ago, our understanding of the disease was largely descriptive and there were no approved therapies to modify the natural history of MS. Today, delineation of immune pathways relevant to MS have been clarified; a comprehensive map of genes that influence risk compiled; clues to environmental triggers identified; noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the MS disease process has been revolutionized by high-field MRI; and many effective therapies for the early, relapsing, component of MS now exist. However, major challenges remain. We still have no useful treatment for progressive MS (the holy grail of MS research), no means to repair injured axons or protect neurons, and extremely limited evidence to guide treatment decisions. Recent advances have set in place a foundation for development of increasingly selective immunotherapy for patients; application of genetic and genomic discoveries to improve therapeutic options; development of remyelination or neuroprotection therapies for progressive MS; and integrating clinical, imaging and genomic data for personalized medicine. MS has now advanced from the backwaters of autoimmune disease research to the front-line, and definitive answers, including cures, are now realistic goals for the next decade. Many of the breakthrough discoveries in MS have also resulted from meaningful interactions across disciplines, and especially from translational and basic scientists working closely with clinicians, highlighting that the clinical value of discoveries are most often revealed when ideas developed in the laboratory are tested at the bedside. PMID:23955638

  10. The Impact of Niatak Lateral Spillway Performance on Process of Erosion and Sedimentation of Sistan River of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Motallebian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sistan River Being located on the tail water of Helmand’s very extensive basin, it is prone to deposition of fine sediments, particularly in times of flood. The diversion structures on this river are Zahak and Sistan Dams. In this research the HEC-RAS model which has the ability to calculate the hydraulic parameters, is used to study of Niatakk spillway located in the upstream of Zahak dam. In this regard after the calibration model, the Erosion and Sedimentation process of the river during various conditions of utilization of the Zahak and Sistan dams was studied. The results show due to backwater by Zahak dam and giving the opportunity to the settling of suspended sediments, the rate of sedimentation between Niatak spillway and Zahak dam in situation of full utilization of Niatak spillway has become twice greater than situation which the gates are completely open. In situation of full utilization from Niatak spillway, the accumulated sediment in the interval between the Niatak spillway and Zahak dam is about 45% of the whole accumulated sediment and the accumulated sediments weight in this interval is about 20% of the whole accumulated sediment in situation which the gates are completely open.

  11. 'You were men in war time' - The manipulation of gender identity in war and peace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra S. Swart

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The story of the Rebellion begins where many stories end, with the Treaty of Vereeniging. Twelve years after the end of the South African War, a handful of men in the rural backwaters of the south-western Transvaal and north-eastern Free State tried to overthrow the young South African state. The rebel leaders mobilised their followers with the rhetoric of Republican nostalgia, using the seductively refashioned images of the Republican struggle in the South African War to foster rebellion. In the first decades of the twentieth century, Boer masculine identity was based, in part; on a Republican idea1. This article focuses on this facet of Boer identity, which was inextricably bound up in a sense of Republicanism forged in the South African war and fostered by the rebel leaders. It also shows how the memories of a war can metonymically capture a sense of gendered national identity and its manipulation can contribute to a movement as powerful as a rebellion against the state.

  12. A compact wet end for the papermachine; Paperikoneen kompakti maerkaepaeae - EKY 06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinander, P.O. [POM Technology Oy Ab, Helsinki (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The heaviness of the lateral processes in papermaking cause major costs for the papermaking industry. These processes delay grade changes, cause instabilities in the process, collect dirt, build slime, consume energy and so on. The POM Concept aims at minimising the detrimental effects of backwater and other circulations in the paper mill. The concept comprises the principles of a compact, airless, hydraulic, integrated circulation system without or with few tanks for water. A pump for deareation, the pomp, which may be characterized as a pumping centrifuge has been developed to its third generation and provides an energy efficient means for deareation of the process water. A pilot installation is working since May 1997 at MD Albbruck Papier in Germany and provides an efficient and easy to operate process. The air content in the head box is as low as with conventional vacuum deaeration. The system keeps significantly cleaner, and the process is as stable as a conventional one. Grade change times are shorter than before. A homogeniser for wet broke and a processor for stock, substituting for the conventional mixing-/machine-chest combination are further developments. A pomp with a capacity of 500 l/s will be finalised for use on large paper machines. (orig.)

  13. Mario Bunge: Physicist and Philosopher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    Mario Bunge was born in Argentina in the final year of the First World War.He learnt atomic physics and quantum mechanics from an Austrian refugee who had been a student of Heisenberg. Additionally he taught himself modern philosophy in an environment that was a philosophical backwater. He was the first South American philosopher of science to be trained in science. His publications in physics, philosophy, psychology, sociology and the foundations of biology, are staggering in number, and include a massive 8-volume Treatise on Philosophy. The unifying thread of his scholarship is the constant and vigorous advancement of the Enlightenment Project, and criticism of cultural and academic movements that deny or devalue the core planks of the project: namely its naturalism, the search for truth, the universality of science, rationality, and respect for individuals. At a time when specialisation is widely decried, and its deleterious effects on science, philosophy of science, educational research and science teaching are recognised - it is salutary to see the fruits of one person's pursuit of the Big'' scientific and philosophical picture.

  14. Zooplankton structure in two interconnected ponds: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špoljar Maria

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of zooplankton diversity, abundance and trophic structure was conducted during the summer period in pelagial zone on the longitudinal profile of the Sutla River Backwater. Investigated site consists of two interconnected basins: transparent Upper Basin with submerged macrophytes and turbid Lower Basin without macrophytes in the littoral zone. In the Upper Basin, abundance and diversity of zooplankton in the pelagial was higher in comparison to the Lower Basin, with prevailing species of genus Keratella as microfilter-feeder, and genera of Polyartha and Trihocerca as macrofilter-feeder rotifers. On the contrary, in the Lower Basin, crustaceans dominated in abundance. Microfilter-feeder cladoceran (Bosmina longirostris and larval and adult stages of macrofilter-feeder copepod (Macrocyclops albidus prevailed in the Lower Basin. Fish predation pressure was more pronounced in the pelagial of the Upper Basin, indicated by low cladoceran abundance in the surface layer. Although the studied basins were interconnected, results indicate significant (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.05 differences in the zooplankton structure as a potential result of the macrophyte impact on environmental conditions and fish predation pressure.

  15. Colonial American Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Donald K.

    2007-12-01

    While a foundation of German scientific methods enabled the rapid growth of North American Astronomy in the nineteenth century, during the seventeenth and most of the eighteenth centuries, the colonial men of science looked only to the English mother country for scientific patronage and guidance. An essay on fundamental astronomy appeared in one of the annual colonial almanacs as early as 1656, telescopic observations were made about 1660 and the first original colonial astronomical work was published by Thomas Danforth on the comet of 1664. By 1671 the Copernican ideas were so espoused at Harvard College that a physics class refused to read a Ptolemaic textbook when it was assigned to them by a senior instructor. At least in the Cambridge-Boston area, contemporary colonialist had access to the most recent scientific publications from the mother country. Observations of the great comet of 1680 by the Almanac maker, John Foster, reached Isaac Newton and were used and gratefully acknowledged in his Principia. During the seventeenth century the colonial interest in astronomy was more intense than it was for other sciences but colonists still occupied a position in the scientific backwater when compared with contemporary European scientists. Nevertheless, the science of astronomy was successfully transplanted from England to North America in the seventeenth century.

  16. Habitat preferences of common native fishes in a tropical river in Southeastern Brazil

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    Marcus Rodrigues da Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined in this study the habitat preferences of seven native fish species in a regulated river in Southeastern Brazil. We tested the hypothesis that fishes differ in habitat preference and that they use stretches of the river differing in hydraulic characteristics and substrate type. We surveyed fishes in four 1-km long river stretches encompassing different habitat traits, where we also measured water depth, velocity, and substrate type. We investigated preference patterns of four Siluriformes (Loricariichthys castaneus, Hoplosternum littorale, Pimelodus maculatus, and Trachelyopterus striatulus and three Characiformes (Astyanax aff. bimaculatus, Oligosarcus hepsetus, and Hoplias malabaricus, representing approximately 70% of the total number of fishes and 64% of the total biomass. We classified fishes into four habitat guilds: (1 a slow-flowing water guild that occupied mud-sand substrate, composed of two Siluriformes in either shallow ( 8 m, L. castaneus waters; (2 a run-dwelling guild that occurs in deep backwaters with clay-mud substrate, composed of the Characiformes A. aff. bimaculatus and O. hepsetus; (3 a run-dwelling guild that occurs in sandy and shallow substrate, composed of T. striatulus; and (4 a fast-flowing guild that occurs primarily along shorelines with shallow mud bottoms, composed of H. malabaricus and P. maculatus. Our hypothesis was confirmed, as different habitat preferences by fishes appear to occur in this regulated river.

  17. hydrological and hydrodynamic modeling on la plata river basin using mgb-iph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Paulo; Collischonn, Walter; Paiva, Rodrigo; Fan, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present an improving of Large Scale Hydrological Model (MGB-IPH). The improving consists in implementing a new hydrodynamic model (Inertial) and considering of flooded areas. The Inertial model, which is a simplification of Saint-Venant equations, replaced the Muskingum-Cunge flow routing model. The Inertial equation allows represent the flow in low slope rivers, the backwater, and the tide effects. We tested the model on La Plata River Basin (3,100,000 km²) which is a complex hydrological system located on South America. The aim of this paper is assess the MGB-IPH with the Inertial model and identify regions where is required new modification on model to represent others hydrological process. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm to extract of the Digital Elevation Model the required information about unit catchment, river length and river slope, flooded areas and cross section information. For this, we used available global data, as DEM of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and HYDROSHEDS flow direction map. We used climate data available on Climate Research Unit and satellite precipitation (MERGE). The results show that this new version of MGB-IPH can reproduce the flow on La Plata river Basin.

  18. Investigating extreme flood response to Holocene palaeoclimate in the Chinese monsoonal zone: A palaeoflood case study from the Hanjiang River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongqiang; Huang, Chun Chang; Pang, Jiangli; Zha, Xiaochun; Zhou, Yali; Wang, Longsheng; Zhang, Yuzhu; Hu, Guiming

    2015-06-01

    Palaeoflood events recorded by slackwater deposits (SWDs) were investigated extensively by sedimentological criteria of palaeohydrology along the upper Hanjiang River valley. Modern flood SWDs were collected for comparison with palaeoflood SWD in the same reaches. Three typical palaeoflood SWDs were observed within Holocene loess-soil blanket on the first river terrace land. The grain size distributions of palaeoflood SWDs are similar to modern flood SWDs, whereas they are different from eolian loess and soil. Palaeoflood SWD lies in three major pedo-stratigraphic boundaries (TS/L0, L0/S0, and S0/Lt) in the Holocene loess-soil profiles. The chronology of three palaeoflood episodes was established by OSL dating and pedo-stratigraphic correlation with the well-dated Holocene loess-soil profiles in the upper Hanjiang River basin. Holocene palaeoflood events were dated to 9500-8500, 3200-2800, and 1800-1700 a B.P., respectively. Palaeoflood discharges were estimated by the palaeoflood model (i.e., slope-area method and step-backwater method). The highest discharges are 51,680-53,950 m3 s- 1 at the 11,500-time scale in the Xunyang reach of the upper Hanjiang River valley. Holocene extraordinary hydroclimatic events in the Hanjiang River often result from abnormal atmospheric circulations from Southwest monsoons in the Chinese monsoonal zone. These results provide a regional expression of extreme flood response to Holocene palaeoclimate to understand the effects of global climatic variations on the river system dynamics.

  19. 多边界条件下热泵利用循环水余热的CPCS-RBF预测控制%Heat Pump CPCS-RBF Predictive Control Based on Multiple Boundary Conditions in Circulating Water Waste Heat Recovery System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周洪煜; 杜学森; 张振华; 黄耀珍

    2015-01-01

    循环水余热回收系统中,热泵热网水出口温度在跟踪供热负荷需求时,在受驱动蒸汽量的调节的同时,往往易受热网回水、循环水等工况变化的影响,传统 PID 控制方式超调量大、负荷跟踪能力差。提出一种混沌变异克隆选择−径向基函数(CPCS-RBF)直接多步预测控制策略,以热泵热网水出口温度预测值与设定值差值为目标函数,利用CPCS优化算法求取目标函数最小时的驱动蒸汽最佳值。预测模型由2个RBF神经网络结合热泵现场运行数据构建,以提高热泵系统适应工况变化的能力;实验结果表明,该控制策略能综合学习热网回水温度、循环水温度等参数的变化,使驱动蒸汽调门超前动作,及时跟踪供热负荷需求变化的同时,适应发电负荷变化下排气余热量的波动,具有更好的节能效果和变工况适应能力。%In the circulating water waste heat recovery system, when heat pump heating net water outlet temperature trace heating load demand, that’s not only adjusted by driven steam capacity, and is easily influenced by operating conditions variation of the heating net backwater and circulating water, the traditional PID control method has a large overshoot volume and a poor load tracking ability. So a chaotic particle clone selection (CPCS)-radial basis function (RBF) direct multi-step predictive control strategy was proposed, with difference between heat pump heat supply network water outlet temperature predicted value and the set values as the objective function, using CPCS optimization algorithm to calculate the optimal values of driven steam when the objective function is the minimum. The prediction model was constructed by two RBF neural networks according to the field operation data in order to improve the model variable condition adaptability. The experimental results show that the control strategy can comprehensively learn the change of the

  20. Development of a flood-warning system and flood-inundation mapping in Licking County, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for selected reaches of South Fork Licking River, Raccoon Creek, North Fork Licking River, and the Licking River in Licking County, Ohio, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Ohio Department of Transportation; U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration; Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service; and the City of Newark and Village of Granville, Ohio. The inundation maps depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to water levels (stages) at the following USGS streamgages: South Fork Licking River at Heath, Ohio (03145173); Raccoon Creek below Wilson Street at Newark, Ohio (03145534); North Fork Licking River at East Main Street at Newark, Ohio (03146402); and Licking River near Newark, Ohio (03146500). The maps were provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into a Web-based flood-warning system that can be used in conjunction with NWS flood-forecast data to show areas of predicted flood inundation associated with forecasted flood-peak stages. As part of the flood-warning streamflow network, the USGS re-installed one streamgage on North Fork Licking River, and added three new streamgages, one each on North Fork Licking River, South Fork Licking River, and Raccoon Creek. Additionally, the USGS upgraded a lake-level gage on Buckeye Lake. Data from the streamgages and lake-level gage can be used by emergency-management personnel, in conjunction with the flood-inundation maps, to help determine a course of action when flooding is imminent. Flood profiles for selected reaches were prepared by calibrating steady-state step-backwater models to selected, established streamgage rating curves. The step-backwater models then were used to determine water-surface-elevation profiles for up to 10 flood stages at a streamgage with corresponding streamflows ranging from approximately

  1. Flood-inundation maps for Peachtree Creek from the Norfolk Southern Railway bridge to the Moores Mill Road NW bridge, Atlanta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.5-mile reach of the Peachtree Creek from the Norfolk Southern Railway bridge to the Moores Mill Road NW bridge, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Atlanta, Georgia. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Peachtree Creek at Atlanta, Georgia (02336300) and the USGS streamgage at Chattahoochee River at Georgia 280, near Atlanta, Georgia (02336490). Current water level (stage) at these USGS streamgages may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ and can be used in conjunction with these maps to estimate near real-time areas of inundation. The National Weather Service (NWS) is incorporating results from this study into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that commonly are collocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information for the USGS streamgage at Peachtree Creek, which is available through the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. A one-dimensional step-backwater model was developed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC–RAS software for a 6.5-mile reach of Peachtree Creek and was used to compute flood profiles for a 5.5-mile reach of the creek. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Peachtree Creek at Atlanta, Georgia, streamgage (02336300), and the Chattahoochee River at Georgia 280, near Atlanta, Georgia, streamgage (02336490) as well as high water marks collected during the 2010 annual peak flow event. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 50 water

  2. Determination of time-of-travel, dispersion characteristics, and oxygen reaeration coefficients during low streamflows--Lower Tacony/Frankford Creek, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Gyves, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Time-of-travel, dispersion characteristics, and oxygen reaeration coefficients were determined by use of dye and gas tracing for a 2-mile reach of Tacony/Frankford Creek in Philadelphia, southeastern Pennsylvania. The reach frequently has concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) below the water-quality standard of 4 milligrams per liter during warm months. Several large combined sewer overflows (CSOs), including one of the largest in Philadelphia (former Wingohocking Creek), discharge to the study reach in this urbanized watershed, affecting water quality and the timing and magnitude of storm peaks. In addition, a dam that commonly results in backwater conditions and reduced natural reaeration is present a few hundred feet from the end of the study reach. Time-of-travel and reaeration data were collected under base-flow conditions in August and September 2009 for three sub-reaches from Roosevelt Boulevard (U.S. Route 1) to Castor Avenue. Determination of traveltimes to the centroid of the dye cloud were needed for calculation of the reaeration coefficients. Results of the dye study in Tacony/Frankford Creek indicate that traveltimes were affected by the presence of man-made structures, such as the large scour hole and pool developed at the outfall of the T14 CSO and the dam, both of which reduce stream velocities. Mean stream velocities during the dye-tracer tests ranged from a maximum of 0.44 to 0.04 foot per second through a large pool. The dispersion efficiency of the stream was determined from relations between normalized unit concentrations to time to peak for use in water-quality modeling. Oxygen reaeration coefficients determined by a constant rate-injection method using propane as the tracer gas were as low as 0.04 unit per hour in a long pool affected by backwater conditions behind a dam. The highest reaeration coefficient was 2.29 units per hour for a steep-gradient reach with multiple winding channels through gravel deposits, just downstream of a large

  3. Anacostia River fringe wetlands restoration project: final report for the five-year monitoring program (2003 through 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Cairn C.; Hammerschlag, Richard S.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2009-01-01

    The 6-hectare (ha) freshwater tidal Anacostia River Fringe Wetlands (Fringe Wetlands) were reconstructed along the mainstem of the Anacostia River in Washington, DC (Photograph 1, Figure 1) during the summer of 2003. The Fringe Wetlands consist of two separate planting cells. Fringe A, located adjacent to Lower Kingman Island, on the west bank of the Anacostia River, occupies 1.6 ha; Fringe B, located on the east bank of the Anacostia River, occupies 4.4 ha. This project is the third in a series of freshwater tidal wetland reconstructions on the Anacostia River designed and implemented by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Baltimore District and District Department of the Environment (DDOE) on lands managed by the National Park Service (NPS). The first was Kenilworth Marsh, reconstructed in 1993 (Syphax and Hammerschlag 2005); the second was Kingman Marsh, reconstructed in 2000 (Hammerschlag et al. 2006). Kenilworth and Kingman were both constructed in low-energy backwaters of the Anacostia. However, the Fringe Wetlands, which were constructed on two pre-existing benches along the high-energy mainstem, required sheet piling to provide protection from erosive impacts of increased flow and volume of water associated with storm events during the establishment phase (Photograph 2). All three projects required the placement of dredged sediment materials to increase elevations enough to support emergent vegetation (Photograph 3). The purpose of all three wetland reconstruction projects was to restore pieces of the once extensive tidal freshwater marsh habitat that bordered the Anacostia River historically, prior to the dredge and fill operations and sea wall installation that took place there in the early to mid-1900's (Photograph 4).

  4. River restoration strategies in channelized, low-gradient landscapes of West Tennessee, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.P.; Diehl, T.H.; Turrini-Smith, L. A.; Maas-Baldwin, J.; Croyle, Z.

    2009-01-01

    West Tennessee has a complex history of watershed disturbance, including agricultural erosion, channelization, accelerated valley sedimentation, and the removal and reestablishment of beaver. Watershed management has evolved from fl oodplain drainage via pervasive channelization to include local drainage canal maintenance and local river restoration. Many unmaintained canals are undergoing excessive aggradation and complex channel evolution driven by upland erosion and low valley gradient. The locus of aggradation in fully occluded canals (valley plugs) moves up-valley as sediment continues to accumulate in the backwater behind the plug. Valley plugs that cause canal avulsion can lead to redevelopment of meandering channels in less disturbed areas of the fl oodplain, in a process of passive self-restoration. Some valley plugs have brought restored fl oodplain function, reoccupation of extant historic river channels, and formation of a "sediment shadow" that protects downstream reaches from excess sedimentation. Despite the presence of numerous opportunities, there is presently no mechanism for including valley plugs in mitigation projects. In 1997 a survey of 14 reference reach cross sections documented relations between drainage area and bankfull geometry of relatively unmodified streams in West Tennessee. Reassessment of seven of those sites in 2007 showed that one had been dammed by beaver and that two sites could not be analyzed further because of signifi cant vertical or lateral instability. In contrast to other regions of North America, the results suggest that stream channels in this region fl ood more frequently than once each year, and can remain out of banks for several weeks each year. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  5. Cumulative effects of restoration efforts on ecological characteristics of an open water area within the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B.R.; Shi, W.; Houser, J.N.; Rogala, J.T.; Guan, Z.; Cochran-Biederman, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ecological restoration efforts in large rivers generally aim to ameliorate ecological effects associated with large-scale modification of those rivers. This study examined whether the effects of restoration efforts-specifically those of island construction-within a largely open water restoration area of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) might be seen at the spatial scale of that 3476ha area. The cumulative effects of island construction, when observed over multiple years, were postulated to have made the restoration area increasingly similar to a positive reference area (a proximate area comprising contiguous backwater areas) and increasingly different from two negative reference areas. The negative reference areas represented the Mississippi River main channel in an area proximate to the restoration area and an open water area in a related Mississippi River reach that has seen relatively little restoration effort. Inferences on the effects of restoration were made by comparing constrained and unconstrained models of summer chlorophyll a (CHL), summer inorganic suspended solids (ISS) and counts of benthic mayfly larvae. Constrained models forced trends in means or in both means and sampling variances to become, over time, increasingly similar to those in the positive reference area and increasingly dissimilar to those in the negative reference areas. Trends were estimated over 12- (mayflies) or 14-year sampling periods, and were evaluated using model information criteria. Based on these methods, restoration effects were observed for CHL and mayflies while evidence in favour of restoration effects on ISS was equivocal. These findings suggest that the cumulative effects of island building at relatively large spatial scales within large rivers may be estimated using data from large-scale surveillance monitoring programs. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Biosorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions by aqueous solutions of novel alkalophillic Streptomyces VITSVK5 spp. biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurav, Kumar; Kannabiran, Krishnan

    2011-03-01

    Discharge of heavy metals from metal processing industries is known to have adverse effects on the environment. Biosorption of heavy metals by metabolically inactive biomass of microbial organisms is an innovative and alternative technology for removal of these pollutants from aqueous solution. The search of marine actinobacteria with potential heavy metal biosorption ability resulted in the identification of a novel alkalophilic Streptomyces VITSVK5 species. The biosorption property of Streptomyces VITSVK5 spp. was investigated by absorbing heavy metals Cadmium (Cd) and Lead (Pb). Physiochemical characteristics and trace metal concentration analysis of the backwater showed the concentrations of different metals were lead 13±2.1 μg L-1, cadmium 3.1±0.3μg L-1, zinc 8.4±2.6μg L-1 and copper 0.3±0.1μg L-1, whereas mercury was well below the detection limit. The effect of pH and biomass dosage on removal efficiency of heavy metal ions was also investigated. The optimum pH for maximal biosorption was 4.0 for Cd (II) and 5.0 for Pb (II) with 41% and 84% biosorption respectively. The biosorbent dosage was optimized as 3 g L-1 for both the trace metals. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum results indicated the chemical interactions of hydrogen atoms in carboxyl (-COOH), hydroxyl (-CHOH) and amine (-NH2) groups of biomass with the metal ions. This could be mainly involved in the biosorption of Cd (II) and Pb (II) onto Streptomyces VITSVK5 spp. The results of our study revealed Streptomyces metabolites could be used to develop a biosorbent for adsorbing metal ions from aqueous environments.

  7. The application of the EMAS-ordinance to small hydro-power-plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the eco-management and audit scheme ordinance to small hydro-power-plants deals with the possibility to take an environmental-relevant audition on sites of small hydro-power-plants to achieve the environmental EMAS-certificate. Within the realization of the acquired improvement steps also the efficiency of the power plants should be increased that the audit also becomes interesting in economic matters. Contents: after explaining the legal frame being prescribed by the European Community, its interpretation and relevance for the sites of SHP, common impacts of these on the environment are particularized. From these facts a valuation-catalogue has been developed, which will be used by the power plant-owners for the assessment of their sites to take part in the EMAS-system. This catalogue is split up into six modules, which comprise all possible valuation areas which can appear concerning the different kinds of plants. These modules are: MODUL A: backwater area; MODUL B: weir; MODUL C: powerhouse; MODUL D: tail water area; MODUL E: diversion channel / penstock; MODUL F: diversion section. Furthermore three submodules to gather common data concerning plant and river have been created. At the development of the catalogue there was particularly attached importance to a user-friendly application. The goal was to realize the valuation by the plant owners to minimize costs. To take objectiveness into account the module-catalogue was created in a way that auditors (the power plant owners) must not formulate specifications by themselves; the possible assessments only have to be marked with a cross at the corresponding parameters, which have been listed up. (author)

  8. Environmental Sciences Laboratory dedication, February 26-27, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Millemann, N.T. (eds.)

    1980-09-01

    The dedication of the new Environmental Sciences Laboratory coincided with the 25th year of the establishment of the science of ecology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. That quarter century witnessed the evolution of ecology from an obscure, backwater discipline of biology to a broadly used, everyday household word. The transition reflected broad and basic changes in our social and cultural view of the world. This was brought about as a result of the awareness developed in our society of the importance of the environment, coupled with efforts of ecologists and other environmental scientists who identified, clarified, and formulated the issues and challenges of environmental protection for both the lay public and the scientific community. In many respects, the activities in ecology at ORNL were a microcosm of the broader social scene; the particular problems of the environment associated with atomic energy needed to be defined in scientific terms and articulated in both the specific and general sense for a larger audience which was unfamiliar with the field and somewhat alien to its concepts and philosophy. The success of this effort is reflected in the existence of the new Environmental Sciences Laboratory. This dedication volume brings together the thoughts and reflections of many of these scientists whose efforts contributed in a unique and individualistic fashion not only to ORNL but also to the national identification of ecology and its importance to the achievement of our national goals. Their remarks and presentations are not only a pleasant and personally gratifying recapitulation of the past and of ORNL's contributions to ecology but also portend some of the challenges to ecology in the future.

  9. Landscape Ecology of the Upper Mississippi River System: Lessons learned, challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.

    2016-01-01

    The Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) is a mosaic of river channels, backwater lakes, floodplain forests, and emergent marshes. This complex mosaic supports diverse aquatic and terrestrial plant communities, over 150 fish species; 40 freshwater mussel species; 50 amphibian and reptile species; and over 360 bird species, many of which use the UMRS as a critical migratory route. The river and floodplain are also hotspots for biogeochemical activity as the river-floodplain collects and processes nutrients derived from the UMR basin. These features qualify the UMRS as a Ramsar wetland of international significance.Two centuries of land-use change, including construction for navigation and conversion of large areas to agriculture, has altered the broad-scale structure of the river and changed local environmental conditions in many areas. Such changes have affected rates of nutrient processing and transport, as well as the abundance of various fish, mussel, plant, and bird species. However, the magnitude and spatial scale of these effects are not well quantified, especially in regards to the best methods and locations for restoring various aspects of the river ecosystem.The U.S. Congress declared the navigable portions of the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) a “nationally significant ecosystem and nationally significant commercial navigation system” in the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) and launched the Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program, the first comprehensive program for ecosystem restoration, monitoring, and research on a large river system. This fact sheet focuses on landscape ecological studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey to support decision making by the UMRR with respect to ecosystem restoration.

  10. Floodplain persistence and dynamic-equilibrium conditions in a canyon environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranmer, Andrew W.; Tonina, Daniele; Benjankar, Rohan; Tiedemann, Matthew; Goodwin, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Canyon river systems are laterally constrained by steep walls, strath terraces, and bedrock intrusions; however, semialluvial reaches are nested within these environments as discontinuous floodplains along the river margins. These semialluvial floodplains provide an example of dynamic-equilibrium set within high-energy fluvial systems, marking areas where the river is free to alter its boundary conditions. Most research has focused on hydraulic conditions necessary for floodplain formation and persistence in unconfined systems, whereas little is known about canyon streams. This paper focuses on (1) characterizing dynamic-equilibrium, (2) describing the controls on floodplain formation and distribution, and (3) evaluating the performance of extremal hypotheses to identify dynamic-equilibrium and floodplain persistence in high-energy, semiconfined canyon environments. These objectives were addressed with field and numerical data derived from a one-dimensional hydraulic model for bankfull and 100-year return interval flood events, supported by closely spaced cross sections for the lower 38-km canyon reach of the Deadwood River (Idaho). Under bankfull conditions, critical energy thresholds for equilibrium floodplain persistence at this study site present the upper limits of: slope = 0.018, shear stress = 175 N/m2, and specific stream power = 400 W/m2. Channel and floodplains near equilibrium, quantified with a near-zero sediment transport divergence (Exner equation), were successfully identified by the minimum unit stream power extremal hypothesis and to a lesser degree by the other extremal hypotheses that minimize energy expenditure (minimum specific stream power, minimum total stream power, and minimum Froude number), provided backwater environments and major tributaries could be identified. Extremal results were compared to hydraulic geometry relations to evaluate how closely equilibrium floodplains approached values for unconfined alluvial river systems.

  11. Geology of the Carnegie museum dinosaur quarry site of Diplodocus carnegii, Sheep Creek, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinski, D.K.; Kollar, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    The holotype of Diplodocus carnegii Hatcher, 1901, consists of a partial skeleton (CM 84) that was recovered, along with a second partial skeleton of the same species (CM 94), from the upper 10 m of the Talking Rock facies of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation exposed along Bone Quarry Draw, a tributary of Sheep Creek in Albany County, Wyoming. A composite measured section of the stratigraphic interval exposed adjacent to the quarry indicates that the Brushy Basin Member in this area is a stacked succession of lithofacies consisting of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone and greenish brown, dense, fine-grained limestone. The more erosion resistant limestone layers can be traced over many hundreds of meters. Thus, these strata do not appear to represent a highly localized deposit such as a stream channel, oxbow lake, or backwater pond. The Sheep Creek succession is interpreted as representing a clastic-dominated lake where high turbidity and sediment influx produced deposition of calcareous mudstone. During drier periods the lake's turbidity decreased and limestone and dolomite precipitation replaced mud deposition. Microkarsting at the top of some limestone/ dolomite layers suggests subaerial deposition may have prevailed during these dry episodes. The quarry of D. carnegii was excavated within the top strata of one of the numerous intervals of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone that represent an ephemeral freshwater lake. The quarry strata are directly overlain by 0.3 m of dolomite-capped limestone that was deposited shortly after interment of D. carnegii in the lake mudstones. The close vertical proximity of the overlying limestone to the skeleton's stratigraphic: level suggests that the animal's carcass may have been buried beneath the drying lake deposits during a period of decreased rainfall.

  12. Biosorption of Cd(Ⅱ)and Pb(Ⅱ)Ions by Aqueous Solutions of Novel Alkalophillic Streptomyces VITSVK5 spp.Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kumar Saurav; Krishnan Kannabiran

    2011-01-01

    Discharge of heavy metals from metal processing industries is known to have adverse effects on the environment.Biosorption of heavy metals by metabolically inactive biomass of microbial organisms is an innovative and alternative technology for removal of these pollutants from aqueous solution.The search of marine actinobacteria with potential heavy metal biosorption ability resulted in the identification of a novel alkalophilic Streptomyces VITSVK5 species.The biosorption property of Streptomyces VITSVK5 spp.was investigated by absorbing heavy metals Cadmium(Cd)and Lead(Pb).Physiochemical characteristics and trace metal concentration analysis of the backwater showed the concentrations of different metals were lead 13±2.1 μg L·1,cadmium 3.1±0.3 μg L·1,zinc 8.4±2.6μg L·1 and copper 0.3±0.1μg L·1,whereas mercury was well below the detection limit.The effect of pH and biomass dosage on removal efficiency of heavy metal ions was also investigated.The optimum pH for maximal biosorption was4.0 for Cd(Ⅱ)and 5.0 for Pb(Ⅱ)with 41% and 84% biosorption respectively.The biosorbent dosage was optimized as 3 g L-1 for both the trace metals.Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum results indicated the chemical interactions of hydrogen atoms in carboxyl(-COOH),hydroxyl(-CHOH)and amine(-NH2)groups of biomass with the metal ions.This could be mainly involved in the biosorption of Cd(Ⅱ)and Pb(Ⅱ)onto Streptomyces VITSVK5 spp.The results of our study revealed Streptomyces metabolites could be used to develop a biosorbent for adsorbing metal ions from aqueous environments.

  13. PAI-OFF: A new proposal for online flood forecasting in flash flood prone catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, G. H.; Cullmann, J.

    2008-10-01

    SummaryThe Process Modelling and Artificial Intelligence for Online Flood Forecasting (PAI-OFF) methodology combines the reliability of physically based, hydrologic/hydraulic modelling with the operational advantages of artificial intelligence. These operational advantages are extremely low computation times and straightforward operation. The basic principle of the methodology is to portray process models by means of ANN. We propose to train ANN flood forecasting models with synthetic data that reflects the possible range of storm events. To this end, establishing PAI-OFF requires first setting up a physically based hydrologic model of the considered catchment and - optionally, if backwater effects have a significant impact on the flow regime - a hydrodynamic flood routing model of the river reach in question. Both models are subsequently used for simulating all meaningful and flood relevant storm scenarios which are obtained from a catchment specific meteorological data analysis. This provides a database of corresponding input/output vectors which is then completed by generally available hydrological and meteorological data for characterizing the catchment state prior to each storm event. This database subsequently serves for training both a polynomial neural network (PoNN) - portraying the rainfall-runoff process - and a multilayer neural network (MLFN), which mirrors the hydrodynamic flood wave propagation in the river. These two ANN models replace the hydrological and hydrodynamic model in the operational mode. After presenting the theory, we apply PAI-OFF - essentially consisting of the coupled "hydrologic" PoNN and "hydrodynamic" MLFN - to the Freiberger Mulde catchment in the Erzgebirge (Ore-mountains) in East Germany (3000 km 2). Both the demonstrated computational efficiency and the prediction reliability underline the potential of the new PAI-OFF methodology for online flood forecasting.

  14. Estimated flood peak discharges on Twin, Brock, and Lightning creeks, Southwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorelli, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The flash flood in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993, was the result of an intense 3-hour rainfall on saturated ground or impervious surfaces. The total precipitation of 5.28 inches was close to the 3-hour, 100-year frequency and produced extensive flooding. The most serious flooding was on Twin, Brock, and Lightning Creeks. Four people died in this flood. Over 1,900 structures were damaged along the 3 creeks. There were about $3 million in damages to Oklahoma City public facilities, the majority of which were in the three basins. A study was conducted to determine the magnitude of the May 8, 1993, flood peak discharge in these three creeks in southwestern Oklahoma City and compare these peaks with published flood estimates. Flood peak-discharge estimates for these creeks were determined at 11 study sites using a step-backwater analysis to match the flood water-surface profiles defined by high-water marks. The unit discharges during peak runoff ranged from 881 cubic feet per second per square mile for Lightning Creek at SW 44th Street to 3,570 cubic feet per second per square mile for Brock Creek at SW 59th Street. The ratios of the 1993 flood peak discharges to the Federal Emergency Management Agency 100-year flood peak discharges ranged from 1.25 to 3.29. The water-surface elevations ranged from 0.2 foot to 5.9 feet above the Federal Emergency Management Agency 500-year flood water-surface elevations. The very large flood peaks in these 3 small urban basins were the result of very intense rainfall in a short period of time, close to 100 percent runoff due to ground surfaces being essentially impervious, and the city streets acting as efficient conveyances to the main channels. The unit discharges compare in magnitude to other extraordinary Oklahoma urban floods.

  15. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Tegucigalpa, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Tegucigalpa that would be inundated by a 50-year flood of Rio Choluteca, Rio Grande, Rio Guacerique, and Rio Chiquito. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Tegucigalpa as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for an estimated 50-year-flood on Rio Choluteca, Rio Grande, Rio Guacerique, and Rio Chiquito at Tegucigalpa were determined using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area and ground surveys at bridges. There are no nearby long-term stream-gaging stations; therefore, the 50-year-flood discharges were estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The estimated 50-year-flood discharge is 922 cubic meters per second at Rio Choluteca at downstream end of the study area boundary, 663 cubic meters per second at the mouth of the Rio Grande, 475 cubic meters per second at the mouth of the Rio Guacerique, and 254 cubic meters per second at the mouth of the Rio Chiquito.

  16. Potential large wood-related hazards at bridges: the Czarny Dunajec River (Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Mikuś, Paweł; Hajdukiewicz, Maciej; Stoffel, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Besides high water levels in the drainage network and important channel changes, the transport of large quantities of wood material must be considered an additional factor of flood hazard in forested areas. At critical sections such as bridges, the effect of the transport and deposition of large quantities of wood during floods is mainly a reduction of the cross-sectional area, triggering a quick succession of backwater effects with inundation of the adjacent valley floor, bed aggradation, channel avulsion and local scouring processes that ultimately may cause embankment/bridge collapse and bank erosion. Therefore, the aim of this work is to analyse potential hazards related to wood transport and deposition in the reach of the Czarny Dunajec (Tatra Mountains foreland, Polish Carpathians) where the river flows through the village of Długopole. Buildings in the village are located very close to the river and the bridge has a very narrow cross-section and is thus threatened by wood-related phenomena. The approach is based on the combination of numerical modelling and field observations. A numerical model which simulates the transport of large wood together with flow dynamics is applied and inlet and boundary conditions are designed based on field observations. We established several scenarios for flow conditions and the wood transport. Results provided data to compute bridge clogging probability under the designed scenarios and the potential impacts of the clogging on hydrodynamics, flooded area and effects on the bridge. This information will be very useful for flood risk assessment and management of the river. This work was supported by the Polish-Swiss FLORIST project (Flood risk on the northern foothills of the Tatra Mountains; PSPB no. 153/2010).

  17. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for La Ceiba, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, M.C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of La Ceiba that would be inundated by a 50-year-flood of Rio Cangrejal. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of La Ceiba as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for a 50-year-flood discharge of 1,030 cubic meters per second on Rio Cangrejal at La Ceiba were computed using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area. There are no nearby long-term stream-gaging stations on Rio Cangrejal; therefore, the 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Cangrejal at La Ceiba was estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The drainage area and mean annual precipitation estimated for Rio Cangrejal at La Ceiba are 498 square kilometers and 2,306 millimeters, respectively.

  18. Flood-inundation maps for a 15-mile reach of the Kalamazoo River from Marshall to Battle Creek, Michigan, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoard, C.J.; Fowler, K.K.; Kim, M.H.; Menke, C.D.; Morlock, S.E.; Peppler, M.C.; Rachol, C.M.; Whitehead, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 15-mile reach of the Kalamazoo River from Marshall to Battle Creek, Michigan, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to help guide remediation efforts following a crude-oil spill on July 25, 2010. The spill happened on Talmadge Creek, a tributary of the Kalamazoo River near Marshall, during a flood. The floodwaters transported the spilled oil down the Kalamazoo River and deposited oil in impoundments and on the surfaces of islands and flood plains. Six flood-inundation maps were constructed corresponding to the flood stage (884.09 feet) coincident with the oil spill on July 25, 2010, as well as for floods with annual exceedance probabilities of 0.2, 1, 2, 4, and 10 percent. Streamflow at the USGS streamgage at Marshall, Michigan (USGS site ID 04103500), was used to calculate the flood probabilities. From August 13 to 18, 2010, 35 channel cross sections, 17 bridges and 1 dam were surveyed. These data were used to construct a water-surface profile for the July 25, 2010, flood by use of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The calibrated model was used to estimate water-surface profiles for other flood probabilities. The resulting six flood-inundation maps were created with a geographic information system by combining flood profiles with a 1.2-foot vertical and 10-foot horizontal resolution digital elevation model derived from Light Detection and Ranging data.

  19. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Tocoa, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Tocoa that would be inundated by a 50-year flood of Rio Tocoa. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Tocoa as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for an estimated 50-year-flood on Rio Tocoa at Tocoa were estimated using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area and a ground survey at one bridge. There are no nearby long-term stream-gaging stations on Rio Tocoa; therefore, the 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Tocoa, 552 cubic meters per second, was estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The drainage area and mean annual precipitation estimated for Rio Tocoa at Tocoa are 204 square kilometers and 1,987 millimeters, respectively. It was assumed that a portion of the 50-year flood, 200 cubic meters per second, would escape the main channel and flow down a side channel before re-entering the main channel again near the lower end of the study area.

  20. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Catacamas, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Catacamas that would be inundated by a 50-year-flood of Rio Catacamas. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Catacamas as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/ floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for a 50-year-flood on Rio Catacamas at Catacamas were estimated using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area. The 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Catacamas at Catacamas, 216 cubic meters per second, was estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation because there are no long-term stream-gaging stations on the river from which to estimate the discharge. The drainage area and mean annual precipitation estimated for Rio Catacamas at Catacamas are 45.4 square kilometers and 1,773 millimeters, respectively.

  1. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for El Progreso, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of El Progreso that would be inundated by a 50-year flood of Rio Pelo. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of El Progreso as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for a 50-year-flood on Rio Pelo at El Progreso were estimated using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area. There are no nearby long-term stream-gaging stations on Rio Pelo; therefore, the 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Pelo, 235 cubic meters per second, was estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The drainage area and mean annual precipitation estimated for Rio Pelo at El Progreso are 47.4 square kilometers and 1,920 millimeters, respectively.

  2. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Siguatepeque, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Siguatepeque that would be inundated by 50-year floods on Rio Selguapa, Rio Guique, Rio Celan, Rio Calan, and Quebrada Chalantuma. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Siguatepeque as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for 50-year-floods on each of the streams studied were computed using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area and ground surveys at six bridges. There are no nearby long-term stream-gaging stations on any of the streams studied; therefore, the 50-year-flood discharges were estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The 50-year-flood discharges estimated for Rio Selguapa, Rio Guique, Rio Celan, Rio Calan, and Quebrada Chalantuma are 323, 168, 161, 146, and 90 cubic meters per second, respectively.

  3. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Choloma, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Choloma that would be inundated by a 50-year flood of Rio Choloma. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Choloma as part of the in the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for a 50-year-flood on Rio Choloma at Choloma were determined using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area. There are no nearby long-term stream-gaging stations on Rio Choloma; therefore, the 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Choloma, 370 cubic meters per second, was estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The drainage area and mean annual precipitation estimated for Rio Choloma at Choloma are 89.5 square kilometers and 2,164 millimeters, respectively.

  4. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Olanchito, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, M.C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Olanchito that would be inundated by a 50-year-flood of Rio Uchapa. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Olanchito as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for a 50-year-flood discharge of 243 cubic meters per second on Rio Uchapa at Olanchito were estimated using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area. There are no nearby long-term stream-gaging stations on Rio Uchapa; therefore, the 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Uchapa was estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The drainage area and mean annual precipitation estimated for Rio Uchapa at Olanchito are 97.1 square kilometers and 1,178 millimeters, respectively.

  5. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Sonaguera, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Sonaguera that would be inundated by a 50-year flood of Rio Sonaguera and its tributary, Rio Juan Lazaro. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Sonaguera as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for an estimated 50-year-flood on Rio Sonaguera and Rio Juan Lazaro at Sonaguera were determined using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area and a ground survey at the bridge. There are no nearby long-term stream-gaging stations on Rio Sonaguera or Rio Juan Lazaro; therefore, the 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Sonaguera above the confluence with Rio Juan Lazaro, 194 cubic meters per second; for Rio Juan Lazaro at its mouth, 168 cubic meters per second, and for Rio Sonaguera at the downstream end of the study area, 282 cubic meters per second; were estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation.

  6. Use of flood propagation models in real time hydrologic forecast: experiences at Segura River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a case study related to flood propagation forecast in the Segura River in Spain is presented along with the application that was developed for that purpose. Simulation and forecast models ease the work carry out by the watershed organism personnel and may be essential to understand the complexity of some of the propagation phenomena that take place at specific locations such as the study area, a man-made channel at the downstream end of the Segura River (from Contraparada to Guardamar), including the tributaries along the stream. Three different models were used in the previous studies: a steady state numerical model (Hec-Ras), a physical model and two unsteady state numerical models (ISIS and HMS). Also, historical time series were analyzed and some topography works were carried out along the stream. PROC Segura model was conceived for real time flood propagation forecast in the mentioned area using the data collected by the SAIH. A simplified model was developed based on the following methods: Muskingum, Muskingum-Cunge and Modified Puls. To overcome some of these models limitations, such as the one to one discharge-water surface relationships and the impossibility of reproducing downstream backwater, doubled input rating curves were used to estimate the discharge at some of the gauging stations located at the tributaries, i.e. Merancho and Rambia del Derramador, which may be affected by the water level in the Segura River. The advantages of using these simplified models versus a dynamic wave model were studied and reported as well. In general, it can be stated that when several solutions are provided to solve the same problem, the simplest solution is usually the best one.(Author)

  7. Prediction and prevention of the impacts of sea level rise on the Yangtze River Delta and its adjacent areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Yangtze River Delta region is characterized by high density of population and rapidly developing economy. There are low lying coastal plain and deltaic plain in this region. Thus, the study area could be highly vulnerable to accelerated sea level rise caused by global warming. This paper deals with the scenarios of the relative sea level rise in the early half period of the 21st century in the study area. The authors suggested that relative sea level would rise 25 50 cm by the year 2050 in the study area, of which the magnitude of relative sea level rise in the Yangtze River Delta would double the perspective worldwide average. The impacts of sea level rise include: (i) exacerbation of coastline recession in several sections and vertical erosion of tidal flat, and increase in length of eroding coastline; (ii) decrease in area of tidal flat and coastal wetland due to erosion and inundation; (iii) increase in frequency and intensity of storm surge, which would threaten the coastal protection works; (iv) reduction of drainage capacity due to backwater effect in the Lixiahe lowland and the eastern lowland of Taihu Lake region, and exacerbation of flood and waterlogging disasters; and (v) increase in salt water intrusion into the Yangtze Estuary. Comprehensive evaluation of sea level rise impacts shows that the Yangtze River Delta and eastern lowland of Taihu Lake region, especially Shanghai Municipality, belong in the district in the extreme risk category and the next is the northern bank of Hangzhou Bay, the third is the abandoned Yellow River delta, and the district at low risk includes the central part of north Jiangsu coastal plain and Lixiahe lowland.

  8. Stratigraphic and Paleomagnetic Study of Glacial Lake Missoula Lacustrine and Flood Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M. A.; Barendregt, R.; Clague, J. J.; Enkin, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    During the late Wisconsinan, the Purcell Trench lobe of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet advanced south into Idaho where it dammed the Clark Fork River and formed glacial Lake Missoula in western Montana. The lake repeatedly filled and emptied through its dam between about 16,000 and 12,500 14C yr ago. The floodwaters entered glacial Lake Columbia, Washington, and spilled across the plateaux of eastern Washington. Repeated floods excavated the Channeled Scablands and deposited slackwater sediments in several valleys in Washington and in the Willamette Valley in Oregon. Stratigraphic study of the flood and slackwater sediments in Washington and Oregon, and of glacial Lake Missoula sediments near Missoula, Montana, provide evidence for at least 46 glacial Lake Missoula floods. Paleomagnetic analyses were done on oriented samples of (1) glacial Lake Missoula sediments at the Ninemile section and at a section in Missoula (348 samples); (2) interstratified flood and lacustrine sediments at the Manila Creek site in the Sanpoil Valley, Washington (615 samples); and (3) backwater sediments in the Yakima, Walla Walla, and Willamette valleys (813 samples). The sediments record strong and stable magnetic remanence carried by either magnetite or hematite. Magnetic remanence directions of flood beds and of interbedded lacustrine units show secular variation over a time span of hundreds to a few thousands of years, consistent with deposition by many tens of floods separated on average by several decades. Rock magnetic properties of the flood deposits give insight into depositional processes involved and the source of the floodwaters. We are now attempting to date the floods using radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence techniques, to correlate the paleomagnetic records between our study sites, which are up to 750 km apart, and to correlate them with well dated paleomagnetic records from Fish Lake, Oregon, and Mono Lake, California.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Bifurcation Evolution in a Sand-bed Braided River

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haas, T.; Schuurman, F.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    River bifurcations are key units in a braided river. Although simple bifurcations are well understood and can be analyzed by 1D models (e.g. Bolla Pittaluga et al., 2003 and Kleinhans et al., 2008), predicting the stability and dynamics of multiple interacting bifurcations in a braided river with migrating bars requires understanding of the interaction between braid bars, channel network and bifurcations, in particular the upstream curvature and downstream backwater effects. Our objective is to understand the evolution of bifurcations at migrating bars in a braided river and the effects on bar evolution. We used the 3D numerical morphodynamic model Delft3D to produce a dynamically braiding sand bed river. This model solves the 3D-flow and computes sediment transport and bed level change accounting for effects of transverse bed slope. It includes a simple bank erosion model to reactivate emerged areas. The morphology of mid-channel bars produced by the model was analyzed and the partitioning of water and sediment over the bifurcating channels are compared with a 1D model concept. Next, the evolution of bars is linked to that of the bifurcations, in order to infer relations between bar morphology and bifurcation evolution. We find that upstream bar dynamics have a major effect on the stability of bifurcations. Migration and elongation of bars can close the upstream entrance of a bifurcation channel, independent of the stability of the bifurcation. Moreover, bifurcation angle and upstream curvature can be affected by upstream bar migration and elongation, which steers flow and sediment partitioning at the bifurcation. At the same time, the partitioning of water and sediment over a bifurcation affects bar shape. Sediment eroded at one of the bar sides just downstream of the bifurcation deposits downstream of the braid bar in the form of tail bars. Hence bar shape as observable on imagery contains useful information about the evolution of the upstream bifurcation and

  10. Environmental Sciences Laboratory dedication, February 26-27, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dedication of the new Environmental Sciences Laboratory coincided with the 25th year of the establishment of the science of ecology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. That quarter century witnessed the evolution of ecology from an obscure, backwater discipline of biology to a broadly used, everyday household word. The transition reflected broad and basic changes in our social and cultural view of the world. This was brought about as a result of the awareness developed in our society of the importance of the environment, coupled with efforts of ecologists and other environmental scientists who identified, clarified, and formulated the issues and challenges of environmental protection for both the lay public and the scientific community. In many respects, the activities in ecology at ORNL were a microcosm of the broader social scene; the particular problems of the environment associated with atomic energy needed to be defined in scientific terms and articulated in both the specific and general sense for a larger audience which was unfamiliar with the field and somewhat alien to its concepts and philosophy. The success of this effort is reflected in the existence of the new Environmental Sciences Laboratory. This dedication volume brings together the thoughts and reflections of many of these scientists whose efforts contributed in a unique and individualistic fashion not only to ORNL but also to the national identification of ecology and its importance to the achievement of our national goals. Their remarks and presentations are not only a pleasant and personally gratifying recapitulation of the past and of ORNL's contributions to ecology but also portend some of the challenges to ecology in the future

  11. A unique application of the instream flow incremental methodology (IFIM) to predict impacts on riverine aquatic habitat, resulting from construction of a proposed hydropower reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, proposed to construct a new low-head hydroelectric project on the Susquehanna River in the central part of the state in 1986, about 108 km upstream of the river mouth. As part of the licensing process, the city was required by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to carry out studies that would forecast the impacts on riverine aquatic habitat as a result of construction of the proposed 13 km long by 1.5 km wide reservoir. The methodology selected by the city and its consultants was to use the IFIM to model the habitat conditions in the project reach both before and after construction of the proposed reservoir.The IFIM is usually used to model instream flow releases downstream of dams and diversions, and had not been used before to model habitat conditions within the proposed reservoir area. The study team hydraulically modelled the project reach using existing hydraulic data, and a HEC-2 backwater analysis to determine post-project water surface elevations. The IFG-4 model was used to simulate both pre- and post-project water velocities, by distributing velocities across transects based on known discharges and cell depth. Effects on aquatic habitat were determined using the IFIM PHABSIM program, in which criteria for several evaluation species and life stages were used to yield estimates of Weighted Usable Area. The analysis showed, based on trends in WUA from pre- and post-project conditions, that habitat conditions would improve for several species and life stages, and would be negatively affected for fewer life stages and species. Some agency concerns that construction of the proposed reservoir would have significant adverse effects on the resident and anadromous fish populations were responded to using these results

  12. Observation of Sea Ice Surface Thermal States Under Cloud Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Perovich, D. K.; Gow, A. J.; Kwok, R.; Barber, D. G.; Comiso, J. C.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Clouds interfere with the distribution of short-wave and long-wave radiations over sea ice, and thereby strongly affect the surface energy balance in polar regions. To evaluate the overall effects of clouds on climatic feedback processes in the atmosphere-ice-ocean system, the challenge is to observe sea ice surface thermal states under both clear sky and cloudy conditions. From laboratory experiments, we show that C-band radar (transparent to clouds) backscatter is very sensitive to the surface temperature of first-year sea ice. The effect of sea ice surface temperature on the magnitude of backscatter change depends on the thermal regimes of sea ice thermodynamic states. For the temperature range above the mirabilite (Na2SO4.10H20) crystallization point (-8.2 C), C-band data show sea ice backscatter changes by 8-10 dB for incident angles from 20 to 35 deg at both horizontal and vertical polarizations. For temperatures below the mirabilite point but above the crystallization point of MgCl2.8H2O (-18.0 C), relatively strong backwater changes between 4-6 dB are observed. These backscatter changes correspond to approximately 8 C change in temperature for both cases. The backscattering mechanism is related to the temperature which determines the thermodynamic distribution of brine volume in the sea ice surface layer. The backscatter is positively correlated to temperature and the process is reversible with thermodynamic variations such as diurnal insolation effects. From two different dates in May 1993 with clear and overcast conditions determined by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), concurrent Earth Resources Satellite 1 (ERS-1) C-band ice observed with increases in backscatter over first-year sea ice, and verified by increases in in-situ sea ice surface temperatures measured at the Collaborative-Interdisciplinary Cryosphere Experiment (C-ICE) site.

  13. Succession of phytoplankton assemblages in response to large-scale reservoir operation: a case study in a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhe; Guo, Jinsong; Fang, Fang; Smith, Val H

    2016-03-01

    The Three Gorges Dam (TGD) has greatly altered ecological and environmental conditions within the reservoir region, but it is not known how these changes affect phytoplankton structure and dynamics. Here, a bimonthly monitoring program was implemented from 2007 to 2009 to study the impact of damming on phytoplankton assemblages in the backwater area of the Pengxi River (PBA). By application of the phytoplankton functional group (C strategists, competitive species; S strategists, stress-tolerant species; R strategists, rapid propagation species), seasonal changes in phytoplankton relative to environmental variations were evaluated using ordination analysis. Seasonal patterns of phytoplankton dynamics were detected during this study, with CS/S strategists causing algal blooms from mid-spring to early summer, CS/CR strategists often observed during flood season, and CS strategists dominant during mid-autumn. CR/R groups dominated during winter and caused algal blooms in February. Our results indicated that phytoplankton assemblages were directly related to reservoir operation effects. Generally, the TGD had a low water level during flood season, resulting in a relatively short hydraulic retention time and intensive variability, which supported the cooccurrence of CS and CR species. During the winter drought season, water storage in the TGD increased the water level and the hydraulic retention time in the PBA, enabling R/CR strategists to overcome the sedimentation effect and to out-compete S/CS species in winter. As expected, these diversity patterns were significantly correlated with the hydraulic retention time and nutrient limitation pattern in the PBA. This study provides strategic insight for evaluating the impacts of reservoir operations on phytoplankton adaptation. PMID:26861743

  14. Distribution of Foraminifera in the Core Samples of Kollidam and Marakanam Mangrove Locations, Tamil Nadu, Southeast Coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowshath, M.

    2013-05-01

    In order to study the distribution of Foraminifera in the subsurface sediments of mangrove environment, two core samples have been collected i) near boating house, Pitchavaram, from Kollidam estuary (C2) and ii) backwaters of Marakanam (C2)with the help of PVC corer. The length of the core varies from a total of 25 samples from both cores were obtained and they were subjected to standard micropaleontological and sedimentological analyses for the evaluation of different sediment characteristics. The core sample No.C1 (Pitchavaram) yielded only foraminifera whereas the other one core no.C2 (Marakanam) has yielded discussed only the down core distribution of foraminifera. The widely utilized classification proposed by Loeblich and Tappan (1987) has been followed in the present study for Foraminiferal taxonomy and accordingly 23 foraminiferal species belonging to 18 genera, 10 families, 8 superfamilies and 4 suborders have been reported and illustrated. The foraminiferal species recorded are characteristic of shallow innershelf to marginal marine and tropical in nature. Sedimentological parameters such as CaCO3, Organic matter and sand-silt-clay ratio was estimated and their down core distribution is discussed. An attempt has been made to evaluate the favourable substrate for the Foraminifera population abundance in the present area of study. From the overall distribution of foraminifera in different samples of Kollidam estuary (Pitchavaram area), and Marakanam estuary it is observed that siltysand and sandysilt are more accommodative substrate for the population of foraminifera, respectively. The distribution of foraminifera in the core samples indicate that the sediments were deposited under normal oxygenated environment conditions.;

  15. Streambed and water profile response to in-channel restoration structures in a laboratory meandering stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bangshuai; Chu, Hong-Hanh; Endreny, Theodore A.

    2015-11-01

    In-channel structures are often installed in alluvial rivers during restoration to steer currents, but they also modify the streambed morphology and water surface profile, and alter hydraulic gradients driving ecologically important hyporheic exchange. Although river features before and after restoration need to be compared, few studies have collected detailed observations to facilitate this comparison. We created a laboratory mobile-bed alluvial meandering river and collected detailed measurements in the highly sinuous meander before and after installation of in-channel structures, which included one cross vane and six J-hooks situated along 1 bar unit. Measurements of streambed and water surface elevation with submillimeter vertical accuracy and horizontal resolution were obtained using close-range photogrammetry. Compared to the smooth gradually varied water surface profile for control runs without structures, the structures created rapidly varied flow with subcritical to supercritical flow transitions, as well as backwater and forced-morphology pools, which increased volumetric storage by 74% in the entire stream reach. The J-hooks, located along the outer bank of the meander bend and downstream of the cross vane, created stepwise patterns in the streambed and water surface longitudinal profiles. The pooling of water behind the cross vane increased the hydraulic gradient across the meander neck by 1% and increased local groundwater gradients by 4%, with smaller increases across other transects through the intrameander zone. Scour pools developed downstream of the cross vane and around the J-hooks situated near the meander apex. In-channel structures significantly changed meander bend hydraulic gradients, and the detailed streambed and water surface 3-D maps provide valuable data for computational modeling of changes to hyporheic exchange.

  16. MODIS Inundation Estimate Assimilation into Soil Moisture Accounting Hydrologic Model: A Case Study in Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Posner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Flash Flood Guidance consists of indices that estimate the amount of rain of a certain duration that is needed over a given small basin in order to cause minor flooding. Backwater catchment inundation from swollen rivers or regional groundwater inputs are not significant over the spatial and temporal scales for the majority of upland flash flood prone basins, as such, these effects are not considered. However, some lowland areas and flat terrain near large rivers experience standing water long after local precipitation has ceased. NASA is producing an experimental product from the MODIS that detects standing water. These observations were assimilated into the hydrologic model in order to more accurately represent soil moisture conditions within basins, from sources of water from outside of the basin. Based on the upper soil water content, relations are used to derive an error estimate for the modeled soil saturation fraction; whereby, the soil saturation fraction model state can be updated given the availability of satellite observed inundation. Model error estimates were used in a Monte Carlo ensemble forecast of soil water and flash flood potential. Numerical experiments with six months of data (July 2011–December 2011 showed that MODIS inundation data, when assimilated to correct soil moisture estimates, increased the likelihood that bankfull flow would occur, over non-assimilated modeling, at catchment outlets for approximately 44% of basin-days during the study time period. While this is a much more realistic representation of conditions, no actual events occurred allowing for validation during the time period.

  17. Sedimentation in the Three Gorges Dam and the future trend of Changjiang (Yangtze River sediment flux to the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guogang Li

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Three Gorges Dam (TGD on the upper Changjiang (Yangtze River, China, disrupts the continuity of Changjiang sediment delivery to downstream and coastal areas. In this study, which was based on 54 years of annual water and sediment data from the mainstream and major tributaries of Changjiang, sediment deposition induced by the TGD in 2003–2008 was quantified. Furthermore, we determined the theoretical trapping efficiency of the cascade reservoir upstream of the TGD. Its impact on Changjiang sediment flux in the coming decades is discussed. Results show that about 172 million tons (Mt of sediment was trapped annually by the TGD in 2003–2008, with an averaged trapping efficiency of 75%. Most of the total sediment deposition, as induced by the TGD (88%, accumulated within the region between the TGD site and Cuntan. However, significant siltation (12% of the total sediment deposition also occurred upstream of Cuntan as a consequence of the upstream extended backwater region of the TGD. Additionally, the Changjiang sediment flux entered a third downward step in 2001, prior to operation of the TGD. This mainly resulted from sediment reduction in the Jinshajiang tributary since the late 1990s. As the cascade reservoir is put into full operation, it could potentially trap 91% of the Jinshajiang sediment discharge and, therefore, the Jinshajiang sediment discharge would most likely further decrease to 14 Mt/yr in the coming decades. Consequently, the Changjiang sediment flux to the sea is expected to continuously decrease to below 90 Mt/yr in the near future, or only 18% of the amount observed in the 1950s. In the presence of low sediment discharge, profound impacts on the morphology of estuary, delta and coastal waters are expected.

  18. Trophic ecomorphology of Siluriformes (Pisces, Osteichthyes) from a tropical stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, J P A; Goulart, E; Oliveira, E F; Yamamura, C B

    2011-05-01

    The present study analysed the relationship between morphology and trophic structure of Siluriformes (Pisces, Osteichthyes) from the Caracu Stream (22º 45' S and 53º 15' W), a tributary of the Paraná River (Brazil). Sampling was carried out at three sites using electrofishing, and two species of Loricariidae and four of Heptapteridae were obtained. A cluster analysis revealed the presence of three trophic guilds (detritivores, insectivores and omnivores). Principal components analysis demonstrated the segregation of two ecomorphotypes: at one extreme there were the detritivores (Loricariidae) with morphological structures that are fundamental in allowing them to fix themselves to substrates characterised by rushing torrents, thus permitting them to graze on the detritus and organic materials encrusted on the substrate; at the other extreme of the gradient there were the insectivores and omnivores (Heptapteridae), with morphological characteristics that promote superior performance in the exploitation of structurally complex habitats with low current velocity, colonised by insects and plants. Canonical discriminant analysis revealed an ecomorphological divergence between insectivores, which have morphological structures that permit them to capture prey in small spaces among rocks, and omnivores, which have a more compressed body and tend to explore food items deposited in marginal backwater zones. Mantel tests showed that trophic structure was significantly related to the body shape of a species, independently of the phylogenetic history, indicating that, in this case, there was an ecomorphotype for each trophic guild. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the Siluriformes of the Caracu Stream were ecomorphologically structured and that morphology can be applied as an additional tool in predicting the trophic structure of this group. PMID:21755165

  19. Title: Flushed Away: Linking Carbon Storage and Log Jams in Colorado's Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, N. D.; Wohl, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Historical documents and recent field studies suggest that resource use within the Colorado Rockies during the past two centuries has reduced the wood loads and frequency of wood jams along most forested streams. Recent research has also shown that streams play a significant role in the sequestration and transport of organic carbon, and wood jams are a key component of storage and biological processing in mountain headwater streams. Log jams tend to slow the transport of carbon and encourage its uptake in the riverine environment and therefore may have effects which extend beyond streams and into the global carbon cycle. The paper aims to quantify the effects of past and present resource management on instream wood loads and logjam frequency along Colorado's Front Range. We hypothesize that more highly impacted reaches (as measured by recent fire, logging, and high flow regulation) will demonstrate lower wood loads, lower jam densities and lower overall volume of stored sediment. In addition, we hypothesize that soils stored behind log jams will have a higher OM and TC content. If these hypothesis hold true, then by implication areas with younger forests and higher impacts will have higher carbon flux and lower return of carbon and nutrients to the surrounding ecosystem. Wood loads and jam frequency are compared based on stream characteristics, forest age, and flow alteration. In addition, sediment samples from reaches with and without log jams are compared based on organic matter (OM) content and Total Carbon (TC) content. Samples taken from behind log jams are compared to samples taken from other backwater areas along a river reach. Preliminary results of the 2010/2011 field seasons indicate that sediment samples taken from log jams (regardless of forest age) have an overall average of 5% OM, as compared to an average of 1% OM in samples taken from non-jam areas. Samples taken from log jams on streams draining old growth forests (more than 250 years since last

  20. In-channel Restoration Structures and the Implications on Hyporheic Exchange: a Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B.; Chu, H. H.; Endreny, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    In-channel structures, i.e. cross-vanes and J-hooks, are commonly installed in river restoration projects to modify the streambed morphology and stream water surface profile, and are known to change hyporhiec exchange flux and habitats for riverine animals. However, few studies have continuous and accurate pre- and post-treatment data to evaluate the impact of these structures on channel hydraulic gradients and morphology. To quantify the effects of in-channel structures, we developed a scaled physical model of a meandering stream with a cross-vane and 6 J-hooks on a mobile-bed river table. Close-range photogrammetry technique was applied to obtain 3-D water and ground surface profiles with sub-millimeter vertical accuracy and horizontal resolution. The experiment was compared with a control experiment without structures while maintaining the same initial conditions of river bed, floodplain and stream flow. Results indicated that the cross-vane caused an average local head loss that represented 16% of the total stream reach head loss, and a 74% increase in channel load in the entire stream reach. Most J-hooks can create stepwise patterns in stream longitudinal profile, and cross-vane can create even more significant ones. Hydraulic gradients across the intra-meander zone also increased with in-channel structures, i.e. from 2.5% to 3.5% at the meander neck. Scour pools developed downstream of the cross-vane, and mostly around the 4 meander apex J-hooks at their hooked tip. Backwater caused by the cross-vane steepened the local water table profile by an additional 4.2%, and was the primary driver of statistically significant hydraulic gradient increase. Reach scale water and streambed surface profiles from our study provided detailed data to improve the understanding of in-channel structure effects, and may serve as reliable data source in computational modeling of hyporheic exchange.

  1. Amazon flood wave hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Bates, Paul D.; Horritt, Matthew S.; Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Forsberg, Bruce R.; Vega, Maria C.

    2009-07-01

    SummaryA bathymetric survey of 575 km of the central Amazon River and one of its tributaries, the Purus, are combined with gauged data to characterise the Amazon flood wave, and for hydraulic modelling of the main channel for the period June 1995-March 1997 with the LISFLOOD-FP and HEC-RAS hydraulic models. Our investigations show that the Amazon flood wave is subcritical and diffusive in character and, due to shallow bed slopes, backwater conditions control significant reach lengths and are present for low and high water states. Comparison of the different models shows that it is necessary to include at least the diffusion term in any model, and the RMSE error in predicted water elevation at all cross sections introduced by ignoring the acceleration and advection terms is of the order of 0.02-0.03 m. The use of a wide rectangular channel approximation introduces an error of 0.10-0.15 m on the predicted water levels. Reducing the bathymetry to a simple bed slope and with mean cross section only, introduces an error in the order of 0.5 m. These results show that when compared to the mean annual amplitude of the Amazon flood wave of 11-12 m, water levels are relatively insensitive to the bathymetry of the channel model. The implication for remote sensing studies of the central Amazon channel, such as those proposed with the Surface Water and Ocean Topography mission (SWOT), is that even relatively crude assumptions regarding the channel bathymetry will be valid in order to derive discharge from water surface slope of the main channel, as long as the mean channel area is approximately correct.

  2. In-situ treatment of acid mine waters using fluidized bed ash: Field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A slurry of mine water and fluidized bed ash (FBA) was injected into an abandoned coal mine in eastern Oklahoma in July 1997. Oil-field technology was used to inject 1.8 Gg (418 tons) of FBA through five wells in 15 hours. Prior to injection the seep water had a pH of 4.4, was net acidic (acidity over 400 mg/L as CaCO3), and had relatively high metal concentrations (in mg/L: Fe-200; Mn-7; and Al-6). After injection, during the period of effective treatment, the seep water had a pH above 6.0, less net acidity, and had lower metals concentrations (in mg/L: Fe-120; Mn-5; and Al-< PQL). When the treated seep water exited the mine, the dissolved metals oxidized and hydrolyzed. As the metals precipitated, the alkalinity introduced by the FBA was consumed and the pH dropped. However, the seep water characteristics upon entering the receiving stream were improved, compared to pre-injection. The resulting seep water quality is such that it is more amenable to further treatment by passive treatment methods, such as anoxic limestone drains or wetlands. Alkaline injection is a finite treatment process. Eventually, the added alkalinity is exhausted, at which time the seep returns to pre-injection conditions, necessitating another injection of ash. For the study discussed in this paper, the treatment lasted approximately 15 months. While the amount of alkalinity added to the mine could have potentially treated much more than a year's volume of seep water, it is believed that much of the injected alkalinity was unavailable in backwater areas in the mine. This alkalinity contributed little, if any, to the treatment of water flowing through the mine. Mine hydrology, especially during injection are crucial to treatment longevity

  3. Summer monsoon onset-induced changes of autotrophic pico- and nanoplankton in the largest monsoonal estuary along the west coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arya P; Jyothibabu, R; Jagadeesan, L; Lallu, K R; Karnan, C

    2016-02-01

    This study presents the response of autotrophic pico- and nanoplankton to southwest monsoon-associated hydrographical transformations in the Cochin backwaters (CBW), the largest monsoonal estuary along the west coast of India. By the onset of the southwest monsoon, the euhaline/mesohaline conditions in the downstream/upstream of CBW usually transform into oligohaline/limnohaline. The flow cytometer analysis revealed the dominance of picoeukaryotes > Synechococcus > nanoautotrophs, with Prochlorococcus either very low or entirely absent. Synechococcus abundance was high during the pre-southwest monsoon (10(6) L(-1)), which dwindled with heavy fresh water influx during the southwest monsoon (10(5) L(-1)). The drastic drop in salinity and faster flushing of the CBW during the southwest monsoon replaced the euhaline/mesohaline strain of Synechococcus with an oligohaline/limnohaline strain. Epifluorescence microscopy analyses showed that, among the two strains of Synechococcus, the phycoerythrin-rich (PE-rich) one was dominant in the mesohaline/euhaline conditions, whereas the phycocyanin-rich (PC-rich) strain dominated in oligohaline/limnohaline conditions. Although Synechococcus abundance diminished during the southwest monsoon, the total abundance of picoplankton community remained virtually unchanged in the upstream due to an increase in the abundance of picoeukaryotes. On the other hand, the autotrophic nanoplankton abundance increased from pre-monsoon levels of av. 3.8 × 10(6)-av. 9.5 × 10(6) L(-1) at the onset of the southwest monsoon. Utilizing suitable multivariate analyses, the study illustrated the differential response and niche preference of various smaller communities of autotrophs to the southwest monsoon-associated hydrographical ramifications in a large monsoonal estuary, which may be applicable to similar such estuaries situated along the Indian coastline. PMID:26780412

  4. Sediment pulses in mountain rivers: 2. Comparison between experiments and numerical predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yantao; Parker, Gary; Pizzuto, James; Lisle, Thomas E.

    2003-09-01

    Mountain rivers in particular are prone to sediment input in the form of pulses rather than a more continuous supply. These pulses often enter in the form of landslides from adjacent hillslopes or debris flows from steeper tributaries. The activities of humans such as timber harvesting, road building, and urban development can increase the frequency of sediment pulses. The question as to how mountain rivers accommodate pulses of sediment thus becomes of practical as well as academic significance. In part 1 [, 2003], the results of three laboratory experiments on sediment pulses are reported. It was found there that the pulses were eliminated from the flume predominantly by dispersion of the topographic high. Significant translation was observed only when the pulse material was substantially finer than the ambient load in the river. Here the laboratory data are used to test a numerical model originally devised for predicting the evolution of sediment pulses in field-scale gravel bed streams. The model successfully reproduces the predominantly dispersive deformation of the experimental pulses. Rates of dispersion are generally underestimated, largely because bed load transport rates are underestimated by the transport equation used in the model. The model reproduces the experimental data best when the pulse is significantly coarser than the ambient sediment. In this case, the model successfully predicts the formation and downstream progradation of a delta that formed in the backwater zone of the pulse in run 3. The performance of the model is less successful when the pulse is composed primarily of sand. This is likely because the bed load equation used in the study is specifically designed for gravel. When the model is adapted to conditions characteristic of large, sand bed rivers with low Froude numbers, it predicts substantial translation of pulses as well as dispersion.

  5. Grain-size evolution in suspended sediment and deposits from the 2004 and 2008 controlled-flood experiments in Marble and Grand Canyons, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Topping, David J.; Rubin, David M.; Wright, Scott A.; Schmidt, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Since the closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, the hydrology, sediment supply, and distribution and size of modern alluvial deposits in the Colorado River through Grand Canyon have changed substantially (e.g., Howard and Dolan, 1981; Johnson and Carothers, 1987; Webb et al., 1999; Rubin et al., 2002; Topping et al., 2000, 2003; Wright et al., 2005; Hazel et al., 2006). The dam has reduced the fluvial sediment supply at the upstream boundary of Grand Canyon National Park by about 95 percent. Regulation of river discharge by dam operations has important implications for the storage and redistribution of sediment in the Colorado River corridor. In the absence of natural floods, sediment is not deposited at elevations that regularly received sediment before dam closure. There has been a systemwide decrease in the size and number of subaerially exposed fluvial sand deposits since the 1960s, punctuated by episodic aggradation during the exceptional high-flow intervals in the early 1980s and by sediment input from occasional tributary floods (Beus and others, 1985; Schmidt and Graf, 1990; Kearsley et al., 1994; Schmidt et al., 2004; Wright et al., 2005; Hazel et al., 2006). Fluvial sandbars are an important component of riparian ecology that, among other functions, enclose eddy backwaters that form native-fish habitat, provide a source for eolian sand that protects some archaeological sites, and are used as campsites by thousands of river-runners annually (Rubin et al., 1990; Kearsley et al., 1994; Neal et al., 2000; Wright et al., 2005; Draut and Rubin, 2008).

  6. Preliminary Classification of Water Areas Within the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System by Using Landsat Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Yvonne C.; Constant, Glenn C.; Couvillion, Brady R.

    2008-01-01

    The southern portion of the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway System (ABFS) is a large area (2,571 km2) in south central Louisiana bounded on the east and west sides by a levee system. The ABFS is a sparsely populated area that includes some of the Nation's most significant extents of bottomland hardwoods, swamps, bayous, and backwater lakes, holding a rich abundance and diversity of terrestrial and aquatic species. The seasonal flow of water through the ABFS is critical to maintaining its ecological integrity. Because of strong interdependencies among species, habitat quality, and water flow in the ABFS, there is a need to better define the paths by which water moves at various stages of the hydrocycle. Although river level gages have collected a long historical record of water level variation, very little synoptic information has been available regarding the distribution and character of water at more remote locations in the basin. Most water management plans for the ABFS strive to improve water quality by increasing water flow and circulation from the main stem of the Atchafalaya River into isolated areas. To describe the distribution of land and water on a basin-wide scale, we chose to use Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 imagery to determine the extent of water distribution from 1985 to 2006 and at a variety of river stages. Because the visual signature of river water is high turbidity, we also used Landsat imagery to describe the distribution of turbid water in the ABFS. The ability to track water flow patterns by tracking turbid waters will enhance the characterization of water movement and aid in planning.

  7. Energy recovery in SUDS towards smart water grids: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a methodology for urban flood adaptation and energy recovery solutions is resting on the concept of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) as a measure to reduce risks of urban flooding while fully utilizing the available resources. Flood drainage systems are infrastructures essential in urban areas, which include retention ponds that can be used as water storage volumes to damp floods and simultaneously to produce energy, constituting innovative solutions to be integrated in future smart water grid′s designs. The consideration of urban flooding as a problem caused by excess water that can be harvested and re-used is expected to provide a comprehensive representation of a water-energy nexus for future urban areas. The study comprises an optimization of energy recovery in SUDS of a small district area of Lisbon down-town through the use of a low-head hydropower converter. The status-quo solution based on a basin catchment for the average expected runoff is analysed, with influence of the tidal backwater effect of the Atlantic Ocean which causes difficulties to the drainage of excess flow. The methodology used to reach the flow damping and the optimized solution for energy production is presented. -- Highlights: •An innovative solution for Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS). •Use of retention ponds to reduce risks of urban flooding while producing energy. •Use of recently developed hydropower converters for low heads. •Solution to be integrated in future smart water networks for increasing efficiency. •Water and energy nexus for sustainable operation towards future smart cities

  8. Simulation of Flow Regimes to Reduce Habitat for T. tubifex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhous, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Whirling disease has had a significant impact on trout fisheries of the American west by reducing the numbers and quality of rainbow trout in infected streams. A critical factor in the life cycle of the whirling disease parasite is the fine sediment that provides the optimum habitat for Tubifex tubifex, an oligochaete worm that acts as an intermediate host for the disease. This report presents a model for the simulation of flushing flows required to remove undesirable fines and sand from a pool. Undesirable fines may also need to be flushed from runs, the surface layer, and backwater areas. Well-defined links of specific particle sizes to oligochaete worm abundance is needed to justify the use of flushing flows to move sediment. An analytical method for estimating the streamflows needed to remove the fine sediment is demonstrated herein. The overall steps to follow in removing fines from a stream are: Step 1. Determine size of the sediment that is the habitat for oligochaete worms. Step 2. Determine location of the sediment that is the habitat for oligochaete worms. Step 3. Determine streamflows needed to flush (remove) the sediment that is the habitat for oligochaete worms. The case study approach is used to present the method and to demonstrate its application. The case is derived from the sediment and oligochaete worm habitat of Willow Creek, a tributary of the Upper Colorado River located in Grand County, Colo. Willow Creek Reservoir (an element of the Colorado-Big Thompson Project) controls the streamflows of the creek and is just above the study site.

  9. Characterization of phosphorus leaching from phosphate waste rock in the Xiangxi River watershed, Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-guo; Liang, Bing; Xue, Qiang; Yin, Cheng-wei

    2016-05-01

    Phosphate mining waste rocks dumped in the Xiangxi River (XXR) bay, which is the largest backwater zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), are treated as Type I industry solid wastes by the Chinese government. To evaluate the potential pollution risk of phosphorus leaching from phosphate waste rocks, the phosphorus leaching behaviors of six phosphate waste rock samples with different weathering degrees under both neutral and acidic conditions were investigated using a series of column leaching experiments, following the Method 1314 standard of the US EPA. The results indicate that the phosphorus release mechanism is solubility-controlled. Phosphorus release from waste rocks increases as pH decreases. The phosphorus leaching concentration and cumulative phosphorus released in acidic leaching conditions were found to be one order of magnitude greater than that in neutral leaching conditions. In addition, the phosphorus was released faster during the period when environmental pH turned from weak alkalinity to slight acidity, with this accelerated release period appearing when L/S was in the range of 0.5-2.0 mL/g. In both neutral and acidic conditions, the average values of Total Phosphorus (TP), including orthophosphates, polyphosphates and organic phosphate, leaching concentration exceed the availability by regulatory (0.5 mg/L) in the whole L/S range, suggesting that the phosphate waste rocks stacked within the XXR watershed should be considered as Type II industry solid wastes. Therefore, the phosphate waste rocks deposited within the study area should be considered as phosphorus point pollution sources, which could threaten the adjacent surface-water environment. PMID:26901468

  10. Aquatic baseline report for the Athabasca, Steepbank and Muskeg Rivers in the vicinity of the Steepbank and Aurora Mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both Suncor Inc., and Syncrude Canada Ltd. plan to expand their operations in the Athabasca oil sands deposit: Suncor in the vicinity of the Steepbank and Athabasca Rivers (Steepbank Mine) and Syncrude in the Muskeg River watershed (Aurora Mine). An aquatic study was conducted in which the current conditions were described with respect to surface water, benthic invertebrates, fish habitat, fish communities and fish health. The study also provided a baseline for future comparisons. River water within the study area was characterized by pHs ranging from 7 to 8, low to moderate dissolved salt concentrations and moderate levels of nutrients. Dissolved organic carbon concentration was high. The major findings in this study were: (1) naturally-occurring hydrocarbons were found in river sediments, but no changes in surface water chemistry were associated with Athabasca oil sands deposits or existing oil sands facilities, (2) benthic invertebrate communities were thriving and showed no indication of negative effects resulting from exposure to naturally-occurring hydrocarbon deposits or existing oil sands developments, (3) fish habitat in the Athabasca River was poor because of the turbid backwaters associated with islands and sandbars, and dynamically shifting sand bottom, (4) high quality habitat was found to exist in the Steepbank and Muskeg Rivers and in some tributaries to these rivers, (5) there were diverse fish communities in the Athabasca, Steepbank and Muskeg River basins, and (6) there was evidence of exposure of fish to naturally-occurring hydrocarbons, however, general indicators suggested that the fish populations were healthy. 112 refs., 100 tabs., 118 figs

  11. Erosion potential from Missoula floods in the Pasco Basin, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localities within the Pasco Basin preserve evidence of Missoula floods. Deposits are 46% sand-sized, 36% gravel-sized, and 18% finer than sand-sized. Mean thickness is 39 meters. High water marks at Wallula Gap require a discharge of approximately 12.5 Mcms. At Sentinel Gap, the slope-area method shows that the high water marks require a discharge of 34.6 Mcms. Since this discharge greatly exceeds any estimated for Missoula floods, there must have been backwater ponding from Wallula Gap. Projecting the slope of the water surface at the upper end of Wallula Gap to the downstream cross section at Gable Mountain leads to a discharge of 9.5 Mcms at Sentinel Gap. The HEC-6 steady state code and four sediment transport equations were applied. Assuming sand-sized particles, DuBoys function estimated 4 to 9 meters of scour. Yang's equation estimated 3 to 4 meters of scour. These are a minimum. A hydrograph synthesized for the boundaries of the Pasco Basin shows the maxima of the flood would occur after 90 h at Sentinel Gap, and at 114 h at Wallula Gap. The 200 areas will remain inundated for four days and six hours. With a quasi-dynamic sediment transport computation, HEC-6 scour estimates range from 0.61 meters to 0.915 meters. This is a minimum amount and erosion is highly variable suggesting reworking of sediment. The Meyer-Peter Meuller equations show less than 1 meter of net scour in the 200 areas. More extensive erosion was achieved during particular time steps of this analysis suggesting that sediment re-working would occur

  12. Why doesn't this HR department get any respect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galford, R

    1998-01-01

    Since becoming managing partner of human resources at Loft Securities more than a year ago, Luke Robinson has tried everything he can think of to change his department's reputation as an administrative backwater. But he's swimming against the tide. Ever since the retirement of a charismatic CEO in 1995, the firm has suffered a slow bleed of good people. The new CEO doesn't have a flair for attracting and retaining talented people, and the HR department hasn't been able to pick up the slack. Robinson has done his best to turn things around. He's met with just about everyone, from senior executives to administrative assistants to external contacts. And, when he found out that recruiting wasn't Loft's only problem, he took a variety of concrete steps. Among other things, he established internal service standards and performance guarantees for his department. He created "listening posts" and implemented and "HR ambassador" program. And he drafted plans for a program to help educate all the company's employees about the role of HR--specifically, how it can contribute to creating and upholding the firm's strategy for success. But Robinson has run over some major speed bumps. Just before he joined the company, HR sullied its reputation by mishandling the investigation of a discrimination charge. And while on Robinson's watch, HR botched the issuance of year-end bonus checks for the managing directors and vice presidents. The frustrations are piling up, leading Robinson to entertain thoughts of bailing out. Five commentators on this fictional case study explain why he should avoid quitting and how he can help his department earn new respect. PMID:10177864

  13. Breeding and mass scale rearing of clownfish Amphiprion percula: feeding and rearing in brackishwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DHANEESH Kottila Veettil; AJITH KUMAR Thipramalai Thankappan; SWAGAT Ghosh; BALASUBRAMANIAN Thangavel

    2012-01-01

    Breeding and mass scale larval rearing of clownfish Amphiprion percula is very limited in brackishwater.We designed an indoor program of A.percula culture in brackishwater with a salinity of 24±1,during which the impacts of feed type,water temperature,and light intensity,on the efficiency of its reproduction,were revealed.The fish were accommodated along with sea anemones in fibre glass tanks to determine the influence of brooder diet on breeding efficiency.Higher reproductive efficiency [number of eggs laid (276±22.3 eggs)] was observed when fish were fed live Acetes sp.rather than clam (204±16.4eggs),trash fish (155±12 eggs) and formulated feed (110±10 eggs).The spawning rate was increased during September and October (water temperature,28.74±0.55℃) on average of 2.4 spawning per month; and low spawning rate was in January (water temperature,24.55±0.45℃) on average of 1 spawning per month.Among three light intensities (100,500,and 900 Ix) set to evaluate larval survival rate,larvae showed the highest survival rate (65.5%) at 900 Ix.The breeding method specifically in brackishwater developed in the present study is a new approach,will help the people from the regions of estuary and backwater to enhance their livelihood and it will lead to reduce the exploitation from the wild habitat.

  14. Reproduction and early-age survival of manatees at Blue Spring, Upper St. Johns River, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Hartley, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    We summarize reproduction of adults and survival of calves and subadult Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) that were identified in winter at Blue Spring on the upper St. Johns River in Florida. Some records span more than 20 years, but most are from 15-year continuous annual observations during winter 1978-79 through winter 1992-93. Fifty-seven, first-year calves were identified; 55 litter sizes were one, and one consisted oftwins (1.79% of all births). Sex ratios of first-year calves did notsignificantly differfrom 1:1. Based on 21 of35 sighted females (15 individuals) that appeared pregnant and returned with calves during the subsequent winter, we estimated an early (neonatal to about 6 months) calf survival of 0.600. Based on estimations with a minimum-number-known-alive method, calf survival from the first to the second winter was at least 0.822, and subadult survival was 0.903 to the third, 0.958 to the fourth, 1.00 to the fifth, and 1.00 to the sixth winters. Seven females were observed from year of birth to their first winter with a nursing calf; the mean age at parturition to the first calf that survived to the next winter was 5.4 + 0.98 (SD) years. The estimated ages at first conception ranged from 3 to 6 years. The proportion of adult pregnant females was 0.410/year. Weaning was not observed in winter. Intervals between births averaged 2.60 + 0.81 years. The pooled proportion of adult females nursing first-winter calves was 0.303; the proportion of adult females nursing calves of any age was 0.407. These values do not significantly differ from those ofmanatees from the Crystal River or Atlantic Coast study areas. Anecdotal accounts are provided that suggested the existence of a pseudo estrus, an 11 to 13-month gestation, suppression of parturition in winter, and giving birth in quiet backwaters and canals. A female from Blue Spring produced at least seven calves during the 22 years since first observed and died giving birth at an estimated

  15. Evaluate the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Habitat, Status Report 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanrahan, T.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-01-08

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Project 2003-038-00, Evaluate the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, began in FY04 (15 December 2003) and continues into FY06. This status report is intended to summarize accomplishments during FY04 and FY05. Accomplishments are summarized by Work Elements, as detailed in the Statement of Work (see BPA's project management database PISCES). This project evaluates the restoration potential of mainstem habitats for fall Chinook salmon. The studies address two research questions: 'Are there sections not currently used by spawning fall Chinook salmon within the impounded lower Snake River that possess the physical characteristics for potentially suitable fall Chinook spawning habitat?' and 'Can hydrosystem operations affecting these sections be adjusted such that the sections closely resemble the physical characteristics of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in similar physical settings?' Efforts are focused at two study sites: (1) the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Columbia River confluence, and (2) the Lower Granite Dam tailrace. Our previous studies indicated that these two areas have the highest potential for restoring Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The study sites will be evaluated under existing structural configurations at the dams (i.e., without partial removal of a dam structure), and alternative operational scenarios (e.g., varying forebay/tailwater elevations). The areas studied represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We are using a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats is the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the

  16. Transport of micropollutants in a riverbank filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driezum, Inge; Oudega, Thomas; Reiner, Philipp; Zessner, Matthias; Farnleitner, Andreas; Blaschke, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater locations at alluvial backwaters are essential for public water supply. Riverbank filtration (RBF) systems are widely used as a means of obtaining public water supplies. Riverbank filtration is an effective way to remove micropollutants from the receiving surface water. The efficiency of the RBF system strongly depends on the residence time of the water in the aquifer and on the soil properties (Ray, 2011). In order to understand all bio- and geochemical processes within the hyporheic zone (e.g. the region were mixing of surface water and groundwater occurs), exchange rates and flow patterns need to be quantified. The main study area covers the porous groundwater aquifer study site (PGWA) - an urban floodplain extending on the left bank of the River Danube downstream of the City of Vienna. It is one of the main groundwater bodies in Austria. Groundwater quality in the PGWA is influenced by a combination of anthropogenic activities, industry, wastewater treatment plants, heavy precipitation events and floodings. The upper layer of the DPA is impermeable, preventing pollution originating from the surface. The upper layer consists of silt. The underlying confined aquifer consists of sand and gravel layers. Hydraulic conductivities range from 5 x 10-2 m/s up to 5 x 10-5 m/s. Underneath the aquifer are alternating sand an clay/silt layers. Samples are taken from two transects in the DPA. These transects consist of four piezometers in the first few meters of the groundwater aquifer. Several other piezometers are placed downstream from the river-groundwater interface. The behaviour of the micropollutants in the hyporheic zone can therefore be studied intensively. The transport behaviour of several micropollutants is modeled using carbamazepine (CBZ) and acesulfame (ACE) as natural tracers. Furthermore, temperature and electrical conductivity data was used for modeling. The micropollutants are measured using an in house developed online SPE-HPLC-MS/MS method

  17. Computing continuous record of discharge with quantified uncertainty using index velocity observations: A probabilistic machine learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Touraj; Hamilton, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs). In general, the index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate and recommended when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage such as backwater and unsteady flow conditions caused by but not limited to the following; stream confluences, streams flowing into lakes or reservoirs, tide-affected streams, regulated streamflows (dams or control structures), or streams affected by meteorological forcing, such as strong prevailing winds. In existing index velocity modeling techniques, two models (ratings) are required; index velocity model and stage-area model. The outputs from each of these models, mean channel velocity (Vm) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. Mean channel velocity (Vm) can generally be determined by a multivariate regression parametric model such as linear regression in the simplest case. The main challenges in the existing index velocity modeling techniques are; 1) Preprocessing and QA/QC of continuous index velocity data and synchronizing them with discharge measurements. 2) Nonlinear relationship between mean velocity and index velocity which is not uncommon at monitoring locations. 3)Model exploration and analysis in order to find the optimal regression model predictor(s) and model type (linear vs nonlinear and if nonlinear number of the parameters). 3) Model changes caused by dynamical changes in the environment (geomorphic, biological) over time 5) Deployment of the final model into the Data Management Systems (DMS) for real-time discharge calculation 6) Objective estimation of uncertainty caused by: field measurement errors; structural uncertainty; parameter uncertainty; and continuous sensor data

  18. The contribution of sea-level rise to flooding in large river catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele-Eich, I.; Hopson, T. M.; Gilleland, E.; Lamarque, J.; Hu, A.; Simmer, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is expected to both impact sea level rise as well as flooding. Our study focuses on the combined effect of climate change on upper catchment precipitation as well as on sea-level rise at the river mouths and the impact this will have on river flooding both at the coast and further upstream. We concentrate on the eight catchments of the Amazonas, Congo, Orinoco, Ganges/Brahmaputra/Meghna, Mississippi, St. Lawrence, Danube and Niger rivers. To assess the impact of climate change, upper catchment precipitation as well as monthly mean thermosteric sea-level rise at the river mouth outflow are taken from the four CCSM4 1° 20th Century ensemble members as well as from six CCSM4 1° ensemble members for the RCP scenarios RCP8.5, 6.0, 4.5 and 2.6. Continuous daily time series for average catchment precipitation and discharge are available for each of the catchments. To arrive at a future discharge time series, we used these observations to develop a simple statistical hydrological model which can be applied to the modelled future upper catchment precipitation values. The analysis of this surrogate discharge time series alone already yields significant changes in flood return levels as well as flood duration. Using the geometry of the river channel, the backwater effect of sea-level rise is incorporated in our analysis of both flood frequencies and magnitudes by calculating the effective additional discharge due to the increase in water level at the river mouth outflow, as well as its tapering impact upstream. By combining these effects, our results focus on the merged impact of changes in extreme precipitation with increases in river height due to sea-level rise at the river mouths. Judging from our preliminary results, the increase in effective discharge due to sea-level rise cannot be neglected when discussing late 21st century flooding in the respective river basins. In particular, we find that especially in countries with low elevation gradient, flood

  19. Discrete Element Modelling of Floating Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Samantha; Liang, Qiuhua; Parkin, Geoff; Large, Andy; Rouainia, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Flash flooding is characterised by high velocity flows which impact vulnerable catchments with little warning time and as such, result in complex flow dynamics which are difficult to replicate through modelling. The impacts of flash flooding can be made yet more severe by the transport of both natural and anthropogenic debris, ranging from tree trunks to vehicles, wheelie bins and even storage containers, the effects of which have been clearly evident during recent UK flooding. This cargo of debris can have wide reaching effects and result in actual flood impacts which diverge from those predicted. A build-up of debris may lead to partial channel blockage and potential flow rerouting through urban centres. Build-up at bridges and river structures also leads to increased hydraulic loading which may result in damage and possible structural failure. Predicting the impacts of debris transport; however, is difficult as conventional hydrodynamic modelling schemes do not intrinsically include floating debris within their calculations. Subsequently a new tool has been developed using an emerging approach, which incorporates debris transport through the coupling of two existing modelling techniques. A 1D hydrodynamic modelling scheme has here been coupled with a 2D discrete element scheme to form a new modelling tool which predicts the motion and flow-interaction of floating debris. Hydraulic forces arising from flow around the object are applied to instigate its motion. Likewise, an equivalent opposing force is applied to fluid cells, enabling backwater effects to be simulated. Shock capturing capabilities make the tool applicable to predicting the complex flow dynamics associated with flash flooding. The modelling scheme has been applied to experimental case studies where cylindrical wooden dowels are transported by a dam-break wave. These case studies enable validation of the tool's shock capturing capabilities and the coupling technique applied between the two numerical

  20. Sediment pore-water interactions associated with arsenic and uranium transport from the North Cave Hills mining region, South Dakota, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extent of historical U mining impacts is well documented for the North Cave Hills region of Harding County, South Dakota, USA. While previous studies reported watershed sediment and surface water As and U concentrations up to 90× established background concentrations, it was unclear whether or how localized changes in sediment redox behavior may influence contaminant remobilization. Five pore-water equilibration samplers (peepers) were spatially and temporally deployed within the study area to evaluate seasonal solid–liquid As and U distributions as a function of sediment depth. Pore-water and solid phase As and U concentrations, Fe speciation, Eh and pH were measured to ascertain specific geochemical conditions responsible for As and U remobilization and transport behavior. At a mine overburden sedimentation pond adjacent to the mine sites, high total aqueous As and U concentrations (4920 and 674 μg/L, respectively) were found within surface water during summer sampling; however pond dredging prior to autumn sampling resulted in significantly lower aqueous As and U concentrations (579 and 108 μg/L, respectively); however, both As and U still exceeded regional background concentrations (20 and 18 μg/L, respectively). At a wetlands-dominated deposition zone approximately 2 km downstream of the sedimentation pond, pore-water geochemical conditions varied seasonally. Summer conditions promoted reducing conditions in pore water, resulting in active release of As(III) to the water column. Autumn conditions promoted oxidizing conditions, decreasing pore-water As (Aspw) 5× and increasing Upw 10×. Peak U pore-water concentrations (781 μg/L) were 3.5× greater than determined for the surface water (226 μg/L), and approximately 40× background concentrations. At the Bowman–Haley reservoir backwaters 45 km downstream from the mine sites, As and U pore-water concentrations increased significantly between the summer and autumn deployments, attributed to

  1. Natural radioactivity content in soil and indoor air of Chellanam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contribution of terrestrial radiation due to the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil and air constitutes a significant component of the background radiation exposure to the population. The concentrations of natural radionuclides in the soil and indoor air of Chellanam were investigated with an aim of evaluating the environmental radioactivity level and radiation hazard to the population. Chellanam is in the suburbs of Cochin, with the Arabian Sea in the west and the Cochin backwaters in the east. Chellanam is situated at ∼25 km from the sites of these factories. The data obtained serve as a reference in documenting changes to the environmental radioactivity due to technical activities. Soil samples were collected from 30 locations of the study area. The activity concentrations of 232Th, 238U and 40K in the samples were analysed using gamma spectrometry. The gamma dose rates were calculated using conversion factors recommended by UNSCEAR [United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. UNSCEAR (2000)]. The ambient radiation exposure rates measured in the area ranged from 74 to 195 nGy h-1 with a mean value of 131 nGy h-1.The significant radionuclides being 232Th, 238U and 40K, their activities were used to arrive at the absorbed gamma dose rate with a mean value of 131 nGy h-1 and the radium equivalent activity with a mean value of 162 Bq kg-1. The radon progeny levels varied from 0.21 to 1.4 mWL with a mean value of 0.6 mWL. The thoron progeny varied from 0.34 to 2.9 mWL with a mean value of 0.85 mWL. The ratio between thoron and radon progenies varied from 1.4 to 2.3 with a mean of 1.6. The details of the study, analysis and results are discussed. (authors)

  2. Morphological changes of Gumara River channel over 50 years, upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Mengiste; Nyssen, Jan; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Moges, Michael M.; Tilahun, Seifu A.; Enku, Temesgen; Adgo, Enyew

    2015-06-01

    In response to anthropogenic disturbances, alluvial rivers adjust their geometry. The alluvial river channels in the upper Blue Nile basin have been disturbed by human-induced factors since a longtime. This paper examines channel adjustment along a 38-km stretch of the Gumara River which drains towards Lake Tana and then to the Blue Nile. Over a 50 years period, agriculture developed rapidly in the catchment and flooding of the alluvial plain has become more frequent in recent times. The objectives of this study were to document the changes in channel planform and cross-section of the Gumara River and to investigate whether the changes could have contributed to the frequent flooding or vice versa. Two sets of aerial photographs (1957 and 1980) were scanned, and then orthorectified. Recent channel planform information was extracted from SPOT images of 2006 and Google Earth. Channel planform and bed morphology (vertical changes) were determined for these nearly 50 years period. The vertical changes were determined based on aggradation along a permanent structure, historic information on river cross-sections at a hydrological gauging station, and field observations. The results indicate that the lower reach of Gumara near its mouth has undergone major planform changes. A delta with approx. 1.12 km2 of emerged land was created between 1957 and 1980 and an additional 1 km2 of land has been added between 1980 and 2006. The sinuosity of the river changed only slightly: negatively (-1.1% i.e. meandering decreased) for the period from 1957 to 1980 and positively (+3.0%) for the period 1980-2006. Comparison of cross-sections at the hydrological gauging station showed that the deepest point in the river bed aggraded by 2.91 m for the period 1963-2009. The importance of sediment deposition in the stream and on its banks is related to land degradation in the upper catchment, and to artificial rising of Lake Tana level that creates a backwater effect and sediment deposition in

  3. Surface and sub-surface anatomy of the landscape: integrating Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Structure from Motion (UAV-SfM) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GRP) to investigate sedimentary features in the field. - an example from NW Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callow, Nik; Leopold, Matthias; May, Simon Matthias

    2015-04-01

    implications of this feature for reconstructing the paleotempestology of the Australia NW coast. This has allowed insight into the backwater heights associated with the depositional environment of the contemporary fan, areas of the fan surface in preferential connection to the wash-up channel and the relationship between topography and vegetation and GPR transects that has allowed for targeting of Field trenches and OSL dating.

  4. Study of Chironomidae Natural Populations of the Former Semipalatinsk Test Site Water Bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The open water bodies as a component of the biosphere serve as the accumulators of artificial radionuclides generated during the nuclear explosions; therefore their radioactive contamination needs to be registered. The assessment of the environmental radioactive contamination consequences for the natural populations of organisms living in water bodies is of particular importance. Chironomini (Diptera, Chironomidae) play an important role as they are a significant component of water and air biocenoses and provide the self-cleaning of water bodies and food chains of industrial fish and bird. Chironomini have been chosen to be a model for the UNESCO International Program titled 'Man and Biosphere' and are used as the biologic indicator for ecological studies of anthropogenic influence on water bodies. The study of Chironomini natural mutagenic process and its alteration due to the radioactive contamination of water bodies is of extreme scientific interest and can serve as the indicator of the scale of genetic damage of water organisms. This work presents the data on natural populations of Chironomini of former STS water bodies: Shagan Lake, Balapan Lake, the artificial water body on the Karazhyra Coal Field, the backwater near the Shagan River, Balykty col Lake, etc. The analysis of morphology and caryotype of Camptochironomus sp. S (S - larvae have been sampled from the Semipalatinsk Test Site) showed that this is a new species as compared to studied species (C. tentans, C. pallidivittatus) of Camptochironomus subfamily. The caryotype Camptochironomus sp. S differs sharply from the caryotypes of other Camptochironomus species due to its strong hetero chromatization of centromeric discs. The immediate molecular analysis of genome DNA of Camptochironomus sp. S larvae sampled from Shagan Lake was performed: the total DNA of larvae of this species was obtained, nucleonic sequences of genes of cytochrome B (Cyt B) and cytochrome I (COI) were determined using methods of

  5. Evaluation of alternative macroinvertebrate sampling techniques for use in a new tropical freshwater bioassessment scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Eleanor Moore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aimed to determine the effectiveness of benthic macroinvertebrate dredge net sampling procedures as an alternative method to kick net sampling in tropical freshwater systems, specifically as an evaluation of sampling methods used in the Zambian Invertebrate Scoring System (ZISS river bioassessment scheme. Tropical freshwater ecosystems are sometimes dangerous or inaccessible to sampling teams using traditional kick-sampling methods, so identifying an alternative procedure that produces similar results is necessary in order to collect data from a wide variety of habitats.MethodsBoth kick and dredge nets were used to collect macroinvertebrate samples at 16 riverine sites in Zambia, ranging from backwaters and floodplain lagoons to fast flowing streams and rivers. The data were used to calculate ZISS, diversity (S: number of taxa present, and Average Score Per Taxon (ASPT scores per site, using the two sampling methods to compare their sampling effectiveness. Environmental parameters, namely pH, conductivity, underwater photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, temperature, alkalinity, flow, and altitude, were also recorded and used in statistical analysis. Invertebrate communities present at the sample sites were determined using multivariate procedures.ResultsAnalysis of the invertebrate community and environmental data suggested that the testing exercise was undertaken in four distinct macroinvertebrate community types, supporting at least two quite different macroinvertebrate assemblages, and showing significant differences in habitat conditions. Significant correlations were found for all three bioassessment score variables between results acquired using the two methods, with dredge-sampling normally producing lower scores than did the kick net procedures. Linear regression models were produced in order to correct each biological variable score collected by a dredge net to a score similar to that of one collected by kick net

  6. Flood of June 22-24, 2006, in North-Central Ohio, With Emphasis on the Cuyahoga River Near Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James M.; Ebner, Andrew D.; Koltun, G.F.; Astifan, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    Heavy rains caused severe flooding on June 22-24, 2006, and damaged approximately 4,580 homes and 48 businesses in Cuyahoga County. Damage estimates in Cuyahoga County for the two days of flooding exceed $47 million; statewide damage estimates exceed $150 million. Six counties (Cuyahoga, Erie, Huron, Lucas, Sandusky, and Stark) in northeast Ohio were declared Federal disaster areas. One death, in Lorain County, was attributed to the flooding. The peak streamflow of 25,400 cubic feet per second and corresponding peak gage height of 23.29 feet were the highest recorded at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging station Cuyahoga River at Independence (04208000) since the gaging station began operation in 1922, exceeding the previous peak streamflow of 24,800 cubic feet per second that occurred on January 22, 1959. An indirect calculation of the peak streamflow was made by use of a step-backwater model because all roads leading to the gaging station were inundated during the flood and field crews could not reach the station to make a direct measurement. Because of a statistically significant and persistent positive trend in the annual-peak-streamflow time series for the Cuyahoga River at Independence, a method was developed and applied to detrend the annual-peak-streamflow time series prior to the traditional log-Pearson Type III flood-frequency analysis. Based on this analysis, the recurrence interval of the computed peak streamflow was estimated to be slightly less than 100 years. Peak-gage-height data, peak-streamflow data, and recurrence-interval estimates for the June 22-24, 2006, flood are tabulated for the Cuyahoga River at Independence and 10 other USGS gaging stations in north-central Ohio. Because flooding along the Cuyahoga River near Independence and Valley View was particularly severe, a study was done to document the peak water-surface profile during the flood from approximately 2 miles downstream from the USGS streamflow-gaging station at

  7. Distribution of pesticides, PAHs, PCBs, and bioavailable metals in depositional sediments of the lower Missouri River, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, K.R.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Orazio, C.E.; May, T.W.; Poulton, B.C.; Peterman, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    The lower Missouri River was studied to determine the distribution of selected persistent organic pollutants and bioavailable metals in depositional sediments. Nineteen sites between Omaha, Nebraska and Jefferson City, Missouri were sampled. This stretch of the river receives point-source and non-point-source inputs from industrial, urban, and agricultural activities. As part of an ecological assessment of the river, concentrations of 29 legacy organochlorine pesticides (OC pesticides), including chlordanes, DDTs, and hexachlorocyclohexanes; a select list of current-use pesticides, including trifluralin, diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and permethrin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), divalent metals (copper, nickel, zinc, cadmium, and lead), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were determined. Concentrations (dry weight basis) of OC pesticides in the sediments were less than 1 ng/g, with the exception of the backwater sediment collected from the mouth of the Blue River in the Kansas City metropolitan area, which contained up to 20 ng/g total chlordane, 8.1 ng/g p,p???-DDE, 1.5 ng/g lindane, 4.8 ng/g dieldrin, and 3 ng/g endrin. Concentrations of chlorpyrifos and permethrin ranged from less than 1 ng/g to 5.5 ng/g and 44 ng/g, respectively. Concentrations of PCBs ranged from less than 11 ng/g to 250 ng/g, with the Blue River and Sibley sediments containing 100 and 250 ng/g total PCBs, respectively. Concentrations of total PAHs at 17 of the 19 sites ranged from 250 to 700 ng/g, whereas the Riverfront and Blue River sites in Kansas City contained 1100 ng/g and nearly 4000 ng/g, respectively. Concentrations of the metals did not vary significantly among most sites; however, the Blue River site contained elevated concentrations of zinc (104 ??g/g), cadmium (0.7 ??g/g), and lead (34 ??g/g) compared to the other sites. The moderately high concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide in the sediments suggest a low potential for metal

  8. An expanded model: flood-inundation maps for the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Mississippi, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.8-mile reach of the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Mississippi (Miss.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Hattiesburg, City of Petal, Forrest County, Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, Mississippi Department of Homeland Security, and the Emergency Management District. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Miss. (station no. 02473000). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation by use of USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Miss. streamgage (02473000) and documented high-water marks from recent and historical floods. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1.0-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS

  9. Flood-inundation maps for the White River at Newberry, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Kim, Moon H.; Menke, Chad D.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.9-mile reach of the White River at Newberry, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03360500, White River at Newberry, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03360500). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs at the Newberry streamgage. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the White River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at USGS streamgage 03360500, White River at Newberry, Ind., and high-water marks from a flood in June 2008.The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 22 water-surface profiles for flood stages a1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The availability of these maps, along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage at Newberry, Ind., and forecasted stream stages from the NWS, provide emergency management personnel and

  10. Flood-inundation maps for the Saddle River in Ho-Ho-Kus Borough, the Village of Ridgewood, and Paramus Borough, New Jersey, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kara M.; Niemoczynski, Michal J.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.4-mile reach of the Saddle River in New Jersey from Hollywood Avenue in Ho-Ho-Kus Borough downstream through the Village of Ridgewood and Paramus Borough to the confluence with Hohokus Brook in the Village of Ridgewood were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Saddle River at Ridgewood, New Jersey (station 01390500). Current conditions for estimating near real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?site_no=01390500 or at the National Weather Services (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) at http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?wfo=okx&gage=rwdn4. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation (March 11, 2011) at the USGS streamgage 01390500, Saddle River at Ridgewood, New Jersey. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 10 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum, North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88), and ranging from 5 ft, the NWS “action and minor flood stage”, to 14 ft, which is the maximum extent of the stage-discharge rating and 0.6 ft higher than the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system 3-meter (9.84-ft) digital elevation model derived from Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) data in order to delineate the area flooded

  11. Flood-inundation maps for a nine-mile reach of the Des Plaines River from Riverwoods to Mettawa, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Soong, David T.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 9-mile reach of the Des Plaines River from Riverwoods to Mettawa, Illinois, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Lake County Stormwater Management Commission and the Villages of Lincolnshire and Riverwoods. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (gage heights) at the USGS streamgage at Des Plaines River at Lincolnshire, Illinois (station no. 05528100). Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?05528100. In addition, this streamgage is incorporated into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/) by the National Weather Service (NWS). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often co-located at USGS streamgages. The NWS forecasted peak-stage information, also shown on the Des Plaines River at Lincolnshire inundation Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was then used to determine seven water-surface profiles for flood stages at roughly 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from the 50- to 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flows. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System (GIS) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) (derived from Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. These maps, along with information on the Internet regarding current gage height from USGS streamgages and forecasted stream stages from

  12. Flood-inundation maps for the Mississinewa River at Marion, Indiana, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 9-mile (mi) reach of the Mississinewa River from 0.75 mi upstream from the Pennsylvania Street bridge in Marion, Indiana, to 0.2 mi downstream from State Route 15 were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Mississinewa River at Marion (station number 03326500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site. Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relation at the Mississinewa River streamgage, in combination with water-surface profiles from historic floods and from the current (2002) flood-insurance study for Grant County, Indiana. The hydraulic model was then used to compute seven water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-fo (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 10 ft, which is near bankfull, to 16 ft, which is between the water levels associated with the estimated 10- and 2-percent annual exceedance probability floods (floods with recurrence interval between 10 and 50 years) and equals the “major flood stage” as defined by the NWS. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data having a 0.98 ft vertical accuracy and 4.9 ft

  13. Flood-inundation maps for the Saddle River from Rochelle Park to Lodi, New Jersey, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Heidi L.; Watson, Kara M.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 2.75-mile reach of the Saddle River from 0.2 mile upstream from the Interstate 80 bridge in Rochelle Park to 1.5 miles downstream from the U.S. Route 46 bridge in Lodi, New Jersey, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Saddle River at Lodi, New Jersey (station 01391500). Current conditions for estimating near real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?site_no=01391500. The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Saddle River at Lodi, New Jersey streamgage and documented high-water marks from recent floods. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 11 water-surface profiles for flood stages at the Saddle River streamgage at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum, North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88), and ranging from bankfull, 0.5 ft below NWS Action Stage, to the extent of the stage-discharge rating, which is approximately 1 ft higher than the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. Action Stage is the stage which when reached by a rising stream the NWS or a partner needs to take some type of mitigation action in

  14. Flood-inundation maps for the West Branch Susquehanna River near the Boroughs of Lewisburg and Milton, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Mark A.; Hoffman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximate 8-mile reach of the West Branch Susquehanna River from approximately 2 miles downstream from the Borough of Lewisburg, extending upstream to approximately 1 mile upstream from the Borough of Milton, Pennsylvania, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict the estimated areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa. In addition, the information has been provided to the Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC) for incorporation into their Susquehanna Inundation Map Viewer (SIMV) flood warning system (http://maps.srbc.net/simv/). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasted peak-stage information (http://water.weather.gov/ahps) for USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa., may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. Calibration of the model was achieved using the most current stage-discharge relations (rating number 11.1) at USGS streamgage 01553500, West Branch Susquehanna River at Lewisburg, Pa., a documented water-surface profile from the December 2, 2010, flood, and recorded peak stage data. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 26 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 14 feet (ft) to 39 ft. Modeled flood stages, as defined by NWS, include Action Stage, 14 ft; Flood Stage, 18 ft; Moderate Flood Stage, 23 ft; and Major Flood Stage, 28 ft. Geographic information system (GIS) technology

  15. Flood-inundation maps for the Iroquois River at Rensselaer, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Bunch, Aubrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.0-mile reach of the Iroquois River at Rensselaer, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 05522500, Iroquois River at Rensselaer, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=05522500). In addition, the National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs at the Rensselaer streamgage. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/), may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the Iroquois River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current (June 27, 2012) stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 05522500, Iroquois River at Rensselaer, Ind., and high-water marks from the flood of July 2003. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The availability of these maps, along with Internet information regarding

  16. Flood-inundation maps for the DuPage River from Plainfield to Shorewood, Illinois, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 15.5-mi reach of the DuPage River from Plainfield to Shorewood, Illinois, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Will County Stormwater Management Planning Committee. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (gage heights or stages) at the USGS streamgage at DuPage River at Shorewood, Illinois (sta. no. 05540500). Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?05540500. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. The NWS-forecasted peak-stage information, also shown on the DuPage River at Shorewood inundation Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was then used to determine nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from NWS Action stage of 6 ft to the historic crest of 14.0 ft. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) (derived from Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data) by using a Geographic Information System (GIS) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. These maps, along with information on the Internet regarding current gage height from USGS streamgages and forecasted stream stages from the NWS, provide emergency

  17. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Nacaome, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, M.C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Nacaome that would be inundated by 50-year floods on Rio Nacaome, Rio Grande, and Rio Guacirope. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Nacaome as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for 50-year-floods on Rio Nacaome, Rio Grande, and Rio Guacirope at Nacaome were computed using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area and ground surveys at two bridges. The estimated 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Nacaome at Nacaome, 5,040 cubic meters per second, was computed as the drainage-area-adjusted weighted average of two independently estimated 50-year-flood discharges for the gaging station Rio Nacaome en Las Mercedes, located about 13 kilometers upstream from Nacaome. One of the discharges, 4,549 cubic meters per second, was estimated from a frequency analysis of the 16 years of peak-discharge record for the gage, and the other, 1,922 cubic meters per second, was estimated from a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The weighted-average of the two discharges is 3,770 cubic meters per second. The 50-year-flood discharges for Rio Grande, 3,890 cubic meters per

  18. Flood-inundation maps for Suwanee Creek from the confluence of Ivy Creek to the Noblin Ridge Drive bridge, Gwinnett County, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.9-mile reach of Suwanee Creek, from the confluence of Ivy Creek to the Noblin Ridge Drive bridge, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Gwinnett County, Georgia. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Suwanee Creek at Suwanee, Georgia (02334885). Current stage at this USGS streamgage may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ and can be used in conjunction with these maps to estimate near real-time areas of inundation. The National Weather Service (NWS) is incorporating results from this study into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that commonly are collocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information for the USGS streamgage at Suwanee Creek at Suwanee (02334885), available through the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. A one-dimensional step-backwater model was developed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC-RAS software for Suwanee Creek and was used to compute flood profiles for a 6.9-mile reach of the creek. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Suwanee Creek at Suwanee streamgage (02334885). The hydraulic model was then used to determine 19 water-surface profiles for flood stages at the Suwanee Creek streamgage at 0.5-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage. The profiles ranged from just above bankfull stage (7.0 feet) to approximately 1.7 feet above the highest recorded water level at the streamgage (16.0 feet). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined

  19. Flood-inundation maps for the Wabash River at Terre Haute, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.3-mi reach of the Wabash River from 0.1 mi downstream of the Interstate 70 bridge to 1.1 miles upstream of the Route 63 bridge, Terre Haute, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to select water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage Wabash River at Terre Haute (station number 03341500). Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv/?site_no=03341500&agency_cd=USGS&p"). In addition, the same data are provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps//). Within this system, the NWS forecasts flood hydrographs for the Wabash River at Terre Haute that may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Wabash River at the Terre Haute streamgage. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 22 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft interval referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bank-full to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data having a 0.37-ft vertical accuracy and a 1.02-ft horizontal accuracy) to delineate the area flooded at each water

  20. Flood-inundation maps for a 9.1-mile reach of the Coast Fork Willamette River near Creswell and Goshen, Lane County, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Glen W.; Haluska, Tana L.

    2016-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 9.1-mile reach of the Coast Fork Willamette River near Creswell and Goshen, Oregon, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected stages at the USGS streamgage at Coast Fork Willamette River near Goshen, Oregon (14157500), at State Highway 58. Current stage at the streamgage for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/or/nwis/uv/?site_no=14157500&PARAmeter_cd=00065,00060. In addition, the National Weather Service (NWS) forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.In this study, areas of inundation were provided by USACE. The inundated areas were developed from flood profiles simulated by a one-dimensional unsteady step‑backwater hydraulic model. The profiles were checked by the USACE using documented high-water marks from a January 2006 flood. The model was compared and quality assured using several other methods. The hydraulic model was then used to determine eight water-surface profiles at various flood stages referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 11.8 to 19.8 ft, approximately 2.6 ft above the highest recorded stage at the streamgage (17.17 ft) since 1950. The intervals between stages are variable and based on annual exceedance probability discharges, some of which approximate NWS action stages.The areas of inundation and water depth grids provided to USGS by USACE were used to create interactive flood‑inundation maps. The availability of these maps with current stage from USGS streamgage and forecasted stream stages from the NWS provide emergency management

  1. Flood-inundation maps for the White River at Spencer, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.3-mile reach of the White River at Spencer, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage White River at Spencer, Indiana (sta. no. 03357000). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. National Weather Service (NWS)-forecasted peak-stage inforamation may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the White River at Spencer, Indiana, streamgage and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 8, 2008. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from the NWS action stage (9 feet) to the highest rated stage (28 feet) at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The availability of these maps along with Internet information regarding the current stage from the Spencer USGS streamgage and forecasted stream stages from the NWS will provide emergency management personnel and residents with information that is critical for flood response activities, such as evacuations and road

  2. Flood-inundation maps for a 6.5-mile reach of the Kentucky River at Frankfort, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lant, Jeremiah G.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.5-mile reach of Kentucky River at Frankfort, Kentucky, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Frankfort Office of Emergency Management. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage Kentucky River at Lock 4 at Frankfort, Kentucky (station no. 03287500). Current conditions for the USGS streamgage may be obtained online at the USGS National Water Information System site (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/inventory?agency_code=USGS&site_no=03287500). In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the Kentucky River reach by using HEC–RAS, a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current (2013) stage-discharge relation for the Kentucky River at Lock 4 at Frankfort, Kentucky, in combination with streamgage and high-water-mark measurements collected for a flood event in May 2010. The calibrated model was then used to calculate 26 water-surface profiles for a sequence of flood stages, at 1-foot intervals, referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from a stage near bankfull to the elevation that breached the levees protecting the City of Frankfort. To delineate the flooded area at

  3. Flood-inundation maps for the Driftwood River and Sugar Creek near Edinburgh, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Kim, Moon H.; Menke, Chad D.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 11.2 mile reach of the Driftwood River and a 5.2 mile reach of Sugar Creek, both near Edinburgh, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, Edinburgh, Indiana. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage in Indiana may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/current/?type=flow. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/. The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated at USGS streamgages. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to determine elevations throughout the study reaches for nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to nearly the highest recorded water level at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geospatial digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to

  4. Development of flood-inundation maps for the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Christiana R.; Fallon, James D.; Lewis, Corby R.; Cooper, Diane F.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.3-mile reach of the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minnesota, were developed through a multi-agency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and in collaboration with the National Weather Service. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ and the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service site at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/inundation.php, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage at the Mississippi River at Saint Paul (05331000). The National Weather Service forecasted peak-stage information at the streamgage may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the Mississippi River by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the most recent stage-discharge relation at the Robert Street location (rating curve number 38.0) of the Mississippi River at Saint Paul (streamgage 05331000), as well as an approximate water-surface elevation-discharge relation at the Mississippi River at South Saint Paul (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers streamgage SSPM5). The model also was verified against observed high-water marks from the recent 2011 flood event and the water-surface profile from existing flood insurance studies. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 25 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals ranging from approximately bankfull stage to greater than the highest recorded stage at streamgage 05331000. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model, derived from high-resolution topography

  5. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.4-mile reach of the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana, from where the Flatrock and Driftwood Rivers combine to make up East Fork White River to just upstream of the confluence of Clifty Creek with the East Fork White River, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03364000, East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv/?site_no=03364000&agency_cd=USGS&). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs for the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana at their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system Website (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/), that may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at USGS streamgage 03364000, East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data), having a 0.37-ft vertical accuracy and a 1.02 ft

  6. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Comayagua, Hondura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Comayagua that would be inundated by 50-year floods on Rio Humuya and Rio Majada. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Comayagua as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for 50-year-floods on Rio Humuya and Rio Majada at Comayagua were estimated using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area. The 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Humuya at Comayagua, 1,400 cubic meters per second, was estimated using a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The reasonableness of the regression discharge was evaluated by comparing it with drainage-area-adjusted 50-year-flood discharges estimated for three long-term Rio Humuya stream-gaging stations. The drainage-area-adjusted 50-year-flood discharges estimated from the gage records ranged from 946 to 1,365 cubic meters per second. Because the regression equation discharge agrees closely with the high end of the range of discharges estimated from the gaging-station records, it was used for the hydraulic modeling to ensure that the resulting 50-year-flood water-surface elevations would not be underestimated. The 50-year

  7. Flood-inundation maps for the Tippecanoe River near Delphi, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Chad D.; Bunch, Aubrey R.; Kim, Moon H.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 11-mile reach of the Tippecanoe River that extends from County Road W725N to State Road 18 below Oakdale Dam, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03333050, Tippecanoe River near Delphi, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgages in Indiana may be obtained online at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/current/?type=flow. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often co-located at USGS streamgages. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, water-surface profiles were simulated for the stream reach by means of a hydraulic one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at USGS streamgage 03333050, Tippecanoe River near Delphi, Ind., and USGS streamgage 03332605, Tippecanoe River below Oakdale Dam, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to simulate 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals reference to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the

  8. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for La Lima, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of the 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of La Lima that would be inundated by Rio Chamelecon with a discharge of 500 cubic meters per second, the approximate capacity of the river channel through the city of La Lima. The 50-year flood (2,400 cubic meters per second), the original design flow to be mapped, would inundate the entire area surveyed for this municipality. Because water-surface elevations of the 50-year flood could not be mapped properly without substantially expanding the area of the survey, the available data were used instead to estimate the channel capacity of Rio Chamelecon in La Lima by trial-and-error runs of different flows in a numerical model and to estimate the increase in height of levees needed to contain flows of 1,000 and 2,400 cubic meters per second. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of La Lima as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for various discharges on Rio Chamelecon at La Lima were determined using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area and ground surveys at three bridges. Top-of-levee or top-of-channel-bank elevations and locations at the cross sections were critical to estimating the channel capacity of Rio Chamelecon

  9. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Choluteca, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, Mark C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Choluteca that would be inundated by 50-year floods on Rio Choluteca and Rio Iztoca. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Choluteca as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for 50-year-floods on Rio Choluteca and Rio Iztoca at Choluteca were estimated using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area. The estimated 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Choluteca at Choluteca is 4,620 cubic meters per second, which is the drainage-area-adjusted weighted-average of two independently estimated 50-year-flood discharges for the gaging station Rio Choluteca en Puente Choluteca. One discharge, 4,913 cubic meters per second, was estimated from a frequency analysis of the 17 years of peak discharge record for the gage, and the other, 2,650 cubic meters per second, was estimated from a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The weighted-average of the two discharges at the gage is 4,530 cubic meters per second. The 50-year-flood discharge for the study area reach of Rio Choluteca was estimated by multiplying the weighted discharge at the gage by the ratio of the drainage

  10. Flood-inundation maps for the West Branch Delaware River, Delhi, New York, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, William F.; Breaker, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5-mile reach of the West Branch Delaware River through the Village and part of the Town of Delhi, New York, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Village of Delhi, the Delaware County Soil and Water Conservation District, and the Delaware County Planning Department. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ and the Federal Flood Inundation Mapper Web site at http://wim.usgs.gov/FIMI/FloodInundationMapper.html, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) referenced to the USGS streamgage at West Branch Delaware River upstream from Delhi, N.Y. (station number 01421900). In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model that had been used to produce the flood insurance rate maps for the most recent flood insurance study for the Town and Village of Delhi. This hydraulic model was used to compute 10 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 7 ft or near bankfull to 16 ft, which exceeds the stages that correspond to both the estimated 0.2-percent annual-exceedance-probability flood (500-year recurrence interval flood) and the maximum recorded peak flow. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model, which was derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data with a 1.2-ft (0.61-ft root mean squared error) vertical accuracy and 3.3-ft (1-meter) horizontal resolution, to delineate the area flooded at each water level. A map that was produced using this method to delineate the inundated area for the flood that occurred on August 28, 2011, agreed well with highwater marks that had been located in the field using a

  11. Fifty-year flood-inundation maps for Juticalpa, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresch, David L.; Mastin, M.C.; Olsen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    After the devastating floods caused by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, maps of the areas and depths of 50-year-flood inundation at 15 municipalities in Honduras were prepared as a tool for agencies involved in reconstruction and planning. This report, which is one in a series of 15, presents maps of areas in the municipality of Juticalpa that would be inundated by a 50-year flood of Rio Juticalpa. Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages of the flood inundation are available on a computer in the municipality of Juticalpa as part of the Municipal GIS project and on the Internet at the Flood Hazard Mapping Web page (http://mitchnts1.cr.usgs.gov/projects/floodhazard.html). These coverages allow users to view the flood inundation in much more detail than is possible using the maps in this report. Water-surface elevations for a 50-year-flood on Rio Juticalpa at Juticalpa were estimated using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional, steady-flow, step-backwater computer program. The channel and floodplain cross sections used in HEC-RAS were developed from an airborne light-detection-and-ranging (LIDAR) topographic survey of the area. The estimated 50-year-flood discharge for Rio Juticalpa at Juticalpa, 1,360 cubic meters per second, was computed as the drainage-area-adjusted weighted average of two independently estimated 50-year-flood discharges for the gaging station Rio Juticalpa en El Torito, located about 2 kilometers upstream from Juticalpa. One discharge, 1,551 cubic meters per second, was estimated from a frequency analysis of the 33 years of peak-discharge record for the gage, and the other, 486 cubic meters per second, was estimated from a regression equation that relates the 50-year-flood discharge to drainage area and mean annual precipitation. The weighted-average of the two discharges at the gage is 1,310 cubic meters per second. The 50-year flood discharge for the study area reach of Rio Juticalpa was estimated by multiplying the weighted discharge at the gage by the

  12. Flood-inundation maps for the Elkhart River at Goshen, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Kellan R.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs, created digital flood-inundation maps for an 8.3-mile reach of the Elkhart River at Goshen, Indiana, extending from downstream of the Goshen Dam to downstream from County Road 17. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to nine selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Elkhart River at Goshen (station number 04100500). Current conditions for the USGS streamgages in Indiana may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, stream stage data have been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Elkhart River at Goshen streamgage. The hydraulic model was then used to compute nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from approximately bankfull (5 ft) to greater than the highest recorded water level (13 ft). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital-elevation model (DEM), derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data having a 0.37-ft vertical accuracy and 3.9-ft horizontal resolution in order to delineate the area flooded at each

  13. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2015-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  14. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 1.8-mile reach of the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana (Ind.) were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selectedwater levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03371500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind., and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 2008. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from

  15. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.9-mile reach of the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. (USGS station number 03373500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS AHPS site SHLI3). NWS AHPS forecast peak stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.Flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relation (USGS rating no. 43.0) at USGS streamgage 03373500, East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute 26 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from approximately bankfull (10 ft) to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve (35 ft). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM), derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data, to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The areal extent of the 24-ft flood-inundation map was

  16. Flood-inundation maps for the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon H.; Johnson, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a reach of the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 04100222, North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=04100222. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS AHPS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind. NWS AHPS-forecast peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the North Branch Elkhart River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 04100222, North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind., and preliminary high-water marks from the flood of March 1982. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine four water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS

  17. Flood-inundation maps for an 8.9-mile reach of the South Fork Little River at Hopkinsville, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lant, Jeremiah G.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 8.9-mile reach of South Fork Little River at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Hopkinsville Community Development Services. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at South Fork Little River at Highway 68 By-Pass at Hopkinsville, Kentucky (station no. 03437495). Current conditions for the USGS streamgage may be obtained online at the USGS National Water Information System site (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/inventory?agency_code=USGS&site_no=03437495). In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often co-located at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the South Fork Little River reach by using HEC-RAS, a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current (2012) stage-discharge relation at the South Fork Little River at Highway 68 By-Pass at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, streamgage and measurements collected during recent flood events. The calibrated model was then used to calculate 13 water-surface profiles for a sequence of flood stages, most at 1-foot intervals, referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from a stage near bank full to the estimated elevation of the 1.0-percent annual exceedance

  18. Flood-inundation maps for the Flatrock River at Columbus, Indiana, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5-mile reach of the Flatrock River on the western side of Columbus, Indiana, from County Road 400N to the river mouth at the confluence with Driftwood River, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ and the Federal Flood Inundation Mapper Web site at http://wim.usgs.gov/FIMI/FloodInundationMapper.html, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Flatrock River at Columbus (station number 03363900). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service, which also presents the USGS data, at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/. Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Flatrock River streamgage, high-water marks that were surveyed following the flood of June 7, 2008, and water-surface profiles from the current flood-insurance study for the City of Columbus. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 12 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 9 ft or near bankfull to 20 ft, which exceeds the stages that correspond to both the estimated 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood (500-year recurrence interval flood) and the maximum recorded peak flow. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data having a 0.37 ft

  19. Flood-inundation maps for the St. Marys River at Fort Wayne, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Chad D.; Kim, Moon H.; Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 9-mile reach of the St. Marys River that extends from South Anthony Boulevard to Main Street at Fort Wayne, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Fort Wayne. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 04182000 St. Marys River near Fort Wayne, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgages in Indiana may be obtained from the National Water Information System: Web Interface. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system. The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated at USGS streamgages. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, water-surface profiles were simulated for the stream reach by means of a hydraulic one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relation at the USGS streamgage 04182000 St. Marys River near Fort Wayne, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to simulate 11 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. A flood inundation map was generated for each water-surface profile stage (11 maps in all) so that for any given flood stage users will be

  20. Regeneration of Native Trees and Wetlands: Results of an Unplanned, Twenty Year Experiment in the Colorado River Delta, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.

    2007-05-01

    Historically, cottonwood and willow trees were common on the Lower Colorado River, although quantitative estimates of their former abundance are not available. During the past hundred years, dams and flow regulation have altered the riparian habitat to favor dominance by exotic saltcedar and other salt-tolerant shrubs over the floodplain. It is widely assumed that, once established, saltcedar competitively excludes native trees, and that removal of saltcedar will be necessary as part of restoration programs. We studied the regeneration of cottonwood and willow trees in the presence of saltcedar in the delta of the Colorado River in Mexico from 1992 to 2002 in response to flood releases from the U.S. Flood releases of 50 cms to 750 cms in El Nino years of 1993, 1997-1998 and 2000 each germinated cohorts of trees amidst saltcedar stands and in bare soil scoured by the floods. During their establishment year, these trees rooted into the shallow aquifer under the river channel, and became dominant age classes of trees in subsequent years. Low-volume administrative spills (water ordered by irrigators but not used) provided a nearly perennial run of water in the river in non-flood years. The large and small flows created a rich avian habitat, containing backwaters, marsh areas, and a multi-stored canopy of native trees, saltcedar and other shrubs. Bird density and diversity in this river stretch are higher than has been reported anywhere else on the Lower Colorado River. The acreage of cottonwood and willow trees in the delta might be as high today as was reported in a 1904 timber survey before the era of dams and agriculture. The main threats to the ecosystem are fires, many deliberately set, timber harvesting, and vegetation clearing projects. Although surface flows are needed to wash salts from the riverbanks, germinate seeds, and enhance avian habitat, the main water source for the trees is the regional aquifer maintained by irrigation of the surrounding agricultural

  1. Morphodynamics of the erosional phase of crevasse-splay evolution and implications for river sediment diversion function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuill, Brendan T.; Khadka, Ashok K.; Pereira, João; Allison, Mead A.; Meselhe, Ehab A.

    2016-04-01

    Despite being a primarily depositional landform, a crevasse splay experiences an initial evolutionary phase that is primarily erosional as sediment-laden river water spills from a main river channel and incises a new route through the river banks and levee into an interdistributary basin or floodplain. This phase sets the dimensions and the conveyance properties of the crevasse, which, in turn, influences the continued expansion or closure of the crevasse channel. However, little is known about the controlling morphodynamics or how the erosional processes transition to depositional processes during this phase. The objective of this study is to investigate these phenomena at the West Bay sediment diversion (Louisiana, USA) using coupled field observations and numerical modeling. The West Bay diversion was cut into a lower Mississippi River levee to mimic the function of a crevasse-splay, i.e., to divert river water and sediment to an adjacent receiving basin for land-building purposes. Bathymetric measurements show that the diversion channel experienced significant natural morphologic evolution during the initial decade (2004-2014). Hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling suggests that this evolution initially increased the discharge of flow and sediment through the crevasse as the channel became wider and deeper and altered its orientation relative to the main river flow direction. After 5 years, the model results predict that further evolution led to monotonically reduced diversion discharges. During this time, natural and engineered sediment deposition in the receiving basin decreased predicted basin-flow velocities and promoted a backwater effect that reduced the sediment transport capacity of the diversion channel. Observations during the final 2 years show that much of the initial erosion around the diversion had abated indicating that diversion morphology may have stabilized. A modeling sensitivity analysis confirmed that the observed changes to channel

  2. Ambient conditions and fate and transport simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate in Beaver Lake, Arkansas, 2006--10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, W. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Beaver Lake is a large, deep-storage reservoir located in the upper White River Basin in northwestern Arkansas, and was completed in 1963 for the purposes of flood control, hydroelectric power, and water supply. Beaver Lake is affected by point and nonpoint sources of minerals, nutrients, and sediments. The City of Fayetteville discharges about half of its sewage effluent into the White River immediately upstream from the backwater of the reservoir. The City of West Fork discharges its sewage effluent into the West Fork of the White River, and the City of Huntsville discharges its sewage effluent into a tributary of War Eagle Creek. A study was conducted to describe the ambient conditions and fate and transport of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate concentrations in Beaver Lake. Dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate are components of wastewater discharged into Beaver Lake and a major concern of the drinking water utilities that use Beaver Lake as their source. A two-dimensional model of hydrodynamics and water quality was calibrated to include simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate for the period January 2006 through December 2010. Estimated daily dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate loads were increased in the White River and War Eagle Creek tributaries, individually and the two tributaries together, by 1.2, 1.5, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 times the baseline conditions to examine fate and transport of these constituents through time at seven locations (segments) in the reservoir, from upstream to downstream in Beaver Lake. Fifteen dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate fate and transport scenarios were compared to the baseline simulation at each of the seven downstream locations in the reservoir, both 2 meters (m) below the surface and 2 m above the bottom. Concentrations were greater in the reservoir at model segments closer to where the tributaries entered the reservoir. Concentrations resulting from the increase in loading became more diluted

  3. Continuous measurements of water surface height and width along a 6.5km river reach for discharge algorithm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuozzolo, S.; Durand, M. T.; Pavelsky, T.; Pentecost, J.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite will provide measurements of river width and water surface elevation and slope along continuous swaths of world rivers. Understanding water surface slope and width dynamics in river reaches is important for both developing and validating discharge algorithms to be used on future SWOT data. We collected water surface elevation and river width data along a 6.5km stretch of the Olentangy River in Columbus, Ohio from October to December 2014. Continuous measurements of water surface height were supplemented with periodical river width measurements at twenty sites along the study reach. The water surface slope of the entire reach ranged from during 41.58 cm/km at baseflow to 45.31 cm/km after a storm event. The study reach was also broken into sub-reaches roughly 1km in length to study smaller scale slope dynamics. The furthest upstream sub-reaches are characterized by free-flowing riffle-pool sequences, while the furthest downstream sub-reaches were directly affected by two low-head dams. In the sub-reaches immediately upstream of each dam, baseflow slope is as low as 2 cm/km, while the furthest upstream free-flowing sub-reach has a baseflow slope of 100 cm/km. During high flow events the backwater effect of the dams was observed to propagate upstream: sub-reaches impounded by the dams had increased water surface slopes, while free flowing sub-reaches had decreased water surface slopes. During the largest observed flow event, a stage change of 0.40 m affected sub-reach slopes by as much as 30 cm/km. Further analysis will examine height-width relationships within the study reach and relate cross-sectional flow area to river stage. These relationships can be used in conjunction with slope data to estimate discharge using a modified Manning's equation, and are a core component of discharge algorithms being developed for the SWOT mission.

  4. Predicting the type, location and magnitude of geomorphic responses to dam removal: Role of hydrologic and geomorphic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, John D.; Magilligan, Francis J.; Renshaw, Carl E.

    2015-12-01

    Using a dam removal on the Ashuelot River in southern New Hampshire, we test how a sudden, spatially non-uniform increase in river slope alters sediment transport dynamics and riparian sediment connectivity. Site conditions were characterized by detailed pre- and post-removal field surveys and high-resolution aerial lidar data, and locations of erosion and deposition were predicted through one-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling. The Homestead Dam was a ~ 200 year old, 4 m high, 50 m wide crib dam that created a 9.5 km long, relatively narrow reservoir. Following removal, an exhumed resistant bed feature of glaciofluvial boulders located 400 m upstream and ~ 2.5 m lower than the crest of the dam imposed a new boundary condition in the drained reservoir, acting as a grade control that maintained a backwater effect upstream. During the 15 months following removal, non-uniform erosion in the former reservoir totaled ~ 60,000 m3 (equivalent to ~ 9.3 cm when averaged across the reservoir). Net deposition of ~ 10,700 m3 was measured downstream of the dam, indicating most sediment from the reservoir was carried more than 8 km downstream beyond the study area. The most pronounced bed erosion occurred where modeled sediment transport increased in the downstream direction, and deposition occurred both within and downstream of the former reservoir where modeled sediment transport decreased in the downstream direction. We thus demonstrate that spatial gradients in sediment transport can be used to predict locations of erosion and deposition on the stream bed. We further observed that bed incision was not a necessary condition for bank erosion in the former reservoir. In this characteristically narrow and shallow reservoir lacking abundant dam-induced sedimentation, the variable resistance of the bed and banks acted as geomorphic constraints. Overall, the response deviated from the common conceptual model of knickpoint erosion and channel widening due to dam removal. With

  5. [A new species of Hyphessobrycon (Characiformes: Characidae) from the Telembi River drainage, Southern Pacific slope of Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alzate, Carlos A; Román-Valencia, César; Taphorn, Donald C

    2013-03-01

    The genus Hyphessobrycon is included within the subfamily Tetragonopterinae. The species are generally small, do not exceed 70mm of standard length, are economically important as ornamental fish, with 128 valid species distributed from Southern Mexico to Rio La Plata in Argentina. The collections of fish were made with seines, in a single biotope, along shore in backwaters and working downstream. Measurements of the specimens were taken point to point with digital calipers. Observations of bone and cartilage structures were made on cleared and stained (C&S) specimens. The morphometric relationships between species were explored using a principal component analysis (PCA)using 21 variables. We described a new species, Hyphessobrycon chocoensis, from the Telembi River drainage of the Pacific versant of Colombia. The new species, Hyphessobrycon chocoensis, is distinguished from congeners not of the "flammeus" species group by: having a diffuse humeral spot, in lacking a dark spot on the dorsal fin and caudal peduncle. It is distinguished from members its species group by the number of rays in the dorsal fin (ii, 8, i), by the number of branched anal-fin rays (25-26) and by having a diffuse humeral spot. It differs from H. tortuguerae in the number of teeth on the maxilla (1-2), by the number of predorsal scales and the high number of scales between the lateral line and the anal fin (6-7). Hyphessobrycon chocoensis can be distinguished from the other known species of Hyphessobrycon from the Pacific Coast of Colombia in having: a high number of pored lateral-line scales, by the snout to dorsal-fin length, by caudal-peduncle depth and by eye diameter. In addition, it differs from H. columbianus by the distance from the dorsal fin to the anal fin, by the length of the upper jaw, and by snout length. It differs from H. condotensis in having a high number of scales between the lateral line and the dorsal fin, and by the number of simple rays in the anal fin. H. chocoensis is

  6. Investigations into the Early History of Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin : Fish Research Project Oregon : Annual Progress Report Project Period September 1, 1996 to August 31, 1997.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johasson, Brian C.; Tranquilli, J. Vincent; Keefe, MaryLouise

    1998-10-28

    habitats, particularly alcove and backwater pools. These results were consistent for both summer and winter surveys.

  7. Endotoxin detection--from limulus amebocyte lysate to recombinant factor C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jeak Ling; Ho, Bow

    2010-01-01

    Gram negative bacterial endotoxin is a biological pyrogen that causes fever when introduced intravenously. The endotoxin, also known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. During Gram-negative sepsis, endotoxin stimulates host macrophages to release inflammatory cytokines. However, excessive inflammation causes multiple organ failure and death. Endotoxins, which are ubiquitous pathogenic molecules, are a bane to the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare community. Thus early and sensitive detection of endotoxin is crucial to prevent endotoxaemia. The limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) has been widely used for ~30 years for the detection of endotoxin in the quality assurance of injectable drugs and medical devices. The LAL constitutes a cascade of serine proteases which are triggered by trace levels of endotoxin, culminating in a gel clot at the end of the reaction. The Factor C, which normally exists as a zymogen, is the primer of this coagulation cascade. In vivo, Factor C is the perfect biosensor, which alerts the horseshoe crab of the presence of a Gram-negative invader. The hemostatic end-point entraps the invader, killing it and limiting further infection. However, as an in vitro endotoxin detection tool, variations in the sensitivity and specificity of LAL to endotoxin, and the dwindling supply of horseshoe crabs are posing increasing challenges to the biotechnology industry. This has necessitated the innovation of an alternative test for endotoxin. Thus, Factor C became the obvious, albeit tricky target for the recombinant technology effort. This chapter documents the backwater of mining the natural blood lysate of the endangered species to the monumental effort of genetic engineering, to produce recombinant Factor C (rFC). The rFC is a 132 kDa molecule, which was produced as a proenzyme inducible by the presence of trace levels of endotoxin. The rFC forms the basis of the "PyroGene" kit, which is a novel micro

  8. Finding an optimal strategy for measuring the quality of groundwater as a source for drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driezum, Inge; Saracevic, Ernis; Scheibz, Jürgen; Zessner, Matthias; Kirschner, Alexander; Sommer, Regina; Farnleitner, Andreas; Blaschke, Alfred Paul

    2015-04-01

    A good chemical and microbiological water quality is of great importance in riverbank filtration systems that are used as public water supplies. Water quality is ideally monitored frequently at the drinking water well using a steady pumping rate. Monitoring source water (like groundwater) however, can be more challenging. First of all, piezometers should be drilled in the correct layer of the aquifer. Secondly, the sampling design should include all preferred parameters (microbiological and chemical parameters) and should also take the hydrological conditions into account. In this study, we made use of different geophysical techniques (ERT and FDEM) to select the optimal placement of the piezometers. We also designed a sampling strategy which can be used to sample fecal indicators, biostability parameters, standard chemical parameters and a wide range of micropollutants. Several time series experiments were carried out in the study site Porous GroundWater Aquifer (PGWA) - an urban floodplain extending on the left bank of the river Danube downstream of the City of Vienna, Austria. The upper layer of the PGWA consist of silt and has a thickness from 1 to 6 meter. The underlying confined aquifer consists of sand and gravel and has a thickness of in between 3 and 15 meter. Hydraulic conductivities range from 5 x 10-2 m/s up to 5 x 10-5 m/s. Underneath the aquifer are alternating sand and clay/silt layers. As fecal markers Escherichia coli, enterococci and aerobic spores were measured. Biostability was measured using leucine incorporation. Additionally, several micropollutants and standard chemical parameters were measured. Results showed that physical and chemical parameters stayed stable in all monitoring wells during extended purging. A similar trend could be observed for E coli and enterococci. In the wells close to the river, aerobic spores and leucine incorporation decreased after 30 min. of pumping, whereas the well close to the backwater showed a different

  9. Fish Research Project, Oregon, Investigations into the Early Life History of Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin, Annual Progress Report, Project Period: September 1, 1996 - August 31, 1997; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    habitats, particularly alcove and backwater pools. These results were consistent for both summer and winter surveys

  10. A channel transmission losses model for different dryland rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Costa

    2012-04-01

    for the saturated zone (mathematically simple water budgeting in aquifer columns, including backwater effects. In case of the MJR-application, we have seen that structural uncertainties due to the limited knowledge of the subsurface saturated system interactions (i.e. groundwater coupling with channel water; possible groundwater flow parallel to the river were more relevant than those related to the subsurface parameter variability. In case of the WEGW application we have seen that the non-linearity involved in the unsaturated flow processes in disconnected dryland river systems (controlled by the unsaturated zone generally contain far more model uncertainties than do connected systems controlled by the saturated flow. Therefore, the degree of aridity of a dryland river may be an indicator of potential model uncertainty and subsequent attainable predictability of the system.

  11. Floodplain restoration on the upper Danube by re-establishing back water dynamics: first results of the hydro-geomorphological monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Hilger, Ludwig; Cyffka, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    Within the framework of a restoration project at the upper Danube, eight working groups of different scientific disciplines have been operating since 2009. They investigate the changes evoked through the accomplished restoration measures, which seek to bring back new dynamics to the floodplain and to reconnect it with the river in order to optimize flood plain ecological functioning. Main object is the identification and analysis of hydro-geomorphological processes and their impact on vegetation and fauna. Hydrology is one of the key factors determining the type and function of flood plains and thus alternating water levels are the motor of riparian ecosystems. Diverse water and groundwater levels and particularly flood events affect and support floodplain typical vegetation and animal species. All floodplain waterbodies (oxbows, floodplain ponds, backwaters and sidearms) are more or less connected by surface or subsurface waterways. Hydrological conditions are mainly influenced by the following measures: a, permanent nature orientated bypass river with a discharge of up to 5 m3/s; b, man controlled ecological flooding (discharge of up to 30 m3/s); c, groundwater drawdown in the eastern project area. These measures shall bring back "former" natural hydrological dynamics to the floodplain. They establish geomorphological processes and forms as well and create a mosaic of typical habitats. River morphology is monitored by terrestrial laser scanning analysing the so attained data sets, erosion and aggregation rates at selected undercut slopes and point bars can be detected with a high resolution. Large scale mapping by a drone and dGPS mapping are very helpful tools for identifing widespread flooding areas. Further methods such as, cross section and bed load measurements complete the research work. The aim is to link the interaction of these abiotic processes with the biotic nature and determine the importance of geomorphological disturbance for floodplain ecosystems

  12. Mass balance study of gravitational mass movements in proglacial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohn, Joachim; Vehling, Lucas; Moser, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the DFG joint research project PROSA (high resoluted measurements of morphodynamics in rapidly changing PROglacial Systems of the Alps), mass movements are investigated geotechnically and process rates will be determined. As result, the actual mass balance for gravitational mass movements will be investigated exemplarily in an alpine glacier foreland in this PROSA sub-project. Alpine glacier forelands are defined as the area between the edge of the glacier and the moraines of the latest maximum in 1850. Since then, the region has become ice free due to the retreat of the glaciers. Because of this recent development, the glacier foreland differs considerably from the surrounding landscape and exhibits a rapid morphodynamic development. Mass movements like landslides and rock falls contribute a remarkable portion to total sediment transport in this area. As study area the region between Gepatschferner and Gepatsch backwater was choosen. The study area encompasses 62,5 km², lies at altitudes between 1759 and 3539 m a.s.l. and around 30 % are covered by glacier. Basic prerequisite is the geotechnical inventory-taking including the production of a geotechnical map. All mass balance studies for gravitational mass movements will base on this data collection. Short term behaviour during extreme meteorological events will be investigated as well, as the long term behaviour of the alpine slopes. The results of repeated high-resolution airborne laser scanning will contribute to a complete area-wide detection of surface changes. Detailed periodical terrestrial laser scanning of steep rock walls and their scree cones, as well as of slopes with soft rock will complete the data set. Spot tests with nets collecting the rock fall material, constructed on elected scree cones, allow the control and verification of the collected data. Mass movements in hard rock apart from rock fall processes, like rock creep, rock sliding and sagging will be monitored

  13. Flood-inundation maps for the Saluda River from Old Easley Bridge Road to Saluda Lake Dam near Greenville, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Andral W.; Clark, Jimmy M.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 3.95-mile reach of the Saluda River from approximately 815 feet downstream from Old Easley Bridge Road to approximately 150 feet downstream from Saluda Lake Dam near Greenville, South Carolina, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Saluda River near Greenville, South Carolina (station 02162500). Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained through the National Water Information System Web site at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/sc/nwis/uv/?site_no=02162500&PARAmeter_cd=00065,00060,00062. The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated with USGS streamgages. Forecasted peak-stage information is available on the Internet at the NWS Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system Web site (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/) and may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-streamflow relations at USGS streamgage station 02162500, Saluda River near Greenville, South Carolina. The hydraulic model was then used to determine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1.0-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from approximately bankfull to 2 feet higher than the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then exported to a geographic information system, ArcGIS, and combined with a digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging [LiDAR] data with a 0

  14. Space-time clustering of childhood malaria at the household level: a dynamic cohort in a Mali village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouattara Amed

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spatial and temporal heterogeneities in the risk of malaria have led the WHO to recommend fine-scale stratification of the epidemiological situation, making it possible to set up actions and clinical or basic researches targeting high-risk zones. Before initiating such studies it is necessary to define local patterns of malaria transmission and infection (in time and in space in order to facilitate selection of the appropriate study population and the intervention allocation. The aim of this study was to identify, spatially and temporally, high-risk zones of malaria, at the household level (resolution of 1 to 3 m. Methods This study took place in a Malian village with hyperendemic seasonal transmission as part of Mali-Tulane Tropical Medicine Research Center (NIAID/NIH. The study design was a dynamic cohort (22 surveys, from June 1996 to June 2001 on about 1300 children (Plasmodium falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale infection and P. falciparum gametocyte carriage by means of time series and Kulldorff's scan statistic for space-time cluster detection. Results The time series analysis determined that malaria parasitemia (primarily P. falciparum was persistently present throughout the population with the expected seasonal variability pattern and a downward temporal trend. We identified six high-risk clusters of P. falciparum infection, some of which persisted despite an overall tendency towards a decrease in risk. The first high-risk cluster of P. falciparum infection (rate ratio = 14.161 was detected from September 1996 to October 1996, in the north of the village. Conclusion This study showed that, although infection proportions tended to decrease, high-risk zones persisted in the village particularly near temporal backwaters. Analysis of this heterogeneity at the household scale by GIS methods lead to target preventive actions more accurately on the high-risk zones identified. This mapping of malaria risk makes it possible

  15. Crims Island-Restoration and monitoring of juvenile salmon rearing habitat in the Columbia River Estuary, Oregon, 2004-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Craig A.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    2011-01-01

    -channel' was extended westward and connected to Bradbury Slough to create a second outlet to the main river. New intertidal channels were constructed from the existing 'T-channel' and tidal mudflats became inundated at high tide to increase rearing habitat for juvenile salmonids. The restoration action resulted in a 95-percent increase in available juvenile salmon rearing habitat. We collected juvenile salmon and other fishes at Crims Island and a nearby reference site using beach seines and fyke nets annually from March through August during all years. Benthic invertebrates were collected with sediment corers and drift invertebrates were collected with neuston nets. Juvenile salmon stomach contents were sampled using lavage. Vegetation and sediments characteristics were surveyed and we conducted a topographic/bathymetric survey using a RTK (real time kinematic) GPS (global positioning system). The fish assemblage at Crims Island, composed primarily of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), non-native banded killifish (Fundulus diaphanus), peamouth chub (Mylocheilus caurinus), subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) (hereinafter referred to as subyearlings), and small numbers of juvenile chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), did not differ appreciably pre- and post-restoration. Subyearlings were the primary salmonid collected and were seasonally abundant from April through May during all years. The abundance of juvenile salmon declined seasonally as water temperature exceeded 20 degrees C in the Reference site by mid-June; however, subyearlings persisted at the Mainstem site and in subtidal channels of the Restoration site through the summer in water temperatures exceeding 22 degrees C. Residence times of subyearlings in Crims Island backwaters generally were short consisting of one or two tidal cycles. Median residence time was longer in the Restoration site than in the Reference site pre- and post-restoration. Small (mean = 55.7 millimeters) subyea

  16. Dynamic Channel Network Extraction from Satellite Imagery of the Jamuna River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addink, E. A.; Marra, W. A.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    channel migration and vegetation cover along the channels. A network evolves in time by adding or removing channels and their bifurcation- and confluence couples. Using the network topology, we quantified network properties such as `centrality’, which provides a measure for the overall importance of individual channels in a network. This is a novel and robust indicator to assess the effect of a change or engineering measure in a channel on the entire network. The physical basis for downstream propagation of information through a fluvial network is the flood conveyance and sediment transport, and for upstream propagation it is the backwater effect. Using the dynamic network description we can start quantifying the effects of local changes in the network on the entire upstream and downstream network. We conclude that the developed workflow allows the use of novel and useful measures borrowed from other sciences in river network analysis, and provides, e.g., the assessment of the importance of individual branches in a large complicated network.

  17. Methods for estimating annual exceedance-probability discharges and largest recorded floods for unregulated streams in rural Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Rodney E.; Veilleux, Andrea G.

    2014-01-01

    similar and related to three primary physiographic provinces. The final regional regression analyses resulted in three sets of equations. For Regions 1 and 2, the basin characteristics of drainage area and basin shape factor were statistically significant. For Region 3, because of the small amount of data from streamgages, only drainage area was statistically significant. Average standard errors of prediction ranged from 28.7 to 38.4 percent for flood region 1, 24.1 to 43.5 percent for flood region 2, and 25.8 to 30.5 percent for region 3. The regional regression equations are only applicable to stream sites in Missouri with flows not significantly affected by regulation, channelization, backwater, diversion, or urbanization. Basins with about 5 percent or less impervious area were considered to be rural. Applicability of the equations are limited to the basin characteristic values that range from 0.11 to 8,212.38 square miles (mi2) and basin shape from 2.25 to 26.59 for Region 1, 0.17 to 4,008.92 mi2 and basin shape 2.04 to 26.89 for Region 2, and 2.12 to 2,177.58 mi2 for Region 3. Annual peak data from streamgages were used to qualitatively assess the largest floods recorded at streamgages in Missouri since the 1915 water year. Based on existing streamgage data, the 1983 flood event was the largest flood event on record since 1915. The next five largest flood events, in descending order, took place in 1993, 1973, 2008, 1994 and 1915. Since 1915, five of six of the largest floods on record occurred from 1973 to 2012.

  18. Methods for estimating annual exceedance-probability discharges for streams in Iowa, based on data through water year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eash, David A.; Barnes, Kimberlee K.; Veilleux, Andrea G.

    2013-01-01

    .9 percent for flood region 2, and 92.4 to 96.0 percent for flood region 3. The regression equations are applicable only to stream sites in Iowa with flows not significantly affected by regulation, diversion, channelization, backwater, or urbanization and with basin characteristics within the range of those used to develop the equations. These regression equations will be implemented within the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats Web-based geographic information system tool. StreamStats allows users to click on any ungaged site on a river and compute estimates of the eight selected statistics; in addition, 90-percent prediction intervals and the measured basin characteristics for the ungaged sites also are provided by the Web-based tool. StreamStats also allows users to click on any streamgage in Iowa and estimates computed for these eight selected statistics are provided for the streamgage.

  19. BOOK REVIEW Cracking the Einstein Code: Relativity and the Birth of Black Hole Physics With an Afterword by Roy Kerr Cracking the Einstein Code: Relativity and the Birth of Black Hole Physics With an Afterword by Roy Kerr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    General relativity is arguably the most beautiful scientific theory ever conceived but its status within mainstream physics has vacillated since it was proposed in 1915. It began auspiciously with the successful explanation of the precession of Mercury and the dramatic confirmation of light-bending in the 1919 solar eclipse expedition, which turned Einstein into an overnight celebrity. Though little noticed at the time, there was also Karl Schwarzschild's discovery of the spherically symmetric solution in 1916 (later used to predict the existence of black holes) and Alexander Friedmann's discovery of the cosmological solution in 1922 (later confirmed by the discovery of the cosmic expansion). Then for 40 years the theory was more or less forgotten, partly because most physicists were turning their attention to the even more radical developments of quantum theory but also because the equations were too complicated to solve except in situations involving special symmetries or very weak gravitational fields (where general relativity is very similar to Newtonian theory). Furthermore, it was not clear that strong gravitational fields would ever arise in the real universe and, even if they did, it seemed unlikely that Einstein's equations could then be solved. So research in relativity became a quiet backwater as mainstream physics swept forward in other directions. Even Einstein lost interest, turning his attention to the search for a unified field theory. This book tells the remarkable story of how the tide changed in 1963, when the 28-year-old New Zealand mathematician Roy Kerr discovered an exact solution of Einstein's equations which represents a rotating black hole, thereby cracking the code of the title. The paper was just a few pages long, it being left for others to fill in the extensive beautiful mathematics which underlay the result, but it ushered in a golden age of relativity and is now one of the most cited works in physics. Coincidentally, Kerr

  20. The traditional irrigation technique of Lake Garda lemon--houses (Northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barontini, Stefano; Vitale, Nicola; Fausti, Federico; Bettoni, Barbara; Bonati, Sara; Peli, Marco; Pietta, Antonella; Tononi, Marco; Ranzi, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Between 16th and 19th centuries the North-Western side of Lake Garda was seat of an important district which, at the time of its maximum splendour between 18th and 19th centuries, produced and exported lemons and citrus even toward the Northern Europe and the Russia. The limonaie del Garda (Lake-Garda lemon-houses), the local name of the citrus orchards, were settled on terraces built on steep slopes, with landfill taken from the Eastern side of the lake, and closed by greenhouses during late autumn and winter in order to protect the cultivations. The terraces were built nearby streams, they were South-Eastern exposed and protected by walls from the cold winds. Thanks in fact to the Lake Garda microclimate, lemon trees were not cultivated in pots, as in the typical orangeries of mid-latitudes Europe, but directly in the soil. Here the citrus cultivation technique reached a remarkably high degree of standardisation, with local cultivar as the Madernino or lemon from Maderno, and it involved, as in modern industrial districts, all the surrounding land in order to satisfy the needing of required materials to build the terraces, the walls, the greenhouses and the wooden frames to hold the branches laden with fruits. Due to the great water requirement of lemon trees during summer, which is estimated to range from 150 to 300 ℓ every ten days, the water management played a key role in the cultivation technique. The traditional irrigation technique was standardized as well. During our surveys, we observed that most of the lemon-houses still conserve little stone flumes along the walls upslope to the terraces, with spillways every adult tree, i.e. about every 4 m. The flumes were filled with water taken from an upstream reservoir, built nearby a stream. The spillways were activated with a backwater obtained by means of a sand bag placed within the flume, just downstream to the spillway itself. In order to avoid any excavation, spilled water was driven to the base of each

  1. Flood-inundation maps for the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 1.7-mile reach of the Leaf River were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Hattiesburg, City of Petal, Forrest County, Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, Mississippi Department of Homeland Security, and the Emergency Management District. The Leaf River study reach extends from just upstream of the U.S. Highway 11 crossing to just downstream of East Hardy/South Main Street and separates the cities of Hattiesburg and Petal, Mississippi. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water-surface elevations (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Mississippi (02473000). Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained through the National Water Information System Web site at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ms/nwis/uv/?site_no=02473000&PARAmeter_cd=00065,00060. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information, available on the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Leaf River at Hattiesburg, Mississippi, streamgage and documented high-water marks from recent and historical floods. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1.0-foot intervals referenced to the

  2. Flood-inundation maps for the Saddle River from Upper Saddle River Borough to Saddle River Borough, New Jersey, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kara M.; Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.1-mile reach of the Saddle River from 0.6 miles downstream from the New Jersey-New York State boundary in Upper Saddle River Borough to 0.2 miles downstream from the East Allendale Road bridge in Saddle River Borough, New Jersey, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to select water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 01390450, Saddle River at Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. Current conditions for estimating near real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?site_no=01390450. The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations (in effect March 2013) at USGS streamgage 01390450, Saddle River at Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, and documented high-water marks from recent floods. The hydraulic model was then used to determine eight water-surface profiles for flood stages at 0.5-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum, North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88), and ranging from bankfull, 0.5 ft below NWS Action Stage, to the upper extent of the stage-discharge rating which is approximately 1 ft higher than the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. Action Stage is the stage which when reached

  3. Flood-inundation maps for Sweetwater Creek from above the confluence of Powder Springs Creek to the Interstate 20 bridge, Cobb and Douglas Counties, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 10.5-mile reach of Sweetwater Creek, from about 1,800 feet above the confluence of Powder Springs Creek to about 160 feet below the Interstate 20 bridge, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Cobb County, Georgia. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Sweetwater Creek near Austell, Georgia (02337000). Current stage at this USGS streamgage may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ and can be used in conjunction with these maps to estimate near real-time areas of inundation. The National Weather Service (NWS) is incorporating results from this study into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that commonly are collocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information for the USGS streamgage at Sweetwater Creek near Austell (02337000), which is available through the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. A one-dimensional step-backwater model was developed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC–RAS) software for Sweetwater Creek and was used to compute flood profiles for a 10.5-mile reach of the creek. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Sweetwater Creek near Austell streamgage (02337000), as well as high-water marks collected during annual peak-flow events in 1982 and 2009. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 21 water-surface profiles for flood stages at the Sweetwater Creek streamgage at 1-foot intervals referenced to the

  4. Flood inundation maps for the Wabash and Eel Rivers at Logansport, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 8.3-mile reach of the Wabash River and a 7.6-mile reach of the Eel River at Logansport, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage Wabash River at Logansport, Ind. (sta. no. 03329000) and USGS streamgage Eel River near Logansport, Ind. (sta. no. 03328500). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgages 03329000, Wabash River at Logansport, Ind., and 03328500, Eel River near Logansport, Ind. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine five water-surface profiles for flood stage at 1-foot intervals referenced to the Wabash River streamgage datum, and four water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the Eel River streamgage datum. The stages range from bankfull to approximately the highest

  5. Global determination of rating curves in the Amazon basin from satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Adrien; Paiva, Rodrigo C. D.; Santos da Silva, Joecila; Medeiros Moreira, Daniel; Calmant, Stéphane; Collischonn, Walter; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Seyler, Frédérique

    2014-05-01

    is more efficient than the determinist one. By using for the parameters prior credible intervals defined by the user, this method provides an estimate of best rating curve estimate without any unlikely parameter. Results were assessed trough the Nash Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient. Ens superior to 0.7 is found for most of the 920 virtual stations . From these results we were able to determinate a fully coherent map of river bed height, mean depth and Manning's roughness coefficient, information that can be reused in hydrological modeling. Bad results found at a few virtual stations are also of interest. For some sub-basins in the Andean piemont, the bad result confirms that the model failed to estimate discharges overthere. Other are found at tributary mouths experiencing backwater effects from the Amazon. Considering mean monthly slope at the virtual station in the rating curve equation, we obtain rated discharges much more consistent with modeled and measured ones, showing that it is now possible to obtain a meaningful rating curve in such critical areas.

  6. Assimilation of NASA MODIS Flood Mapping Product into Operational Flash Flood Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, A. J.; Georgakakos, K. P.; Shamir, E.

    2013-12-01

    Regional operational systems that support forecasters for the real-time warning of flash flood events have been implemented worldwide in the last decade. These systems provide hydrological and meteorological agencies the tools to make possible timely alerts and warnings for flash floods in small basins (area of order of 100 km2). The output of the model consists of indices that estimate the amount of rain of a certain duration that is needed over a given small basin in order to cause minor flooding (bankfull flow) at its outlet. These indices are adjusted and used with local available data and nowcast products by forecasters and enable the generation of prompt flash flood warnings and alerts. Soil moisture is the principal state variable in estimating the rainfall-runoff relationship in a given catchment. Antecedent soil moisture conditions directly impact the ability of additional precipitation to infiltrate, rather than becoming surface runoff. In the operational systems the focus is on the water balance over the flash-flood prone small watersheds. Backwater catchment inundation from swollen rivers or regional groundwater inputs is not significant over the spatial and temporal scales for the majority of the upland flash flood prone basins, and as such, these effects are not considered. However, some lowland areas and flat terrain near large rivers experience standing water long after local precipitation has ceased as a result of phenomena outside of local forcing. The NASA Office of Applied Science is producing an experimental product from the MODIS instrument on the Terra and Aqua satellites that detects standing water, beyond reference water, at a daily time interval and with a 250m resolution. This presentation discusses the potential utility of this product to adjust the soil water estimates of the operational systems for flash flood prone basins in low lying areas to improve local flash flood warnings. Given that a portion of the catchment area is inundated

  7. Beaver Dam Effects on Gravel Transport Patterns - a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunte, K.; Swingle, K. W.; Potyondy, J. P.; Abt, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Beaver dams are numerous in mountain streams, but little is known about gravel transport in those streams. The dams may be fully functioning and retain all incoming sediment or partially permeable to sediment or be almost completely removed. Beaver dams in their various states of preservation can have a profound influence on stream morphology and bedload transport. During the spring of 2011, the authors made a time series study of bedload transport in a mountain stream dominated by beavers dams. Dams occurred with a frequency of one every 50 feet and showed a range of decay and fluvial influence. Gravel transport was sampled with bedload traps over a 2-month long snowmelt highflow season. The reach-average gradient was 0.03 and stream widths ranged from 3 to 8 m. The stream bed was incised 0.5 to 1.5 m deep into a floodplain and typically trapezoidal in its cross-sectional shape. Much of the floodplain consisted of filled-in beaver dams. Partially breached dams that were permeable to gravel transport acted as an obstacle, forcing the flow around sharp bends. Complex hydraulic conditions developed in the vicinity of the bends with backwater eddies upstream and downstream of the remnant dam. Wake eddies at the downstream side of dam remnants caused gravel deposits. The tortuous channel course around the bends caused strong secondary currents that forced gravel transport into a narrow pathway along one of the banks causing a strong lateral concentration of transport. The pathway had a bed of fine and medium gravel, while the remainder of the bed consisted mostly of coarse gravel and cobbles that became immobile shortly after peak flows. Tracer experiments indicated that most of the mobile gravel traveled along that bankward path, even though flow velocities and depths were considerably smaller than in the stream center. Over the highflow season, flows increased to about 160% of the 1.5 year recurrence interval (Q1.5) within about a week and then remained within the

  8. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1984 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, James E.; Pajak, Paul; Wunderlich, Mary P.

    1984-12-01

    sedimentation. Among the consequences of the present operational regime are constant, rapid changes in river discharge during spawning and Incubation seasons of trout species present in the lower river. Hamilton and Buell (1976) reported that similar fluctuation might exceed tolerance limits of adults and inhibit spawning behavior, dewater redds, strand fry, and displace juveniles to habitats less suitable for survival. Similar problems are felt to exist on the lower river. Constant fluctuations over backwater vegetation have been linked to major problems in successful northern pike spawning and recruitment by preventing access to spawning sites, and dewatering eggs and attached fry. Phase I of the South Bay investigation was completed this year resulting in a detailed study program for the next three years. Dominant habitat types were mapped, and physical habitat and biological monitoring methods were evaluated and selected. Permanent habitat transects, water quality stations, fish sampling, gillnetting, seining, and trapping sites were established.

  9. Modeling the erosion risk potential induced by terraces and their condition in a highly dynamic watershed close to the Three-Gorges-Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbrodt, S.; Behrens, T.; Imbery, S.; Scholten, T.

    2010-03-01

    Globally, the Three-Gorges Ecosystem is currently one of the most anthropogenic influenced regions. Due to the Three-Gorges Dam large areas in the upper catchment of the Yangtze and its major tributaries become inundated. Consequently, high land-use dynamic with resettlements, construction of infrastructure, and new land reclamation for smallholder agriculture and cash crops characterize this area. Therefore, ecological impacts are expected in an unforeseeable dimension. Soil loss is one of the major threats and its control an enormous challenge. Even existing erosion control measures like dry-stone walling bench terraces have to be adapted to this new situation in order to keep their effectiveness. In the highly dynamic watershed of the Xiangxi, a first class tributary to the Yangtze, this study aims to assess and predict the spatial and temporal varying dam-caused soil erosion risk potential. Using a multi-level and multi-scale approach this study seeks to develop an integrative data-based methodology for soil erosion assessment by means of GIS-based erosion modeling using relevant digital terrain data, field investigations and remote sensing. The different scales considered cover the Xiangxi watershed (3.100 km²), the highly dynamic backwater area (500 km²), and two micro-scale study sites (3 km² and 88 km²) subject to flooding and high land-use dynamic. Central features of the Xiangxi watershed are steep slopes artificially fractured by terraces. A preliminary erosion survey has shown a strong connection of the frequency and intensity of erosion and the quality of terrace-maintenance. Terraces with wall disorders and technically poor constructed design show higher soil loss and runoff than well-maintained terraces. Their condition is regarded as a driving erosion factor. Therefore, a conceptual Terrace-Condition-Erosion model (TerraCE) was developed in order to assess to what extent soil erosion depends on the quality of terraces. Central aspects are the

  10. Mobile polishing system of feedwater at start-up feedback from the implementation and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of the quantity of Steam Generator (SG) metallic oxides deposits, and maintaining a good chemical composition of the secondary side of SG tubes are some of the main objectives being looked at, in order to reduce the risk of SG corrosion, regardless of the alloy used, right from the start-up phase. For all types of outage, obtaining and maintaining sufficient chemical cleanliness at the start-up requires treatment of the water. The treatments are notably: - Water movements using the purge / make-up water method until the chemical criteria have been met. This method can be long and generate large volumes of discharge. - Using suitable resins to remove pollutants from the water. The advantage of this method is that it is selective. - Filtration, allowing for the removal of any insoluble agent. In order to optimise the start-up process, Gravelines and Blayais Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) put trials in place towards the end of the 1980s. These trials lead to a water supply treatment installation (mobile polishing system- in French Systeme Mobile d'Epuration, SME) being put in place for the start-up phase, made up of an up-stream filter, a mixed-bed resin pollutant trap and a down-stream filter to prevent losing the fines into the feedwater. At the same time, the manifestation of cracking on the secondary side of the steam generator tubes lead EDF to roll out a water treatment for the feedwater dedicated to the start-up. The choice was made not to install a condensate polishing plant, in order to limit notably the pollution risks (resin leaks or waste from the regeneration in the backwater) following difficulties during regeneration. The positive results from the first trials validated for EDF the choice to give priority to the roll-out of the SME to the NPPs judged to be most critical due to the SG material. The SME, installed on a mobile base, can be used on different units at the same station; this reduced the investment and maintenance costs, and

  11. Daily values flow comparison and estimates using program HYCOMP, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Curtis L.

    2002-01-01

    do hydrographic comparison and data estimates by entering the number of the review station, selecting an index station, and specifying the periods to be used for regression and plotting. For example, the user can restrict the regression to ice-free periods of the year to exclude flows estimated during iced conditions. However, the regression could still be used to estimate flow during iced conditions. HYDCOMP produces the standard error of estimate as a measure of the central scatter of the regression and R-square (coefficient of determination) for evaluating the accuracy of the regression. Output from HYDCOMP includes plots of percent residuals against (1) time within the regression and plot periods, (2) month and day of the year for evaluating seasonal bias in the regression, and (3) the magnitude of flow. For hydrographic comparisons, it plots 2-month segments of hydrographs over the selected plot period showing the observed flows, the regressed flows, the 95 percent confidence limit flows, flow measurements, and regression limits. If the observed flows at the review station remain outside the 95 percent confidence limits for a prolonged period, there may be some error in the flows at the review station or at the index station(s). In addition, daily minimum and maximum temperatures and daily rainfall are shown on the hydrographs, if available, to help indicate whether an apparent change in flow may result from rainfall or from changes in backwater from melting ice or freezing water. HYDCOMP statistically smooths estimated flows from non-missing flows at the edges of the gaps in data into regressed flows at the center of the gaps using the Kalman smoothing algorithm. Missing flows are automatically estimated by HYDCOMP, but the user also can specify that periods of erroneous, but nonmissing flows, be estimated by the program.

  12. Managing the uncertainties of the streamflow data produced by the French national hydrological services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puechberty, Rachel; Bechon, Pierre-Marie; Le Coz, Jérôme; Renard, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    records to produce continuous discharge time series. The management of rating curves is also done using BAREME. The BaRatin method (Le Coz et al., 2014) was developed as a Bayesian approach of rating curve development and uncertainty analysis. Since BaRatin accounts for the individual uncertainties of gauging data used to build the rating curve, it was coupled with BAREME. The BaRatin method is still undergoing development and research, in particular to address non univocal or time-varying stage-discharge relations, due to hysteresis, variable backwater, rating shifts, etc. A new interface including new options is under development. The next steps are now to propagate the uncertainties of water level records, through uncertain rating curves, up to discharge time series and derived variables (e.g. annual mean flow) and statistics (e.g. flood quantiles). Bayesian tools are already available for both tasks but further validation and development is necessary for their integration in the operational data workflow of the French NHS. References Le Coz, J., Camenen, B., Peyrard, X., Dramais, G., 2012. Uncertainty in open-channel discharges measured with the velocity-area method. Flow Measurement and Instrumentation 26, 18-29. Le Coz, J., Renard, B., Bonnifait, L., Branger, F., Le Boursicaud, R., 2014. Combining hydraulic knowledge and uncertain gaugings in the estimation of hydrometric rating curves: a Bayesian approach, Journal of Hydrology, 509, 573-587.

  13. Delineating forested river habitats and riparian floodplain hydrology with LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrasek, Chris

    Rivers and the riparian forest corridor comprise a valuable freshwater ecosystem that has been altered by human activities including timber management, road building, and other land conversions. The habitats of river dependent species in the Pacific Northwest, in particular salmon have often been degraded by these activities. Many salmon runs have become threatened with extinction and have been Endangered Species Act listed. New conservation planning and policies have developed around protecting freshwater habitats and restoring more natural river processes. In WA State, timber landowners, officials from State and Federal agencies, Native tribes, and other stakeholders developed Forest Practice rules and codified a Habitat Conservation Plan with dual goals of providing regulatory surety for timber land owners and helping to recover the threatened salmon runs in forested watersheds. Conserving critical stream ecological functions and potential fish habitats throughout watersheds while managing and regulating timber harvest across the State requires accurate and up-to-date delineation and mapping of channels, tributaries, and off-channel wetlands. Monitoring the effectiveness of protection efforts is necessary but can also be difficult. Agency staff and resources are limited for both day-to-day implementation of Forest Practice rules and adaptive management. The goal of this research has been to develop efficient and accessible methods to delineate wetlands, side-channels, tributaries, and pools and backwaters created by large log jams in forested watersheds. It was also essential to use publicly available LiDAR data and to model these waters at ecologically meaningful flows. I tested a hydraulic model at a 2-year and 50-year flows, and a relative height above river surface model and compared them. I completed two additional remote sensing investigations to correlate channel movement and the locations of off-channel wetlands: an analysis of historical aerial imagery

  14. Influence of Channel Morphology on Flow Hydraulics in a Compound Meander Bend of the Lower Brazos River, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, B. U.; Guneralp, I.; Filippi, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    At a meander-bend scale, process-form interactions between channel morphology and flow hydraulics generate unique features called geomorphic units, such as pools, sediment bars, and backwater regions. Geomorphic units play an important role as distinct habitats for aquatic species. In this study, we investigate channel morphology and flow structure of an incised meander bend on the lower Brazos River, Texas, to inform aquatic habitat assessment. The bend represents the characteristics of sand-bed and high-amplitude meandering rivers and contains a localized bank-protection structure along its cutbank. We examine: 1) the spatial characteristics of channel morphology (i.e., geomorphic units); 2) spatial characteristics of flow hydraulics in relation to geomorphic units at low- (Q1), medium- (Q2), and high- (Q3) discharge conditions; and 3) the influence of channel morphology on flow hydraulics within this meander bend. We utilize bathymetric and hydraulic surveys conducted using Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and simultaneously collected bed-sediment samples. To characterize channel morphology, we use a digital terrain model (DTM) of the bend that we generate by fusing our bathymetric data and an airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)-derived DTM. We examine flow hydraulics by performing quasi 3-D hydraulic modeling. Results show that channel morphology has a strong influence on the spatial distribution of hydraulic parameters, including water depth, flow velocities, Froude number, and helix strength. At Q1, the emergent mid-channel bar forces flow divergence/convergence and acts as a macro-roughness structure. High flow velocity concentrates in the deeper and narrower sub-channel along the cutbank side. At Q2, the location of the mid-channel bar shifts toward the point bar, forming a new chute sub-channel. Highest flow velocities are still concentrated in the permanent sub-channel along the cutbank, but shift downstream toward the exit

  15. 代谢重编程:肿瘤的平衡之舞%Metabolic reprogramming in cancer:the art of balance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易梅; 向波; 李小玲; 李桂源

    2013-01-01

    Despite seminal studies in the 1920s by Warburg showing a characteristic metabolic pattern for tumors, cancer bioenergetics has otfen been relegated to the backwaters of cancer biology. Recent studies have shown that metabolism in the tumor tissue is far more complicated than we previously knew. Despite vigorous glycolysis, in fact, the tumor tissue still retains mitochondrial aerobic metabolism. Mitochondria is one of the main sites of the biosynthesis process of tumor cells. Recent studies revealed that abnormal fatty acid metabolism. Amino acid metabolism plays a key role in the tumorigenesis. The metabolic network in tumor cells was reprogrammed, leading to nutrition lfux reorganization and re-direction. Metabolism reprogramming in tumor cells facilitates the balance between the needs of energy supply and the synthesis of biological macromolecules. Targeting cell metabolism is not intended to interfere the energy supply of tumor cells but to affect the synthesis of metabolic rate, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of the tumor. hTe review focuses on the importance of metabolic reprogramming in tumor development and cancer therapy. We summarize what is currently known about metabolic reprogramming and establish a framework to understanding its contribution to the altered metabolism of cancer cells.%肿瘤细胞存在能量代谢异常,表现为糖酵解过度活跃,而线粒体有氧代谢削弱,被称为“Warburg效应”。最近的研究表明,肿瘤组织中的代谢异常远比我们之前认识的要复杂。尽管存在旺盛的糖酵解,实际上肿瘤组织仍然保留线粒体有氧代谢。另一方面,线粒体是肿瘤细胞合成代谢的主要场所之一。肿瘤组织还发现存在脂肪酸代谢、氨基酸代谢异常。肿瘤发生过程中,整个代谢网络在瘤基因、抑瘤基因主导下发生重编程,营养组织在代谢网络中的流向和流量被重新定义。肿瘤细胞代谢重编程的法则在于平

  16. Concentrations and transport of suspended sediment, nutrients, and pesticides in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during the 2011 Mississippi River flood, April through July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Heather L.; Coupe, Richard H.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2014-01-01

    the water-quality station located at Vicksburg, Mississippi. The majority of the suspended-sediment flux introduce into the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during the 2011 flood was in the form of fine-grained particles from the upper Mississippi River—77 percent of the suspended-sediment flux compared to 23 percent from the Ohio River. As water moved downstream along the lower Mississippi River, there were losses in suspended-sediment flux because of deposition and backwater areas. Fluxes showed a greater response to increased streamflow in the Atchafalaya River than in the lower Mississippi River. The result was a gain in suspended-sediment flux with distance downstream in the Atchafalaya River because of resuspension of previously deposited materials—particularly sand particles. Overall, 13 percent less suspended sediment left the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin than entered it from the confluence of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers during the flood. The loss in suspended-sediment flux during the flood accounted for 14 percent of the 2011 annual suspended-sediment flux loss within the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin. Nitrate composed approximately 70 percent of the total nitrogen flux at all of the sampled water-quality stations, excluding the Arkansas River. Almost 2.4 times more nitrate flux entered the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin from the upper Mississippi River than from the Ohio River. As nitrate moved down the lower Mississippi River and the Atchafalaya River, there were no substantial losses or gains in flux, indicating that nitrate moved conservatively within the subbasin during the 2011 flood. Although streamflow was the largest on record, nitrate flux during the flood period resulted in a zone of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico that was only the tenth largest on record. The flux of total phosphorus in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during the 2011 flood was strongly related

  17. Mercury Geochemistry of Gold Placer Tailings, Sediments, Bedrock, and Waters in the Lower Clear Creek Area, Shasta County, California - Report of Investigations, 2001-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Roger P.; Rytuba, James J.

    2008-01-01

    flood-plain ponds, tailings in a dredge pond, and active stream sediment in a Clear Creek backwater have elevated levels of methylmercury. Stream waters in the area show low mercury levels during both summer and winter base-flow conditions. During winter high flows total mercury increases by about one order of magnitude; this additional mercury is associated with suspended particulate material. Methylmercury is low in stream waters. Ponds in various environments generally have higher total mercury levels in waters than Clear Creek under base-flow conditions and higher methylmercury levels in both sediments and waters. Ponds are probably the main source of bioavailable mercury in the lower Clear Creek area. Several saline springs occur in the area. The saline waters are enriched in lithium, boron, and mercury, similar to connate waters that are expelled along thrust faults to the south on the west side of the Sacramento Valley. Saline springs may locally contribute some mercury to pond and drainage waters.

  18. Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-11-13

    This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat

  19. Tracing nutrient sources in the Mississippi River Basin, U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Periodic hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico near the mouth of the Mississippi River is of increasing concern. The condition is thought to be primarily the result of nitrate delivered to the Gulf by the Mississippi River. However, as much as half of the nitrogen transported by large rivers to coastal areas is in dissolved or particulate organic form, with the remainder primarily as nitrate. Nitrate is thought to be conservatively transported in the Mississippi and other large rivers, but reduction can occur in marshy pools and backwater channels. Thus, it is important to examine all forms of nitrogen and their potential transformations, in both in groundwater and in riverine environments. To provide critically needed information for the development of management strategies to reduce N loads and enhance N attenuation mechanisms, we have been using isotopic techniques to investigate the sources and cycling of nutrients at a number of sites in the Mississippi Basin (which includes the Ohio and Missouri River Basins) since 1996, in collaboration with several national monitoring programs. One of our most noteworthy finding was that about half of the POM in the Mississippi (and other big rivers in the USA) is composed of plankton and/or heterotrophic bacteria. This suggests that in-situ productivity may be a significant source of bioavailable organic matter contributing to the hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. Monthly samples from 19 river sites in the Basin sampled over 5 years showed that δ15N and δ13C were quite useful in discriminating among four major categories of POM: terrestrial soil, fresh terrestrial vegetation, aquatic macrophytes, and plankton/bacteria. The δ13C values for the sites ranged from about -35 to -20 per mille, and the δ15N values ranged from about -15 to +15 per mille. The isotopic data, along with ancillary chemical and hydrologic measurements, were also useful for documenting seasonal changes in in-situ processes. A pilot study in 2000

  20. New health and environmental risks in water for a new centry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael J. García-Villanova Ruiz

    2003-12-01

    intoxication, many of them with skin, lung and bladder cancers.Coastal and continental water eutrophycation is a broadly generalized phenomenon, which affects Spain too. There is a recent concern about it because toxigenic algal blooms are more and more frequent. There is an estimation that half of them have produced neuro or hepatotoxins in dams and backwaters. The surface accumulation of some species of blue-green algae with crusts or foams by the shore is been known as a cause for lethal intoxication of cattle. More frequently can be found human episodes with eyes irritation, rashes, vomiting, dyarrhea, fever and muscular and articulation pain in individuals after drinking or bathing in waters with foams from algae. The new spanish regulation stablishes a control for microcystine, with a limit of 1 μg/l.Waste waters may hold up to 100 especies of human pathogenic viruses. They usually cross through sewage treatment plants and survive in the water bodies for large periods, thus reaching the drinking water plants were they are not affected by the chlorine. However, only for a few there is evidence of transmission through water, as with the case of the Hepatitis A and E viruses. On the other hand, currently viral gastroenteritis is the second cause of infectious disease in developed countries. The agents are considered to be Rotavirus and Norovirus (Norwalk-like viruses with a hydric transmission.For years, Cryptosporidium has been considered an animal parasite, especially of cattle. In 1976 it was first recognized as a human pathogen, but not until 1983 it was documented the first epidemic transmitted by the water. In 1993 a big epidemic was declared at Milwaukee (Wisconsin with some 400.000 affected, after ingestion of water from a distribution system which showed to comply with all the legal standards. In inmunosuppressed patients, the infection is severe and with a high rate of death among those affected by SIDA. Conventional chlorination does not affect the oocyst

  1. Plantas de la Diáspora Africana en la botánica americana de la fase Colonial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Carney

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The revolutionary plant and ecological exchanges that accompanied European maritime expansion after 1492 is now widely appreciated. So, too, is the significance of plants new to Europeans for changing food preferences, cuisines, economies, and commerce over a much broader area of the world. The role of Amerindian maize and manioc in West Africa has received ample attention, as has Asian rice in the region. But the literature on the Columbian Exchange remains remarkably silent on the diffusion of indigenous African plants elsewhere and the means by which they dispersed. To do so, as this paper reveals, requires addressing the Atlantic slave trade in their dissemination as well as the role of enslaved Africans in establishing preferred dietary staples in the Americas. This paper examines the plants of African origin that became central to subsistence and economy in the era of plantation slavery. Three centers of agricultural domestication in sub-Saharan Africa contributed to the diversity of plant resources that sustained millions subsequently swept into transatlantic enslavement. The establishment of these crops in the Americas occurred through the "botanical gardens" of the dispossessed: plantation subsistence fields, dooryard gardens, and in agricultural plots of maroon communities. In drawing attention to the African Diaspora as one of plants as well as people, emphasis is placed on indigenous African knowledge systems. The expression of these knowledge systems in landscapes of bondage reflected prevalent power relations, food preferences, cultural identity, and struggles over the work process. In profiling the African plants established in the Americas, this paper seeks to correct distortion in narratives of the Columbian Exchange, which remains centered on European agency, crops of Amerindian and Asian origin and Africa as a backwater of global plant transfers. The objective is to promote historical recovery of the African role in colonial

  2. Short-Term Effects of the 2008 High-Flow Experiment on Macroinvertebrates in Colorado River Below Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Kincaid, Dustin W.; Cross, Wyatt F.; Kelly, Holly A.W.; Behn, Kathrine A.; White, Tyler; Hall, Robert O., Jr.; Baxter, Colden V.

    2010-01-01

    Glen Canyon Dam has dramatically altered the physical environment (especially discharge regime, water temperatures, and sediment inputs) of the Colorado River. High-flow experiments (HFE) that mimic one aspect of the natural hydrograph (floods) were implemented in 1996, 2004, and 2008. The primary goal of these experiments was to increase the size and total area of sandbar habitats that provide both camping sites for recreational users and create backwaters (areas of stagnant flow in the lee of return-current eddies) that may be important as rearing habitat for native fish. Experimental flows might also positively or negatively alter the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) sport fishery in the clear tailwater reach below Glen Canyon Dam, Ariz., and native fish populations in downstream reaches (for example, endangered humpback chub, Gila cypha) through changes in available food resources. We examined the short-term response of benthic macroinvertebrates to the March 2008 HFE at three sites [river mile 0 (RM 0, 15.7 miles downriver from the dam), RM 62, and RM 225] along the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam by sampling immediately before and then 1, 7, 14, and 30 days after the HFE. We selected these sites because of their importance to management; RM 0 has a valuable trout fishery, and RM 62 is the location of the largest population of the endangered humpback chub in the Grand Canyon. In addition to the short-term collection of samples, as part of parallel investigations, we collected 3 years of monthly (quarterly for RM 62) benthic macroinvertebrate samples that included 15 months of post-HFE data for all three sites, but processing of the samples is only complete for one site (RM 0). At RM 0, the HFE caused an immediate 1.75 g AFDM/m2 (expressed as grams ash-free dry mass, or AFDM) reduction of macroinvertebrate biomass that was driven by significant reductions in the biomass of the two dominant taxa in this reach-Potamopyrgus antipodarum (New

  3. Risk-based consequences of extreme natural hazard processes in mountain regions - Multi-hazard analysis in Tyrol (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttenlau, Matthias; Stötter, Johann

    2010-05-01

    incorporated with additional GIS and statistic data to a comprehensive property-by-property geodatabase of the existing elements and values. This stock of elements and values geodatabase is furthermore the consistent basis for all natural hazard analyses and enables the comparison of the results. The study follows the general accepted moduls (i) hazard analysis, (ii) exposition analysis, and (iii) consequence analysis, whereas the exposition analysis estimates the elements at risk with their corresponding damage potentials and the consequence analysis estimates the PMLs. This multi-hazard analysis focuses on process types with a high to extreme potential of negative consequences on a regional scale. In this context, (i) floodings, (ii) rockslides with the potential of corresponding consequence effects (backwater ponding and outburst flood), (iii) earthquakes, (iv) hail events, and (v) winter storms were considered as hazard processes. Based on general hazard analyses (hazard maps) concrete scenarios and their spatial affectedness were determined. For the different hazard processes, different vulnerability approaches were considered to demonstrate their sensitivity and implication on the results. Thus, no absolute values of losses but probable loss ranges were estimated. It can be shown, that the most serious amount of losses would arise from extreme earthquake events with loss burdens up to more than € 7 bn. solely on buildings and inventory. Possible extreme flood events could lead to losses between € 2 and 2.5 bn., whereas a severe hail swath which affects the central Inn valley could result in losses of ca. € 455 mill. (thereof € 285 mill. on vehicles). The potential most serious rockslide with additional consequence effects would result in losses up to ca. € 185 mill. and extreme winter storms can induce losses between € 100 mill. and 150 mill..

  4. 英文文摘

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    stretch of perennial backwater zone and the uppermost sediment location is 120 km from the dam. The tail river channel of the reservoir and shallow beach maintains the same evolution trend as before impoundment.The critical flow condition of the rapids and navigation channel in the reservoir area are all improved in varying degrees. Key words: sediment in reservoir; shallow beach evolution; navigation condition; Gezhouba reservoir On hydraulic issues of Gezhouba shiplocks DENG Ting-zhe JIN Feng PENG Ai-lin DENG Hao (Hydraulic Division of Changjiang Scientific Research Institute,Changjiang Water Resources Commission, Wuhan 430010,China) Abstract: The hydraulic phenomena occurring in the operation of three Gezhouba shiplocks with their operation water head approching to the design water head of 27 m and the observed data from the prototype locks and their hydraulic models are comprehensively analysed. It includes: flow velocity,flow pattern, surge wave propagation in the upper and lower lock approaches in the cases of lock filling and emptying; hydraulic characteristics of lock filling and emptying; flow cavitation, noise and vibration phenomena in the gallery sections at filling and emptying valves; hoist loads on the valve hoisting machinery, viberation characteristics of the lock valves etc. Some problems discovered in the operation and maintenance of the locks and corresponding treatment and improvement measures are also presented in this paper. Key words: shiplock design; characteristics analysis; hydraulic research; treatment measure; Gezhouba project On the design and operation of turbine generator sets for Gezhouba hydropower station LU Shi-min HUANG Meng-xing XIONG Teng-hui (Design Institute,Changjiang Water Resources Commission,Wuhan 430010,China) Abstract: Gezhouba hydropower station is the largest low waterhead hydropower station in the world, with the installation of 21 hydrogenerator sets(2 sets of 170 MW,19 sets of 125 MW). The runner diameter is the largest

  5. New health and environmental risks in water for a new centry Nuevo siglo, nuevos riesgos sanitarios y ambientales en el agua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael J. García-Villanova Ruiz

    2003-12-01

    intoxication, many of them with skin, lung and bladder cancers.Coastal and continental water eutrophycation is a broadly generalized phenomenon, which affects Spain too. There is a recent concern about it because toxigenic algal blooms are more and more frequent. There is an estimation that half of them have produced neuro or hepatotoxins in dams and backwaters. The surface accumulation of some species of blue-green algae with crusts or foams by the shore is been known as a cause for lethal intoxication of cattle. More frequently can be found human episodes with eyes irritation, rashes, vomiting, dyarrhea, fever and muscular and articulation pain in individuals after drinking or bathing in waters with foams from algae. The new spanish regulation stablishes a control for microcystine, with a limit of 1 μg/l.Waste waters may hold up to 100 especies of human pathogenic viruses. They usually cross through sewage treatment plants and survive in the water bodies for large periods, thus reaching the drinking water plants were they are not affected by the chlorine. However, only for a few there is evidence of transmission through water, as with the case of the Hepatitis A and E viruses. On the other hand, currently viral gastroenteritis is the second cause of infectious disease in developed countries. The agents are considered to be Rotavirus and Norovirus (Norwalk-like viruses with a hydric transmission.For years, Cryptosporidium has been considered an animal parasite, especially of cattle. In 1976 it was first recognized as a human pathogen, but not until 1983 it was documented the first epidemic transmitted by the water. In 1993 a big epidemic was declared at Milwaukee (Wisconsin with some 400.000 affected, after ingestion of water from a distribution system which showed to comply with all the legal standards. In inmunosuppressed patients, the infection is severe and with a high rate of death among those affected by SIDA. Conventional chlorination does not affect the oocyst

  6. BOOK REVIEW Cracking the Einstein Code: Relativity and the Birth of Black Hole Physics With an Afterword by Roy Kerr Cracking the Einstein Code: Relativity and the Birth of Black Hole Physics With an Afterword by Roy Kerr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    General relativity is arguably the most beautiful scientific theory ever conceived but its status within mainstream physics has vacillated since it was proposed in 1915. It began auspiciously with the successful explanation of the precession of Mercury and the dramatic confirmation of light-bending in the 1919 solar eclipse expedition, which turned Einstein into an overnight celebrity. Though little noticed at the time, there was also Karl Schwarzschild's discovery of the spherically symmetric solution in 1916 (later used to predict the existence of black holes) and Alexander Friedmann's discovery of the cosmological solution in 1922 (later confirmed by the discovery of the cosmic expansion). Then for 40 years the theory was more or less forgotten, partly because most physicists were turning their attention to the even more radical developments of quantum theory but also because the equations were too complicated to solve except in situations involving special symmetries or very weak gravitational fields (where general relativity is very similar to Newtonian theory). Furthermore, it was not clear that strong gravitational fields would ever arise in the real universe and, even if they did, it seemed unlikely that Einstein's equations could then be solved. So research in relativity became a quiet backwater as mainstream physics swept forward in other directions. Even Einstein lost interest, turning his attention to the search for a unified field theory. This book tells the remarkable story of how the tide changed in 1963, when the 28-year-old New Zealand mathematician Roy Kerr discovered an exact solution of Einstein's equations which represents a rotating black hole, thereby cracking the code of the title. The paper was just a few pages long, it being left for others to fill in the extensive beautiful mathematics which underlay the result, but it ushered in a golden age of relativity and is now one of the most cited works in physics. Coincidentally, Kerr