WorldWideScience

Sample records for backhoes

  1. Multidisciplinary Design and Collaborative Optimization for Excavator Backhoe Device

    OpenAIRE

    Yin Guang-qiu; Lin Shu-wen; Perlurst, D.B

    2014-01-01

    The excavator working device is a typical mechanical system of electromechanical liquid that is complex. Traditional optimization design methods are difficult to get global optimized results of excavator backhoe device through the serial mode of “mechanism-load-structure”. Thus, the theory of parallel collaborative optimization (CO) is applied. To establish a sophisticated CO model of the backhoe device, a certain excavator is investigated as a sample multidisciplinary CO (MDCO) d...

  2. Multidisciplinary Design and Collaborative Optimization for Excavator Backhoe Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Guang-qiu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The excavator working device is a typical mechanical system of electromechanical liquid that is complex. Traditional optimization design methods are difficult to get global optimized results of excavator backhoe device through the serial mode of “mechanism-load-structure”. Thus, the theory of parallel collaborative optimization (CO is applied. To establish a sophisticated CO model of the backhoe device, a certain excavator is investigated as a sample multidisciplinary CO (MDCO design. To generate the CO model, an improved optimization algorithm called the particle swarm-genetic algorithm (PS-GA)is proposed. To verify the MDCO design of the excavator backhoe device, a parameterized virtual prototype (VP of the backhoe device is established in ADAMS. This VP is optimized by applying the MDCO design results to the parameterized VP. The VP of the backhoe device is also optimized by a single discipline when the optimization results from a single discipline are inputted into the parameterized VP. Both optimized VPs are simulated under similar conditions, and results show that in the MDCO design, the arm crowd force of the backhoe device is 8.1% stronger than that in the design optimized by a single discipline under constant power and oil pressure conditions. Similarly, breakout force increased by approximately 8.3%. The quality (volume of the entire backhoe device decreased by 9.5%; however, the maximum stress of each characteristic partition changed only slightly. Therefore, the MDCO design effectively and practically addresses problems regarding the optimization of the design of complex mechanical systems.

  3. Experimenting with Electrical Load Sensing on a Backhoe Loader

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2005-01-01

    Where traditional load sensing is made using hydro-mechanical regulators and load pressure is fed back hydraulically, electrical load sensing employs the usage of electronic sensors and electrically actuated components. This brings forth new possibilities, but also imposes problems concerning...... dynamic performance and stability. In this paper the possibilities for implementing electrical load sensing (ELS) on a backhoe loader is investigated. Major components in the system are modelled and verified, and a linear model of the pump is presented, which is used for designing the pump controller....... By comparing results from linear analyses performed on both the conventional hydraulic load sensing system (HLS) and the modified electrical load sensing system, it is concluded that system performance closely matching the conventional system is obtainable....

  4. Development of a portable teleoperated robot for the manipulation of a backhoe shovel for the restoration of disaster-stricken sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshihiko; Sakai, Yosiharu; Konomi, Yosiyuki; Chayama, Kazuhiro; Minamoto, Masahiko; Matsunaga, Katsuya

    1999-11-01

    Restoration activities after disasters such as landslides or rock avalanches require rapid action, but in fact, in most cases these activities are very inefficient because of the danger of secondary disasters. A system which can operate reconstruction machinery by remote control was therefore developed, and it was installed on general-purpose construction machines (backhoe shovels). Control performance experiments and field experiments on this developed system were carried out, and its effectiveness was confirmed.

  5. Structure Analysis and Design Improvement of Transmission Rocker Arm for Backhoe Loader%挖掘装载机传动摇臂的结构分析与设计改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王虎奇

    2011-01-01

    挖掘装载机的传动摇臂是挖掘装载机传递载荷实现装卸与运输工作的关键部件之一,同时也是挖掘装载机在工作中最容易损坏的部件之一.据挖掘装载机传动摇臂的开裂反馈信息,对传动摇臂的结构特点与承载特点进行了全面分析,总结出传动摇臂在作业过程中的工况与载荷.利用ANSYS软件分析出了导致传动摇臂开裂的原因,并就此提出了设计改进方案.改进后传动摇臂的强度比改进前提高了29%.改进后的传动摇臂已经投入市场使用,不再有开裂反馈,证明了分析与改进的科学性与正确性.%Transmission rocker arm for backhoe loader is one of the key parts to transmitting load to realize load and unload and transportation. At the same time it is a easy to damage part in the operation of backhoe loader. The analysis of structural and bearing load characteristic of transmission rocker arm of backhoe loader is carried out fully according to its crack feedback, and its loads and work conditions in operation are summarized. The reason of crack is gotten by ANSYS analysis and an improvement design is put forward. The structure strength of improvement transmission rocker arm is improved by 29% than before. And the improved rocker arm is used abroadly without crack feedback. It can be seen that the improvement design is scientic and right.

  6. 29 CFR 1926.602 - Material handling equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the rear to be used in reverse gear unless the equipment has in operation a reverse signal alarm... arrangement for tractor operation, even though back-hoes, breakers, or other similar attachments are used...

  7. Power management in hydraulically actuated mobile equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2008-01-01

    model of a backhoe loader is first presented. Based on this model and the dynamic properties of the system, a generally applicable power management algorithm is developed based on an optimization procedure, which takes into account the dynamics of the system and different modes of operation...

  8. SOIL-TOOL INTERACTION AS A REVIEW FOR DIGGING OPERATION OF MINI HYDRAULIC EXCAVATOR

    OpenAIRE

    BHAVESHKUMAR P. PATEL,; DR. J. M. PRAJAPATI

    2011-01-01

    Since the late 50’s hydraulics have been the systems of choice where high force-to-weight ratios are required. Today hydraulic excavators are widely used in construction, mining, excavation, and forestryapplications. The skilled operator also cannot know about the terrain condition, soil parameters, and the soil-tool interaction forces exerted during excavation operation are required to find because these forces helpful for better design of the tool, backhoe parts and for trajectory planning....

  9. Papermill sludge amendments, tree protection and tree establishment on an abandoned coal minesoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, D.A.; Boutelle, D.A.; Larson, M.M.; Smith, W.D.; Vimmerstedt, J.P. [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States). School of Natural Resources

    1997-09-01

    The authors measured survival, growth, and foliar nutrition of white ash (Fraxinus americana L.), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.), and black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) on a regraded minesoil (Typic Udorthent, pH 2.9) treated with four combinations of papermill sludge depth by incorporation methods. They also compared tree performance when protected from mammal damage by tube, netting, or no shelters. Sludge rates were approximately 860 Mg ha{sup -1} for a 15-cm depth and 3450 Mg ha{sup -1} for a 60-cm depth. After 4 yr, tree survival was 65% when either 15 or 60 -cm depth. After 4 yr, tree survival was 65% when either 15 or 60 cm of sludge was deep incorporated by a backhole. Survival was 43% if 15 cm of sludge was rototill incorporated and 3% if 45 cm of sludge was surface applied over the rotoiller-incorporated sludge (60 cm total sludge depth). Trees were tallest (236 cm) on 15 cm-backhoed, intermediate (204 cm) on 60 cm backhoed, and shortest (130 cm) on 15 cm rotilled treatments. Ash (56% survival) survived better than sycamore (40%) and walnut (36%). Tree survival was best (61%) in tubes, intermediate (43%) in nets, and worst (28%) with no protection. Ash and walnut were tallest (177 cm) in tubes, intermediate (124 cm) in nets, and shortest (103 cm) with no protection. Sycamore height (305 cm) was not affected by the shelters. Foliar nutrition of trees was adequate except for possible low P in ash. In summary, tree survival and growth were good if sludge was incorporated by backhoeing and trees were protected by tube shelters. 38 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Remote Excavation System technology evaluation report: Buried Waste Robotics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This document describes the results from the Remote Excavation System demonstration and testing conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during June and July 1993. The purpose of the demonstration was to ascertain the feasibility of the system for skimming soil and removing various types of buried waste in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements, and to compare the performances of manual and remote operation of a backhoe. The procedures and goals of the demonstration were previously defined in The Remote Excavation System Test Plan, which served as a guideline for evaluating the various components of the system and discussed the procedures used to conduct the tests.

  11. Human Machine Interaction by Simulation of Dynamics of Construction Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Thomas Heegaard

    different kinds of machinery; an articulated backhoe loader and an articulated dump truck. In this work a standardized procedure containing a set of duty cycles for measuring and declaring whole-body vibrations has been proposed for both of these machines. The result of the measuring is important......-body vibration exposure was more than 20 percent and at the same time the fuel consumption was reduced significant. Training of operators is hence beneficial for both employees and employers of the construction industry. The whole-body vibration exposure on operators of dump trucks are dominated by off-road...

  12. Remote Excavation System technology evaluation report: Buried Waste Robotics Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the results from the Remote Excavation System demonstration and testing conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during June and July 1993. The purpose of the demonstration was to ascertain the feasibility of the system for skimming soil and removing various types of buried waste in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements, and to compare the performances of manual and remote operation of a backhoe. The procedures and goals of the demonstration were previously defined in The Remote Excavation System Test Plan, which served as a guideline for evaluating the various components of the system and discussed the procedures used to conduct the tests

  13. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Norris Brook Crossing Peabody, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted August 17--19, 1992, at the Norris Brook crossing in the town of Peabody, Essex County, Massachusetts. The pipeline at this site was installed during September and October 1990. A backhoe was used to install the pipeline. The pipe was assembled on the adjacent upland and slid into the trench, after which the backhoe was used again to fill the trench and cover the pipeline. Within two years after pipeline construction, a dense vegetative community, composed predominantly of native perennial species, had become established on the ROW. Compared with adjacent natural areas undisturbed by pipeline installation, there was an increase in purple loosestrife and cattail within the ROW, while large woody species were excluded from the ROW. As a result of the ROW`s presence, habitat diversity, edge-type habitat, and species diversity increased within the site. Crooked-stem aster, Aster prenanthoides (a species on the Massasschusetts list of plants of special concern), occurred in low numbers in the adjacent natural areas and had reinvaded the ROW in low numbers.

  14. Perencanaan Disain Deep Dig Arm pada Kapal Water Witch Untuk Pengerukan Sampah di Kali Mas Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Bambang Musriyadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kali Mas merupaka salah satu Sungai di Surabaya yang bermanfaat bagi hajat hidup penduduk Surabaya,Namun seiring berjalan waktu Kali Mas mengalami pendangkalan dan polusi sampah padat akibat pembuangan sampah sembarangan.Oleh karena itu penting untuk melakuakan pengerukan sendimen dan sampah yang efektif dan tepat agar tidak menggangu fungsi utama dari Kali Mas,maka perlu suatu alat untuk pengerukan,Backhoe dreger merupak alat yang tepat untuk pengerukan, akan tetapi harus disesuaikan lengan penerukannya agar efektif dalam beroperasi.Dalam pembuatan Tugas Akhir ini akan di disain Boom dan Arm dari Backhoe dreger untuk pengerukan di Kali mas di Surabaya.Sesuai dengan Kebutuhan dan aspek pertimbangan ukuran kapal telah ditentukan disain Boom dengan panjang 4.6m dan arm 2.1m dengan kapasitas Bucket 0.56 m3 .Dengan pemilihan matrial   Carbon Stell Sheet (SS 1023 dan ketebalan plat 10  mm,metode yang digunakan untuk analisa pembebanan adalah stress analisis pada Program Solid work,dan sebagai pertimbangan kelayakan

  15. Earth-moving equipment as base machines in forest work. Final report of an NSR project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Jerry [ed.

    1997-12-31

    Excavators have been used for forest draining for a long time in the Nordic countries. Only during the 1980s they were introduced as base machines for other forest operations, such as mounding, processing, harvesting, and road construction and road maintenance. Backhoe loaders were introduced in forestry at a somewhat later stage and to a smaller degree. The number of this type of base machines in forestry is so far small and is increasing very slowly. The NSR project `Earth moving equipment as base machines in forest work` started in 1993 and the project ended in 1995. The objective of the project was to obtain an overall picture of this type of machines up to a point where the logs are at landing site, ready for transportation to the industry. The project should cover as many aspects as possible. In order to obtain this picture, the main project was divided into sub projects. The sub projects separately described in this volume are (1) Excavators in ditching operations and site preparation, (2) Backhoe loaders in harvesting operations, (3) Excavators in wood cutting operations, (4) Tracked excavators in forestry operations, (5) Crawler versus wheeled base machines for single-grip harvester, and (6) Soil changes - A comparison between a wheeled and a tracked forest machine

  16. Scour protection for wind turbine foundations on highly erodible sea bottom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottesen Hansen, N.E.

    2002-12-01

    Scour around offshore structures is well known. It is caused by the strong eddy formation at the base of the structures protruding from the sea bottom. The strong vortices result in an amplified effective shear stress working on the sea bottom surface adjacent to the structure. When the surrounding sea bottom is lowered the scour protection will end up being a cap on a small hill and when the slopes are getting too steep the scour protection will roll or slide down the sides. It will loose its cohesion and therefore its integrity. This will take place irrespective of the type of scour protection material and the type of scour protection. This report describes scour protections, which can deal with this particular problem. Such a scour protection must be able to sustain the following loads: Be able to follow the lowering of the seabed on its way down; Be resistant to edge scour (scour around the perimeter of the scour protection). The installation of scour protection is not straightforward because the developed scour hole may be very uneven. It will be highly impractical to survey the hole although it can be done. There will be power cables etc. obstructing for ROV's or instrumented backhoe arms. Therefore the recommended method is to assume that the scour hole is developed and to place the scour protection material evenly around the foundation. In practice this is done by fall pipes positioned from a barge or by an instrumented backhoe. The procedure will be as follows: The outline of the scour hole is surveyed by a ROV (eye ball) and the status of the power cables are investigated; If the tie-in of the power cables are hanging as free spans, material shall be dumped on these spans in order to cover them. This material shall have a size, which will not be harmful to the cable during a dumping; Alternatively the tie-in takes place through an armoured flex-pipe that can sustain the impact from the stone dumping. Hence, in this case the stone dumping can commence

  17. World War I chemical weapons bunker engineering evaluation and cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, C.A.; Crotteau, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides a review of the US Army Corps of Engineers development and execution of a CERCLA chemical weapons and soil removal from two World War 1 underground test bunkers. The non-time critical removal action was completed from October 1994 to January 1995 in conjunction with Operation Safe Removal, Spring Valley, Washington, D.C. On January 5, 1993, a startled backhoe operator unearthed three 75mm artillery shells, exposing the legacy of a World War 1 (WWI) chemical weapons test facility in the midst of the nation`s capitol. That discovery, made in an exclusive residential neighborhood, prompted an intensive two year environmental cleanup. The Army immediately responded to the chemical ordnance threat, initiating Operation Safe Removal, a $20 million emergency response action and remedial investigation.

  18. Application of system engineering processes to analyze and predict engine cooling fan system noise for off-highway machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Christopher P.; Mann, J. Adin

    2005-09-01

    System Engineering processes were applied to create a Cooling Fan System Noise Analysis Tool for a back-hoe loader machine. The Cooling Fan System Noise Analysis Tool combined elements of aeroacoustic theory, Fan Law, sound power measurements and particle image velocimetry into a single computer analysis tool. The cooling fan system consisted of a cooling fan, multiple radiators in front of the cooling fan, a shroud, a mock engine behind the cooling fan, and a simulated engine compartment. A vortex flow structure was measured in front of the cooling fan. The cooling fan system sound power spectrum was measured. The radiated sound power spectrum for the vortex interaction with the fan blades was calculated. Measured and predicted cooling fan system sound power results were compared. The overall structure and approach will be presented along with an overview of the theory and initial results.

  19. Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Reducing Extra-Terrestrial Excavation Forces with Percussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert; Schuler, Jason M.; Smith, Jonathan Drew; Nick, Andrew J.; Lippitt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    High launch costs and mission requirements drive the need for low mass excavators with mobility platforms, which in turn have little traction and excavation reaction capacity in low gravity environments. This presents the need for precursor and long term future missions with low mass robotic mining technology to perform In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) tasks. This paper discusses a series of experiments that investigate the effectiveness of a percussive digging device to reduce excavation loads and thereby the mass of the excavator itself. A percussive mechanism and 30" wide pivoting bucket were attached at the end of the arm simulating a basic backhoe with a percussion direction tangent to the direction of movement. Impact energies from 13.6J to 30.5J and frequencies from 0 BPM to 700 BPM were investigated. A reduction in excavation force of as much as 50% was achieved in this experimental investigation.

  1. In-Situ Hydraulic Conductivities of Soils and Anomalies at a Future Biofuel Production Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, M. F.; Jackson, C. R.; Hale, J. C.; Sletten, H. R.

    2010-12-01

    Forested hillslopes of the Upper Coastal Plain at the Savannah River Site, SC, feature a shallow clay loam argillic layer with low median saturated hydraulic conductivity. Observations from a grid of shallow, maximum-rise piezometers indicate that perching on this clay layer is common. However, flow measurements from an interflow-interception trench indicate that lateral flow is rare and most soil water percolates through the clay layer. We hypothesize that the lack of frequent lateral flow is due to penetration of the clay layer by roots of pine trees. We used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map the soil structure and potential anomalies, such as root holes, down to two meters depth at three 10×10-m plots. At each plot, a 1×10-m trench was later back-hoe excavated along a transect that showed the most anomalies on the GPR maps. Each trench was excavated at 0.5-m intervals until the clay layer was reached (two plots were excavated to a final depth of 0.875 m and the third plot was excavated to a final depth of 1.0 m). At each interval, compact constant-head permeameters (CCHPs) were used to measure in-situ hydraulic conductivities in the clay-loam matrix and in any visually apparent anomalies. Conductivity was also estimated using a second 1×10-m transect of CCHP measurements taken within randomly placed augur holes. Additional holes targeted GPR anomalies. The second transect was created in case the back-hoe impacted conductivity readings. High-conductivity anomalies were also visually investigated by excavating with a shovel. Photographs of soil wetness were taken at visually apparent anomalies with a multispectral camera. We discovered that all visually apparent anomalies found are represented on the GPR maps, but that not all of the predicted anomalies on the GPR maps are visually apparent. We discovered that tree root holes create anomalies, but that there were also many conductivity anomalies that could not be visually distinguished from low

  2. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-10-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  3. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirber, T. [NorthernSTAR, Minneaplolis, MN (United States); Mosiman, G. [NorthernSTAR, Minneaplolis, MN (United States); Ojczyk, C. [NorthernSTAR, Minneaplolis, MN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4 inches wide by 4 feet to 5 feet deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  4. Development of robotics technology for remote characterization and remediationof buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection, characterization, and excavation of buried objects and materials are important steps in the restoration of subsurface disposal sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE), through its Buried Waste Robotics Program, is developing a Remote Characterization System (RCS) to address the needs of remote subsurface characterization and, in a joint program with the US Army, is developing a teleoperated excavator. Development of the RCS is based on recent DOE remote characterization testing and demonstrations performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The RCS, which will be developed and refined over a two- to three-year period, is designed to (1) increase safety by removing on-site personnel from hazardous areas, (2) remotely acquire real-time data from multiple sensors, (3) increase cost-effectiveness and productivity by partial automation of the data collection process and by gathering and evaluating data from multiple sensors in real time, and (4) reduce costs for other waste-related development programs through joint development efforts and reusable standardized subsystems. For retrieval of characterized waste, the Small Emplacement Excavator, an existing US Army backhoe that is being converted to teleoperated control, will be used to demonstrate the feasibility of retrofitting commercial equipment for high-performance remote operations

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale's Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor-I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex-CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location

  6. Sounds and vibrations in the frozen Beaufort Sea during gravel island construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Charles R; Blackwell, Susanna B; McLennan, Miles Wm

    2008-02-01

    Underwater and airborne sounds and ice-borne vibrations were recorded from sea-ice near an artificial gravel island during its initial construction in the Beaufort Sea near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Such measurements are needed for characterizing the properties of island construction sounds to assess their possible impacts on wildlife. Recordings were made in February-May 2000 when BP Exploration (Alaska) began constructing Northstar Island about 5 km offshore, at 12 m depth. Activities recorded included ice augering, pumping sea water to flood the ice and build an ice road, a bulldozer plowing snow, a Ditchwitch cutting ice, trucks hauling gravel over an ice road to the island site, a backhoe trenching the sea bottom for a pipeline, and both vibratory and impact sheet pile driving. For all but one sound source (underwater measurements of pumping) the strongest one-third octave band was under 300 Hz. Vibratory and impact pile driving created the strongest sounds. Received levels of sound and vibration, as measured in the strongest one-third octave band for different construction activities, reached median background levels <7.5 km away for underwater sounds, <3 km away for airborne sounds, and <10 km away for in-ice vibrations.

  7. A Survey of Mining and Tailings Disposal Practices of Selected Artisanal and Small Scale Mining Companies in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiri G. Amedjoe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Management of small scale mining operations for maximum profitability with good environmental stewardship requires careful planning of mining and tailings disposal strategies. Field studies and observations of eleven selected artisanal and small-scale gold mining companies winning gold from alluvial (placer source mostly, but also mine out cropping and underground quartz veins where available from the Takwaian and Birimian Formations in southwestern Ghana. Excavation is either by pitting or using backhoes. Sluicing, panning followed by mercury amalgamation and then roasting to recover the gold is the beneficiation method in use. Riverine waste rocks/tailings disposal is the main management invoked, however some companies do sell their waste to construction firms. Environmentally mining operations are impacting rivers with siltation, mercury pollution, channel diversions and possibly change in heavy metals concentration and water chemistry. Vast arable lands are degraded leaving peasant farmers with no livelihood due to failure by concessionaires to reclaim lands after closure. Only two companies out of the eleven somehow demonstrated environmental consciousness by constructing small tailings dam and backfilling some pits.

  8. Houdini: Site and locomotion analysis-driven design of an in-tank mobile cleanup robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes design and locomotion analysis efforts to develop a new reconfigurable and collapsible working machine, dubbed Houdini, to remotely clean up hazardous-waste and petroleum storage tanks. The tethered robot system is designed to allow remote entry through man-way openings as small as 0.61 m in diameter, after which it expands its locomotors and opens up its collapsible backhoe/manipulator and plow to subsequently perform waste or material handling operations. The design is optimized to meet stringent site and safety requirements, and represents a viable alternative to (1) the long-reach manipulation systems proposed for hazardous storage tank cleanup, and (2) confined-entry manual cleanup approaches. The system development has been funded to provide waste mobilization and removal solutions for the hazardous waste storage tanks in the Department of Energy (DoE) Fernald and Oak Ridge complexes. Other potential applications areas are the cleanup of heavy-crude petroleum storage tanks. The author has developed a fully operational prototype which is currently undergoing testing

  9. Explosive ordinance disposal technology demonstration using the telerobotic small emplacement excavator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, B.L.; Killough, S.M.; Thompson, D.H.; Dinkins, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics & Process Systems Div.

    1994-06-01

    The small emplacement excavator (SEE) is a ruggedized military vehicle with backhoe and front loader used by the US Army for explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), combat engineer, and general utility excavation activities. In order to evaluate the feasibility of removing personnel from the vehicle during the high risk EOD excavation tasks a development and demonstration project was initiated to evaluate performance capabilities of the SEE under telerobotic control. This feasibility study was performed at the request of the Ordinance Missile and Munitions Center and School (OMMCS) at the Redstone Arsenal to help define requirements for further joint service development activities. Development of a telerobotic SEE (TSEE) was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a project funded jointly by the US Army Project Manager for Ammunition Logistics (PM-AMMOLOG) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). A technology demonstration of the TSEE was conducted at McKinley Range, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama, on September 13--17, 1993. The primary objective of the demonstration was to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of remote EOD. During the demonstration, approximately 40 EOD specialists were instructed on telerobotic operation of the TSEE and then were asked to complete a series of simulated EOD tasks. Upon completion of the tasks, participants completed an evaluation of the system including human factors performance data.

  10. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration work plan for Corrective Action Unit 126: Closure of aboveground storage tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This plan addresses the closure of several aboveground storage tanks in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. The unit is currently identified as Corrective Action Unit 126 in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and is listed as having six Corrective Action Sites. This plan addresses the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration closure for five of the six sites. Four of the CASs are located at the Engine Test Stand complex and one is located in the Central Support Area. The sites consist of aboveground tanks, two of which were used to store diesel fuel and one stored Nalcool (an antifreeze mixture). The remaining tanks were used as part of a water demineralization process and stored either sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide, and one was used as a charcoal adsorption furnace. Closure will be completed by removal of the associated piping, tank supports and tanks using a front end loader, backhoe, and/or crane. When possible, the tanks will be salvaged as scrap metal. The piping that is not removed will be sealed using a cement grout

  11. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration closure report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical underground storage tank release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the site characterization of three historical underground storage tank (UST) petroleum hydrocarbon release sites identified as 25-3101-1, 25-3102-3, and 25-3152-1. The sites are located within the Nevada Test Site in Area 25 at Buildings 3101, 3102, and 3152. The characterization was completed to support administrative closure of the sites. Characterization was completed using drilling equipment to delineate the extent of hydrocarbon impact. Clean closure had been previously attempted at each of these sites using backhoe equipment without success due to adjacent structures, buried utilities, or depth restrictions associated with each site. Although the depth and extent of hydrocarbon impact was determined to be too extensive for clean closure, it was verified through drilling that the sites should be closed through an administrative closure. The Nevada Administrative Code ''A Through K'' evaluation completed for each site supports that there is no significant risk to human health or the environment from the impacted soils remaining at each site

  12. 1996 Buyer's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Buyer's Guide consists of two sections: a list of vendors by category and an alphabetical list of vendors. The type of equipment and services include: air compressors, air conditioning, gas analysis, pipe anchors, anodes, gas appliances, augers, backhoes, pipe bending machines, billing systems, bits, blasting equipment, gas boilers, boring equipment, gas burners, calorimeters, well casings, cathodic protection equipment and surveys, coating machines, coatings, cogeneration equipment, gas heaters, communications equipment, compactors, compressor stations, computer software, flow computers, portable computers, connectors, consulting services, control equipment, cooling systems, corrosion control systems, couplings, cranes, cutting tools, data acquisition systems, dehydration equipment, gas detectors, drilling machines, engine controls and monitors, engineering services, diesel engines, gas engines, excavators, filters, financial services, fireplace equipment, pipe fittings, flanges, flowmeters, food services, fork lifts, gas furnaces, gas exploration, gas marketing services, gas processing, gas production, gas storage, gas transmission, electric generators, heat exchangers, heating systems, hydrostatic testing services, information systems, instruments, insulation, insurance, expansion joints, leak detectors, legal services, lightning protection, lubricants, meter reading services, meter sets, gas meters, NGV equipment, nondestructive test equipment, odorants, offshore drilling, pigs, pipes, pipe maintenance services, pressure relief valves, pressure vessels, pumps, recording equipment, regulators, risers, safety equipment, gas scrubbers, sealants, security systems, separators, SCADA equipment, survey instruments, tanks, telemetering equipment, tractors, training, trenching equipment, gas turbines, underwater tools, valve actuators, valves, vibration analyzers, gas water heaters, weld inspection, welding equipment, and wires and cables

  13. Concrete decontamination and demolition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Environmental Control Technology, requested Nuclear Energy Services to prepare a handbook for the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of DOE-owned and commercially-owned radioactive facilities. the objective of the handbook is to provide the nuclear industry with guidance on the state-of-the-art methods and equipment available for decommissioning and to provide the means to estimate decommissioning costs and environmental impact. The methods available for concrete decontamination and demolition are summarized to provide an overview of some of the state-of-the-art techniques to be discussed at this workshop. The pertinent information on each method will include the selection factors such as the rate of performance in terms of concrete removal per unit time (cubic yards per day), manpower required by craft, unit cost (dollars per cubic yard) and the advantages and disadvantages. The methods included in this overview are those that have been routinely used in nuclear and nonnuclear applications or demonstrated in field tests. These methods include controlled blasting, wrecking ball or slab, backhoe mounted ram, flame torch, thermic lance, rock splitter, demolition compound, sawing, core stitch drilling, explosive cutting, paving breaker and power chisel, drill and spall, scarifying, water cannon and grinding

  14. Development and demonstration of a telerobotic excavation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Barry L.; Thompson, David H.; Killough, Stephen M.; Dinkins, Marion A.

    1994-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing remote excavation technologies for the Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of Technology Development, Robotics Technology Development Program, and also for the Department of Defense (DOD) Project Manager for Ammunition Logistics. This work is being done to meet the need for remote excavation and removal of radioactive and contaminated buried waste at several DOE sites and unexploded ordnance at DOD sites. System requirements are based on the need to uncover and remove waste from burial sites in a way that does not cause unnecessary personnel exposure or additional environmental contamination. Goals for the current project are to demonstrate dexterous control of a backhoe with force feedback and to implement robotic operations that will improve productivity. The Telerobotic Small Emplacement Excavator is a prototype system that incorporates the needed robotic and telerobotic capabilities on a commercially available platform. The ability to add remote dexterous teleoperation and robotic operating modes is intended to be adaptable to other commercially available excavator systems.

  15. Large-scale vertical shaft excavation using super-open caisson system. Construction of Tamasato vertical shaft (Ishioka vertical shaft No.5); Jidoka open caisson koho ni yoru daikibo tatekui no kussaku. Tamasato tateko (Ishioka dai5 tateko) shinsetsu koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanimura, D. [Ministry of Construction, Tokyo (Japan); Ueda, J.; Tani, Y. [Konoike Construction Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-07-25

    The above-named work is part of the Ministry of Construction`s water conveyance system construction work for Lake Kasumigaura. The super-open caisson system (SOCS) is a method developed from the conventional open caisson method by enlarging the construction area, improving construction accuracy, enhancing rationalization, etc. This report discusses the first application of the new system. SOCS comprises an automatic excavation/soil-lifting system, consisting of a back-hoe type automatic submarine excavator and an automatic soil-lifter of the bridge crane type, and an automatic settlement management system that automatically controls a press-in jack on the real-time basis in compliance with information from various sensors installed on the driven body of the press-in type open caisson. In view of the results of the execution of this construction work using the new SOCS system, it is acknowledged that the automatic excavation/soil-lifting system is accurate enough to manage caisson settlement and that its handling of hard sandy soil is so efficient as to satisfy the designed performance specifications. 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. n_TOF: a new experimental area under way

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    On Thursday 23 May, CERN celebrated the laying of the foundation stone of the new experimental area (EAR-2) of n_TOF – CERN’s neutron source facility*. Under a mild sun, Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, Enrico Chiaveri, spokesperson for the n_TOF collaboration, Frédérick Bordry, head of CERN’s Technology Department, and other important figures at CERN raised their glasses to the launch of this new scientific adventure.   Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, driving a backhoe at the EAR-2 foundation stone laying ceremony. “This new experimental area is very important as it shows the diversity of the science we are doing at CERN,” says Rolf Heuer. “One of the Laboratory’s goals is to build infrastructures and to do science that is unique, or at least world leading. And that is exactly what we are doing here.” The n_TOF collaboration is taking advantage of the long shutdown (LS1) for the const...

  17. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace

    2007-10-01

    This report describes the cultural resource monitoring activities of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Office during fiscal year 2007 (FY 2007). In FY 2007, 40 localities were revisited: two locations of heightened Shoshone-Bannock tribal sensitivity, four caves, three butte/craters, twelve prehistoric archaeological sites, two historic stage stations, nine historic homesteads, a portion of Goodale’s Cutoff of the Oregon Trail, a portion of historic trail T-16, one World War II dump, four buildings from the World War II period, and Experimental Breeder Reactor –I, a modern scientific facility and National Historic Landmark. Several INL project areas were also monitored in FY 2007. This included direct observation of ground disturbing activities within the Power Burst Facility (PBF, now designated as the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex – CITRC), backfilling operations associated with backhoe trenches along the Big Lost River, and geophysical surveys designed to pinpoint subsurface unexploded ordnance in the vicinity of the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area. Surprise checks were also made to three ongoing INL projects to ensure compliance with INL CRM Office recommendations to avoid impacts to cultural resources. Although some impacts were documented, no significant adverse effects that would threaten the National Register eligibility of any resource were observed at any location.

  18. Design and construction of a soil bentonite cut-off wall for Suncor's South Tailings Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, B. [Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Bowron, M. [Suncor Energy Inc., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Commissioned in July 2006, Suncor's South Tailings Pond (STP) is an external oil sands tailings storage facility with a footprint of 2300 hectares including infrastructure. The Southwest cut-off wall was completed in 2008, forming one of four principal seepage management systems for the STP. The cut-off wall consists of soil bentonite backfill from native materials from the wall excavation. Construction of the wall utilized both a long-stick back-hoe and crane mounted clamshell to excavate the wall under bentonite slurry. This paper discussed the construction of the cut-off wall as well as the the field and laboratory testing programs that determined the soil-bentonite mix. It also described the quality assurance and quality control programs conducted during construction. Last, the paper provided a brief discussion of the design and construction issues specific to seepage cut-off walls in the oil sands region. It was concluded that while construction of a soil-bentonite wall is a simple process, a professional experienced in the construction of deep walls is essential to achieve a quality product. Technical site support is also needed by the construction team in order to confirm geology, material properties and design assumptions. 1 tab., 5 figs.

  19. Heavy construction equipment noise study using dosimetry and time-motion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Ellsworth R.; Yantek, David S.

    2005-09-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss continues to afflict workers in many occupational settings despite longstanding recognition of the problems and well-known methods of prevention and regulations. Sound levels associated with heavy construction equipment range from 80 to 120 dB(A) and power tools commonly used in construction produce sound levels up to 115 dB(A). The focus of the research was to determine the noise exposures of heavy construction equipment operators while documenting the workers' tasks, (i.e., hauling, moving, and/or pushing construction material). Time-motion studies were performed at the construction sites and were used to correlate the noise dosage with the work performed by equipment operators. The cumulative dose for the operator was then plotted with references to work tasks, to identify the tasks that caused the greatest noise exposure. Three construction sites were examined and located in the western Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio areas. The types of construction equipment studied included asphalt pavers, backhoes, bulldozers, compaction equipment, excavators, haul trucks, telehandlers, and wheeled loaders. The results showed that bulldozer operators consistently had the highest noise exposures, ranging from a NIOSH REL (Recommended Exposure Limit) dose of 844% to 25836% and an OSHA PEL (Permissible Exposure Limit) dose of 139% to 1397%.

  20. A practical procedure for the selection of time-to-failure models based on the assessment of trends in maintenance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louit, D.M. [Komatsu Chile, Av. Americo Vespucio 0631, Quilicura, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: rpascual@ing.puc.cl; Pascual, R. [Centro de Mineria, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Jardine, A.K.S. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ont., M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    Many times, reliability studies rely on false premises such as independent and identically distributed time between failures assumption (renewal process). This can lead to erroneous model selection for the time to failure of a particular component or system, which can in turn lead to wrong conclusions and decisions. A strong statistical focus, a lack of a systematic approach and sometimes inadequate theoretical background seem to have made it difficult for maintenance analysts to adopt the necessary stage of data testing before the selection of a suitable model. In this paper, a framework for model selection to represent the failure process for a component or system is presented, based on a review of available trend tests. The paper focuses only on single-time-variable models and is primarily directed to analysts responsible for reliability analyses in an industrial maintenance environment. The model selection framework is directed towards the discrimination between the use of statistical distributions to represent the time to failure ('renewal approach'); and the use of stochastic point processes ('repairable systems approach'), when there may be the presence of system ageing or reliability growth. An illustrative example based on failure data from a fleet of backhoes is included.

  1. Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Basher, A.M.H. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

    1996-09-01

    To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical

  2. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1985 Annual and Final Reports.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Ken

    1986-10-01

    The Hot Springs Fork of the Collawash River is a major sub-drainage in the Clackamas River drainage. Emphasis species for natural production are spring chinook, coho salmon, and winter steelhead. Increased natural production appears limited by a lack of quality rearing habitat. Habitat complexity over approximately 70% of accessible area to anadromous fish has been reduced over the last 40 years by numerous factors. Natural passage barriers limit anadromous fish access to over 7 miles of high quality habitat. In the first year of a multi-year effort to improve fish habitat in the Hot Springs Fork drainage, passage enhancement on two tributaries and channel rehabilitation on one of those tributaries was completed. Three waterfalls on Nohorn Creek were evaluated and passage improved on the uppermost waterfall to provide steelhead full access to 2.4 miles of good quality habitat. The work was completed in October 1985 and involved blasting three jump pools and two holding pools into the waterfall. On Pansy Creek, four potential passage barriers were evaluated and passage improvement work conducted on two logjams and one waterfall. Minor modifications were made to a waterfall to increase flow into a side channel which allows passage around the waterfall. Channel rehabilitation efforts on Pansy Creek (RM 0.0 to 0.3) to increase low flow pool rearing habitat and spawning habitat including blasting five pools into areas of bedrock substrate and using a track-mounted backhoe to construct instream structures. On site materials were used to construct three log sills, three boulder berms, a boulder flow deflector, and five log and boulder structures. Also, an alcove was excavated to provide overwinter rearing habitat. Pre-project monitoring consisting of physical and biological data collection was completed in the project area.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Air port Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-10

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    US DOE/Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-10

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  5. Wireless optics protection of fiber via SONET ring closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Ruth Ann; Celmer, Ken T.; Foster, Michael; Wooten, Jimmie; Miller, Jared; Kean, John C.; Carter, Doug; Kefauver, Michael; Singh, Bhupendra; Achour, Maha; Willebrand, Heinz A.

    2001-02-01

    12 A free-space laser link closes an otherwise all-fiber SONET ring, demonstrating for the first time the feasibility of using wireless optics as a back-up to fiber in an application demanding the highest levels of statistical availability and sub-50-ms protection-restoral times. This experiment demonstrates that protocol-transparent wireless optical links can be readily internetworked with industry- standard fiber-based protection protocols to achieve SONET restoral times in the event of a fiber cut. By using the wireless optics as a back-up to fiber rather than as the primary link, end-users are normally protected from the unavoidable burst errors and outages that can arise on a wireless optical link in the event of anomalously poor atmospheric visibility or unanticipated line-of-sight obstructions. While an all-fiber SONET ring operating over physically diverse paths is generally preferred, hybrid fiber/air rings operating over physically-diverse paths (fiber as one path and air as the other) will easily meet or exceed existing Bellcore availability standards for SONET rings. The hybrid part-fiber, part-air ring advantageously protects customers from fiber cuts (a.k.a. `backhoe fade') and may be preferable to over service via either an unprotected fiber spur or over a `collapsed' fiber ring made up of fiber segments sharing a common conduit. The experiment is performed at an OC-12 (622 Mbps) data rate in a point-to-consecutive point configuration which demonstrates the use of a relay site to work-around a line- of-sight obstruction.

  6. A Multifaceted Sampling Approach to Better Understanding Biogeochemical and Hydrogeological Controls on Uranium Mobility at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Riverton, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, W. L.; Johnson, R. H.; Campbell, S.; Bone, S. E.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding uranium mobility in subsurface environments is not trivial. Obtaining sufficient data to accurately represent soil and aquifer characteristics can require unique approaches that evolve with added site knowledge. At Riverton, the primary source of uranium mill tailings remaining from ore processing was removed but contaminant plumes have persisted longer than predicted by groundwater modeling. What are the primary mechanisms controlling plume persistence? DOE is conducting new characterization studies to assist our understanding of underlying biogeochemical and hydrogeological mechanisms affecting secondary sources. A variety of field sampling techniques are being sequentially employed including augering, trenching, pore water sampling, and installing multi-level wells. In August 2012, vadose zone soil samples from 34 locations and groundwater from 103 boreholes were collected with Geoprobe ® direct push rods. Lower than expected uranium concentrations in composited shallow soils indicated the need for more focused and deeper samples. In May 2014, soil samples containing evaporites were collected along the bank of the Little Wind River; elevated uranium concentrations in evaporite minerals correlated with plume configurations and reflect contaminated groundwater discharge at the river. In September 2014, hand anger samples collected by the river and oxbow lake also indicated the presence of organic rich zones containing elevated uranium (>50 mg/kg). Subsequent samples collected from five backhoe trenches in May 2015 revealed a highly heterogeneous vadose zone composed of clay, silt, sand and cobbles containing evaporites and organic rich zones which may interact with groundwater plumes.Plans for August 2015 include sonic drilling to obtain continuous cores from the surface down to the base of the surficial aquifer with multi-level monitoring wells constructed in each borehole to assess vertical variation in groundwater chemistry. Temporary well

  7. Lithology, fault displacement, and origin of secondary calcium carbonate and opaline silica at Trenches 14 and 14D on the Bow Ridge Fault at Exile Hill, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucca Mountain, a proposed site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository, is located in southern Nevada, 20 km east of Beatty, and adjacent to the southwest comer of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (fig. 1). Yucca Mountain is located within the Basin and Range province of the western United States. The climate is semiarid, and the flora is transitional between that of the Mojave Desert to the south and the Great Basin Desert to the north. As part of the evaluation, hydrologic conditions, especially water levels, of Yucca Mountain and vicinity during the Quaternary, and especially the past 20,000 years, are being characterized. In 1982, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (under interagency agreement DE-A104-78ET44802), excavated twenty-six bulldozer and backhoe trenches in the Yucca Mountain region to evaluate the nature and frequency of Quaternary faulting (Swadley and others, 1984). The trenches were oriented perpendicular to traces of suspected Quaternary faults and across projections of known bedrock faults into Quaternary deposits. Trench 14 exposes the Bow Ridge Fault on the west side of Exile Hill. Although the original purpose of the excavation of trench 14 was to evaluate the nature and frequency of Quaternary faulting on the Bow Ridge Fault, concern arose as to whether or not the nearly vertical calcium carbonate (the term ''carbonate'' in this study refers to calcium carbonate) and opaline silica veins in the fault zone were deposited by ascending waters (ground water). These veins resemble in gross morphology veins commonly formed by hydrothermal processes

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document

  9. Technology for concrete pipe manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Dan; Lin, Renzhi

    2010-01-01

    The pipe manipulator is a developing mechatronic system to enhance productivity and protects workers from cave-ins in the trench while excavating and laying pipe. The pipe manipulator is for installing concrete pipe into the trench. It is an optical-electro-mechanical system. The mechanism is make up of two parts, the upside and underside. The upside is for lifting the equipment by backhoe and rotating the underside mechanism. It includes rigidity lift beams, holding pad, four-bar linkages, hydraulic cylinder, rotating support, and rotating mechanism. Holding pad will press the bucket back to keep the bucket hooking the pipe man safely and stably. The underside mechanism is for lifting, holding and adjusting the pipe section's stance. The underside mechanism includes support trolley, and lift fork. The support trolley is driven by hydraulic cylinder for moving the fork forward or backward while laying a pipe into trench. The fork is with a self-lock mechanism for preventing the pipe from slide out of the prongs. A new photoelectric locating system is developed for auto-measuring the installing pipe section's stance within the work area. The laser target has been developed as a key part in the photoelectric locating systems. The photoelectric target is a rotating polar coordinate. Photodiodes are used for making the polar radius. There is an angular displacement sensor sitting on the heart-axis of the target for measuring angle of the target rotating. The pipe manipulator can be located by the system, and the locating methods have been presented at last of the paper.

  10. Three-Dimensional Investigation of a 5 m Deflected Swale along the San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain

    KAUST Repository

    Akciz, S. O.

    2014-10-21

    Topographic maps produced from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data are useful for paleoseismic and neotectonic research because they provide submeter representation of faulting-related surface features. Offset measurements of geomorphic features, made in the field or on a remotely sensed imagery, commonly assume a straight or smooth (i.e., undeflected) pre-earthquake geometry. Here, we present results from investigation of an ∼20 cm deep and >5 m wide swale with a sharp bend along the San Andreas fault (SAF) at the Bidart fan site in the Carrizo Plain, California. From analysis of LiDAR topography images and field measurements, the swale was initially interpreted as a channel tectonically offset ∼4:7 m. Our observations from exposures in four backhoe excavations and 25 hand-dug trenchettes show that even though a sharp bend in the swale coincides with the trace of the A.D. 1857 fault rupture, the swale formed after the 1857 earthquake and was not tectonically offset. Subtle fractures observed within a surficial gravel unit overlying the 1857 rupture trace are similar to fractures previously documented at the Phelan fan and LY4 paleoseismic sites 3 and 35 km northwest of Bidart fan, respectively. Collectively, the fractures suggest that a post-1857 moderate-magnitude earthquake caused ground cracking in the Carrizo and Cholame stretches of the SAF. Our observations emphasize the importance of excavation at key locations to validate remote and ground-based measurements, and we advocate more geomorphic characterization for each site if excavation is not possible.

  11. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  12. Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical

  13. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the

  14. Calibration Shots Recorded for the Salton Seismic Imaging Project, Salton Trough, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. M.; Rymer, M. J.; Fuis, G. S.; Stock, J. M.; Goldman, M.; Sickler, R. R.; Miller, S. A.; Criley, C. J.; Ricketts, J. W.; Hole, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    .5-Hz velocity sensor, and a 60-channel cabled array with 40-Hz sensors. Irrigation districts in both the Coachella Valley and Imperial Valley use clay drainage pipes buried beneath fields to remove irrigation water and prevent ponding. To determine the effect of seismic energy on the drain pipes, we exposed sections of pipe several meters long with a backhoe at distances of 7-15 meters from the shot holes, and, after each shot, visually inspected the pipes. Our shots produced no pipe damage.

  15. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers

  16. Spatial Heterogeneity of Loess Tilled Slope Surface Roughness%黄土坡耕地地表糙度的空间异质性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 张青峰; 赵龙山; 王健; 吴发启

    2014-01-01

    Objective]The objective of this paper is to reveal the spatial heterogeneity of surface roughness of 4 typical loess tilled slopes during different erosive stages under a micro-scale (2 cm×2 cm) condition.[Method]When slopes with 4 different gradients and tillage measures were prepared (artificial backhoe, artificial digging, contour tillage and straight cultivated slope (check), an erosive rainfall with a rainfall intensity of 60 mm/h was carried out. Soil surface roughness relative elevation data points were taken by a laser scanner and analyzed with both the semivariogram function and fractal dimension models.[Result]The result of classical statistical analysis showed that the loess tillage slope surface roughness has a weak spatial variability. The result of the semivariogram analysis indicated that the loess tilled slope surface roughness had a higher spatial autocorrelation, their spatial autocorrelation scale of surface roughness ranged from 2.02 m to 3.82 m. The spatial heterogeneity caused by the spatial structure characteristic accounted for the greater proportion of the total heterogeneity. The fractal dimension analysis showed that the surface roughness had good fractal features, and it ranged from 1.59 to 1.91. With the increase of gradient, the spatial distribution of slope surface roughness tended to complex, its spatial heterogeneity was stronger. The spatial heterogeneities of the artificial backhoe (AB), artificial digging (AD) and contour tillage (CT) increase in turn within the scope of the small scale, and had a good effect on soil and water conservation.[Conclusion]The main reason for the differences of the spatial heterogeneity of surface roughness is the spatial structural characteristics formed by the integrated interaction of human farming and slope and the artificial cultivation. The space configuration pattern of surface roughness is mainly controlled by slope gradient factor in a smaller scale range, and by the rainfall with its

  17. Short-term recovery of soil physical, chemical, micro- and mesobiological functions in a new vineyard under organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, E. A. C.; Agnelli, A. E.; Fabiani, A.; Gagnarli, E.; Mocali, S.; Priori, S.; Simoni, S.; Valboa, G.

    2015-06-01

    Deep earthwork activities carried out before vineyard plantation can severely affect soil profile properties. As a result, soil features in the root environment are often much more similar to those of the underlying substratum than those of the original profile. The time needed to recover the original soil functions is ecologically relevant and may strongly affect vine phenology and grape yield, particularly under organic viticulture. The general aim of this work was to investigate soil resilience after vineyard pre-planting earthworks. In particular, an old and a new vineyard, established on the same soil type, were compared over a 5-year period for soil chemical, physical, micro- and mesobiological properties. The investigated vineyards (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Sangiovese) were located in the Chianti Classico district (central Italy), on stony and calcareous soils, and were not irrigated. The older vineyard was planted in 2000, after slope reshaping by bulldozing and back-hoe ploughing down to about 0.8-1.0 m. The new vineyard was planted in 2011, after equivalent earthwork practices carried out in the summer of 2009. Both vineyards were organically managed, and they were fertilized with compost only every autumn (1000 kg ha-1 per year). The new vineyard was cultivated by periodic tillage, while the old vineyard was managed with alternating grass-covered and tilled inter-rows. Soil samples were collected at 0-15 cm depth from fixed locations in each vineyard every spring from 2010 to 2014. The old vineyard was sampled in both tilled and grass-covered inter-rows. According to the results from physical and chemical analyses, the new vineyard, during the whole 2010-2014 period, showed lower total organic carbon, total nitrogen, carbon to nitrogen ratio and electrical conductivity, along with higher silt and total CaCO3 contents than the old vineyard, suggesting still-evolving equilibrium conditions. The microarthropod analysis showed significantly different

  18. 基于试验和数值模拟确定挖掘机具作用下埋地输气管道的动载荷%Determining dynamic load on a buried gas pipeline under mining machinery actions based on test and numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚安林; 徐涛龙; 李星; 曾祥国

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the dynamic load of bucket tip of an excavator during contacting a buried gas pipeline,dynamic and static response tests were performed to reflect two action modes including static load and impact of a hydraulic backhoe excavator's bucket tip contacting the pipeline.Load time-history curves were simulated with ADAMS multi-body dynamics software according to the dynamic test data.STEP function and the script control technology were combined and used,the dynamic force transfer process of the excavator was converted into the displacement and speed control of cylinders,then the dynamic load time-history curves of the bucket tip of the extreme were obtained during the excavator contacting the pipe with five-tooth and one-tooth.Finally,the dynamic load time-history curves were induced into the finite element commercial software ANSYS /LS-DYNA,the dynamic response of the pipe was analyzed,the dynamic strain response of the pipe agreed well with field test results.The test and calculation results showed that the proposed method to determine the bucket tip load of a mining machinery based on the combination of test and numerical simulation is feasible,and the research can provide correct data for quantitative assessment of mechanical damage of a buried gas pipeline under mining machinery actions.%为确定挖掘机具接触埋地输气管道斗尖产生的载荷,分别对液压反铲挖掘机斗尖静载和冲击两种方式作用于输气管道的动静态响应进行了现场测试。基于动态测试数据,采用 ADAMS 多体动力学软件,结合 STEP 函数和Script 脚本仿真控制技术,将挖掘机动力传递过程转化为油缸的位移控制和速度控制,获得五齿和单齿接触输气管道极端工况下挖掘机斗尖动载荷时程曲线。最后将载荷时程曲线导入 ANSYS /LS -DYNA 商业有限元软件中,对管道的动态响应进行了有限元分析,其动态应变响应与现场测试数据吻合较好

  19. Estudo dos efeitos auditivos e extra-auditivos da exposição ocupacional a ruído e vibração Auditory and extra-auditory effects of occupational exposure to noise and vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Fernandes

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Este estudo teve como objetivo investigar as queixas de saúde e achados audiológicos de dois grupos de trabalhadores. Forma de estudo: Clínico prospectivo randomizado. Material e método: Grupo 1- exposto a níveis de pressão sonora elevados e vibração transmitida por meio das mãos-braços nos trabalhadores que operam motorroçadeiras, e Grupo 2- exposto a níveis elevados de pressão sonora e vibração transmitida por meio do corpo inteiro nos trabalhadores que operam equipamentos pesados como pá-carregadeira, moto niveladora, retro-escavadeira e rolo compressor. Os 73 participantes passaram por entrevista, inspeção do meato acústico externo e audiometria tonal. Resultado: Em relação aos problemas de saúde, o grupo 2, exposto a vibração de corpo inteiro, é o que apresenta um maior número de queixas. Os trabalhadores do Grupo 1, sem exceção, fazem uso do protetor auditivo e apenas 4 (11% referem zumbido. No Grupo 2 nem todos os trabalhadores usam o protetor auditivo e 6 (17% referem apresentar zumbido. Entretanto, a porcentagem de audiogramas alterados é mais elevada no grupo 1, expostos a vibração transmitida por meio das mãos-braços. Conclusão: Este estudo revelou uma série de deficiências no acompanhamento de saúde dessas populações e demonstrou a necessidade da implantação de programas preventivos tanto no que se refere à exposição a níveis de pressão sonora elevados quanto à vibração.Aim: The present study aimed to investigate the health complaints and the audiological findings of 2 groups of workers. Study design: Clinical prospective randomized. Material and method: Group 1 was exposed to high sound pressure levels and vibration transmitted by hands and arms through the use of power brush cutter/string trimmers. Group 2 was exposed to high sound pressure levels and whole-body vibration transmitted by heavy machinery such as vibrating compactor rollers, skid-steer loaders, backhoes and

  20. Modeling of the height control system using artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R Tahavvor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Automation of agricultural and machinery construction has generally been enhanced by intelligent control systems due to utility and efficiency rising, ease of use, profitability and upgrading according to market demand. A broad variety of industrial merchandise are now supplied with computerized control systems of earth moving processes to be performed by construction and agriculture field vehicle such as grader, backhoe, tractor and scraper machines. A height control machine which is used in measuring base thickness is consisted of two mechanical and electronic parts. The mechanical part is consisted of conveyor belt, main body, electrical engine and invertors while the electronic part is consisted of ultrasonic, wave transmitter and receiver sensor, electronic board, control set, and microcontroller. The main job of these controlling devices consists of the topographic surveying, cutting and filling of elevated and spotted low area, and these actions fundamentally dependent onthe machine's ability in elevation and thickness measurement and control. In this study, machine was first tested and then some experiments were conducted for data collection. Study of system modeling in artificial neural networks (ANN was done for measuring, controlling the height for bases by input variable input vectors such as sampling time, probe speed, conveyer speed, sound wave speed and speed sensor are finally the maximum and minimum probe output vector on various conditions. The result reveals the capability of this procedure for experimental recognition of sensors' behavior and improvement of field machine control systems. Inspection, calibration and response, diagnosis of the elevation control system in combination with machine function can also be evaluated by some extra development of this system. Materials and Methods Designing and manufacture of the planned apparatus classified in three dissimilar, mechanical and electronic module, courses of

  1. Soil analyses for 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-DCP), sodium n-methyldithiocarbamate (metam-sodium), and their degradation products near Fort Hall Idaho, September 1999 through March 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliman, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Between September 1999 and March 2000, soil samples from the Fort Hall, Idaho, area were analyzed for two soil fumigants, 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-DCP) and sodium n-methyldithiocarbamate (metam-sodium), and their degradation products. Ground water is the only source of drinking water at Fort Hall, and the purpose of the investigation was to determine potential risk of ground-water contamination from persistence and movement of these pesticides in cropland soils. 1,3-DCP, metam-sodium, or their degradation products were detected in 42 of 104 soil samples. The samples were collected from 1-, 2-, and 3-foot depths in multiple backhoe trenches during four sampling events—before pesticide application in September; after application in October; before soil freeze in December; and after soil thaw in March. In most cases, concentrations of the pesticide compounds were at or near their laboratory minimum reporting limits. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 5035 was used as the guideline for soil sample preparation and analyses, and either sodium bisulfate (NaHSO4), an acidic preservative, or pesticide-free water was added to samples prior to analyses. Addition of NaHSO4 to the samples resulted in a greater number of compound detections, but pesticide-free water was added to most samples to avoid the strong reactions of soil carbonate minerals with the NaHSO4. As a result, nondetection of compounds in samples containing pesticide-free water did not necessarily indicate that the compounds were absent. Detections of these compounds were inconsistent among trenches with similar soil characteristics and histories of soil fumigant use. Compounds were detected at different depths and different trench locations during each sampling event. Overall results of this study showed that the original compounds or their degradation products can persist in soil 6 months or more after their application and are present to at least 3 feet below land surface in some areas. A few of

  2. Aplicação de uma técnica alternativa de manejo físico do solo no cultivo de Eucalyptus grandis W.Hill (Myrtaceae Application of an alternative technique for physical soil management in cultivation of Eucalyptus grandis W.Hill (Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo de Maçaneiro

    2013-02-01

    areas by E. grandis are considerably sensitive to the initial conditions of soil preparation was applied the technique of roughening (variations relief alternating concave and convex surfaces to cause over time emergent properties that accelerate the process of plant growth. The study area is located on the Itajai River Basin, in Brusque, SC. This was divided into four smaller portions: two treatments with irregular (IR-A and IR-B and two others with regular treatments (R-A and R-B. The treatments consisted of irregular armhole opening, using a hydraulic backhoe, interspersed with 1 meter wide, 4 to 5 meters long and 0.5 meters deep. In regular treatments was adopted minimum tillage of the soil, where soil preparation was restricted to lines or planting holes. In the analysis of the development of E. grandis (height, diameter and breast height - DBH was found statistical differences between the techniques of soil preparation, and the highest values in treatments irregular. In plots irregular (IR-A and IR-B were found higher mean values of height (5.29 meters and 5.46 meters, stem diameter (45.65 mm and 45.4 mm and DBH (4.44 cm to 4.79 cm, respectively. It is assumed that the roughness effectively functioned as auxiliary components in the internalization of matter, retaining water, sediments and nutrients, a fact that should have enhanced and accelerated the growth of E. grandis.

  3. Challenges in planning and performing the retrieval of the prototype repository at Aespoe HRL- Project management's reflections and practical experiences from field work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the outer plug could start in November 2010 and the field-work was fully completed according to schedule at the end of 2011. The field work included breaching of the outer plug and removal and sampling of the buffer and backfill. The removal of the plug was mainly made by external entrepreneurs and the technique used was to core drill trough the entire reinforced concrete dome to make it easier to mechanically tear the plug down. About 200 tons of concrete was removed and the work took about 12 weeks. The removal of the backfill material in the tunnel was made in two stages in order to minimise the upward swelling of the buffer in the deposition holes. The first stage included removal and sampling of the backfill to a sample-section in between the deposition holes. The remaining backfill was removed after the bentonite in the first deposition hole had been removed and the first canister had been retrieved. The backfill was excavated with a back-hoe loader in layers of two metres. Furthermore, samples were taken for determining the water content and density of the backfill. This work was made by a staff of 3 persons. The samples were wrapped in foil, to avoid them from drying, and transported to a local lab where the determination of the water content and density were performed. About 1100 samples were taken and about 900 tons of backfill material was removed. The total time for removing the backfill was about 10 weeks. No actual problems with the excavation method were observed. The main problem with this part of the work was to get representative samples due to the heterogeneity of the backfill material. The removal of the buffer was made by core drilling into the bentonite blocks from tunnel floor level. Double drilling machines were used and the sample-cores were placed in 8 directions to a depth of about 500 mm. The cores were used for determining the water content and the density of the buffer. The bentonite in between the cores was then mechanically removed