WorldWideScience

Sample records for backhoes

  1. Development of a portable teleoperated robot for the manipulation of a backhoe shovel for the restoration of disaster-stricken sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshihiko; Sakai, Yosiharu; Konomi, Yosiyuki; Chayama, Kazuhiro; Minamoto, Masahiko; Matsunaga, Katsuya

    1999-11-01

    Restoration activities after disasters such as landslides or rock avalanches require rapid action, but in fact, in most cases these activities are very inefficient because of the danger of secondary disasters. A system which can operate reconstruction machinery by remote control was therefore developed, and it was installed on general-purpose construction machines (backhoe shovels). Control performance experiments and field experiments on this developed system were carried out, and its effectiveness was confirmed.

  2. Structure Analysis and Design Improvement of Transmission Rocker Arm for Backhoe Loader%挖掘装载机传动摇臂的结构分析与设计改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王虎奇

    2011-01-01

    挖掘装载机的传动摇臂是挖掘装载机传递载荷实现装卸与运输工作的关键部件之一,同时也是挖掘装载机在工作中最容易损坏的部件之一.据挖掘装载机传动摇臂的开裂反馈信息,对传动摇臂的结构特点与承载特点进行了全面分析,总结出传动摇臂在作业过程中的工况与载荷.利用ANSYS软件分析出了导致传动摇臂开裂的原因,并就此提出了设计改进方案.改进后传动摇臂的强度比改进前提高了29%.改进后的传动摇臂已经投入市场使用,不再有开裂反馈,证明了分析与改进的科学性与正确性.%Transmission rocker arm for backhoe loader is one of the key parts to transmitting load to realize load and unload and transportation. At the same time it is a easy to damage part in the operation of backhoe loader. The analysis of structural and bearing load characteristic of transmission rocker arm of backhoe loader is carried out fully according to its crack feedback, and its loads and work conditions in operation are summarized. The reason of crack is gotten by ANSYS analysis and an improvement design is put forward. The structure strength of improvement transmission rocker arm is improved by 29% than before. And the improved rocker arm is used abroadly without crack feedback. It can be seen that the improvement design is scientic and right.

  3. Simulation of Vibration Isolation Performance of Backhoe Loader's Powertrain Mounting System%挖掘装载机动力总成悬置系统隔振性能仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丕晶; 侯亮; 黄伟; 曾峥; 郭涛; 李胜玉

    2012-01-01

    以某型号挖掘装载机为研究对象,应用拉格朗日方程建立了动力总成悬置系统的数学模型,用Matlab编程求出动力总成悬置系统固有频率和能量分布;并且在ADAMS中建立动力总成悬置系统的6自由度模型,进行怠速工况下的振动仿真,得到系统的固有特性和频域响应曲线;通过比较两者振动特性,验证了模型的正确性,结果表明动力总成悬置系统不能满足动力总成隔振要求,并且存在严重耦合现象,指出在下一步优化过程中,应该缩小固有频率分布范围和提高系统的解耦度.%With regard to backhoe loader,a mathematical model is established for powertrain mounting system with lagrange s principle. A Matlab program is applied to program natural frequency and energy distribution matrix of the system. In addition,a 6-degree-of-freedom of powertrain mounting system is set up using the ADAMS and by carrying out the vibration simulation at idle speed,getting natural characteristics and the frequency response curve. The correctness of the model is also validated by the experiments. The results show that the mount system can't basically meet the requirement of vibration isolation and the coupling exists in the mount system, which shows we should narrow the range of inherent frequency and improve the vibration coupling degree in the next step to optimize the design of the system

  4. Experimenting with Electrical Load Sensing on a Backhoe Loader

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2005-01-01

    Where traditional load sensing is made using hydro-mechanical regulators and load pressure is fed back hydraulically, electrical load sensing employs the usage of electronic sensors and electrically actuated components. This brings forth new possibilities, but also imposes problems concerning...

  5. Characterization of Underwater Sounds Produced by a Backhoe Dredge Excavating Rock and Gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    the powerplant . Periodically, sounds may be produced when the dredge advances, either by raising and lowering spuds or by swinging along deployed...with their powerplants . The various underwater sounds produced are influenced by a host of factors, including substrate type, geomorphology of the...system was powered by a deep-cycle marine battery connected to a StatPower pure sine- wave inverter, which provided a 120V AC power source to an APC Smart

  6. 两种挖装机简介%Introduction of Two Backhoe Loaders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐经世

    2001-01-01

    @@1 Schaeff ITC112型挖装机 20世纪90年代,铁道部为了加快铁路隧道掘进速度,先后从德国、日本购买了若干台挖装机,诸如Schaeff ITC112、ITC312,Kemco-Schaeff KL41等,在铁路隧道工程中,使用效果良好。 图1为Schaeff ITC112型反铲挖装机整机示意图。

  7. 78 FR 25958 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Demolition and Construction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... (i.e., a 980 Case backhoe, dump truck, air compressor, electric screw guns, jackhammer, concrete saw..., hardscape, landscape, hand rails, plaques, and benches. Equipment--backhoe, truck, hand/power tools... from a 980 Case backhoe, dump truck, air compressor, electric screw guns, jackhammer, concrete saw,...

  8. Power management in hydraulically actuated mobile equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2008-01-01

    model of a backhoe loader is first presented. Based on this model and the dynamic properties of the system, a generally applicable power management algorithm is developed based on an optimization procedure, which takes into account the dynamics of the system and different modes of operation...

  9. Environmental Assessment for Repairs and Replacement of Overhead Electrical Line, Feeders N1, N3, and N6 Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    salamanders such as the Monterey ensatina and arboreal salamander would also be expected to occur. The California red-legged frog is federally...of U.S. Sprint Standby and Regenerator Building: Results of Phase I Survey and Phase Ia Backhoe Testing, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. On

  10. The Search for, Recovery, and Positive Identification of a Vietnam-Era U.S. Army Soldier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    2 stated that only the top 20 cm of soil (plow zone) had been disturbed through the years of plowing. No heavy equipment, such as backhoes or...dental remains recovered consisted of 17 severely eroded, dessicated, and fractured teeth: nine maxillary teeth (nos. 2,4,6,9. 10. 11, 12. 15, and 16...and eight mandibular teeth (nos. 18,21,22,25,26,28, and 32). The dental artifact consisted of an acrylic segment from a maxillary denture with denture

  11. Papermill sludge amendments, tree protection and tree establishment on an abandoned coal minesoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, D.A.; Boutelle, D.A.; Larson, M.M.; Smith, W.D.; Vimmerstedt, J.P. [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States). School of Natural Resources

    1997-09-01

    The authors measured survival, growth, and foliar nutrition of white ash (Fraxinus americana L.), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.), and black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) on a regraded minesoil (Typic Udorthent, pH 2.9) treated with four combinations of papermill sludge depth by incorporation methods. They also compared tree performance when protected from mammal damage by tube, netting, or no shelters. Sludge rates were approximately 860 Mg ha{sup -1} for a 15-cm depth and 3450 Mg ha{sup -1} for a 60-cm depth. After 4 yr, tree survival was 65% when either 15 or 60 -cm depth. After 4 yr, tree survival was 65% when either 15 or 60 cm of sludge was deep incorporated by a backhole. Survival was 43% if 15 cm of sludge was rototill incorporated and 3% if 45 cm of sludge was surface applied over the rotoiller-incorporated sludge (60 cm total sludge depth). Trees were tallest (236 cm) on 15 cm-backhoed, intermediate (204 cm) on 60 cm backhoed, and shortest (130 cm) on 15 cm rotilled treatments. Ash (56% survival) survived better than sycamore (40%) and walnut (36%). Tree survival was best (61%) in tubes, intermediate (43%) in nets, and worst (28%) with no protection. Ash and walnut were tallest (177 cm) in tubes, intermediate (124 cm) in nets, and shortest (103 cm) with no protection. Sycamore height (305 cm) was not affected by the shelters. Foliar nutrition of trees was adequate except for possible low P in ash. In summary, tree survival and growth were good if sludge was incorporated by backhoeing and trees were protected by tube shelters. 38 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Environmental Assessment (EA): Proposed Emergency Power Unit Overhaul Complex at Little Mountain Test Annex, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Excavations would be necessary to install: footings; foundations; hazardous spill containment pits ; pavements; and buried utilities consisting of...frames and masonry walls, reinforced concrete footings, foundations and floor slabs, hazardous spill containment pits , mechanical and electrical...0.23 Diesel Tractors/Loaders/Backhoes 1.81 1.59 0.30 0.29 0.21 0.41 Diesel Bull Dozers 0.91 3.15 0.22 0.21 0.49 0.24 Diesel Front End Loaders 1.03

  13. Remote Excavation System technology evaluation report: Buried Waste Robotics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This document describes the results from the Remote Excavation System demonstration and testing conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during June and July 1993. The purpose of the demonstration was to ascertain the feasibility of the system for skimming soil and removing various types of buried waste in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements, and to compare the performances of manual and remote operation of a backhoe. The procedures and goals of the demonstration were previously defined in The Remote Excavation System Test Plan, which served as a guideline for evaluating the various components of the system and discussed the procedures used to conduct the tests.

  14. WZ30-25型轮式挖掘装载机

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈海涛

    2012-01-01

    WZ30-25型轮式挖掘装载机是在WZ25-20的基础上,吸收国内外新技术,并根据市场使用情况开发的一款系列化产品.该机外形美观、结构合理、性能先进、节能环保、操作轻便、可靠耐用,自投放市场后,得到国内外用户的普遍认可.介绍WZ30-25型轮式挖掘装载机的设计思想、主要参数、结构特点等.%In accordance with the application conditions in the market, model WZ30-25 wheel type backhoe loader is a serial product that is based on model WZ25-20 with absorption of new technologies both at home and abroad. The machine features nice looking, logic construction, advanced performance, energy saving & environment friendly, easy operation, reliability and durability. Therefore, it has been popularly recognized since it was launched into the market. The text introduces the design idea, main parameters and structural features of the model WZ30-25 wheel type backhoe loader.

  15. Earth-moving equipment as base machines in forest work. Final report of an NSR project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Jerry [ed.

    1997-12-31

    Excavators have been used for forest draining for a long time in the Nordic countries. Only during the 1980s they were introduced as base machines for other forest operations, such as mounding, processing, harvesting, and road construction and road maintenance. Backhoe loaders were introduced in forestry at a somewhat later stage and to a smaller degree. The number of this type of base machines in forestry is so far small and is increasing very slowly. The NSR project `Earth moving equipment as base machines in forest work` started in 1993 and the project ended in 1995. The objective of the project was to obtain an overall picture of this type of machines up to a point where the logs are at landing site, ready for transportation to the industry. The project should cover as many aspects as possible. In order to obtain this picture, the main project was divided into sub projects. The sub projects separately described in this volume are (1) Excavators in ditching operations and site preparation, (2) Backhoe loaders in harvesting operations, (3) Excavators in wood cutting operations, (4) Tracked excavators in forestry operations, (5) Crawler versus wheeled base machines for single-grip harvester, and (6) Soil changes - A comparison between a wheeled and a tracked forest machine

  16. Scour protection for wind turbine foundations on highly erodible sea bottom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottesen Hansen, N.E.

    2002-12-01

    Scour around offshore structures is well known. It is caused by the strong eddy formation at the base of the structures protruding from the sea bottom. The strong vortices result in an amplified effective shear stress working on the sea bottom surface adjacent to the structure. When the surrounding sea bottom is lowered the scour protection will end up being a cap on a small hill and when the slopes are getting too steep the scour protection will roll or slide down the sides. It will loose its cohesion and therefore its integrity. This will take place irrespective of the type of scour protection material and the type of scour protection. This report describes scour protections, which can deal with this particular problem. Such a scour protection must be able to sustain the following loads: Be able to follow the lowering of the seabed on its way down; Be resistant to edge scour (scour around the perimeter of the scour protection). The installation of scour protection is not straightforward because the developed scour hole may be very uneven. It will be highly impractical to survey the hole although it can be done. There will be power cables etc. obstructing for ROV's or instrumented backhoe arms. Therefore the recommended method is to assume that the scour hole is developed and to place the scour protection material evenly around the foundation. In practice this is done by fall pipes positioned from a barge or by an instrumented backhoe. The procedure will be as follows: The outline of the scour hole is surveyed by a ROV (eye ball) and the status of the power cables are investigated; If the tie-in of the power cables are hanging as free spans, material shall be dumped on these spans in order to cover them. This material shall have a size, which will not be harmful to the cable during a dumping; Alternatively the tie-in takes place through an armoured flex-pipe that can sustain the impact from the stone dumping. Hence, in this case the stone dumping can commence

  17. World War I chemical weapons bunker engineering evaluation and cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, C.A.; Crotteau, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides a review of the US Army Corps of Engineers development and execution of a CERCLA chemical weapons and soil removal from two World War 1 underground test bunkers. The non-time critical removal action was completed from October 1994 to January 1995 in conjunction with Operation Safe Removal, Spring Valley, Washington, D.C. On January 5, 1993, a startled backhoe operator unearthed three 75mm artillery shells, exposing the legacy of a World War 1 (WWI) chemical weapons test facility in the midst of the nation`s capitol. That discovery, made in an exclusive residential neighborhood, prompted an intensive two year environmental cleanup. The Army immediately responded to the chemical ordnance threat, initiating Operation Safe Removal, a $20 million emergency response action and remedial investigation.

  18. Pit Viper strikes at the Hanford site. Pit maintenance using robotics at the Hanford Tank Farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeder-Smith, Lynne

    2002-06-30

    The Pit Viper - a remote operations waste retrieval system - was developed to replace manual operations in the valve pits of waste storge tanks at the Hanford Site. The system consists of a typical industrial backhoe fitted with a robotic manipulator arm and is operated remotely from a control trailer located outside of the tank farm. Cameras mounted to the arm and within the containment tent allow the operator to view the entire pit area and operate the system using a joystick. The arm's gripper can grasp a variety of tools that allow personnel to perform cleaning, debris removal, and concrete repair tasks -- a more efficient and less dose-intensive process than the previous "long-pole" method. The project team overcame a variety of obstacles during development and testing of the Pit Viper system, and deployment occurred in Hanford Tank C-104 in December 2001.

  19. Human Machine Interaction by Simulation of Dynamics of Construction Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Thomas Heegaard

    This industrial Ph.D. project concerns whole-body vibrations in human operated construction machinery. The emissions of these vibrations is closely related to the subjective experience of comfort and in some cases these vibrations can occur in a level which can cause the operator back disorders...... on long term basis. Whole-body vibrations are potential damaging for the human operator in a frequency range for which the dynamics of the machines are dominated by the inputs of the operator. The objective of this project is to reduce the amount of potential damaging wholebody vibrations for two...... different kinds of machinery; an articulated backhoe loader and an articulated dump truck. In this work a standardized procedure containing a set of duty cycles for measuring and declaring whole-body vibrations has been proposed for both of these machines. The result of the measuring is important...

  20. Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Results from the Mars Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Bonitz, R. G.; Robinson, M. L.; Carsten, J. L.; Volpe, R. A.; Trebi-Ollennu, A.; Mellon, M. T.; Chu, P. C.; Davis, K. R.; Wilson, J. J.; Shaw, A. S.; Greenberger, R. N.; Siebach, K. L.; Stein, T. C.; Cull, S. C.; Goetz, W.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Keller, H. U.; Lemmon, M. T.; Sizemore, H. G.; Mehta, M.

    2009-10-01

    The Mars Phoenix Lander was equipped with a 2.4 m Robotic Arm (RA) with an Icy Soil Acquisition Device capable of excavating trenches in soil deposits, grooming hard icy soil surfaces with a scraper blade, and acquiring icy soil samples using a rasp tool. A camera capable of imaging the scoop interior and a thermal and electrical conductivity probe were also included on the RA. A dozen trench complexes were excavated at the northern plains landing site and 31 samples (including water-ice-bearing soils) were acquired for delivery to instruments on the Lander during the 152 sol mission. Deliveries included sprinkling material from several centimeters height to break up cloddy soils on impact with instrument portals. Excavations were done on the side of the Humpty Dumpty and the top of the Wonderland polygons, and in nearby troughs. Resistive forces encountered during backhoe operations show that soils above the 3-5 cm deep icy soil interfaces are stronger with increasing depth. Further, soils are similar in appearance and properties to the weakly cohesive crusty and cloddy soils imaged and excavated by the Viking Lander 2, which also landed on the northern plains. Adsorbed H2O is inferred to be responsible for the variable nature and cohesive strength of the soils. Backhoe blade chatter marks on excavated icy soil surfaces, combined with rasp motor currents, are consistent with laboratory experiments using grain-supported icy soil deposits, as is the relatively rapid decrease in icy soil strength over time as the ice sublimated on Mars.

  2. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration closure report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical underground storage tank release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report addresses the site characterization of three historical underground storage tank (UST) petroleum hydrocarbon release sites identified as 25-3101-1, 25-3102-3, and 25-3152-1. The sites are located within the Nevada Test Site in Area 25 at Buildings 3101, 3102, and 3152. The characterization was completed to support administrative closure of the sites. Characterization was completed using drilling equipment to delineate the extent of hydrocarbon impact. Clean closure had been previously attempted at each of these sites using backhoe equipment without success due to adjacent structures, buried utilities, or depth restrictions associated with each site. Although the depth and extent of hydrocarbon impact was determined to be too extensive for clean closure, it was verified through drilling that the sites should be closed through an administrative closure. The Nevada Administrative Code ``A Through K`` evaluation completed for each site supports that there is no significant risk to human health or the environment from the impacted soils remaining at each site.

  3. Building America Case Study: Excavationless Exterior-Side Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NorthernSTAR

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  4. Soil remediation at natural gas mercury meter stations in Montana and northwestern Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larango, G.J. [Olympus Environmental, Incorporated, Billings, MT (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Montana Power Company initiated voluntary soil assessment and remediation at natural gas meter stations reported to have contained a mercury manometer at some time during facility operation. Remedial sites were selected according to criteria developed from data collected during a Phase I Assessment of approximately 400 facilities. The Montana Power Company and the Montana Department of Environmental Quality agreed upon a soil cleanup action level of 23 parts per million Total Mercury. Remedial field work included an initial assessment with a mercury vapor analyzer to determine the areal extent of impact at each site, excavation of soil until laboratory analyses of confirmation samples met the cleanup action level, and disposal of the excavated soil. The mercury meters were typically housed in small sheds measuring less than 10 feet by 10 feet. Generally, the spilled mercury was confined to areas beneath or adjacent to the meters; but in some cases, mercury was detected in other areas inside and outside the sheds. Approximately 355 cubic yards of soil at 103 sites were excavated primarily by hand and occasionally with a backhoe, and placed in one-yard soil bags for disposal. Composite soil samples were collected from each soil bag and analyzed by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure for mercury to characterize the material as hazardous or non-hazardous. Bags characterized as non-hazardous were transported to an industrial landfill in Montana, while bags characterized as hazardous were transported to a facility in Tennessee where the mercury was recovered through a recycling process.

  5. Evaluations of in-use emission factors from off-road construction equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Tanfeng; Durbin, Thomas D.; Russell, Robert L.; Cocker, David R.; Scora, George; Maldonado, Hector; Johnson, Kent C.

    2016-12-01

    Gaseous and particle emissions from construction engines contribute an important fraction of the total air pollutants released into the atmosphere and are gaining increasing regulatory attention. Robust quantification of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions are necessary to inventory the contribution of construction equipment to atmospheric loadings. Theses emission inventories require emissions factors from construction equipment as a function of equipment type and modes of operation. While the development of portable emissions measurement systems (PEMS) has led to increased studies of construction equipment emissions, emissions data are still much more limited than for on-road vehicles. The goal of this research program was to obtain accurate in-use emissions data from a test fleet of newer construction equipment (model year 2002 or later) using a Code of Federal Requirements (CFR) compliant PEMS system. In-use emission measurements were made from twenty-seven pieces of construction equipment, which included four backhoes, six wheel loaders, four excavators, two scrapers (one with two engines), six bulldozers, and four graders. The engines ranged in model year from 2003 to 2012, in rated horsepower (hp) from 92 to 540 hp, and in hours of operation from 24 to 17,149 h. This is the largest study of off-road equipment emissions using 40 CFR part 1065 compliant PEMS equipment for all regulated gaseous and particulate emissions.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale’s Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor –I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex – CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location.

  7. Sounds and vibrations in the frozen Beaufort Sea during gravel island construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Charles R; Blackwell, Susanna B; McLennan, Miles Wm

    2008-02-01

    Underwater and airborne sounds and ice-borne vibrations were recorded from sea-ice near an artificial gravel island during its initial construction in the Beaufort Sea near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Such measurements are needed for characterizing the properties of island construction sounds to assess their possible impacts on wildlife. Recordings were made in February-May 2000 when BP Exploration (Alaska) began constructing Northstar Island about 5 km offshore, at 12 m depth. Activities recorded included ice augering, pumping sea water to flood the ice and build an ice road, a bulldozer plowing snow, a Ditchwitch cutting ice, trucks hauling gravel over an ice road to the island site, a backhoe trenching the sea bottom for a pipeline, and both vibratory and impact sheet pile driving. For all but one sound source (underwater measurements of pumping) the strongest one-third octave band was under 300 Hz. Vibratory and impact pile driving created the strongest sounds. Received levels of sound and vibration, as measured in the strongest one-third octave band for different construction activities, reached median background levels <7.5 km away for underwater sounds, <3 km away for airborne sounds, and <10 km away for in-ice vibrations.

  8. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirber, T. [NorthernSTAR, Minneaplolis, MN (United States); Mosiman, G. [NorthernSTAR, Minneaplolis, MN (United States); Ojczyk, C. [NorthernSTAR, Minneaplolis, MN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4 inches wide by 4 feet to 5 feet deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  9. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-10-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  10. Heavy construction equipment noise study using dosimetry and time-motion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Ellsworth R.; Yantek, David S.

    2005-09-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss continues to afflict workers in many occupational settings despite longstanding recognition of the problems and well-known methods of prevention and regulations. Sound levels associated with heavy construction equipment range from 80 to 120 dB(A) and power tools commonly used in construction produce sound levels up to 115 dB(A). The focus of the research was to determine the noise exposures of heavy construction equipment operators while documenting the workers' tasks, (i.e., hauling, moving, and/or pushing construction material). Time-motion studies were performed at the construction sites and were used to correlate the noise dosage with the work performed by equipment operators. The cumulative dose for the operator was then plotted with references to work tasks, to identify the tasks that caused the greatest noise exposure. Three construction sites were examined and located in the western Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio areas. The types of construction equipment studied included asphalt pavers, backhoes, bulldozers, compaction equipment, excavators, haul trucks, telehandlers, and wheeled loaders. The results showed that bulldozer operators consistently had the highest noise exposures, ranging from a NIOSH REL (Recommended Exposure Limit) dose of 844% to 25836% and an OSHA PEL (Permissible Exposure Limit) dose of 139% to 1397%.

  11. A practical procedure for the selection of time-to-failure models based on the assessment of trends in maintenance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louit, D.M. [Komatsu Chile, Av. Americo Vespucio 0631, Quilicura, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: rpascual@ing.puc.cl; Pascual, R. [Centro de Mineria, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Jardine, A.K.S. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ont., M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    Many times, reliability studies rely on false premises such as independent and identically distributed time between failures assumption (renewal process). This can lead to erroneous model selection for the time to failure of a particular component or system, which can in turn lead to wrong conclusions and decisions. A strong statistical focus, a lack of a systematic approach and sometimes inadequate theoretical background seem to have made it difficult for maintenance analysts to adopt the necessary stage of data testing before the selection of a suitable model. In this paper, a framework for model selection to represent the failure process for a component or system is presented, based on a review of available trend tests. The paper focuses only on single-time-variable models and is primarily directed to analysts responsible for reliability analyses in an industrial maintenance environment. The model selection framework is directed towards the discrimination between the use of statistical distributions to represent the time to failure ('renewal approach'); and the use of stochastic point processes ('repairable systems approach'), when there may be the presence of system ageing or reliability growth. An illustrative example based on failure data from a fleet of backhoes is included.

  12. n_TOF: a new experimental area under way

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    On Thursday 23 May, CERN celebrated the laying of the foundation stone of the new experimental area (EAR-2) of n_TOF – CERN’s neutron source facility*. Under a mild sun, Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, Enrico Chiaveri, spokesperson for the n_TOF collaboration, Frédérick Bordry, head of CERN’s Technology Department, and other important figures at CERN raised their glasses to the launch of this new scientific adventure.   Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, driving a backhoe at the EAR-2 foundation stone laying ceremony. “This new experimental area is very important as it shows the diversity of the science we are doing at CERN,” says Rolf Heuer. “One of the Laboratory’s goals is to build infrastructures and to do science that is unique, or at least world leading. And that is exactly what we are doing here.” The n_TOF collaboration is taking advantage of the long shutdown (LS1) for the const...

  13. Recognizing articulated objects using a region-based invariant transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Isaac; Ray, Manjit

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we present a new method for representing and recognizing objects, based on invariants of the object's regions. We apply the method to articulated objects in low-resolution, noisy range images. Articulated objects such as a back-hoe can have many degrees of freedom, in addition to the unknown variables of viewpoint. Recognizing such an object in an image can involve a search in a high-dimensional space that involves all these unknown variables. Here, we use invariance to reduce this search space to a manageable size. The low resolution of our range images makes it hard to use common features such as edges to find invariants. We have thus developed a new "featureless" method that does not depend on feature detection. Instead of local features, we deal with whole regions of the object. We define a "transform" that converts the image into an invariant representation on a grid, based on invariant descriptors of entire regions centered around the grid points. We use these region-based invariants for indexing and recognition. While the focus here is on articulation, the method can be easily applied to other problems such as the occlusion of fixed objects.

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Air port Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-10

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    US DOE/Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-10

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  16. Field and Laboratory Data From an Earthquake History Study of Scarps in the Hanging Wall of the Tacoma Fault, Mason and Pierce Counties, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alan R.; Personius, Stephen F.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Buck, Jason; Bradley, Lee-Ann; Henley, Gary; Liberty, Lee M.; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Witter, Robert C.; Koehler, R.D.; Schermer, Elizabeth R.; Nemser, Eliza S.; Cladouhos, Trenton T.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the effort to assess seismic hazard in the Puget Sound region, we map fault scarps on Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM, an application of LiDAR) imagery (with 2.5-m elevation contours on 1:4,000-scale maps) and show field and laboratory data from backhoe trenches across the scarps that are being used to develop a latest Pleistocene and Holocene history of large earthquakes on the Tacoma fault. We supplement previous Tacoma fault paleoseismic studies with data from five trenches on the hanging wall of the fault. In a new trench across the Catfish Lake scarp, broad folding of more tightly folded glacial sediment does not predate 4.3 ka because detrital charcoal of this age was found in stream-channel sand in the trench beneath the crest of the scarp. A post-4.3-ka age for scarp folding is consistent with previously identified uplift across the fault during AD 770-1160. In the trench across the younger of the two Stansberry Lake scarps, six maximum 14C ages on detrital charcoal in pre-faulting B and C soil horizons and three minimum ages on a tree root in post-faulting colluvium, limit a single oblique-slip (right-lateral) surface faulting event to AD 410-990. Stratigraphy and sedimentary structures in the trench across the older scarp at the same site show eroded glacial sediments, probably cut by a meltwater channel, with no evidence of post-glacial deformation. At the northeast end of the Sunset Beach scarps, charcoal ages in two trenches across graben-forming scarps give a close maximum age of 1.3 ka for graben formation. The ages that best limit the time of faulting and folding in each of the trenches are consistent with the time of the large regional earthquake in southern Puget Sound about AD 900-930.

  17. Three-Dimensional Investigation of a 5 m Deflected Swale along the San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain

    KAUST Repository

    Akciz, S. O.

    2014-10-21

    Topographic maps produced from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data are useful for paleoseismic and neotectonic research because they provide submeter representation of faulting-related surface features. Offset measurements of geomorphic features, made in the field or on a remotely sensed imagery, commonly assume a straight or smooth (i.e., undeflected) pre-earthquake geometry. Here, we present results from investigation of an ∼20 cm deep and >5 m wide swale with a sharp bend along the San Andreas fault (SAF) at the Bidart fan site in the Carrizo Plain, California. From analysis of LiDAR topography images and field measurements, the swale was initially interpreted as a channel tectonically offset ∼4:7 m. Our observations from exposures in four backhoe excavations and 25 hand-dug trenchettes show that even though a sharp bend in the swale coincides with the trace of the A.D. 1857 fault rupture, the swale formed after the 1857 earthquake and was not tectonically offset. Subtle fractures observed within a surficial gravel unit overlying the 1857 rupture trace are similar to fractures previously documented at the Phelan fan and LY4 paleoseismic sites 3 and 35 km northwest of Bidart fan, respectively. Collectively, the fractures suggest that a post-1857 moderate-magnitude earthquake caused ground cracking in the Carrizo and Cholame stretches of the SAF. Our observations emphasize the importance of excavation at key locations to validate remote and ground-based measurements, and we advocate more geomorphic characterization for each site if excavation is not possible.

  18. Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Basher, A.M.H. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

    1996-09-01

    To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical

  19. A Multifaceted Sampling Approach to Better Understanding Biogeochemical and Hydrogeological Controls on Uranium Mobility at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Riverton, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, W. L.; Johnson, R. H.; Campbell, S.; Bone, S. E.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding uranium mobility in subsurface environments is not trivial. Obtaining sufficient data to accurately represent soil and aquifer characteristics can require unique approaches that evolve with added site knowledge. At Riverton, the primary source of uranium mill tailings remaining from ore processing was removed but contaminant plumes have persisted longer than predicted by groundwater modeling. What are the primary mechanisms controlling plume persistence? DOE is conducting new characterization studies to assist our understanding of underlying biogeochemical and hydrogeological mechanisms affecting secondary sources. A variety of field sampling techniques are being sequentially employed including augering, trenching, pore water sampling, and installing multi-level wells. In August 2012, vadose zone soil samples from 34 locations and groundwater from 103 boreholes were collected with Geoprobe ® direct push rods. Lower than expected uranium concentrations in composited shallow soils indicated the need for more focused and deeper samples. In May 2014, soil samples containing evaporites were collected along the bank of the Little Wind River; elevated uranium concentrations in evaporite minerals correlated with plume configurations and reflect contaminated groundwater discharge at the river. In September 2014, hand anger samples collected by the river and oxbow lake also indicated the presence of organic rich zones containing elevated uranium (>50 mg/kg). Subsequent samples collected from five backhoe trenches in May 2015 revealed a highly heterogeneous vadose zone composed of clay, silt, sand and cobbles containing evaporites and organic rich zones which may interact with groundwater plumes.Plans for August 2015 include sonic drilling to obtain continuous cores from the surface down to the base of the surficial aquifer with multi-level monitoring wells constructed in each borehole to assess vertical variation in groundwater chemistry. Temporary well

  20. Multipurpose drive-over. Ajonkestaevae monikaeyttoekuivuri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivinen, K. (Tyoetehoseura, Helsinki (Finland)); Mononen, R. (Maaseutukeskusten Liitto, Helsinki (Finland))

    1992-01-01

    The usage and structural principle of a multipurpose drive-over floor dryer corresponds to that of a conventional dryer except that the floor structure in the former is such that it can withstand the weight of machines. Furthermore the method of filling and discharging the dryer must be appropriate for the handling of various products. A multipurpose drive-overfloor dryer is appropriate for self-construction and timber from the farm woodlot can be used in building it. The dryer lends itself to be constructed within existing farm facilities (e.g. the farms's machine hall). In its simplest form, the handling of material in a multipurpose drive-overfloor dryer can be performed using tractor-mounted accessories. The dryer is filled by reversing the trailer into it and then tipping its contents onto the floor. This takes little time, requires only a small amount of labour input and the receiving capacity is large. Discharging of dry material can be executed using the tractor's front-end loader or backhoe. The base structure study involved measurements of the trial floor static pressures when drying grain (oats and barley), small-bale hay and wood chips with varying air volumes and material thicknesses. The purpose of the static pressure measurements was to clarify the effect of drive-overfloor types on the counter pressure produced. In addition, the study provided information on the effect of the perforated area on static pressure. The static pressure measurements were conducted on six floor types. The surface material used on the floors consisted of perforated 1 mm and 2 mm in thickness, dryer beams and wire cloth.

  1. Environmental remediation following the Fukushima-Daiichi accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagawa, A.; Miyahara, K.; Nakayama, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    A wide area of Fukushima Prefecture was contaminated with radioactivity released by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The decontamination pilot projects conducted by JAEA aimed at demonstrating the applicability of different techniques to rehabilitate affected areas. As most radioactive cesium is concentrated at the top of the soil column and strongly bound to mineral surfaces, there are 3 options left to decrease the gamma dose rate (usually measured 1 m above the ground surface): the stripping of the contaminated topsoil (i.e. direct removal of cesium), the dilution by mixing and the soil profile inversion. The last two options do not generate waste. As the half-distance of {sup 137}Cs gammas in soil is in the order of 5-6 cm (depending on density and water content), the shielding by 50 cm of uncontaminated deep soil would theoretically reduce gamma doses by about 3 orders of magnitude. Which option is employed depends basically on the Cesium concentration in the topsoil, averaged over a 15-cm thickness. The JAEA's decontamination pilot projects focus on soil profile inversion and topsoil stripping. Two different techniques have been tested for the soil profile inversion: one is the reversal tillage by which surface soil of thickness of several tens of cm is reversed by using a tractor plough and the other is the complete interchanging of contaminated topsoil with uncontaminated subsoil by using a back-hoe. Reversal tillage with a tractor plough cost about 30 yen/m{sup 2}, which is an order of magnitude lower than that of topsoil-subsoil interchange (about 300 yen/m{sup 2}). Topsoil stripping is significantly more costly (between 550 yen/m{sup 2} and 690 yen/m{sup 2} according to the equipment used)

  2. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1985 Annual and Final Reports.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Ken

    1986-10-01

    The Hot Springs Fork of the Collawash River is a major sub-drainage in the Clackamas River drainage. Emphasis species for natural production are spring chinook, coho salmon, and winter steelhead. Increased natural production appears limited by a lack of quality rearing habitat. Habitat complexity over approximately 70% of accessible area to anadromous fish has been reduced over the last 40 years by numerous factors. Natural passage barriers limit anadromous fish access to over 7 miles of high quality habitat. In the first year of a multi-year effort to improve fish habitat in the Hot Springs Fork drainage, passage enhancement on two tributaries and channel rehabilitation on one of those tributaries was completed. Three waterfalls on Nohorn Creek were evaluated and passage improved on the uppermost waterfall to provide steelhead full access to 2.4 miles of good quality habitat. The work was completed in October 1985 and involved blasting three jump pools and two holding pools into the waterfall. On Pansy Creek, four potential passage barriers were evaluated and passage improvement work conducted on two logjams and one waterfall. Minor modifications were made to a waterfall to increase flow into a side channel which allows passage around the waterfall. Channel rehabilitation efforts on Pansy Creek (RM 0.0 to 0.3) to increase low flow pool rearing habitat and spawning habitat including blasting five pools into areas of bedrock substrate and using a track-mounted backhoe to construct instream structures. On site materials were used to construct three log sills, three boulder berms, a boulder flow deflector, and five log and boulder structures. Also, an alcove was excavated to provide overwinter rearing habitat. Pre-project monitoring consisting of physical and biological data collection was completed in the project area.

  3. Subsurface ices at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site: Assessing emplacement mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Mellon, M. T.; Skemer, P. A.; Shaw, A.; Morris, R. V.

    2010-12-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the emplacement of subsurface ices on Mars: vapor diffusion from the atmosphere, freezing of bodies of surface water (e.g., lakes or oceans), buried glaciers, or accumulation and burial of packed snow. These formation mechanisms predict different physical properties for the subsurface ices: vapor diffusion should produce pore ice, whereas other mechanisms should produce massive, relatively pure ice. NASA's Phoenix Lander uncovered two types of ice at its 2008 landing site on the northern plains of Mars: a light-toned ice (Dodo-Goldilocks) that broke into pieces during backhoe operations; and a hard, darker icy surface that had to be scraped to provide particulate materials for sampling (Snow White). Here, we use spectra from Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) and a non-linear mixing model with ice and soil components to determine the ice to soil ratio of the ices exposed at the Phoenix landing site. We find Dodo-Goldilocks consists of almost pure water ice. The darker icy material contains ~30 wt% ice (~55 vol%), indicating that it probably formed as pore ice between grains of soil. We conclude that these two types of ice represent two different emplacement mechanisms and periods of deposition. Snow White ice was probably deposited via vapor diffusion from the atmosphere. Dodo-Goldilocks ice was probably deposited through an ice-lens or needle ice mechanism. Buried snow or glacial ice is unlikely for Dodo-Goldilocks, given its restricted spatial extent and the fact that the site is covered by large rocks.

  4. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  5. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers

  6. Spatial Heterogeneity of Loess Tilled Slope Surface Roughness%黄土坡耕地地表糙度的空间异质性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 张青峰; 赵龙山; 王健; 吴发启

    2014-01-01

    Objective]The objective of this paper is to reveal the spatial heterogeneity of surface roughness of 4 typical loess tilled slopes during different erosive stages under a micro-scale (2 cm×2 cm) condition.[Method]When slopes with 4 different gradients and tillage measures were prepared (artificial backhoe, artificial digging, contour tillage and straight cultivated slope (check), an erosive rainfall with a rainfall intensity of 60 mm/h was carried out. Soil surface roughness relative elevation data points were taken by a laser scanner and analyzed with both the semivariogram function and fractal dimension models.[Result]The result of classical statistical analysis showed that the loess tillage slope surface roughness has a weak spatial variability. The result of the semivariogram analysis indicated that the loess tilled slope surface roughness had a higher spatial autocorrelation, their spatial autocorrelation scale of surface roughness ranged from 2.02 m to 3.82 m. The spatial heterogeneity caused by the spatial structure characteristic accounted for the greater proportion of the total heterogeneity. The fractal dimension analysis showed that the surface roughness had good fractal features, and it ranged from 1.59 to 1.91. With the increase of gradient, the spatial distribution of slope surface roughness tended to complex, its spatial heterogeneity was stronger. The spatial heterogeneities of the artificial backhoe (AB), artificial digging (AD) and contour tillage (CT) increase in turn within the scope of the small scale, and had a good effect on soil and water conservation.[Conclusion]The main reason for the differences of the spatial heterogeneity of surface roughness is the spatial structural characteristics formed by the integrated interaction of human farming and slope and the artificial cultivation. The space configuration pattern of surface roughness is mainly controlled by slope gradient factor in a smaller scale range, and by the rainfall with its

  7. Short-term recovery of soil physical, chemical, micro- and mesobiological functions in a new vineyard under organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, E. A. C.; Agnelli, A. E.; Fabiani, A.; Gagnarli, E.; Mocali, S.; Priori, S.; Simoni, S.; Valboa, G.

    2015-06-01

    Deep earthwork activities carried out before vineyard plantation can severely affect soil profile properties. As a result, soil features in the root environment are often much more similar to those of the underlying substratum than those of the original profile. The time needed to recover the original soil functions is ecologically relevant and may strongly affect vine phenology and grape yield, particularly under organic viticulture. The general aim of this work was to investigate soil resilience after vineyard pre-planting earthworks. In particular, an old and a new vineyard, established on the same soil type, were compared over a 5-year period for soil chemical, physical, micro- and mesobiological properties. The investigated vineyards (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Sangiovese) were located in the Chianti Classico district (central Italy), on stony and calcareous soils, and were not irrigated. The older vineyard was planted in 2000, after slope reshaping by bulldozing and back-hoe ploughing down to about 0.8-1.0 m. The new vineyard was planted in 2011, after equivalent earthwork practices carried out in the summer of 2009. Both vineyards were organically managed, and they were fertilized with compost only every autumn (1000 kg ha-1 per year). The new vineyard was cultivated by periodic tillage, while the old vineyard was managed with alternating grass-covered and tilled inter-rows. Soil samples were collected at 0-15 cm depth from fixed locations in each vineyard every spring from 2010 to 2014. The old vineyard was sampled in both tilled and grass-covered inter-rows. According to the results from physical and chemical analyses, the new vineyard, during the whole 2010-2014 period, showed lower total organic carbon, total nitrogen, carbon to nitrogen ratio and electrical conductivity, along with higher silt and total CaCO3 contents than the old vineyard, suggesting still-evolving equilibrium conditions. The microarthropod analysis showed significantly different

  8. Estudo dos efeitos auditivos e extra-auditivos da exposição ocupacional a ruído e vibração Auditory and extra-auditory effects of occupational exposure to noise and vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Fernandes

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Este estudo teve como objetivo investigar as queixas de saúde e achados audiológicos de dois grupos de trabalhadores. Forma de estudo: Clínico prospectivo randomizado. Material e método: Grupo 1- exposto a níveis de pressão sonora elevados e vibração transmitida por meio das mãos-braços nos trabalhadores que operam motorroçadeiras, e Grupo 2- exposto a níveis elevados de pressão sonora e vibração transmitida por meio do corpo inteiro nos trabalhadores que operam equipamentos pesados como pá-carregadeira, moto niveladora, retro-escavadeira e rolo compressor. Os 73 participantes passaram por entrevista, inspeção do meato acústico externo e audiometria tonal. Resultado: Em relação aos problemas de saúde, o grupo 2, exposto a vibração de corpo inteiro, é o que apresenta um maior número de queixas. Os trabalhadores do Grupo 1, sem exceção, fazem uso do protetor auditivo e apenas 4 (11% referem zumbido. No Grupo 2 nem todos os trabalhadores usam o protetor auditivo e 6 (17% referem apresentar zumbido. Entretanto, a porcentagem de audiogramas alterados é mais elevada no grupo 1, expostos a vibração transmitida por meio das mãos-braços. Conclusão: Este estudo revelou uma série de deficiências no acompanhamento de saúde dessas populações e demonstrou a necessidade da implantação de programas preventivos tanto no que se refere à exposição a níveis de pressão sonora elevados quanto à vibração.Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the health complaints and the audiological findings of 2 groups of workers. Study design: Clinical prospective randomized. Material and method: Group 1 was exposed to high sound pressure levels and vibration transmitted by hands and arms through the use of power brush cutter/string trimmers. Group 2 was exposed to high sound pressure levels and whole-body vibration transmitted by heavy machinery such as vibrating compactor rollers, skid-steer loaders, backhoes and

  9. Soil analyses for 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-DCP), sodium n-methyldithiocarbamate (metam-sodium), and their degradation products near Fort Hall Idaho, September 1999 through March 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliman, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Between September 1999 and March 2000, soil samples from the Fort Hall, Idaho, area were analyzed for two soil fumigants, 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-DCP) and sodium n-methyldithiocarbamate (metam-sodium), and their degradation products. Ground water is the only source of drinking water at Fort Hall, and the purpose of the investigation was to determine potential risk of ground-water contamination from persistence and movement of these pesticides in cropland soils. 1,3-DCP, metam-sodium, or their degradation products were detected in 42 of 104 soil samples. The samples were collected from 1-, 2-, and 3-foot depths in multiple backhoe trenches during four sampling events—before pesticide application in September; after application in October; before soil freeze in December; and after soil thaw in March. In most cases, concentrations of the pesticide compounds were at or near their laboratory minimum reporting limits. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 5035 was used as the guideline for soil sample preparation and analyses, and either sodium bisulfate (NaHSO4), an acidic preservative, or pesticide-free water was added to samples prior to analyses. Addition of NaHSO4 to the samples resulted in a greater number of compound detections, but pesticide-free water was added to most samples to avoid the strong reactions of soil carbonate minerals with the NaHSO4. As a result, nondetection of compounds in samples containing pesticide-free water did not necessarily indicate that the compounds were absent. Detections of these compounds were inconsistent among trenches with similar soil characteristics and histories of soil fumigant use. Compounds were detected at different depths and different trench locations during each sampling event. Overall results of this study showed that the original compounds or their degradation products can persist in soil 6 months or more after their application and are present to at least 3 feet below land surface in some areas. A few of

  10. D&D TECHNOLOGIES FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripp, Julia L.

    2003-02-27

    contaminated. Encapsulation Technologies, LLC has developed a patented process for eliminating airborne radioactivity and fixing contamination in place remotely without the need for people or equipment to enter the area being treated. The process uses a device called the Passive Aerosol Generator (PAG) to create an aerosol of a capture coating. The aerosol condenses on surfaces, capturing the contaminants in place. Use of this fogging technology will reduce or eliminate the requirement for glovebags and extensive contamination control during cutting and removal of ductwork. Demolition of building slabs and foundations is necessary at most DOE facilities undergoing D&D. The baseline method for their demolition at the INEEL is to use a hydraulic hammer on the end of a backhoe or trackhoe. However, the vibration of the hammer typically causes excessive wear and tear on the equipment (resulting in additional maintenance), and dust control can be a problem. The SureStrike rock breaker, or Hammerhead, is used commercially in the mining and demolition industries . The modular impact hammer attaches to a conventional frontend loader or excavator and can be used to break up oversized materials such as equipment pedestals and heavy reinforced concrete foundations. The Hammerhead uses a coiled spring that generates 100,000 psi of single-blow impact energy through a breaker rod. It takes about 3 seconds for the equipment operator to load the spring and deliver the blow. The Hammerhead reduces noise pollution because it uses no motors, hydraulics, or air, and it reduces dust pollution because the single-blow impact energy forces the energy down into the concrete, rubblizing the concrete below the surface while leaving the surface with only breaks/cracks instead of a lot of loose pieces. In addition, equipment maintenance is reduced, and safety is improved because the amount of ''fly rock'' is minimal.

  11. Aplicação de uma técnica alternativa de manejo físico do solo no cultivo de Eucalyptus grandis W.Hill (Myrtaceae Application of an alternative technique for physical soil management in cultivation of Eucalyptus grandis W.Hill (Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo de Maçaneiro

    2013-02-01

    areas by E. grandis are considerably sensitive to the initial conditions of soil preparation was applied the technique of roughening (variations relief alternating concave and convex surfaces to cause over time emergent properties that accelerate the process of plant growth. The study area is located on the Itajai River Basin, in Brusque, SC. This was divided into four smaller portions: two treatments with irregular (IR-A and IR-B and two others with regular treatments (R-A and R-B. The treatments consisted of irregular armhole opening, using a hydraulic backhoe, interspersed with 1 meter wide, 4 to 5 meters long and 0.5 meters deep. In regular treatments was adopted minimum tillage of the soil, where soil preparation was restricted to lines or planting holes. In the analysis of the development of E. grandis (height, diameter and breast height - DBH was found statistical differences between the techniques of soil preparation, and the highest values in treatments irregular. In plots irregular (IR-A and IR-B were found higher mean values of height (5.29 meters and 5.46 meters, stem diameter (45.65 mm and 45.4 mm and DBH (4.44 cm to 4.79 cm, respectively. It is assumed that the roughness effectively functioned as auxiliary components in the internalization of matter, retaining water, sediments and nutrients, a fact that should have enhanced and accelerated the growth of E. grandis.

  12. Integrating geomorphological mapping, InSAR, GPR and trenching for the identification and investigation of buried sinkholes in the mantled evaporite karst of the Ebro Valley (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco; Galve, Jorge Pedro; Lucha, Pedro; Bonachea, Jaime; Castañeda, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    bedrock sagging. (2) Around 70% of the sinkholes have been filled by man-made ground. (3) Subsidence has caused severe damage to many human structures, primarily due to the ongoing activity of pre-existing buried sinkholes. Consequently, the identification of sinkholes is the key for preventive planning and the delineation of the main risk areas. A total of eleven sinkholes (S1-S11) covering around 20% of the study area were mapped. Six of the sinkholes were buried and the largest one (S8), which occupies approximately 35,500 m2, partially coincides with the area previously selected for the construction of a housing state. The investigation was developed in three main phases. A preliminary sinkhole map was produced in phase I using: (a) aerial photographs and satellite images from different dates (1927, 1957, 1984, 2003, 2006, 2007), (b) detailed topographical maps from 1969 (1:2000) and 1971-73 (1:1000) with contour intervals of 1 m, (c) thorough field surveys including interviews to local people and inspection to human structures, and (d) radar interferometry. Deformation measurements were obtained from 54 interferograms generated by means of the Stable Point Network technique with 23 ENVISAT images acquired from May 2003 to July 2008. The InSAR analysis provides data on the temporal evolution of the subsidence (magnitude and rate) for coherent 20 m-sized pixels. During phase II, 26 GPR profiles with a total length of 2,290 m were conducted using a 400 MHz antenna. In phase III, 13 backhoe trenches up to 2.8 m deep and totalling 323 m were investigated following the methodology commonly used in paleoseismological studies. Two samples were obtained for radiocarbon dating in a trench dug at the margin of sinkhole S8. The aerial photographs, specially the stereoscopic images taken in 1957, were the most useful tool for the identification of buried sinkholes. They allowed us the detection of 9 sinkholes out of 11. The topographical maps depict 7 of the inventoried sinkholes

  13. Modeling of the height control system using artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R Tahavvor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Automation of agricultural and machinery construction has generally been enhanced by intelligent control systems due to utility and efficiency rising, ease of use, profitability and upgrading according to market demand. A broad variety of industrial merchandise are now supplied with computerized control systems of earth moving processes to be performed by construction and agriculture field vehicle such as grader, backhoe, tractor and scraper machines. A height control machine which is used in measuring base thickness is consisted of two mechanical and electronic parts. The mechanical part is consisted of conveyor belt, main body, electrical engine and invertors while the electronic part is consisted of ultrasonic, wave transmitter and receiver sensor, electronic board, control set, and microcontroller. The main job of these controlling devices consists of the topographic surveying, cutting and filling of elevated and spotted low area, and these actions fundamentally dependent onthe machine's ability in elevation and thickness measurement and control. In this study, machine was first tested and then some experiments were conducted for data collection. Study of system modeling in artificial neural networks (ANN was done for measuring, controlling the height for bases by input variable input vectors such as sampling time, probe speed, conveyer speed, sound wave speed and speed sensor are finally the maximum and minimum probe output vector on various conditions. The result reveals the capability of this procedure for experimental recognition of sensors' behavior and improvement of field machine control systems. Inspection, calibration and response, diagnosis of the elevation control system in combination with machine function can also be evaluated by some extra development of this system. Materials and Methods Designing and manufacture of the planned apparatus classified in three dissimilar, mechanical and electronic module, courses of