WorldWideScience

Sample records for backscattered electron imaging

  1. The complementary use of electron backscatter diffraction and ion channelling imaging for the characterization of nanotwins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Pantleon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    On the example of electrodeposited nickel films, it is shown that unique information on twins with dimensions on the nanoscale can be obtained by suitable combination of ion channelling imaging and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, whereas both (routine) single techniques cannot meet the...... for adjusting EBSD data based on ion channelling images are proposed. Thorough selection of the complementary techniques opens future perspectives for the investigation of other challenging samples with nanoscale features in the microstructure.......On the example of electrodeposited nickel films, it is shown that unique information on twins with dimensions on the nanoscale can be obtained by suitable combination of ion channelling imaging and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, whereas both (routine) single techniques cannot meet the...... this information with ion channelling imaging provides more representative insights into the microstructure, because it supplements the quantitative investigation of the number and width of twin lamellae with additional crystallographic orientation analysis provided by EBSD. To this end, two methods...

  2. Estimating transport properties of mortars using image analysis on backscattered electron images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pore structure of two ordinary Portland cement mortars at water-cement ratio of 0.35 and 0.70 was characterised using quantitative backscattered electron imaging. The mortars were cured and conditioned to produce a range of pore structure characteristics. Image analysis was used to characterise the pore structure in terms of simple morphological parameters such as resolvable porosity and the specific surface area. These were found to be correlated to measured transport coefficients (diffusivity, permeability and sorptivity), suggesting the feasibility of image analysis to derive valuable quantitative information describing the pore structure that can be used as input values for a transport prediction model. A simple analytical model incorporating tortuosity and constrictivity was used to predict oxygen diffusivity and a variant of the Kozeny-Carman model was used to predict oxygen permeability. The diffusion model tended to over-predict for the lower w/c ratio mortar, but the general agreement was reasonable, with 90% of the estimated values within a factor of two from the measured values. The modified Kozeny-Carman model, however, over-predicted all permeability values with an error of between half to one order of magnitude

  3. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  4. Advantages of application of the backscattered electron scanning image in the determination of soil structure and soil constituents

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ascaso; M.T. Garcia-Gonzalez; J. Wierzchoś

    1995-01-01

    Submicroscopic techniques can be broadly subdivided into the study of micromorphology and imaging of the arrangement of the soil particles and voids, and the microchemical analysis of soil components. In the authors opinion, one of the most promising tools in the micromorphology study of soil is the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) operating in Backscattered Electron emission mode (BSE) with the auxiliary Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS) as a microanalytical system. The emission of BSE ...

  5. Imaging of Non-Conductive Samples by Means of Low Energy Backscattered Electrons in SEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wandrol, Petr

    Prague : Czechoslovak Microscopy Society, 2007 - (Nebesářová, J.; Hozák, P.), s. 111-112 ISBN 978-80-239-9397-4. [Multinational Congress on Microscopy /8./. Prague (CZ), 17.06.2007-21.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB200650501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : non-conductive samples * low energy SEM * backscattered electrons * charging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  6. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pia C. Lansåker; Anders Hallén; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The v...

  7. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM

  8. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Lansåker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness dg—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM. The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for dg were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  9. Backscattered electron SEM imaging of resin sections from plant specimens: observation of histological to subcellular structure and CLEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, N W; Duncan, K E; Bourett, T M; Howard, R J

    2016-08-01

    We have refined methods for biological specimen preparation and low-voltage backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope that allow for observation at continuous magnifications of ca. 130-70 000 X, and documentation of tissue and subcellular ultrastructure detail. The technique, based upon early work by Ogura & Hasegawa (1980), affords use of significantly larger sections from fixed and resin-embedded specimens than is possible with transmission electron microscopy while providing similar data. After microtomy, the sections, typically ca. 750 nm thick, were dried onto the surface of glass or silicon wafer and stained with heavy metals-the use of grids avoided. The glass/wafer support was then mounted onto standard scanning electron microscopy sample stubs, carbon-coated and imaged directly at an accelerating voltage of 5 kV, using either a yttrium aluminum garnet or ExB backscattered electron detector. Alternatively, the sections could be viewed first by light microscopy, for example to document signal from a fluorescent protein, and then by scanning electron microscopy to provide correlative light/electron microscope (CLEM) data. These methods provide unobstructed access to ultrastructure in the spatial context of a section ca. 7 × 10 mm in size, significantly larger than the typical 0.2 × 0.3 mm section used for conventional transmission electron microscopy imaging. Application of this approach was especially useful when the biology of interest was rare or difficult to find, e.g. a particular cell type, developmental stage, large organ, the interface between cells of interacting organisms, when contextual information within a large tissue was obligatory, or combinations of these factors. In addition, the methods were easily adapted for immunolocalizations. PMID:26708578

  10. Analytical purpose electron backscattering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work an analytical purposes electron backscattering system improved at the Center of Applied Studies for Nuclear Development is described. This system can be applied for fast, exact and nondestructive testing of binary and AL/Cu, AL/Ni in alloys and for other applications

  11. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  12. Staining plastic blocks with triiodide to image cells and soft tissues in backscattered electron SEM of skeletal and dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, A

    2012-01-01

    Backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (BSE SEM) is an invaluable method for studying the histology of the hard, mineralised components of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) or other resin embedded skeletal and dental tissues. Intact tissues are studied in micro-milled or polished block faces with an electron-optical section thickness of the order of a half to one micron and with the area of the section as big as a whole--large or small--bone organ. However, BSE SEM does not give information concerning the distribution of uncalcified, 'soft', cellular and extracellular matrix components. This can be obtained by confocal microscopy of the same block and the two sorts of images merged but the blocks have to be studied in two microscope systems. The present work shows a new, simple and economic approach to visualising both components by using the triiodide ion in Lugol's iodine solution to stain the block surface prior to the application of any conductive coating--and the latter can be omitted if charging is suppressed by use of poor vacuum conditions in the SEM sample chamber. The method permits the use of archival tissue, and it will be valuable in studies of both normal growth and development and pathological changes in bones and joints, including osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, and tissue adaptation to implants. PMID:22828992

  13. A pseudo-3D approach based on electron backscatter diffraction and backscatter electron imaging to study the character of phase boundaries between Mg and long period stacking ordered phase in a Mg–2Y–Zn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar, Mehran, E-mail: m.afshar@mpie.de; Zaefferer, Stefan, E-mail: s.zaefferer@mpie.de

    2015-03-15

    In Mg–2 at.% Y–1 at.% Zn alloys, the LPSO (Long Period Stacking Ordered) phase is important to improve mechanical properties of the material. The aim of this paper is to present a study on the phase boundary character in these two-phase alloys. Using EBSD pattern analysis it was found that the 24R structure is the dominant LPSO phase structure in the current alloy. The phase boundary character between the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase was investigated using an improved pseudo-3D EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) technique in combination with BSE or SE (backscatter or secondary electron) imaging. A large amount of very low-angle phase boundaries was detected. The (0 0 0 2) plane in the Mg matrix which is parallel to the (0 0 0 24) plane in the LPSO phase was found to be the most frequent plane for these phase boundaries. This plane is supposed to be the habit plane of the eutectic co-solidification of the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase. - Highlights: • It is shown that for the investigated alloy the LPSO phase has mainly 24R crystal structure. • A new method is presented which allows accurate determination of the 5-parameter grain or phase boundary character. • It is found that the low-angle phase boundaries appearing in the alloy all have basal phase boundary planes.

  14. Identification of growth increments in the shell of the bivalve mollusc Arctica islandica using backscattered electron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karney, G B; Butler, P G; Scourse, J D; Richardson, C A; Lau, K H; Czernuszka, J T; Grovenor, C R M

    2011-01-01

    Annually resolved growth increments in the shell of the bivalve mollusc Arctica islandica have previously been used in combination with geochemical measurements to successfully construct high-resolution proxy records of past marine environmental conditions. However, to ensure the accuracy of these paleoenvironmental reconstructions it is essential that the annual growth series of increments within the examined shells are reliably identified, and can be distinguished from spurious lines caused by nonannual perturbations such as those resulting from storm disturbance. The current methods used for identifying the growth increment series are sometimes compromised because of ambiguity that results from the employed preparation methods. Here it is shown that backscattered electron imaging of polished shell cross sections may be used to clearly discriminate between the two compositionally and structurally distinct increments that comprise 1 year of outer shell growth. This method, involving minimal specimen preparation, is likely to be primarily useful as a validation technique of particular value in cases where increment identification using existing methods is difficult or ambiguous. PMID:21118202

  15. Harvesting backscatter electrons for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: An innovative technique is used to harvest backscatter electrons for the treatment of superficial small lesions of skin, oral cavity, and rectum where a significant dose gradient and maximum surface dose is desired. Methods and Materials: Backscatter electrons are harvested out of the primary electron beams from the linear accelerators. The design consists of a short cylindrical cone that fits snugly over a long cylindrical electron cone. The short cylindrical cone has a thick circular plate of high atomic number medium (Pb) attached to the distal end, and a lateral slit of variable length and width. The width of the slit could be closed as desired by rotating the two cones and the length can be increased by lowering the short cylindrical cone. Primary electrons strike the Pb plate perpendicularly and produce backscatter electrons that pass through the lateral slit for treatment. Using film and a parallel plate ion chamber, backscattered electron dose characteristics are studied. Results: The depth dose characteristic of the backscatter electron is very similar to that of the 0.2 mm Al half-value layer x-ray beam that is commonly used for the intracavitary and superficial lesions. The backscatter electron energy is nearly constant and effectively ≤ 1 MeV from the clinical megavoltage beams. The backscatter electron dose rate of 0.32-0.8 Gy/min could be achieved from modern accelerators without any modification. The beam flatness is dependent on the slit size and the depth of treatment, but is satisfactory to treat small lesions. Conclusions: The measured data for backscatter electron energy, fluence, depth dose, flatness, dose rate, and absolute dose indicates that the harvested backscattered electrons are suitable for clinical use

  16. Backscattered electron imaging: The role in calcified tissue and implant analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloebaum, R.D.; Bachus, K.N.; Boyce, T.M. (Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (151F), Salt Lake City, UT (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The working distance and tilt studies helped to clarify the influences of specimen variability when the BSE mode is used in calcified tissue research. This work has shown that the BSEPs of cortical bone may be accurately maintained within 2 percent error over a 10 degree range of tilt, or 300 microns working distance variation. If future bone and implant investigators wish to conduct accurate, quantitative mineral microanalysis in bone, then standard grinding and polishing techniques should be adequate if calibration procedures are developed. The BSEP characteristics of the pure metals make them suitable to be used for calibrating the BSE signal. BSE analysis, with correlated biomechanical studies, will lead us to a better understanding of the relationships between structure, function, and mineral content in bone. On-line BSEP analysis techniques will expand our understanding of the mineralization events in bone which are associated with aging, weightlessness, pharmaceutical therapies, and the presence of biomaterials. The future of the BSE imaging technology and the contributions to be made in understanding the histometry, biomechanics and mineral content of bone as well as bone's response to implant materials has just begun to unfold. 74 references.

  17. Electron backscatter diffraction in materials characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Stojakovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD is a powerful technique that captures electron diffraction patterns from crystals, constituents of material. Captured patterns can then be used to determine grain morphology, crystallographic orientation and chemistry of present phases, which provide complete characterization of microstructure and strong correlation to both properties and performance of materials. Key milestones related to technological developments of EBSD technique have been outlined along with possible applications using modern EBSD system. Principles of crystal diffraction with description of crystallographic orientation, orientation determination and phase identification have been described. Image quality, resolution and speed, and system calibration have also been discussed. Sample preparation methods were reviewed and EBSD application in conjunction with other characterization techniques on a variety of materials has been presented for several case studies. In summary, an outlook for EBSD technique was provided.

  18. Exploring backscattered imaging in low voltage FE-SEM

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, P.; Micklethwaite, S.; Harrington, J; Dixon, M.; Brydson, R; Hondow, N

    2015-01-01

    Contrast levels in backscattered SEM images were investigated, utilising stage deceleration for low voltage imaging and also electron energy filtering. Image contrast variations are explained via use of Monte Carlo simulations which can predict the optimum accelerating and filter voltages for imaging complex sample mixtures.

  19. Numerical study of electron backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of electrons which undergo only elastic scattering has been studied by a method similar to the Sn method in reactor physics. The electrons were assumed to have a normal incidence on the plane surface of a semi-infinite medium. The method was first tested for isotropic scattering. Good agreement was obtained with available analytical results for the albedo and for the reflected angular distribution. Calculations were then performed on aluminium and gold at 1 keV electron energy. The differential cross sections were taken in analytical form from the literature. It was found that at least 48 directional cosines are needed for good accuracy. The results for the albedo and the reflected angular distribution were compared to Monte Carlo calculations with very good agreement. Some efforts to obtain also the path length distribution were in vain, since the numerical method is not suitable for this purpose. 9 refs, 2 figs

  20. Demonstration of differential backscatter absorption gas imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) is a technique that uses infrared active imaging to generate real-time video imagery of gas plumes. We describe a method that employs imaging at two wavelengths (absorbed and not absorbed by the gas to be detected) to allow wavelength-differential BAGI. From the frames collected at each wavelength, an absorbance image is created that displays the differential absorbance of the atmosphere between the imager and the backscatter surface. This is analogous to a two-dimensional topographic differential absorption lidar or differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurement. Gas plumes are displayed, but the topographic scene image is removed. This allows a more effective display of the plume image, thus ensuring detection under a wide variety of conditions. The instrument used to generate differential BAGI is described. Data generated by the instrument are presented and analyzed to estimate sensitivity. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America

  1. Present State of Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Prospective Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzer, R A; Field, D P; Adams, B L; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    2008-10-24

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), when employed as an additional characterization technique to a scanning electron microscope (SEM), enables individual grain orientations, local texture, point-to-point orientation correlations, and phase identification and distributions to be determined routinely on the surfaces of bulk polycrystals. The application has experienced rapid acceptance in metallurgical, materials, and geophysical laboratories within the past decade (Schwartz et al. 2000) due to the wide availability of SEMs, the ease of sample preparation from the bulk, the high speed of data acquisition, and the access to complementary information about the microstructure on a submicron scale. From the same specimen area, surface structure and morphology of the microstructure are characterized in great detail by the relief and orientation contrast in secondary and backscatter electron images, element distributions are accessed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), or cathodoluminescence analysis, and the orientations of single grains and phases can now be determined, as a complement, by EBSD.

  2. Cell surface and cell outline imaging in plant tissues using the backscattered electron detector in a variable pressure scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Talbot, Mark J; White, Rosemary G

    2013-01-01

    Background Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been used for high-resolution imaging of plant cell surfaces for many decades. Most SEM imaging employs the secondary electron detector under high vacuum to provide pseudo-3D images of plant organs and especially of surface structures such as trichomes and stomatal guard cells; these samples generally have to be metal-coated to avoid charging artefacts. Variable pressure-SEM allows examination of uncoated tissues, and provides a flexible range...

  3. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian;

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fis to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fis species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments......, a cod (Gadus morhua) was scanned with both a BK Medical ProFocus 2202 ultrasound scanner and a Toshiba Aquilion ONE computed tomography (CT) scanner. The US images of the fis were compared with US images created using the ultrasound simulation program Field II. The center frequency of the transducer...... is 10 MHz and the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at the focus point is 0.54 mm in the lateral direction. The transducer model in Field II was calibrated using a wire phantom to validate the simulated point spread function. The inputs to the simulation were the CT image data of the fis converted to...

  4. Effects of Odanacatib on bone mineralization density distribution in thoracic spine and femora of ovariectomized adult rhesus monkeys: a quantitative backscattered electron imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Roschger, Paul; Fisher, John E; Duong, Le T; Klaushofer, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Odanacatib (ODN) has been developed as a selective inhibitor of cathepsin K, the major cysteine protease in osteoclasts. In adult rhesus monkeys, treatment with ODN prevents ovariectomy-induced bone loss in lumbar vertebrae and hip. In this study, we evaluate the effects of ODN on bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) by quantitative backscattered electron imaging in vertebral spongiosa, distal femoral metaphyseal and cortical shaft from monkeys (aged 16-23 years), treated with vehicle (n=5) or ODN (6 mg/kg, n=4 or 30 mg/kg, n=4, PO daily) for 21 months. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was measured in a subset of distal femoral samples. In lumbar vertebrae there was a shift to higher mineralization in samples from ODN-treated groups, compared to vehicle: CaMean (+4%), CaPeak (+3%), CaWidth (-9%), CaLow (-28%) in the 6 mg/kg group and CaMean (+5.1%, p<0.023), CaPeak (+3.4%, p<0.046), CaWidth (-15.7%, p=0.06) and CaLow (-38.2%, p<0.034) in the 30 mg/kg group. In distal femoral metaphyseal cancellous bone, there was a clear tendency toward a dose-dependent increase in matrix mineralization, as in the spine. However, primary and osteonal bone of the distal cortical diaphyses showed no significant change in BMDD, whereas bone mineral density was significantly increased after treatment. In ovariectomized monkeys, this study shows that ODN treatment increased trabecular BMDD, consistent with its previously reported ability to reduce cancellous remodeling. Here, ODN also showed no changes in BMDD in cortical bone sites, consistent with its actions on maintaining endocortical and stimulating periosteal bone formation. PMID:23179105

  5. Working at higher magnifications in scanning electron microscopy with secondary and backscattered electrons on metal coated biological specimens and imaging macromolecular cell membrane structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K R

    1985-01-01

    Membrane structures of macromolecular dimensions were imaged with high resolution secondary electron type I (SE-I) signal contrasts on metal coated biological specimens. The quality of the surface information was strongly dependent on the signal used for microscopy and on the properties of metal films, i.e., thickness, continuity, structure and decoration effects. Films of 10 nm thickness produced so much type II electrons that identical images were obtained with the conventional SE-II and BSE-II signals. In such images, the type I SE signal was so low that only very weak contrasts were recognizable. If the films--continuous or discontinuous--were composed of large metal aggregates (gold and platinum) a strong micro-roughness contrast was produced by the type II signal. At high magnifications (100,000 x) this background signal greatly reduced the S/N ratio of the SE-I signal. A similar effect was previously shown to be produced by the type III background signal. The type II background signal minimized when continuous films of small aggregates (tantalum and chromium) were applied. SE-I contrast dominated in the image if the film thickness was limited to 1 nm. Additionally, it was found that gold and platinum decorated membrane surface structures, less than 20 nm in size, and did not reveal all the topographic information available (size, shape, orientation spacing of small surface features) but merely displayed center-to-center distances. These decoration effects were avoided and extensive topographic information was obtained through surface coating with Ta or Cr. PMID:4095499

  6. Electron backscattering from solid targets: Elastic scattering calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Backscattering coefficient of low-energy electrons. • Elastic scattering cross sections. • Analytical expression of the numerical coefficient in the Nigam atomic screening factor. - Abstract: Analytical expression of the target atomic number dependence of the numerical coefficient in the Nigam atomic screening factor is proposed here to approximate the Rutherford elastic scattering cross sections for slow electron beams impinging on selected solid targets (from Be to Au) in the primary energy range 1–4 keV. Applications are then proposed in terms of Monte Carlo calculation of backscattering coefficient. In this respect, tabulations of backscattering coefficients are here reported for slow electrons in solid targets of interest pointing out a reasonable agreement with the data available in the literature. Analytical expressions of the target atomic number dependence of the electron backscattering coefficient is also suggested for selected electron primary energies ranging from 1 to 4 keV allowing thus an accurate determination of backscattering coefficients for low-energy electrons in solid targets without any resort in Monte Carlo type calculations

  7. Characterization of a γ-backscattering imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, N.; Fajardo, E.; Blanco, W.; Cristancho, F.

    2012-02-01

    The Compton Camera is a γ-backscattering imaging device that allows us to obtain images of hidden objects. In order to evaluate the factors that affect the quality of those images, experiments were carried out to determine its response to different materials. Mathematical methods have been developed to quantify the image quality.

  8. A backscattered x-ray imager for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Eric Jude L.; Dibianca, Frank A.; Shukla, Hemant; Gulabani, Daya

    2005-04-01

    Conventional X-ray radiographic systems rely on transmitted photons for the production of images. Backscatter imaging makes use of the more abundant scattered photons for image formation. Specifically, incoherently (Compton) scattered X-ray photons are detected and used for image formation in this modality of medical imaging. However, additional information is obtained when the transmitted X-ray photons are also detected and used. Transmission radiography produces a two-dimensional image of a three dimensional system, therefore image information from a shallower object is often contaminated by image information from underlying objects. Backscattered x-ray imaging largely overcomes this deficiency by imaging depth selectively, which reduces corruption of shallow imaging information by information from deeper objects lying under it. Backscattered x-ray imaging may be particularly useful for examining anatomical structures at shallow depths beneath the skin. Some typical applications for such imaging might be breast imaging, middle ear imaging, imaging of skin melanomas, etc. Previous investigations, by way of theoretical calculations and computational simulations into the feasibility of this kind of imaging have uncovered high-contrast and SNR parameters. Simulations indicate that this method can be used for imaging relatively high-density objects at depths of up to approximately five centimeters below the surface. This paper presents both theoretical and experimental SNR results on this new medical imaging modality.

  9. Profiling of back-scattered electrons in opposed magnetic field of a Twin Electron Beam Gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron gun is extensively used in material processing, physical vapour deposition and atomic vapour based laser processes. In these processes where the electron beam is incident on the substrate, a significant fraction of electron beam gets back-scattered from the target surface. The trajectory of this back scattered electron beam depends on the magnetic field in the vicinity. The fraction of back-scattered depends on the atomic number of the target metal and can be as high as ∼40% of the incident beam current. These back-scattered electrons can cause undesired hot spots and also affect the overall process. Hence, the study of the trajectory of these back-scattered electrons is important. This paper provides the details of experimentally mapped back-scattered electrons of a 2×20kW Twin Electron Beam Gun (TEBG) in opposed magnetic field i.e. with these guns placed at 180° to each other.

  10. Measurement of crystal misorientation distribution by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel and nickel based alloy is enhanced by plastic strain induced in the material, although the reason why has not been fully understood. Since stress corrosion cracking begins from small crack initiation and its growth, it is important to know the inhomogeneous distribution of plastic strain. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) enables us to measure crystal orientations on specimen surface with a spatial resolution of nano-meter order. The magnitude of local plastic strain can be estimated from change in crystal orientation (misorientation) obtained. In this study, distributions of the misorientation were evaluated by using EBSD. A tensile specimen made of pure copper was subjected to tensile test to introduce plastic strain. From changes in surface images of the specimen during the test, distribution of plastic strain was identified by using the image correlation technique and was compared with distribution of misorientation obtained by EBSD measurement. It was revealed that the misorientation correlates well with dislocation density introduced by deformation rather than with local plastic strain. A data processing technique for improving accuracy of measured data of crystal orientation was developed and was successfully applied to obtain distributions of misorientation. The improved misorientation map showed that the misorientation tended to concentrate at grain boundaries. Influence of setting parameters in the new processing technique was investigated. Also, other techniques for improving a quality of distribution map were discussed. Finally, a procedure was shown for getting qualified misorientation distribution. (author)

  11. Source point calibration from an arbitrary electron backscattering pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Niels Christian Krieger

    1999-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the position of the source point is a requirement if electron backscattering patterns (EBSPs) are to be used for crystal orientation measurements or other types of measurements which demand a geometrical analysis of the patterns. Today, possibly the most popular method for...

  12. Analysis of a proposed Compton backscatter imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James M.; Jacoby, Barry A.

    1994-03-01

    One-sided imaging techniques are currently being used in nondestructive evaluation of surfaces and shallow subsurface structures. In this work we present both analytical calculations and detailed Monte Carlo simulations aimed at assessing the capability of a proposed Compton backscattering imaging technique designed to detect and characterize voids located several centimeters below the surface of a solid.

  13. Electron backscattering rates of light elements in Moliere approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron backscattering rates of light elements (atomic number Z = 6, 13, 29) are evaluated for electron energies of E = 20 ... 60 keV. The scattering amplitude in Moliere approximation is expanded as a series. The series elements are calculated in closed form with the aid of substitute functions. By comparison with the first Born approximation this yields correction factors of 1 ... 1,25. (orig.) 891 WBU

  14. X-ray backscatter imaging for radiography by selective detection and snapshot: Evolution, development, and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, Daniel

    Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) is a single-sided imaging technique that uses the penetrating power of radiation and unique interaction properties of radiation with matter to image subsurface features. CBI has a variety of applications that include non-destructive interrogation, medical imaging, security and military applications. Radiography by selective detection (RSD), lateral migration radiography (LMR) and shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) are different CBI techniques that are being optimized and developed. Radiography by selective detection (RSD) is a pencil beam Compton backscatter imaging technique that falls between highly collimated and uncollimated techniques. Radiography by selective detection uses a combination of single- and multiple-scatter photons from a projected area below a collimation plane to generate an image. As a result, the image has a combination of first- and multiple-scatter components. RSD techniques offer greater subsurface resolution than uncollimated techniques, at speeds at least an order of magnitude faster than highly collimated techniques. RSD scanning systems have evolved from a prototype into near market-ready scanning devices for use in a variety of single-sided imaging applications. The design has changed to incorporate state-of-the-art detectors and electronics optimized for backscatter imaging with an emphasis on versatility, efficiency and speed. The RSD system has become more stable, about 4 times faster, and 60% lighter while maintaining or improving image quality and contrast over the past 3 years. A new snapshot backscatter radiography (SBR) CBI technique, shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR), has been developed from concept and proof-of-principle to a functional laboratory prototype. SABR radiography uses digital detection media and shaded aperture configurations to generate near-surface Compton backscatter images without scanning, similar to how transmission radiographs are taken. Finally, a

  15. Phase Identification of Dual-Phase (DP980) Steels by Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Nanoindentation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Ruimi, Annie; Field, David P

    2016-02-01

    Phase identification of multi-phase materials provides essential information relating the material to its mechanical properties. In this study we selected DP980, a type of dual-phase steel, to investigate the content of martensite and ferrite grains. A combination of advanced techniques was used to provide detailed and precise information of the microstructure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to provide observations of the sample surface at different scales. Martensite and ferrite phases of DP980 were further identified and characterized using electron backscatter diffraction and scanning probe microscopy. Results obtained with nanoindentation tests confirmed that the differences in nanohardness values in single-phase grains are martensite and ferrite with different surface heights shown by scanning probe microscopy. The similarity shown in the image quality map and scanning probe microscopy proves that a large fraction of martensite can be distinguished in this undeformed material using image quality parameters obtained during electron backscatter diffraction imaging. PMID:26781200

  16. Detection and imaging in strongly backscattering randomly layered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echoes from small reflectors buried in the heavy clutter are weak and difficult to distinguish from the medium backscatter. Detection and imaging with sensor arrays in such media require filtering out the unwanted backscatter and enhancing the echoes from the reflectors that we wish to locate. We consider a filtering and detection approach based on the singular value decomposition of the local cosine transform of the array response matrix. The algorithm is general and can be used for detection and imaging in the heavy clutter, but its analysis depends on the model of the cluttered medium. This paper is concerned with the analysis of the algorithm in finely layered random media. We obtain a detailed characterization of the singular values of the transformed array response matrix and justify the systematic approach of the filtering algorithm for detecting and refining the time windows that contain the echoes that are useful in imaging

  17. Reproducible methods for calibrating the backscattered electron signal for quantitative assessment of mineral content in bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, T.M.; Bloebaum, R.D.; Bachus, K.N.; Skedros, J.G. (VA Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging shows promise for orthopaedic and bone research. BSE images of bone may be captured on-line directly from the scanning electron microscope (SEM), and then analyzed to produce a backscattered electron profile (BSEP), a modified image graylevel histogram which is representative of the mineral content in bone. The goals of this work were (1) develop a reproducible graylevel calibration technique for bone specimens, and (2) determine a conservative time interval during which SEM operating conditions would remain stable. Calibration standards containing pure aluminum and pure magnesium wires were placed in the SEM with human cancellous bone. Baseline imaging conditions were first established by adjusting the SEM until the bone image displayed good resolution and graylevel separation between regions of different mineral content. Microscope brightness and contrast controls were randomly changed to initiate the new operating conditions of another imaging session, and graylevel values from the calibration metals were used to readjust the microscope back to baseline operating conditions. Weighted mean graylevel values of the BSEPs from calibration trials were compared to those of the baseline. Data showed that bone images could be reproduced within 1.2 percent. It was also concluded that our equipment required calibration checks at 20 minute intervals.

  18. Many-beam dynamical simulation of electron backscatter diffraction patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Aimo; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Sweeney, Francis; Day, Austin P; Parbrook, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present an approach for the simulation of complete electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns where the relative intensity distributions in the patterns are accurately reproduced. The Bloch wave theory is applied to describe the electron diffraction process. For the simulation of experimental patterns with a large field of view, a large number of reflecting planes has to be taken into account. This is made possible by the Bethe perturbation of weak reflections. Very good agreement is obtained for simulated and experimental patterns of gallium nitride GaN{0001} at 20kV electron energy. Experimental features like zone-axis fine structure and higher-order Laue zone rings are accurately reproduced. We discuss the influence of the diffraction of the incident beam in our experiment. PMID:17126489

  19. Transport equation theory of electron backscattering and x-ray production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transport equation theory of electron backscattering and x ray production is derived and applied to energy dissipation of 30-KeV electrons for copper as a function of depth and to the energy distribution of backscattered electrons for copper, aluminum, and gold. These results are plotted and compared with experiment. Plots for variations of backscattering with atomic number and with angle of incidence, and polar plots of backscattering for 30-keV electrons at normal incidence are also presented. 10 references, seven figures

  20. Correcting for 3D distortion when using backscattered electron detectors in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    A variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) can produce a topographic surface relief of a physical object under examination, in addition to its two-dimensional (2D) image. This topographic surface relief is especially helpful when dealing with porous rock because it may elucidate the pore-space structure as well as grain shape and size. Whether the image accurately reproduces the physical object depends on the management of the hardware, acquisition, and postprocessing. Two problems become apparent during testing: (a) a topographic surface relief of a precision ball bearing is distorted and does not correspond to the physical dimensions of the actual sphere and (b) an image of a topographic surface relief of a Berea sandstone is geometrically tilted and topographically distorted even after standard corrections are applied. The procedure presented here is to ensure the veracity of the image, and includes: (a) adjusting the brightness and contrast levels originally provided by the manufacturer and (b) tuning the amplifiers of the backscatter detector plates to be equal to each other, and producing zero voltage when VPSEM is idle. This procedure is tested and verified on the said two physical samples. SCANNING 31: 59-64, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:19204999

  1. Energy Filtering and Coaxial Detection of the Backscattered Electrons in Scanning Electron Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chang-Zhong; P. Morin; N. Rosenberg

    2000-01-01

    A new detection system in scanning electron microscope, which filters in energy and detects the backscattered electrons close to the microscope axis, is described. This technique ameliorates the dependence of the back. scat tering coefficient on atomic number, and suppresses effectively the relief contrast at the same time. Therefore this new method is very suitable to the composition analysis.

  2. Automated determination of crystal orientations from electron backscattering patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Niels Christian Krieger

    1994-01-01

    pattern recognition procedure which enables 8 to 12 bands to be localized in typical EBSPs from a modern system. It will be described, how these automatically localized bands can be indexed and used for optimal estimation of the unknown crystal orientations. A necessary prerequisite for precise......The electron backscattering pattern (EBSP) technique is widely accepted as being an extremely powerful tool for measuring the crystallographic orientation of individual crystallites in polycrystalline materials. Procedures which allow crystal orientations to be calculated on the bases of the...... determination of crystallographic orientations from EBSPs is accurate knowledge of three calibration parameters which describe the position of the point from which the patterns are emitted relative to the phosphor screen on which they are recorded. This thesis will describe a novel method by which these...

  3. Electron backscatter diffraction: Strategies for reliable data acquisition and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) software packages there are many user choices both in data acquisition and in data processing and display. In order to extract maximum scientific value from an inquiry, it is helpful to have some guidelines for best practice in conducting an EBSD investigation. The purpose of this article therefore is to address selected topics of EBSD practice, in a tutorial manner. The topics covered are a brief summary on the principles of EBSD, specimen preparation, calibration of an EBSD system, experiment design, speed of data acquisition, data clean-up, microstructure characterisation (including grain size) and grain boundary characterisation. This list is not meant to cover exhaustively all areas where EBSD is used, but rather to provide a resource consisting of some useful strategies for novice EBSD users.

  4. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, Thomas Jan; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Sommers, Ricky; Goers, Uta-Barbara; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of landmine detection using neutron backscattering imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datema, Cor P. E-mail: c.datema@iri.tudelft.nl; Bom, Victor R.; Eijk, Carel W.E. van

    2003-11-01

    Neutron backscattering is a technique that has successfully been applied to the detection of non-metallic landmines. Most of the effort in this field has concentrated on single detectors that are scanned across the soil. Here, two new approaches are presented in which a two-dimensional image of the hydrogen distribution in the soil is made. The first method uses an array of position-sensitive {sup 3}He-tubes that is placed in close proximity of the soil. The second method is based on coded aperture imaging. Here, thermal neutrons from the soil are projected onto a detector which is typically placed one to several meters above the soil. Both methods use a pulsed D/D neutron source. The Monte Carlo simulation package GEANT 4 was used to investigate the performance of both imaging systems.

  6. Towards high accuracy calibration of electron backscatter diffraction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingard, Ken [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Day, Austin, E-mail: Austin.Day@ADSci.co.uk [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Claremont House, Lydney, GL15 5DX (United Kingdom); Maurice, Claire [Ecole des Mines, Centre SMS-UMR CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Quested, Peter [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    For precise orientation and strain measurements, advanced Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) techniques require both accurate calibration and reproducible measurement of the system geometry. In many cases the pattern centre (PC) needs to be determined to sub-pixel accuracy. The mechanical insertion/retraction, through the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) chamber wall, of the electron sensitive part of modern EBSD detectors also causes alignment and positioning problems and requires frequent monitoring of the PC. Optical alignment and lens distortion issues within the scintillator, lens and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera combination of an EBSD detector need accurate measurement for each individual EBSD system. This paper highlights and quantifies these issues and demonstrates the determination of the pattern centre using a novel shadow-casting technique with a precision of {approx}10 {mu}m or {approx}1/3 CCD pixel. -- Research highlights: {yields} Issues with accurate EBSD calibration are discussed. {yields} Optical distortion data for 17 EBSD detectors are tabulated. {yields} A new shadow-casting system is demonstrated; it gives a pattern centre precision of {approx}10 {mu}m and allows changes to be observed on the live EBSP.

  7. Monochromatic hard X-ray generators using laser-electron compton backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional hard X-ray sources for medical/industrial use such as X-ray tubes generate broadband white light. Such X-ray tubes are inefficient sources of radiation for medical imaging, because only a small part of radiation contributes to imaging and a large part of radiation causes radiation hazard. A tunable monochromatic hard X-ray source by laser-electron Compton backscattering would be an ideal source of radiation for medical imaging. Its energy spectrum can be optimized for the best absorption energy of contrast agent such as Iodine (33.17 keV), Indium (27.95 keV) or Gadolium (50.2 keV). It is also possible to upgrade contrast by digital subtract imaging technology. We present several schemes of Compton backscattering for the generation of high-flux tunable monochromatic X-ray: -photocathode X-band normal-conducting RF linac and pulse Nd:YAG/ (or Ti:Sapphire) laser -CW superconducting accelerator with energy recovery and CW diode-pumped solid-state laser -CW superconducting accelerator and free electron laser. Photon fluxes and energy spectra of the output hard X-ray for the various schemes have been estimated

  8. Feasibility of using backscattered muons for archeological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Use of nondestructive methods to accurately locate and characterize underground objects such as rooms and tools found at archeological sites is ideal to preserve these historic sites. High-energy cosmic ray muons are very sensitive to density variation and have been used to image volcanoes and archeological sites such as the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids. Muons are subatomic particles produced in the upper atmosphere that penetrate the earth's crust up to few kilometers. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale making it useful for this type of work. However, the muon detector must be placed below the target of interest. For imaging volcanoes, the upper portion is imaged when the detector is placed on the earth's surface at the volcano's base. For sites of interest beneath the ground surface, the muon detector would need to be placed below the site in a tunnel or borehole. Placing the detector underground can be costly and may disturb the historical site. We will assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upward traveling muons, to eliminate the current constraint of positioning the detector below the target. This work consists of three parts 1) determine the backscattered flux rate from theory, 2) distinguish backscattered from forward scattered muons at the detector, and 3) validate the theoretical results with field experimentation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi; Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong; Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-09-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone-tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution-function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella-patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage zone of

  10. Ion beam polishing for three-dimensional electron backscattered diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Ubhi, H.S.;

    2013-01-01

    Serial sectioning by focused ion beam milling for three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction (3D-EBSD) can create surface damage and amorphization in certain materials and consequently reduce the EBSD signal quality. Poor EBSD signal causes longer data acquisition time due to signal...... averaging and/or poor 3D-EBSD data quality. In this work a low kV focused ion beam was successfully implemented to automatically polish surfaces during 3D-EBSD of La- and Nb-doped strontium titanate of volume 12.6 × 12.6 × 3.0 μm. The key to achieving this technique is the combination of a defocused low k......V high current ion beam and line scan milling. The line scan was used to restrict polishing to the sample surface and the ion beam was defocused to ensure the beam contacted the complete sample surface. In this study 1 min polishing time per slice increases total acquisition time by approximately 3...

  11. Multi-beam backscatter image data processing techniques employed to EM 1002 system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, W.A.; Chakraborty, B.

    backscatter intensities recorded in the raw (*.all) files are corrected during data acquisition for backscatter employing Lambert’s law (Simrad Model) [4]. However, for lower incidence angles (within the 0-25º) it was determined that the gain settings... of seabed during online data acquisition. Thus there will be image distortion, therefore, above correction is made during processing the raw backscatter strengths. • Lambert’s law removal: As discussed in preceding sections [4], the raw data is treated...

  12. Semi-automated characterization of the γ' phase in Ni-based superalloys via high-resolution backscatter imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size distribution and volume fraction of the γ' phase in Ni-based superalloys plays a critical role in microstructural evolution and mechanical properties. Automated analysis of images is often desired for rapid quantitative characterization of these microstructures. Backscatter electron imaging of specimens in which the γ' phase has been selectively etched yields images that can be more readily segmented with image processing algorithms than other imaging techniques. Utilization of this combination of sample preparation and imaging technique allows for the rapid collection of microstructural data.

  13. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution–function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella–patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage

  14. Characterization of calcium and zinc spatial distributions at the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction by synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis combined with backscattered electron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongbin; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Qu, Jin; Xu, Daqi [Department of Sports Medicine, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Wu, Tianding; Cao, Yong [Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Zhou, Jingyong; Zheng, Cheng [Department of Sports Medicine, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Hu, Jianzhong, E-mail: jianzhonghu@hotmail.com [Department of Sports Medicine, Research Center of Sports Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China)

    2015-09-01

    Tendon attaches to bone through a functionally graded fibrocartilage zone, including uncalcified fibrocartilage (UF), tidemark (TM) and calcified fibrocartilage (CF). This transition zone plays a pivotal role in relaxing load transfer between tendon and bone, and serves as a boundary between otherwise structurally and functionally distinct tissue types. Calcium and zinc are believed to play important roles in the normal growth, mineralization, and repair of the fibrocartilage zone of bone–tendon junction (BTJ). However, spatial distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of BTJ and their distribution–function relationship are not totally understood. Thus, synchrotron radiation-based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μXRF) in combination with backscattered electron imaging (BEI) was employed to characterize the distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of rabbit patella–patellar tendon complex (PPTC). For the first time, the unique distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were clearly mapped by this method. The distributions of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of the PPTC were inhomogeneous. A significant accumulation of zinc was exhibited in the transition region between UF and CF. The highest zinc content (3.17 times of that of patellar tendon) was found in the TM of fibrocartilage zone. The calcium content began to increase near the TM and increased exponentially across the calcified fibrocartilage region towards the patella. The highest calcium content (43.14 times of that of patellar tendon) was in the transitional zone of calcified fibrocartilage region and the patella, approximately 69 μm from the location with the highest zinc content. This study indicated, for the first time, that there is a differential distribution of calcium and zinc at the fibrocartilage zone of PPTC. These observations reveal new insights into region-dependent changes across the fibrocartilage

  15. Angular distribution of elastic electron backscattering from surfaces: determination of the electron inelastic mean free path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of analytical techniques based on measurements of electron elastic-backscattering probabilities stimulated an interest in the theoretical description of such phenomena. The most accurate and reliable theoretical models involve Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron trajectories in solids; however, this approach generally requires considerable computer effort. It has been shown that the performance of a modified analytical theory originally proposed by Oswald et al (1993 J. Electron Spectrosc. Relat. Phenom. 61 251), designated with the acronym OKGM, compares reasonably well with MC calculations. The MC data are usually underestimated by the OKGM model, and the mean percentage deviation, averaged over nine elements and five energies up to 5 keV, is equal to 8.8% for typical experimental configurations. However, the agreement between ratios of backscattering probabilities from MC simulations and the OKGM model agree much better due to the fact that underestimation of backscattering probability by the OMGM theory is partially cancelled. The percentage deviation between ratios from these theoretical models decreases to 3.14%. The OKGM model should then be useful for determining inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) from measured elastic-peak intensities. The accuracy of the obtained IMFPs is comparable with IMFPs from MC simulations. (paper)

  16. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1998-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy provides a description of the physics of electron-probe formation and of electron-specimen interations The different imaging and analytical modes using secondary and backscattered electrons, electron-beam-induced currents, X-ray and Auger electrons, electron channelling effects, and cathodoluminescence are discussed to evaluate specific contrasts and to obtain quantitative information

  17. Photon beams for radiosurgery produced by laser Compton backscattering from relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, B.; Larsson, B.; Preger, M.; Schaerf, C.; Stepanek, J.

    1996-09-01

    The frontal collisions of a laser beam with relativistic electrons result in Compton-backscattered photons. The energy of these photons is dependent on the laser and electron energy in the range from kilo-electron-volts to tens of mega-electron-volts. In a sufficiently narrow backscattering angle the photons are nearly monochromatic. Over the past 30 years there have been several attempts to produce photon beams by laser backscattering from relativistic electrons stored in magnetic ring structures. One aim is to produce photons in the high mega-electron-volt energy range with fluxes useful for nuclear physics research; another is to produce photons in the high kilo-electron-volt energy range, which would be useful for medical applications, such as coronary angiography or treatment of tumour. Our present interest is to investigate the possibility of using 34 keV to 10 MeV photon beams for applications in stereotactic functional radiosurgery. We foresee the possibility of neurosurgical operations through the intact skull with precise and effective destruction of deeply lying millimetre-sized targets with minimal effects on intervening structures, high reproducibility and good prediction of the results. Our paper presents: a Monte Carlo study of radiosurgery based on cross firing with 34 keV to 100 MeV photon beams and 200 and 580 MeV proton beams, a theoretical description of the kinematics of Compton backscattering and estimates of the backscattered photon flux from several combinations of laser cavities at Nd:YAG (1.17 eV) and images/0031-9155/41/9/002/img8.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> (0.117 eV) laser energies and electron storage rings energies in the range 0.1 - 1.3 GeV. As examples, existing magnetic structures, such as the images/0031-9155/41/9/002/img9.gif" ALIGN="TOP"/> Accumulator in the lower energy range and the Trieste Synchrotron Light Source ELETTRA in the higher energy range have been utilized in the calculations. The Monte Carlo study has shown that

  18. Depth dependence of electron backscatter: An energy spectral and dosimetry study using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, James C. L.; Owrangi, Amir M. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada) and Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    This study investigated the depth dependence of electron backscatter from a layer of lead (Pb) for clinical electron beams. The change in the electron backscatter with variation in the water depth above the Pb was determined. Electron energy spectra and relative depth doses as a function of depth in water over the Pb layer were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation and studied. Phase-space files for 4 and 9 MeV electron beams (10x10 cm{sup 2} applicator and cutout) based on the Varian 21 EX linear accelerator were generated using the EGSnrc-based BEAMNRC code. 3 mm of Pb, at depths of 0.5 and 1 cm in water, was irradiated with electrons. The source-to-surface distance is equal to 100 cm. Electron energy spectra and relative depth doses with and without the presence of the Pb layer at different depths in water were determined using the BEAMNRC code. For the 4 MeV electron energy spectra at a depth of 0.5 cm in water, electron backscatter was found to originate at the Pb-water interface and extend to 0.5 cm above the Pb insert. However, at a depth of 1 cm in water, electron backscatter almost disappeared at 0.5 and 1 cm above th ePb insert. This is due to the increased attenuation of the incident 4 MeV electron beam in a thicker layer of water as well as increased attenuation of the electron backscatter above the Pb. This resulted in a 23% decrease in relative dose at a measurement point of 0.5 cm depth, when the depth of the Pb insert was changed from 1 to 0.5 cm. For the electron energy spectra of the 9 MeV beams with a 0.5 cm depth of water, only a small amount of electron backscatter was observed. However, more electron backscatter was found when the water depth was increased to 1 cm. This is because the electron beam energy was decreased more due to the increase in attenuation from the increased depth of water compared to 0.5 cm. Since the electron energy spectrum and relative depth dose above the Pb layer vary with depth of water on top of the Pb, the

  19. Depth dependence of electron backscatter: An energy spectral and dosimetry study using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the depth dependence of electron backscatter from a layer of lead (Pb) for clinical electron beams. The change in the electron backscatter with variation in the water depth above the Pb was determined. Electron energy spectra and relative depth doses as a function of depth in water over the Pb layer were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation and studied. Phase-space files for 4 and 9 MeV electron beams (10x10 cm2 applicator and cutout) based on the Varian 21 EX linear accelerator were generated using the EGSnrc-based BEAMNRC code. 3 mm of Pb, at depths of 0.5 and 1 cm in water, was irradiated with electrons. The source-to-surface distance is equal to 100 cm. Electron energy spectra and relative depth doses with and without the presence of the Pb layer at different depths in water were determined using the BEAMNRC code. For the 4 MeV electron energy spectra at a depth of 0.5 cm in water, electron backscatter was found to originate at the Pb-water interface and extend to 0.5 cm above the Pb insert. However, at a depth of 1 cm in water, electron backscatter almost disappeared at 0.5 and 1 cm above th ePb insert. This is due to the increased attenuation of the incident 4 MeV electron beam in a thicker layer of water as well as increased attenuation of the electron backscatter above the Pb. This resulted in a 23% decrease in relative dose at a measurement point of 0.5 cm depth, when the depth of the Pb insert was changed from 1 to 0.5 cm. For the electron energy spectra of the 9 MeV beams with a 0.5 cm depth of water, only a small amount of electron backscatter was observed. However, more electron backscatter was found when the water depth was increased to 1 cm. This is because the electron beam energy was decreased more due to the increase in attenuation from the increased depth of water compared to 0.5 cm. Since the electron energy spectrum and relative depth dose above the Pb layer vary with depth of water on top of the Pb, the electron

  20. Depth dependence of electron backscatter: an energy spectral and dosimetry study using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L; Owrangi, Amir M

    2009-02-01

    This study investigated the depth dependence of electron backscatter from a layer of lead (Pb) for clinical electron beams. The change in the electron backscatter with variation in the water depth above the Pb was determined. Electron energy spectra and relative depth doses as a function of depth in water over the Pb layer were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation and studied. Phase-space files for 4 and 9 MeV electron beams (10 x 10 cm2 applicator and cutout) based on the Varian 21 EX linear accelerator were generated using the EGSnrc-based BEAMNRC code. 3 mm of Pb, at depths of 0.5 and 1 cm in water, was irradiated with electrons. The source-to-surface distance is equal to 100 cm. Electron energy spectra and relative depth doses with and without the presence of the Pb layer at different depths in water were determined using the BEAMNRC code. For the 4 MeV electron energy spectra at a depth of 0.5 cm in water, electron backscatter was found to originate at the Pb-water interface and extend to 0.5 cm above the Pb insert. However, at a depth of 1 cm in water, electron backscatter almost disappeared at 0.5 and 1 cm above th ePb insert. This is due to the increased attenuation of the incident 4 MeV electron beam in a thicker layer of water as well as increased attenuation of the electron backscatter above the Pb. This resulted in a 23% decrease in relative dose at a measurement point of 0.5 cm depth, when the depth of the Pb insert was changed from 1 to 0.5 cm. For the electron energy spectra of the 9 MeV beams with a 0.5 cm depth of water, only a small amount of electron backscatter was observed. However, more electron backscatter was found when the water depth was increased to 1 cm. This is because the electron beam energy was decreased more due to the increase in attenuation from the increased depth of water compared to 0.5 cm. Since the electron energy spectrum and relative depth dose above the Pb layer vary with depth of water on top of the Pb, the electron

  1. Stereographic intensity projections of elastically backscattered electrons in directional elastic peak electron spectroscopy: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stereographic intensity projections of elastically backscattered electrons for Au(1 1 1) were obtained by using directional elastic peak electron spectroscopy (DEPES). An enhancement of the recorded signal is observed when primary electrons with energies ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 keV strike the crystalline sample along the close-packed rows of atoms, proving the sensitivity of DEPES to the short atomic chain axial order. Besides, the obtained data reveal the threefold symmetry of the substrate. Experimental data are compared with the results of single scattering cluster (SSC) and multiple scattering (MS) calculations by means of contrast and an R-factor analysis. A satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory is found when the third scattering order is taken into account in MS approximation.

  2. Contribution of backscattered electrons to the total electron yield produced in collisions of 8–28 keV electrons with tungsten

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Yadav; R Shanker

    2007-03-01

    It is shown experimentally that under energetic electron bombardment the backscattered electrons from solid targets contribute significantly (∼ 80%) to the observed total electron yield, even for targets of high backscattering coefficients. It is further found that for tungsten ( = 74) with a backscattering coefficient of about 0.50, about 20% of the total electron yield is contributed by the total secondary electrons for impact energies in the range of 8–28 keV. The yield of true backscattered electrons at normal incidence (0), total secondary electrons () and the total electron yield (tot) produced in collisions of 8–28 keV electrons with W have been measured and compared with predictions of available theories. The present results indicate that the constant-loss of primary electrons in the target plays a significant role in producing the secondary electrons and that it yields a better fit to the experiment compared to the power-law.

  3. Electron back-scattering coefficient below 5 keV: Analytical expressions and surface-barrier effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, J.

    2012-10-01

    Simple analytical expressions for the electron backscattering coefficient, η, are established from published data obtained in the ˜0.4-5 keV range for 21 elements ranging from Be to Au. They take into account the decline in η with a decrease in energy E° for high-Z elements and the reverse behavior for low-Z elements. The proposed expressions for η (E°) lead to crossing energies situated in the 0.4-1 keV range and they may be reasonably extended to any of the other elements—via an interpolation procedure—to metallic alloys and probably to compounds. The influence of the surface barrier on the escape probability of the back-scattered electrons is next evaluated. This evaluation provides a theoretical basis to explain the observed deviation between various published data as a consequence of surface contamination or oxidation. Various practical applications and strategies are deduced for the η-measurements in dedicated instruments as well for the image interpretation in low voltage scanning electron microscopy based on the backscattered electron detection. In this microscopy, the present investigation allows to generalize the scarce contrast changes and contrast reversals previously observed on multi elemental samples and it suggests the possibility of a new type of contrast: the work function contrast.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET dosimeter for electron backscatter using the GEANT4 code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L; Leung, Michael K K

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the body of the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter in measuring the electron backscatter from lead. The electron backscatter factor (EBF), which is defined as the ratio of dose at the tissue-lead interface to the dose at the same point without the presence of backscatter, was calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation using the GEANT4 code. Electron beams with energies of 4, 6, 9, and 12 MeV were used in the simulation. It was found that in the presence of the MOSFET body, the EBFs were underestimated by about 2%-0.9% for electron beam energies of 4-12 MeV, respectively. The trend of the decrease of EBF with an increase of electron energy can be explained by the small MOSFET dosimeter, mainly made of epoxy and silicon, not only attenuated the electron fluence of the electron beam from upstream, but also the electron backscatter generated by the lead underneath the dosimeter. However, this variation of the EBF underestimation is within the same order of the statistical uncertainties as the Monte Carlo simulations, which ranged from 1.3% to 0.8% for the electron energies of 4-12 MeV, due to the small dosimetric volume. Such small EBF deviation is therefore insignificant when the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulation is taken into account. Corresponding measurements were carried out and uncertainties compared to Monte Carlo results were within +/- 2%. Spectra of energy deposited by the backscattered electrons in dosimetric volumes with and without the lead and MOSFET were determined by Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that in both cases, when the MOSFET body is either present or absent in the simulation, deviations of electron energy spectra with and without the lead decrease with an increase of the electron beam energy. Moreover, the softer spectrum of the backscattered electron when lead is present can result in a reduction of the MOSFET response due to stronger

  5. Mitigating the effect of optical back-scatter in multispectral underwater imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multispectral imaging is a very useful technique for extracting information from the underwater world. However, optical back-scatter changes the intensity value in each spectral band and this distorts the estimated spectrum. In this work, a filter is used to detect the level of optical back-scatter in each spectral band from a set of multispectral images. Extraction of underwater object spectra can be done by subtracting the estimated level of optical back-scatter and scaling the remainder in each spectral band from the captured image in the corresponding band. An experiment has been designed to show the performance of the proposed filter for correcting the set of multispectral underwater images and recovering the pixel spectra. The multispectral images are captured by a B/W CCD digital camera with a fast tunable liquid-crystal filter in 33 narrow spectral bands in clear and different levels of turbid water. Reference estimates for the optical back-scatter spectra are found by comparing a clear and a degraded set of multispectral images. The accuracy and consistency of the proposed method, the extended Oakley–Bu cost function, is examined by comparing the estimated values with the reference level of an optical back-scatter spectrum. The same comparison is made for the simple estimation approach. The results show that the simple method is not reliable and fail to estimate the level of optical back-scatter spectrum accurately. The results from processing experimental images in turbid water show that the effect of optical back-scatter can be mitigated in the image of each spectral band and, as a result, the spectra of the object can be recovered. However, for a very high level of turbid water the recovery is limited because of the effect of extinction. (paper)

  6. Advantages and artifacts of higher order modes in nanoparticle-enhanced backscattering Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Zachary D; Stranick, Stephan J; Levin, Ira W

    2009-12-01

    In order to facilitate nanoparticle-enhanced Raman imaging of complicated biological specimens, we have examined the use of higher order modes with radial and azimuthal polarizations focused onto a Au nanoparticle atomic force microscope (AFM) tip utilizing a backscattering reflection configuration. When comparing the Raman intensity profiles with the observed sample topography, the radial-polarized configuration demonstrates enhanced spatial resolution. This enhanced resolution results from the direction of the induced electron oscillation in the metal nanoparticle oriented by the electromagnetic field at the laser focus. The electric field component along the direction of laser propagation, attendant to the radial polarization, creates an enhanced field along the z-axis and normal to the sample. Substantial enhancement is observed utilizing an intermediate numerical aperture objective (NA = 0.7), necessary for backscattering measurements. The azimuthal polarization, similar to linear polarization, results in an enhanced field predominantly parallel to the sample, resulting in imaging artifacts. The Raman intensity profiles observed as the exciting laser polarization is switched between either a radially polarized or an azimuthally polarized state illustrate these imaging artifacts. Because azimuthal polarization arises readily from changes in the incident polarization onto the mode converter, the results presented here aid in identifying such artifacts when analyzing nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopic images. Due to the power law decay of the enhanced field, an enhancement orientation normal to the sample enables contrast between structures smaller than the tip dimensions as the apex of the nanoparticle tip, where the enhancement is strongest, passes over the sample. These effects are demonstrated using both carbon nanotube and fixed biological samples. PMID:19947663

  7. Three-dimensional imaging of hidden objects using positron emission backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission backscatter imaging is a technique for interrogation and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of hidden objects when we only have access to the objects from one side. Using time-of-flight differences in detected direct and backscattered positron-emitted photons, we construct 3-D images of target objects. Recently at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a fully three-dimensional imaging system has been built and the experimental results are discussed in this paper. Quantitative analysis of images reconstructed in both two- and three-dimensions are also presented.

  8. Cyclic bending experiments on free-standing Cu micron lines observed by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline Cu samples 20 × 20 μm2 in size were cyclically bent inside a scanning electron microscope until fracture occurred. The microstructural changes were investigated by secondary electron imaging and electron backscatter diffraction. The in situ experiments revealed that, for the coarse-grained samples, it is not the external stress that dominates the cyclic deformation, but the local internal strength. This is in strong contrast to macroscopic bending samples, where deformation always happens near the fixed end of the bending beam and decreases constantly with increasing distance from the fixation. For micron-sized polycrystalline samples, the grain dimensions, dislocation density evolution and grain orientation (Taylor factor) can define the location of failure if the grain size and sample diameter become similar in size. A comparison with cyclic in situ tension–tension experiments (ratio of minimum stress to maximum stress R ≈ 0) reveals that cyclic bending experiments (R ≈ −1) undergo bulk-like fatigue deformation with extrusions/intrusions, in contrast to the experiments with R ≈ 0. Both the cyclic tension–tension and bending experiments can be described by a Basquin equation, although different mechanisms lead to failure of the samples

  9. The energy-dependent electron loss model: backscattering and application to heterogeneous slab media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Kyu; Sandison, George A [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, 1338 Civil Engineering Building, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2003-01-21

    Electron backscattering has been incorporated into the energy-dependent electron loss (EL) model and the resulting algorithm is applied to predict dose deposition in slab heterogeneous media. This algorithm utilizes a reflection coefficient from the interface that is computed on the basis of Goudsmit-Saunderson theory and an average energy for the backscattered electrons based on Everhart's theory. Predictions of dose deposition in slab heterogeneous media are compared to the Monte Carlo based dose planning method (DPM) and a numerical discrete ordinates method (DOM). The slab media studied comprised water/Pb, water/Al, water/bone, water/bone/water, and water/lung/water, and incident electron beam energies of 10 MeV and 18 MeV. The predicted dose enhancement due to backscattering is accurate to within 3% of dose maximum even for lead as the backscattering medium. Dose discrepancies at large depths beyond the interface were as high as 5% of dose maximum and we speculate that this error may be attributed to the EL model assuming a Gaussian energy distribution for the electrons at depth. The computational cost is low compared to Monte Carlo simulations making the EL model attractive as a fast dose engine for dose optimization algorithms. The predictive power of the algorithm demonstrates that the small angle scattering restriction on the EL model can be overcome while retaining dose calculation accuracy and requiring only one free variable, {chi}, in the algorithm to be determined in advance of calculation.

  10. Image restoration techniques using Compton backscatter imaging for the detection of buried land mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Keshavmurthy, Shyam P.; Watanabe, Yoichi; Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.

    1995-06-01

    Earlier landmine imaging systems used two collimated detectors to image objects. These systems had difficulty in distinguishing between surface features and buried features. Using a combination of collimated and uncollimated detectors in a Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) system, allows the identification of surface and buried features. Images created from the collimated detectors contain information about the surface and the buried features, while the uncollimated detectors respond (approximately 80%) to features on the surface. The analysis of surface features are performed first, then these features can be removed and the buried features can be identified. Separation of the surface and buried features permits the use of a globbing algorithm to define regions of interest that can then be quantified [area, Y dimension, X dimension, and center location (xo, yo)]. Mine composition analysis is also possible because of the properties of the four detector system. Distinguishing between a pothole and a mine, that was previously very difficult, can now be easily accomplished.

  11. Assessing the precision of strain measurements using electron backscatter diffraction – part 1: Detector assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, T.B., E-mail: b.britton@imperial.ac.uk; Jiang, J.; Clough, R.; Tarleton, E.; Kirkland, A.I.; Wilkinson, A.J.

    2013-12-15

    We analyse the link between precision of pattern shift measurements and the resolution of the measurement of elastic strain and lattice rotation using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD). This study combines analysis of high quality experimentally obtained diffraction patterns from single crystal silicon; high quality dynamical simulations using Bloch wave theory; quantitative measurements of the detector Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and a numerical model. We have found that increases in exposure time, when 1×1 binning is selected, are the primary reason for the observed increase in sensitivity at greater than 2×2 binning and therefore use of software integration and high bit depth images enables a significant increase in strain resolution. This has been confirmed using simulated diffraction patterns which provide evidence that the ultimate theoretical resolution of the cross correlation based EBSD strain measurement technique with a 1000×1000 pixel image could be as low as 4.2×10{sup −7} in strain based on a shift precision of 0.001 pixels. - Highlights: • The precision of the HR-EBSD based strain and lattice rotation measurements is established with a rigorous experimental test. • Precision of the technique is related to the total exposure time, pattern bit depth, CCD array size and detector quality. • A simple numerical model indicates that precision when direct comparing similar patterns is proportional to strain measurement accuracy.

  12. Electron Backscattering Diffraction Analysis of Secondary Crack Propagation in Low-Alloy Bainitic Steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nohava, Jiří; Haušild, P.; Bompard, P.

    Vol. A. Praha : CVUT, 2002, s. 592-593. [Workshop 2002. Praha (CZ), 11.02.2002-13.02.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : electron backscattering difraction, bainitic steel , crack propagation Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  13. Quantitative microstructure characterization of self-annealed copper films with electron backscatter diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Gholinia, A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was applied to analyze cross sections of self-annealed copper electrodeposits, for which earlier the kinetics of self-annealing had been investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The EBSD investigations on the grain size, grain boundary character and...... microstructure evolution at room temperature (self-annealing)....

  14. Carbon/Hydrogen ratio determination in hydrocarbons and its mixtures by electron backscattering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method carbon/hydrogen ratio (C/H) determination in hydrocarbons and its mixtures was improved using the electron backscattering technique. Besides the hetero atoms (S,O and N) influence in petroleum is studied for being able to determinate the C/H ratio in cuban petroleum with high sulphur contents

  15. Investigation of electron spectra backscattered from polyethylene-terephthalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Recently, guiding of medium energy electrons (a few hundred eV) through insulating polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) capillaries was observed. The poorly characterized spatial structure and, even more challenging, local charge-up of the material pose consideration of difficulties for a microscopic treatment of electron transport through PET. In order to identify the processes giving rise to guiding we investigate scattering from a flat PET surface both experimentally and theoretically. Reflection electron energy loss (REEL) and elastic peak electron spectra (EPES) were taken using a high-energy, high-resolution, home built ESA-31 electron spectrometer. Primary electron energies range from 200 eV to 1000 eV. The cleanliness of sample surfaces was monitored analyzing X-ray photoelectron spectra. Photoelectrons were excited using the K(α)1-line of Al (1486,67 eV). To interpret our experimental data, classical-transport simulations were performed to obtain electron-energy loss spectra, angular distributions, and the secondary-electron (SEE) yield for PET. Apart from elastic and inelastic scattering processes along the trajectory within the target material we also include the effect of charge-up of the surface based on the SEE yield of previously scattered trajectories which leads to a partial suppression of electron emission in later stages of the simulation. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP) of electrons in PET was determined from EPES spectra using Cu and Ni standards. Experimentally obtained IMFPs were compared with theoretical predictions derived from optical data. As Figure 1 shows good agreement between measured and simulated energy loss spectra is found

  16. An automated method of quantifying ferrite microstructures using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Sachin L., E-mail: sachin.shrestha@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Breen, Andrew J.; Trimby, Patrick [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Proust, Gwénaëlle [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P.; Cairney, Julie M. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-02-01

    The identification and quantification of the different ferrite microconstituents in steels has long been a major challenge for metallurgists. Manual point counting from images obtained by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is commonly used for this purpose. While classification systems exist, the complexity of steel microstructures means that identifying and quantifying these phases is still a great challenge. Moreover, point counting is extremely tedious, time consuming, and subject to operator bias. This paper presents a new automated identification and quantification technique for the characterisation of complex ferrite microstructures by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). This technique takes advantage of the fact that different classes of ferrite exhibit preferential grain boundary misorientations, aspect ratios and mean misorientation, all of which can be detected using current EBSD software. These characteristics are set as criteria for identification and linked to grain size to determine the area fractions. The results of this method were evaluated by comparing the new automated technique with point counting results. The technique could easily be applied to a range of other steel microstructures. - Highlights: • New automated method to identify and quantify ferrite microconstituents in HSLA steels is presented. • Unique characteristics of the ferrite microconstituents are investigated using EBSD. • Characteristics of ferrite microconstituents are exploited to identify the type of ferrite grains within the steel's microstructures. • The identified ferrite grains are linked to their associated grain's size for area fraction calculations.

  17. Image combination enhancement method for X-ray compton back-scattering security inspection body scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for X-ray Compton Back-Scattering (CBS) body scanner, image clearness is very important for the performance of detecting the contraband hidden on the body. A new image combination enhancement method is provided based on characteristics of CBS body images and points of human vision. After processed by this method, the CBS image will be obviously improved with clear levels, distinct outline and uniform background. (authors)

  18. Single-shot radiography using X-rays from Compton-backscattering with laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Gautier, J; Andriyash, I; Lifschitz, A; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Malka, V; Rousse, A; Phuoc, K Ta

    2015-01-01

    We present results from the production of high energy femtosecond X-rays by Compton-backscattering of an intense femtosecond laser pulse with quasi-monoenergetic laser-accelerated electron beams using a plasma mirror. In our parameter regime electrons of $\\sim$ 150 MeV peak energy emit a high energy radiation beam with a broad spectrum extending up to $\\sim$ 500 keV. The photon yield from the source is sufficiently high to illuminate a centimeter-size sample placed 90 centimeters behind the source and record a single-shot radiograph. The small diameter of the laser-accelerated electron beams translates into a micrometer X-ray source size, making it a promising candidate for advanced X-ray imaging techniques as e.g. propagation-based phase contrast imaging.

  19. Coherent backscattering of inelastic photons from atoms and their mirror images

    CERN Document Server

    Moriya, P H; Teixeira, R Celistrino; Máximo, C E; Piovella, N; Bachelard, R; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W

    2016-01-01

    Coherent backscattering is a coherence effect in the propagation of waves through disordered media involving two or more scattering events. Here, we report on the observation of coherent backscattering from individual atoms and their mirror images. This system displays two important advantages: First, the effect can be observed at low optical densities, which allows to work in very dilute clouds or far from resonance. Second, due to the fact that the radiation of an atom interferes constructively with that of its own image, the phenomenon is much more robust to dephasing induced by strong saturation. In particular, the contribution of inelastically scattered photons to the interference process is demonstrated.

  20. 2D Doppler backscattering using synthetic aperture microwave imaging of MAST edge plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, D.A.; Brunner, K.J.; Freethy, S.J.; Huang, B.K.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is already established as a powerful diagnostic; its extension to 2D enables imaging of turbulence characteristics from an extended region of the cut-off surface. The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D DBS experiments of MAST edge plasma. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (±40° vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10–34.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector for...

  1. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N; Ben Britton, T; Wilkinson, Angus J

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. PMID:27337604

  2. Advanced microstructural analysis of ferrite materials by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Mücklich, F.

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of the achieved texture is of great importance for the performance of ferrite materials, either bulk or thin films. The recently developed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique enables a spatially resolved study of the crystallographic orientations by means of recording of Kikuchi patterns. To our knowledge, such a thorough EBSD analysis was not yet performed in any oxidic magnetic material, and only very recently on magnetite thin films by us. A good surface polishing/cleaning is essential for this analysis, as the method requires an undisturbed surface area for a high image quality (IQ). This information is recorded to each measured Kikuchi pattern, together with a parameter describing the quality of indexation. Here, the spatially highly resolved EBSD mappings provide additional information as compared to the standard analysis techniques, which can contribute to an optimization of the growth process. Furthermore, an analysis of the grain aspect ratio is possible which provides further insight to the microstructural dependence of the magnetic properties of ferrites.

  3. Implementation of a near backscattering imaging system on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, A. J.; McCarville, T.; Piston, K.; Niemann, C.; Jones, G.; Reinbachs, I.; Costa, R.; Celeste, J.; Holtmeier, G.; Griffith, R.; Kirkwood, R.; MacGowan, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Latta, M. R.

    2004-10-01

    A near backscattering imaging diagnostic system is being implemented on the first quad of beams on the National Ignition Facility. This diagnostic images diffusing scatter plates, placed around the final focus lenses on the National Ignition Facility target chamber, to quantitatively measure the fraction of light backscattered outside of the focusing cone angle of incident laser beam. A wide-angle imaging system relays an image of light scattered outside the lens onto a gated charge coupled device camera, providing 3 mm resolution over a 2 m field of view. To account for changes of the system throughput due to exposure to target debris the system will be routinely calibrated in situ at 532 and 355 nm using a dedicated pulsed laser source.

  4. Landmine Detection: on the Role of Soil Composition in the Imaging Capabilities of Gamma-ray Compton Backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two issues related with the use of γ-ray Compton backscattering as an imaging technique are addressed: γ-soil interaction, and image processing. Promising methodologies are described in both topics. (author)

  5. Electron backscatter diffraction study of Nb3Sn superconducting multifilamentary wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution electron backscatter diffraction was used to characterize a Nb3Sn-based superconducting multifilamentary wire produced by the bronze method. The niobium core has a clear fiber texture in the wire axis direction. The Nb3Sn crystals also show a slight preference for the direction parallel to the wire axis. The misorientation angle distribution of the Nb3Sn crystals are similar to the Mackenzie distribution for a randomly oriented set of crystals with cubic crystal symmetry.

  6. Time-lapse misorientation maps for the analysis of electron backscatter diffraction data from evolving microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 'time-lapse misorientation map' is defined here as a map which shows the orientation change at each point in an evolving crystalline microstructure between two different times. Electron backscatter diffraction data from in situ heating experiments can be used to produce such maps, which then highlight areas of microstructural change and also yield statistics indicative of how far different types of boundary (with different misorientations) have moved.

  7. Thomson backscattering diagnostics of nanosecond electron bunches in high space charge regime

    OpenAIRE

    B. Paroli

    2012-01-01

    The intra-beam repulsions play a significant role in determining the performances of free-electron devices when an high brilliance of the beam is required. The transversal and longitudinal spread of the beam, its energy and density are fundamental parameters in any beam experiment and different beam diagnostics are available to measure such parameters. A diagnostic method based on the Thomson backscattering of a laser beam impinging on the particle beam is proposed in this work for the study ...

  8. Spectral narrowing of backscattered photons in electron-laser collisions under a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied an electron-laser collisions, for the first time, at a bending section of a compact storage ring to study an effect of the magnetic field. The observed backscattered photon spectrum showed an unexpectedly narrow band width without any collimation. We were only able to reproduce this phenomenon by assuming that the scattering occurs within the electron orbital plane. Conservation of the total angular momentum may become important when a strong magnetic field is applied to an electron-laser collision. (author)

  9. Strongly Enhanced Stimulated Brillouin Backscattering in an Electron-Positron Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Matthew R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Mikhailova, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin backscattering of light is shown to be drastically enhanced in electron-positron plasmas, in contrast to the suppression of stimulated Raman scattering. A generalized theory of three-wave coupling between electromagnetic and plasma waves in two-species plasmas with arbitrary mass ratios, confirmed with a comprehensive set of particle-in-cell simulations, reveals violations of commonly held assumptions about the behavior of electron-positron plasmas. Specifically, in the electron-positron limit three-wave parametric interaction between light and the plasma acoustic wave can occur, and the acoustic wave phase velocity differs from its usually assumed value.

  10. Three-Dimensional Backscatter X-Ray Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA application requires a system that can generate 3D images of non-metallic material when access is limited to one side of the material. The objective of...

  11. Three-Dimensional Backscatter X-Ray Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the proposal is to design, develop and demonstrate a potentially portable Compton x-ray scatter 3D-imaging system by using specially...

  12. Qualification of a near backscattering imaging system on the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A near backscattering imaging diagnostic system has been implemented, qualified, and fielded on the first quad of beams on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, B39 (1999)]. This diagnostic image diffusing scatter plates, placed around the final focus lenses on the NIF target chamber, to quantitatively measure the fraction of light backscattered outside of the incident cone of the focusing optics. The imaging system consists of a wide-angle lens coupled to a gated charged coupled device camera, providing 3 mm resolution over a 2 m field of view. To account for changes of the system throughput due to exposure to target debris the system was routinely calibrated in situ at 532 and 355 nm using a dedicated pulsed laser source. The diagnostic and calibration methods will be described together with recent results from the NIF early light shots

  13. Qualification of a near backscattering imaging system on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, A. J.; Niemann, C.; Piston, K.; Holtmeier, G.; McCarville, T.; Jones, G.; Reinbachs, I.; Costa, R.; Celeste, J.; Griffith, R.; Kirkwood, R. K.; MacGowan, B. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2006-10-01

    A near backscattering imaging diagnostic system has been implemented, qualified, and fielded on the first quad of beams on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, B39 (1999)]. This diagnostic image diffusing scatter plates, placed around the final focus lenses on the NIF target chamber, to quantitatively measure the fraction of light backscattered outside of the incident cone of the focusing optics. The imaging system consists of a wide-angle lens coupled to a gated charged coupled device camera, providing 3mm resolution over a 2m field of view. To account for changes of the system throughput due to exposure to target debris the system was routinely calibrated in situ at 532 and 355nm using a dedicated pulsed laser source. The diagnostic and calibration methods will be described together with recent results from the NIF early light shots.

  14. Measurement of the BESSY II electron beam energy by Compton-backscattering of laser photons

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, R; Thornagel, R; Brandt, G; Görgen, R; Ulm, G

    2002-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of all storage ring parameters is essential for the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to operate the electron storage ring BESSY II as a primary source standard. One parameter entering the Schwinger equation for the calculation of the spectral photon flux of bending magnet radiation is the electron beam energy. So at BESSY II the electron beam energy is measured by two independent techniques one of which is described in this paper: the photons from a CO sub 2 -laser are scattered in a head-on collision with the stored electrons. From the spectrum of the backscattered photons that are detected by an energy-calibrated HPGe detector the electron beam energy can be determined. The experimental set-up at the BESSY II electron storage ring as well as the current experimental status are described for operation of the storage ring at the energies of 900 and 1700 MeV.

  15. Backscattering of fast electrons from solids within a multiple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukanic, J.; Davidovic, D. M.

    2008-07-01

    Reflection of electrons from solids is treated by the approximate analytic solution of the linearized transport equation. Scattering of electrons on target atoms is determined by the screened Coulomb interaction and the energy loss due to interaction with target electrons is defined by Bethe- Bloch formula. The anisotropic P_3 approximation of the collision integral is utilized and the Bolzmann transport equation is Laplace transformed in relative path length and solved by applying the DP0 technique. The approach is applicable in a wide range of electron energy --from several tens of keV to several MeV- and for materials where the mean number of collisions of an electron with target atoms during slowing down is large. Analytic expressions for energy distribution of backscattered electrons as well as for the particle and energy reflection coefficients were derived. Comparison of our results with data of the computational bipartition model is presented.

  16. Energy backscattering of electron beams and absorbed dose in thin layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research development in this laboratory concerning radiation effects on the thin layer specimens of organic polymers and p-n junction of semiconductors requires the accurate evaluation of backscattered energy which is especially important for low energy electrons below 1.0 MeV and gives rise to errors of up to some 60 % depending on the materials of backing substrates. The present report describes the past studies on backscattering phenomena on backing substances of various elements and summarizes the experimental results of the measurements of the dose rate absorbed by the thin layer substance on backing substances of various elements as numerical tables which allow convenient determination of dose absorbed by the thin layer specimens on the backing substances. (author)

  17. Advantages and Artifacts of Higher Order Modes in Nanoparticle Enhanced Back-Scattering Raman Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Stephan J. Stranick; Levin, Ira W.

    2009-01-01

    In order to facilitate nanoparticle enhanced Raman imaging of complicated biological specimens, we have examined the use of higher order modes with radial and azimuthal polarizations focused onto a Au nanoparticle AFM tip utilizing a back-scattering reflection configuration. When comparing the Raman intensity profiles with the observed sample topography, the radial polarized configuration demonstrates enhanced spatial resolution. This enhanced resolution results from the direction of the indu...

  18. Quantitative analysis of the energy distributions of electrons backscattered elastically from polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tőkési, K., E-mail: tokesi@atomki.mta.hu; Varga, D.; Berényi, Z.

    2015-07-01

    We present results of theoretical and experimental studies of the spectra of electrons backscattered elastically from polyethylene in the primary energy range between 1 and 5 keV. The experiments were performed using a high energy resolution electron spectroscopy. The theoretical interpretation is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the recoil and Doppler effects. The separation between the carbon and hydrogen peak in the energy distributions is shown as a function of the primary electron energy. The simulations give many partial distributions separately, depending on the number of elastic scatterings (single, and multiple scatterings of different types). We show our results for intensity ratios, peak shifts and broadenings. We also present detailed analytical calculations for the main parameters of a single scattering. Finally, we present a qualitative comparison with the experimental data. We find our resulting energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons to be in good agreement with our measurements.

  19. Linear and nonlinear ultrasonic imaging of tight crack surface with backscattered transverse wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focusing ultrasonic beams of the mode-converted transverse wave at every point on cracked surfaces, and receiving the backscattered wave signal from those points, we have imaged the tight crack surfaces themselves with a conventional C-scan imaging system. The validity of the technique is confirmed by FEM analyses of scattered wave propagation. The proposed ultrasonic imaging technique was applied to nearly closed fatigue cracks and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel. In addition to linear ultrasonic imaging, we also visualized higher harmonic amplitude scattered by these crack surfaces by using a high-powered burst wave pulser and bandpass filters. By comparing linear images with higher harmonic images, we can estimate the gap width of the tight cracks.

  20. Positron and electron backscattering from elemental solids in the 1-10 keV energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron and positron backscattering coefficients are analytically calculated for a number of selected atomic targets in the energy range 1-10 keV and for incident angles between 0 deg. and 80 deg. The dependence of the backscattering coefficient on the material, on the projectile primary energy and on the incidence angle has been examined and discussed. Our results are found to be in better agreement with experiment than earlier Monte Carlo simulations

  1. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from collisions of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Yadav; R Shanker

    2007-03-01

    The energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons produced under the impact of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets are measured. The energy range of backscattered electrons is considered between B = 50 eV and 5000 eV. The angle of incidence α and take-off angle are chosen to have values = 0° and 10° and = 100°, 110° and 120° respectively. The measured energy spectra are compared with the available theoretical models for = 0° and 10°. The elastic peak intensity of backscattered electrons is found to be a function of angle of incidence, take-off angle and atomic number of the target material. The considered theories are reasonably in good agreement with experiment for the energy spectra of the backscattered electrons having their reduced energies (= B/0) in the range of 0.20 to 1.00.

  2. Full aperture backscatter station imager (FABSI) diagnostics system for far-field imaging of laser plasma instabilities on Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ICF, the understanding of laser plasma scattering processes is essential for laser target coupling and in controlling the symmetry of indirect drive implosions. The existing Nova Full Aperture Backscatter Station (FABS) has been useful in understanding laser plasma instabilities occurring in hohlraums by measuring the quantity, spectral distribution and near-field spatial distributions of Brillouin and more recently Raman backscatter. Equally important is an understanding of the farfield spatial intensity distribution which provides information on density, temperature and velocity gradient distributions, and which affect capsule implosion symmetry in hohlraums. Such information could potentially help in understanding processes such as filamentation and saturation mechanism. This paper describes a broad-band, color-corrected far-field imager and associated diagnostics capable of imaging the source of scattered light to better than 25 microm resolution. The imager can either image Brillouin or Raman backscatter through the Nova beam 7 focusing lens or be used like a microscope to image side scatter from other beams

  3. Analytical studies of a backscatter x-ray imaging landmine detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavmurthy, Shyam P.; Dugan, Edward T.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Jacobs, Alan M.

    1996-05-01

    The Compton Backscatter Imaging (CBI) technique has been applied successfully to detect buried plastic anti-tank landmines. The images acquired by a CBI system are often cluttered by surface features. Additionally, some buried objects give the same response as the plastic landmines. The landmine detection can be successful only when the detection system is capable of distinguishing between surface features and the mine-like objects. This can be accomplished by designing detectors that differentiate between the surface features and the buried objects. An understanding of the physical phenomena underlining the CB image formation helps us to design these detectors. To study the physics of the Compton backscattering, the photon transport in a CBI system is simulated using Monte-Carlo calculations with the generalized particle transport program MCNP. The photon tracks are graphically displayed using a visualization program SABRINA. On the basis of the results from these Monte-Carlo analyses, a four-detector system has been designed. This detector design utilizes the unique nature of various collision components of the scattered photons to generate separate images of buried objects and surface features. The success of this detector design is demonstrated through a series of analytically generated images. The results of the experimental measurements that validate these analytical predictions are brought out in a separate paper to be presented in this conference.

  4. The magmatic and metamorphic evolution of zircons from the Barro Alto Complex (Goias State, Central region, Brazil), using backscattered electrons and chemical analysis by electron microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zircon is a mineral much used in U-Pb geochronology because it is considered a closed system and has fairly high quantities of U and Th. In this paper, we study Barro Alto Complex (Goias, Brazil) zircons by backscattered electrons (BSE) imaging and spatial scanning profiles by wavelength dispersive spectrometer of Hf, Y and U. The BSE images and the profiles show variations in the internal structures and composition of zircon crystals that reflect the magmatic and metamorphic processes in the host rocks. Magmatic features are still observed, but metamorphic processes are registered in different textures on the zircons crystals; some are less affected because they are more resistant. The medium to high grade regional metamorphism of the Brasiliano Cycle is registered in all studied crystals and it may indicate an open-system geochemistry, that consequently affected the U-Pb isotopic system. (author)

  5. Mobile x-ray backscatter imaging system for inspection of vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Roderick D.

    1997-02-01

    A mobile, rapid-deployment, x-ray system for the inspection of vehicles and freight containers has been developed and delivered in a prototype configuration. The system is based on 450 kV flying-spot x-ray beam technology originally developed for inspection of commercial vehicles at fixed- site border crossings and ports. The fixed-site system includes both transmission and Compton backscatter imaging capabilities. The prototype mobile system employs backscatter imaging only, which allowed it to be brought into service sooner and at lower cost, while still achieving most of the functionality and detection capabilities of a full system. Work is in progress to incorporate transmission imaging. Both the primary radiation dose and the environmental dose due to leakage and scatter are low. Measured primary and secondary radiation exposure rates are presented. The prototype system was configured and certified as a 'cabinet' x-ray system. The pros and cons of this certification compared to alternative 'industrial' certification is discussed. The mobile vehicle/ cargo inspection system is typically deployed and operated by a crew of three. Deployment requires about 10 minutes after its arrival on-site. During acquisition of scan data, a slow-speed hydraulic drive system moves the inspection system past the inspected object at a speed of 6 inches per second. Smaller vehicles (less than about 6 feet in height) can be scanned in a single pass for each side; taller vehicles require multiple scans for full coverage. Sample backscatter images obtained during system tests are presented.

  6. Coherent Thomson backscattering from laser-driven relativistic ultra-thin electron layers

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    The generation of laser-driven dense relativistic electron layers from ultra-thin foils and their use for coherent Thomson backscattering is discussed, applying analytic theory and one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The blow-out regime is explored in which all foil electrons are separated from ions by direct laser action. The electrons follow the light wave close to its leading front. Single electron solutions are applied to initial acceleration, phase switching, and second-stage boosting. Coherently reflected light shows Doppler-shifted spectra, chirped over several octaves. The Doppler shift is found to be proportional to \\gamma_x^2=1/(1-\\beta_x^2), where \\beta_x is the electron velocity component in normal direction of the electron layer which is also the direction of the driving laser pulse. Due to transverse electron momentum p_y, the Doppler shift by 4*\\gamma_x^2=4*\\gamma^2/(1+(p_y/mc)^2) ~= 2*\\gamma is significantly smaller than full shift of 4*\\gamma^2. Methods to turn p_y -> 0 and to recove...

  7. Enhancement of radiation dose to the bone marrow from backscattering of electron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed fractions of continuous sources of monoenergetic electrons in marrow cavities of human bone have been previously evaluated. The difference in the scattering power of electrons in cortical bone (CB) and the red marrow (RM) was neglected. In the present work the Integrated Tiger series of radiation transport Monte Carlo codes was used to investigate the effect of the size of the marrow cavity, assumed to be spherical, on the backscatter dose to the RM. Three hundred and 500-μm radius spheres imbedded with isotropic distributions of 90Y or 131I were considered. The average dose increases for 131I and 90Y in the 500 μm radius spherical model of the marrow cavities are 5 and 4%, respectively. The average dose increases for the same nuclides in the 300-,am radius spheres are 6 and 4%, respectively

  8. 2D Doppler backscattering using synthetic aperture microwave imaging of MAST edge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. A.; Brunner, K. J.; Freethy, S. J.; Huang, B. K.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is already established as a powerful diagnostic; its extension to 2D enables imaging of turbulence characteristics from an extended region of the cut-off surface. The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D DBS experiments of MAST edge plasma. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (±40° vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-34.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24° FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial observations of phenomena previously measured by conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch angle to be made; preliminary results are presented. Capabilities gained through steering a beam using a phased array and the limitations of this technique are discussed.

  9. Optical transmission of glass for the National Ignition Facility near backscatter imagers under x-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the near backscatter imager materials need to maintain high optical transmission while exposed to hohlraum generated x rays. Glass plates are incorporated in the design to protect the optical scattering plates from x-ray damage. Radiation environments spanning those expected on NIF have been produced at the Omega Laser Facility by symmetric laser illumination of 1 mm sized gold spheres. The time-dependent ultraviolet transmission of sample glass plates was measured. The data are interpreted with a free electron absorption model. Combined with the simulations of the hohlraum x-ray emission, this model is used to predict the transmission of the glass plates on the NIF. We predict that the plates should perform adequately up to the peak of the laser pulse.

  10. Mine detection using backscattered x-ray imaging of antitank and antipersonnel mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Grant J.; Shope, Steve L.; Bishop, Luke B.; Selph, Michael M.; Jojola, John

    1997-07-01

    The use of backscattered x-rays to image buried land miens and distinguish between surface and buried features has been well documented. Laboratory imaging experiments, being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico, have been used to develop preliminary data acquisition hardware and software for an upcoming advanced technology demonstration (ATD). In addition image processing techniques, developed by the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of Florida, are utilized. Previous buried land mine imaging studies focused on antitank mines buried in screened sand and have included well defined surface features such as a board or a small diameter rock. In the present study we have examined imaging under a variety of practical environmental conditions. We have successfully imaged antitank miens (ATM) buried in sand and rocky New Mexico soil. Images have been obtained for bare surfaces as well as four surfaces covered with limestone road coarse base, snow, water, and native grass. In addition, we have imaged buried ATM and surface antipersonnel mines covered with debris consisting of various size rocks, a log, and leaves such that no mine was visible to the eye. Contour plots of the images obtained for the various environmental conditions are presented.

  11. Electron imaging with an EBSD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has proven to be a useful tool for characterizing the crystallographic orientation aspects of microstructures at length scales ranging from tens of nanometers to millimeters in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the advent of high-speed digital cameras for EBSD use, it has become practical to use the EBSD detector as an imaging device similar to a backscatter (or forward-scatter) detector. Using the EBSD detector in this manner enables images exhibiting topographic, atomic density and orientation contrast to be obtained at rates similar to slow scanning in the conventional SEM manner. The high-speed acquisition is achieved through extreme binning of the camera—enough to result in a 5×5 pixel pattern. At such high binning, the captured patterns are not suitable for indexing. However, no indexing is required for using the detector as an imaging device. Rather, a 5×5 array of images is formed by essentially using each pixel in the 5×5 pixel pattern as an individual scattered electron detector. The images can also be formed at traditional EBSD scanning rates by recording the image data during a scan or can also be formed through post-processing of patterns recorded at each point in the scan. Such images lend themselves to correlative analysis of image data with the usual orientation data provided by and with chemical data obtained simultaneously via X-Ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS). - Highlights: • The EBSD detector can be used as a set of multiple electron scattering detectors for microstructural imaging. • Extreme binning enables the use of the EBSD detector as an imaging detector with image collection times similar to slow scan SEM imaging. • Using an EBSD detector as an imaging detector provides images showing topographic, atomic density and orientation contrast or a mix of all three. • These images can collect prior to performing a scan, during a scan or through post-processing of patterns

  12. Lead foil in dental X-ray film: Backscattering rejection or image intensifier?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental X-ray films are still largely used due to sterilization issues, simplicity and, mainly, economic reasons. These films almost always are double coated (double emulsion) and have a lead foil in contact with the film for X-ray backscattering rejection. Herein we explore the use of the lead foil as an image intensifier. In these studies, spatial resolution was investigated when images were acquired on the dental X-ray films with and without the lead foil. Also, the lead foil was subjected to atomic analysis (fluorescent measurements) and structure analysis (X-ray diffraction). We determined that the use of the lead foil reduces the exposure time, however, does not affect the spatial resolution on the acquired images. This suggests that the fluorescent radiation spread is smaller than the grain sizes of the dental X-ray films

  13. Research on application of CNN in Compton back-scattering image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cellular neural network (CNN) is a large-scale nonlinear analog circuit suitable for real-time signal and image processing. CNN can be used for high-speed parallel computation and is easy to be translated into a VLSI implementation. This paper presents one new approach for Compton back-scattering (CBS) image filter and segmentation using CNN. Furthermore presents one new way for eliminating isolated point on CNN and morphologic method. CNN Some practical results are presented and briefly discussed, which demonstrates the successful operation of the proposed algorithm. Those new approaches is very affordable to parallelism and analog VLSI implementation, which allowing the CBS image processing to be performed in real-time. (authors)

  14. Lead foil in dental X-ray film: Backscattering rejection or image intensifier?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hönnicke, M.G., E-mail: marcelo.honnicke@unila.edu.br [Universidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana, Foz do Iguaçu (Brazil); Delben, G.J. [Faculdade de Tecnologia Tupy, Curitiba (Brazil); Godoi, W.C. [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, Curitiba (Brazil); Swinka-Filho, V. [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento – LACTEC, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    Dental X-ray films are still largely used due to sterilization issues, simplicity and, mainly, economic reasons. These films almost always are double coated (double emulsion) and have a lead foil in contact with the film for X-ray backscattering rejection. Herein we explore the use of the lead foil as an image intensifier. In these studies, spatial resolution was investigated when images were acquired on the dental X-ray films with and without the lead foil. Also, the lead foil was subjected to atomic analysis (fluorescent measurements) and structure analysis (X-ray diffraction). We determined that the use of the lead foil reduces the exposure time, however, does not affect the spatial resolution on the acquired images. This suggests that the fluorescent radiation spread is smaller than the grain sizes of the dental X-ray films.

  15. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined

  16. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of electrodeposited nano-scale copper wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction technique was applied to study grain-size, misorientation distribution and texture, which affect resistivity substantially, in electrodeposited and subsequently annealed nano-scale (80 nm width) copper wires. Particular emphasis was given to the examination of the variation of the microstructural parameters and texture in the trench thickness direction. The bottom part of the wires was shown to be characterized by the largest proportion of low-angle boundaries and the lowest fraction of annealing twins. The crystallographic texture of the wires was also demonstrated to significantly change in thickness direction. Depending on the trench height, the close packed {111} plane was shown to align either with the side walls or the bottom surface. - Highlights: • Texture distribution is essentially inhomogeneous in the line depth direction. • The material contains significant proportions of low-angle and twin boundaries. • The material is the least recrystallized in the bottom part of the lines

  17. Spectral Ellipsometry and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analyses of Silicon Surfaces Implanted with Silver Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarov, V. V.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Vorobev, V. V.; Osin, Yu. N.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) produced on surfaces of single-crystal substrates (c-Si) by low-energy low-dose implantation of silver ions is studied by spectral ellipsometry and electron backscatter diffraction. Implantation was done with an ion energy of 30 keV at a constant ion beam current density of 2 μA/cm2 and doses of 6.24·1012-1.25·1016 ions/cm2 on room temperature substrate targets. Irradiation was carried out with a current density of 0.1-5 μA/cm2 for implantation doses of 6.24·1013 and 1.87·1014 ions/cm2. It was found that spectral ellipsometry is an accurate andreliable method for monitoring low-dose ion implantation processes.

  18. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-02-01

    We present a migration method that does not require a velocity model to migrate backscattered surface waves to their projected locations on the surface. This migration method, denoted as natural migration, uses recorded Green\\'s functions along the surface instead of simulated Green\\'s functions. The key assumptions are that the scattering bodies are within the depth interrogated by the surface waves, and the Green\\'s functions are recorded with dense receiver sampling along the free surface. This natural migration takes into account all orders of multiples, mode conversions and non-linear effects of surface waves in the data. The natural imaging formulae are derived for both active source and ambient-noise data, and computer simulations show that natural migration can effectively image near-surface heterogeneities with typical ambient-noise sources and geophone distributions.

  19. Measurement of geometrically necessary dislocation density with high resolution electron backscatter diffraction: Effects of detector binning and step size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances using cross-correlation analysis of full resolution high quality electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns have provided a method for quantitatively mapping the stored dislocation density at high spatial resolution. Larger areas could be mapped with image binning or coarser step sizes. We have studied the effects of image binning and step size on the recovery of GND density. Our results suggest that: (i) the measured lower bound GND density noise floor broadly agrees with Wilkinson and Randman’s 2009 prediction, where a decrease in step size or an increase in misorientation uncertainty increases the noise floor; (ii) increasing the step size results in a lower GND density being recovered as some dislocations are now considered as statistically stored dislocations (SSDs); (iii) in deformed samples the average GND density stays relatively constant as the degree of pattern binning is increased up to 8×8. Pattern binning thus provides a means of increasing the data acquisition and analysis rate without unduly degrading the data quality. - Highlights: ► Recovery of GND content using HR-EBSD was studied with differing CCD binning and sample step size. ► Increased binning results in poorer recovery of the stored GND density using Nye's analysis. ► High level of binning may be acceptable for severely deformed samples. ► Reduction in step size results in an increase in the measurement noise. ► Reduction in step size also leads to separation of dislocations into GNDs and SSDs

  20. The Simulation of AN Imaging Gamma-Ray Compton Backscattering Device Using GEANT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechas, D.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Cristancho, F.; Fajardo, E.

    2014-02-01

    A gamma-backscattering imaging device dubbed Compton Camera, developed at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) and modified and studied at the Nuclear Physics Group of the National University of Colombia in Bogotá, uses the back-to-back emission of two gamma rays in the positron annihilation to construct a bidimensional image that represents the distribution of matter in the field-of-view of the camera. This imaging capability can be used in a host of different situations, for example, to identify and study deposition and structural defects, and to help locating concealed objects, to name just two cases. In order to increase the understanding of the response of the Compton Camera and, in particular, its image formation process, and to assist in the data analysis, a simulation of the camera was developed using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. In this work, the images resulting from different experimental conditions are shown. The simulated images and their comparison with the experimental ones already suggest methods to improve the present experimental device

  1. The simulation of an imaging gamma-ray Compton backscattering device using GEANT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gamma-backscattering imaging device dubbed Compton Camera, developed at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) and modified and studied at the Nuclear Physics Group of the National University of Colombia in Bogota, uses the back-to-back emission of two gamma rays in the positron annihilation to construct a bidimensional image that represents the distribution of matter in the field-of-view of the camera. This imaging capability can be used in a host of different situations, for example, to identify and study deposition and structural defects, and to help locating concealed objects, to name just two cases. In order to increase the understanding of the response of the Compton Camera and, in particular, its image formation process, and to assist in the data analysis, a simulation of the camera was developed using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. In this work, the images resulting from different experimental conditions are shown. The simulated images and their comparison with the experimental ones already suggest methods to improve the present experimental device. (author)

  2. Design of a proton-electron beam overlap monitor for the new RHIC electron lens, based on detecting energetic backscattered electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieberger T.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Minty, M.; Miller, T.; Montag, C.; Pikin, A.

    2012-04-15

    The optimal performance of the two electron lenses that are being implemented for high intensity polarized proton operation of RHIC requires excellent collinearity of the {approx}0.3 mm RMS wide electron beams with the proton bunch trajectories over the {approx}2m interaction lengths. The main beam overlap diagnostic tool will make use of electrons backscattered in close encounters with the relativistic protons. These electrons will spiral along the electron guiding magnetic field and will be detected in a plastic scintillator located close to the electron gun. A fraction of these electrons will have energies high enough to emerge from the vacuum chamber through a thin window thus simplifying the design and operation of the detector. The intensity of the detected electrons provides a measure of the overlap between the e- and the opposing proton beams. Joint electron arrival time and energy discrimination may be used additionally to gain some longitudinal position information with a single detector per lens.

  3. Crystallographic Characteristic of Intermetallic Compounds in Al-Si-Mg Casting Alloys Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yongzhi; XU Zhengbing; HE Juan; ZENG Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The Al-Si-Mg alloy which can be strengthened by heat treatment is widely applied to the key components of aerospace and aeronautics. Iron-rich intermetallic compounds are well known to be strongly influential on mechanical properties in Al-Si-Mg alloys. But intermetallic compounds in cast Al-Si-Mg alloy intermetallics are often misidentified in previous metallurgical studies. It was described as many different compounds, such as AlFeSi, Al8Fe2Si, Al5(Fe, Mn)3Si2 and so on. For the purpose of solving this problem, the intermetallic compounds in cast Al-Si alloys containing 0.5% Mg were investigated in this study. The iron-rich compounds in Al-Si-Mg casting alloys were characterized by optical microscope(OM), scanning electron microscope(SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer(EDS), electron backscatter diffraction(EBSD) and X-ray powder diffraction(XRD). The electron backscatter diffraction patterns were used to assess the crystallographic characteristics of intermetallic compounds. The compound which contains Fe/Mg-rich particles with coarse morphologies was Al8FeMg3Si6 in the alloy by using EBSD. The compound belongs to hexagonal system, space group P2m, with the lattice parameter a=0.662 nm, c=0.792 nm. The β-phase is indexed as tetragonal Al3FeSi2, space group I4/mcm, a=0.607 nm and c=0.950 nm. The XRD data indicate that Al8FeMg3Si6 and Al3FeSi2 are present in the microstructure of Al-7Si-Mg alloy, which confirms the identification result of EBSD. The present study identified the iron-rich compound in Al-Si-Mg alloy, which provides a reliable method to identify the intermetallic compounds in short time in Al-Si-Mg alloy. Study results are helpful for identification of complex compounds in alloys.

  4. A flying spot X-ray system for Compton backscatter imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, M D; McInerney, J J; Lamser, D G; Copenhaver, G L

    1994-01-01

    A Compton X-ray backscatter imaging (CBI) system using a single detector and a mechanically rastered "flying spot" X-ray beam has been designed, built, and tested. While retaining the essential noninvasive imaging capability of previous multiple detector CBI devices, this single detector system incorporates several advances over earlier CBI devices: more efficient detection of scattered X-rays, reduced X-ray exposure, and a simplified scan protocol more suitable for use with humans. This new CBI system also has specific design features to permit automating data acquisition from multiple two-dimensional image planes for integration into a 3D dynamic surface image. A simulated multislice scan study of a human thorax phantom provided X-ray dosimetry data verifying a very low X-ray dose (~50 mrem) delivered by this imaging device. Validation experiments with mechanical models show that surface displacement at typical heart beat frequencies can be measured to the nearest 0.1 mm (SD). PMID:18218521

  5. Compton backscattering of intracavity storage ring free-electron laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the γ- ray production by Compton backscattering of intracavity S.R. FEL radiation. We use a semi-analytical model which provides the build up of the signal combined with the storage ring damping mechanism and derive simple relations yielding the connection between backscattered photons brightness and the intercavity laser equilibrium intensity

  6. Theoretical explanation of the relationship between backscattered electron and x-ray linear attenuation coefficients in calcified tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, F S; Elliott, J C

    1997-11-01

    X-ray absorption and backscattered electron (BSE) microscopies are two commonly used techniques for estimating mineral contents in calcified tissues. The resolution in BSE images is usually higher than in x-ray images, but due to the previous lack of good standards to quantify the grey levels in BSE images of bones and teeth, x-ray microtomography (XMT) images of the same specimens have been used for calibration. However, the physics of these two techniques is different: for a specimen with a given composition, the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient is proportional to density, but there is no such relation with the BSE coefficient. To understand the reason that this calibration appears to be valid, the behaviour of simulated bone samples was investigated. In this, the bone samples were modelled as having three phases: hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), protein, and void (either empty or completely filled with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), a resin which is usually used for embedding bones and teeth in microscopic studies). The x-ray linear attenuation coefficients (calculated using published data) and the BSE coefficients (calculated using Monte Carlo simulation) were compared for samples of various phase proportions. It was found that the BSE coefficient correlated only with the x-ray attenuation coefficient for samples with PMMA infiltration. This was attributed to the properties of PMMA (density and mean atomic number) being very similar to those of the protein; therefore, the sample behaves like a two-phase system which allows the establishment of a monotonic relation between density and BSE coefficient. With the newly developed standards (brominated and iodinated dimethacrylate esters) for BSE microscopy of bone, grey levels can be converted to absolute BSE coefficients by linear interpolation, from which equivalent densities can be determined. PMID:9418207

  7. Tackling pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of perovskite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Elisabetta; Kaercher, Pamela; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite minerals form an important mineral group that has applications in Earth science and emerging alternative energy technologies, however crystallographic quantification of these minerals with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is not accurate due to pseudosymmetry problems. The silicate perovskite Bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, is understood to be the dominant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Gaining insight into its physical and rheological properties is therefore vital to understand the dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. Rock deformation experiments on analogue perovskite phases, for example (Ca,Sr)TiO3, combined with quantitative microstructural analyses of the recovered samples by EBSD, yield datasets that can reveal what deformation mechanisms may dominate the flow of perovskite in the lower mantle. Additionally, perovskite structures have important technological applications as new, suitable cathodes for the operation of more efficient and environmentally-friendly solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In recent years they have also been recognised as a potential substitute for silicon in the next generation of photovoltaic cells for the construction of economic and energy efficient solar panels. EBSD has the potential to be a valuable tool for the study of crystal orientations achieved in perovskite substrates as crystal alignment has a direct control on the properties of these materials. However, perovskite structures currently present us with challenges during the automated indexing of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs). Such challenges are represented by the pseudosymmetric character of perovskites, where atoms are subtly displaced (0.005 nm to 0.05 nm) from their higher symmetry positions. In orthorhombic Pbnm perovskites, for example, pseudosymmetry may be evaluated from the c/a unit cell parameter ratio, which is very close to 1. Two main types of distortions from the higher symmetry structure are recognised: a

  8. Determination of the easy axes of small ferromagnetic precipitates in a bulk material by combined magnetic force microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to determine the magnetic easy axes of micro- and nanoscopic ferromagnetic precipitates embedded in a bulk material is proposed and applied to globular cementite (Fe3C) embedded in a ferrite matrix. The method combines magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Magnetic domain structures in globular and in lamellar cementite precipitates in unalloyed pearlitic steels were imaged using MFM. The domain structure of the precipitates was analyzed in dependency of their size, shape and crystallographic orientation. It was found that the magnetic moments of the cementite precipitates are highly geared to their crystalline axes. The combined MFM and EBSD studies allow the conclusion that the cementite easy direction of magnetization is the long [010] axis. For fine lamellae cementite the determination of their crystallographic orientations using electron diffraction techniques is very difficult. With the previous knowledge of the behavior of the domain structure in globular cementite, the crystalline orientations of the fine lamellae cementite can be estimated by simply observing the magnetic microstructures and the topographic profiles. - Highlights: • We develop a method to determine the easy axes of nanoscopic ferromagnetic precipitates in a matrix. • We combine the magnetic force microscopy and the electron backscatter diffraction techniques. • Globular and lamellar cementite (Fe3C) precipitates are taken as examples. • MFM images revealed different orientations of the magnetic moments in cementite. • The cementite easy direction of magnetization is the long [010] axis

  9. Magnetic domain structure and crystallographic orientation of electrical steels revealed by a forescatter detector and electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steels (NOES) are an important factor in determining the efficiency of electric vehicle drivetrains. Due to the highly variable texture of NOES, the relationships between crystal orientation, the magnetic domain structure, and the final magnetic properties are complicated and not fully understood. In this study, a NOES sample was characterized with a method capable of imaging surface magnetic domains using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system equipped with a forescatter detector. This method used type II magnetic contrast without a specialized SEM setup, and imaged with a resolution limit of approximately 250–300 nm. The domain structure of the NOES sample was successfully related to β, which was defined as the angle between the closest magnetic easy axis and the surface of the sample (the RD–TD plane). However, it was shown that if the easy axes were aligned between neighbouring grains with respect to the grain boundary normal, the domain structure could align with an easy axis that was not the closest to the surface, and complex domain structures could be become wider. This structure and width change of complex domain structures has not been previously observed from single crystal or large-grained material studies. The successful application of this method to reveal the influence of surrounding grains can be used to better understand the magnetic properties of NOES. - Highlights:: • Magnetic domains and orientation of NOES was studied using an SEM. • Type II magnetic contrast was used, with a FSD on an EBSD camera. • The domain structure was related to the orientation of the magnetic easy axis. • The domain structure was influenced by the orientation of neighbouring grains

  10. Lateral migration radiography: a new x-ray backscatter imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Alan M.; Dugan, Edward T.; Brygoo, Stephanie; Ekdahl, Dan; Houssay, Laurent; Su, Zhong

    2002-11-01

    A new Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) technique, described as lateral migration radiography (LMR), has been developed and applied successfully to two difficult diagnostic problems: Detection of buried, plastic landmines, and detection of material flaws which lie close to, and parallel to, a surface, the method is based on image contrast generated by alteration of photon lateral migration relative to the illuminating beam direction. It is extraordinarily sensitive to density and/or atomic number variation along the photon lateral-direction travel paths. In LMR, relevant information-carrying photon detection efficiencies are two to three orders-of-magnitude greater than other CBI techniques such that the electric energy requirement for x-ray generation is only about one joule per acquired image pixel. The resulting small product of pixel illumination dwell time and x-ray generator electric power implies that current, easily accessible technology can be used to fabricate LMR systems with practical usage protocols. Three have been designed and built at the University of Florida: A laboratory device for perfecting buried landmine acquisition; a mobile system for field-demonstrating landmine detection; and, a laboratory system for detection of material defects in small structural parts. The LMR images, acquired in a laboratory landmine detection setting, are so definitive that identification of the mine-type, as well as presence, can be often accomplished. Results of a field test are near-perfect, both in determining buried landmine presence and in lack of false positive response. Images acquired in material flaw detection indicate ability to detect lateral cracks or delaminations with thickness less than 100 microns, as well as corrosion on surfaces between layers of structural sheets. These applications provide evidence of the viability of a new, one-sided x-ray radiography technique which images hidden structures of objects which have here-to-fore been difficult, or

  11. Texture evolution in Copper film at high temperature studied in situ by electron back-scatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in texture and microstructure during the thermal treatment of Cu films have been studied in situ using electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD). A partially recrystallized Cu film which still had its microstructure evolving at room temperature was investigated using orientation imaging microscopy. Two separate investigations were conducted-the first one at different locations of the film and at different temperatures and a second one at the same location of the film and at different temperatures. The orientation of the (111) (110) and (100) grains within the plane of Cu film was investigated from the orientation distribution functions. There was an increased tendency of the (111) and (110) grains to form either {111} or {111} and {110} texture respectively at higher temperature. The impact of elastic strain energies and dislocation glide in formation of these textures at higher temperatures has been analyzed in the light of some recent observations reported in literature. The variation in the area fraction of different fiber texture components, as a function of temperature, has been discussed in correlation with the measured mean grain size, grain boundary misorientation distribution and stress states. Stress state during the entire thermal cycle was monitored by wafer curvature technique and the traces of additive impurities at the surface were measured using X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. The possible role of impurities in affecting the behavior of texture components at high temperature is discussed. Comparison was made between the EBSD and X-ray diffraction texture data

  12. An electron backscatter diffraction investigation of crystallographic orientations of embedded nanoparticles within melt-textured YBCO high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructures of melt-textured YBCO samples with embedded nanosized particles of Y2BaCuO5 (Y-211) and Y2Ba4CuMOx (M-2411 with M = U,Zr) are analysed by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). With the recent developments of the EBSD technique, we can directly measure the crystallographic orientation of the embedded nanoparticles, employing a spatial resolution of about 40 nm. The high image quality of the Kikuchi patterns allows true three-phase (YBCO, Y-211 and M-2411) scans to be performed. The Y-211 particles do not exhibit any preferred orientation, even if their size is considerably reduced, to the 100 nm range. The size reduction reduces the negative influence of the Y-211 particles on the YBCO matrix, however. U-2411 particles, which are formed during the processing stage, do not show any orientation, and with increasing concentration, some texture develops. In contrast to this, embedded Zr-2411 particles are fully oriented in the (001) orientation according to the surrounding superconducting matrix

  13. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4

  14. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  15. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lawrence H; Vaudin, Mark D; Stranick, Stephan J; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA-AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10(-4) in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. PMID:26939030

  16. Spatially resolved determination of lattice distortions in silicon nanostructures by means of electron-backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the submitted thesis, a novel combined approach of both focused ion beam (FIB) based target preparation and strain determination using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in semiconductor nanostructures is presented. In the first part, a powerful cross-correlation algorithm for detecting small feature shifts within EBSD patterns and, consequently, determining the strain, is presented. The corresponding strain sensitivity is demonstrated using dynamically simulated diffraction patterns. Furthermore, novel procedures for automated pattern analysis are introduced. Results of systematic studies concerning the influence of ion species, ion energy and dose density on the surface quality of silicon surfaces are presented in the second part. For that matter, the assessment of surface amorphization and rippling is based on high resolution microstructural diagnostics (TEM, AFM, Raman) and molecular dynamics simulation. The high application potential of combined FIB preparation and strain analysis using EBSD is exemplarily demonstrated for a 60 nm thick sSOI-sample. The good agreement with established techniques like Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction is also shown.

  17. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis of copper damascene interconnect for ultralarge-scale integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo-Jong [Research Institute of Advanced Materials and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Ik [Research Institute of Advanced Materials and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jeong Hun [Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Giheung-Eup, Yong-in City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Nyung [Research Institute of Advanced Materials and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: dnlee@snu.ac.kr

    2005-03-01

    This study focuses on the structures and the crystallographic orientations of copper electrodeposits in trench patterns by the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. The EBSD measurement was made on the surface of annealed deposits before and after removal of their over-plated layers by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) and also on the section normal to trench lines. The textures of the annealed deposit with and without the over-plated layer are almost same. The major and minor orientation components in the annealing textures of trench specimens were approximated by {l_brace}111{r_brace}<110> and its twin components, {l_brace}115{r_brace}<110> and {l_brace}115{r_brace}<141>, respectively. Here {l_brace}hkl{r_brace} indicates that {l_brace}hkl{r_brace} is the crystallographic planes parallel to the trench base plane and is the crystallographic directions parallel to the trench line direction. By measuring the line-normal sectional EBSD analysis, the copper electrodeposit in a trench plug is figured as a single crystal having a few of twinning, and hence the over-plated layer has almost the same texture as the trench plug. Therefore, the texture of trench plugs can be inferred by that of the over-plated layer.

  18. STRAIN CORRELATIONS IN ALLOY 690 MATERIALS USING ELECTRON BACKSCATTER DIFFRACTION AND VICKERS HARDNESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-03-09

    High chromium, nickel-base Alloy 690 exhibits an increased resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environments over lower chromium alloy 600. As a result, Alloy 690 has been used to replace Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing, reactor pressure vessel nozzles and other pressure boundary components. However, recent laboratory crack-growth testing has revealed that heavily cold-worked Alloy 690 materials can become susceptible to SCC. To evaluate reasons for this increased SCC susceptibility, detailed characterizations have been performed on as-received and cold-worked Alloy 690 materials using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and Vickers hardness measurements. Examinations were performed on cross sections of compact tension specimens that were used for SCC crack growth rate testing in simulated PWR primary water. Hardness and the EBSD integrated misorientation density could both be related to the degree of cold work for materials of similar grain size. However, a microstructural dependence was observed for strain correlations using EBSD and hardness which should be considered if this technique is to be used for gaining insight on SCC growth rates

  19. Microstructure evolution of 6061 O Al alloy during ultrasonic consolidation: An insight from electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    6061 O Al alloy foils were welded to form monolithic and SiC fibre-embedded samples using the ultrasonic consolidation (UC) process. Contact pressures of 135, 155 and 175 MPa were investigated at 20 kHz frequency, 50% of the oscillation amplitude, 34.5 mm s-1 sonotrode velocity and 20 deg. C. Deformed microstructures were analysed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). At all contact pressures deformation occurs by non-steady state dislocation glide. Dynamic recovery is active in the upper and lower foils. Friction at the welding interface, instantaneous internal temperatures (0.5-0.8 of the melting temperature, Tm), contact pressure and fast strain rates result in transient microstructures and grain size reduction by continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) within the bonding zone. Bonding occurs by local grain boundary migration, which allows diffusion and atom interlocking across the contact between two clean surfaces. Textures weaken with increasing contact pressure due to increased strain hardening and different grain rotation rates. High contact pressures enhance dynamic recovery and CDRX. Deformation around the fibre is intense within 50 μm and extends to 450 μm from it.

  20. In situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) during the compression of micropillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements during compression experiments by a modified nanoindenter on micron-sized single crystal pillars are demonstrated here. The experimental setup and the requirements concerning the compression sample are described in detail. EBSD mappings have been acquired before loading, under load and after unloading for consecutive compression cycles on a focused ion beam (FIB) milled GaAs micropillar. In situ EBSD allows for the determination of crystallographic orientation with sub-100 nm spatial resolution. Thereby, it provides highly localized information pertaining to the deformation phenomena such as elastic bending of the micropillar or the formation of deformation twins and plastic orientation gradients due to geometrically necessary dislocations. The most striking features revealed by in situ EBSD are the non-negligible amount of reversible (elastic) bending of the micropillar and the fact that deformation twinning and dislocation glide initiate where the bending is strongest. Due to this high spatial and orientation resolution, in situ EBSD measurements during micromechanical testing are demonstrated to be a promising technique for the investigation of deformation phenomena at the nano- to micro-scale.

  1. Simulation of emittance dilution in electron storage ring from Compton backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte-Carlo simulation of Compton backscattered λL =3.2-μm (EL = .38494 eV) photons from an IR-FEL on 75-MeV electrons in a storage ring yields an RMS electron energy spread of ΔE= 11.9-keV for a sample of 107 single scattering events. Electrons are sampled from a beam of natural energy spread σE = 5.6-keV and damped transverse angle spreads σx = .041-mrad and σy = .052-mrad (100%) coupling, scaled from the 200-MeV BNL XLS compact storage ring. The Compton-scattered X-Rays are generated from an integral of the CM Klein-Nishina cross-section transformed to the lab. A tracking calculation has also been performed in 6-dimensional phase space. Initial electron coordinates are selected randomly from a Gaussian distribution of RMS spreads σxo =.102-mm, σx'o=0.41-mrad, σyo=0.18-mm, σy'o=0.52-mrad, σφo=22-mrad and σEo=6-keV. A sample of 10000 electrons were each following for 40000 turns around the ring through an RF cavity of frf=211.54-MHz and peak voltage Vm=300-keV. Preliminary results indicate that the resulting energy distribution is quite broad with an RMS width of ΔE = 124-keV. The transverse widths are only slightly increased from their original values, i.e. Δx =.106-mm and ΔE=.043 mrad. The scaled energy spread of ΔE∼360-keV for ∼350,000 turns desired in a 10-msec X-Ray angiography exposure is well within the RF bucket used here; even VmEX=.32-keV. The electron energy damping time of τE=379-msec at 75-MeV in an XLS-type ring allows for damping this induced spread and top-off the ring between heart cycles

  2. Simulation of emittance dilution in electron storage ring from Compton backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte-Carlo simulation of Compton backscattered κL=3.2-μm photons from an IR-FEL on 75-MeV electrons in a storage ring yields an RMS electron energy spread of ΔE=11.9-keV for a sample of 107 single scattering events. Electrons are sampled from a beam of natural energy spread σE = 5.6-keV and damped transverse angle spreads σx', = .041-mrad and σy' = .052-mrad (100%) coupling, scaled from the 200-MeV BNL XLS compact storage ring. The Compton-scattered X-Rays are generated from an integral of the CM Klein-Nishina cross-section transformed to the lab. A tracking calculation has also been performed in 6-dimensional phase space. Initial electron coordinates are selected randomly from a Gaussian distribution of RMS spreads σxo=.102-mm, σx'o=.041-mrad, σyo=.018-mm, σy'o=.052-mrad, σφo=22-mrad and σEo=6-keV. A sample of 10000 electrons were each following for 40000 turns around the ring through an RF cavity of frf=211.54-MHz and peak voltage Vm=300-keV. Preliminary results indicate that the resulting energy distribution is quite broad with an RMS width of ΔE = 124-keV. The transverse widths are only slightly increased from their original values, i.e. Δx = .106-mm and Δx'=.043 mrad. The scaled energy spread of ΔE ∼ 360-keV for ∼ 350,000 turns desired in a 10-msec X-Ray angiography exposure is well within the RF bucket used here; even Vm Ex=.32-keV. The electron energy damping time of τE=379-msec at 75-MeV in an XLS-type ring allows for damping this induced spread and top-off of the ring between heart cycles

  3. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of blind hole fillings by electrolytic Cu deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blind hole (BH) filling by electrolytic Cu deposition is widely used in high density interconnection technology for printed circuit boards. In this study, we investigated Cu deposition behavior in a BH structure using optical microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy in combination with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). According to the deposition morphology/rate, the BH filling process was divided into three distinct regimes: (1) the initial deposition regime (t = 20–25 min), (2) the bottom up deposition regime (t = 25–35 min), and (3) the final deposition regime (t = 35–80 min). EBSD analyses showed that the Cu grains were predominantly in the [111]||TD (TD: transverse direction) orientation in the first regime. The [111] Cu grains were predominantly oriented with a takeoff angle of ∼ 20° in the bottom up deposition regime. In the final deposition regime, the [111]||RD (RD: rolling direction) and [101]||RD orientations became dominant in the BH fillings. In addition, we characterized the grain boundaries in the Cu deposits with respect to t. The microstructural/crystallographic information presented in this study will improve the understanding of how the electrolytic Cu filling process occurs in a BH structure. - Highlights: • Blind hole (BH) filling by electrolytic Cu deposition • Surface Cu deposition obeys Faraday's first law. • The Cu deposition rate is strongly time dependent in the BH filling. • [111] and [101] are preferred crystal directions in electrolytic Cu deposition. • Numerous high angle grain boundaries with strong coincidence site lattices (CSLs)

  4. Detector for high-energy photon backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Michael D.; Erker, Joseph W.; Duncan, Michael Z.; Hartford, Thomas J.; Sivers, E. A.; Hopkinson, James F.

    1993-12-01

    High energy photon backscatter uses pair production to probe deep beneath surfaces with single side accessibility or to image thick, radiographically opaque objects. At the higher photon energies needed to penetrate thick and/or highly attenuating objects, Compton backscatter becomes strongly forward peaked with relatively little backscatter flux. Furthermore, the downward energy shift of the backscattered photon makes it more susceptible to attenuation on its outbound path. Above 1.022 MeV, pair production is possible; at about 10 MeV, pari production crosses over Compton scatter as the dominant x-ray interaction mechanism. The backscattered photons can be hard x rays from the bremsstrahlung of the electrons and positrons or 0.511 MeV photons from the annihilation of the positron. Monte Carlo computer simulations of such a backscatter system were done to characterize the output signals and to optimize a high energy detector design. This paper touches on the physics of high energy backscatter imaging and describes at some length the detector design for tomographic and radiographic imaging.

  5. Compton back-scattering of X-photons from 8 GeV electrons at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Nelyubin, V V; Nakano, T; Wojtsekhowski, B B

    1999-01-01

    The experimental feasibility of using an intensive photon beam at the SPring-8 for producing a high-energy gamma-ray beam is examined. Compton back-scattering of the soft X-photons emitted by an undulator and reflected back by a multi-layer mirror from the electron beam can produce a quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beam up to an energy very close to 8 GeV. The intensity of the gamma-ray beam in the energy range of 6.6-7.8 GeV has been estimated at 2x10 sup 4 per second. The energy shape and the scattered angle of gamma-rays produced in Compton back-scattering of the soft X-photons from an 8 GeV electron beam are calculated.

  6. Grain size distributions of chalk from image analysis of electron micrographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    from image analysis due to rim effects inherent in backscatter images at high magnification. Thus, in order to obtain a consistent interpretation, we use total (He) porosity and insoluble residue as measured in the laboratory. We find that the volume density of larger grains (cross section larger than...... image analysis. The chalk is composed of a fine-grained matrix of nannofossils and predominantlycalcitic fossil debris with larger microfossil grains, but the chalk may also contain significant amounts of silica and siliciclastic clay. For image analysis, we used backscatter electron images of epoxy...

  7. Backscattering of Laser Radiation on Ultrarelativistic Electrons in a Transverse Magnetic Field: Evidence of MeV-Scale Photon Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumova, E. V.; Achasov, M. N.; Berkaev, D. E.; Kaminsky, V. V.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Perevedentsev, E. A.; Pyata, E. E.; Shatunov, Yu. M.

    2013-04-01

    In this Letter we report an observation of interference effects in Compton scattering in the experiment held on the VEPP-2000 collider. Infrared laser radiation was scattered head-on the 990 MeV electrons inside the dipole magnet, where an electron orbit radius is about 140 cm. It was observed that the energy spectrum of backscattered photons, measured by a HPGe detector, differs from that defined by the Klein-Nishina cross section and scattering kinematics of free electrons. The explanation of the effect, proposed in terms of classical electrodynamics, is in agreement with QED calculations.

  8. Electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics discussed include, among others, the following: Role of portal imaging; Port films vs. EPID; Image guidance: Elekta volume view; Delivery verification; Automation tasks of portal imaging; Types of portal imaging (Fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera-based imaging; Liquid ion chamber imaging; Amorpho-silicon portal imagers; Fluoroscopic portal imaging; Kodak CR reader; and Other types of portal imaging devices); QA of EPID; and Portal dosimetry (P.A.)

  9. NDE of spacecraft materials using 3D Compton backscatter x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, E. R.; Grubsky, V.; Romanov, V.; Shoemaker, K.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of testing of the NDE performance of a Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) system for single-sided, penetrating 3D inspection. The system was recently developed by Physical Optics Corporation (POC) and delivered to NASA for testing and evaluation. The CIT technology is based on 3D structure mapping by collecting the information on density profiles in multiple object cross sections through hard x-ray Compton backscatter imaging. The individual cross sections are processed and fused together in software, generating a 3D map of the density profile of the object which can then be analyzed slice-by-slice in x, y, or z directions. The developed CIT scanner is based on a 200-kV x-ray source, flat-panel x-ray detector (FPD), and apodized x-ray imaging optics. The CIT technology is particularly well suited to the NDE of lightweight aerospace materials, such as the thermal protection system (TPS) ceramic and composite materials, micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding, spacecraft pressure walls, inflatable habitat structures, composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and aluminum honeycomb materials. The current system provides 3D localization of defects and features with field of view 20x12x8 cm3 and spatial resolution ˜2 mm. In this paper, we review several aerospace NDE applications of the CIT technology, with particular emphasis on TPS. Based on the analysis of the testing results, we provide recommendations for continued development on TPS applications that can benefit the most from the unique capabilities of this new NDE technology.

  10. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria‐stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb‐doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D‐EBSD experiments by FIB...... of STN samples compared to a mechanically polished surface but yielded a high pattern quality on YSZ. The difference between STN and YSZ pattern quality is thought to be caused by difference in the degree of ion damage as their backscatter coefficients and ion penetration depths are virtually identical....... Reducing the FIB probe current from 5000to 100 pA improved the pattern quality by 20% for STN but only showed a marginal improvement for YSZ. On STN, a conductive coating can help to improve the pattern quality and 5 kV polishing can lead to a 100% improvement of the pattern quality relatively to 30 kV FIB...

  11. A system of beam energy measurement based on the Compton backscattered laser photons for the VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Abakumova, E V; Berkaev, D E; Kaminsky, V V; Koop, I A; Korol, A A; Koshuba, S V; Krasnov, A A; Muchnoi, N Yu; Perevedentsev, E A; Pyata, E E; Shatunov, P Yu; Shatunov, Yu M; Shwartz, D B

    2013-01-01

    The beam energy measurement system for the VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider is described. The method of Compton backscattering of $CO$ laser photons on the electron beam is used. The relative systematic uncertainty of the beam energy determination is estimated as 6\\cdot10^{-5}. It was obtained through comparison of the results of the beam energy measurements using the Compton backscattering and resonance depolarization methods.

  12. A system of beam energy measurement based on the Compton backscattered laser photons for the VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumova, E. V.; Achasov, M. N.; Berkaev, D. E.; Kaminsky, V. V.; Koop, I. A.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Krasnov, A. A.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Perevedentsev, E. A.; Pyata, E. E.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Shwartz, D. B.

    2014-04-01

    The beam energy measurement system for the VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider is described. The method of Compton backscattering of CO laser photons on the electron beam is used. The relative systematic uncertainty of the beam energy determination is estimated as 6×10-5. It was obtained through comparison of the results of the beam energy measurements using the Compton backscattering and resonance depolarization methods.

  13. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  14. Experimental measurement of noise-removal techniques for Compton backscatter imaging systems as applied to the detection of landmines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Keshavmurthy, Shyam P.; Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.

    1996-05-01

    The measurement and removal of noise from images created using lateral migration backscatter radiography (LMBR) a form of Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) is applied to the detection and identification of landmines. The photons that interact with the landmine produce the signal component of interest. The signal is corrupted by both quantum and structured noise. The structured noise is due to photon interaction with non-mine material. Due to the strong response of all detectors to soil surface features and other buried objects, image enhancement methods are essential for landmine identification. A four detector system is used to generate the LMBR/CB images. The inner two detectors are uncollimated and positioned to optimally detect first scattered photons. The outer detectors are collimated to detect photons that have had two or more scatterings. The difference between the collimated and uncollimated detector responses to the different types of landmine image masking phenomena, form the basis of the image enhancement and landmine identification procedures. The surface feature information is obtained by the uncollimated detectors. The collimated detector signal contains information about the surface features as well as the buried objects. Using images from these two sets of detectors the surface objects can be analyzed for possible landmines and then removed. The buried objects can then be resolved. The measurements and image enhancements demonstrate that it is possible to detect 12' plastic landmines at a buried of 3' under simulated battlefield conditions.

  15. Electron backscattering on Si(Li) detectors and determination of the transmission curve of a Mini-Orange Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerro, Leonardo, E-mail: leonardo.guerro@unicam.it [Division of Physics, School of Science and Technology, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Blasi, Nives [INFN-Sezione di Milano (Italy); Saltarelli, Alessandro [Division of Physics, School of Science and Technology, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Perugia (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    A detailed electron backscattering analysis in Si(Li) detectors was done in order to evaluate the response function of the Mini-Orange Spectrometer. The analysis was performed via Monte Carlo simulations and by measuring the energy and the angular dependencies without and with the insertion of the Mini-Orange Spectrometer in the detection system, combining data taken with a continuous β{sup −} source ({sup 90}Sr) with those from discrete electron transitions of an electron conversion source ({sup 207}Bi). A simple but accurate method is described to determine the transmission function T(E) of the Mini-Orange. - Highlights: • We analyze electron backscattering in Si(Li) detectors. • We evaluate the response function of a Mini-Orange Spectrometer. • We perform Monte Carlo simulations and measure MOS energy and angular dependencies. • Data are taken with a continuous source combined with a discrete conversion source. • An accurate method is described to determine the transmission of a Mini-Orange.

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of Abrir La Sierra Bank, PR (2007) collected using a SeaBat Reson 8124 (200 kHz) multibeam echosounder

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the Abrir La Sierra Bank off the coast of western Puerto Rico, collected using a SeaBat Reson 8124...

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of Abrir La Sierra Bank, PR (2007) collected using a Kongsberg EM 1002 (95 kHz) multibeam echosounder

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the Abrir La Sierra Bank off the coast of western Puerto Rico, collected using a Kongsberg EM 1002...

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of Bajo de Cico, Puerto Rico, Project NF-07-06, 2007, UTM 19 NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Bajo de Cico off the coast of western Puerto Rico, collected using a Kongsberg EM 1002 (95 kHz)...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 2 m Backscatter Mosaic of Isla de Mona, PR, Project NF-07-06, 2007, UTM 19 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 2 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the southern coast of Isla de Mona, collected using a Kongsberg EM 1002 (95 kHz) multibeam...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of Bajo de Cico, Puerto Rico, Project NF-07-06, 2007, UTM 19 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Bajo de Cico off the coast of western Puerto Rico, collected using a Kongsberg EM 1002 (95 kHz)...

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - 2 m Backscatter Mosaic of Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico, Project NF-07-06, 2007, UTM 19 NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 2 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the southern coast of Isla de Mona, collected using a Kongsberg EM 1002 (95 kHz) multibeam...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image- 0.5 meter Backscatter Mosaic of Grammanik Bank - East (St. Thomas), US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Grammanik Bank, south of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team,...

  3. NOAA TIFF Image- 0.5 meter Backscatter Mosaic of Mid Shelf Reef (St. Thomas), US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the Mid Shelf Reef south of St. Thomas, US Virgin IslandsNOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team,...

  4. Scale invariance and scaling law of Thomson backscatter spectra by electron moving in laser-magnetic resonance regime

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Yi-Jia; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-01-01

    The Thomson scattering spectra by an electron moving in the laser-magnetic resonance acceleration regime are computed numerically and analytically. The dependence of fundamental frequency on the laser intensity and magnetic resonance parameter is examined carefully. By calculating the emission of a single electron in a circularly polarized plane-wave laser field and constant external magnetic field, the scale invariance of the radiation spectra is evident in terms of harmonic orders. The scaling law of backscattered spectra are exhibited remarkably for the laser intensity as well for the initial axial momentum of the electron when the cyclotron frequency of the electron approaches the laser frequency. The results indicate that the magnetic resonance parameter plays an important role on the strength of emission. And the rich features of scattering spectra found may be applicable to the radiation source tunability.

  5. An assessment of COMSCAN, a Compton backscatter imaging camera, for the one-sided non-destructive inspection of aerospace components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponder, L.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents some results obtained using a Compton backscatter imaging camera, developed by Philips Industries, which were obtained during a visit to the Defense Research Establishment Pacific (DREP) during May/June 1992. Compton backscatter imaging is an X-ray technique which can be used to non-destructively inspect the interior of both metallic and non-metallic structures and, unlike conventional X-ray methods, requires access to only one side of the part being inspected.

  6. Electron backscatter diffraction study of dislocation content of a macrozone in hot-rolled Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compare the dislocation substructure within macrozone and non-macrozone regions of hot-rolled Ti-6Al-4 V. Hough-based and cross-correlation-based analysis of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns are used to establish the grain orientations and intra-granular misorientations, respectively. The set of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) that support measured lattice curvatures and minimize the total GND line energy are calculated. The GND content in the macrozone is approximately twice that in the non-macrozone region, and GNDs are present at densities ∼10 times higher than GNDs.

  7. Work hardening mechanism in high nitrogen austenitic steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a focus on microstructural hierarchy, work hardening behaviour in high nitrogen-bearing austenitic steel (HNS) was investigated mainly by a combined technique of in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). Stress partitioning due to difference in deformability among grains is enhanced in HNS. The larger stress partitioning among [h k l]-oriented family grains seems to realize high work hardening at a small strain. At a larger strain, dislocation density is higher in HNS than in low nitrogen austenitic steel (LNS), which is a possible reason for high work hardening after straining proceeds, resulting in large uniform elongation.

  8. Quasioptical design of integrated Doppler backscattering and correlation electron cyclotron emission systems on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quasioptical design of a new integrated Doppler backscattering (DBS) and correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system is presented. The design provides for simultaneous measurements of intermediate wavenumber density and long wavelength electron temperature turbulence behavior. The Doppler backscattering technique is sensitive to plasma turbulence flow and has been utilized to determine radial electric field, geodesic acoustic modes, zonal flows, and intermediate scale (k∼1-6 cm-1) density turbulence. The correlation ECE system measures a second turbulent field, electron temperature fluctuations, and is sensitive to long poloidal wavelength (k≤1.8 cm-1). The integrated system utilizes a newly installed in-vessel focusing mirror that produces a beam waist diameter of 3.5-5 cm in the plasma depending on the frequency. A single antenna (i.e., monostatic operation) is used for both launch and receive. The DBS wavenumber is selected via an adjustable launch angle and variable probing frequency. Due to the unique system design both positive and negative wavenumbers can be obtained, with a range of low to intermediate wavenumbers possible (approximately -3 to 10 cm-1). A unique feature of the design is the ability to place the DBS and CECE measurements at the same radial and poloidal locations allowing for cross correlation studies (e.g., measurement of nT cross-phase).

  9. Detection of Subsurface Defects Using X-Ray Lateral Migration Radiography - A New Backscatter Imaging Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward T. Dugan; Alan M. Jacobs

    2003-02-10

    A new Compton X-ray backscatter imaging technique called lateral migration radiography (LMR) is applied to detecting a class of sub-surface defects in materials and structures of industrial importance. These include flaws and defects for which there is either no known method or an effective method for detection. Examples are delamination in layered composite structures, defects in deposited coatings on metal surfaces such as in aircraft jet engine components and geometrical structural/composition changes (e.g. due to corrosion) on the inside of shell-like components with only outside surface area access.Research efforts include: the construction of simulated flawed test objects on which experimental measurements are performed to establish LMR flaw detection capabilities; performance of Monte Carlo simulations of these measurements to assist in predicting optimum source-detector configurations and to help obtain a detailed understanding of the physics of lateral migration in small voids and how this impacts the resulting LMR image contrasts; the procurement of samples of materials of industrial importance with flaws and defects; the application of LMR to the detection of flaws and defects in these samples; the development of a multi-detector scanning system to provide for faster, more effective flaw detection; and a determination, for the types of samples examined, of the limits and capabilities of flaw detection using LMR.LMR imaging measurements on the machined samples showed that the optimum contrast in flaw-to-background signal intensity occurred at an X-ray energy of 75 kVp for the aluminum samples and at 35 kVp for the Delrin sample. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements on the aluminum samples showed that LMR is capable of detecting defects down to the tens of microns range. Measurements on the aluminum samples also showed that LMR is capable of detecting relatively small composition variations; a 30 % difference in image intensity was

  10. Solving next generation (1x node) metrology challenges using advanced CDSEM capabilities: tilt, high energy and backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Snow, Patrick W.; Vaid, Alok; Solecky, Eric; Zhou, Hua; Ge, Zhenhua; Yasharzade, Shay; Shoval, Ori; Adan, Ofer; Schwarzband, Ishai; Bar-Zvi, Maayan

    2015-03-01

    Traditional metrology solutions are facing a range of challenges at the 1X node such as three dimensional (3D) measurement capabilities, shrinking overlay and critical dimension (CD) error budgets driven by multi-patterning and via in trench CD measurements. Hybrid metrology offers promising new capabilities to address some of these challenges but it will take some time before fully realized. This paper explores new capabilities currently offered on the in-line Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscope (CD-SEM) to address these challenges and enable the CD-SEM to move beyond measuring bottom CD using top down imaging. Device performance is strongly correlated with Fin geometry causing an urgent need for 3D measurements. New beam tilting capabilities enhance the ability to make 3D measurements in the front-end-of-line (FEOL) of the metal gate FinFET process in manufacturing. We explore these new capabilities for measuring Fin height and build upon the work communicated last year at SPIE1. Furthermore, we extend the application of the tilt beam to the back-end-of-line (BEOL) trench depth measurement and demonstrate its capability in production targeting replacement of the existing Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) measurements by including the height measurement in the existing CDSEM recipe to reduce fab cycle time. In the BEOL, another increasingly challenging measurement for the traditional CD-SEM is the bottom CD of the self-aligned via (SAV) in a trench first via last (TFVL) process. Due to the extremely high aspect ratio of the structure secondary electron (SE) collection from the via bottom is significantly reduced requiring the use of backscatter electrons (BSE) to increase the relevant image quality. Even with this solution, the resulting images are difficult to measure with advanced technology nodes. We explore new methods to increase measurement robustness and combine this with novel segmentation-based measurement algorithm generated specifically for BSE

  11. Response in Electrostatic Analyzers due to Backscattered Electrons: Case Study Analysis with the Juno JADE-E Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G. B.; Allegrini, F.; McComas, D. J.; Randol, B. M.; Valek, P. W.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Juno mission includes the Jovian Auroral Distribution Experiment (JADE) that will measure in situ electrons and ions in Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. JADE consists of three nearly identical electron sensors (JADE-E) and one ion sensor (JADE-I). JADE-E measures full electron pitch angle distributions from 0.1 to 100 keV. The electro-optics are based on an electrostatic analyzer (ESA) with an Ebonol-C blackening surface treatment, and a detection system composed of a MCP stack and 16 individual anodes each with a 7.5 degree field of view. A non-ideal response was observed during calibration with count rates measured on anodes adjacent to the focal anode. The integrated non-ideal response contributes up to ~25%, relative to the ideal signal, for electron beam energies ~30 keV. We propose that this response is due to backscattered electrons (BSEs) from the electron beam off of the ESA coating. With a SIMION model, we explored the angular and energy distributions of BSEs and how they affect the response of JADE-E. Non-ideal responses occur at some level in electron plasma ESAs generally, likely due to the effect of BSEs discussed here.

  12. Two and three dimensional electron backscattered diffraction analysis of solid oxide cells materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath

    There are two main technique were developed in this work: a technique to calculate grain boundary energy and pressure and a technique to measure lattice constant from EBSD. The techniques were applied to Nb-doped Strontium titanate (STN) and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which are commonly used...... compared to a mechanically polished surface but yielded a high pattern quality on YSZ. The difference between STN and YSZ pattern quality is thought to be caused by difference in the degree of ion damage as their backscatter coefficients and ion penetration depths are virtually identical. Reducing the FIB...... probe current from 5000 to100pA improved the pattern quality by 20% for STN but only showed a marginal improvement for YSZ. On STN, a conductive coating can help to improve the pattern quality and 5 kV polishing can lead to a 100% improvement of the pattern quality relatively to 30 kV FIB milling...

  13. Heavy Element Staining of Sedimentary Organic Matter Functional Groups for Backscattered Electron Imaging Marquage par éléments lourds de la matière organique sédimentaire pour la microscopie électronique en électrons rétrodiffusés

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belin-Geindre S.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The scanning electron microscopy (SEM in backscattered electron mode (BSE, which imaging is based upon atomic number (Z contrasts between constituents, allows to visualize the organic matter distribution within the sediment. However the precise identification of organic matter is not possible as all the organic matter appears black. The contrasts between the different types of organic matter were enhanced for the use of the SEM/BSE imaging by staining organic matter with high Z elements. Experimental procedure was tested in terms of faisability, selectivity and specificity on polymers containing functional groups likely to occur in sedimentary organic matter. Then staining was applied to sedimentary organic matter, i. e. to purely organic sediments (algal mats, kukersite and coal and to clayey sediments (Kimmeridge Clay Formation. The chosen staining solutions comprised : ruthenium tetroxide, osmium tetroxide, phosphotungstic acid (PTA and silver methenamine. Samples were immersed in staining solutions for 24 hours, rinsed and observed with SEM/BSE. The penetration depth ranges between 20 and 150 µm. Other complementary tests with ruthenium tetroxide and mercury acetate were also performed on polymers. Tests with PTA, silver methenamine and osmium tetroxide were satisfying and presented a more or less broad specificity. Osmium allows the distinction of each algal laminite of the algal mat. The different parts of the kukersite react specifically with osmium, PTA and silver. The coal constituents display a specific staining with silver methenamine. Osmium and PTA allow in the Kimmeridge Clay sample (a to differenciate several types of organic particles according to their chemical composition; (b to locate the organic matter finely dispersed within the mineral, clayey matrix. La microscopie électronique à balayage (MEB en mode électrons rétrodiffusés (ER permet de visualiser la répartition de toute la matière organique d'un sédiment (Belin

  14. Aluminum matrix texture in Al-Al3Ti functionally graded materials analyzed by electron back-scattering diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Sequeira, Paulo D.; Sato, Hisashi; Inamura, Tomonari; Hosoda, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Al matrix functionally graded materials (FGMs) with oriented Al3Ti platelets were fabricated by a centrifugal solid-particle method. The applied centrifugal forces were 30, 60, and 120G (units of gravity). The orientation and volume fraction gradients of the Al3Ti platelets within the samples were measured. Since a good lattice correspondence was reported for the close-packed directions and the close-packed planes between Al and Al3Ti, the Al matrix in the Al-Al3Ti FGMs fabricated by the centrifugal solid-particle method should have some texture. Al matrix texture was, therefore, analyzed by electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD). Analysis of the resulting pole figures indicates a preferred orientation along the (200) plane for the Al matrix crystals. Furthermore, increasing the applied centrifugal force enhances the orientation effect. A correlation appears to exist between platelet orientation and the preferred texture of the Al matrix.

  15. On the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation in Ni superalloy containing inclusions using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of interrupted three-point bend low-cycle fatigue tests were carried out on a powder metallurgy FHG96 nickel superalloy sample containing non-metallic inclusions. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) was used to characterise the distribution and evolution of geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density, residual stress and total dislocation density near a non-metallic inclusion. A systematic study of room temperature cyclic deformation is presented in which slip localisation, cyclic hardening, ratcheting and stabilisation occur, through to crack formation and microstructurally-sensitive propagation. Particular focus is brought to bear at the inclusion–matrix interface. Complex inhomogeneous deformation structures were directly observed from the first few loading cycles, and these structures were found not to vary significantly with increasing number of cycles. A clear link was observed between crack nucleation site and microstructurally-sensitive growth path and the spatially-resolved sites of extreme values of residual stress and GND density

  16. Deformation micro-mechanism for compression of magnesium alloys at room temperature analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In-situ tracking on the evolution of grains orientation of magnesium alloy was carried out by EBSD. • Distributions of twin bands were closely related to the activation of extension twin variants. • Activation of extension twin significantly changes the order of Schmid factor of slips. • Pyramidal slips become the dominant deformation mode at the late stage of compression. - Abstract: In-situ tracking on the evolution of grains orientation of rolled magnesium alloy sheets compressed uniaxially at room temperature was carried out by the method of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and meanwhile, distributions of twin bands, activations of twin and slips were also analyzed. The results show that the distributions of twin bands were closely related to the activation of extension twin variants. The activation of extension twin significantly changes the order of Schmid factor of different slips, and accordingly affects the activation of slips during the subsequent deformation

  17. Novel CMOS electron imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Hod; Ginosar, Ran

    1998-09-01

    Electron detector arrays are employed in numerous imaging applications, from low-light-light-level imaging to astronomy, electron microscopy, and nuclear instrumentation. The majority of these detectors are fabricated with dedicated processes, use the semiconductor as a stopping and detecting layer, and utilize CCD-type charge transfer and detection. We present a new detector, wherein electrons are stopped by an exposed metal layer, and are subsequently detected either through charge collection in a CCD-type well, or by a measurement of a potential drop across a capacitor which is discharged by these electrons. Spatial localization is achieved by use of two metal planes, one for protecting the underlying gate structures, and another, with metal pixel structures, for 2D detection. The new device does not suffer from semiconductor non-uniformities, and blooming effects are minimized. It is effective for electrons with energies of 2-6 keV. The unique structure makes it possible to achieve a high fill factor, and to incorporate on-chip processing. An imaging chip implementing several test structures incorporating the new detector has been fabricated using a 2 micron double-poly double-metal process, and tested inside a JEOL 640 electron microscope.

  18. On the characterization of recrystallized fraction using electron backscatter diffraction: A direct comparison to local hardness in an IF steel using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → EBSD-based techniques can be effectively used to assess the recrystallized fraction of many engineering alloys, including interstitial-free steels. → Kernel average misorientation and grain average misorientation agree with the local recrystallized state (as assessed by nanohardness) better than EBSD image quality, optical microscopy, or microhardness. → Kernel average misorientation and grain average misorientation produce the most reliable results of the methods analyzed in the present work for characterizing recrystallization fraction using EBSD, despite having a step size dependence. - Abstract: Recrystallized fraction was characterized in a Ti-stabilized interstitial-free (IF) steel by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), optical metallography, and hardness-based techniques. EBSD and nanoindentation were performed on overlapping areas to assess the agreement between standard methods of EBSD analysis of deformation microstructures and local hardness. The results of the study indicate that carefully implemented misorientation-based techniques may be used to effectively determine recrystallization fraction, to better agreement with the local recrystallization state than EBSD image quality, optical metallography, or microhardness-based techniques.

  19. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saowadee, N; Agersted, K; Bowen, J R

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb-doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D-EBSD experiments by FIB serial sectioning. Band contrast and band slope were used to describe the pattern quality. The FIB probe currents investigated ranged from 100 to 5000 pA and the accelerating voltage was either 30 or 5 kV. The results show that 30 kV FIB milling induced a significant reduction of the pattern quality of STN samples compared to a mechanically polished surface but yielded a high pattern quality on YSZ. The difference between STN and YSZ pattern quality is thought to be caused by difference in the degree of ion damage as their backscatter coefficients and ion penetration depths are virtually identical. Reducing the FIB probe current from 5000 to 100 pA improved the pattern quality by 20% for STN but only showed a marginal improvement for YSZ. On STN, a conductive coating can help to improve the pattern quality and 5 kV polishing can lead to a 100% improvement of the pattern quality relatively to 30 kV FIB milling. For 3D-EBSD experiments of a material such as STN, it is recommended to combine a high kV FIB milling and low kV polishing for each slice in order to optimize the data quality and acquisition time. PMID:22582798

  20. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. - Highlights: • Multi-condition segmentation of austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite and ferrite in bainite. • Ferrites in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite segmented by variation in relative carbon counts. • Carbon partitioning during growth explains variation in carbon content of ferrites in bainites. • Developed EBSD image processing tools can be applied to the microstructures of a variety of alloys. • EBSD-based segmentation procedure verified by correlative TEM results

  1. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazder, Azdiar A., E-mail: azdiar@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Mitchell, David R.G. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. - Highlights: • Multi-condition segmentation of austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite and ferrite in bainite. • Ferrites in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite segmented by variation in relative carbon counts. • Carbon partitioning during growth explains variation in carbon content of ferrites in bainites. • Developed EBSD image processing tools can be applied to the microstructures of a variety of alloys. • EBSD-based segmentation procedure verified by correlative TEM results.

  2. Keyhole electron diffractive imaging (KEDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, Liberato; Carlino, Elvio; Vittoria, Fabio Alessio; Siliqi, Dritan; Giannini, Cinzia

    2012-11-01

    Electron diffractive imaging (EDI) relies on combining information from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image of an isolated kinematically diffracting nano-particle with the corresponding nano-electron diffraction pattern. Phase-retrieval algorithms allow one to derive the phase, lost in the acquisition of the diffraction pattern, to visualize the actual atomic projected potential within the specimen at sub-ångström resolution, overcoming limitations due to the electron lens aberrations. Here the approach is generalized to study extended crystalline specimens. The new technique has been called keyhole electron diffractive imaging (KEDI) because it aims to investigate nano-regions of extended specimens at sub-ångström resolution by properly confining the illuminated area. Some basic issues of retrieving phase information from the EDI/KEDI measured diffracted amplitudes are discussed. By using the generalized Shannon sampling theorem it is shown that whenever suitable oversampling conditions are satisfied, EDI/KEDI diffraction patterns can contain enough information to lead to reliable phase retrieval of the unknown specimen electrostatic potential. Hence, the KEDI method has been demonstrated by simulations and experiments performed on an Si crystal cross section in the [112] zone-axis orientation, achieving a resolution of 71 pm. PMID:23075611

  3. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Analysis and U-Pb Geochronology of the Oldest Lunar Zircon: Constraining Early Lunar Differentiation and Dating Impact-Related Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, Nick; Nemchin, Alexander; Grange, Marion; Reddy, Steve; Pidgeon, Bob; Geisler, Thorsten; Meyer, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of the early moon was dominated by two processes (i) crystallization of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) and differentiation of potassium-rare earth element-phosphorous-rich residual magma reservoir referred to as KREEP, and (ii) an intense meteorite bombardment referred to as lunar cataclysm . The exact timing of these processes is disputed, and resolution relies on collection and interpretation of precise age data. This study examines the microstructure and geochronology of zircon from lunar impact breccias collected during the Apollo 17 mission. A large zircon clast within lunar breccia 72215,195 shows sector zoning in optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and Raman mapping, and indicates that it was a relict fragment of a much larger magmatic grain. Sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb analysis of the zircon shows that U and Th concentration correlate with sector zoning, with darkest CL domains corresponding with high-U and Th (approx.150 and approx.100 ppm respectively), and the brightest-CL sectors containing approx.30-50 ppm U and approx.10-20 ppm Th. This indicates that variations in optical CL and Raman properties correspond to differential accumulation of alpha-radiation damage in each sector. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping shows that the quality of electron backscatter patterns (band contrast) varies with sector zoning, with the poorest quality patterns obtained from high-U and Th, dark-CL zones. EBSD mapping also reveals a deformation microstructure that is cryptic in optical, CL and Raman imaging. Two orthogonal sets of straight discrete and gradational low-angle boundaries accommodate approx.12 misorientation across the grain. The deformation bands are parallel to the crystallographic {a}-planes of the zircon, have misorientation axes parallel to the c-axis, and are geometrically consistent with formation by dislocation creep associated with {010} slip. The deformation bands are unlike curved

  4. Electron Backscatter Diffraction: An Important Tool for Analyses of Structure-Property Relationships in Thin-Film Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Ras, D.; Kavalakkatt, J.; Nichterwitz, M.; Schäfer, N.; Harndt, S.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Tsyrulin, K.; Schulz, H.; Bauer, F.

    2013-09-01

    The present work gives an overview of the application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the field of thin-film solar cells, which consist of stacks of polycrystalline layers on various rigid or flexible substrates. EBSD provides access to grain-size and local-orientation distributions, film textures, and grain-boundary types. By evaluation of the EBSD patterns within individual grains of the polycrystalline solar cell layers, microstrain distributions also can be obtained. These microstructural properties are of considerable interest for research and development of thin-film solar cells. Moreover, EBSD may be performed three-dimensionally, by alternating slicing of cross sections in a focused ion-beam machine and EBSD acquisition. To relate the microstructural properties to the electrical properties of individual layers as well as to the device performances of corresponding solar cells, EBSD can be combined with electron-beam-induced current and cathodoluminescence measurements and with various scanning-probe microscopy methods such as Kelvin-probe force, scanning spreading resistance, or scanning capacitance microscopy on identical specimen positions. Together with standard device characterization of thin-film solar cells, these scanning microscopy measurements provide the means for extensive analysis of structure-property relationships in solar-cell stacks with polycrystalline layers.

  5. Pseudo sidescan images from backscatter amplitude data of the Hydrosweep multibean sonar system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.; Hagen, R.; Schenke, H.W.

    in the southeast Pacific Ocean is presented. The two sidescan images are perfectly comparable. This result will enhance the utility of the Hydrosweep multibeam system so that, even in the absence of sidescan option, the offline pseudo sidescan images can...

  6. An optical storage cavity-based, Compton-backscatter x-ray source using the MKV free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadmack, Michael R.

    A compact, high-brightness x-ray source is presently under development at the University of Hawai`i Free Electron Laser Laboratory. This source utilizes Compton backscattering of an infrared laser from a relativistic electron beam to produce a narrow beam of monochromatic x-rays. The scattering efficiency is greatly increased by tightly focusing the two beams at an interaction point within a near-concentric optical storage cavity, designed with high finesse to coherently stack the incident laser pulses and greatly enhance the number of photons available for scattering with the electron beam. This dissertation describes the effort and progress to integrate and characterize the most important and challenging aspects of the design of this system. A low-power, near-concentric, visible-light storage cavity has been constructed as a tool for the exploration of the performance, alignment procedures, and diagnostics required for the operation of a high power infrared storage cavity. The use of off-axis reflective focussing elements is essential to the design of the optical storage cavity, but requires exquisite alignment to minimize astigmatism and other optical aberrations. Experiments using a stabilized HeNe laser have revealed important performance characteristics, and allowed the development of critical alignment and calibration procedures, which can be directly applied to the high power infrared storage cavity. Integration of the optical and electron beams is similarly challenging. A scanning-wire beam profiler has been constructed and tested, which allows for high resolution measurement of the size and position of the laser and electron beams at the interaction point. This apparatus has demonstrated that the electron and laser beams can be co-aligned with a precision of less than 10 microm, as required to maximize the x-ray production rate. Equally important is the stabilization of the phase of the GHz repetition rate electron pulses arriving at the interaction point

  7. Backscatter imagery in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1x1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The backscatter values are in relative 8-bit (0 –...

  8. Solution to the transport equation for electron backscattering on massive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scattering of a monoenergetic electron beam (Albedo problem) vertical to the plane of the boundary layer of a massive material is treated as transportproblem using the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). The strong anistropic to 1 standardized differential effective cross section (DEC) of the single scattering of the electrons enters into the integral term. A complete, orthogonal set of solution units of the BTE can be given by a new type of approximation of the DEC in a generalization of a solution method from CASE 1960. By continuously changing an anisotropy parameter, the region of strong anisotropic and isotropic single scattering is simultaneously determined, the case results are taken as special case. (orig./RW)

  9. Conditions required for high quality high magnification images in secondary electron-I scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K R

    1982-01-01

    High quality of secondary electron (SE) images, taken at useful magnifications of 100,000 to 200,000, require new signal generation and collection methods and new metal coating procedures. High quality is defined as the condition under which image contrast describes accurately the topographic features of the specimen in a size range that approximates the beam diameter. Such high resolution contrasts are produced by the SE (SE-I) generated by a small electron probe on the specimen surface. Tobacco mosiac virus and ferritin molecules deposited on bulk substrates were introduced as test specimens to check the image quality obtained. The SE-I signal contrast could be imaged when SE (SE-III), produced by backscattered electrons (BSE) at the pole piece of the final lens, were eliminated with an electron absorption device attached to the pole piece. This signal collection procedure will be referred to as "Secondary Electron-I Image" (SE-I image) mode. In addition to the SE-III, BSE generate SE-II in the specimen itself. On specimens deposited on bulk gold or platinum, and coated with the same metals SE-II produced a microroughness contrast that limited particle resolution in the SE-I image mode to approximately 10 nm. Reduction of SE-II and enrichment of the signal in SE-I was achieved by using continuous fine crystalline coatings of tantalum, niobium and chromium. By applying these metals in films of approximately 2.0 nm thickness, the SE-I contrast generation was found to be indepedent of the atomic number of the metal. Edge sharpness was improved when the specimens were coated with low atomic number metals. Under these conditions, the quality of images obtained in SE-I image mode equals that of images obtained in TEM from identically coated specimens and was limited only by the size of the topographic details, beam diameter and beam current. PMID:7184136

  10. Silicon location through backscattered electron imaging and X-ray microanalysis in leaves of Cyperus ligularis L. and Rhynchospora aberrans C. B. Clarke (Cyperaceae Localização de sílica por elétrons retroespalhados em folhas de Cyperus ligularis L. and Rhynchospora aberrans C. B. Clarke (Cyperaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Emília Maranhão Estelita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Cyperaceae show the ability to incorporate silicon by depositing colloidal silica, which is recorded by the occurrence of projections in the form of cones, in inner tangential walls of some epidermal cells or "silica cells". Leaves of C. ligularis and R. aberrans were analyzed through the technique of electron backscatter. Cyperus ligularis accumulates silica, in addition to "silica cells", in some stomata, trichomes and the cell walls that surround the cavities of the aerenchyma. The silica in the latter occurs in various forms; however, the cells located near the vascular bundles have conical projections, similar to those of the epidermis. Rhynchospora aberrans presents "silica cells" whose projections have tapered "satellites". In this species, silica also occurs in stomata and certain epidermal cells adjacent to them. It appears that the silicon deposition occurs in combination with the wall (with no apparent structural changes, and structures of secretion, or projections of the wall. These structural changes in the species, and location, are probably related to functional and environmental factors, especially the soil, in addition to relation with taxonomic groups.As Cyperaceae têm a capacidade de incorporação do ácido silícico mediante depósito de sílica coloidal, que é registrada pela ocorrência de projeções sob a forma de cones, nas paredes tangenciais internas de determinadas células epidérmicas ou "células de sílica". Folhas de C. ligularis e R. aberrans foram analisadas pela técnica de elétrons retroespalhados. C. ligularis além de acumular sílica nas "células de sílica", acumula também em alguns estômatos, nos tricomas e nas paredes das células que contornam as cavidades do aerênquima. Este último apresenta formas diversas, entretanto, as células que se localizam junto aos feixes vasculares mostram projeções cônicas, semelhantes àquelas da epiderme. R. aberrans contém "células de silica" cujas

  11. Comparison between magnetic force microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction for ferrite quantification in type 321 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several analytical techniques that are currently available can be used to determine the spatial distribution and amount of austenite, ferrite and precipitate phases in steels. The application of magnetic force microscopy, in particular, to study the local microstructure of stainless steels is beneficial due to the selectivity of this technique for detection of ferromagnetic phases. In the comparison of Magnetic Force Microscopy and Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction for the morphological mapping and quantification of ferrite, the degree of sub-surface measurement has been found to be critical. Through the use of surface shielding, it has been possible to show that Magnetic Force Microscopy has a measurement depth of 105–140 nm. A comparison of the two techniques together with the depth of measurement capabilities are discussed. - Highlights: • MFM used to map distribution and quantify ferrite in type 321 stainless steels. • MFM results compared with EBSD for same region, showing good spatial correlation. • MFM gives higher area fraction of ferrite than EBSD due to sub-surface measurement. • From controlled experiments MFM depth sensitivity measured from 105 to 140 nm. • A correction factor to calculate area fraction from MFM data is estimated

  12. Standard practice for determining average grain size using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in fully recrystallized polycrystalline materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice is used to determine grain size from measurements of grain areas from automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) scans of polycrystalline materials. 1.2 The intent of this practice is to standardize operation of an automated EBSD instrument to measure ASTM G directly from crystal orientation. The guidelines and caveats of E112 apply here, but the focus of this standard is on EBSD practice. 1.3 This practice is only applicable to fully recrystallized materials. 1.4 This practice is applicable to any crystalline material which produces EBSD patterns of sufficient quality that a high percentage of the patterns can be reliably indexed using automated indexing software. 1.5 The practice is applicable to any type of grain structure or grain size distribution. 1.6 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.7 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parenthe...

  13. Characterization of Sputtered CdTe Thin Films with Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Correlation with Device Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Matthew M; Scarpulla, Michael A; Paudel, Naba R; Wieland, Kristopher A; Compaan, Alvin D; Liu, Xiangxin

    2015-08-01

    The performance of polycrystalline CdTe photovoltaic thin films is expected to depend on the grain boundary density and corresponding grain size of the film microstructure. However, the electrical performance of grain boundaries within these films is not well understood, and can be beneficial, harmful, or neutral in terms of film performance. Electron backscatter diffraction has been used to characterize the grain size, grain boundary structure, and crystallographic texture of sputtered CdTe at varying deposition pressures before and after CdCl2 treatment in order to correlate performance with microstructure. Weak fiber textures were observed in the as-deposited films, with (111) textures present at lower deposition pressures and (110) textures observed at higher deposition pressures. The CdCl2-treated samples exhibited significant grain recrystallization with a high fraction of twin boundaries. Good correlation of solar cell efficiency was observed with twin-corrected grain size while poor correlation was found if the twin boundaries were considered as grain boundaries in the grain size determination. This implies that the twin boundaries are neutral with respect to recombination and carrier transport. PMID:26077102

  14. Texture development study during the primary recrystallization of ferritic steels by using X ray and electron backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X ray and electron backscattering diffraction, in distinct levels, were applied to evaluate microstructural changes in two low carbon ferritic steels (2 per cent Si and ABNT 1006), observing the texture development in cold lamination step (skin-pass) and in the subsequent annealing at 760 deg C. In these two steels, results showed that after the skin-pass and annealing in the conditions of the present work, the observed phenomenon is the primary recrystallization. By applying skin-pass dislocations were introduced mostly in low Taylor factor grains as they are prone to be more deformed. Nucleation and grain growth were observed in high density dislocation cell regions. Silicon presence delayed the recovery favoring the sub-boundaries increase. It was not observed the abnormal grain growth, even in the presence of Gross grains. CSL boundaries did not guarantee the grains growth. Growing nuclei gave rise to grains with distinct orientations, showing that the grain growth was not dependent on the previous presence of grains with the developed orientation. This fact demonstrates that the abnormal grain growth is not necessarily related to the Gross grains. (author)

  15. Characterisation of plastic zones around crack-tips in pure single-crystal tungsten using electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. D.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Roberts, S. G.

    2009-07-01

    Plastic zones around crack-tips in tungsten were characterised by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Pre-cracks were made in ~1mm square cross section beams of pure single-crystal tungsten using a spark erosion method. The beams were loaded at different temperatures to a range of stress intensity factors below the fracture toughness. High resolution EBSD patterns were recorded in a two dimensional array in the vicinity of the crack-tip on sectioned samples. Cross-correlation based analysis of these patterns was used to determine lattice rotations associated with the plastic deformation near the cracks. Crystal rotations in the plane of observation were found to dominate over rotations in other planes. For all specimens deformed above the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature, plastic zones were found to extend from the crack tips on along narrow bands along {110} planes. The sizes of the plastic zones and their associated lattice rotations were determined as a function of loading history.

  16. A view of the implanted SiC damage by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4H-SiC single crystalline substrates were implanted at room temperature with 150 keV Al+ ions using fluences of 4x1014, 1x1015, and 2x1015 cm-2 with current density of 2.5 μA cm-2. The samples were subsequently annealed at 1100 deg. C in N2 for 1 h in order to analyze their structural recovery. The disorder induced in both sublattices by the Al+ ions was studied by backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry with a 3.5 MeV He2+ beam. The results were compared with the optical properties of the samples measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. In a previous work, we concluded that during the postimplantation annealing of a highly damaged SiC crystalline material the short distance order can be recovered, while the long distance disorder remains. We also presented the possibility to have grains of different polytypes oriented faraway from the original direction. Now, this alternative is confirmed by the cross-sectional transmission and high resolution electron microscopy studies, carried out to obtain information about the crystal structure

  17. Assessment of surface hardening effects from shot peening on a Ni-based alloy using electron backscatter diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)-based tool is described to assess the depth of strain-hardening effects of shot-peening treatments applied to the Ni-based superalloy, Udimet (copy right) alloy 720Li. The method consists of a statistical analysis of a number of data points from each grain scanned based on the grain orientation spread and their relative position from the shot-peened edge. The output is a quantitative measure of the depth of strain-hardening effects. The tool is used at various shot-peening intensities to demonstrate the ability to distinguish between these changes, using a range of intensities from 4 to 10 Almen. An increase in shot-peening intensity is observed to increase the depth of strain-hardening effects in the alloy. A comparison with residual stress measurements using X-ray diffraction for the same material shows that the strain-hardened depth determined by EBSD extends to approximately half the distance of the residual stress present due to shot peening. A comparison is also made with predicted profiles from the PeenstressSM model and subsequent microhardness testing. A positive correlation is observed between strained hardened depth and surface roughness of the peened samples. In each case, the increases in surface roughness and strain-hardened depth diminish toward the upper end of the shot-peening intensity range studied for this alloy.

  18. Assessment of lattice strain, rotation and dislocation content using electron back-scatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross-correlation based analysis methods have been developed for electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns that improve the angular sensitivity to ∼10−4 rads. This enables EBSD to be used to study the much smaller misorientations and even local elastic strain fields that are typical in semiconducting materials. Mapping of the lattice rotations and elastic strain variations provides sufficient detail for quantitative analysis of the threading dislocation density through the Nye tensor. The analysis will be briefly described and applications given to GaN and Si/SiGe based systems. Measurements of tilt, twist and elastic strain variations in GaN layers on basal plane sapphire will be reported and compared to results for some epitaxial lateral over grown (ELOG) GaN samples. The effects of misfit interfacial dislocations on the spatial distribution of the full strain and rotation tensors in a partially relaxed SiGe layer will also be shown.

  19. Application of the artificial neural network for reconstructing the internal-structure image of a random medium by spatial characteristics of backscattered optical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of using an artificial neural network (ANN), which is the standard Matlab tool, for non-invasive (based on the data of backscattering) diagnostics of macro-inhomogeneities, localised at subsurface layers of the turbid strongly scattering medium was shown. The spatial and angle distribution of the backscattered optical radiation was calculated by using the Monte-Carlo method combining the modelling of effective optical paths and the use of statistical weights. It was shown that application of the backscattering method together with the ANN allows solving inverse problems for determining the average radius of the scattering particles and for reconstructing the images of structural elements within the medium with a high accuracy. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  20. Advances in imaging and electron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    1995-01-01

    Academic Press is pleased to announce the creation of Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics. This serial publication results from the merger of two long running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics will feature extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies,microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Continuation order customers for either of the original Advances will receiveVolume 90, the first combined volume.

  1. Advances in imaging and electron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mulvey, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Academic Press is pleased to announce the creation of Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics. This serial publication results from the merger of two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics will feature extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies,microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.

  2. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis on the microstructures of electrolytic Cu deposition in the through hole filling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through hole (TH) filling by electrolytic Cu deposition has become a critical process for high density interconnection technologies associated with three-dimensional packaging. In this study, the morphological and crystallographic evolutions of the electrolytic Cu TH filling with the plating time (t) were investigated using an optical microscope and a field-emission scanning electron microscope equipped with an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis system. The Cu deposition rate in the TH was strongly dependent on t, which was established at a moderate rate of ∼ 0.3 μm/min at t = 40 min–74 min, then dramatically accelerated to ∼ 4 μm/min at t = 74 min–80 min (termed “fast deposition regime”), and subsequently decelerated in the final plating regime (t = 80 min–100 min). EBSD analyses showed that the electrolytic Cu predominantly possessed high-angle grain boundaries with strong coincidence site lattices at ∑3 (60° rotation at <111>) and ∑9 (38.9° rotation at <101>) for all t examined. Interestingly, the [111]‖TD (transverse direction) orientation displayed a relatively strong presence in the initial induction regime, while the [111]‖TD + [101]‖TD orientations with large grain sizes became dominant in the fast deposition regime (i.e., t = 74 min–80 min), and there was a very low concentration of the [111]‖TD orientation in the final deposition regime. This research offered a better understanding of the morphological and crystallographic evolutions in each stage of the electrolytic Cu TH filling. - Highlights: • Through hole (TH) filling by electrolytic Cu deposition • The Cu deposition rate is strongly dependent on the plating time in the THs. • The dominant Cu orientations were [111]‖TD (transverse direction) and [101]‖TD. • Cu possessed high angle grain boundaries with strong coincidence site lattices

  3. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of electrolytic Cu deposition in the blind-hole structure: Current density effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blind-hole (BH) filling via direct-current Cu electrodeposition is widely used in high-density interconnection technology for advanced printed circuit boards (PCBs). In this study, electrolytic Cu BH fillings deposited at various current densities (j = 2, 4, 5, and 6 A/dm2) were investigated using transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The TXM, FE-SEM, and EBSD investigations indicated that the Cu deposition morphology (e.g., void formation and concave surface Cu) and its crystallographic microstructure (e.g., orientation and twin structure) were strongly dependent on j. The formation of voids and concave surface Cu in the BH fillings inevitably degraded the thermomechanical and electrical characteristics of the Cu deposition, deteriorating the reliability of PCB Cu interconnection. These dependencies revealed that j is an important factor of the Cu electrodeposition in the BH structure and should be reduced to a level of j < 4 A/dm2 to avoid the undesired microstructures. This knowledge serves to advance the understanding of the role of the current density in the Cu BH filling process. - Highlights: • Pronounced effect of current density (j) on Cu blind-hole (BH) filling • High-current-density induced void formation in the BH structure. • Concave Cu surface was caused in a high-j electrodeposition process. • Crystallographic transition of the [111] Cu to [101] was induced by increasing j. • Formation of Cu twin structure (60° rotation at 〈111〉) strongly depended on j

  4. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of electrolytic Cu deposition in the blind-hole structure: Current density effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.E., E-mail: ceho1975@hotmail.com; Chen, C.C.; Hsu, L.H.; Lu, M.K.

    2015-06-01

    Blind-hole (BH) filling via direct-current Cu electrodeposition is widely used in high-density interconnection technology for advanced printed circuit boards (PCBs). In this study, electrolytic Cu BH fillings deposited at various current densities (j = 2, 4, 5, and 6 A/dm{sup 2}) were investigated using transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The TXM, FE-SEM, and EBSD investigations indicated that the Cu deposition morphology (e.g., void formation and concave surface Cu) and its crystallographic microstructure (e.g., orientation and twin structure) were strongly dependent on j. The formation of voids and concave surface Cu in the BH fillings inevitably degraded the thermomechanical and electrical characteristics of the Cu deposition, deteriorating the reliability of PCB Cu interconnection. These dependencies revealed that j is an important factor of the Cu electrodeposition in the BH structure and should be reduced to a level of j < 4 A/dm{sup 2} to avoid the undesired microstructures. This knowledge serves to advance the understanding of the role of the current density in the Cu BH filling process. - Highlights: • Pronounced effect of current density (j) on Cu blind-hole (BH) filling • High-current-density induced void formation in the BH structure. • Concave Cu surface was caused in a high-j electrodeposition process. • Crystallographic transition of the [111] Cu to [101] was induced by increasing j. • Formation of Cu twin structure (60° rotation at 〈111〉) strongly depended on j.

  5. Identification of magnetic Fe-Ti oxides in marine sediments by electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, C.; Pennock, G.M.; Drury, M.R.; Engelmann, R.; Lattard, D.; Garming, J.F.L.; Dobeneck, T. von; Dekkers, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    In paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic studies the magnetomineralogical identification is usually based on a set of rock magnetic parameters, complemented by crystallographic and chemical information retrieved from X-ray diffraction (XRD), (electron) microscopy or energy dispersive spectroscopy

  6. Dependence of the relative backscatter cross section of 1-m density fluctuations in the auroral electrojet on the angle between electron drift and radar wave vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the STARE radar system it is possible to measure, with high spatial and temporal resolution the electron drift velocity V/sub D/ and the relative amplitude of electron density fluctuations of 1-m wavelength in the auroral electrojet. These density fluctuations are generated by the combined effects of the two-stream and the gradient drift instabilities. We have determined the angular dependence of the backscatter intensity (which is proportional to the square of the amplitude of the density fluctuations) on the angle theta betweeen the electron drift direction and the direction from the scattering volume to the radar in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find a fluctuation minimum for theta = 900 and an increase towards theta = 00 over the whole velocity range up to 1000 m/s. This increase is small for velocities below the ion acoustic velocity C/sub N/ but reaches over 20 dB gain in the backscatter intensity (corresponding to a density fluctuation more than 10 times as great) for higher velocities. We explain that the backscatter is caused mainly by two-stream instability in the range cos theta>C/sub S//V/sub d/ and by secondary gradient drift instability elsewhere

  7. Damage measurement of structural material by electron backscatter diffraction. Quantification of measurement quality toward standardization of measurement procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several attempts have been made to assess the damage induced in materials by crystal orientation distributions identified using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). In particular, the local misorientation, which is the misorientation between neighboring measurement points, was shown to correlate well with the degree of material damage such as plastic strain, fatigue and creep. However, the damage assessments conducted using the local misorientations were qualitative rather than quantitative. The local misorientation can be correlated theoretically with physical parameters such as dislocation density. However, the error in crystal orientation measurements makes quantitative evaluation of the local misorientation difficult. Furthermore, the local misorientation depends on distance between the measurement points (step size). For a quantitative assessment of the local misorientation, the error in the crystal orientation measurements must be reduced or the degree of error must be shown quantitatively. In this study, first, the influence of the quality of measurements (accuracy of measurements) and step size on the local misorientation was investigated using stainless steel specimens damaged by tensile deformation or fatigue. By performing the crystal orientation measurements with different conditions, it was shown that the quality of measurement could be represented by the error index, which was previously proposed by the author. Secondly, a filtering process was applied in order to improve the accuracy of crystal orientation measurements and its effect was investigated using the error index. It was revealed that the local misorientations obtained under different measurement conditions could be compared quantitatively only when the error index and the step size were almost or exactly the same. It was also shown that the filtering process could successfully reduce the measurement error and step size dependency of the local misorientations. By applying the filtering

  8. Determination of the analyzing power of the A4 Compton-backscattering polarimeter for the measurement of the longitudinal spin polarization of the MAMI electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The A4 experiment determines the strange quark contribution to the electromagnetic from factors of the nucleon by measuring the parity violation in elastic electron nucleon scattering. These measurements are carried out using the spin polarized electron beam of the Mainzer Mikrotron (MAMI) with beam energies in the range from 315 to 1508 MeV. For the data analysis it is essential to determine the degree of polarization of the electron beam in order to extract the physics asymmetry from the measured parity violating asymmetry. For this reason the A4 collaboration has developed a novel type of Compton laser backscattering polarimeter that allows for a non-destructive measurement of the beam polarization in parallel to the running parity experiment. In the scope of this work the polarimeter was refined in order to enable reliable continuous operation of the polarimeter. The data acquisition system for the photon and electron detector was re-designed and optimized to cope with high count rates. A novel detector (LYSO) for the backscattered photons was commissioned. Furthermore, GEANT4 simulations of the detectors have been performed and an analysis environment for the extraction of Compton asymmetries from the backscattered photon data has been developed. The analysis makes use of the possibility to detect backscattered photons in coincidence with the scattered electrons, thus tagging the photons. The tagging introduces a differential energy scale which enables the precise determination of the analyzing power. In this work the analyzing power of the polarimeter has been determined. Therefore, at a beam current of 20 μA the product of electron and laser polarization can be determined, while the parity experiment is running, with a statistical accuracy of 1 % in 24 hours at 855 MeV or 2=0.6 (GeV/c)2 the analysis yields a raw asymmetry of ARohPV=(-20.0±0.9stat) x 10-6 at the moment. For a beam polarization of 80 % the total error would be 1,68 x 10-6 with ΔPe/Pe=5

  9. X-ray Compton backscattering techniques for process tomography: imaging and characterization of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P.; Duvauchelle, P.; Peix, G.; Babot, D.

    1996-03-01

    Non-destructive evaluation by Compton scattering using an industrial x-ray tube allows three-dimensional (3D) imaging of materials. The x-ray tube and the detector are set on the same side of the object. Thus, non-destructive evaluation of the wall of a tank, even when it is full, is possible without the requirement for the x-ray beam to cross the whole object. Several applications were tried in our laboratory. Besides 3D imaging, a method allowing thickness measurement of a wall was developed, which was especially suitable for multilayer compounds. The accuracy is 0957-0233/7/3/008/img1 mm. Compton scattering techniques also allow point-by-point density measurements in the near-surface zone of any component (even dense and bulky ones). An accuracy of 1% was achieved for light composite materials and also for dense components (0957-0233/7/3/008/img2) provided by powder metallurgy. A new application allows us to perform 3D imaging using a linear accelerator (6 MeV) as the photon source. Thus, testing can be performed inside a tank, even through a thick and dense wall (8 mm of steel).

  10. X-ray Microscopy as an Approach to Increasing Accuracy and Efficiency of Serial Block-face Imaging for Correlated Light and Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Bushong, Eric A; Johnson, Donald D.; Kim, Keun-Young; Terada, Masako; Hatori, Megumi; Peltier, Steven T.; Panda, Satchidananda; Merkle, Arno; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    The recently developed three-dimensional electron microscopic (EM) method of serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) has rapidly established itself as a powerful imaging approach. Volume EM imaging with this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method requires intense staining of biological specimens with heavy metals to allow sufficient back-scatter electron signal and also to render specimens sufficiently conductive to control charging artifacts. These more extreme heavy metal s...

  11. A novel approach for site-specific atom probe specimen preparation by focused ion beam and transmission electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a suitable technique for chemical analyses with almost atomic resolution. However, the time-consuming site-specific specimen preparation can be improved. Recently, transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) has been established for high resolution crystallographic analyses of thin foils. In this paper we present the first successful application of a combined focused ion beam (FIB)/t-EBSD preparation of site-specific APT specimens using the example of grain boundary segregation in technically pure molybdenum. It will be shown that the preparation of a grain boundary can be substantially accelerated by t-EBSD analyses in-between the annular milling FIB procedure in the same microscope. With this combined method, a grain boundary can easily be recognized and positioned in the first 220 nm of an APT sample much faster than e.g. with complementary investigations in a transmission electron microscope. Even more, the high resolution technique of t-EBSD gives the opportunity to get crystallographic information of the mapped area and, therefore, an analysis of the grain boundary character to support the interpretation of the APT data files. To optimize this newly developed technique for the application on needle-shaped APT specimens, a parameter study on enhanced background correction, acceleration voltage, and tilt angle was carried out. An acceleration voltage of 30 kV at specimen surface tilt angles between −45° and −35° from horizontal plane leads to the best results. Even for molybdenum the observation of crystal orientation data up to about 200 nm specimen thickness is possible. - Highlights: • We developed a new site-specific APT specimen preparation method by FIB and t-EBSD. • A grain boundary was positioned in the first 220 nm of the APT tip by the FIB/t-EBSD method. • Crystallographic information of the mapped area can be quickly obtained. • An acceleration voltage of 30 kV at specimen surface tilt angles

  12. Monte Carlo study of electron spectra and dose from backscattered radiation in the vicinity of media interfaces for monoenergetic photons of 50-1250 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper electron fluence spectra and backscatter dose factors for monoenergetic photons (50, 100, 250 and 1250 keV) are presented. The influence of the atomic number of the backscatter materials glass, bone, steel and titanium is studied. For all radiations increases in dose were found in the immediate vicinity of the interface in a region extending over a distance determined by the photon energy. In a thin layer extending several tens of micrometers from the interface, a large increase in dose was found for 50 and 100 keV photons. The largest backscatter dose factor (3.5) was found for 50 keV photons and a steel interface. This large effect was found to be due largely to backscattered photoelectrons. K-shell fluorescent photons from titanium and steel were also included but were found to have almost no effect on backscatter dose factors or electron spectra. With both K-shell fluorescence and sampling of the photoelectron angular distribution switched off, much smaller backscatter factors were obtained. Beyond the thin region near the interface where the dose is increased, significant dose depressions were found for photons of these energies in a region extending several centimeters from the interface. The effect was maximum of 50 keV photons, for which dose depressions of about 35% for steel and titanium and 15% for glass and bone were obtained. For 250 and 1250 keV photons a more modest dose enhancement was found close to the interface (40-50%) but extending over a larger region (e.g. 5 mm for 1250 keV photons). Small differences in radiation quality nearer to the interface were found as expressed by track-averaged and dose-averaged restricted linear energy transfer, rvec LET1000,T and rvec LET100,D, with a maximum effect for the 100 keV photons. For this radiation quality a decrease of 50% in rvec LET100,T was found close to the interface. 29 refs., 4 figs

  13. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. PMID:25126753

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Multibeam Backscatter for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Multibeam Backscatter GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the geomorphology of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  15. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Backscatter, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Nancy Foster - (2006), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 3m Backscatter Mosaic, Florida Deep Coral Areas - Lost Coast Explorer - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 3x3 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the Atlantic...

  17. Electron backscatter diffraction study of deformation and recrystallization textures of individual phases in a cross-rolled duplex steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaid, Md; Bhattacharjee, P.P., E-mail: pinakib@iith.ac.in

    2014-10-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture during cross-rolling and annealing was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction in a ferritic–austenitic duplex stainless steel. For this purpose an alloy with nearly equal volume fraction of the two phases was deformed by multi-pass cross-rolling process up to 90% reduction in thickness. The rolling and transverse directions were mutually interchanged in each pass by rotating the sample by 90° around the normal direction. In order to avoid deformation induced phase transformation and dynamic strain aging, the rolling was carried out at an optimized temperature of 898 K (625 °C) at the warm-deformation range. The microstructure after cross warm-rolling revealed a lamellar structure with alternate arrangement of the bands of two phases. Strong brass and rotated brass components were observed in austenite in the steel after processing by cross warm-rolling. The ferrite in the cross warm-rolling processed steel showed remarkably strong RD-fiber (RD//< 011 >) component (001)< 011 >. The development of texture in the two phases after processing by cross warm-rolling could be explained by the stability of the texture components. During isothermal annealing of the 90% cross warm-rolling processed material the lamellar morphology was retained before collapse of the lamellar structure to the mutual interpenetration of the phase bands. Ferrite showed recovery resulting in annealing texture similar to the deformation texture. In contrast, the austenite showed primary recrystallization without preferential orientation selection leading to the retention of deformation texture. The evolution of deformation and annealing texture in the two phases of the steel was independent of one another. - Highlights: • Effect of cross warm-rolling on texture formation is studied in duplex steel. • Brass texture in austenite and (001)<110 > in ferrite are developed. • Ferrite shows recovery during annealing retaining the (001

  18. Electron backscatter diffraction study of deformation and recrystallization textures of individual phases in a cross-rolled duplex steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of microstructure and texture during cross-rolling and annealing was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction in a ferritic–austenitic duplex stainless steel. For this purpose an alloy with nearly equal volume fraction of the two phases was deformed by multi-pass cross-rolling process up to 90% reduction in thickness. The rolling and transverse directions were mutually interchanged in each pass by rotating the sample by 90° around the normal direction. In order to avoid deformation induced phase transformation and dynamic strain aging, the rolling was carried out at an optimized temperature of 898 K (625 °C) at the warm-deformation range. The microstructure after cross warm-rolling revealed a lamellar structure with alternate arrangement of the bands of two phases. Strong brass and rotated brass components were observed in austenite in the steel after processing by cross warm-rolling. The ferrite in the cross warm-rolling processed steel showed remarkably strong RD-fiber (RD//< 011 >) component (001)< 011 >. The development of texture in the two phases after processing by cross warm-rolling could be explained by the stability of the texture components. During isothermal annealing of the 90% cross warm-rolling processed material the lamellar morphology was retained before collapse of the lamellar structure to the mutual interpenetration of the phase bands. Ferrite showed recovery resulting in annealing texture similar to the deformation texture. In contrast, the austenite showed primary recrystallization without preferential orientation selection leading to the retention of deformation texture. The evolution of deformation and annealing texture in the two phases of the steel was independent of one another. - Highlights: • Effect of cross warm-rolling on texture formation is studied in duplex steel. • Brass texture in austenite and (001)<110 > in ferrite are developed. • Ferrite shows recovery during annealing retaining the (001

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of an offshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of an offshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St. John, US...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Backscatter Mosaic , W00216 USVI 2011 , Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-11-1 (2011), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of of a sharply sloping swath of the St. John Shelf, south of St. John, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's...

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Northeast Reserve, Haystack Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents an 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a seamount/bank east of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of Abrir La Sierra Bank, PR (2007) collected using a SeaBat Reson 8124 (200 kHz) multibeam echosounder (NCEI Accession 0131853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the Abrir La Sierra Bank off the coast of western Puerto Rico, collected using a SeaBat Reson 8124...

  3. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Escollo Grappler Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a seamount/bank East of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Northeast Reserve, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI, UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the bathymetry of a reef shelf/bank and the steep slopes and canyons of the NE Reserve, offshore of...

  5. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Vieques, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI, UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the bathymetry of a reef shelf/bank south of Vieques, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA...

  6. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Northeast Reserve, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI, UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the bathymetry of a reef shelf/bank and the steep slopes and canyons of the NE Reserve, offshore of...

  7. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Escollo Grappler Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a seamount/bank East of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  8. NOAA TIFF Image - 2m Backscatter Mosaic, W00217 USVI 2011, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-11-1 (2011), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 2 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a broad bank south of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Backscatter Mosaic, W00221-222 USVI 2012, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - M-I907-NF-12 (2012), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131856)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the bathymetry of a reef shelf/bank and the steep slopes and canyons of the NE Reserve, offshore of...

  10. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Vieques, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI, UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the bathymetry of a reef shelf/bank south of Vieques, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA...

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Vieques, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents an 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a reef shelf/bank south of Vieques, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of Abrir La Sierra Bank, PR (2007) collected using a Kongsberg EM 1002 (95 kHz) multibeam echosounder (NCEI Accession 0131853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the Abrir La Sierra Bank off the coast of western Puerto Rico, collected using a Kongsberg EM 1002...

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Northeast Reserve, Haystack Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents an 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a seamount/bank east of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2012-2013, Northeast Reserve, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI, UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the bathymetry of a reef shelf/bank and the steep slopes and canyons of the NE Reserve, offshore of...

  15. NOAA TIFF Image - 2m Backscatter Mosaic, W00217 USVI 2011, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-11-1 (2011), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 2 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a broad bank south of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Backscatter Mosaic, W00221-222 USVI 2012, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - M-I907-NF-12 (2012), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the bathymetry of a reef shelf/bank and the steep slopes and canyons of the NE Reserve, offshore of...

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, W00221-222 USVI 2012, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - M-I907-NF-12 (2012), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of of a sharply sloping swath of the St. John Shelf, south of NE Reserve, offshore of Fajardo, Puerto...

  18. mos115_0403.TIF -- Multibeam backscatter sonar image for the nearshore Cape Flattery area: Data from survey effort HMPR-115-2004-03 in the Olympic Coast national marine sanctuary.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This multibeam backscatter sonar image of the sea floor (0-200 m water depths) was mosaiced from data collected fromvarious mapping efforts each October from...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image- 0.5 meter Backscatter Mosaic of Grammanik Bank - East (St. Thomas), US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Grammanik Bank, south of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team,...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 3 m Backscatter Mosaic of the north shore of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, Project NF-06-03, 2006, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 3 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the north shore of St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of the Virgin Passage and the St. John Shelf, U.S. Virgin Islands, Project NF-10-03, 2010, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the Virgin Passage in the US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  2. NOS TIFF Image, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, 2006, 3 m Backscatter Mosaic of the North Shore of Project NF-06-03, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 3 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the north shore of St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  3. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, W00221-222 USVI 2012, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - M-I907-NF-12 (2012), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131856)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of of a sharply sloping swath of the St. John Shelf, south of NE Reserve, offshore of Fajardo, Puerto...

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of the Virgin Passage and the St. John Shelf, U.S. Virgin Islands, Project NF-10-03, 2010, UTM 20 WGS84 (NCEI Accession 0131854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the Virgin Passage in the US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  5. NOAA TIFF Image - 1 m Backscatter Mosaic of the St. John Shelf, U.S. Virgin Islands, Project NF-10-03, 2010, UTM 20 WGS84 (NCEI Accession 0131854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the St. John Shelf, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in collaboration...

  6. NOAA TIFF Image- 0.5 meter Backscatter Mosaic of Mid Shelf Reef (St. Thomas), US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the Mid Shelf Reef south of St. Thomas, US Virgin IslandsNOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team,...

  7. Determination of the maximum energy loss for electron stopping power calculations and its effect on backscattering electron yield in Monte-Carlo simulations applying continuous slowing-down approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum energy loss for electron stopping power calculations by the full Penn algorithm within the dielectric formalism is determined with taking into account the contribution of electron and plasmon excitations. Use of these calculated electron stopping powers in Monte Carlo simulations applying continuous slowing down approximation gives the backscattering electron yields in much better agreement with experimental data than previous other theoretical results. The muffin-tin model is used to describe the electron elastic scattering by atom bound in solids with taking into account the exchange correlation and polarization effect

  8. Determination of the maximum energy loss for electron stopping power calculations and its effect on backscattering electron yield in Monte-Carlo simulations applying continuous slowing-down approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Truong, Hieu T. [Faculty of Electronics and Computer Science, Volgograd State Technical University, 28 Lenin Avenue, Volgograd 400131 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-28

    The maximum energy loss for electron stopping power calculations by the full Penn algorithm within the dielectric formalism is determined with taking into account the contribution of electron and plasmon excitations. Use of these calculated electron stopping powers in Monte Carlo simulations applying continuous slowing down approximation gives the backscattering electron yields in much better agreement with experimental data than previous other theoretical results. The muffin-tin model is used to describe the electron elastic scattering by atom bound in solids with taking into account the exchange correlation and polarization effect.

  9. Development of a pulsed backscatter-absorption gas-imaging system and its application to the visualization of natural gas leaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, T J; Powers, P; Kennedy, R; Goers, U B

    1998-06-20

    The design and evaluation of a backscatter-absorption gas-imaging sensor that operates in a pulsed mode is described. It is capable of video visualization of natural gas leaks. Its development was motivated by the need for a methane imaging system to operate at ranges and sensitivities useful to the natural gas industry. The imager employs pulsed laser illumination at a repetition rate of 30 Hz and an average power of ~150 mW to image gas at standoff ranges of as long as 100 m, using a backscatter target with a reflectivity of 0.016 sr(-1). This is a tenfold improvement over an earlier raster-scanned imager. Natural gas leaks as small as 1.6 x 10(-4) standard liters/s [equal to 0.02 standard cubic feet per hour (scfh)] were imaged at short ranges; leaks as low as 7.9 x 10(-4) standard liters/s (0.1 scfh) were observed at long ranges. Data are compared with model predictions, and potential extensions to a fieldable prototype are discussed. The optimization of a direct-injection focal-plane array for detecting short (nanosecond) laser pulses is described. PMID:18273359

  10. Electron-optic limitations on image resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Various approaches are considered to the solution of the electron-optical problem of designing an image tube configuration. Emphasis is placed on the method of computer design, and an illustration is given in which the technique is used in the design of an 80-mm image tube with a zoom capability of 3:1. The solutions are discussed to such problems as image distortion, magnification, and electron bundles striking the zoom electrode. Three types of an electron-optical configuration are examined for the electron-optic limitations to resolution: (1) the proximity image tube, (2) the magnetic-type image tube having uniform electric and magnetic fields, and (3) the electrostatic-type image tube such as the 80-mm zoom tube.

  11. Coherent Electron Source for Ultrafast Electron Diffraction and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu C.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We numerically investigate the suitability of photoexcited nanotips as a source of coherent femtosecond single electron pulses for ultrafast surface-sensitive electron diffraction and non-destructive imaging with low-energy electrons. The experimental parameters for realizing hundred femtosecond time resolution are identified by evaluating the effects of vacuum dispersion and beam divergence on the temporal broadening of the electron wave packet during its propagation to the sample.

  12. Fundamentals of electronic image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Weeks, Arthur R

    1996-01-01

    This book is directed to practicing engineers and scientists who need to understand the fundamentals of image processing theory and algorithms to perform their technical tasks. It is intended to fill the gap between existing high-level texts dedicated to specialists in the field and the need for a more practical, fundamental text on image processing. A variety of example images are used to enhance reader understanding of how particular image processing algorithms work.

  13. Theory and application of electron channelling contrast imaging under controlled diffraction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) is a powerful technique for observing crystal defects, such as dislocations, stacking faults, twins and grain boundaries in the scanning electron microscope. Electron channelling contrast (ECC) is strongest when the primary electron beam excites so called two-beam diffraction conditions in the crystal. In the present approach this is achieved, by a combination of crystal orientation measurement using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and simulation of electron channelling patterns. From the latter, the crystal is rotated such that two-beam diffraction conditions are achieved. This technique is called “ECCI under controlled diffraction conditions” or cECCI. Following an extensive literature review, this paper presents a simple, yet instructive and demonstrative treatment of the theory of ECC of lattice defects based on Bloch wave theory using a two-beam approach. This is followed by a discussion of technical issues associated with an ideal ECC set-up such as optimum detector position and microscope conditions. Subsequently, the appearance of different types of lattice defects under ECCI conditions; namely of dislocations, stacking faults, slip lines, and nanotwins, is discussed in detail. It is shown how different types of defects are distinguished and which type of crystallographic information can be extracted from such observations. Finally, the limits of the technique, particularly in terms of spatial resolution and depth of visibility are discussed and a comparison with the EBSD and transmission electron microscopy techniques with respect to imaging lattice defects is provided. In contrast to many investigations recently published in the literature, the current paper focuses on ‘true’ backscattering, i.e. on a signal that is recorded with a conventional backscatter detector positioned below the pole piece, and not on forward scattering, where the signal is recorded on a detector usually positioned below

  14. Gravitational Laser Back-Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Novaes, S. F.; Spehler, D.

    1993-01-01

    A possible way of producing gravitons in the laboratory is investigated. We evaluate the cross section electron + photon $\\rightarrow$ electron + graviton in the framework of linearized gravitation, and analyse this reaction considering the photon coming either from a laser beam or from a Compton back-scattering process.

  15. Image simulation for atomic resolution secondary electron image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been demonstrated recently that an atomic resolution secondary electron (SE) image can be achieved with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with a probe-aberration corrector. Its high sensitivity to the surface structure provides a powerful tool to simultaneously study both surface and bulk structure in the STEM, in the combination with the annular dark field (ADF) image. To quantitatively explain the atomic resolution SE image and retrieve surface-structure information, an image simulation is required. Here, we develop a method to simultaneously calculate, for the first time, the atomic resolution SE and ADF-STEM images, based on the multislice method with a frozen-phonon approximation. An object function for secondary electrons, derived from the inelastic scattering, is used to calculate the intensity distribution of the secondary electrons emitted from each slice. The simulations show that the SE image contrast is sensitive to the surface structure and the electron inelastic mean free path, but insensitive to specimen thickness when the thickness is more than 5 nm. The simulated SE images for SrTiO3 crystal show good agreement with the experimental observations. -- Highlights: ► A method is proposed to simulate secondary electron images at atomic resolution. ► Multislice method is used for propagation of primary electrons. ► An object function is derived to calculate secondary electrons emitted from each slice. ► The calculations are compared with experiments. ► It is demonstrated that the secondary electron image is sensitive to the surface structure.

  16. Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Analysis of an Austenitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment and Plasma Nitriding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Retraint, Delphine; Chemkhi, Mahdi; Roos, Arjen; Demangel, Clemence

    2015-08-01

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel can be used for orthopedic implants due to its biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance. Its range of applications in this field could be broadened by improving its wear and friction properties. Surface properties can be modified through surface hardening treatments. The effects of such treatments on the microstructure of the alloy were investigated here. Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) is a surface treatment that enhances mechanical properties of the material surface by creating a thin nanocrystalline layer. After SMAT, some specimens underwent a plasma nitriding process to further enhance their surface properties. Using electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the microstructural evolution of the stainless steel after these different surface treatments was characterized. Microstructural features investigated include thickness of the nanocrystalline layer, size of the grains within the nanocrystalline layer, and depth of diffusion of nitrogen atoms within the material. PMID:26139391

  17. Electronic imaging of the human body.

    OpenAIRE

    Vannier, M. W.; Yates, R. E.; Whitestone, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Human Engineering Division of the Armstrong Laboratory (USAF); the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology; the Washington University School of Medicine; and the Lister-Hill National Center for Biomedical Communication, National Library of Medicine are sponsoring a working group on electronic imaging of the human body. Electronic imaging of the surface of the human body has been pursued and developed by a number of disciplines including radiology, forensics, surgery, engineering, medical educ...

  18. Electron image reconstruction of helical protein assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of projections of large ordered biological systems obtained by electron microscopy of negatively stained specimens is described. The biological structures amenable to this approach are constructed from a large number of identical protein molecules, which are arranged according to helical symmetry. Electron images of these structures generally contain sufficient information in order to calculate a three-dimensional density map. (Auth.)

  19. Imaging the electrons from transfer ionization collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrons emitted into the continuum in transfer ionization of He2+ on helium collisions in the energy range of 75 - 400 keV were imaged using reaction microscope. The electron emission patterns show big difference for projectile velocity lower and upper than 1 a.u. in the present studies.

  20. Electron imaging of pyrrhotite superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, L; Buseck, P R

    1974-12-27

    Natural pyrrhotites, when studied by high resolution electron microscopy, yield crystallographic information on a unit cell scale. Structural heterogeneity is prominent. The many reported superstructures are interpretable through an antiphase model. The 5C pyrrhotite superstructure results from an ordered sequence of antiphase domains while the higher temperature NC type results from a disordered sequence. PMID:17833934

  1. Novel electronics for MCP imaging detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe novel electronics for processing signals from a microchannel plate detector using a resistive anode readout. High sampling-rate (MHz) Analogue-to-Digital Converters (ADCs) coupled to a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) combine to offer high spatial resolution (70μm), low noise (0.1countcm-1s-1) imaging over a large (93mmx93mm) imaging area.These new low-cost electronics form an integral part of a MCP-based system for digital autoradiography designed to image radiolabelled thin tissue slices and 1- and 2-D electrophoresis gels

  2. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging: 1. CW-EPR Imaging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-01

    Twentieth century bore witness to remarkable scientists whohave advanced our understanding of the brain. Among them,EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance) imaging is particularlyuseful in monitoring hypoxic zones in tumors which arehighly resistant to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment.This first part of the article covers aspects of CW(continuous wave) imaging with details of FT (pulsed FourierTransform)-EPR imaging covered in Part 2, to be publishedin the next issue of Resonance.

  3. Electron accelerating unit for streak image tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fangke Zong; Qinlao Yang; Houzhi Cai; Li Gu; Xiang Li; Jingjin Zhang

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerating unit is proposed for use in streak image tubes (SITs). An SIT with this new accelerating unit was simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The simulation results show that the accelerating unit improves both the spatial and temporal resolution. Compared to a traditional SIT, the transit time spread for electrons in the cathode-to-mesh region is reduced from 247 to 162 fs, the line width of the electron beam on the image surface is reduced from 42.7 to 26.1 m, and the temporal resolution is improved from 515 to 395 fs.

  4. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  5. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W., E-mail: cwdomier@ucdavis.edu; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Tobias, B. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  6. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of gold nanoparticles on Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochmann, A.; Teichert, S., E-mail: steffen.teichert@fh-jena.de [University of Applied Sciences Jena, Carl Zeiss Promenade 2, Jena 07745 (Germany); Katzer, C.; Schmidl, F. [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Fürstengraben 1, Jena 07743 (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    It has been shown recently that the incorporation of gold nanoparticles into Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} enhances the superconducting properties of this material in a significant way. Previous XRD and TEM investigations suggest different crystallographic relations of the gold nanoparticles with respect to the epitaxial Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}. Here, detailed investigations of the crystal orientations for a large ensemble of gold nanoparticles with electron backscatter diffraction are reported. The average size of the gold nanoparticles is in the range of 60 nm–80 nm. We identified five different types of heteroepitaxial relationships between the gold nanoparticles and the superconductor film, resulting in complex pole figures. The observed different types of crystallographic orientations are discussed based on good lattice matching and the formation of low energy interfaces.

  7. Factors influencing the austenite stability during tensile testing of Quenching and Partitioning steel determined via in-situ Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the microstructural characteristics of retained austenite on its transformation stability in steel after Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) was studied via interrupted tensile tests and Electron Backscatter Diffraction measurements on a pre-determined zone of a micro-tensile test sample. The evolution of the retained austenite fraction was obtained as a function of the plastic strain. The dependence of the austenite transformation stability on the corresponding grain size, morphology, and local crystallographic orientation was discussed. Furthermore, the importance of the parameters on the austenite stability was analysed and it was shown that the austenite grains rotated, in addition to being transformed, constituting therefore an additional contribution to the ductility of Q&P steel

  8. Factors influencing the austenite stability during tensile testing of Quenching and Partitioning steel determined via in-situ Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Knijf, Dorien, E-mail: dorien.deknijf@ugent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Zwijnaarde (Ghent) (Belgium); Föjer, Cecilia [ArcelorMittal Global R& D Gent, President J.F. Kennedylaan 3, B-9060 Zelzate (Belgium); Kestens, Leo A.I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Zwijnaarde (Ghent) (Belgium); Department Material Science and Engineering, TUDelft, Mekelweg 2, NL-2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Petrov, Roumen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Zwijnaarde (Ghent) (Belgium); ArcelorMittal Global R& D Gent, President J.F. Kennedylaan 3, B-9060 Zelzate (Belgium)

    2015-06-25

    The effect of the microstructural characteristics of retained austenite on its transformation stability in steel after Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) was studied via interrupted tensile tests and Electron Backscatter Diffraction measurements on a pre-determined zone of a micro-tensile test sample. The evolution of the retained austenite fraction was obtained as a function of the plastic strain. The dependence of the austenite transformation stability on the corresponding grain size, morphology, and local crystallographic orientation was discussed. Furthermore, the importance of the parameters on the austenite stability was analysed and it was shown that the austenite grains rotated, in addition to being transformed, constituting therefore an additional contribution to the ductility of Q&P steel.

  9. Characterization of local strain/stress in copper through-silicon via structures using synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction, electron backscattered diffraction and nonlinear thermomechanical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the thermomechanical characteristics of copper through-silicon via (Cu TSV) structures were studied using synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and nonlinear numerical modeling. The strain and stress distribution in the Si substrate was measured by synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction from the tops of the TSV structures. The strain distribution map in a Cu via was determined from EBSD data by the kernel average misorientation (KAM) method and microstructural characteristics of the Cu via were investigated. The results offered direct evaluation of the local strain and stress induced in the Cu via and its surrounding silicon substrate. A finite element model including nonlinear plastic deformation was built for predicting thermomechanical behaviors of Cu TSV structures. The results show that the stress distribution obtained by finite element modeling is in relatively good agreement with the measurements of synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction and EBSD. (paper)

  10. Investigation into the high temperature oxidation of Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel using simultaneous electron backscatter diffraction-energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •EBSD–EDS simultaneous analysis was introduced for the complex oxide scale analysis. •High temperature oxidation of Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel was investigated. •Multi-layered external and internal oxide scales were developed at 700 °C. •Copper addition induced spinel structured oxide solid solution at the oxide surface. -- Abstract: The oxide scales of high-alloyed steel are composed of complex phases that are difficult to differentiate with conventional analysis techniques. Here, we used simultaneous electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to analyze the complex oxide layers formed on a Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel. Multi-layered structures of external hematite, external magnetite, internal chromite, internal chromium oxide, and austenite matrix were clearly identified using the simultaneous EBSD–EDS analysis technique. The addition of Cu into the austenitic stainless steel induced spinel structured oxide formation at the top surface of the external oxide

  11. Influence of the grain orientation spread on the pitting corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels using electron backscatter diffraction and critical pitting temperature test at the microscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Influence of grain orientation spread on the corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steels. ► Metallurgical criterion for pit initiation of duplex stainless steels. ► Crystallographic and electrochemical investigations at the microscale within both phases. - Abstract: The corrosion behavior of UNS S32202 duplex stainless steel was studied by combining electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements and critical pitting temperature tests at the microscale. The grain orientation spread (GOS) value was determined in grains of both phases from EBSD data. It was shown that austenitic sites containing extremely small ferrite grains having a GOS value greater than 1.3° were precursor sites for pitting in 4 M NaCl. The critical pitting temperature range was 45–90 °C. All the other sites of both phases remained passive up to 100 °C.

  12. Improvement of depth resolution and detection efficiency by control of secondary-electrons in single-event three-dimensional time-of-flight Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo, Satoshi, E-mail: s-abo@stec.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Hamada, Yasuhisa [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Seidl, Albert [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Engineering Science and Industrial Design, Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences, Breitscheidstraße 2, 39114 Magdeburg (Germany); Wakaya, Fujio; Takai, Mikio [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    An improvement of a depth resolution and a detection efficiency in single-event three-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is discussed on both simulation and experiment by control of secondary electron trajectories using sample bias voltage. The secondary electron, used for a start signal in single-event TOF-RBS, flies more directly to a secondary electron detector with the positive sample bias voltage of several tens of volt than that without sample bias voltage in the simulation. The simulated collection efficiency of the secondary electrons also increases with the positive sample bias voltage of several tens of volt. These simulation results indicate the possibility of a smaller depth resolution and a shorter measurement time in single-event TOF-RBS with positive sample bias voltage. The measurement time for the Pt-stripe sample using single-event three-dimensional TOF-RBS with the sample bias voltage of +100 V is 65% shorter than that without sample bias voltage, resulting in a less sample damage by a probe beam. The depth resolution for the Pt stripes under the 50-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} cover-layer with the sample bias voltage of +100 V is 4 nm smaller than that without sample bias voltage. Positive sample bias voltage improves the depth resolution and the detection efficiency in single-event three-dimensional TOF-RBS without an influence on the beam focusing.

  13. Study of Pd--Ta on Si(100) using Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and variable energy positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van der Kolk, G.J.; Kuiper, A.E.T.; Duchateau, J.P.W.B.; Willemsen, M.; Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.

    1989-05-01

    The applicability of Pd/sub x/Ta/sub 1-//sub x/ as a diffusion barrier on Si has been investigated. For this purpose Pd/sub x/Ta/sub 1-//sub x/ films of 200-nm thickness (x ranges from 0 to 1) were deposited on Si(100), and the reaction between overlayer and substrate was studied as a function of temperature. Interaction was found to occur at temperatures increasing with the Ta content. The as-deposited Pd/sub x/Ta/sub 1-//sub x/ films with 0.2less than or equal toxless than or equal to0.6 were found to be amorphous. The amorphous phase had a higher reaction temperature than the crystalline one, causing a discontinuous step in the reaction temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed that for the Pd-rich compositions, first a stoichiometric Pd/sub 2/Si layer formed underneath a pure Ta layer. At higher temperatures TaSi/sub 2/ formed at the surface. For Ta-rich compositions Pd/sub 2/Si formed first as well; however, the reaction temperature was so high that Pd/sub 2/Si grains formed in a Si matrix. The defect density of the Ta layer, which remained after outdiffusion of Pd, was investigated using variable energy positron annihilation. The defect concentration is very high, as deduced from the trapped positron fraction. A model is presented that describes the composition dependence of the reaction temperature.

  14. On line ultrasonic integrated backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new equipment for on-line evaluation of index based on two-dimensional integrated backscatter from ultrasonic images is described. The new equipment is fully integrated into a B-mode ultrasonic apparatus which provides a simultaneous display of conventional information together with parameters of tissue characterization. The system has been tested with a backscattering model of microbubbles in polysaccharide solution, characterized by a physiological exponential time decay. An exponential fitting to the experimental data was performed which yielded r=0.95

  15. Electron cyclotron emission imaging in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsat, Tobin; Domier, Calvin W.; Kong, Xiangyu; Liang, Tianran; Luhmann, Jr.; Neville C.; Tobias, Benjamin J.; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.; Yun, Gunsu; Classen, Ivo. G. J.; Donne, Anthony J. H.

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the recent history and latest developments of the electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic technique, wherein electron temperature is measured in magnetically confined plasmas with two-dimensional spatial resolution. The key enabling technologies for this technique are the large-aperture optical systems and the linear detector arrays sensitive to millimeter-wavelength radiation. We present the status and recent progress on existing instruments as well as new systems under development for future experiments. We also discuss data analysis techniques relevant to plasma imaging diagnostics and present recent temperature fluctuation results from the tokamak experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR).

  16. Assessment of Multiple Delamination in Laminated Composites for Aircrafts using X-ray Backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Noh Yu [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    A Compton X-ray backscatter technique has been developed to quantitatively assess impact damage in quasi-isotropic laminated composites made by a drop-weight tester. X-ray backscatter imaging system with a slit-type camera is constructed to obtain a cross-sectional profile of impact-damaged laminated composites from the electron-density variation of the cross section. A nonlinear scattering model based on Boltsman equation is introduced to compute Compton X-ray backscattering field for the defect assessment. An adaptive filter is also used to reduce noises from many sources including quantum noise and irregular distributions of fibers and matrix in composites. Delaminations masked or distorted by the first delamination are detected and characterized effectively by the Compton X-ray backscatter technique, both in width and location, by application of error minimization algorithm

  17. Further uses of electronic portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Electronic portal imaging (EPI) is a system designed for acquiring digital images in radiation therapy. The principal use of EPI is the analysis of set-up parameters, such as beam size, field alignment, and portal location with respect to anatomical structures. Dosimetric studies have also been undertaken determining the transmission dose. Quality assurance (QA) using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a relatively new procedure being investigated. Previous investigations as a QA tool have largely concentrated on areas such as position of photon isocentre, light and radiation field congruence, and MLC leaf transmission and positional reproducibility. It is the idea of this project to use the EPID for electron beams. Current research into electrons for portal imaging deals only with the secondary photon contamination that is always present. It is our intention to show that quality assurance procedures can be performed on electron beams using an EPID. The Varian PortalVision is a matrix ion chamber EPID system attached to a Vanan Clinac 2100C. Electron energies used were 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18MeV. Electron beam parameters were measured using a water phantom. Properties were then investigated using PortalVision. Images were obtained using a range of absorber thicknesses to determine both percentage depth doses and depth dose profiles. Percentage depth doses were characterized using the EPID for each electron energy. Depth dose profiles were plotted and compared against phantom-measured profiles to determine the penumbral width. Effective depth of measurement of the EPID was also measured for each energy. Results have demonstrated the validity of using an EPID as a quality assurance tool for electrons, with little preparation required to prepare the system. Benefits of an EPID for electron QA include gathering data within a few short minutes, and that an EPID has the ability to conduct some measurements at any given gantry angle, whereas a water

  18. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    CERN Document Server

    Pullen, M G; Le, A -T; Baudisch, M; Sclafani, M; Pires, H; Schröter, C D; Ullrich, J; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Lin, C D; Biegert, J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly follow and time resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as {\\pi}g) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with {\\pi}g and {\\pi}u symmetries, respectively, and where their ionisation probabilities do not maximise along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpec...

  19. 极化SAR影像弱散射地物统计分类%Statistical classification of weak backscattering scatterers of PolSAR image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵伶俐; 杨杰; 李平湘; 郎丰铠; 史磊

    2013-01-01

    The Wishart classifier has the major issue of drastically favoring the intensity over the polarimetric information, so the weak backscattering targets such as water, road, bare soil and shadow in Polariemtric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) image are hard to be made fine distinction. This paper proposed an unsupervised statistical classifier of the weak backscattering scatterers based on H-α target decomposition and hypothesis test. Likelihood ratio test is used as a distance measure to compare the similarity of a pixel and class centers. Pixels with small similarity are rejected according to the first type error and the distribution of the test statistics to reduce the effect on classification. The others pixels being not rejected are assigned to the class with the smallest statistics. The experiential results using E-SAR L band and Radarsat-2 C band quad polarimetric image demonstrate that this algorithm making advantage of the polarimetric information, improves the classification accuracy of the weak backscattering scatterers greatly.%针对Wishart分类器对功率具有较强的依赖性,不易区分极化SAR影像上水体、道路、裸土、阴影等弱后向散射地物的问题,提出一种利用极化目标分解和假设检验的弱散射地物统计分类方法.即在H-α初始化的基础上,使用似然比检验得出像元与每个类中心的相似性,并将其作为像元与类中心的距离测度.根据第一类错误概率和统计量的概率分布,将相似性很小的强散射点归为拒绝类,减少对分类的影响;对不能显著拒绝的像元归入具有最小统计量的类别中.通过使用E-SAR L波段和Radarsat-2 C波段全极化数据进行实验,结果表明本文方法有利于弱散射地物极化信息的利用,能够实现水体、道路、裸露的土壤和阴影等的精确分类.

  20. New method for the determination of the correction function of a hemisperical electron analyser based on elastic electron images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Determination of correction function of a hemispherical analyzer (HSA). • Visualization of analysis area using elastic backscattered electron images. • Dependence of analysis area and transmission function with the kinetic energy. • Efficiency of these functions for quantitative interpretations of XPS. • Description of the general methodology to use these functions. - Abstract: The correction function of a hemispherical analyzer (HSA) is determined for quantitative interpretations of electron spectroscopy. In this way, electron elastic images are performed using a scanning electron gun. This new method allowed the determination of the analysis area A(EK) of a HSA for the first time. An important result is the dependence of this analysis area on the electron kinetic energy EK. Indeed, results show that A(EK) varies as EK−1.2 regardless of the spectrometer configuration. This parameter is different from the so-called transmission function and must be taken into account for quantitative interpretation. Moreover, the transmission function T(EK) is also determined in this work and varies as a power function EKx where x is a fitting parameter which depends only on the width in the energy dispersive direction of the hemisphere entrance slit. These two apparatus functions are then validated thanks to XPS measurements by comparing results obtained on two different Ag surfaces. Then a general methodology to use these functions is given

  1. New method for the determination of the correction function of a hemisperical electron analyser based on elastic electron images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahjoub, Mohamed Aymen [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut Pascal, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6602, IP, F-63171 Aubière (France); Monier, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.monier@univ-bpclermont.fr [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut Pascal, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6602, IP, F-63171 Aubière (France); Robert-Goumet, Christine; Bideux, Luc; Gruzza, Bernard [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut Pascal, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6602, IP, F-63171 Aubière (France)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Determination of correction function of a hemispherical analyzer (HSA). • Visualization of analysis area using elastic backscattered electron images. • Dependence of analysis area and transmission function with the kinetic energy. • Efficiency of these functions for quantitative interpretations of XPS. • Description of the general methodology to use these functions. - Abstract: The correction function of a hemispherical analyzer (HSA) is determined for quantitative interpretations of electron spectroscopy. In this way, electron elastic images are performed using a scanning electron gun. This new method allowed the determination of the analysis area A(E{sub K}) of a HSA for the first time. An important result is the dependence of this analysis area on the electron kinetic energy E{sub K}. Indeed, results show that A(E{sub K}) varies as E{sub K}{sup −1.2} regardless of the spectrometer configuration. This parameter is different from the so-called transmission function and must be taken into account for quantitative interpretation. Moreover, the transmission function T(E{sub K}) is also determined in this work and varies as a power function E{sub K}{sup x} where x is a fitting parameter which depends only on the width in the energy dispersive direction of the hemisphere entrance slit. These two apparatus functions are then validated thanks to XPS measurements by comparing results obtained on two different Ag surfaces. Then a general methodology to use these functions is given.

  2. Application of particle-induced X-ray emission, backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy in the evaluation of orthodontic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this investigation was on orthodontic materials used in the manufacture of dental brackets. The properties of these dental materials are subjected to various physical parameters such as elongation, yield strength and elasticity that justify their application. In turn, these parameters depend on the quantitative elemental concentration distribution (QECD) in the materials used in the manufacture. For compositional analysis, proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), backscatter spectrometry (BS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied. QECD analysis was performed to correlate the physical parameters with the composition and to quantify imperfections in the materials. PIXE and BS analyses were performed simultaneously with a 3 MeV proton beam while electrons accelerated at 25 keV were used for the SEM analysis. From the QECDs it was observed that: (1) the major elements Cr, Fe and Ni were homogeneously distributed in the orthodontic plate; (2) the distribution of Mo and O correlated with one another; (3) there was a spread of Cr around regions of high C concentration; and, (4) areas of high concentrations of Mo and O corresponded to a decrease in C concentrations. Elemental concentration correlations are shown to indicate the similarities and differences in the ease of formation of phases, based on the tangent of linearity. (author)

  3. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, M. G.; Wolter, B.; Le, A. -T.; Baudisch, M.; Sclafani, M.; Pires, H.; Schröter, C. D.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Pfeifer, T.; Lin, C. D.; Biegert, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms. PMID:27329236

  4. Influence of orbital symmetry on diffraction imaging with rescattering electron wave packets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, M G; Wolter, B; Le, A-T; Baudisch, M; Sclafani, M; Pires, H; Schröter, C D; Ullrich, J; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Lin, C D; Biegert, J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly follow and time-resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser-induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as πg) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with πg and πu symmetries, respectively, and where their ionization probabilities do not maximize along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser-induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong backscattering contributions from low-Z atoms. PMID:27329236

  5. Automatic recognition of circuit patterns on semiconductor wafers from multiple scanning electron microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique is proposed for high-precision, automatic recognition of circuit patterns on a semiconductor wafer from multiple scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. This technique uses multiple SEM images obtained by selective detection of secondary and backscattered electrons emitted from a wafer surface irradiated with primary electrons. It automatically detects circuit patterns in these images. The appearances of circuit patterns in SEM images vary widely depending on the structure, the material and the pattern layout. The proposed technique can cope with such a large variation in pattern appearance by adaptively selecting two recognition methods based on pattern structure and pattern density. Other information, such as the images to be processed and the contrast between pattern and non-pattern regions, is also utilized for recognition. The technique provides effective preprocessing for automating defect classification. It is expected to improve the efficacy of process monitoring and yield management in semiconductor device fabrication. Experimental results for five wafers (from which 421 circuit pattern images were obtained) demonstrate that the proposed technique can automatically recognize circuit patterns with an accuracy of 99.8%

  6. Transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischebeck, Rasmus; Prat, Eduard; Thominet, Vincent; Ozkan Loch, Cigdem

    2015-08-01

    A transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams is presented, which overcomes resolution issues in present designs by observing the Scheimpflug imaging condition as well as the Snell-Descartes law of refraction in the scintillating crystal. Coherent optical transition radiation emitted by highly compressed electron bunches on the surface of the crystal is directed away from the camera, allowing to use the monitor for profile measurements of electron bunches suitable for X-ray free electron lasers. The optical design has been verified by ray tracing simulations, and the angular dependency of the resolution has been verified experimentally. An instrument according to the presented design principles has been used in the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility, and different scintillator materials have been tested. Measurements in conjunction with a transverse deflecting radiofrequency structure and an array of quadrupole magnets demonstrate a normalized slice emittance of 25 nm in the core of a 30 fC electron beam at a pulse length of 10 ps and a particle energy of 230 MeV.

  7. Plastic and elastic strains in short and long cracks in Alloy 600 studied by polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction and electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microscopic strain distributions were studied for stress corrosion cracks produced electrochemically in C-rings of Alloy 600 (0.65 Ni, 0.16 Cr, 0.08 Fe). The strain data were obtained using polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction (PXM) and (in part) by electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD). PXM was used to measure plastic and elastic strain distributions around the tip of a short crack, along with the changes to the direction and shape of the diffraction spots (ellipticity). For a sample with a short (30 μm) crack, the misorientation map showed a well-defined region of plastic deformation along the grain boundary in advance of the crack tip, extending to the next triple point. For the large crack sample, plastic and elastic stains as well as crystalline order could be measured in high detail with respect to the crack path. However, no correlation between these could be obtained, except for a notable degradation of crystalline order near the crack mouth. A comparable EBSD misorientation map shows strong correlation between misorientation and the crack edges; this may in part reflect the role of sharp edges in the more surface-sensitive approach.

  8. Study of microstructure and phase evolution of hot-dipped aluminide mild steel during high-temperature diffusion using electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mild steel was coated by hot-dipping into a molten aluminum bath. The microstructure and phase evolution in the aluminide layer during diffusion at 750 deg. C in static air were analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The results showed that the aluminide layer of the as-coated specimen consisted of an outer aluminum topcoat, minor FeAl3 and major Fe2Al5, respectively. Also, Fe2Al5 possessed a tongue-like morphology, which caused corresponding serration-like morphology in the steel substrate. A portion of the peaks of serration-like substrate were isolated, after short exposure at 750 deg. C, and accompanied by the formation of voids, which continued to appear with further exposure at 750 deg. C. As the aluminum topcoat was consumed, FeAl3 phase disappeared and left an aluminide layer of Fe2Al5 phase. After 60 min of exposure, FeAl2 and FeAl phases formed at the interface between Fe2Al5 and the steel substrate. With increasing exposure time, the voids condensed and the serration-like morphology disappeared, while FeAl2 and FeAl phases kept growing. After prolonged exposure, the aluminide layer was composed of FeAl2 and FeAl and possessed a flat interface between FeAl and steel substrate.

  9. Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 tube by electron backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 ferrule tube were carried out using an electron backscattering diffraction pattern (EBSP). A basket-weave structure with sub-micron lath width caused by quenching from the β to α phase was observed in the heat-affected and fusion zones, and mainly showed a grain boundary misorientation angle of 60 deg. with an rotation axis. This result is consistent with the Burgers orientation relationship of {1 1 0}β//(0 0 0 1)α and β//α for the β to α phase transformation. The texture of the quenched α' phase was strongly inherited from the original α phase, having a radial (0 0 0 1) basal pole and axial {1 1 2-bar0} textures, even in the fusion zone. The primary hydride habit plane in the welded Zircaloy-2 was (0 0 0 1)α//{1 1 1}δ, matching previously obtained results for recrystallized cladding tubes. In addition to the primary habit plane, secondary habit planes were observed for the other low-index planes {1 0 1-bar0} and {1 0 1-bar1} in the fusion zone. The heterogeneous accumulation of hydrides in the transition zone between heat-affected and unaffected zones was mainly due to the residual stress distribution in the narrow region.

  10. Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 tube by electron backscattering diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Une, K.; Ishimoto, S.

    2009-06-01

    Crystallographic measurement of the β to α phase transformation and δ-hydride precipitation in a laser-welded Zircaloy-2 ferrule tube were carried out using an electron backscattering diffraction pattern (EBSP). A basket-weave structure with sub-micron lath width caused by quenching from the β to α phase was observed in the heat-affected and fusion zones, and mainly showed a grain boundary misorientation angle of 60° with an rotation axis. This result is consistent with the Burgers orientation relationship of {1 1 0} β//(0 0 0 1) α and β// α for the β to α phase transformation. The texture of the quenched α' phase was strongly inherited from the original α phase, having a radial (0 0 0 1) basal pole and axial {1 1 2¯ 0} textures, even in the fusion zone. The primary hydride habit plane in the welded Zircaloy-2 was (0 0 0 1) α//{1 1 1} δ, matching previously obtained results for recrystallized cladding tubes. In addition to the primary habit plane, secondary habit planes were observed for the other low-index planes {1 0 1¯ 0} and {1 0 1¯ 1} in the fusion zone. The heterogeneous accumulation of hydrides in the transition zone between heat-affected and unaffected zones was mainly due to the residual stress distribution in the narrow region.

  11. Quality assurance for electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDS) are assuming an ever-increasing role in the verification of radiation treatment accuracy. They are used both in a passive capacity, for the determination of field displacement distributions (''setup errors''), and also in an active role whereby the patient setup is corrected on the basis of electronic portal images. In spite of their potential impact on the precision of patient treatment, there are few quality assurance procedures available, and most of the EPIDS in clinical use are subject, at best, to only perfunctory quality assurance. The goals of this work are (a) to develop an objective and reproducible test for EPID image quality on the factory floor and during installation of the EPID on site; (b) to provide the user with a simple and accurate tool for acceptance, commissioning, and routine quality control; and (c) to initiate regional, national and international collaboration in the implementation of standardized, objective, and automated quality assurance procedures. To this end we have developed an automated test in which a simple test object is imaged daily, and the spatial and contrast resolution of the EPID are automatically evaluated in terms of ''acceptable'', ''warning'' and ''stop'' criteria. Our experience over two years shows the test to be highly sensitive, reproducible, and inexpensive in time and effort. Inter-institutional trials are under way in Canada, US and Europe which indicate large variations in EPID image quality from one EPID to another, and from one center to another. We expect the new standardized quality assurance procedure to lead to improved, and consistent image quality, increased operator acceptance of the technology, and agreement on uniform standards by equipment suppliers and health care agencies. (author)

  12. The role of electronic media in shaping the country's image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azel Zhanibek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the influence of electronic media in the country to external image of Kazakhstan. Special attention is paid to the experience of various countries in promoting the country's image by electronic media.

  13. The role of electronic media in shaping the country's image

    OpenAIRE

    Azel Zhanibek

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the influence of electronic media in the country to external image of Kazakhstan. Special attention is paid to the experience of various countries in promoting the country's image by electronic media.

  14. Quality control in electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Pitfalls in the electronic portal imaging routine demonstrate the necessary of a quality assurance program. The aim of this study is to evaluate the limits of various commercially available video based systems in the recognition of mistakes made when positioning radiation fields. In addition, the time stability of the systems was investigated. The parameters used were spatial resolution, contrast difference and geometric distortion. Material and Methods: A special phantom was designed consisting of a box filled with silicon and containing one metal plate with a hole of 20 cm diameter, one metal plate containing small holes of different diameters (0.5 to 10 mm) and step wedges of metal and cork. The images of the big hole provide information about the degree of distortion, those of the small holes, about spatial resolution and those of the step wedges, about contrast difference. The energy of the X-rays was 6, 10, 15 and 25 MeV. Hardcopies on both paper and film were investigated as well as the presentation on the screen. Different available image processing programs were used. The quality standard was given by a port film with copper/plastic cassette exposed with 6 MeV X-rays. Results: The minimum detail diameter which could be delineated with all systems was about 1mm, irrespective of the X-ray's energy. The minimum contrast was found to be depending on the system as well as on the special parameters of the imaging processing method applied. In some cases, the geometric distortion was up to 20%. We observed cloud-like artefacts on the paper hardcopies, which destroyed the detail informations. Conclusion: The quality of the electronic portal imaging devices is lower than that of conventional port films. The comparison of the systems shows differences in detail contrast but not in the spatial resolution. In some cases, significant degrees of distortion were found. It is necessary to have a check program in order to evaluate the differences between

  15. SU-E-J-176: Results of Images Acquired with Backscattered MV Radiation Using a Pinhole Collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, D; Turian, J; Wu, Z; Darwish, N; Chu, J; Bernard, D [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To ascertain the feasibility of acquiring real time images of small lung tumors from scattered photons while undergoing radiation treatment.There are several methodologies currently used to track tumor location such as MV-cine acquisition and kV fluoroscopy. However, MVcine offers no information parallel to the beam axis while kV fluoroscopy offers little potential for soft tissue discernability while also increasing the patient dose. This study investigates the feasibility of observing an actual simulated tumor while exploring techniques that may improve image quality. Methods: A prototype imager consisting of a gamma camera pinhole collimator and a computed radiography (CR) plate were used in conjunction with a Varian TrueBeam linac. One study consisted of a 2.5 cm diameter solid water cylinder representing a solid tumor imbedded within a lung equivalent material slab. The cylinder with the lung slab was sandwiched between 1 cm lung equivalent slabs and these were sandwiched between 2 slabs of solid water. The top water slab was 1 cm thick. The other imaging study consisted of three different density plugs, 0.46, 1.09, and 1.82 g/cm3 placed on the accelerator couch. The gantry was orientated 70° relative to the CR plate. The slabs and plugs were irradiated with 2000 MU and 500 MU respectively using the 6FFF mode. Results: The solid water plug was visually discernible in the slab phantom. The ratio of the signal coming from the higher density plugs (placed on the treatment couch) to that between the plugs increased from 1.02 to about 3.0 after subtracting the background image acquired with no plugs present. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate that a lung tumor could be visualized with scattered radiation during treatment. Improvements in discerning an object can be enhanced by filtering out the head leakage and background scattered radiation not emanating from the imaged object.

  16. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M., E-mail: mxu@fairfield.edu [Physics Department, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06824 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  17. Theory of dynamical electron channeling contrast images of near-surface crystal defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, Y.N., E-mail: yoosuf@andrew.cmu.edu; Liu, M., E-mail: mincongl@andrew.cmu.edu; Lammatao, J., E-mail: jlammmat@andrew.cmu.edu; Kamaladasa, R., E-mail: rkamalad@andrew.cmu.edu; De Graef, M., E-mail: degraef@cmu.edu

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the dynamical simulation of electron channeling contrast images (ECCIs) of dislocations. The approach utilizes both the Bloch wave formalism and the scattering matrix formalism to generate electron channeling patterns (ECPs). The latter formalism is then adapted to include the effect of lattice defects on the back-scattered electron yield, resulting in a computational algorithm for the simulation of ECCIs. Dislocations of known line direction and Burgers vector are imaged experimentally by ECCI and match well with simulated ECCIs for various channeling conditions. Experiment/simulation comparisons for ECPs and ECCIs are demonstrated for metals (Al), semiconductors (Si), and ceramics (SrTiO{sub 3}). - Highlights: • We provide a new formulation for electron channeling patterns formation. • We adapt the ECP model to include defect contrast, leading to a new ECCI algorithm. • We provide examples of excellent matches between experimental and simulated ECPs. • We illustrate the importance of surface relaxation for accurate ECCI simulations. • We obtain an excellent match of experimental and simulated dislocation images.

  18. Analysis of verification image using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Shinichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Hasegawa, Hironori; Satoh, Kazuhiko; Sakurai, Kuniaki; Kawagoe, Yasumitsu; Kusumi, Yoshimi [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Hospital

    1999-05-01

    We studied the evaluation of patient set-up error by verification image using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). We analyzed which cleared 3 mm in our hospital for visual by using a distance measurement function. The body parts examined included the head and neck, thorax, pelvis and abdomen. The items that were evaluated included shell, Pb block, multi-leaf collimator and landmark. Patient set-up error was 10.4%, with that for the pelvis especially poor. The visual false rate was 17.9%. The result for the abdomen was poor because of the absence of landmark. We showed a decrease in patient set-up error by using EPID and improvement of radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Three-dimensional investigation of grain boundary–twin interactions in a Mg AZ31 alloy by electron backscatter diffraction and continuum modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of grain boundary (GB) misorientation (θ) on twinning in a Mg AZ31 alloy is investigated using a three-dimensional (3-D) experimental and modeling approach, in which 3-D electron backscattered diffraction is performed in a volume consisting of a central grain, favorably oriented for twinning, and surrounded by three boundaries, with θ ranging from 15° to 64°. This study corroborates previous observations that twin nucleation and propagation are favored at low θ. Furthermore, it reveals that non-Schmid effects, such as the activation of low Schmid factor (SF) variants or of double tensile twins, are absent in the vicinity of low misorientation boundaries and that they become more abundant as θ increases. The 3-D morphology of individual twin variants is found to be related to their SF. High SF variants have well-established plate morphology, while low SF variants adopt irregular shapes. A crystal plasticity continuum model recently proposed by the authors is used in a very high intragrain resolution and large-scale finite element polycrystalline aggregate model of the experimental specimen. This model is shown to successfully capture the influence of θ on twin propagation and variant selection. It ultimately predicts (i) a rise in local non-basal slip with increasing θ, (ii) that low θ GB favor twin nucleation by non-Schmid stress concentrations, but that propagation is immediately accommodated by the macroscopic stress, and (iii) that high θ GB are not favorable twin nucleation sites, despite having high von Mises stress concentrations

  20. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM. PMID:26206941

  1. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM – electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM – electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  2. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G F; Grysan, P; Guennou, M; Kreisel, J; Martinotti, D; Rountree, C L; Mathieu, C; Barrett, N

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  3. Response in electrostatic analyzers due to backscattered electrons: case study analysis with the Juno Jovian Auroral Distribution Experiment-Electron instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G; Allegrini, F; Randol, B M; McComas, D J; Louarn, P

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we introduce a model to characterize electron scattering in an electrostatic analyzer. We show that electrons between 0.5 and 30 keV scatter from internal surfaces to produce a response up to ~20% of the ideal, unscattered response. We compare our model results to laboratory data from the Jovian Auroral Distribution Experiment-Electron sensor onboard the NASA Juno mission. Our model reproduces the measured energy-angle response of the instrument well. Understanding and quantifying this scattering process is beneficial to the analysis of scientific data as well as future instrument optimization. PMID:24182165

  4. Backscattering of gyrotron radiation and short-wavelength turbulence during electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating in the L-2M stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D., E-mail: tinborz@gmail.com; Kovrizhnykh, L. M.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Malakhov, D. V.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-15

    Backscattering of gyrotron radiation ({theta} = {pi}) by short-wavelength density fluctuations (k{sub Up-Tack} = 30 cm{sup -1}) in the plasma of the L-2M stellarator was studied under conditions of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma heating at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency (75 GHz). The scattering of the O-wave emerging due to the splitting of the linearly polarized gyrotron radiation into the X- and O-waves was analyzed. The signal obtained after homodyne detection of scattered radiation is a result of interference of the reference signal, the quasi-steady component, and the fast oscillating component. The coefficients of reflection of the quasi-steady component, R{sub =}{sup 2}(Y), and fast oscillating component, R{sub {approx}}{sup 2}(Y), of scattered radiation are estimated. The growth of the R{sub {approx}}{sup 2}(Y) coefficient from 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} to 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} with increasing ECR heating power from 190 to 430 kW is found to correlate with the decrease in the energy lifetime from 1.9 to 1.46 ms. The relative density of short-wavelength fluctuations is estimated to be Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket n{sub {approx}}{sup 2} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket / Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket n{sub e}{sup 2} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}. It is shown that the frequencies of short-wavelength fluctuations are in the range 10-150 kHz. The recorded short-wavelength fluctuations can be interpreted as structural turbulence, the energy of which comprises {approx}10% of the total fluctuations energy. Simulations of transport processes show that neoclassical heat fluxes are much smaller than anomalous ones. It is suggested that short-wavelength turbulence plays a decisive role in the anomalous heat transport.

  5. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. PMID:25810353

  7. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South...

  8. NOAA TIFF Image - 3x3m Multibeam Backscatter, US Virgin Islands - Vieques Island (South Bank) - Project NF-09-01 - (2009), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 3x3 meter cell size representing the backscatter or intensity of sound returned from the seafloor on the bank/shelf escarpment...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 3m Backscatter Mosaic, Florida Deep Coral Areas (Miami) - Lost Coast Explorer - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 3x3 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the Atlantic...

  10. NOAA TIFF Image - Backscatter - Lang Bank, St. Croix, USVI - Benthic Habitat Characterization - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - M-1907-NF-14 (2014), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geotiff represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the reef shelf and the steep slopes of the Lang Bank (H12639) of St. Croix, US Virgin Islands....

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - .75m Multibeam Backscatter, US Virgin Islands - Vieques Island (El Seco) - Project NF-09-01 - (2009), UTM 20N WGS 84 (NCEI Accession 0131857)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with .75x.75 meter cell size representing the backscatter or intensity of sound returned from the seafloor in "El Seco" east of...

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - .75m Multibeam Backscatter, US Virgin Islands - Vieques Island (El Seco) - Project NF-09-01 - (2009), UTM 20N WGS 84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with .75x.75 meter cell size representing the backscatter or intensity of sound returned from the seafloor in "El Seco" east of...

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Backscatter, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  14. 1 meter resolution GeoTIFF image of the sidescan sonar backscatter imagery of Boston Harbor and Approaches (BH_1MBS.TIF, UTM 19, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are high-resolution acoustic backscatter measurements of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches, Massachusetts. Approximately 170 km...

  15. NOAA TIFF Image - LIS_2014_Biogeo_Backscatter_1m.tif - Benthic Habitat Characterization - Biogeographic Branch - (2014), UTM 18N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified backscatter GeoTiff with 1x1 meter cell size representing the 2014 Long Island Sound Benthic Habitat Priority Area of Interest off...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South...

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 5m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 5x5 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South...

  18. The use of electron Rutherford backscattering to characterize novel electronic materials as illustrated by a case study of sputter-deposited NbOx films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrons scattered over large angles at relatively high energies (40 keV) are used to study NbOx films. These films were deposited by reactive sputter deposition on a Si substrate using a Nb target and an Ar/O2 gas mixture. Energy spectra of electrons scattered from such samples exhibit elastic scattering peaks for each component due to the energy difference associated with scattering from different masses. The spectra provide in this way information about the film thickness as well as its stoichiometry. The stoichiometry and the deposition rate depends on the concentration of O2 in the mixture. For Nb2O5-like films the energy loss measurements also give an estimate of the band gap, but for Nb films with lower O concentration the band gap is not resolved. This work illustrates the possibility of characterizing modern transition metal oxide films in a fairly simple electron scattering experiment

  19. Backscattered helium spectroscopy in the helium ion microscope: Principles, resolution and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the possibilities and limitations for microstructure characterization using backscattered particles from a sharply focused helium ion beam. The interaction of helium ions with matter enables the imaging, spectroscopic characterization, as well as the nanometer scale modification of samples. The contrast that is seen in helium ion microscopy (HIM) images differs from that in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and is generally a result of the higher surface sensitivity of the method. It allows, for instance, a much better visualization of low-Z materials as a result of the small secondary electron escape depth. However, the same differences in beam interaction that give HIM an edge over other imaging techniques, also impose limitations for spectroscopic applications using backscattered particles. Here we quantify those limitations and discuss opportunities to further improve the technique

  20. The next generation of electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics (invited)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, P.; Domier, C.W.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Tobias, B.; Shen, Z.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Park, H.; Classen, I.G.J.; van de Pol, M.J.; Donne, A. J. H.; R. Jaspers,

    2008-01-01

    A 128 channel two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging system collects time-resolved 16x8 images of T-e profiles and fluctuations on the TEXTOR tokamak. Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) is undergoing significant changes which promise to revolutionize and extend its capabilities

  1. Deciphering igneous and metamorphic events in high-grade rocks of the Wilmington complex, Delaware: Morphology, cathodoluminescence and backscattered electron zoning, and SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology of zircon and monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Schenck, W.S.; Plank, M.O.; Srogi, L.A.; Fanning, C.M.; Kamo, S.L.; Bosbyshell, H.

    2006-01-01

    High-grade rocks of the Wilmington Complex, northern Delaware and adjacent Maryland and Pennsylvania, contain morphologically complex zircons that formed through both igneous and metamorphic processes during the development of an island-arc complex and suturing of the arc to Laurentia. The arc complex has been divided into several members, the protoliths of which include both intrusive and extrusive rocks. Metasedimentary rocks are interlayered with the complex and are believed to be the infrastructure upon which the arc was built. In the Wilmingto n Complex rocks, both igneous and metamorphic zircons occur as elongate and equant forms. Chemical zoning, shown by cathodoluminescence (CL), includes both concentric, oscillatory patterns, indicative of igneous origin, and patchwork and sector patterns, suggestive of metamorphic growth. Metamorphic monazites are chemically homogeneous, or show oscillatory or spotted chemical zoning in backscattered electron images. U-Pb geochronology by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) was used to date complexly zoned zircon and monazite. All but one member of the Wilmington Complex crystallized in the Ordovician between ca. 475 and 485 Ma; these rocks were intruded by a suite of gabbro-to-granite plutonic rocks at 434 ?? Ma. Detrital zircons in metavolcanic and metasedimentary units were derived predominantly from 0.9 to 1.4 Ga (Grenvillian) basement, presumably of Laurentian origin. Amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism of the Wilmington Complex, recorded by ages of metamorphic zircon (428 ?? 4 and 432 ?? 6 Ma) and monazite (429 ?? 2 and 426 ?? 3 Ma), occurred contemporaneously with emplacement of the younger plutonic rocks. On the basis of varying CL zoning patterns and external morphologies, metamorphic zircons formed by different processes (presumably controlled by rock chemistry) at slightly different times and temperatures during prograde metamorphism. In addition, at least three other thermal episodes are

  2. Experimental determination of the electron elastic backscattering probability and the surface excitation parameter for Si, Ni, Cu, and Ag at 0.5 and 1 KeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gergely, G.; Gurban, S.; Menyhard, M.; Jablonski, A.; Zemek, Josef; Goto, K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 11 (2011), s. 1365-1370. ISSN 0142-2421 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : backscattering probability * SEP * EPES * AREPES * AES * XPS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.180, year: 2011

  3. The use of electron Rutherford backscattering to characterize novel electronic materials as illustrated by a case study of sputter-deposited NbO{sub x} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, M., E-mail: maarten.vos@anu.edu.au [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Liu, X. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Grande, P.L. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Instituto de Fisica da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Nandi, S.K. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh); Venkatachalam, D.K.; Elliman, R.G. [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    Electrons scattered over large angles at relatively high energies (40 keV) are used to study NbO{sub x} films. These films were deposited by reactive sputter deposition on a Si substrate using a Nb target and an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture. Energy spectra of electrons scattered from such samples exhibit elastic scattering peaks for each component due to the energy difference associated with scattering from different masses. The spectra provide in this way information about the film thickness as well as its stoichiometry. The stoichiometry and the deposition rate depends on the concentration of O{sub 2} in the mixture. For Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-like films the energy loss measurements also give an estimate of the band gap, but for Nb films with lower O concentration the band gap is not resolved. This work illustrates the possibility of characterizing modern transition metal oxide films in a fairly simple electron scattering experiment.

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2012-2013, Northeast Reserve, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013) and M-I907-NF-12 (2012), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents an 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a reef shelf/bank and the steep slopes and canyons of the NE Reserve, offshore of Fajardo, Puerto...

  5. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2012-2013, Northeast Reserve, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013) and M-I907-NF-12 (2012), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents an 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a reef shelf/bank and the steep slopes and canyons of the NE Reserve, offshore of Fajardo, Puerto...

  6. Electron-Focus Adjustment for Photo-Optical Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Walter B.; Flemming, Keith; Ziegler, Michael M.

    1987-01-01

    Internal electron focus made independent of optical focus. Procedure enables fine tuning of internal electron-focusing system of photo-optical imager, without complication by imperfections of associated external optics. Applicable to imager in which electrons emitted from photocathode in optical focal plane, then electrostatically and/or magnetically focused to replica of image in second focal plane containing photodiodes, phototransistorss, charge-coupled devices, multiple-anode outputs, or other detectors.

  7. Quality control for electronic portal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The need for objective quality control of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) arises at a number of different stages. The manufacturer should be able to conduct a test before shipping the EPID, to be sure that the device meets predetermined specifications. On installation, the engineer should have a simple and definitive test to ensure that installation is complete. The customer also requires proof that specifications have been met. And a quick and easy test is required for daily or weekly verification that the EPID is operating as well as at installation. All the suppliers of EPIDs provide copies of the 'Las Vegas' phantom, but this is a highly subjective test that was never intended to be used for routine quality control. A quality control test is described which involves acquiring a pair of portal images of a specially designed phantom, followed by totally automatic analysis to provide quantities related to the spatial resolution and the contrast-to-noise ratio. The phantom includes five bar patterns, with spatial frequencies from 0.1 to 0.75 1p/mm. The measured modulation in each pattern is normalized to the value at the lowest frequency, and the spatial frequency f50 corresponding to a 50% decrease in RMIF is used as the measure of spatial resolution. Contrast is measured in regions of the phantom with different attenuations, and noise is obtained from the difference image derived from the original pair. Tests were conducted on EPIDs from all the commercial suppliers. By determining f50 with the phantom placed on the surface of the EPID, and again at isocenter (ISO), it is possible to determine the relative contributions to image blurring from the EPID (E) and from the effect of the finite focal spot size in the linac (S). In all cases the effect of the focal spot is dominant. The results are presented in a table, which shows mean values of the resolution, blurring parameters E and S, the optimal magnification, and the best attainable

  8. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the theory of image and contrast formation and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal structure determination and imaging of lattice defects X-ray microanalysis and energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The second edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the areas of energy-loss spectroscopy, crystal-lattice imaging and reflection electron microscopy

  9. A novel approach for scanning electron microscopy of colloidal gold- labeled cell surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for the use of scanning electron microscopy on the surface of gold-labeled cells. It includes the use of 45- or 20-nm colloidal gold marker conjugated with Staphylococcal protein A. The marker is best recognized on the basis of its atomic number contrast by using the backscattered electron imaging mode of the scanning electron microscope. When the backscattered electron signal is mixed with the secondary electron signal, an optimum correlation between the distribution of...

  10. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement

  11. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, K. S., E-mail: kssim@mmu.edu.my; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  12. Electronic imaging and high spatial resolution slow electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning Auger are now commonly used techniques. They are extended here to the complete electron energy distribution. It is shown that pictures can be obtained with electron energy loss peaks or with true secondary electron peaks of very low energy. These pictures are performed with very low primary electron energies (Esub(p) approximately 250 eV) and a fairly good spatial resolution. A very wide field of application of these techniques is now open. In the next future, work function and adsorbed hydrogen micromapping will be obtained

  13. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1993-01-01

    "Transmission Electron Microscopy" presents the theory of image and contrastformation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy Theprinciples of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also analysed are the kinetical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure determination and imaging of lattices and their defects X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The third edition includes a brief discussionof Schottky emission guns, some clarification of minor details, and references to the recent literature

  14. Role of electron-electron interference in ultrafast time-resolved imaging of electronic wavepackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering is an emerging approach to image the dynamical evolution of the electronic charge distribution during complex chemical and biological processes in real-space and real-time. Recently, the differences between semiclassical and quantum-electrodynamical (QED) theory of light-matter interaction for scattering of ultrashort x-ray pulses from the electronic wavepacket were formally demonstrated and visually illustrated by scattering patterns calculated for an electronic wavepacket in atomic hydrogen [G. Dixit, O. Vendrell, and R. Santra, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 109, 11636 (2012)]. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of time-resolved x-ray scattering from a sample containing a mixture of non-stationary and stationary electrons within both the theories. In a many-electron system, the role of scattering interference between a non-stationary and several stationary electrons to the total scattering signal is investigated. In general, QED and semiclassical theory provide different results for the contribution from the scattering interference, which depends on the energy resolution of the detector and the x-ray pulse duration. The present findings are demonstrated by means of a numerical example of x-ray time-resolved imaging for an electronic wavepacket in helium. It is shown that the time-dependent scattering interference vanishes within semiclassical theory and the corresponding patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the time-independent interference, whereas the time-dependent scattering interference contribution do not vanish in the QED theory and the patterns are dominated by the scattering contribution from the non-stationary electron scattering.

  15. Sub-MeV tunably polarized X-ray production with laser Thomson backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, K.; Kando, M.; Hayakawa, T.; Daito, I.; Kondo, S.; Homma, T.; Kameshima, T.; Kotaki, H.; Chen, L.-M.; Fukuda, Y.; Faenov, A.; Shizuma, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.

    2008-05-01

    Reported in this article is the generation of unique polarized x-rays in the sub-MeV region by means of the Thomson backscattering of the Nd:YAG laser photon with a wavelength of 1064nm on the 150MeV electron from the microtron accelerator. The maximum energy of the x-ray photons is estimated to be about 400keV. The total energy of the backscattered x-ray pulse is measured with an imaging plate and a LYSO scintillator. The angular divergence of the x-rays is also measured by using the imaging plate. We confirm that the x-ray beam is polarized according to the laser polarization direction with the Compton scattering method. In addition, we demonstrate the imaging of the object shielded by lead with the generated x-rays.

  16. 3D image reconstruction of fiber systems using electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years, electron microscopists and materials researchers have shown increased interest in electron tomography (reconstruction of three-dimensional information from a tilt series of bright field images obtained in a transmission electron microscope (TEM)). In this research, electron tomography has been used to reconstruct a three-dimensional image for fiber structures from secondary electron images in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The implementation of this technique is used to examine the structure of fiber system before and after deformation. A test sample of steel wool was tilted around a single axis from −10° to 60° by one-degree steps with images taken at every degree; three-dimensional images were reconstructed for the specimen of fine steel fibers. This method is capable of reconstructing the three-dimensional morphology of this type of lineal structure, and to obtain features such as tortuosity, contact points, and linear density that are of importance in defining the mechanical properties of these materials. - Highlights: • The electron tomography technique has been adapted to the SEM for analysis of linear structures. • Images are obtained by secondary electron imaging through a given depth of field, making them analogous to projected images. • Quantitative descriptions of the microstructure can be obtained including tortuosity and contact points per volume

  17. Orientation contrast of secondary electron images from electropolished metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D; Chang, C P; Loretto, M H

    2015-09-01

    Orientation contrast obtained by an in-lens secondary electron detector in a scanning electron microscope from electropolished/etched metals is reported. The imaging conditions for obtaining such orientation contrast are defined. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the orientation contrast is explained, and an application example of this new imaging method is given. PMID:25980953

  18. Compact low-cost detection electronics for optical coherence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Akcay, A. C.; Lee, K. S.; Furenlid, L.R.; Costa, M A; Rolland, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    A compact and low-cost detection electronics scheme for optical coherence imaging is demonstrated. The performance of the designed electronics is analyzed in comparison to a commercial lock-in amplifier of equal bandwidth. Images of a fresh-onion sample are presented for each detection configuration.

  19. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  20. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented

  1. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  2. Orientation contrast of secondary electron images from electropolished metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orientation contrast obtained by an in-lens secondary electron detector in a scanning electron microscope from electropolished/etched metals is reported. The imaging conditions for obtaining such orientation contrast are defined. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the orientation contrast is explained, and an application example of this new imaging method is given. - Highlights: • A new imaging technique to obtain orientation contrast from SEI in the SEM is reported. • Imaging conditions for obtaining orientation contrast from SEI are defined. • The mechanism responsible for the formation of the orientation contrast is explained. • An application example of this new imaging method is given

  3. Card controlled beta backscatter thickness measuring instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved beta backscatter instrument for the nondestructive measurement of the thickness of thin coatings on a substrate is described. Included therein is the utilization of a bank of memory stored data representative of isotope, substrate, coating material and thickness range characteristics in association with a control card having predetermined indicia thereon selectively representative of a particular isotope, substrate material, coating material and thickness range for conditioning electronic circuit means by memory stored data selected in accord with the predetermined indicia on a control card for converting backscattered beta particle counts into indicia of coating thickness

  4. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1997-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray micronanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fourth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of Schottky emission guns, convergent-beam electron diffraction, electron tomography, holography and the high resolution of crystal lattices.

  5. Role of electron-electron interference in ultrafast time-resolved imaging of electronic wavepackets

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering is an emerging approach to image the dynamical evolution of the electronic charge distribution during complex chemical and biological processes in real-space and real-time. Recently, the differences between semiclassical and quantum-electrodynamical (QED) theory of light-matter interaction for scattering of ultrashort x-ray pulses from the electronic wavepacket were formally demonstrated and visually illustrated by scattering patterns calculated for an electronic wavepacket in atomic hydrogen [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., {\\bf 109}, 11636 (2012)]. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of time-resolved x-ray scattering from a sample containing a mixture of non-stationary and stationary electrons within both the theories. In a many-electron system, the role of scattering interference between a non-stationary and several stationary electrons to the total scattering signal is investigated. In general, QED and semiclassical theory provide different results for the ...

  6. CHANGES OF BACKSCATTERING PARAMETERS DURING CHILLING INJURY IN BANANAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NORHASHILA HASHIM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The change in backscattering parameters during the appearance of chilling injury in bananas was investigated. Bananas were stored at a chilling temperature for two days and the degrees of the chilling injuries that appeared were measured before, during and after storage using backscattering imaging and visual assessment. Laser lights at 660 nm and 785 nm wavelengths were shot consecutively onto the samples in a dark room and a camera was used to capture the backscattered lights that appeared on the samples. The captured images were analysed and the changes of intensity against pixel count were plotted into graphs. The plotted graph provides useful information of backscattering parameters such as inflection point (IP, slope after inflection point (SA, and full width at half maximum (FWHM and saturation radius (RSAT. Results of statistical analysis indicated that there were significant changes of these backscattering parameters as chilling injury developed.

  7. Spatial Domain based Image Enhancement Techniques for Scanned Electron Microscope-SEM-images

    OpenAIRE

    Rakhi Chanana; Parneet Kaur Randhawa; Navneet Singh Randhawa

    2011-01-01

    The growing need for efficiently processing and analyzing the information contained in digital images is a continuous challenge in order to apply image processing. Digital images are captured from different imaging media elements like cameras, scanned electron microscopes etc. While going through the imaging process, Images get distorted in various forms resulting in extreme dark or light areas. All these things lead to the loss of information. The goal in each case is to extract useful infor...

  8. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  9. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  10. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi [Science and Medical Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hiroaki [Corporate Manufacturing Strategy Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-1991 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  11. Automated Classification Of Scanning Electron Microscope Particle Images Using Morphological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, B. L.; Lewis, R. R.; Girvin, D. C.; McKinley, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing a software tool that can automatically classify anthropogenic and natural aerosol particulates using morphological analysis. Our method was developed using SEM (background and secondary electron) images of single particles. Particle silhouettes are detected and converted into polygons using Intel's OpenCV image processing library. Our analysis then proceeds independently for the two kinds of images. Analysis of secondary images concerns itself solely with the silhouette and seeks to quantify its shape and roughness. Traversing the polygon with spline interpolation, we uniformly sample k(s), the signed curvature of the silhouette's path as a function of distance along the perimeter s. k(s) is invariant under rotation and translation. The power spectrum of k(s) qualitatively shows both shape and roughness: more power at low frequencies indicates variation in shape; more power at higher frequencies indicates a rougher silhouette. We present a series of filters (low-, band-, and high-pass) which we convolve with k(s) to yield a set of parameters that characterize the shape and roughness numerically. Analysis of backscatter images focuses on the (visual) texture, which is the result of both composition and geometry. Using the silhouette as a boundary, we compute the variogram, a statistical measure of inter-pixel covariance as a function of distance. Variograms take on characteristic curves, which we fit with a heuristic, asymptotic function that uses a small set of parameters. The combination of silhouette and variogram fit parameters forms the basis of a multidimensional classification space whose dimensionality we may reduce by principal component analysis and whose region boundaries allow us to classify new particles. This analysis is performed without a priori knowledge of other physical, chemical, or climatic properties. The method will be adapted to multi-particulate images.

  12. Imaging electron detectors for low-voltage TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moldovan, G; Kirkland, A I, E-mail: grigore.moldovan@materials.ox.ac.u [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    There is an increasing effort for the development of transmission electron microscopes operating at accelerating voltages of less that 100 kV, down to 20 kV. This work aims to clarify if the technology of conventional indirect scintillator-CCD cameras is suitable to record images formed with electrons of such low energy and how its performance compare to that of novel direct silicon imaging detectors. The performance of these imaging detectors is discussed in terms of modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency. It is demonstrated that whilst the performance of conventional scintillator-CCDs improves as the electron energy is dropped, it then peaks at 70 keV and then drops again. Optimum imaging performance at even lower energies is expected for the novel directly exposed detectors, which are capable of near 100% detective quantum efficiency at very low electron energies.

  13. Electronic aperture control devised for solid state imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, R. A.; Callahan, D. E.; Mc Cann, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    Electronic means of performing the equivalent of automatic aperture control has been devised for the new class of television cameras that incorporates a solid state imaging device in the form of phototransistor mosaic sensors.

  14. Semi-automatic organelle detection on transmission electron microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Sato, Mayuko; Sawaki, Fumie; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nagata, Noriko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the acquisition of large-scale datasets of transmission electron microscope images have allowed researchers to determine the number and the distribution of subcellular ultrastructures at both the cellular level and the tissue level. For this purpose, it would be very useful to have a computer-assisted system to detect the structures of interest, such as organelles. Using our original image recognition framework CARTA (Clustering-Aided Rapid Training Agent), combined with procedures to highlight and enlarge regions of interest on the image, we have developed a successful method for the semi-automatic detection of plant organelles including mitochondria, amyloplasts, chloroplasts, etioplasts, and Golgi stacks in transmission electron microscope images. Our proposed semi-automatic detection system will be helpful for labelling organelles in the interpretation and/or quantitative analysis of large-scale electron microscope imaging data. PMID:25589024

  15. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  16. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images and...

  17. High-brightness electron beams for ultrafast electron microdiffraction and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianyin; Zhou, Faran; Chang, Kiseok; Tao, Zhensheng; Williams, Joe; Ruan, Chong-Yu; MSU UEM Collaboration

    Currently the ultrafast electron diffraction has achieved sub-picosecond temporal resolution and atomic resolution. However, direct ultrafast imaging of a nanometer scale specimen through coherent single-particle diffraction has not been achieved largely due to insufficient intensity when tuned to a coherence length that matches the size of the specimen under the projected phase space density. Utilizing a recently implemented high-brightness electron source with flexible optical design, we test the performance of ultrafast electron microdiffraction and coherence imaging. We demonstrate the feasibilities of single-shot microdiffraction on a single micrometer-sized domain in Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) and coherent diffractive imaging of 10 nm scale charge-ordered domain structures in single-crystal complex materials, as validated by the measured brightness at the sample plane. These initial results show that source-limited performance even from a sub-relativistic electron beamline can drastically improve the current performance of ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  18. Analysis of electron energy-loss spectra and images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W.J. Sorber (Lianne)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSeveral methods are proposed for the elemental analysis of biological material with the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) in a Zeiss EM902. For spectra, the Simplex-method was tested and compared to Egerton's 2- area method, the Stee

  19. Images of triple gas electron multiplier with pixel-pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing of a triple gas electron multiplier (GEM) with pixel-pads is described. Images by scanning and suspending radioactive sources were obtained by using 96 channels digital data acquisition (DAQ) system which was composed of 96 8 × 8 mm2 pads and associated electronics channels. (nuclear physics)

  20. Large-Scale Electron Microscopy Image Segmentation in Spark

    OpenAIRE

    Plaza, Stephen M.; Berg, Stuart E.

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of connectomics aims to unlock the mysteries of the brain by understanding the connectivity between neurons. To map this connectivity, we acquire thousands of electron microscopy (EM) images with nanometer-scale resolution. After aligning these images, the resulting dataset has the potential to reveal the shapes of neurons and the synaptic connections between them. However, imaging the brain of even a tiny organism like the fruit fly yields terabytes of data. It can take ye...

  1. CMOS Image Sensors: Electronic Camera On A Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent advancements in CMOS image sensor technology are reviewed, including both passive pixel sensors and active pixel sensors. On- chip analog to digital converters and on-chip timing and control circuits permit realization of an electronic camera-on-a-chip. Highly miniaturized imaging systems based on CMOS image sensor technology are emerging as a competitor to charge-coupled devices for low cost uses.

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  3. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  4. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 μs. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low cost linear mixer/receiver array. Unlike conventional ECE diagnostics, the sample volumes of the ECE imaging system are aligned vertically, and can be shifted across the plasma cross-section by varying the local oscillator frequency, making possible 2D measurements of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. The poloidal/radial wavenumber spectra and correlation lengths of Te fluctuations in the plasma core can also be obtained by properly positioning the focal plane of the imaging system. Due to these unique features, ECE imaging is an ideal tool for plasma transport study. Technical details of the system are described, together with preliminary experimental results. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  5. The next generation of electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 128 channel two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging system collects time-resolved 16x8 images of Te profiles and fluctuations on the TEXTOR tokamak. Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) is undergoing significant changes which promise to revolutionize and extend its capabilities far beyond what has been achieved to date. These include the development of a minilens array configuration with increased sensitivity antennas, a new local oscillator pumping scheme, enhanced electron cyclotron resonance heating shielding, and a highly flexible optical design with vertical zoom capability. Horizontal zoom and spot size (rf bandwidth) capabilities are also being developed with new ECEI electronics. An interface module is under development to remotely control all key features of the new ECEI instrument, many of which can be changed during a plasma discharge for maximum flexibility.

  6. A Micropulse eye-safe all-fiber molecular backscatter coherent temperature lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abari, Cyrus F.; Chu, Xinzhao; Mann, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of an all-fiber, micropulse, 1.5 μm coherent lidar for remote sensing of atmospheric temperature. The proposed system benefits from the recent advances in optics/electronics technology, especially an all-fiber image-reject homodyne receiver, where a high...... system is the removal of the contaminating Mie backscatter signal by electronic filters at the baseband (before signal conditioning and amplification). The paper presents the basic concepts as well as a Monte-Carlo system simulation as the proof of concept....

  7. Scanning electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions, imaging modes, the interpretation of micrographs and the use of quantitative modes "in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). lt forms a counterpart to Transmission Electron Microscopy (Vol. 36 of this Springer Series in Optical Sciences) . The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Münster and from a German text entitled Raster-Elektronenmikroskopie (Springer-Verlag), published in collaboration with my colleague Gerhard Pfefferkorn. In the introductory chapter, the principles of the SEM and of electron­ specimen interactions are described, the most important imaging modes and their associated contrast are summarized, and general aspects of eiemental analysis by x-ray and Auger electron emission are discussed. The electron gun and electron optics are discussed in Chap. 2 in order to show how an electron probe of small diameter can be formed, how the elec­ tron beam can be blanked at high fre...

  8. Fast Image Drift Compensation in Scanning Electron Microscope using Image Registration.

    OpenAIRE

    Marturi, Naresh; Dembélé, Sounkalo; Piat, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image acquisition is mostly affected by the time varying motion of pixel positions in the consecutive images, a phenomenon called drift. In order to perform accurate measurements using SEM, it is necessary to compensate this drift in advance. Most of the existing drift compensation methods were developed using the image correlation technique. In this paper, we present an image registration-based drift compensation method, where the correction on the distorte...

  9. Detection of buried landmine with X-ray backscatter technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Sunwoo; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Yi, Yun

    2006-11-01

    We describe a continuously operating scanning X-ray imaging system developed for landmine detection based on a backscatter X-ray principle, thus detection is done from the same side as the source. The source operates at 120 kV p and 3 mA. To study the physics of Compton X-ray backscattering, the photon transport factor, backscatter factor (BSF) and backscatter probability (BSP) were simulated using Monte-Carlo calculations using the generalized particle transport program MCNP. Based on the Monte-Carlo analyses results, a mine detecting system has been designed. It potentially has a low false alarm rate and a high detection probability, and a direct imaging facility.

  10. Detection of buried landmine with X-ray backscatter technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuk, Sunwoo [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: sunwoo@korea.ac.kr; Kim, Kwang Hyun [Chosun University, 375, Seosuk-Dong, Dong-Gu, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Yun [Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-30

    We describe a continuously operating scanning X-ray imaging system developed for landmine detection based on a backscatter X-ray principle, thus detection is done from the same side as the source. The source operates at 120 kV p and 3 mA. To study the physics of Compton X-ray backscattering, the photon transport factor, backscatter factor (BSF) and backscatter probability (BSP) were simulated using Monte-Carlo calculations using the generalized particle transport program MCNP. Based on the Monte-Carlo analyses results, a mine detecting system has been designed. It potentially has a low false alarm rate and a high detection probability, and a direct imaging facility.

  11. TU-A-9A-03: Development and Verification of a Forward Model That Assists in Iterative Post-Processing Algorithms Used to Reduce Blur in Compton Backscatter Imaging Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juneja, B; Gilland, D; Hintenlang, D; Doxsee, K; Bova, F [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In Compton Backscatter Imaging (CBI), the source and detector reside on the same side of the patient. We previously demonstrated the applicability of CBI systems for medical purposes using an industrial system. To assist in post-processing images from a CBI system, a forward model based on radiation absorption and scatter principles has been developed. Methods: The forward model was developed in C++ using raytracing to track particles. The algorithm accepts phantoms of any size and resolution to calculate the fraction of incident photons scattered back to the detector, and can perform these calculations for any detector geometry and source specification. To validate the model, results were compared to MCNP-X, which is a Monte Carlo based simulation software, for various combinations of source specifications, detector geometries, and phantom compositions. Results: The model verified that the backscatter signal to the detector was based on three interaction probabilities: a) attenuation of photons going into the phantom, b) Compton scatter of photons toward the detector, and c) attenuation of photons coming out of the phantom. The results from the MCNP-X simulations and the forward model varied from 1 to 5%. This difference was less than 1% for energies higher than 30 keV, but was up to 4% for lower energies. At 50 keV, the difference was less than 1% for multiple detector widths and for both homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Conclusion: As part of the optimization of a medical CBI system, an efficient and accurate forward model was constructed in C++ to estimate the output of CBI system. The model characterized individual components contributing to CBI output and increased computational efficiency over Monte Carlo simulations. It is now used in the development of novel post-processing algorithms that reduce image blur by reversing undesired contribution from outside the region of interest.

  12. TU-A-9A-03: Development and Verification of a Forward Model That Assists in Iterative Post-Processing Algorithms Used to Reduce Blur in Compton Backscatter Imaging Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In Compton Backscatter Imaging (CBI), the source and detector reside on the same side of the patient. We previously demonstrated the applicability of CBI systems for medical purposes using an industrial system. To assist in post-processing images from a CBI system, a forward model based on radiation absorption and scatter principles has been developed. Methods: The forward model was developed in C++ using raytracing to track particles. The algorithm accepts phantoms of any size and resolution to calculate the fraction of incident photons scattered back to the detector, and can perform these calculations for any detector geometry and source specification. To validate the model, results were compared to MCNP-X, which is a Monte Carlo based simulation software, for various combinations of source specifications, detector geometries, and phantom compositions. Results: The model verified that the backscatter signal to the detector was based on three interaction probabilities: a) attenuation of photons going into the phantom, b) Compton scatter of photons toward the detector, and c) attenuation of photons coming out of the phantom. The results from the MCNP-X simulations and the forward model varied from 1 to 5%. This difference was less than 1% for energies higher than 30 keV, but was up to 4% for lower energies. At 50 keV, the difference was less than 1% for multiple detector widths and for both homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Conclusion: As part of the optimization of a medical CBI system, an efficient and accurate forward model was constructed in C++ to estimate the output of CBI system. The model characterized individual components contributing to CBI output and increased computational efficiency over Monte Carlo simulations. It is now used in the development of novel post-processing algorithms that reduce image blur by reversing undesired contribution from outside the region of interest

  13. Scanning image detection (SID) system for conventional transmission electron microscope (CTEM) images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, T; Tomita, M; Kobayashi, H

    1990-08-01

    A new image detection system has been developed to display transmission electron microscope (TEM) images on a CRT without a video camera system. Deflection coils placed in both the upper space of an objective lens and in the lower space of the first intermediate lens scan a small electron probe simultaneously. The electrical signal acquired through an improved scintillator and a photomultiplier is synchronized with the scanning signal and displayed in a similar fashion to a conventional scanning TEM (STEM) instrument. A preliminary system using a 100 kV conventional TEM (CTEM) equipped with a hairpin-type electron gun, produced an image with a spatial resolution of 1 nm. PMID:2391565

  14. Electron Spin Resonance Imaging Utilizing Localized Microwave Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Masahiro; Ikeya, Motoji

    1990-02-01

    A method for two-dimensional electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging utilizing a localized microwave field is presented with an application of the image processing technique. Microwaves are localized at the surface of a sample by placing a sample in contact with a pinholed cavity wall. A two-dimensional ESR image can be obtained by scanning the sample in contact with the cavity. Some ESR images which correspond to distribution of natural radiation damages and paramagnetic impurities in carbonate fossils of a crinoid and an ammonite are presented as applications in earth science. Resolution of a raw ESR image is restricted by the diameter of the hole (1 mm). Higher resolution of 0.2 mm is obtained by using a deconvolution algorithm and instrument function for the hole. Restored images of a test sample of DPPH and of a fossil crinoid are presented.

  15. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  16. Importance of daily electronic portal imaging in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An audit was conducted on 20 randomly selected patients who had daily electronic portal imaging during the course of their radiotherapy treatment. The daily images were reviewed to determine whether they were within tolerance according to departmental protocol. If they were not, the actions that were taken were documented. Four treatment areas (spine, chest, breast and prostate) were compared among five patients belonging to each of these categories. The patients were also categorized according to their treatment intent (radical or palliative). A total of 889 electronic portal images of 475 fractions were audited and 33.5% of all fractions were outside tolerance. It was found that 95% of patients needed an action during their treatment and 80% of the patients needed a treatment centre move during the course of their treatment. We found that errors occurred throughout the treatment and it was not possible to predict patients who could have daily imaging omitted. Concordance between radiation therapists and radiation oncologists for identification of error was also investigated. Despite the use of familiar electronic portal imaging protocols, image reviewers (radiation therapists and radiation oncologists) disagreed in interpretation 10% of the time. Our results support the hypothesis that daily imaging may be a useful tool for patients undergoing radiotherapy and that imaging may be ideally carried out before each fraction. Image assessments would be ideally carried out by a team approach, with all images reviewed by both radiation therapists and radiation oncologists. This approach has significant resource implications and may require review of current Medicare and Health Program Grant reimbursements.

  17. The Application of Similar Image Retrieval in Electronic Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YuPing Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional online shopping platform (OSP, which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers’ experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system.

  18. The application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YuPing; Yin, Hua; Han, Dezhi; Yu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Traditional online shopping platform (OSP), which searches product information by keywords, faces three problems: indirect search mode, large search space, and inaccuracy in search results. For solving these problems, we discuss and research the application of similar image retrieval in electronic commerce. Aiming at improving the network customers' experience and providing merchants with the accuracy of advertising, we design a reasonable and extensive electronic commerce application system, which includes three subsystems: image search display subsystem, image search subsystem, and product information collecting subsystem. This system can provide seamless connection between information platform and OSP, on which consumers can automatically and directly search similar images according to the pictures from information platform. At the same time, it can be used to provide accuracy of internet marketing for enterprises. The experiment shows the efficiency of constructing the system. PMID:24883411

  19. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. s states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z

  20. Semi-automatic organelle detection on transmission electron microscopic images

    OpenAIRE

    Takumi Higaki; Natsumaro Kutsuna; Kae Akita; Mayuko Sato; Fumie Sawaki; Megumi Kobayashi; Noriko Nagata; Kiminori Toyooka; Seiichiro Hasezawa

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the acquisition of large-scale datasets of transmission electron microscope images have allowed researchers to determine the number and the distribution of subcellular ultrastructures at both the cellular level and the tissue level. For this purpose, it would be very useful to have a computer-assisted system to detect the structures of interest, such as organelles. Using our original image recognition framework CARTA (Clustering-Aided Rapid Training Agent), combined with pr...

  1. Electronic Imaging in Colonoscopy: Clinical Applications and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Rameshshanker, R.; Wilson, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Electronic chromoendoscopy (EC) is an equipment-based technology which could be easily activated by push of a button. There are four EC techniques available for use at present: narrow band imaging (NBI), i-Scan, flexible spectral chromoendoscopy and blue laser imaging. Out of the four techniques, NBI has been extensively evaluated for the detection and characterization of dysplasia in colonic polyps and dysplasia associated with inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we...

  2. Note: An improved 3D imaging system for electron-electron coincidence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yun Fei; Lee, Suk Kyoung; Adhikari, Pradip; Herath, Thushani; Lingenfelter, Steven; Winney, Alexander H.; Li, Wen, E-mail: wli@chem.wayne.edu [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate an improved imaging system that can achieve highly efficient 3D detection of two electrons in coincidence. The imaging system is based on a fast frame complementary metal-oxide semiconductor camera and a high-speed waveform digitizer. We have shown previously that this detection system is capable of 3D detection of ions and electrons with good temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we show that with a new timing analysis algorithm, this system can achieve an unprecedented dead-time (<0.7 ns) and dead-space (<1 mm) when detecting two electrons. A true zero dead-time detection is also demonstrated.

  3. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions and image interpretation in transmission electron mic­ roscopy. The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Munster and is a revised version of the first part of my earlier book Elek­ tronenmikroskopische Untersuchungs- und Priiparationsmethoden, omitting the part which describes specimen-preparation methods. In the introductory chapter, the different types of electron microscope are compared, the various electron-specimen interactions and their applications are summarized and the most important aspects of high-resolution, analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy are discussed. The optics of electron lenses is discussed in Chapter 2 in order to bring out electron-lens properties that are important for an understanding of the function of an electron microscope. In Chapter 3, the wave optics of elec­ trons and the phase shifts by electrostatic and magnetic fields are introduced; Fresne...

  4. Signal Processing of Secondary Electron Images in SEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Libor; Müllerová, Ilona

    Prague: Czechoslovak Microscopy Society, 2007 - (Nebesářová, J.; Hozák, P.), s. 99-100 ISBN 978-80-239-9397-4. [Multinational Congress on Microscopy /8./. Prague (CZ), 17.06.2007-21.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/05/2327 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : signal processing * secondary electron images * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  5. Determining the effective electron density of hip prosthesis using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of determining the effective electron density of hip prostheses using a scanning liquid ionization chamber (SLIC) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is described. The method involves establishing an empirical relationship between the pixel intensity values (extracted from a portal image) and the corresponding equivalent thickness of an inhomogeneity such as a hip prosthesis. This is done using a composite phantom made of polystyrene with embedded inhomogeneities of aluminum, copper and lead. Results for 6 and 10 MV photons show that the relationship depends on the characteristics of the imaging device and on the photon energy, provided the atomic number (Z) of the inhomogeneity is sufficiently low such that the Compton effect remains the dominant photon interaction. The portal images of a pelvic phantom with prosthesis were then used to provide x-ray attenuation information, which allowed the determination of the equivalent path length containing the inhomogeneity and, therefore, its effective electron density. (author)

  6. Low-Temperature Scanning Capacitance Probe for Imaging Electron Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel techniques to probe electronic properties at the nanoscale can shed light on the physics of nanoscale devices. In particular, studying the scattering of electrons from edges and apertures at the nanoscale and imaging the electron profile in a quantum dot, have been of interest [1]. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a cooled scanning capacitance probe that operates at liquid He temperatures to image electron waves in nanodevices. The conducting tip of a scanned probe microscope is held above the nanoscale structure, and an applied sample-to-tip voltage creates an image charge that is measured by a cooled charge amplifier [2] adjacent to the tip. The circuit is based on a low-capacitance, high- electron-mobility transistor (Fujitsu FHX35X). The input is a capacitance bridge formed by a low capacitance pinched-off HEMT transistor and tip-sample capacitance. We have achieved low noise level (0.13 e/VHz) and high spatial resolution (100 nm) for this technique, which promises to be a useful tool to study electronic behavior in nanoscale devices

  7. Development of a new electronic neutron imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electronic neutron imaging camera system was developed for use with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons in applications that include nondestructive inspection of explosives, corrosion, turbine blades, electronics, low Z components, etc. The neutron images are expected to provide information to supplement that available from X-ray tests. The primary camera image area was a 30x30 cm field-of-view with a spatial resolution approaching 1.6 line pairs/mm (lp/mm). The camera had a remotely changeable second lens to limit the field-of-view to 7.6x7.6 cm for high spatial resolution (at least 4 lp/mm) thermal neutron imaging, but neutron and light scatter will limit resolution for fast neutrons to about 0.5 lp/mm. Remote focus capability enhanced camera set-up for optimum operation. The 75 dB dynamic range camera system included 6Li-based screens for imaging of thermal and epithermal neutrons and ZnS(Ag)-based screens for fast neutron imaging. The fast optics was input to a Super S-25 Gen II image intensifier, fiber optically coupled to a 1134 (h)x486 (v) frame transfer CCD camera. The camera system was designed to be compatible with a Navy-sponsored accelerator neutron source. The planned neutron source is an RF quadrupole accelerator that will provide a fast neutron flux of 107 n/cm2-s (at a source distance of 1 m) at an energy of about 2.2 MeV and a thermal neutron flux of 106 n/cm2-s at a source L/D ratio of 30. The electronic camera produced good quality real-time images at these neutron levels. On-chip integration could be used to improve image quality for low flux situations. The camera and accelerator combination provided a useful non-reactor neutron inspection system

  8. A secondary electron imaging system for a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A secondary electron imaging system has been developed to provide an efficient means of identifying the position of the beam spot on specimens analysed with the Harwell nuclear microprobe facility. Conventional signal processing is used to improve the image quality, and in addition a dividing circuit is used to reduce the effects of time variation of the accelerator beam current intensity. Images have been obtained with proton beams of energies 1.5 MeV and 2.8 MeV on a variety of specimens and good contrast is possible using beam currents as low as 200 pA. (Auth.)

  9. Interlinking backscatter, grain size and benthic community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, Chris; Collier, Jenny S.

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between acoustic backscatter, sediment grain size and benthic community structure is examined using three different quantitative methods, covering image- and angular response-based approaches. Multibeam time-series backscatter (300 kHz) data acquired in 2008 off the coast of East Anglia (UK) are compared with grain size properties, macrofaunal abundance and biomass from 130 Hamon and 16 Clamshell grab samples. Three predictive methods are used: 1) image-based (mean backscatter intensity); 2) angular response-based (predicted mean grain size), and 3) image-based (1st principal component and classification) from Quester Tangent Corporation Multiview software. Relationships between grain size and backscatter are explored using linear regression. Differences in grain size and benthic community structure between acoustically defined groups are examined using ANOVA and PERMANOVA+. Results for the Hamon grab stations indicate significant correlations between measured mean grain size and mean backscatter intensity, angular response predicted mean grain size, and 1st principal component of QTC analysis (all p response predicted mean grain size (r2 = 0.692; p response predicted grain size (p < 0.001), and QTC class (p = 0.009). Mean grain size (Clamshell) shows a significant difference between groups for mean backscatter (p = 0.001); other methods were not significant. PERMANOVA for the Hamon abundance shows benthic community structure was significantly different between acoustic groups for all methods (p ≤ 0.001). Overall these results show considerable promise in that more than 60% of the variance in the mean grain size of the Clamshell grab samples can be explained by mean backscatter or acoustically-predicted grain size. These results show that there is significant predictive capacity for sediment characteristics from multibeam backscatter and that these acoustic classifications can have ecological validity.

  10. Ultrasonic Backscattering from Suspended Erythrocytes: Dependence on Frequency and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ihyuan

    The ultrasonic scattering properties of blood have been intensively investigated since the echo signal from red blood cells carries abundant diagnostic information for the study of blood flow and blood properties in the vessels. Recently, ultrasound of frequency higher than 20 MHz has been implemented in intravascular imaging to obtain better images of the vessel wall. In this research measurements were extended to 30 MHz to better understand the effect of blood on the operation of these intravascular devices. The experimentally measured backscatter of saline suspended porcine erythrocytes for frequency up to 30 MHz agrees very well with the theoretical analysis which indicate that Rayleigh scattering is still valid below this frequency. The analysis utilize the T-matrix method to calculate the backscattering cross section of an erythrocyte modeled as a fluid sphere, disk, and biconcave disk. Measurements on the backscattering coefficients of porcine, bovine, and lamb erythrocytes reveal that the backscatter has a square dependence on cell volume. The cell size dependent backscatter is also analyzed via a continuum approach. It is found that the echo intensity of high frequency ultrasound suffers greatly from the attenuation. The dilemma may be solved by using a spherically focused transducer. An analysis of the focused beam reflected from a perfect planar reflector leads to the modification of the standard substitution method for the backscatter measurement since the "image source" theory is found to be inappropriate for the focused beam. Reflection of the focused beam near the focal point is described based on Huygens' principle. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that the backscatter is dependent upon the position of the scatterer and the geometry of the transducer if a focused beam is used. Since ultrasound velocity information is needed for scattering measurements, an innovative method for measuring the acoustic speed and the attenuation coefficient

  11. Development of a new electronic neutron imaging system

    CERN Document Server

    Brenizer, J S; Gibbs, K M; Mengers, P; Stebbings, C T; Polansky, D; Rogerson, D J

    1999-01-01

    An electronic neutron imaging camera system was developed for use with thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons in applications that include nondestructive inspection of explosives, corrosion, turbine blades, electronics, low Z components, etc. The neutron images are expected to provide information to supplement that available from X-ray tests. The primary camera image area was a 30x30 cm field-of-view with a spatial resolution approaching 1.6 line pairs/mm (lp/mm). The camera had a remotely changeable second lens to limit the field-of-view to 7.6x7.6 cm for high spatial resolution (at least 4 lp/mm) thermal neutron imaging, but neutron and light scatter will limit resolution for fast neutrons to about 0.5 lp/mm. Remote focus capability enhanced camera set-up for optimum operation. The 75 dB dynamic range camera system included sup 6 Li-based screens for imaging of thermal and epithermal neutrons and ZnS(Ag)-based screens for fast neutron imaging. The fast optics was input to a Super S-25 Gen II image intensifi...

  12. Imaging of tissue sections with very slow electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, L., E-mail: ludek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Nebesářová, J.; Vancová, M. [Biology Centre AS CR, v.v.i., Branišovská 31, 37005 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Paták, A.; Müllerová, I. [Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    The examination of thin sections of tissues with electron microscopes is an indispensable tool. Being composed of light elements, samples of living matter illuminated with electrons at the usual high energies of tens or even hundreds of kiloelectronvolts provide very low image contrasts in transmission or scanning transmission electron microscopes. Therefore, heavy metal salts are added to the specimen during preparation procedures (post-fixation with osmium tetroxide or staining). However, these procedures can modify or obscure the ultrastructural details of cells. Here we show that the energy of electrons used for the scanned transmission imaging of tissue sections can be reduced to mere hundreds or even tens of electronvolts and can produce extremely high contrast even for samples free of any metal salts. We found that when biasing a sufficiently thin tissue section sample to a high negative potential in a scanning transmission electron microscope, thereby reducing the energy of the electrons landing on the sample, and collecting the transmitted electrons with a grounded detector, we obtain a high contrast revealing structure details not enhanced by heavy atoms. Moreover, bombardment with slow electrons sensitively depolymerises the resin in which the tissue is embedded, thereby enhancing the transmitted signal with no observable loss of structure details. The use of low-energy electrons requires ultrathin sections of a thickness of less than 10 nm, but their preparation is now possible. Ultralow energy STEM provides a tool enabling the observation of very thin biological samples without any staining. This method should also be advantageous for examination of 2D crystals, thin films of polymers, polymer blends, etc. - Highlights: • Sections of a thickness below 10 nm were imaged in STEM at hundreds and tens of eV. • Image contrast grows steeply with decreasing electron energy in the STEM. • Very slow electrons provide high contrast for samples free of

  13. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, I. G. J. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Donne, A. J. H. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Park, H. K. [POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Munsat, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  14. Electronic roentgenographic images in presurgical X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An essential part of radiation exposure in surgery is due to devices and results from the required radiation time interval for continuous X-ray play-back up to the point at which all diagnostically relevant information can be retrieved from the screening image. With single-image storage and short exposure times as well as instant image play-back, this superfluous i.e. redundant radiation can be avoided. The electronic X-ray image is realized by means of a laboratory prototype and evaluated in hospitals. There is a report on clinical results and new technical developments. Remarkable are: the high radiation reduction that could be obtained, the problem - free instant image technique, and especially the advantages of automated exposure in direct film settings. The positive results yield the basis for the product development. (orig./MG)

  15. Image process in imaging through a scattering medium using fs electronic holography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯比学; 陈国夫

    1999-01-01

    Aimed at imaging technology through scattering medium using fs electronic holography, a set of image process algorithm is put forward. This algorithm can be divided into three stages. First, every hologram is pre-processed, whose contrast is enhanced. Second, the first-order spatial spectrum is low-pass-filtered through a two-step process, so that high-frequency noise can be removed. Finally, many reconstructed images are ensemble-averaged. This stage can smooth random noise and is advantageous to restraining the speckle noise of image. The operation of this algorithm shows that all of processes in the three stages have obvious effects on improving image quality.

  16. Characterization of SEM speckle pattern marking and imaging distortion by Digital Image Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Guery, Adrien; Latourte, Felix; Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Surface patterning by e-beam lithography and SEM imaging distortions are studied via digital image correlation. The global distortions from the reference pattern, which has been numerically generated, are first quantified from a digital image correlation procedure between the (virtual) reference pattern and the actual SEM image both in secondary and backscattered electron imaging modes. These distortions result from both patterning and imaging techniques. These two contributions can be separa...

  17. A Document Imaging Technique for Implementing Electronic Loan Approval Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manikandan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The image processing is one of the leading technologies of computer applications. Image processing is a type of signal processing, the input for image processor is an image or video frame and the output will be an image or subset of image [1]. Computer graphics and computer vision process uses an image processing techniques. Image processing systems are used in various environments like medical fields, computer-aided design (CAD, research fields, crime investigation fields and military fields. In this paper, we proposed a document image processing technique, for establishing electronic loan approval process (E-LAP [2]. Loan approval process has been tedious process, the E-LAP system attempts to reduce the complexity of loan approval process. Customers have to login to fill the loan application form online with all details and submit the form. The loan department then processes the submitted form and then sends an acknowledgement mail via the E-LAP to the requested customer with the details about list of documents required for the loan approval process [3]. The approaching customer can upload the scanned copies of all required documents. All this interaction between customer and bank take place using an E-LAP system.

  18. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm;

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present...

  19. 77 FR 38829 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade..., telephone (202) 205-1802. Authority: The authority for institution of this investigation is contained...

  20. Conductive resins improve charging and resolution of acquired images in electron microscopic volume imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Huy Bang Nguyen; Truc Quynh Thai; Sei Saitoh; Bao Wu; Yurika Saitoh; Satoshi Shimo; Hiroshi Fujitani; Hirohide Otobe; Nobuhiko Ohno

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in serial block-face imaging using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have enabled the rapid and efficient acquisition of 3-dimensional (3D) ultrastructural information from a large volume of biological specimens including brain tissues. However, volume imaging under SEM is often hampered by sample charging, and typically requires specific sample preparation to reduce charging and increase image contrast. In the present study, we introduced carbon-based conductive resins for 3...

  1. Analysis of backscattered ultrasound amplitude of Ti-5.8Al-4Sn-3.5Zr-0.7Nb-0.5Mo-0.3Si samples in terms of their microstructures and local textures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amplitudes of backscattered ultrasound were measured at 10 MHz on different samples of the near-α titanium alloy Ti-5.8Al-4Sn-3.5Zr-0.7Nb-0.5Mo-0.3Si. Orientation imaging maps (OIMs) of these samples were also determined by electron backscatter diffraction. The backscattered amplitude appears to be related to the microstructure, notably to the orientations, volume fractions and spatial distribution of specific zones. These zones, named macrozones, are formed with a majority of primary αp grains and secondary αs colonies having nearly a common crystallographic axis. To illustrate the role of the microstructure on wave propagation, the local elastic constants determining the velocities of the longitudinal ultrasonic waves were deduced from the OIMs. The analysis of the spatial distribution and variations of the elastic constants explains the observed variations in backscattered ultrasound amplitude

  2. Time-resolved tomographic images of a relativistic electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, H.A.; Jacoby, B.A.; Nelson, M.

    1984-07-01

    We obtained a sequential series of time-resolved tomographic two-dimensional images of a 4.5-MeV, 6-kA, 30-ns electron beam. Three linear fiber-optic arrays of 30 or 60 fibers each were positioned around the beam axis at 0/sup 0/, 61/sup 0/, and 117/sup 0/. The beam interacting with nitrogen at 20 Torr emitted light that was focused onto the fiber arrays and transmitted to a streak camera where the data were recorded on film. The film was digitized, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using the maximum-entropy tomographic technique. These images were then combined to produce an ultra-high-speed movie of the electron-beam pulse.

  3. Nanodiamond Landmarks for Subcellular Multimodal Optical and Electron Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zurbuchen, Mark A; Kohan, Sirus A; Leung, Belinda; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for biolabels that can be used in both optical and electron microscopies, are non-cytotoxic, and do not photobleach. Such biolabels could enable targeted nanoscale imaging of sub-cellular structures, and help to establish correlations between conjugation-delivered biomolecules and function. Here we demonstrate a subcellular multi-modal imaging methodology that enables localization of inert particulate probes, consisting of nanodiamonds having fluorescent nitrogen-vacancy centers. These are functionalized to target specific structures, and are observable by both optical and electron microscopies. Nanodiamonds targeted to the nuclear pore complex are rapidly localized in electron-microscopy diffraction mode to enable "zooming-in" to regions of interest for detailed structural investigations. Optical microscopies reveal nanodiamonds for in-vitro tracking or uptake-confirmation. The approach is general, works down to the single nanodiamond level, and can leverage the unique capabilities of...

  4. Analysis of patient setup accuracy using electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is performed in many fractions, and accurate patient setup is very important. This is more significant nowadays because treatment planning and radiation therapy are more precisely performed. Electronic portal imaging devices and automatic image comparison algorithms let us analyze setup deviations quantitatively. With such in mind we developed a simple image comparison algorithm. Using 2459 electronic verification images (335 ports, 123 treatment sites) generated during the past three years at our institute, we evaluated the results of the algorithm, and analyzed setup deviations according to the area irradiated, use of a fixing device (shell), and arm position. Calculated setup deviation was verified visually and their fitness was classified into good, fair, bad, and incomplete. The result was 40%, 14%, 22%, 24% respectively. Using calculated deviations classified as good (994 images), we analyzed setup deviations. Overall setup deviations described in 1 SD along axes x, y, z, was 1.9 mm, 2.5 mm, 1.7 mm respectively. We classified these deviations into systematic and random components, and found that random error was predominant in our institute. The setup deviations along axis y (cranio-caudal direction) showed larger distribution when treatment was performed with the shell. Deviations along y (cranio-caudal) and z (anterior-posterior) had larger distribution when treatment occurred with the patient's arm elevated. There was a significant time-trend error, whose deviations become greater with time. Within all evaluated ports, 30% showed a time-trend error. Using an electronic portal imaging device and automatic image comparison algorithm, we are able to analyze setup deviations more precisely and improve setup method based on objective criteria. (author)

  5. Understanding the radar backscattering from flooded and nonflooded Amazonian forests: results from canopy backscatter modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the potential of using multiwavelength imaging radars to detect flooding in Amazonian floodplain forests, we simulated the radar backscatter from a floodplain forest with a flooded or nonflooded ground condition at C-, L-, and P-bands. Field measurements of forest structure in the Anavilhanas archipelago of the Negro River, Brazil, were used as inputs to the model. Given the same wavelength or incidence angle, the ratio of backscatter from the flooded forest to that from the nonflooded forest was higher at HH polarization than at VV polarization. Given the same wavelength or polarization, the ratio was larger at small incidence angles than at large incidence angles. Given the same polarization or incidence angle, the ratio was larger at a long wavelength than at a short wavelength. As the surface soil moisture underneath the nonflooded forest increased from 10% to 50% of volumetric moisture, the flooded/nonflooded backscatter ratio decreased; the decreases were small at C- and L-band but large at P-band. When the leaf size was comparable to or larger than the wavelength of C-band, the leaf area index (LAI) had a large effect on the simulated C-band (not L-band or P-band) backscatter from the flooded and nonflooded forests. (author)

  6. Characterization of SEM speckle pattern marking and imaging distortion by digital image correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface patterning by e-beam lithography and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging distortions are studied via digital image correlation. The global distortions from the reference pattern, which has been numerically generated, are first quantified from a digital image correlation procedure between the (virtual) reference pattern and the actual SEM image both in secondary and backscattered electron imaging modes. These distortions result from both patterning and imaging techniques. These two contributions can be separated (without resorting to an external caliper) based on the images of the same patterned surface acquired at different orientations. Patterning distortions are much smaller than those due to imaging on wide field images. (paper)

  7. Electron temperature fluctuation in the HT-7 tokamak plasma observed by electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiao-Yuan; Wang Jun; Yu Yi; Wen Yi-Zhi; Yu Chang-Xuan; Liu Wan-Dong; Wan Bao-Nian; Gao Xiang; N. C. Luhmann; C. W. Domier; Jian Wang; Z. G. Xia; Zuowei Shen

    2009-01-01

    The fluctuation of the electron temperature has been measured by using the electron cyclotron emission imaging in the Hefei Tokamak-7 (HT-7) plasma. The electron temperature fluctuation with a broadband spectrum shows that it propagates in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, and the mean poloidal wave-number kg is calculated to be about 1.58 cm-1, or keps ≈0.34. It indicates that the fluctuation should come from the electron drift wave turbulence. The linear global scaling of the electron temperature fluctuation with the gradient of electron temperature is consistent with the mixing length scale qualitatively. Evolution of spectrum of the fluctuation during the sawtooth oscillation phases is investigated, and the fluctuation is found to increase with the gradient of electron temperature increasing during most phases of the sawtooth oscillation. The results indicate that the electron temperature gradient is probably the driver of the fluctuation enhancement. The steady heat flux driven by electron temperature fluctuation is estimated and compared with the results from power balance estimation.

  8. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-03-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. SCANNING 38:148-163, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26235517

  9. Quantitative analysis of mouse corpus callosum from electron microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. West

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides morphometric analysis of 72 electron microscopy images from control (n=4 and hypomyelinated (n=2 mouse corpus callosum. Measures of axon diameter and g-ratio were tabulated across all brains from two regions of the corpus callosum and a non-linear relationship between axon diameter and g-ratio was observed. These data are related to the accompanying research article comparing multiple methods of measuring g-ratio entitled ‘A revised model for estimating g-ratio from MRI’ (West et al., NeuroImage, 2015.

  10. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  11. Pico-femtosecond image-tube photography in quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of experimental achievement of the time resolution of image-converter tubes (ICTs) corresponding to the theoretical limit of 10 fs is considered as applied to quantum electronics problems. A new generation of ICTs with a temporal resolution of 200 - 500 fs has been developed for recording femtosecond laser radiation. The entirely new devices based on time-analysing ICTs such as femtosecond photoelectronic diffractometers, have been created for studying the dynamics of phase transitions in substances using diffrac-tion of electrons with energies ranging from 20 to 40 keV. (femtosecond technologies)

  12. NANA1M.TIF - Anacapa Island Reserve sidescan sonar backscatter image in nearshore Benthic Habitat mapping Project S. California map Series. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The sidescan sonar image of the nearshore seafloor (0 to 100 m water depths) of the Big Sycamore reserve area was mosaicked from data collected in 1998. A Klein...

  13. SANP1M.TIF - South Anacapa Passage sidescan sonar backscatter image in nearshore Benthic Habitat mapping Project S. California map Series. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The sidescan sonar image of the nearshore seafloor (0 to 100 m water depths) of the southern Anacapa Passage area was mosaicked from data collected in 1999 and...

  14. SECRU1M.TIF - Southeast Santa Cruz sidescan sonar backscatter image in nearshore Benthic Habitat mapping Project S. California map Series. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The sidescan sonar image of the nearshore seafloor (0 to 100 m water depths) of the Southeast Santa Cruz area was mosaicked from data collected in 1999. A Klein...

  15. SANA1M.TIF - South Anacapa Island sidescan sonar backscatter image in nearshore Benthic Habitat mapping Project S. California map Series. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The sidescan sonar image of the nearshore seafloor (0 to 100 m water depths) of the South Anacapa area was mosaicked from data collected in 1999 and 2000. A Klein...

  16. NANP1M.TIF - North Anacapa Passage sidescan sonar backscatter image in nearshore Benthic Habitat mapping Project S. California map Series. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The sidescan sonar image of the nearshore seafloor (0 to 100 m water depths) of the North Anacapa Passage area was mosaicked from data collected in 2000. A Klein...

  17. BSYC1M.TIF - Big Sycamore Reserve sidescan sonar backscatter image in the Nearshore Benthic Habitat Mapping Project S. California map series. (UTM 11N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The sidescan sonar image of the nearshore seafloor (0 to 100 m water depths) of the Big Sycamore reserve area was mosaicked from data collected in 1998. A Klein...

  18. Revealing Dissociative Electron Attachment Dynamics in Polyatomic Molecules Using Momentum Imaging Experiments and Electron Scattering Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacem, Ali; Slaughter, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Understanding electron-driven chemical reactions is important for improving a variety of technological applications such as materials processing and the important role they play in the radiation damage in bulk matter. Furthermore, dissociative electron attachment often exhibits site-selective bond cleavage, which holds promise for prediction and precise control of electron-driven chemical reactions. Recent dynamical studies of these reactions have demonstrated that an understanding of anion dissociation dynamics beyond simple one-dimensional models is crucial in interpreting the measured fragment angular distributions. We combine ion fragment momentum imaging experiments with electron attachment entrance amplitude calculations to interrogate the non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics of dissociative electron attachment in polyatomic molecules. We will report recent experimental developments in molecules of technological interest including methanol, methane and uracil. Work supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  19. Flux maximization techniques for compton backscatter depth profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, L

    1993-01-01

    Resolution in x-ray backscatter imaging has often been hampered by low fluxes. But, for a given set of resolution requirements and geometric constraints, it is possible to define a maximization problem in the geometric parameters for which the solution is the maximum flux possible in those circumstances. In this way, resolution in noncritical directions can be traded for improved resolution in a desired direction. Making this the thickness, or surface normal direction, makes practicable the depth profiling of layered structures. Such techniques were applied to the problem of imaging the layered structure of corroding aircraft sheet metal joints using Compton backscatter. PMID:21307450

  20. High resolution fluorescent bio-imaging with electron beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru

    2014-11-01

    We have developed electron beam excitation assisted (EXA) optical microscope[1-3], and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.Figure 1(a) shows schematic diagram of the proposed EXA microscope. An electron beam is focused on a luminescent film. A specimen is put on the luminescent film directly. The inset in Fig. 1(a) shows magnified image of the luminescent film and the specimen. Nanometric light source is excited in the luminescent film by the focused electron beam. The nanometric light source illuminates the specimen, and the scattered or transmitted radiation is detected with a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The light source is scanned by scanning of the focused electron beam in order to construct on image. Figure 1(b) shows a luminescence image of the cells acquired with the EXA microscope, and Fig. 1(c) shows a phase contrast microscope image. Cells were observed in culture solution without any treatments, such as fixation and drying. The shape of each cell was clearly recognized and some bright spots were observed in cells. We believe that the bright spots indicated with arrows were auto-fluorescence of intracellular granules and light- grey regions were auto-fluorescence of cell membranes. It is clearly demonstrated that the EXA microscope is useful tool for observation of living biological cells in physiological conditions.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i

  1. Electron microscopy imaging of proteins on gallium phosphide semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, Martin; Bauer, Mikael; Gunnarsson, Stefan; Mårsell, Erik; Zakharov, Alexei A.; Karlsson, Gunnel; Sanfins, Elodie; Prinz, Christelle N.; Wallenberg, Reine; Cedervall, Tommy; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2016-02-01

    We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the laminin conformation on the NWs. In blood plasma, an intermediate sized corona around the NWs indicates a corona with a mixture of plasma proteins. The ability to directly visualize proteins on nanostructures in situ holds great promise for assessing the conformation and thickness of the protein corona, which is key to understanding and predicting the properties of engineered nanomaterials in a biological environment.We have imaged GaP nanowires (NWs) incubated with human laminin, serum albumin (HSA), and blood plasma using both cryo-transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy. This extensive imaging methodology simultaneously reveals structural, chemical and morphological details of individual nanowires and the adsorbed proteins. We found that the proteins bind to NWs, forming coronas with thicknesses close to the proteins' hydrodynamic diameters. We could directly image how laminin is extending from the NWs, maximizing the number of proteins bound to the NWs. NWs incubated with both laminin and HSA show protein coronas with a similar appearance to NWs incubated with laminin alone, indicating that the presence of HSA does not affect the

  2. Application of FPGA's in Flexible Analogue Electronic Image Generator Design

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Kulla; Stefan Slavik; Josef Huska

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on usage of the FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) Xilinx as a part of our more complex work dedicated to design of flexible analogue electronic images generator for application in TV measurement technique or/and TV service technique or/and education process. The FPGAs performs here the role of component colour R, G, B, synchronization and blanking signals source. These signals are next processed and amplified in other parts of the generator as NTSC/PAL source ...

  3. Precision crystal alignment for high-resolution electron microscope imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the more difficult tasks involved in obtaining quality high-resolution electron micrographs is the precise alignment of a specimen into the required zone. The current accepted procedure, which involves changing to diffraction mode and searching for symmetric point diffraction pattern, is insensitive to small amounts of misalignment and at best qualitative. On-line analysis of the fourier space representation of the image, both for determining and correcting crystal tilt, is investigated. 8 refs., 42 figs

  4. The CASSIOPE/e-POP Suprathermal Electron Imager (SEI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Cameron, T. G.; Enno, G. A.; Howarth, A.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-06-01

    The Suprathermal Electron Imager (SEI) on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) experiment uses a microchannel-plate-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) detector to record two-dimensional, energy-angle images of electron distributions for energies up to 350 eV. Alternatively, the SEI can be biased to measure positive ions at energies that include the ambient ionospheric population (rate of 100 images per second. The SEI's field of view is 360∘×±4∘, and includes viewing of the nadir and ram directions, nominally. At high latitude the nominal orientation allows coverage of most pitch angles. The SEI is included on e-POP to address the mission's principal scientific objectives, the first being to characterize polar ion outflow and its drivers including ambipolar electric fields generated by suprathermal electron populations, and direct energization of ions by plasma waves or through frictional heating. In addition, the SEI's focus on low energies and high time resolution allows a unique view of suprathermal particle populations and their role in wave-particle interactions, in support of e-POP's second scientific objective: to study plasma waves and wave propagation in the high-latitude ionosphere. Observations taken within geophysically quiet regions indicate that the instrument can track bulk ion flow velocity with a resolution of order 25 m/s or better.

  5. Analysis of forest backscattering characteristics based on polarization coherence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to make an inventory of vertical profiles of forest structure parameters in field measurements.However,analysis and understanding of forest backscattering characteristics contribute to estimation and detection of forest vertical structure because of the close relationships between backscattering characteristics and structure parameters.The vertical structure function in the complex interferometric coherence definition,which represents the vertical variation of microwave scattering with the penetration depth at a point in the 2-D radar image and can be used to analyze the forest backscattering characteristics,can be reconstructed from polarization coherence tomography(PCT).Based on PCT,the paper analyzes the forest backscattering characteristics and explores the inherent relationship between the result of PCT and the forest structure parameters from numerical simulation of Random Volume over Ground model(RVoG),Polarimetric SAR interferometry(PolInSAR)simulation of forest scene and PolInSAR data at L-band of the test site Traunstein.Firstly,the effects of the extinction coefficient and surface-to-volume scattering ratio in RVoG model on vertical backscattering characteristics are analyzed by means of numerical simulation.Secondly,by applying PCT to L-band POLInSAR simulations of forest scene,different variations of vertical backscattering due to different extinction coefficients and the ratios of surface-to-volume scattering resulting from different polarizations,forest types and densities are displayed and analyzed.Then a concept of relative average backscattering intensity is presented,and the factors which affect its vertical distribution are also discussed.Preliminary results show that there is high sensitivity of the vertical distribution of forest relative average backscattering intensity to the polarization,forest type and density.Finally,based on repeat pass DLR E-SAR L-band airborne POLInSAR data,the capability of PCT technology for detection

  6. Low energy electron point source microscopy: beyond imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Andre; Goelzhaeuser, Armin [Physics of Supramolecular Systems and Surfaces, University of Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    Low energy electron point source (LEEPS) microscopy has the capability to record in-line holograms at very high magnifications with a fairly simple set-up. After the holograms are numerically reconstructed, structural features with the size of about 2 nm can be resolved. The achievement of an even higher resolution has been predicted. However, a number of obstacles are known to impede the realization of this goal, for example the presence of electric fields around the imaged object, electrostatic charging or radiation induced processes. This topical review gives an overview of the achievements as well as the difficulties in the efforts to shift the resolution limit of LEEPS microscopy towards the atomic level. A special emphasis is laid on the high sensitivity of low energy electrons to electrical fields, which limits the structural determination of the imaged objects. On the other hand, the investigation of the electrical field around objects of known structure is very useful for other tasks and LEEPS microscopy can be extended beyond the task of imaging. The determination of the electrical resistance of individual nanowires can be achieved by a proper analysis of the corresponding LEEPS micrographs. This conductivity imaging may be a very useful application for LEEPS microscopes. (topical review)

  7. The use of combined three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis to assess the characteristics of the gamma/gamma-prime microstructure in alloy 720Li Trade-Mark-Sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Child, D.J., E-mail: d.child@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); West, G.D., E-mail: g.west@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Thomson, R.C., E-mail: r.c.thomson@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Multiple three-dimensional reconstructions of a {gamma}/{gamma} Prime phase structure in Alloy 720Li have been carried out by employing a serial milling technique with simultaneous electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis data collection. Combining EBSD data with EDX is critical in obtaining maps to distinguish between the chemically differing, but crystallographically similar {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phases present in the alloy studied. EDX is shown to allow the differentiation of {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phases, with EBSD providing increased grain shape accuracy. The combination of data sources also allowed identification of coherent {gamma}/{gamma} Prime phase interfaces that would not be identified using solely EBSD or EDX. The study identifies a region of grain banding within the alloy, which provides the basis for a three-dimensional comparison and discussion of {gamma} Prime phase size between coarse and fine grain regions, whilst also identifying coherent {gamma} Prime phase interfaces, possible only using both EDX and EBSD systems simultaneously. The majority of the {gamma} Prime phase lies in the range of 1-10 {mu}m in non-banded regions, with a detectable particle size limit of 500 nm being established. The validity of the reconstruction has been demonstrated using an electron interaction volumes model, and an assessment of the validity of EBSD and EDX data sources is discussed showing {gamma} Prime phase connectivity in all dimensions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of combined EBSD/EDX for the 3D analysis of gamma prime in a Ni-based alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of 3D reconstruction accuracy using CASINO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observation and validation of gamma prime phase connectivity throughout the alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification and characterisation of grain banding in gamma prime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Distinction of phase coherency

  8. The use of combined three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analysis to assess the characteristics of the gamma/gamma-prime microstructure in alloy 720Li™

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple three-dimensional reconstructions of a γ/γ′ phase structure in Alloy 720Li have been carried out by employing a serial milling technique with simultaneous electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis data collection. Combining EBSD data with EDX is critical in obtaining maps to distinguish between the chemically differing, but crystallographically similar γ and γ′ phases present in the alloy studied. EDX is shown to allow the differentiation of γ and γ′ phases, with EBSD providing increased grain shape accuracy. The combination of data sources also allowed identification of coherent γ/γ′ phase interfaces that would not be identified using solely EBSD or EDX. The study identifies a region of grain banding within the alloy, which provides the basis for a three-dimensional comparison and discussion of γ′ phase size between coarse and fine grain regions, whilst also identifying coherent γ′ phase interfaces, possible only using both EDX and EBSD systems simultaneously. The majority of the γ′ phase lies in the range of 1–10 μm in non-banded regions, with a detectable particle size limit of 500 nm being established. The validity of the reconstruction has been demonstrated using an electron interaction volumes model, and an assessment of the validity of EBSD and EDX data sources is discussed showing γ′ phase connectivity in all dimensions. -- Highlights: ► Use of combined EBSD/EDX for the 3D analysis of gamma prime in a Ni-based alloy. ► Assessment of 3D reconstruction accuracy using CASINO. ► Observation and validation of gamma prime phase connectivity throughout the alloy. ► Identification and characterisation of grain banding in gamma prime. ► Distinction of phase coherency between gamma and gamma prime.

  9. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  10. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  11. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa M. Hirvonen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications.

  12. Advanced electron crystallography through model-based imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aert, Sandra; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T; den Dekker, Arnold J; Van Dyck, Dirk; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2016-01-01

    The increasing need for precise determination of the atomic arrangement of non-periodic structures in materials design and the control of nanostructures explains the growing interest in quantitative transmission electron microscopy. The aim is to extract precise and accurate numbers for unknown structure parameters including atomic positions, chemical concentrations and atomic numbers. For this purpose, statistical parameter estimation theory has been shown to provide reliable results. In this theory, observations are considered purely as data planes, from which structure parameters have to be determined using a parametric model describing the images. As such, the positions of atom columns can be measured with a precision of the order of a few picometres, even though the resolution of the electron microscope is still one or two orders of magnitude larger. Moreover, small differences in average atomic number, which cannot be distinguished visually, can be quantified using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images. In addition, this theory allows one to measure compositional changes at interfaces, to count atoms with single-atom sensitivity, and to reconstruct atomic structures in three dimensions. This feature article brings the reader up to date, summarizing the underlying theory and highlighting some of the recent applications of quantitative model-based transmisson electron microscopy. PMID:26870383

  13. Low-voltage coherent electron imaging based on a single-atom electron

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Wei-Tse; Hsu, Wei-Hao; Chang, Mu-Tung; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2015-01-01

    It has been a general trend to develop low-voltage electron microscopes due to their high imaging contrast of the sample and low radiation damage. Atom-resolved transmission electron microscopes with voltages as low as 15-40 kV have been demonstrated. However, achieving atomic resolution at voltages lower than 10 kV is extremely difficult. An alternative approach is coherent imaging or phase retrieval imaging, which requires a sufficiently coherent source and an adequately small detection area on the sample as well as the detection of high-angle diffracted patterns with a sufficient resolution. In this work, we propose several transmission-type schemes to achieve coherent imaging of thin materials (less than 5 nm thick) with atomic resolution at voltages lower than 10 kV. Experimental schemes of both lens-less and lens-containing designs are presented and the advantages and challenges of these schemes are discussed. Preliminary results based on a highly coherent single-atom electron source are presented. The ...

  14. Physical characteristics of a commercial electronic portal imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althof, V G; de Boer, J C; Huizenga, H; Stroom, J C; Visser, A G; Swanenburg, B N

    1996-11-01

    An electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for use in radiotherapy with high energy photons has been under development since 1985 and has been in clinical use since 1988. The x-ray detector consists of a metal plate/fluorescent screen combination, which is monitored by a charge-coupled device (CDD)-camera. This paper discusses the physical quantities governing image quality. A model which describes the signal and noise propagation through the detector is presented. The predicted contrasts and signal-to-noise ratios are found to be in agreement with measurements based on the EPID images. Based on this agreement the visibility of low contrast structures in clinical images has been calculated with the model. Sufficient visibility of relevant structures (4-10 mm water-equivalent thickness) has been obtained down to a delivered dose of 4 cGy at dose maximum. It is found that the described system is not limited by quantum noise but by camera read-out noise. In addition we predict that with a new type of CCD sensor the signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by a factor of 5 at small doses, enabling high quality imaging, for most relevant clinical situations, with a patient dose smaller than 4 cGy. The latter system would be quantum noise limited. PMID:8947896

  15. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A; Vick, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices. PMID:27586090

  16. Simulations of Radiation Defect Images from Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Sang Chul; Shin, Chan Sub; Kwon, Jun Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Defect clusters in irradiated materials occur radiation hardening and embrittlement. Behaviors of radiation defects should be understood to clarify radiation damage mechanisms. Properties of irradiated materials depend on density, size, kinds, microstructure and etc. of radiation defects. These can be measured with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), positron annihilation (PA), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and 3D atom probe (3DAP). The TEM is undoubtedly the most important technique having made contributions to analysis of characteristics of radiation defects. The TEM is a unique technique, with which a shape and a microstructure of defect clusters can be observed at the images. Radiation defects are mainly dislocation loops. The behavior of a dislocation loop depends on the direction of Burgers vector and a habit plane. Dislocation loops can be observed with a TEM, when the diameter of a loop is larger than 2 nm. When the size is below 5 nm, special cares are required for a determination of directions of the Burgers vector and the habit plane. Generally, g{center_dot}b=0 invisibility criterion is used to determine the Burgers vectors of line dislocations. However, when the size is below 5 nm, loops with g{center_dot}b=0 are often not invisible and loops with g{center_dot}b{ne}0 may also show very weak contrast under weak beam imaging conditions. A special method such as black-white contrast analysis should be used for the determination. This method can be applied to black=white lobe images obtained under dynamical two beam contrast conditions. The directions can be determined roughly with only experimental images. It is needed for a correct determination to match experimental images with computer-generated images. This paper presents results from analyses of dislocation loops with an image simulation technique, TEMACI which was developed by Zhongfu, the Oxford University.

  17. An image correlation procedure for digitally reconstructed radiographs and electronic portal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study a procedure that uses megavoltage digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) calculated from patient's three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) data as a reference image for correlation with on-line electronic portal images (EPIs) to detect patient setup errors. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage DRRs were generated by ray tracing through a modified volumetric CT data set in which CT numbers were converted into linear attenuation coefficients for the therapeutic beam energy. The DRR transmission image was transformed to the grayscale window of the EPI by a histogram-matching technique. An alternative approach was to calibrate the transmission DRR using a measured response curve of the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). This forces the calculated transmission fluence values to be distributed in the same range as that of the EPID image. A cross-correlation technique was used to determine the degree of alignment of the patient anatomy found in the EPID image relative to the reference DRR. Results: Phantom studies demonstrated that the correlation procedure had a standard deviation of 0.5 mm and 0.5 deg. in aligning translational shifts and in-plane rotations. Systematic errors were found between a reference DRR and a reference EPID image. The automated grayscale image-correlation process was completed within 3 s on a workstation computer or 12 s on a PC. Conclusion: The alignment procedure allows the direct comparison of a patient's treatment portal designed with a 3D planning computer with a patient's on-line portal image acquired at the treatment unit. The image registration process is automated to the extent that it requires minimal user intervention, and it is fast and accurate enough for on-line clinical applications

  18. Suppression of COTR in electron beam imaging diagnosis at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) demands electron beams with high peak current to generate high-brilliant, coherent X-ray pulses. Magnetic chicanes are used for longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to achieve the required high peak current. During bunch compression process, microstructures with a modulation length comparable to the visible light can be induced inside the bunch. This leads to coherent emission of optical transition radiation (OTR), which may impede the widely used beam diagnostic based on OTR imaging. In this thesis, two methods of using incoherent scintillation light are proposed to circumvent the problem of coherence effects in beam imaging diagnostics. The method of temporal separation has been proved experimentally to have successfully suppressed coherence effects. The longitudinal beam profiles measured using this method are in good agreement with reference measurements, verifying further the reliability of the method. The method of spatial separation has been investigated in preparation studies, from which an improved experimental setup has been designed.

  19. Suppression of COTR in electron beam imaging diagnosis at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Minjie

    2012-05-15

    The Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) demands electron beams with high peak current to generate high-brilliant, coherent X-ray pulses. Magnetic chicanes are used for longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to achieve the required high peak current. During bunch compression process, microstructures with a modulation length comparable to the visible light can be induced inside the bunch. This leads to coherent emission of optical transition radiation (OTR), which may impede the widely used beam diagnostic based on OTR imaging. In this thesis, two methods of using incoherent scintillation light are proposed to circumvent the problem of coherence effects in beam imaging diagnostics. The method of temporal separation has been proved experimentally to have successfully suppressed coherence effects. The longitudinal beam profiles measured using this method are in good agreement with reference measurements, verifying further the reliability of the method. The method of spatial separation has been investigated in preparation studies, from which an improved experimental setup has been designed.

  20. A High-Efficiency Electron Momentum Spectrometer for Direct Imaging of Orbital Electron Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xue-Guang; NING Chuan-Gang; DENG Jing-Kang; ZHANG Shu-Feng; SU Guo-Lin; LI Bin; CHEN Xue-Jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Direct three-dimensional images for orbital electron density are obtained by using our newly developed electron momentum spectrometer with simultaneous detection in energy and momentum, and the instruments resolutions of Aθ = ±0.7°, △φ = ±1.9°, △E = 1.2 eV, and △T = 2.0ns. The detection efficiency is about 100 times higher than conventional spectrometers. The design and performance of the apparatus are reported together with the experimental results on argon to show the extensive improvements in experimental resolutions, detection efficiency and versatility.

  1. Photoelectron backscattering in vacuum phototubes

    CERN Document Server

    Lubsandorzhiev, B K; Vyatchin, Y E; Shaibonov, B A J

    2006-01-01

    In this article we describe results of a photoelectron backscattering effect in vacuum phototubes: classical photomultipliers (PMT) and hybrid phototubes (PH). Late pulses occurring in PMTs are attributed to the photoelectron backscattering and distinguished from pulses due to an anode glow effect. The late pulses are measured in a number of PMTs and HPs with various photocathode sizes covering 1-50 cm range and different types of the first dynode materials and construction designs. It is shown that the late pulses are a generic feature of all vacuum photodetectors - PMTs and PHs and they don't deteriorate dramatically amplitude and timing responses of vacuum phototubes.

  2. Four-dimensional dielectric property image obtained from electron spectroscopic imaging series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, S C; Kai, J J; Chen, F R; Chang, L; Chen, L C; Chiang, C C; Ding, P; Chin, B; Zhang, H; Chen, F

    2001-01-01

    We have demonstrated a new quantitative method to characterize two-dimensional distributions of energy-dependent dielectric function of materials from low loss electron spectroscopic image (ESI) series. Two problems associated with extracted image-spectrum from the low-loss image series, under-sampling and loss of energy resolution, were overcome by using fast Fourier transformation (FFT) interpolation and maximum entropy deconvolution method. In this study, Black Diamond/Si3N4/SiO2/Si-substrate dielectric layer designed for copper metallization was used as the sample. We show that the reconstructed (FFT interpolated and maximum entropy deconvoluted) image-spectrum obtained from ESI series images can be quantified with the same accuracy as conventional electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra. Since the analysis of the dielectric function is sensitive to the local thickness of the specimen using Kramers-Kronig analysis, we also developed a new method to quantitatively determine the dielectric constant for low-k materials. We have determined the thickness of the Black Diamond using the extrapolated thickness method from the materials of known dielectric constants. Using Kramers-Kronig formula, the dielectric function map can be deduced from two-dimensional reconstructed single scattering spectra with providing the information of thickness. We proposed a four-dimensional data presentation for revealing the uniformity of the energy dependent property. The accuracy of our methods depends on the thickness determination and on the quality of the reconstructed spectra from the image series. PMID:11918416

  3. Alternative optical concept for electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J. X., E-mail: jsliu9@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Milbourne, T. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 (United States); Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dominguez, A.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hill, K. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Kung, C.; Pablant, N. A.; Tobias, B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Kubota, S. [Department of Physics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Kasparek, W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Lu, J. [Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Park, H. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on tokamak experiments has revolutionized the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities and improved our understanding of instabilities, which lead to disruptions. It is therefore desirable to have an ECEI system on the ITER tokamak. However, the large size of optical components in presently used ECEI systems have, up to now, precluded the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER. This paper describes a new optical ECEI concept that employs a single spherical mirror as the only optical component and exploits the astigmatism of such a mirror to produce an image with one-dimensional spatial resolution on the detector. Since this alternative approach would only require a thin slit as the viewing port to the plasma, it would make the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER feasible. The results obtained from proof-of-principle experiments with a 125 GHz microwave system are presented.

  4. Image processing system for electron linac beam diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For diagnosis of electron linac beams, image signals from a TV camera viewing a ceramic screen monitor were processed and analyzed using a waveform digitizer and a personal computer. The black-and-white TV camera used has a zoom lens with a remote-controllable iris; the automatic gain control circuit was switched off to obtain tolerable linearity of the output video signal against the brightness of the beam spot on the screen. The video signals are taken by the waveform digitizer with a sampling rate of 4 MHz; the digitized picture is transmitted to the personal computer via the GPIB and is analyzed to derive spatial intensity distribution of the beam. The sync signal of the TV camera is externally synchronized with the electron linac beam timing

  5. Application of FPGA's in Flexible Analogue Electronic Image Generator Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kulla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on usage of the FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays Xilinx as a part of our more complex workdedicated to design of flexible analogue electronic images generator for application in TV measurement technique or/and TV servicetechnique or/and education process. The FPGAs performs here the role of component colour R, G, B, synchronization and blanking signals source. These signals are next processed and amplified in other parts of the generator as NTSC/PAL source encoder and RF modulator. The main aim of this paper is to show the possibilities how with suitable development software use a FPGAs in analog TV technology.

  6. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  7. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å)−1 were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage

  8. Electron cyclotron emission imaging and applications in magnetic fusion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Benjamin John

    Energy production through the burning of fossil fuels is an unsustainable practice. Exponentially increasing energy consumption and dwindling natural resources ensure that coal and gas fueled power plants will someday be a thing of the past. However, even before fuel reserves are depleted, our planet may well succumb to disastrous side effects, namely the build up of carbon emissions in the environment triggering world-wide climate change and the countless industrial spills of pollutants that continue to this day. Many alternatives are currently being developed, but none has so much promise as fusion nuclear energy, the energy of the sun. The confinement of hot plasma at temperatures in excess of 100 million Kelvin by a carefully arranged magnetic field for the realization of a self-sustaining fusion power plant requires new technologies and improved understanding of fundamental physical phenomena. Imaging of electron cyclotron radiation lends insight into the spatial and temporal behavior of electron temperature fluctuations and instabilities, providing a powerful diagnostic for investigations into basic plasma physics and nuclear fusion reactor operation. This dissertation presents the design and implementation of a new generation of Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostics on toroidal magnetic fusion confinement devices, or tokamaks, around the world. The underlying physics of cyclotron radiation in fusion plasmas is reviewed, and a thorough discussion of millimeter wave imaging techniques and heterodyne radiometry in ECEI follows. The imaging of turbulence and fluid flows has evolved over half a millennium since Leonardo da Vinci's first sketches of cascading water, and applications for ECEI in fusion research are broad ranging. Two areas of physical investigation are discussed in this dissertation: the identification of poloidal shearing in Alfven eigenmode structures predicted by hybrid gyrofluid-magnetohydrodynamic (gyrofluid-MHD) modeling, and

  9. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm2 and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work

  10. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun, E-mail: xyle@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); International Research Center for Nuclei and Particles in the Cosmos, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  11. Laser induced - tunneling, electron diffraction and molecular orbital imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Multiphoton ionization in the tunneling limit is similar to tunneling in a scanning tunneling microscope. In both cases an electron wave packet tunnels from a bound (or valence) state to the continuum. I will show that multiphoton ionization provides a route to extend tunneling spectroscopy to the interior of transparent solids. Rotating the laser polarization is the analogue of scanning the STM tip - a means of measuring the crystal symmetry of a solid. In gas phase molecules the momentum spectrum of individual electrons can be measured. I will show that, as we rotate the molecule with respect to the laser polarization, the photoelectron spectrum samples a filter projection of the momentum wave function (the molecular analogue to the band structure) of the ionizing orbital. Some electrons created during multiphoton ionization re-collide with their parent ion. I will show that they diffract, revealing the scattering potential of the ion - the molecular structure. The electron can also interfere with the initial orbital from which it separated, creating attosecond XUV pulses or pulse trains. The amplitude and phase of the radiation contains all information needed to re-construct the image of the orbital (just as a sheared optical interferometer can fully characterize an optical pulse). Strong field methods provide an extensive range of new tools to apply to atomic, molecular and solid-state problems. (author)

  12. Compton backscattered and primary X-rays from solar flares: angle dependent Green's function correction for photospheric albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Kontar, E P; Schwartz, R A; Brown, J C; Kontar, Eduard P.; Kinnon, Alec L. Mac; Schwartz, Richard A.; Brown, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The observed hard X-ray (HXR) flux spectrum $I(\\epsilon)$ from solar flares is a combination of primary bremsstrahlung photons $I_P(\\epsilon)$ with a spectrally modified component from photospheric Compton backscatter of downward primary emission. The latter can be significant, distorting or hiding the true features of the primary spectrum which are key diagnostics for acceleration and propagation of high energy electrons and of their energy budget. For the first time in solar physics, we use a Green's function approach to the backscatter spectral deconvolution problem, constructing a Green's matrix including photoelectric absorption. This approach allows spectrum-independent extraction of the primary spectrum for several HXR flares observed by the {\\it Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager} (RHESSI). We show that the observed and primary spectra differ very substantially for flares with hard spectra close to the disk centre. We show in particular that the energy dependent photon spectral index $\\gamm...

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 3x3m Multibeam Backscatter, US Virgin Islands - Vieques Island (South Bank) - Project NF-09-01 - (2009), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131857)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 3x3 meter cell size representing the backscatter or intensity of sound returned from the seafloor on the bank/shelf escarpment...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Vieques, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geotiff represents an 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a reef shelf/bank south of Vieques, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  15. 4-m Image of the Southern Half of the Pseudo-colored Backscatter Intensity of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod (CAPESOUTHPSEUDO_GEO4M_WGS84.TIF, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes pseudo-colored backscatter intensity of the sea floor offshore of northeastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a...

  16. 4-m Image of the Northern Half of the Pseudo-colored Backscatter Intensity of the Sea Floor off Northeastern Cape Cod (CAPENORTHPSEUDO_GEO4M_WGS84.TIF, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes pseudo-colored backscatter intensity of the sea floor offshore of northeastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a...

  17. 4-m Image of the Southern Half of the Backscatter Intensity Mosaic of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod from USGS Cruise 98015 (CAPESOUTHMOS_GEO4M_WGS84.TIF, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes backscatter intensity of the sea floor offshore of eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a multibeam sea floor...

  18. 4-m Image of the Northern Half of the Backscatter Intensity Mosaic of the Sea Floor off Northeastern Cape Cod from USGS Cruise 98015 (CAPENORTHMOS_GEO4M_WGS84.TIF, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes backscatter intensity of the sea floor offshore of northern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a multibeam sea floor...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - Backscatter - Lang Bank, St. Croix, USVI - Benthic Habitat Characterization - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - M-1907-NF-14 (2014), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0128255)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geotiff represents a 1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the reef shelf and the steep slopes of the Lang Bank (H12639) of St. Croix, US Virgin Islands....

  20. The dose from Compton backscatter screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rez, Peter; Metzger, Robert L; Mossman, Kenneth L

    2011-04-01

    Systems based on the detection of Compton backscattered X rays have been deployed for screening personnel for weapons and explosives. Similar principles are used for screening vehicles at border-crossing points. Based on well-established scattering cross sections and absorption coefficients in conjunction with reasonable estimates of the image contrast and resolution, the entrance skin dose and the dose at a depth of 1 cm can be calculated. The effective dose can be estimated using the same conversion coefficients as used to convert exposure measurements to the effective dose. It is shown that the effective dose is highly dependent on image resolution (i.e. pixel size).The effective doses for personnel screening systems are unlikely to be in compliance with the American National Standards Institute standard NS 43.17 unless the pixel sizes are >4 mm. Nevertheless, calculated effective doses are well below doses associated with health effects. PMID:21068018

  1. Coherent Effects in Microwave Backscattering Models for Forest Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Sasan; McDonald, Kyle

    1995-01-01

    In modeling forest canopies, several scattering mechanisms are taken into account: 1) volume scattering, 2) surface-volume interaction, and 3) surface scattering from forest floor. Depending on the structural and dielectric characteristics of forest canopies, the relative contribution of each mechanism in the total backscatter signal of an imaging radar can vary. In this paper, two commonly used first order discrete scattering models, Distorted Born Approximation (DBA) and Radiative Transfer (RT) are used to simulate the backscattered power received by polarimetric radars at P-, L-, and C-bands over coniferous and deciduous forests. The difference between the two models resides on the coherent effect in the surface-volume interaction terms.

  2. Analysis of E-Beam Microlithography and SEM Imaging Distortions

    OpenAIRE

    Guery, Adrien; Latourte, Félix; Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Surface patterning by e-beam lithography and SEM imaging distortions are studied via digital image correlation. The surface of a stainless steel specimen is marked with a numerically-generated random pattern by microlithography. The global distortions from the reference pattern are first quantified by digital image correlation between the virtual reference pattern and the actual SEM image both in secondary and backscattered electron imaging modes. A second order polynomial basis reveals suffi...

  3. An observer study for direct comparison of clinical efficacy of electronic to film portal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To directly compare clinical efficacy of electronic to film portal images. Methods and Materials: An observer study was designed to compare clinical efficacy of electronic to film portal images acquired using a liquid matrix ion-chamber electronic portal imaging device and a conventional metal screen/film system. Both images were acquired simultaneously for each treatment port and the electronic portal images were printed on gray-level thermal paper. Four radiation oncologists served as observers and evaluated a total of 44 sets of images for four different treatment sites: lung, pelvis, brain, and head/neck. Each set of images included a simulation image, a double-exposure portal film, and video paper prints of electronic portal images. Eight to nine anatomical landmarks were selected from each treatment site. Each observer was asked to rate each landmark in terms of its clinical visibility and to rate the ease of making the pertinent verification decision in the corresponding electronic and film portal images with the aid of the simulation image. Results: Ratings for the visibility of landmarks and for the verification decision of treatment ports were similar for electronic and film images for most landmarks. However, vertebral bodies and several landmarks in the pelvis such as the acetabulum and pubic symphysis were more visible in the portal film images than in the electronic portal images. Conclusion: The visibility of landmarks in electronic portal images is comparable to that in film portal images. Verification of treatment ports based only on electronic portal images acquired using an electronic portal imaging device is generally achievable

  4. Probing Molecular Dynamics by Laser-Induced Backscattering Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertelt, Marko; Bian, Xue-Bin; Spanner, Michael; Staudte, André; Corkum, Paul B.

    2016-04-01

    We use differential holography to overcome the forward scattering problem in strong-field photoelectron holography. Our differential holograms of H2 and D2 molecules exhibit a fishbonelike structure, which arises from the backscattered part of the recolliding photoelectron wave packet. We demonstrate that the backscattering hologram can resolve the different nuclear dynamics between H2 and D2 with subangstrom spatial and subcycle temporal resolution. In addition, we show that attosecond electron dynamics can be resolved. These results open a new avenue for ultrafast studies of molecular dynamics in small molecules.

  5. BackscatterA [8101]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  6. Backscatter B [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Backscatter D [Snippets]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  8. BackscatterB [7125]--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Pacifica map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as two separate grids...

  9. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  10. Backscatter A [8101]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  11. Backscatter E [Swath]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  12. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  13. Backscatter B [7125]--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California. Backscatter data...

  14. Nodule bottom backscattering study using multibeam echosounder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Raju, Y.S.N.; Nair, R.R.

    A study is carried out to observe the angular dependence of backscattering strength at nodule area where grab sample and photographic data is available. Theoretical study along with the experimentally observed data shows that the backscattering...

  15. Backscatter C [7125]--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Bolinas map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  16. Femtosecond electron imaging of defect-modulated phonon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Plemmons, Dayne A.; Flannigan, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Precise manipulation and control of coherent lattice oscillations via nanostructuring and phonon-wave interference has the potential to significantly impact a broad array of technologies and research areas. Resolving the dynamics of individual phonons in defect-laden materials presents an enormous challenge, however, owing to the interdependent nanoscale and ultrafast spatiotemporal scales. Here we report direct, real-space imaging of the emergence and evolution of acoustic phonons at individual defects in crystalline WSe2 and Ge. Via bright-field imaging with an ultrafast electron microscope, we are able to image the sub-picosecond nucleation and the launch of wavefronts at step edges and resolve dispersion behaviours during propagation and scattering. We discover that the appearance of speed-of-sound (for example, 6 nm ps-1) wavefronts are influenced by spatially varying nanoscale strain fields, taking on the appearance of static bend contours during propagation. These observations provide unprecedented insight into the roles played by individual atomic and nanoscale features on acoustic-phonon dynamics.

  17. Ion Momentum Imaging of Dissociative Electron Attachment to Small Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, low energy dissociative electron attachment (DEA) interactions have been of interest to varying biological and technological applications. To study the dynamics resulting from DEA, we used an ion-momentum imaging apparatus based on the Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) technique in which a molecular beam is crossed by a pulsed electron beam. The beam interaction takes place in a 4 π pulsed electrostatic spectrometer that collects the anion fragments resulting from DEA. The molecular beam is formed by a supersonic expansion which results in a well-localized and cold target. Using this apparatus we have investigated the DEA dynamics for several small molecules: CO2 at the 4 eV shape resonance and the 8 eV Feshbach resonance; N2O at the 2.3 eV shape resonance; HCCH at the 3 eV shape resonance; and CF4 near the 7 eV resonance. An overview of these experimental ion-momentum results will be compared to ab initio electronic structure and fixed-nuclei scattering calculations to gauge the resulting dynamics driven by DEA. In many cases, conical intersections play a pivotal role in driving the dynamics. Some of these systems exhibit non-axial recoil conditions indicative of a bending dynamics in the transitory negative ion state while others exhibit a direct axial recoil dissociation without any bending. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Contract NSF-PHYS1404366.

  18. Clinical task performance and imaging task performance compared for two different commercial electronic portal imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This paper reports on the investigation and comparison of performance of a Varian Portal Vision system and a Siemens Beamview Plus system using the framework outlined by ICRU Report 54. Radiation Therapy EPI (Electronic Portal Imaging) systems are one of the main applications of digital imaging technology in a radiation therapy department. Radiation Therapy EPI systems may produce images of a lesser quality than the diagnostic radiology equivalent. It is therefore important to optimise the system to obtain the best performance possible. Contrasting opinion on the performance of EPI by clinicians, radiation therapists, medical physicists and engineers often exists, even when the same system and even the same image are being evaluated. Differing opinion occurs because of differences in task end points and task assessment methods of two broad groups of individuals, the human-observer group and the technical-measurement group. Each group uses different task criteria and methodology for assessing performance. The human-observer group is primarily interested in system performance that assures a high level clinical-task performance while the technical-measurement group is concerned with system performance that assures a high level of imaging-task performance. The technical-measurement group tends to be closely associated with imaging system technology, testing, adjustment and optimisation tasks which are couched in terms imaging-task criteria. The human-observer group is usually attempting to optimise performance using clinical-task criteria. The challenge is to provide a balanced evaluation using complementary imaging-task performance and clinical-task performance assessments. Comparison of the systems is on the basis of imaging-task performance i.e. technical-measurement through physical performance assessments such as spatial resolution and noise level, and clinical-task performance i.e. human-observer measurements through the application of psychophysical

  19. ILC Beam Energy Measurement by means of Laser Compton Backscattering

    OpenAIRE

    Muchnoi, N.; Schreiber, H. J.; Viti, M

    2008-01-01

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered $\\gamma$-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitiv...

  20. NOAA TIFF Graphic- 0.5m Backscatter Mosaic of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the south shore of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team and...

  1. Backscatter 0.5m TIFF Mosaic of St. Croix (Buck Island), US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the north shore of Buck Island, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography...

  2. Backscatter 0.5m TIFF Mosaic of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.5 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the south shore of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team and...

  3. Electron cyclon emission imaging of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations (invited)(abstract)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cima, G. [Fusion Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78705-1068 (United States); Deng, B.; Domier, C.W.; Geck, W.R.; Hsia, R.P.; Liang, C.; Jiang, F.; Luhmann, N.C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Brower, D. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024-1594 (United States); Watts, C. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasma Physik, Garching (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) is a powerful diagnostic in a high performance/high magnetic field, magnetic confinement experiment, for a number of reasons. The most important one is probably due to the spatial localization of the ECE source, as opposed to most passive plasma diagnostics which perform line integrated measurements. The novel technique of ECE imaging, made possible by the existence of new arrays of high frequency mixers, fully exploits this property of ECE. A description of the device, an analysis of its characteristics, and a review of its preliminary results on TEXT-U will be given.

  4. Improvements in backscatter measurement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvements in measuring the thickness of a coating on a substrate by the technique of backscattered particles are described. These improvements enable the measurements to be carried out continuously as an integral part of the coating production line and also permit measurements where the coated elements are separated from one another by a predetermined distance. The former is achieved by situating the backscatter probe and detector on the rim of the measurement wheel and rotating this wheel at a speed such that the coated element and probe are stationary relative to one another. The latter improvement is achieved by an indexing apparatus which automatically positions the probe beside a coated element. (U.K.)

  5. Hanle effect in coherent backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the shape of the coherent-backscattering (CBS) cone obtained when resonant light illuminates a thick cloud of laser-cooled rubidium atoms in the presence of a homogenous magnetic field. We observe new magnetic field-dependent anisotropies in the CBS signal. We show that the observed behavior is due to the modification of the atomic-radiation pattern by the magnetic field (Hanle effect in the excited state)

  6. The applications possibilities of the gamma-ray compton backscattering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flechas, David; Gonzalez, Natalia; Sarmiento, Luis G.; Fajardo, Eduardo; Garzon, Claudia; Munoz, Juansebastian; Cristancho, Fernando [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: X-rays have been for already longer than a century the instrument of choice when producing images of opaque objects. One important characteristic of the use of X-rays as an imaging tool is the geometrical arrangement in which the object under study is placed between the photons source and the imaging material (film or electronic device). This set-up cannot be realized in a multitude of situations of industrial interest. In those cases the source and the imaging device are limited to be at the same side of the object rendering impossible the use of present day's possibilities of X-ray imaging. It is in these cases where the technique discussed exhibits most of its power and advantages. By using the back-to-back emitted gamma-rays of the positron-decay of {sup 22}Na, the Gamma-Ray Compton Backscattering (GRCB) technique is able of building images of an object placed in front of the gamma-rays source. The set-up includes two detectors connected in time coincidence, one of them, a pixelated position- detector in charge of building the image and the other just providing the gating condition. The talk explains the working principle, shows some first images of hidden objects in soil, and discusses some of the prospective areas of application like oil industry and explosive landmines localization. (author)

  7. A Micropulse eye-safe all-fiber molecular backscatter coherent temperature lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abari Cyrus F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze the performance of an all-fiber, micropulse, 1.5 μm coherent lidar for remote sensing of atmospheric temperature. The proposed system benefits from the recent advances in optics/electronics technology, especially an all-fiber image-reject homodyne receiver, where a high resolution spectrum in the baseband can be acquired. Due to the presence of a structured spectra resulting from the spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouine scattering, associated with the relevant operating regimes, an accurate estimation of the temperature can be carried out. One of the main advantages of this system is the removal of the contaminating Mie backscatter signal by electronic filters at the baseband (before signal conditioning and amplification. The paper presents the basic concepts as well as a Monte-Carlo system simulation as the proof of concept.

  8. A Micropulse eye-safe all-fiber molecular backscatter coherent temperature lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abari, Cyrus F.; Chu, Xinzhao; Mann, Jakob; Spuler, Scott

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of an all-fiber, micropulse, 1.5 μm coherent lidar for remote sensing of atmospheric temperature. The proposed system benefits from the recent advances in optics/electronics technology, especially an all-fiber image-reject homodyne receiver, where a high resolution spectrum in the baseband can be acquired. Due to the presence of a structured spectra resulting from the spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouine scattering, associated with the relevant operating regimes, an accurate estimation of the temperature can be carried out. One of the main advantages of this system is the removal of the contaminating Mie backscatter signal by electronic filters at the baseband (before signal conditioning and amplification). The paper presents the basic concepts as well as a Monte-Carlo system simulation as the proof of concept.

  9. Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with velocity focusing electron optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectrometer at the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline of the Swiss Light Source is presented and a few initial measurements are reported. Monochromatic synchrotron VUV radiation ionizes the cooled or thermal gas-phase sample. Photoelectrons are velocity focused, with better than 1 meV resolution for threshold electrons, and also act as start signal for the ion time-of-flight analysis. The ions are accelerated in a relatively low, 40-80 V cm-1 field, which enables the direct measurement of rate constants in the 103-107 s-1 range. All electron and ion events are recorded in a triggerless multiple-start/multiple-stop setup, which makes it possible to carry out coincidence experiments at >100 kHz event frequencies. As examples, the threshold photoelectron spectrum of the argon dimer and the breakdown diagrams for hydrogen atom loss in room temperature methane and the chlorine atom loss in cold chlorobenzene are shown and discussed.

  10. Current profile reconstruction using electron temperature imaging diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; Kaita, R.; Stratton, B.; Sabbagh, S.

    2004-10-01

    Flux surface shape information can be used to constrain the current profile for reconstruction of the plasma equilibrium. One method of inferring flux surface shape relies on plasma x-ray emission; however, deviations from the flux surfaces due to impurity and density asymmetries complicate the interpretation. Electron isotherm surfaces should correspond well to the plasma flux surfaces, and equilibrium constraint modeling using this isotherm information constrains the current profile. The KFIT code is used to assess the profile uncertainty and to optimize the number, location and SNR required for the Te detectors. As Te imaging detectors we consider tangentially viewing, vertically spaced, linear gas electron multiplier arrays operated in pulse height analysis (PHA) mode and multifoil soft x-ray arrays. Isoflux coordinate sets provided by Te measurements offer a strong constraint on the equilibrium reconstruction in both a stacked horizontal array configuration and a crossed horizontal and vertical beam system, with q0 determined to within ±4%. The required SNR can be provided with either PHA or multicolor diagnostic techniques, though the multicolor system requires ˜×4 better statistics for comparable final errors.

  11. Professional Acceptance Of Electronic Images In Radiologic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, Joseph N.; Curtis, David J.; Kerlin, Barbara D.; Olmsted, William W.

    1983-05-01

    During the past four years, a large number of radiographic images have been interpreted in both film and video modes in an effort to determine the utility of digital/analogue systems in general practice. With the cooperation of the Department of Defense, the MITRE Corporation, and several university-based radiology departments, the Public Health Service has participated in laboratory experiments and a teleradiology field trial to meet this objective. During the field trial, 30 radiologists participated in the interpretation of more than 4,000 diagnostic x-ray examinations that were performed at distant clinics, digitized, and transmitted to a medical center for interpretation on video monitors. As part of the evaluation, all of the participating radiologists and the attending physicians at the clinics were queried regarding the teleradiology system, particularly with respect to the diagnostic quality of the electronic images. The original films for each of the 4,000 examinations were read independently, and the findings and impressions from each mode were compared to identify discrepancies. In addition, a sample of 530 cases was reviewed and interpreted by a consensus panel to measure the accuracy of findings and impressions of both film and video readings. The sample has been retained in an automated archive for future study at the National Center of Devices and Radiological Health facilities in Rockville, Maryland. The studies include a comparison of diagnostic findings and impressions from 1024 x 1024 matrices with those obtained from the 512 x 512 format used in the field trial. The archive also provides a database for determining the effect of data compression techniques on diagnostic interpretations and establishing the utility of image processing algorithms. The paper will include an analysis of the final results of the field trial and preliminary findings from the ongoing studies using the archive of cases at the National Center for Devices and Radiological

  12. The Harwell back-scattering spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron diffraction spectra in which both high resolution (Δ Q/Q approximately equal to 0.003) and high intensity are maintained up to scattering vectors as high as 30A-1(sin theta/lambda = 2.5) have been obtained with the back-scattering spectrometer (BSS) recently installed on the Harwell electron linac. The theory behind the spectrometer design is described, and it is shown how the above resolution requirement leads to its basic features of a 12m incident flight path, a 2m scattering flight path and a scattering angle (2theta) acceptance from 1650 to 1750. Examples of the resolution, intensity and background are given. It is shown that the problem of frame overlap may be overcome by using an absorbing filter. (author)

  13. ILC Beam Energy Measurement by means of Laser Compton Backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Muchnoi, N; Viti, M

    2008-01-01

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered $\\gamma$-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitive detectors operating in a large radiation environment. Several options for high spatial resolution detectors are discussed. Simulation studies support the use of an infrared or green laser and quartz fiber detectors to monitor the backscattered photons and edge electrons. Employing a cavity monitor, the beam particle position downstream of the magnet can be recorded with submicrometer precision. Such a scheme provides a feasible and promising method to access the incident beam energy with precisions of $10^{-4}$ or bette...

  14. Characteristics of final particles in multiple Compton backscattering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyn, A.; Kol‘chuzhkin, A.

    2013-08-01

    An electron passing through a counter propagating intense laser beam can interact with a few laser photons with emission of a hard photon in each collision event. In contrast with the well-known nonlinear Compton backscattering process the above mentioned process may be named as multiple Compton backscattering process (MCBS). In this paper we have investigated the evolution of the electron energy distribution during MCBS process using Monte-Carlo (M-C) simulation. The main characteristics of such a distribution as mean energy and variance obtained by M-C technique were compared with analytical solutions of kinetic equations. We found the kinematic region where the analytical solutions are applicable with a good accuracy. A photon spectrum, even for the case when each electron emits one photon (in average) differs significantly from that described by the Klein-Nishina formula.

  15. Characteristics of Final Particles in Multiple Compton Backscattering Process

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, A

    2013-01-01

    An electron passing through a counter propagating intense laser beam can interact with a few laser photons with emission of a hard photon in each collision event. In contrast with the well-known nonlinear Compton backscattering process the above mentioned process may be named as multiple Compton backscattering process (MCBS). In this paper we have investigated the evolution of the electron energy distribution during MCBS process using Monte-Carlo (M-C) simulation. The main characteristics of such a distribution as mean energy and variance obtained by M-C technique were compared with analytical solutions of kinetic equations. We found the kinematic region where the analytical solutions are applicable with a good accuracy. A photon spectrum, even for the case when each electron emits one photon (in average) differs significantly from that described by the Klein-Nishina formula.

  16. Rutherford backscattering in an industrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is a well established analytical technique, particularly in the university and major research oriented industrial laboratories. Historically, the accelerators used for RBS analysis have been renovated low energy nuclear physics rather than a dedicated optimally designed analytical instrument. It is this 'requirement' that each machine be individually rebuilt prior to use as a materials analysis tool that has contributed to the limited industrial use of RBS when compared with other analytical techniques such as Auger spectroscopy or Secondary Ion Mass spectrometry (SIMS). This paper will discuss the design criteria and applications of an RBS system for use in an industrial analytical environment. The design issues which are discussed include the backscattered particle detection, sample positioning, charge integration, vacuum, and automation systems. An RBS system for which the design of these systems has been optimized in light of many current industrial applications will be evaluated. The prototype of this system has been tested for the previous two years with a utilization factor of 4000-5000 individual analyses per year. The applications which have been investigated extend from the familiar electronics related topics to many other diverse fields such as polymeric chemistry, catalysis, and surface modification of synthetic fibers. Some of the electronics applications include high throughput 'production line' analysis of silicides, copper doped aluminium, and similar interconnect materials as well as the more sophisticated trace impurity mapping techniques which involve channeled line scans. Catalysis applications include the study of cage compound zeolite particle and the depth distribution of the active catalyst in these particles. Applications in the field of synthesis fibers include the study of the depth distribution of coloring agents and dyes in the near surface region of the fibers. (orig.)

  17. Statistical simulation of multiple Compton backscattering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    A number of laboratories are currently developing monochromatic sources of X-rays and gamma quanta based on the Compton backscattering (CBS) of laser photons by relativistic electrons. Modern technologies are capable of providing a concentration of electrons and photons in the interaction point such that each primary electron can emit several hard photons. In contrast to the well-known nonlinear CBS process, in which an initial electron "absorbs" a few laser photons and emits a single hard one, the above-mentioned process can be called a multiple CBS process and is characterized by a mean number of emitted photons. The present paper is devoted to simulating the parameters of a beam of back scattered quanta based on the Monte Carlo technique. It is shown that, even in the case of strong collimation of a resulting photon beam, the radiation monochromaticity may deteriorate because of the contribution coming from the multiple photon emission, which is something that must be considered while designing new CBS sources.

  18. Electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct sensing CCD array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial prototype intraoral radiography system has been developed that can provide digital x-ray images for diagnosis. The system consists of an intraoral detector head, an intermediate drive electronics package, a main drive electronics package and a PC-based digital image management system. The system has the potential to replace the use of dental film in intraoral radiographic examinations. High-resolution images are acquired, then displayed on a CRT within seconds of image acquisition

  19. Electronic intraoral dental x-ray imaging system employing a direct-sensing CCD array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John D.; Langford, D. S.; Williams, Donald W.

    1993-12-01

    A commercial prototype intraoral radiography system has been developed that can provide digital x-ray images for diagnosis. The system consists of an intraoral detector head, an intermediate drive electronics package, a main drive electronics package, and a PC-based digital image management system. The system has the potential to replace the use of dental film in intraoral radiographic examinations. High-resolution images are acquired, then displayed on a CRT within seconds of image acquisition.

  20. Feasibility study of superresolution continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Wakana, Michi; Susaki, Hitoshi

    2006-06-01

    In this letter, we report that superresolution continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw-EPR) imaging is feasible for enhancing spatial resolution in images of unpaired electrons. We demonstrate one-dimensional superresolution EPR imaging for phantoms of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder with a 650MHz cw-EPR imager. The spatial resolution was improved up to fivefold with iterative deconvolution techniques. Our superresolution EPR imaging includes two-stage postprocessing, i.e., noniterative deconvolution for measured EPR spectra and iterative deconvolution processing for a blurred EPR image profile with the point spread function of the low-pass window function being applied.