WorldWideScience

Sample records for background radiation dose

  1. Natural background radiation and estimation of gonadal dose rate of population of Chittagong region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostofa, M.N.; Ahmed, J.U. (Chittagong Univ. (Bangladesh). Dept. of Physics); Ahmed, R.; Ishaque, A.M. (Nuclear Medicine Center, Chittagong (Bangladesh)); Ahmed, K. (Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Dacca (Bangladesh))

    1981-07-01

    A survey was made on the background radiation to estimate the gonadal dose rate in the district of Chittagong from the year 1978 to 80. This was done with the help of a calibrated Nuclear Chicago transistorized survey meter. The measurements were made in different types of dwellings and occupational buildings constructed with wood, straw/bamboo, tin/bamboo, tin/brick and single and multistoried buildings of brick and concrete. For measurement of outdoor radiation the investigating areas taken were the roads, fields and the Karnafuly river. The variation in the population dose rate as well as gonadal dose rate were observed in different types of dwellings and occupational buildings including outdoors. The average population dose rate including cosmic ray intensity was found to be 172.41+-8.61 mrad/year. Thus, the annual gonadal dose rate due to gamma radiation was found to be 137.92+-6.89 mrad/year.

  2. Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, R J; Eakins, J S; Jansen, J T M; Harrison, J D

    2012-08-01

    The impact of depleted uranium (DU) on human health has been the subject of much conjecture. Both the chemical and radiological aspects of its behaviour in the human body have previously been investigated in detail, with the radiological impact being assumed to be linked to the alpha decay of uranium. More recently, it has been proposed that the accumulation in tissue of high-Z materials, such as DU, may give rise to enhanced local energy deposition in the presence of natural background photon radiation due to the high photoelectric interaction cross sections of high-Z atoms. It is speculated that, in addition to producing short-range photoelectrons, these events will be followed by intense Auger and Coster-Kronig electron emission, thereby causing levels of cell damage that are unaccounted for in conventional models of radiological risk. In this study, the physical and biological bases of these claims are investigated. The potential magnitudes of any effect are evaluated and discussed, and compared with the risks from other radiological or chemical hazards. Monte Carlo calculations are performed to estimate likely energy depositions due to the presence of uranium in human tissues in photon fields: whole body doses, organ doses in anthropomorphic phantoms and nano-/micro-dosimetric scenarios are each considered. The proposal is shown generally to be based on sound physics, but overall the impact on human health is expected to be negligible.

  3. Determination of Absorbed and Effective Dose from Natural Background Radiation around a Nuclear Research Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Musa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study presents result of outdoor absorbed dose rate and estimated effective dose from the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th and 238U series 40K, around a Nuclear Research Reactor at the Centre for Energy Research and Training (CERT, Zaria, Nigeria. Approach: A high-resolution in situ ?-ray spectrometry was used to carry out the study. CERT houses a 30Kw Research Reactor and other neutron and gamma sources for Research and Training. Results: The values of absorbed dose rate in air for 232Th, 238U and 40K range from 8.2 ± 2.5-24.5 ± 3.6 nGy h?1, 1.9 ± 1.2-4.6 ± 2.5 nGy h?1 and 12.2 ± 5-38 ± 6.7n Gy h?1 respectively . The estimated total annual effective dose outdoor for the sites range from 27.3-79.9 ?Sv y?1.Conclusions: This showed that radiation exposure level for the public is lower than the recommended value of 1 mSv y?1.Hence, the extensive usage of radioactive materials within and around CERT does not appear to have any impact on the radiation burden of the environment.

  4. Survey of Gamma Dose and Radon Exhalation Rate from Soil Surface of High Background Natural Radiation Areas in Ramsar, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhollah Dehghani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radon is a radioactive gas and the second leading cause of death due to lung cancer after smoking. Ramsar is known for having the highest levels of natural background radiation on earth. Materials and Methods: In this research study, 50 stations of high radioactivity areas of Ramsar were selected in warm season of the year. Then gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were measured.Results: Results showed that gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were in the range of 51-7100 nSv/hr and 9-15370 mBq/m2s, respectively.Conclusion: Compare to the worldwide average 16 mBq/m2s, estimated average annual effective of Radon exhalation rate in the study area is too high.

  5. Assessment of indoor radiation dose received by the residents of natural high background radiation areas of coastal villages of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deva Jayanthi, D., E-mail: d.devajayanthi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Women' s Christian College, Nagercoil 629001 (India); Maniyan, C.G. [Environmental Assessment Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Perumal, S. [Department of Physics and Research Centre, S.T.Hindu College, Nagercoil 629002 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Radiation exposure and effective dose received through two routes of exposure, viz. external and internal, via inhalation, by residents of 10 villages belonging to Natural High Background Radiation Areas (NHBRA) of coastal regions of Kanyakumari District and Tamil Nadu in India were studied. While the indoor gamma radiation levels were monitored using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), the indoor radon and thoron gas concentrations were measured using twin chamber dosimeters employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs, LR-115-II). The average total annual effective dose was estimated and found to be varying from 2.59 to 8.76 mSv. -- Highlights: {yields} The effective dose received by the villages of Natural High Background Area (NHBRA) such as Enayam, Midalam and Mel Midalam is high when compared with other study areas. {yields} The high dose indicates higher concentration of radioactive nuclides like Thorium and Uranium in the soil. {yields} As radiation is harmful to human life, the external and internal doses can be reduced by removing the monazite content present in the soil by mineral separation. {yields} Contribution from vegetables, fruits, fish and other non vegetarian items are also being examined. {yields} These results along with other socio-economic factors can throw considerable light on the epidemiological impacts due to low levels of chronic exposure.

  6. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  7. Cosmic Tachyon Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1999-01-01

    The equilibrium statistical mechanics of a background radiation of superluminal particles is investigated, based on a vectorial wave equation for tachyons of the Proca type. The partition function, the spectral energy density, and the various thermodynamic variables of an ideal Bose gas of tachyons in an open Robertson-Walker cosmology are derived. The negative mass square in the wave equation changes the frequency scaling in the Rayleigh-Jeans law, and there are also significant changes in the low temperature regime as compared to the microwave background, in particular in the caloric and thermal equations of state.

  8. Ultraviolet Background Radiation (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    importance is that the sky may be truly outstandingly black in the far ultraviolet, offering a "dark site " that is unprecedented in astronomy...Estimated spectral energy distribution of the night-sky background near the zenith at an excellent ground-based site on a moonless night and in a...1977. Ap. J. Suppl. 33:451 31. Henry, R. C. 1981. Ap. J. Lett. 244: L69 32. Henry, R. C. 1981. 16th Rencontre de Moriond, ed. J. Tran Thanh Van, p

  9. Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, R. C.; Murthy, J.

    1993-12-01

    The UVX experiment was carried on the Space Shuttle Columbia between 1986 January 12 and 19 (STS-61C). Several ultraviolet spectrometers were used to obtain measurements of the diffuse ultraviolet background at 8 locations in the sky. We have reanalysed the UVX measurements of the surface brightness of the diffuse ultraviolet background above b = 40 using the dust-scattering model of Onaka & Kodaira (1991), which explicitly takes into account the variation of the source function with galactic longitude. The range of allowed values of interstellar grain albedoJa, and scattering asymmetry parameter g, is considerably expanded over those of a previous analysis. The new chi square probability contours come close to, but do not include, the values of a and g found for the interstellar grains by Witt et al. (1992) using the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) on the Astro mission. If we hypothesize in additon to the dust-scattered light an extragalactic component, of 300 1 100 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 A-1, attenuated by a cosecant b law, the new reduction of the UVX data gives complete consistency with the Witt et al. determination of the optical parameters of the grains in the ultraviolet. This work was supported by United States Air Force Contract F19628-93-K-0004, and by National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant NASA NAG5-619. We are grateful for the encouragement of Dr. Stephan Price, and we thank Dr. L. Danly for information. Onaka, T., & Kodaira, K. 1991, ApJ, 379, 532 Witt, A. N., Petersohn, J. K., Bohlin, R. C., O'Connell, R. W., Roberts, M. S., Smith, A. M., & Stecher, T. P. 1992, ApJ, 395, L5

  10. Terrestrial gamma dose rate, radioactivity and radiological hazards in the rocks of an elevated radiation background in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurabu, Wedad Ali; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Heryansyah, Arien; Alnhary, Anees; Fadhl, Shadi

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate natural radiation and radioactivity in the rock and to assess the corresponding health risk in a region of elevated background radiation in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen. The mean external gamma dose rate was 374 nGy h(-1) which is approximately six times the world average. The measured results were used to compute annual effective dose equivalent, collective effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk, which are 2.298 mSv, 61.95 man Sv y(-1) and 8.043  ×  10(-3), respectively. Rocks samples from different geological formations were analyzed for quantitative determination of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The specific activity of the rocks samples ranges from 7  ±  1 Bq Kg(-1) to 12 513  ±  329 Bq Kg(-1) for (232)Th, from 6  ±  1 Bq kg(-1) to 3089  ±  74 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra and 702  ±  69 Bq kg(-1) to 2954  ±  285 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K. (232)Th is the main contributor to gamma dose rate from the rock samples. Indicators of radiological health impact, radium equivalent activity and external hazard index are 3738 Bq kg(-1) and 10.10, respectively. The mean external hazard index was ten times unity in the studied locations in Juban District, which is higher than the recommended value.

  11. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  12. PABLM. Accumulated Environment Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E.Jr.; Soldat, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-04-01

    PABLM calculates internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release, after deposition, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider exposure to radionuclides deposited on the ground or crops from contaminated air or irrigation water, radionuclides in contaminated drinking water, aquatic foods raised in contaminated water, and radionuclides in bodies of water and sediments where people might fish, boat, or swim. For vegetation, the radiation dose model considers both direct deposition and uptake through roots. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The program is designed to calculate accumulated radiation doses from the chronic ingestion of food products that contain radionuclides and doses from the external exposure to radionuclides in the environment. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years.

  13. EPR dosimetry of radiation background in the Urals region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkina, E.A.; Degteva, M.O.; Shved, V.A. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, 48-A Vorovsky, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Fattibene, P.; Onori, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Wieser, A. [GSF, Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Ingolstaedter Landstr (Germany); Ivanov, D.V.; Bayankin, S.N. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Knyazev, V.A.; Vasilenko, E.I.; Gorelov, M. [ZAO, Closed Corporation ' Company GEOSPETSECOLOGIA' (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Method of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is extensively applied to individual retrospective dosimetry. The background dose is unavoidable component of cumulative absorbed dose in the tooth enamel accumulated during the lifetime of donor. Estimation of incidental radiation dose using tooth enamel needs in extraction of background dose. Moreover, the variation of background doses in the population is a limited factor for reliable detection of additional irradiation especially for low dose level. Therefore the accurate knowledge of the natural background radiation dose is a critical element of EPR studies of exposed populations. In the Urals region the method applies for such two large cohorts as the workers of Mayak (Ozersk citizens) and Techa River riverside inhabitants (rural population). Current study aimed to investigate the Urals radiation background detected by EPR spectrometry. For this aim two group of unexposed Urals residents were separated, viz: citizens of Ozersk and rural inhabitants of Chelyabinsk region. Comparison of two investigated territories has demonstrated that from the point of view of radiation background it is impossible to assume the Urals population as uniform. The reliable difference between the urban and rural residents has been found. The average background doses of Ozersk donors is in average 50 mGy higher than those detected for rural residents. The individual variability of background doses for Osersk has been higher than in the rural results. The difference in background dose levels between two population results in different limits of accidental dose detection and individualization. The doses for 'Mayak' workers (Ozyorsk citizens) can be classed as anthropogenic if the EPR measurements exceed 120 mGy for teeth younger than 40 years, and 240 mGy for teeth older than 70 years. The anthropogenic doses for Techa River residents (rural population) would be higher than 95 mGy for teeth younger than 50 years and 270 mGy for

  14. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, TN (United States). Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  15. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  16. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  17. Electromagnetic wave collapse in a radiation background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Mattias; Brodin, Gert; Stenflo, Lennart

    2003-10-17

    The nonlinear interaction, due to quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects between an electromagnetic pulse and a radiation background, is investigated by combining the methods of radiation hydrodynamics with the QED theory for photon-photon scattering. For the case of a single coherent electromagnetic pulse, we obtain a Zakharov-like system, where the radiation pressure of the pulse acts as a driver of acoustic waves in the photon gas. For a sufficiently intense pulse and/or background energy density, there is focusing and the subsequent collapse of the pulse. The relevance of our results for various astrophysical applications are discussed.

  18. Dose Estimation in Radiation Cytogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Lloyd, David

    2009-04-01

    Throughout the radiation cytogenetics community, a core group of methods exists to produce an estimate of radiation dose from an observed yield of DNA damage in blood. Mathematical and statistical analysis is extremely important for accurate assessment of data and results, and a number of classical statistical methods are commonly employed. However, the large number of statistical techniques, and the complexity of the methods, can lead to errors in data analysis and misinterpretation of results. Cytogenetics dose estimation software has been developed to simplify mathematical and statistical analysis of cytogenetic data. ``Dose Estimate'' is a collection of mathematical and statistical methods based on the cytogenetics methods and programs written by Alan Edwards, David Papworth, and others. Details of the biological and mathematical techniques used in the software will be presented, including maximum likelihood estimation of yield curve coefficients for the dicentric or translocation assays. Proposals for increasing the sophistication of the software through implementation of recently published Bayesian analysis techniques for cytogenetics will also be outlined.

  19. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation. [Paramecium tetraurelia; Synechococcus lividus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y.

  20. Adaption of the radiation dose for computed tomography of the body - back-ground for the dose adaption programme OmnimAs; Straaldosreglering vid kroppsdatortomografi - bakgrund till dosregleringsprogrammet OmnimAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, Ulf; Kristiansson, Mattias [Trelleborg Hospital (Sweden); Leitz, Wolfram [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Paahlstorp, Per-Aake [Siemens Medical Solutions, Solna (Sweden)

    2004-11-01

    When performing computed tomography examinations the exposure factors are hardly ever adapted to the patient's size. One reason for that might be the lack of simple methods. In this report the computer programme OmnimAs is described which is calculating how the exposure factors should be varied together with the patient's perimeter (which easily can be measured with a measuring tape). The first approximation is to calculate the exposure values giving the same noise levels in the image irrespective the patient's size. A clinical evaluation has shown that this relationship has to be modified. One chapter is describing the physical background behind the programme. Results calculated with OmnimAs are in good agreement with a number of published studies. Clinical experiences are showing the usability of OmnimAs. Finally the correlation between several parameters and image quality/dose is discussed and how this correlation can be made use of for optimising CT-examinations.

  1. Radiation doses to neonates requiring intensive care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, A. (Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield (UK)); Dellagrammaticas, H.D. (Sheffield Univ. (UK))

    1983-06-01

    Radiological investigations have become accepted as an important part of the range of facilities required to support severely ill newborn babies. Since the infants are so small, many of the examinations are virtually ''whole-body'' irradiations and it was thought that the total doses received might be appreciable. A group of such babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Sheffield over a six-month period have been studied. X-ray exposure factors used for each examination have been noted and total skin, gonad and bone marrow doses calculated, supplemented by measurements on phantoms. It is concluded that in most cases doses received are of the same order as those received over the same period from natural background radiation and probably less than those received from prenatal obstetric radiography, so that the additional risks from the diagnostic exposure are small. The highest doses are received in CT scans and barium examinations and it is recommended that the need for these should be carefully considered.

  2. Potential radiation doses from 1994 Hanford Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldat, J.K.; Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the potential radiation doses to the public from releases originating at the Hanford Site. Members of the public are potentially exposed to low-levels of radiation from these effluents through a variety of pathways. The potential radiation doses to the public were calculated for the hypothetical MEI and for the general public residing within 80 km (50 mi) of the Hanford Site.

  3. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  4. Dose-effect relationship in radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberhausen, E.

    1983-01-01

    As criterion for the evaluation of risk in connection with nuclear accidents the diminishing of life expectance is assumed. This would allow a better weighting of the different detriments. The possible dose-effect relations for the different detriments caused by radiation are discussed. Some models for a realistic evaluation of the different radiation detriments are proposed.

  5. Dose mapping for documentation of radiation sterilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation sterilization standards EN 552 and ISO 11137 require that dose mapping in real or simulated product be carried in connection with the process qualification. This paper reviews the recommendations given in the standards and discusses the difficulties and limitations of practical dose...... mapping. The paper further gives recommendations for effective dose mapping including traceable dosimetry, documented procedures for placement of dosimeters, and evaluation of measurement uncertainties. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. Characterization of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, Douglas D.; Cherkashyna, Nataliia; Scherzinger, Julius; Khaplanov, Anton; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Fissum, Kevin G.; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kirstein, Oliver; Ehlers, Georg; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Hornbach, Donald E.; Iverson, Erik B.; Newby, Robert J.; Hall-Wilton, Richard J.; Bentley, Phillip M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a survey of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA during routine daily operation. A broad range of detectors was used to characterize primarily the neutron and photon fields throughout the facility. These include a WENDI-2 extended range dosimeter, a thermoscientific NRD, an Arktis 4He detector, and a standard NaI photon detector. The information gathered from the detectors was used to map out the neutron dose rates throughout the facility and also the neutron dose rate and flux profiles of several different beamlines. The survey provides detailed information useful for developing future shielding concepts at spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden.

  7. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Simon, Steven L [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wojcik, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardis, Elisabeth [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar) and CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica - CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot [Radiobiology and Epidemiology Department, Radiological and Human Health Division, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Hayata, Isamu [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)], E-mail: jhendry2002uk@yahoo.com

    2009-06-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of {sup 222}Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  8. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Simon, Steven L; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2009-06-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of (222)Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  9. Reducing radiation dose in CT enterography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Gaizo, Andrew J; Fletcher, Joel G; Yu, Lifeng; Paden, Robert G; Spencer, Garrett Clay; Leng, Shuai; Silva, Annelise M; Fidler, Jeff L; Silva, Alvin C; Hara, Amy K

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) enterography is a diagnostic examination that is increasingly being used to evaluate disorders of the small bowel. An undesirable consequence of CT, however, is patient exposure to ionizing radiation. This is of particular concern with CT enterography because patients tend to be young and require numerous follow-up examinations. There are multiple strategies to reduce radiation dose at CT enterography, including adjusting acquisition parameters, reducing scan length, and reducing tube voltage or tube current. The drawback to dose reduction strategies is degradation of image quality due to increased image noise. However, image noise can be reduced with commercial iterative reconstruction and denoising techniques. With a combination of low-dose techniques and noise-control strategies, one can markedly reduce radiation dose at CT enterography while maintaining diagnostic accuracy.

  10. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  11. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R., E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C., E-mail: krausesalles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nadya@ime.ib.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  12. Dose Assurance in Radiation Processing Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Chadwick, K.H.; Nam, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation processing relies to a large extent on dosimetry as control of proper operation. This applies in particular to radiation sterilization of medical products and food treatment, but also during development of any other process. The assurance that proper dosimetry is performed at the radiat......Radiation processing relies to a large extent on dosimetry as control of proper operation. This applies in particular to radiation sterilization of medical products and food treatment, but also during development of any other process. The assurance that proper dosimetry is performed...... at the radiation processing plant can be obtained through the mediation of an international organization, and the IAEA is now implementing a dose assurance service for industrial radiation processing....

  13. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, J.E.M.; Tingey, D.R.C

    1997-11-01

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors) 28 refs., 11 tabs., 10 figs.

  14. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Michael N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  15. Gravitational Instability in Radiation Pressure Dominated Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Todd A

    2008-01-01

    I consider the physics of gravitational instabilities in the presence of dynamically important radiation pressure and gray radiative diffusion, governed by a constant opacity, kappa. For any non-zero radiation diffusion rate on an optically-thick scale, the medium is unstable unless the classical gas-only isothermal Jeans criterion is satisfied. When diffusion is "slow," although the dynamical Jeans instability is stabilized by radiation pressure on scales smaller than the adiabatic Jeans length, on these same spatial scales the medium is unstable to a diffusive mode. In this regime, neglecting gas pressure, the characteristic timescale for growth is independent of spatial scale and given by (3 kappa c_s^2)/(4 pi G c), where c_s is the adiabatic sound speed. This timescale is that required for a fluid parcel to radiate away its thermal energy content at the Eddington limit, the Kelvin-Helmholz timescale for a radiation pressure supported self-gravitating object. In the limit of "rapid" diffusion, radiation do...

  16. Radiation dose in temporomandibular joint zonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coucke, M.E.; Bourgoignie, R.R.; Dermaut, L.R.; Bourgoignie, K.A.; Jacobs, R.J. (Department of Orthodontics, Universitair Ziekenhuis, Ghent (Belgium))

    1991-06-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphology and function can be evaluated by panoramic zonography. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was applied to evaluate the radiation dose to predetermined sites on a phantom eye, thyroid, pituitary, and parotid, and the dose distribution on the skin of the head and neck when the TMJ program of the Zonarc panoramic x-ray unit was used. Findings are discussed with reference to similar radiographic techniques.

  17. Measurement of radiation dose at the north interaction point of BEPCⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Xiao-Hu; ZHANG Jian-Yong; ZHANG Tian-Bao; ZHANG Qing-Jiang; Achasov Mikhail; FU Cheng-Dong; Muchnoi Nikolay; QIN Qing; QU Hua-Min; WANG Yi-Fang; WU Jing-Min; XU Jin-Qiang; YU Bo-Xiang

    2009-01-01

    The technique details for measuring radiation dose are expounded.The results of gamma and neutron radiation levels are presented and the corresponding radiation shielding is discussed based on the simplified estimation.In addition, the photon radiation level move as background for future experiments is measured by a NaI(T1) detector.

  18. Cancer Mortality Among People Living in Areas With Various Levels of Natural Background Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwik Dobrzyński

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There are many places on the earth, where natural background radiation exposures are elevated significantly above about 2.5 mSv/year. The studies of health effects on populations living in such places are crucially important for understanding the impact of low doses of ionizing radiation. This article critically reviews some recent representative literature that addresses the likelihood of radiation-induced cancer and early childhood death in regions with high natural background radiation. The comparative and Bayesian analysis of the published data shows that the linear no-threshold hypothesis does not likely explain the results of these recent studies, whereas they favor the model of threshold or hormesis. Neither cancers nor early childhood deaths positively correlate with dose rates in regions with elevated natural background radiation.

  19. Methods of calculating radiation absorbed dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegst, A V

    1987-01-01

    The new tumoricidal radioactive agents being developed will require a careful estimate of radiation absorbed tumor and critical organ dose for each patient. Clinical methods will need to be developed using standard imaging or counting instruments to determine cumulated organ activities with tracer amounts before the therapeutic administration of the material. Standard MIRD dosimetry methods can then be applied.

  20. Biological effects of background radiation: mutagenicity of 40K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevertz, D.; Friedman, A.M.; Katz, J.J.; Kubitschek, H.E.

    1985-12-01

    The naturally occurring radioactive isotope 40K is the single largest contributor to the internal background radiation dose in living organisms. We examined cell growth and mutation rate or frequency in several strains of Escherichia coli in (i) media containing the natural content of 40K, (ii) media containing potassium from which essentially all of the 40K had been removed by isotope separation, and (iii) media highly enriched in 40K. Growth rates (doubling times) were identical in the present or absence of 40K. In more than 40 chemostat experiments, we were unable to detect any significant differences in mutation rate to bacteriophage T5 resistance or in mutation frequency to valine resistance or tryptophan prototrophy attributable to 40K. We conclude that, in the bacterial systems we have studied, 40K does not make a significant contribution to spontaneous mutation.

  1. Evaluation of High Level Environmental Background Radiation Areas and its Variation in Ramsar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyeb Allahverdi Pourfallah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation from natural sources is a continuing and inescapable feature of life on earth. For most individuals, this exposure exceeds that from all man-made sources combined. Materials and Methods In this study, the annual effective dose in high level environmental background radiation areas (HLEBRAs of northern city of Ramsar in Iran was determined. For dosimetry, a gamma radiation dosimeter was used. Measurements were performed in more than 90 points in five districts with HLEBR around and near hot springs. Results In some areas, the annual effective dose from outdoor external gamma radiation in HLEBRAs (30 mSv/y exceeded the annual effective dose limit for radiation workers. Our results are evident that the population dose from normal background radiation in HLEBRAs is 200 times higher than corresponding values in Ramsar sea shore. To estimate the cosmic ray contribution, dose measurements were performed on the sea surface one km off the sea shore. Conclusion The observed differences over locations and measured doses between this study and the others revealed the dynamic nature of this phenomenon, and necessitate performing the periodic studies in these areas. Moreover, cytogenetic and immunologic researches for studying the long term effects of these high level environmental radiations on the residents of these HLEBRAs are necessary.

  2. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, John [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Day, Philip [School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.harrison@hpa.org.uk, E-mail: philip.day@manchester.ac.uk

    2008-06-01

    This review updates material prepared for the UK Government Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters (CERRIE) and also refers to the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and other recent developments. Two conclusions from CERRIE were that ICRP should clarify and elaborate its advice on the use of its dose quantities, equivalent and effective dose, and that more attention should be paid to uncertainties in dose and risk estimates and their implications. The new ICRP recommendations provide explanations of the calculation and intended purpose of the protection quantities, but further advice on their use would be helpful. The new recommendations refer to the importance of understanding uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk, although methods for doing this are not suggested. Dose coefficients (Sv per Bq intake) for the inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are published as reference values without uncertainty. The primary purpose of equivalent and effective dose is to enable the summation of doses from different radionuclides and from external sources for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to stochastic risks of whole-body radiation exposure. Doses are calculated using defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including reference anatomical data for the organs and tissues of the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used to adjust for the different effectiveness of different radiation types, per unit absorbed dose (Gy), in causing stochastic effects at low doses and dose rates. Tissue weighting factors are used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, providing a simple set of rounded values chosen on the basis of age- and sex-averaged values of relative detriment. While the definition of absorbed dose has the scientific rigour required of a basic physical quantity

  3. Background radiation measurement with water Cherenkov detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertou, X., E-mail: bertou@cab.cnea.gov.a [CONICET/CNEA, Centro Atomico Bariloche (Argentina); Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Martin Norte 304, 5613 Malarguee (Argentina)

    2011-05-21

    Water Cherenkov Detectors have the nice property of being mostly calorimeters for cosmic ray induced electrons and photons, while providing a clear signal for muons. At large energy deposited in the detector, they observe small extended air showers. This makes them interesting detectors to study the background of cosmic ray secondaries. Using low threshold scaler counters, one can follow the flux of cosmic rays on top of the atmosphere, and/or study atmospheric effects on the cosmic ray shower development. In this paper, background data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are presented. These data are searched for short time-scale variation (one second scale, as expected from Gamma Ray Bursts), and larger time-scale variations, showing modulation effects due to Solar activity (Forbush decreases). Rapid changes in the background flux are also observed during the crossing of storms over the 3000 km{sup 2} of the ground array.

  4. Preliminary research on relationship between long-term low dose radiation exposure and the carotid intima-media thickness of female residents in high background radiation area in Yangjiang, China%阳江高本底女性居民低剂量辐射照射与颈动脉中内膜厚度关系的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏垠平; 谭光享; 雷淑洁; 邹剑明; 张素芬; 刘建香; 李小亮; 孙全富; 秋葉澄伯

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases for people due to long-term low dose radiation exposure.Methods Four regions were selected from the high background radiation area (HBRA) in Yangjiang,featuring highest external γ radiation dose rate,and two regions from control area (CA) was chosen at the similar distance from downtown as four regions selected from the high background radiation area.Each of one hundred female residents aged more than 50 years old respectively selected from the HBRA in Yangjiang and in the CA.The carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) was measured using ultrasonic examination.The peripheral venous was sampled to measure the levels of total cholesterol,triglycerides,high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.Blood pressure,height and weight were also measured.Personal life and living history were collected through questionnaires.The estimation of personal lifetime accumulated radiation dose was based on γ-ray dose rate from indoor and outdoor and the age-related occupancy factor obtained from the previous studies.Results There were statistically significant differences of accumulated radiation dose and CIMT of residents between Yangjiang HBRA and CA [(161.2 ± 38.6) mSy vs.(43.7±7.3) mSv,L (1.0±0.3) mm/R (1.0±0.2) mm vs.L&R (0.9±0.2) mm].The average age was (65.2 ± 10.4) years old for HBRA and (60.7 ± 8.0) years old for CA,respectively.After adjusting confounding factors,including age,blood pressure,BMI and serum cholesterol,the increased cumulative radiation dose was shown to be a risk factor for thickening left CIMT (β =0.000 7,P <0.05).The left CIMT for different dose groups was 0.9,1.0,0.9 and 1.1 mm for < 50,50-100,100-200,> 200 mSv,respectively.Conclusions Long-term low dose radiation exposure may age the vascular,and increasing the risk of atherosclerosis.%目的 探索长期低剂量电离辐射对人群心

  5. Responses to low doses of ionizing radiation in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Pollycove, Myron; Sondhaus, Charles A

    2004-07-01

    Biological tissues operate through cells that act together within signaling networks. These assure coordinated cell function in the face of constant exposure to an array of potentially toxic agents, externally from the environment and endogenously from metabolism. Living tissues are indeed complex adaptive systems.To examine tissue effects specific for low-dose radiation, (1) absorbed dose in tissue is replaced by the sum of the energies deposited by each track event, or hit, in a cell-equivalent tissue micromass (1 ng) in all micromasses exposed, that is, by the mean energy delivered by all microdose hits in the exposed micromasses, with cell dose expressing the total energy per micromass from multiple microdoses; and (2) tissue effects are related to cell damage and protective cellular responses per average microdose hit from a given radiation quality for all such hits in the exposed micromasses.The probability of immediate DNA damage per low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) average micro-dose hit is extremely small, increasing over a certain dose range in proportion to the number of hits. Delayed temporary adaptive protection (AP) involves (a) induced detoxification of reactive oxygen species, (b) enhanced rate of DNA repair, (c) induced removal of damaged cells by apoptosis followed by normal cell replacement and by cell differentiation, and (d) stimulated immune response, all with corresponding changes in gene expression. These AP categories may last from less than a day to weeks and be tested by cell responses against renewed irradiation. They operate physiologically against nonradiogenic, largely endogenous DNA damage, which occurs abundantly and continually. Background radiation damage caused by rare microdose hits per micromass is many orders of magnitude less frequent. Except for apoptosis, AP increasingly fails above about 200 mGy of low-LET radiation, corresponding to about 200 microdose hits per exposed micromass. This ratio appears to exceed approximately

  6. BCC and Childhood Low Dose Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Beiraghi Toosi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is a late complication of ionizing radiation. Two skin neoplasms prominent Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC and Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC are the most famous complications of radiotherapy. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC is the most common human malignant neoplasm. Many genetic and environmental factors are involved in its onset. BCC is observed in sun-exposed areas of skin. Some patients with scalp BCC have had a history of scalp radiation for the treatment of tinea capitis in childhood. Evidence that ionizing radiation is carcinogenic first came from past reports of nonmelanoma skin cancers on the hands of workers using radiation devices. The total dose of radiation and irradiated site exposed to sunlight can lead to a short incubation period. It is not clear whether BCC in these cases has a more aggressive nature and requires a more aggressive resection of the lesion. The aim of this review was to evaluate the differences between BCC specification and treatment results between irradiated and nonirradiated patients.

  7. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-09-30

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population's health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h(-1). At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h(-1). Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg(-1), for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  8. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luevano-Gurrola

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  9. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  10. Is natural background or radiation from nuclear power plants leukemogenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    The objective in this review is to provide some facts about normal hemopoietic cell proliferation relevant to leukemogenesis, physical, chemical, and biological facts about radiation effects with the hope that each person will be able to decide for themselves whether background radiation or emissions from nuclear power plants and facilities significantly add to the spontaneous leukemia incidence. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  12. Radiation dose to the eye lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; D. Nielsen, Kamilla;

    2015-01-01

    field in oncology patients undergoing eyes-to-thighs PET/CT must always include the base of the scull according to department guidelines. The eye lens is sensitive to radiation exposure and if possible it should be avoided to scan the eye. If the patient’s head is kipped backwards during the scan one...... might avoid including the eye in the CT scan without losing sufficient visualization of the scull base. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of decreasing the radiation dose to the eye lens, simply by changing the head position, when doing the PET/CT scan from the base of the scull...... pillow below the head (standard), and (b) kipped backwards with the pillow below the neck (kipped). For each head position, CT scans were repeated 5 times with both a low dose and a high dose CT protocol; in this way, a total of 20 CT scans were performed. Robust standard errors were used in order...

  13. Assessment of population external irradiation doses with consideration of Rospotrebnadzor bodies equipment for monitoring of photon radiation dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Stamat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides review of equipment and methodology for measurement of photon radiation dose; analysis of possible reasons for considerable deviation between the Russian Federation population annual effective external irradiation doses and the relevant average global value. Data on Rospotrebnadzor bodies dosimetry equipment used for measurement of gamma radiation dose are collected and systematized. Over 60 kinds of dosimeters are used for monitoring of population external irradiation doses. Most of dosimeters used in the country have gas-discharge detectors (Geiger-Mueller counters, minor biochemical annunciators, etc. which have higher total values of own background level and of space radiation response than the modern dosimeters with scintillation detectors. This feature of dosimeters is apparently one of most plausible reasons of a bit overstating assessment of population external irradiation doses. The options for specification of population external irradiation doses assessment are: correction of gamma radiation dose measurement results with consideration of dosimeters own background level and space radiation response, introduction of more up-to-date dosimeters with scintillation detectors, etc. The most promising direction of research in verification of population external irradiation doses assessment is account of dosimetry equipment.

  14. Committed dose assessment based on background outdoor gamma exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luevano G, S.; Perez T, A.; Pinedo A, C.; Renteria V, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Zootecnia y Ecologia, Perif. Francisco R. Almada Km 1, 31415 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Carrillo F, J.; Montero C, M. E., E-mail: mrenteria@uach.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Miguel de Cervantes 120, 31136 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on populations health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the committed dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, annual effective dose, and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected along the Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Muller counter. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 n Gy h{sup -1}. Results indicated that lifetime effective dose to inhabitants of Chihuahua City is in average of 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of activity concentrations in soil were 51.8, 73.1, and 1096.5 Bq kg{sup -1}, of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K, respectively. From the analysis of the spatial distribution of {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 40}K is to north, to north-center, and to south of city, respectively. In conclusion, natural background gamma dose received by inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to geological characteristics of the zone. (Author)

  15. Natural background radiation induces cytogenetic radioadaptive response more effectively than occupational exposure in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, A. Shabestani; Mozdarani, H.; Amiri, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ramsar, a city in the northern Iran, has the highest level of natural background radiation in the world. It has been clearly shown that low doses of ionising radiation can induce resistance to subsequent higher exposures. This phenomenon is termed radioadaptive response. We have compared induction of cytogenetic radioadaptive response by High Natural Background Radiation (HNBR) in Ramsar and X-ray occupational exposure as conditioning doses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. 30 healthy control individuals, living in Ramsar but in normal background radiation areas, 15 healthy individuals from Talesh Mahalleh, a region with extraordinary high level of background radiation, and 7 X-ray radiographers working in Ramsar hospital located in normal natural background ionising radiation area were evaluated. Peripheral blood samples were prepared and exposed to challenge dose of 0 and 2 Gy. Lymphocytes were scored using analysis of metaphase, for the presence of chromosomal aberrations. An adaptive response was observed in HNBR and radiation workers groups in comparison with sham controls. A significant increase in adaptive response was observed in the HNBR group if compared with the occupationally exposed group. These findings indicate that both natural background radiation and occupational exposure could induce cytogenetic radioadaptive response and it is more significant regarding to natural background ionising radiation.

  16. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-Pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approximately three orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated by assuming that actinide behavior in their bodies was similar to that defined for Standard Man by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (approx.1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 years. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (USA))

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, sup(239,240)Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approx. 3 orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-Pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (of the order of 1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 yr. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources.

  18. Radiation doses inside industrial irradiation installation with linear electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alexandre R., E-mail: alexandre.lima@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pelegrineli, Samuel Q.; Alo, Gabriel F., E-mail: samuelfisica@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: gabriel.alo@aceletron.com.br [Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, Aceletrica Comercio e Representacoes Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Francisco C.A. Da, E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Aceletron Industrial Irradiation Company is the unique installation in South America to provide industrial irradiation service using two linear electron accelerators of 18 kW and 10 MeV energy. The electron beam technology allows using electrons to irradiate many goods and materials, such as hospital and medical equipment, cosmetics, herbal products, polymers, peat, gemstones and food. Aceletron Company uses a concrete bunker with 3.66 m of thickness to provide the necessary occupational and environmental radiation protection of X-rays produced. The bunker is divided in main four areas: irradiation room, maze, tower and pit. Inside the irradiation room the x-rays radiation rates are measured in two ways: direct beam and 90 deg C. The rates produced in the conveyor system using 10 MeV energy are 500 Gy/min/mA and 15 Gy/min/mA, respectively. For a 1.8 mA current, the rates produced are 900 Gy/min and 27 Gy/min, respectively. Outside the bunker the radiation rate is at background level, but in the tower door and modulation room the radiation rate is 10 μSv/h. In 2014, during a routine operation, an effective dose of 30.90 mSv was recorded in a monthly individual dosimeter. After the investigation, it was concluded that the dose was only in the dosimeter because it felt inside the irradiation room. As Aceletron Company follows the principles of safety culture, it was decided to perform the radiation isodose curves, inside the four areas of the installation, to know exactly the hotspots positions, exposure times and radiation doses. Five hotspots were chosen taking into account worker's routes and possible operational places. The first experiment was done using a package with three TLD and OSLD dosimeters to obtain better statistical results. The first results for the five hotspots near the accelerator machine showed that the radiation dose rates were between 26 Gy/h and 31 Gy/h. The final measurements were performed using a package with one TLD and one OSLD

  19. Radiation Dose Reduction during Radial Cardiac Catheterization: Evaluation of a Dedicated Radial Angiography Absorption Shielding Drape

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Ertel; Jeffrey Nadelson; Adhir R. Shroff; Ranya Sweis; Dean Ferrera; Vidovich, Mladen I.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Radiation scatter protection shield drapes have been designed with the goal of decreasing radiation dose to the operators during transfemoral catheterization. We sought to investigate the impact on operator radiation exposure of various shielding drapes specifically designed for the radial approach. Background. Radial access for cardiac catheterization has increased due to improved patient comfort and decreased bleeding complications. There are concerns for increased radiation exp...

  20. Measurement of radioactivity in an elevated radiation background area of Western Ghats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manigandan P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of monitoring the exposure of the general public to natural radioactivity, the activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples in an elevated radiation background area of Western Ghats was determined using gamma-ray spectrometry. Average values of the activity concentration of radionuclides, outdoor terrestrial gamma dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent and radiation hazard indices from soil activity were estimated. The activity concentrations of 232Th and average outdoor terrestrial gamma dose rate were found to be higher than the world average, possibly affecting the Western Ghats environment in general. Therefore, radiological risks to the general population from ionizing radiation from the naturally occurring radionuclides in the soil are considered to be significant. How- ever, other radiological hazard indices were found to be within permissible limits.

  1. On the omnipresent background gamma radiation of the continuous spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjanac, R.; Maletić, D.; Joković, D.; Veselinović, N.; Dragić, A.; Udovičić, V.; Aničin, I.

    2014-05-01

    The background spectrum of a germanium detector, shielded from the radiations arriving from the lower and open for the radiations arriving from the upper hemisphere, is studied by means of absorption measurements, both in a ground level and in an underground laboratory. The low-energy continuous portion of this background spectrum that peaks at around 100 keV, which is its most intense component, is found to be of very similar shape at the two locations. It is established that it is mostly due to the radiations of the real continuous spectrum, which is quite similar to the instrumental one. The intensity of this radiation is in our cases estimated to about 8000 photons/(m2s·2π·srad) in the ground level laboratory, and to about 5000 photons/(m2s·2π·srad) in the underground laboratory, at the depth of 25 m.w.e. Simulations by GEANT4 and CORSIKA demonstrate that this radiation is predominantly of terrestrial origin, due to environmental gamma radiations scattered off the materials that surround the detector (the "skyshine radiation"), and to a far less extent to cosmic rays of degraded energy.

  2. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    OpenAIRE

    Jolyon H Hendry; Simon, Steven L.; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2009-01-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations li...

  3. Measurement of absorbed dose and proposed radiation exposure level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masayuki; Furukawa, Tomo [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). Hospital

    2003-03-01

    Absorbed dose was measured in clinical X-ray examinations using thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). Moreover, we distributed the levels of radiation exposure into 3 classes. The presumed dose of the internal organs, e.g., uterus dose, was computed to depth doses with a surface dose. This information provides a prediction of the influence of radiation, and the examination can be performed with the informed consent of the patient. Moreover, we examined the distribution of the level of absorbed dose. We proposed two kinds of radiation exposure level, one to the fetus in a pregnant woman and a general level of radiation exposure that is not applied to pregnant women. The levels were as follows: 0.5 mGy and 100 mGy were considered the boundaries for fetal radiation exposure in a pregnant woman, and 200 mGy and 3 Gy were considered the boundaries for the general level of radiation exposure (excluding pregnant women). (author)

  4. Alternative application for the radiation background in the development of the atlas database of atmospheric radiation

    CERN Document Server

    De la Hoz, Ivan Arturo Morales

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays radiation is one of the variables to be considered in the environmental forecasting and it is meaningful in the increase of global warming, together greenhouse effect. The radiation considered by the meteorological organizations depends on the World Radiometric Reference (WRR), the World Standard Group (WSG), addressed by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). This work is based on the cosmic microwave background, as a variable to be estimated in order to get information about the incident radiation in the Earth's atmosphere, as a valuable and meaningful contribution in the building of the radiation atlas by the (UPME) and (IDEAM). Due to the fact that the variables considered are ultraviolet and infrared radiation, ozone column, direct radiation and diffuse radiation, the last two get the global radiation, and are the only ones to be evaluated by the national meteorological organizations in the country. The study of the cosmic background radiation as a research project will provide data which ...

  5. Carbon-14 background, pathway, and dose optimization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, E.; Higley, K. [Oregon State University (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Carbon-14 is radiologically relevant due to its long half-life coupled with its ease of incorporation into the global carbon cycle. The majority of carbon-14 releases from nuclear power plants in the United States are gaseous, and terrestrial samples constitute the primary indicator of increased environmental levels, and thus represent an important pathway for the incorporation of the radionuclide into both human and nonhuman populations. This project was broken into three phases: In phase one, information was summarized on background quantities and production mechanisms of carbon-14 in the general environment and adjacent to nuclear power plants. The second phase involved the review and analysis of nuclear power plant carbon-14 pathways to humans as compared to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.109 methodologies (based on ICRP 2), and identified areas where dose calculations could be optimized. Alternative models for calculating plant uptake from atmosphere and transfer in the food chain were investigated, with particular emphasis on models used by countries in the European Union. In phase three, collard green samples grown at three different locations relative to a nuclear power plant (one control garden and two downwind gardens) were evaluated using a Perkin Elmer TriCarb 3180 TR/SL Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC). Samples were first oven dried and combusted using a Perkin Elmer Model 307 Oxidizer, and activity concentrations were calculated based on the LSC count data. These data were compared to samples analyzed using accelerator mass spectrometry. There was no statistically significant difference in carbon-14 concentrations at the two downwind gardens as compared to the control garden. This research is based on work supported, in part, by the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI). The opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent

  6. Direct determination of internal radiation dose in human blood

    CERN Document Server

    Tanır, Ayse Güneş

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the internal radiation dose using a human blood sample. In the literature, there is no process that allows the direct measurement of the internal radiation dose received by a person. The luminescence counts from a blood sample having a laboratory-injected radiation dose and the waste blood of the patient injected with a radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic purposes were both measured. The decay and dose-response curves were plotted for the different doses. The doses received by the different blood aliquots can be determined by interpolating the luminescence counts to the dose-response curve. This study shows that the dose received by a person can be measured directly, simply and retrospectively by using only a very small amount of blood sample. The results will have important ramifications for the medicine and healthcare fields in particular. This will also be very important in cases of suspicion of radiation poisoning, malpractice and so on.

  7. Scalar Radiation in the Background of a Naked Singularity

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Anshuman; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2013-01-01

    We study scalar radiation spectra from a particle in circular orbit, in the background of the Janis-Newman-Winicour (JNW) naked singularity. The differences in the nature of the spectra, from what one obtains with a Schwarzschild black hole, is established. We also compute the angular distribution of the spectra.

  8. Background radiation effects and hazards in planetary instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, Gillian [Space Research Centre, Michael Atiyah Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gib@star.le.ac.uk; Sims, Mark R. [Space Research Centre, Michael Atiyah Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, (United Kingdom); Fraser, George [Space Research Centre, Michael Atiyah Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, (United Kingdom); Klingelhoefer, Goestar [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Bernhardt, Bodo [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Davidson, Andrew [EADS Astrium, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage SG1 2AS, (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-01

    Recent and proposed future planetary missions are becoming increasingly concerned with detailed geochemical assessment, often in a bid to ascertain the presence of water and life supporting geochemical systems. The instruments involved may use some kind of radioactive source, e.g. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Moessbauer spectrometry, neutron scattering. Having radioactive sources on a lander/rover poses various potential problems, in regard to both safety to personnel involved in the building of the instrument and to radiation effects on spacecraft structure and on other instruments. Indeed background radiation effects from one instrument may dominate measurements in another resulting in loss of scientific performance. Drawing on experience with the Beagle 2 probe which contained two instruments with radioactive sources, we present a discussion on the management of radiation hazards and background effects posed by radioactive sources for such planetary missions.

  9. Study of radiation background at the north crossing point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Xiao-Hu; QIN Qing; QU Hua-Min; WANG Yi-Fang; XU Jin-Qiang; ZHANG Tian-Bao; ZHANG Jian-Yong; ZHANG Qing-Jiang; Achasov Mikhail; CAI Xiao; FU Cheng-Dong; Harris Fred; LIU Qian; Muchnoi Nikolay

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the radiation background at the north crossing point (NCP) in the tunnel of BEPCII is crucial for the performance safety of the High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector, and in turn of great significance for long-term stable running of the energy measurement system. Therefore, as the first step, a NaI(Tl) detector is constructed to continuously measure the radiation level of photons as background for future experiments. Furthermore, gamma and neutron dosimeters are utilized to explore the radiation distribution in the vicinity of the NCP where the HPGe detector will be located. Synthesizing all obtained information, the shielding for neutron irradiation is studied based on model-dependent theoretical analysis.

  10. Suppressing Background Radiation Using Poisson Principal Component Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tandon, P; Dubrawski, A; Labov, S; Nelson, K

    2016-01-01

    Performance of nuclear threat detection systems based on gamma-ray spectrometry often strongly depends on the ability to identify the part of measured signal that can be attributed to background radiation. We have successfully applied a method based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to obtain a compact null-space model of background spectra using PCA projection residuals to derive a source detection score. We have shown the method's utility in a threat detection system using mobile spectrometers in urban scenes (Tandon et al 2012). While it is commonly assumed that measured photon counts follow a Poisson process, standard PCA makes a Gaussian assumption about the data distribution, which may be a poor approximation when photon counts are low. This paper studies whether and in what conditions PCA with a Poisson-based loss function (Poisson PCA) can outperform standard Gaussian PCA in modeling background radiation to enable more sensitive and specific nuclear threat detection.

  11. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashenfelter, J. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Balantekin, B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Baldenegro, C.X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Band, H.R. [Wright Laboratory, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Barclay, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bass, C.D. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY 13214 (United States); Berish, D. [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Bowden, N.S., E-mail: nbowden@llnl.gov [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bryan, C.D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Cherwinka, J.J. [Physical Sciences Laboratory, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Chu, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Classen, T. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Davee, D. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Dean, D.; Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Dolinski, M.J. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dolph, J. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Dwyer, D.A. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fan, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); and others

    2016-01-11

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  12. The Effects of the Ionizing Radiation Background on Galaxy Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hambrick, D Clay; Naab, Thorsten; Johansson, Peter H

    2009-01-01

    We find that the amount and nature of the assumed ionizing background can strongly affect galaxy formation and evolution. Galaxy evolution simulations typically incorporate an ultraviolet background which falls off rapidly above z=3; e.g., that of Haardt & Madau (1996). However, this decline may be too steep to fit the WMAP constraints on electron scattering optical depth or observations of intermediate redshift (z ~ 2-4) Ly-alpha forest transmission. As an alternative, we present simulations of the cosmological formation of individual galaxies with UV backgrounds that decline more slowly at high redshift: both a simple intensity rescaling and the background recently derived by Faucher-Giguere (2009), which softens the spectrum at higher redshifts. We also test an approximation of the X-ray background with a similar z-dependence. We find for the test galaxies that an increase in either the intensity or hardness of ionizing radiation generically pushes star formation towards lower redshifts: although overa...

  13. Background Radiation Measurements at High Power Research Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ashenfelter, J; Baldenegro, C X; Band, H R; Barclay, G; Bass, C D; Berish, D; Bowden, N S; Bryan, C D; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, R; Classen, T; Davee, D; Dean, D; Deichert, G; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Dwyer, D A; Fan, S; Gaison, J K; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilje, K; Glenn, A; Green, M; Han, K; Hans, S; Heeger, K M; Heffron, B; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S; Langford, T J; Littlejohn, B R; Martinez, D; McKeown, R D; Morrell, S; Mueller, P E; Mumm, H P; Napolitano, J; Norcini, D; Pushin, D; Romero, E; Rosero, R; Saldana, L; Seilhan, B S; Sharma, R; Stemen, N T; Surukuchi, P T; Thompson, S J; Varner, R L; Wang, W; Watson, S M; White, B; White, C; Wilhelmi, J; Williams, C; Wise, T; Yao, H; Yeh, M; Yen, Y -R; Zhang, C; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including $\\gamma$-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  14. Radiation Dose Risk and Diagnostic Benefit in Imaging Investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrescu, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents many facets of medical imaging investigations radiological risks. The total volume of prescribed medical investigations proves a serious lack in monitoring and tracking of the cumulative radiation doses in many health services. Modern radiological investigations equipment is continuously reducing the total dose of radiation due to improved technologies, so a decrease in per caput dose can be noticed, but the increasing number of investigations has determined a net increase of the annual collective dose. High doses of radiation are cumulated from Computed Tomography investigations. An integrated system for radiation safety of the patients investigated by radiological imaging methods, based on smart cards and Public Key Infrastructure allow radiation absorbed dose data storage.

  15. THE MYSTERY OF THE COSMIC DIFFUSE ULTRAVIOLET BACKGROUND RADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Richard Conn [Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Murthy, Jayant [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru (India); Overduin, James; Tyler, Joshua, E-mail: henry@jhu.edu, E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com, E-mail: joverduin@towson.edu, E-mail: 97tyler@cardinalmail.cua.edu [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1300-1700 Å) is deduced to originate only partially in the dust-scattered radiation of FUV-emitting stars: the source of a substantial fraction of the FUV background radiation remains a mystery. The radiation is remarkably uniform at both far northern and far southern Galactic latitudes and increases toward lower Galactic latitudes at all Galactic longitudes. We examine speculation that this might be due to interaction of the dark matter with the nuclei of the interstellar medium, but we are unable to point to a plausible mechanism for an effective interaction. We also explore the possibility that we are seeing radiation from bright FUV-emitting stars scattering from a ''second population'' of interstellar grains—grains that are small compared with FUV wavelengths. Such grains are known to exist, and they scatter with very high albedo, with an isotropic scattering pattern. However, comparison with the observed distribution (deduced from their 100 μm emission) of grains at high Galactic latitudes shows no correlation between the grains' location and the observed FUV emission. Our modeling of the FUV scattering by small grains also shows that there must be remarkably few such ''smaller'' grains at high Galactic latitudes, both north and south; this likely means simply that there is very little interstellar dust of any kind at the Galactic poles, in agreement with Perry and Johnston. We also review our limited knowledge of the cosmic diffuse background at ultraviolet wavelengths shortward of Lyα—it could be that our ''second component'' of the diffuse FUV background persists shortward of the Lyman limit and is the cause of the reionization of the universe.

  16. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordner, Autumn S; Crosswell, Danielle A; Katz, Ainsley O; Shah, Jill T; Zhang, Catherine R; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W; Ruderman, Malvin A

    2016-06-21

    We report measurements of background gamma radiation levels on six islands in the northern Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Medren, and Runit onEnewetak Atoll; Bikini and Nam on Bikini Atoll; and Rongelap on Rongelap Atoll). Measurable excess radiation could be expected from the decay of (137)Cs produced by the US nuclear testing program there from 1946 to 1958. These recordings are of relevance to safety of human habitation and resettlement. We find low levels of gamma radiation for the settled island of Enewetak [mean = 7.6 millirem/year (mrem/y) = 0.076 millisievert/year (mSv/y)], larger levels of gamma radiation for the island of Rongelap (mean = 19.8 mrem/y = 0.198 mSv/y), and relatively high gamma radiation on the island of Bikini (mean = 184 mrem/y = 1.84 mSv/y). Distributions of gamma radiation levels are provided, and hot spots are discussed. We provide interpolated maps for four islands (Enewetak, Medren, Bikini, and Rongelap), and make comparisons to control measurements performed on the island of Majuro in the southern Marshall Islands, measurements made in Central Park in New York City, and the standard agreed upon by the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) governments (100 mrem/y = 1 mSv/y). External gamma radiation levels on Bikini Island significantly exceed this standard (P = <0.01), and external gamma radiation levels on the other islands are below the standard. To determine conclusively whether these islands are safe for habitation, radiation exposure through additional pathways such as food ingestion must be considered.

  17. Radiative feedback from an early X-ray background

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, S C O; Glover, Simon C.O.; Brand, Peter W.J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The first generation of stars (commonly known as population III) are expected to form in low-mass protogalaxies in which molecular hydrogen is the dominant coolant. Radiation from these stars will rapidly build up an extragalactic ultraviolet background capable of photodissociating H2, and it is widely believed that this background will suppress further star formation in low-mass systems. However, star formation will also produce an extragalactic X-ray background. This X-ray background, by increasing the fractional ionization of protogalactic gas, promotes H2 formation and reduces the effectiveness of ultraviolet feedback. In this paper, we examine which of these backgrounds has the dominant effect. Using a simple model for the growth of the UV and X-ray backgrounds, together with a detailed one-dimensional model of protogalactic chemical evolution, we examine the effects of the X-ray backgrounds produced by a number of likely source models. We show that in several cases, the resulting X-ray background is str...

  18. Direct determination of external radiation dose in human blood

    CERN Document Server

    Tanir, AG; Sahiner, E; Bolukdemir, MH; Koc, K; Meric, N; Keles, SK; Kucuk, O

    2014-01-01

    In this study it was shown that it is possible to determine radiation doses from external beam therapy both directly and retrospectively from a human blood sample. To the best of our knowledge no other studies exist on the direct measurement of doses received by a person from external beam therapy. Optically stimulated luminescence counts from a healthy blood sample exposed to an external radiation source were measured. Blood aliquots were given 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 50, 100 and 200Gy beta doses and their decay and dose-response curves were plotted. While the luminescence intensities were found to be relatively low for the doses smaller than 10Gy, they were measured considerably higher for doses greater than 10Gy. The dose received by the blood aliquots was determined by interpolating the luminescence counts of 10Gy to the dose-response curve. This study has important ramifications for healthcare, medicine and radiation protection

  19. Energies, health, medicine. Low radiation doses; Energies, sante, medecine. Les faibles doses de rayonnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file concerns the biological radiation effects with a special mention for low radiation doses. The situation of knowledge in this area and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are detailed, the different directions of researches are given. The radiation doses coming from medical examinations are given and compared with natural radioactivity. It constitutes a state of the situation on ionizing radiations, known effects, levels, natural radioactivity and the case of radon, medicine with diagnosis and radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  20. Systematic review on physician's knowledge about radiation doses and radiation risks of computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krille, Lucian, E-mail: lucian.krille@unimedizin-mainz.d [Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 69, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Hammer, Gael P.; Merzenich, Hiltrud [Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg - University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 69, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Zeeb, Hajo [Bremen Institute for Prevention Research and Social Medicine (BIPS), Department of Prevention and Evaluation, Linzer Strasse 10, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Background: The frequent use of computed tomography is a major cause of the increasing medical radiation exposure of the general population. Consequently, dose reduction and radiation protection is a topic of scientific and public concern. Aim: We evaluated the available literature on physicians' knowledge regarding radiation dosages and risks due to computed tomography. Methods: A systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane and PRISMA statements was performed using eight databases. 3091 references were found. Only primary studies assessing physicians' knowledge about computed tomography were included. Results: 14 relevant articles were identified, all focussing on dose estimations for CT. Overall, the surveys showed moderate to low knowledge among physicians concerning radiation doses and the involved health risks. However, the surveys varied considerably in conduct and quality. For some countries, more than one survey was available. There was no general trend in knowledge in any country except a slight improvement of knowledge on health risks and radiation doses in two consecutive local German surveys. Conclusions: Knowledge gaps concerning radiation doses and associated health risks among physicians are evident from published research. However, knowledge on radiation doses cannot be interpreted as reliable indicator for good medical practice.

  1. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Hae Youn; Park, Hong Sook

    2001-03-01

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated.

  2. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, L. E.; Badawy, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care.

  3. Nature of the Background Ultraviolet Radiation Field at High Redshifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Archana Samantaray; Pushpa Khare

    2000-06-01

    We have tried to determine the flux of the ultraviolet background radiation field from the column density ratios of various ions in several absorption systems observed in the spectra of QSOs. We find that in most cases the flux is considerably higher than what has been estimated to be contributed by the AGNs. The excess flux could originate locally in hot stars. In a few cases we have been able to show that such galactic flux can only contribute a part of the total required flux. The results suggest that the background gets a significant contribution from an unseen QSO population.

  4. PABLM; accumulated environment radiation dose. [UNIVAC1100; FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T.B.; Tobias, M.L.; Fox, J.N.; Lawler, B.E.; Koppel, J.U.; Triplett, J.R.; Lynn, L.L.; Waldman, L.A.; Goldberg, I.; Greebler, P.; Kelley, M.D.; Davis, R.A.; Keck, C.E.; Redfield, J.A.; Murphy,; Soldat, J.K.

    PABLM calculates internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release, after deposition, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider exposure to radionuclides deposited on the ground or crops from contaminated air or irrigation water, radionuclides in contaminated drinking water, aquatic foods raised in contaminated water, and radionuclides in bodies of water and sediments where people might fish, boat, or swim. For vegetation, the radiation dose model considers both direct deposition and uptake through roots. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The program is designed to calculate accumulated radiation doses from the chronic ingestion of food products that contain radionuclides and doses from the external exposure to radionuclides in the environment. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years.UNIVAC1100; FORTRAN; EXEC8; 80,000 words of memory are required to execute the PABLM program.

  5. Calculation of the dose caused by internal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    For the purposes of monitoring radiation exposure it is necessary to determine or to estimate the dose caused by both external and internal radiation. When comparing the value of exposure to the dose limits, account must be taken of the total dose incurred from different sources. This guide explains how to calculate the committed effective dose caused by internal radiation and gives the conversion factors required for the calculation. Application of the maximum values for radiation exposure is dealt with in ST guide 7.2, which also sets out the definitions of the quantities and concepts most commonly used in the monitoring of radiation exposure. The monitoring of exposure and recording of doses are dealt with in ST Guides 7.1 and 7.4.

  6. Study of Natural Background Radiation around Gurvanbulag Uranium Deposit Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhbat, N.; Norov, N.; Bat-Erdene, B.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Otgooloi, B.

    2009-03-01

    In this work, we will show the study of natural background radiation level around the Gurvanbulag (GB) uranium deposit area in the eastern part of Mongolia. We collected environmental soil samples from 102 points around GB Uranium deposit. Collected samples were measured by HPGe gamma spectrometer at Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia. The averaged activity concentrations of Ra-226, Th-232, K-40, and Cs-137 were 37.1, 29, 939, and 17.7 Bq/kg, respectively.

  7. Non-spherical structures and the microwave background radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argueso, F.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E. (Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna)

    1989-06-15

    We study the influence of homogeneous spheroidal structures on the large angular-scale microwave background radiation (MBR) anisotropies. We consider these structures as linear perturbations on an Einstein-de Sitter Universe. By comparing our calculations with the dipole and quadrupole measurements, we draw some conclusions about the existence and properties of these elongated or flattened lumps (or voids) around us. Useful analytical approximations for the quadrupole generated by such structures are also given when they are inside the horizon. (author).

  8. A Biodosimeter for Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Dose, Radiation Quality, and Radiation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Jansen, Heather; Bors, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure of an individual or a population to ionizing radiation is challenging. To an approximation, this is because uncertainties of uniform absorption of dose and the uniform processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level within a complex set of biological variables degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing cancer by the cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported. This is the demonstration of a dose responsive field effect of enhanced expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells irradiated with cesium-1 37 gamma-rays. Dose response of enhanced K18 expression was experimentally extended over a range of 30 to 90 cGy for cells evaluated at mid-log phase. K18 has been reported to be a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis, and thereby serves as an example of a potential marker for cancer risk, where the reality of such predictive value would require additional experimental development. Since observed radiogenic increase in expression of K18 is a field effect, ie., chronically present in all cells of the irradiated population, it may be hypothesized that K18 expression in specific cells absorbing particulate irradiation, such as the high-LET-producing atomic nuclei of space radiation, will report on both the single-cell distributions of those particles amongst cells within the exposed population, and that the relatively high dose per cell delivered by densely ionizing tracks of those intersecting particles will lead to cell-specific high-expression levels of K18, thereby providing analytical end points that may be used to resolve both the quantity and

  9. CERN-derived analysis of lunar radiation backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Svoboda, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The Moon produces radiation which background-limits scientific experiments there. Early analyses of these backgrounds have either failed to take into consideration the effect of charm in particle physics (because they pre-dated its discovery), or have used branching ratios which are no longer strictly valid (due to new accelerator data). We are presently investigating an analytical program for deriving muon and neutrino spectra generated by the Moon, converting an existing CERN computer program known as GEANT which does the same for the Earth. In so doing, this will (1) determine an accurate prompt neutrino spectrum produced by the lunar surface; (2) determine the lunar subsurface particle flux; (3) determine the consequence of charm production physics upon the lunar background radiation environment; and (4) provide an analytical tool for the NASA astrophysics community with which to begin an assessment of the Moon as a scientific laboratory versus its particle radiation environment. This will be done on a recurring basis with the latest experimental results of the particle data groups at Earth-based high-energy accelerators, in particular with the latest branching ratios for charmed meson decay. This will be accomplished for the first time as a full 3-dimensional simulation.

  10. Radiation dose in neurological computed tomographic scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitmore, R.C.; Bushong, S.C.; Archer, B.A.; Glaze, S.A.

    1979-07-01

    Patient dose and dose distribution during neurologicl computed tomography examinations were determined with five different computed tomography scanners. Maximum intracranial doses ranged from 1.17 to 2.67 rads. Doses to the lens of the eye ranged from 0.23 to 2.81 rads. These levels are considered and compared with patient doses reported for other computed tomography studies and for conventional tomographic examinations. In general, patient dose during computer tomographic examinations is less than one quarter of that during conventional tomography of the head.

  11. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  12. Patient radiation dose in conventional and xerographic cephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copley, R.L.; Glaze, S.A.; Bushong, S.C.; West, D.C.

    1979-11-01

    A comparison of the radiation doses for xeroradiographic and conventional film screen cephalography was made. Alderson tissue-equivalent phantoms were used for patient simulation. An optimum technique in terms of patient dose and image quality indicated that the dose for the Xerox process ranged from five to eleven times greater than that for the conventional process for entrance and exit exposures, respectively. This dose, however, falls within an acceptable range for other dental and medical radiation doses. It is recommended that conventional cephalography be used for routine purposes and that xeroradiography be reserved for situations requiring the increased image quality that the process affords.

  13. Low doses of radiation reduce risks in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2004-05-01

    The 'Linear No Threshold' hypothesis, used in all radiation protection practices, assumes that all doses, no matter how low, increase risk. The protective effects of adaptive responses to radiation, shown to exist in lower organisms and in human and other mammalian cells, are inconsistent with this hypothesis. An in vivo test of the hypothesis in mice showed that a 100-mGy dose of {gamma}-radiation protected the mice by increasing latency for acute myeloid leukemia initiated by a subsequent large dose. A similar result was observed in cancer prone mice, where a 10-mGy adapting exposure prior to a large acute dose increased latency for lymphomas without altering frequency. Increasing the adapting dose to 100-mGy eliminated the protective effect. In the cancer prone mice, a 10-mGy dose alone, without a subsequent high dose, increased latency for spontaneous osteosarcomas and lymphomas without altering frequency. Increasing the dose to 100-mGy decreased latency for spontaneous osteosarcomas but still increased latency for lymphomas, indicating that this higher dose was in a transition zone between reduced and increased risk, and that the transition dose from protective to detrimental effects is tumor type specific. In genetically normal fetal mice, prior low doses also protected against radiation induced teratogenic effects. In genetically normal adult male mice, high doses induce mutations in sperm stem cells, detectable as heritable mutations in the offspring of these mice. A prior 100 mGy dose protected the male mice from induction of these heritable mutations by the large dose. We conclude that adaptive responses are induced by low doses in normal or cancer prone mice, and that these responses can reduce the risk of cancer, teratogenesis and heritable mutations. At low doses in vivo, the relationship between dose and risk is not linear, and low doses can reduce risk. (author)

  14. Vertebrate radiations of the Jehol Biota and their environmental background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhonghe

    2004-01-01

    @@ Significant progress has been made in recent years in the studies of various groups of the Jehol Biota, particularly concerning the origin of birds and their flight as well as the evolution of Early Cretaceous birds, dinosaurs, mammals, insects and flowering plants[1-5]. As a result, the Jehol Biota has become well known to both the scientific community and the public. The studies on the Jehol Biota also revealed the patterns and processes of the evolutionary radiations of many major groups of Early Cretaceous animals and plants, such as the earliest known radiation of angiosperms and birds, early differentiation of mammals and many Cretaceous dinosaurian groups. Notably, the radiations of the Jehol vertebrates share some similar patterns attributable to the particular environmental background. For instance, the Jehol vertebrate radiations are highlighted by the presence of abundant arboreal adaptations and herbivorous forms, thus closely linked to the forest environments. In addition, the differentiation of habitats and diets is also characteristic of the evolutionary radiations of pterosaurs, dinosaurs, birds and mammals in the Jehol Biota.

  15. Assessment of Radiation Background Variation for Moving Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rennie, John Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toevs, James Waldo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallace, Darrin J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abhold, Mark Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-13

    The introduction points out that radiation backgrounds fluctuate across very short distances: factors include geology, soil composition, altitude, building structures, topography, and other manmade structures; and asphalt and concrete can vary significantly over short distances. Brief descriptions are given of the detection system, experimental setup, and background variation measurements. It is concluded that positive and negative gradients can greatly reduce the detection sensitivity of an MDS: negative gradients create opportunities for false negatives (nondetection), and positive gradients create a potentially unacceptable FAR (above 1%); the location of use for mobile detection is important to understand; spectroscopic systems provide more information for screening out false alarms and may be preferred for mobile use; and mobile monitor testing at LANL accounts for expected variations in the background.

  16. KREAM: Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model for Aviation Route Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, H. P.; Cho, K. S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Since Korean Air has begun to use the polar route from Seoul/ICN airport to New York/JFK airport on August 2006, there are explosive needs for the estimation and prediction against cosmic radiation exposure for Korean aircrew and passengers in South Korea from public. To keep pace with those needs of public, Korean government made the law on safety standards and managements of cosmic radiation for the flight attendants and the pilots in 2013. And we have begun to develop our own Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model (KREAM) for aviation route dose since last year funded by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). GEANT4 model and NRLMSIS 00 model are used for calculation of the energetic particles' transport in the atmosphere and for obtaining the background atmospheric neutral densities depending on altitude. For prediction the radiation exposure in many routes depending on the various space weather effects, we constructed a database from pre-arranged simulations using all possible combinations of R, S, and G, which are the space weather effect scales provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To get the solar energetic particles' spectrum at the 100 km altitude which we set as a top of the atmospheric layers in the KREAM, we use ACE and GOES satellites' proton flux observations. We compare the results between KREAM and the other cosmic radiation estimation programs such as CARI-6M which is provided by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA). We also validate KREAM's results by comparison with the measurement from Liulin-6K LET spectrometer onboard Korean commercial flights and Korean Air Force reconnaissance flights.

  17. Audit of radiation dose during balloon mitral valvuloplasty procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingstone, Roshan S [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); Chandy, Sunil [Department of Cardiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); Peace, B S Timothy [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); George, Paul [Department of Cardiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); John, Bobby [Department of Cardiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); Pati, Purendra [Department of Cardiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India)

    2006-12-15

    Radiation doses to patients during cardiological procedures are of concern in the present day scenario. This study was intended to audit the radiation dose imparted to patients during the balloon mitral valvuloplasty (BMV) procedure. Thirty seven patients who underwent the BMV procedure performed using two dedicated cardiovascular machines were included in the study. The radiation doses imparted to patients were measured using a dose area product (DAP) meter. The mean DAP value for patients who underwent the BMV procedure from one machine was 19.16 Gy cm{sup 2} and from the other was 21.19 Gy cm{sup 2}. Optimisation of exposure parameters and radiation doses was possible for one machine with the use of appropriate copper filters and optimised exposure parameters, and the mean DAP value after optimisation was 9.36 Gy cm{sup 2}.

  18. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Muller, R. A.; Smoot, G. F.; Tyson, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A 33-GHz airborne radiometer system has been developed to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 deg apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of plus or minus 1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 deg, reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, Calif.

  19. Radionuclides and radiation indices of high background radiation area in Chavara-Neendakara placer deposits (Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Thomas Derin

    Full Text Available The present paper describes a detailed study on the distribution of radionuclides along Chavara - Neendakara placer deposit, a high background radiation area (HBRA along the Southwest coast of India (Kerala. Judged from our studies using HPGe gamma spectrometric detector, it becomes evident that Uranium ((238U, Thorium ((232Th and Potassium ((40K are the major sources for radioactivity prevailing in the area. Our statistical analyses reveal the existence of a high positive correlation between (238U and (232Th, implicating that the levels of these elements are interdependent. Our SEM-EDAX analyses reveal that titanium (Ti and zircon (Zr are the major trace elements in the sand samples, followed by aluminum, copper, iron, ruthenium, magnesium, calcium, sulphur and lead. This is first of its kind report on the radiation hazard indices on this placer deposit. The average absorbed dose rates (9795 nGy h(-1 computed from the present study is comparable with the top-ranking HBRAs in the world, thus offering the Chavara-Neendakara placer the second position, after Brazil; pertinently, this value is much higher than the World average. The perceptibly high absorbed gamma dose rates, entrained with the high annual external effective dose rates (AEED and average annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE values existing in this HBRA, encourage us to suggest for a candid assessment of the impact of the background radiation, if any, on the organisms that inhabit along this placer deposit. Future research could effectively address the issue of the possible impact of natural radiation on the biota inhabiting this HBRA.

  20. Radiochromic Plastic Films for Accurate Measurement of Radiation Absorbed Dose and Dose Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Miller, Arne; Fidan, S.

    1977-01-01

    of many polymeric systems in industrial radiation processing. The result is that errors due to energy dependence of response of the radiation sensor are effectively reduced, since the spectral sensitivity of the dose meter matches that of the polymer of interest, over a wide range of photon and electron...... in polymeric solutions can be cast into flexible free-standing thin films of uniform thickness and reproducible response to ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. The increase in optical density versus energy deposited by radiation is linear over a wide range of doses and is for practical purposes independent......Thin radiochromic dye films are useful for measuring large radiation absorbed doses (105–108 rads) and for high-resolution imaging of dose patterns produced by penetrating radiation beams passing through non-homogeneous media. Certain types of amino-substituted triarylmethane cyanides dissolved...

  1. Brain Radiation Information Data Exchange (BRIDE): Integration of experimental data from low-dose ionising radiation research for pathway discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Karapiperis (Christos); S.J. Kempf (Stefan J.); R. Quintens (Roel); O. Azimzadeh (Omid); V.L. Vidal (Victoria Linares); S. Pazzaglia; D. Bazyka (Dimitry); P.G. Mastroberardino (Pier); Z.G. Scouras (Zacharias G.); S. Tapio (Soile); M.A. Benotmane (Mohammed Abderrafi); C.A. Ouzounis (Christos A.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The underlying molecular processes representing stress responses to low-dose ionising radiation (LDIR) in mammals are just beginning to be understood. In particular, LDIR effects on the brain and their possible association with neurodegenerative disease are currently being ex

  2. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources.

  3. Cosmic Rays Induced Background Radiation on Board of Commercial Flights

    CERN Document Server

    Pinilla, S; Núñez, L A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the total integrated flux of cosmic radiation which a commercial aircraft is exposed to along specific flight trajectories. To study the radiation background during a flight and its modulation by effects such as altitude, latitude, exposure time and transient magnetospheric events, we perform simulations based on Magnetocosmics and CORSIKA codes, the former designed to calculate the geomagnetic effects on cosmic rays propagation and the latter allows us to simulate the development of extended air showers in the atmosphere. In this first work, by considering the total flux of cosmic rays from 5 GeV to 1 PeV, we obtained the expected integrated flux of secondary particles on board of a commercial airplane during the Bogot\\'a-Buenos Aires trip by point-to-point numerical integration.

  4. The development of remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-woo [KAERI - Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongup-si (Korea, Republic of); Chonbuk National University, Jeonjoo-Si (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kyu-hwan [KINS - Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon-Si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-il [Chonbuk National University, Jeonjoo-Si (Korea, Republic of); Im, Chae-wan [REMTECH, Seoul-Si (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Internet of things (IoT) technology has recently shown a large flow of IT trends in human life. In particular, our lives are now becoming integrated with a lot of items around the 'smart-phone' with IoT, including Bluetooth, Near Field Communication (NFC), Beacons, WiFi, and Global Positioning System (GPS). Our project focuses on the interconnection of radiation dosimetry and IoT technology. The radiation workers at a nuclear facility should hold personal dosimeters such as a Thermo-Luminescence Dosimeter (TLD), an Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeter (OSL), pocket ionization chamber dosimeters, an Electronic Personal Dosimeter (EPD), or an alarm dosimeter on their body. Some of them have functions that generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers in a real working area. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions for communicating with other areas or the responsible personnel in real time. In particular, when conducting a particular task in a high dose area, or a number of repair works within a radiation field, radiation dose monitoring is important for the health of the workers and the work efficiency. Our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system (RWRD) that can be used to monitor the radiation dose in a nuclear facility for radiation workers and a radiation protection program In this project, a radiation dosimeter is the detection device for personal radiation dose, a smart phone is the mobile wireless communication tool, and, Beacon is the wireless starter for the detection, communication, and position of the worker using BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy). In this report, we report the design of the RWRD and a demonstration case in a real radiation field. (authors)

  5. Online Radiation Dose Measurement System for ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Particle detectors and readout electronics in the high energy physics experiment ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN operate in radiation field containing photons, charged particles and neutrons. The particles in the radiation field originate from proton-proton interactions as well as from interactions of these particles with material in the experimental apparatus. In the innermost parts of ATLAS detector components will be exposed to ionizing doses exceeding 100 kGy. Energetic hadrons will also cause displacement damage in silicon equivalent to fluences of several times 10e14 1 MeV-neutrons per cm2. Such radiation doses can have severe influence on the performance of detectors. It is therefore very important to continuously monitor the accumulated doses to understand the detector performance and to correctly predict the lifetime of radiation sensitive components. Measurements of doses are important also to verify the simulations and represent a crucial input into the models used for predicting future ...

  6. Low dose ionizing radiation induced acoustic neuroma: A putative link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin A Borkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure to high dose ionizing radiation (following therapeutic radiotherapy has been incriminated in the pathogenesis of many brain tumors, exposure to chronic low dose ionizing radiation has not yet been shown to be associated with tumorigenesis. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old atomic reactor scientist who received a cumulative dose of 78.9 mSv over a 10-year period and was detected to have an acoustic neuroma another 15 years later. Although there is no proof that exposure to ionizing radiation was the cause for the development of the acoustic neuroma, this case highlights the need for extended follow-up periods following exposure to low dose ionizing radiation.

  7. Radiation dose measurement of paediatric patients in Estonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepler, K. [Training Centre of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tartu (Estonia); Lintrop, M. [Department of Radiology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu (Estonia); Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Eek, V.; Filippova, I. [Estonian Radiation Protection Centre, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2003-06-01

    According to the Medical Exposure Directive (97/43/Euratom) the radiation doses to patients should be measured in every hospital and doses should be compared to the reference doses established by the competent authorities. Special attention should be paid to the paediatric x-ray examinations, because the paediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adult patients. The requirement of measurements of radiation dose to patients is not yet included in the Estonian radiation act, but the purpose to join the European Communities makes the quality control in radiology very actual in Estonia. The necessity exists to introduce suitable measurement methods in the Xray departments of Estonian hospitals for establishing feedback system for radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists in optimising the radiation burden of patients and image quality. (orig.)

  8. Monitoring of radiation exposure and registration of doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and working conditions and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently organizing it. In addition, instructions are given for reporting doses to the Dose Register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Also the procedures are described for situations leading to exceptional exposures. (10 refs., 1 tab.).

  9. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  10. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  11. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanusi, M S M; Ramli, A T; Gabdo, H T; Garba, N N; Heryanshah, A; Wagiran, H; Said, M N

    2014-09-01

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h(-1) to 500 nGy h(-1). The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h(-1). This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h(-1) (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation.

  12. Megagray Dosimetry (or Monitoring of Very Large Radiation Doses)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Uribe, R.M.; Miller, Arne

    1983-01-01

    A number of suitably calibrated plastic and dyed films and solid-state systems can provide mapping of very intense radiation fields with high spatial resolution and reasonable limits of uncertainty of absorbed dose assessment. Although most systems of this type suffer from rate dependence...... and temperature dependence of response when irradiated with charged particle beams at high dose rates, a few are stable, easily calibrated, and capable of faithful imaging of detailed dose profiles, even at doses up to 106 Gy and dose rates up to 108 Gy·s−1. Candidates include certain undyed plastic films (e...

  13. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation: artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masao S; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-05-01

    Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined because of ambiguity in the quantitative link to doses below 0.2 Sv in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki arising from limitations in the statistical power and information available on overall radiation dose. To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the 'integrate-and-fire' algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The analysis revealed unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal exposure dose, including (i) the presence of a threshold that varied with organ, gender and age at exposure, and (ii) a small but significant bumping increase in cancer risk at low doses in Nagasaki that probably reflects internal exposure to (239)Pu. The threshold was distinct from the canonical definition of zero effect in that it was manifested as negative excess relative risk, or suppression of background cancer rates. Such a unique tissue response at low doses of radiation exposure has been implicated in the context of the molecular basis of radiation-environment interplay in favor of recently emerging experimental evidence on DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and its epigenetic memory by histone marking.

  14. Radiation Parameters of High Dose Rate Iridium -192 Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    A lack of physical data for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 sources has necessitated the use of basic radiation parameters measured with low dose rate (LDR) Ir-192 seeds and ribbons in HDR dosimetry calculations. A rigorous examination of the radiation parameters of several HDR Ir-192 sources has shown that this extension of physical data from LDR to HDR Ir-192 may be inaccurate. Uncertainty in any of the basic radiation parameters used in dosimetry calculations compromises the accuracy of the calculated dose distribution and the subsequent dose delivery. Dose errors of up to 0.3%, 6%, and 2% can result from the use of currently accepted values for the half-life, exposure rate constant, and dose buildup effect, respectively. Since an accuracy of 5% in the delivered dose is essential to prevent severe complications or tumor regrowth, the use of basic physical constants with uncertainties approaching 6% is unacceptable. A systematic evaluation of the pertinent radiation parameters contributes to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in HDR Ir-192 dose delivery. Moreover, the results of the studies described in this thesis contribute significantly to the establishment of standardized numerical values to be used in HDR Ir-192 dosimetry calculations.

  15. Surface dose with grids in electron beam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, K.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.; Lin, J.-P.; Chu, T.-C. E-mail: tcchu@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2002-03-01

    This investigation attempts to solve the problem of the lack of skin-sparing effect in electron radiation therapy and to increase the tolerance of skin to radiation using the grid technique. Electron grid therapy involves the mounting of a Cerrobend grid in the electron cone. Film dosimetry was employed to measure the relative surface dose and the percentage depth dose profile of electron grid portals. Various grid hole diameters (d=0.45, 1.0, 1.5 cm) and grid hole spacings (s=0.4, 0.2 cm) were considered for electron beams from 6 to 14 MeV. Experimental results indicate that the electron grid technique can reduce the relative surface dose in electron radiation therapy. Degradations of the relative surface dose depend on the percentage of open area in the grid portal. A proper grid design allows the surface dose to be reduced and the range of nonhomogeneous doses to be limited to a depth at which the target volume can receive a homogeneous dose. The grid technique can lower the surface dose in electron radiation therapy.

  16. Malignant melanoma of the tongue following low-dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalemeris, G.C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Gray, G.F. Jr.; Glick, A.D.

    1985-03-01

    A 47-year-old man had a spindly malignant melanoma of the tongue many years after low-dose radiation therapy for lichen planus. To our knowledge, only 12 melanomas of the tongue have been reported previously, and in none of these was radiation documented.

  17. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audette-Stuart, M., E-mail: stuartm@aecl.ca [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S. [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: > Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. > The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. > No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. > Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  18. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGING RADIATION DOSE TO PATIENTS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY USING REFERENCE DOSE LEVELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almén, Anja; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities.

  19. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  20. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  1. Dose received by radiation workers in Australia, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, N.D.

    1994-07-01

    Exposure to radiation can cause genetic defects or cancer. People who use sources of radiation as part of their employment are potentially at a greater risk than others owing to the possibility of their being continually exposed to small radiation doses over a long period. In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council has established radiation protection standards and set annual effective dose limits for radiation workers in order to minimise the chance of adverse effects occurring. These standards are based on the the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1990). In order to ensure that the prescribed limits are not exceeded and to ensure that doses are kept to a minimum, some sort of monitoring is necessary. The primary purpose of this report is to provide data on the distribution of effective doses for different occupational categories of radiation worker in Australia. The total collective effective dose was found to be of the order of 4.9 Sv for a total of 34750 workers. 9 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs.

  2. Far Infrared Spectrometry of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    I describe two experiments to measure the cosmic background radiation near 1 mm wavelength. The first was a ground-based search for spectral lines, made with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and an InSb detector. The second is a measurement of the spectrum from 3 to 18 cm{sup -1}, made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer. It is a polarizing Michelson interferometer, cooled in liquid helium, and operated with a germanium bolometer. I give the theory of operation, construction details, and experimental results. The first experiment was successfully completed but the second suffered equipment malfunction on its first flight. I describe the theory of Fourier transformations and give a new understanding of convolutional phase correction computations. I discuss for infrared bolometer calibration procedures, and tabulate test results on nine detectors. I describe methods of improving bolometer sensitivity with immersion optics and with conductive film blackening.

  3. Do changes in biomarkers from space radiation reflect dose or risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A.

    . Following low-LET radiation exposure, the biological response often does not increase as a linear function of dose. Thus, the RBE and the subsequent risk predicted is dependent on the dose where the two radiation types are compared. To avoid this problem the standard procedure is to use the dose and dose-rate response and compare the linear components of the two r diation exposures. Important riska comparisons are often done at very low doses, where the reference radiation may either increase or decrease as a function of dose. Since the low-LET exposure often does not produce a significant change above the background level of damage, the derived RBE factors can become very large.Studies using micronuclei as biomarkers following exposure to mono-energetic neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays delivered at very low doses (up to 0.10 Gy) demonstrated the differences in the shape of each dose-response relationship and the problems associated with the RBE. These studies show that RBE may not accurately reflect the hazards or risk associated with space radiation exposure. As additional measures of biological change are developed, it may become possible to base risk on biological change and not on changes in radiation doses. Research funded through grants # DE-FG03-99ER62787 from DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research and RO1 CA74053-01 from NIH/NASA to Washington State University Tri-Cities.

  4. Direct determination of radiation dose in human blood

    CERN Document Server

    Tanir, Ayse Gunes; Sahiner, Eren; Bolukdemir, Mustafa Hicabi; Koc, Kemal; Meric, Niyazi; Kelec, Sule Kaya

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose is to measure the internal radiation dose (ID) using human blood sample. In the literature, there is no process that allows the direct measurement of ID received by a person. This study has shown that it is possible to determine ID in human blood exposed to internal or external ionizing radiation treatment both directly and retrospectively. OSL technique was used to measure the total dose from the blood sample. OSL counts from the waste blood of the patient injected with a radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic or treatment purposes and from a blood sample having a laboratory-injected radiation dose were both used for measurements. The decay and dose-response curves (DRC) were plotted for different doses. The doses received by different blood aliquots have been determined by interpolating the natural luminescence counts to DRC. In addition, OSL counts from a healthy blood sample exposed to an external radiation source were measured. The blood aliquots were given different 0-200Gy beta doses and their ...

  5. Radioactivity in the groundwater of a high background radiation area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabana, E I; Kinsara, A A

    2014-11-01

    Natural radioactivity was measured in groundwater samples collected from 37 wells scattered in an inhabited area of high natural background radiation, in a purpose of radiation protection. The study area is adjacent to Aja heights of granitic composition in Hail province, Saudi Arabia. Initial screening for gross α and gross β activities showed levels exceeded the national regulation limits set out for gross α and gross β activities in drinking water. The gross α activity ranged from 0.17 to 5.41 Bq L(-)(1) with an average value of 2.15 Bq L(-)(1), whereas gross β activity ranged from 0.48 to 5.16 Bq L(-)(1), with an average value of 2.60 Bq L(-)(1). The detail analyses indicated that the groundwater of this province is contaminated with uranium and radium ((226)Ra and (228)Ra). The average activity concentrations of (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra and (228)Ra were 0.40, 0.77, 0.29 and 0.46 Bq L(-)(1), respectively. The higher uranium content was found in the samples of granitic aquifers, whereas the higher radium content was found in the samples of sandstone aquifers. Based on the obtained results, mechanism of leaching of the predominant radionuclides has been discussed in detail.

  6. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  7. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  8. Radiation doses to children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmedal, Lise J. [Helse Fonna, Department of Radiology, Stord Hospital, Stord (Norway); Friberg, Eva G.; Boerretzen, Ingelin; Olerud, Hilde [The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Laegreid, Liv [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Bergen (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology Section, Bergen (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-15

    Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus are still followed routinely with frequent head CT scans. To estimate the effective dose, brain and lens doses from these examinations during childhood, and to assess dose variation per examination. All children born between 1983 and 1995 and treated for hydrocephalus between 1983 and 2002 were included. We retrospectively registered the number of examinations and the applied scan parameters. The effective dose was calculated using mean conversion factors from the CT dose index measured free in air, while doses to the lens and brain were estimated using tabulated CT dose index values measured in a head phantom. A total of 687 CT examinations were performed in 67 children. The mean effective dose, lens dose and brain dose to children over 6 months of age were 1.2 mSv, 52 mGy and 33 mGy, respectively, and the corresponding doses to younger children were 3.2 mSv, 60 mGy and 48 mGy. The effective dose per CT examination varied by a factor of 64. None of the children was exposed to doses known to cause deterministic effects. However, since the threshold for radiation-induced damage is not known with certainty, alternative modalities such as US and MRI should be used whenever possible. (orig.)

  9. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  10. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  11. Radiation Doses to Skin from Dermal Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    and they probably contain a higher proportion of volatile radionuclides (e.g., cesium , strontium and iodine) that are preferentially deposited on...of skin cancer is the health effect of concern but would be result in an overestimate of the biologically significant dose when deterministic...factors for alpha-emitting radionuclides. Uncertainty in the biological effectiveness of alpha particles in inducing cancer in humans relative to high

  12. Phosphoproteomics Profiling of Human Skin Fibroblast Cells Reveals Pathways and Proteins Affected by Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Miller, John H.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Du, Xiuxia; Livesay, Eric A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Yingchun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Background High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage; however, the precise relationships between long-term health effects, including cancer, and low-dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high-dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose-dependent responses to radiation. Principal Findings We have identified 7117 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins) from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy) primary human skin fibroblasts 1 h post-exposure. Semi-quantitative label-free analyses were performed to identify phosphopeptides that are apparently altered by radiation exposure. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation-responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role for MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. Conclusions Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provide a basis for the systems-level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at different radiation doses and elucidate the impact of low-dose radiation exposure on human health. PMID:21152398

  13. Phosphoproteomics profiling of human skin fibroblast cells reveals pathways and proteins affected by low doses of ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage; however, the precise relationships between long-term health effects, including cancer, and low-dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high-dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose-dependent responses to radiation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified 7117 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy primary human skin fibroblasts 1 h post-exposure. Semi-quantitative label-free analyses were performed to identify phosphopeptides that are apparently altered by radiation exposure. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation-responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role for MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provide a basis for the systems-level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at different radiation doses and elucidate the impact of low-dose radiation exposure on human health.

  14. Changes in biomarkers from space radiation may reflect dose not risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Antone L.; Lei, Xingye C.; Rithidech, Kanokporn

    This presentation evaluates differences between radiation biomarkers of dose and risk and demonstrates the consequential problems associated with using biomarkers to do risk calculations following radiation exposures to the complex radiation environment found in deep space. Dose is a physical quantity, while risk is a biological quantity. Dose does not predict risk. This manuscript discusses species sensitivity factors, tissue weighting factors, and radiation quality factors derived from relative biological effectiveness (RBE). These factors are used to modify dose to make it a better predictor of risk. At low doses, where it is not possible to measure changes in risk, biomarkers have been used incorrectly as an intermediate step in predicting risk. Examples of biomarkers that do not predict risk are reviewed. Species sensitivity factors were evaluated using the Syrian hamster and the Wistar rat. Although the frequency of chromosome damage is very similar in these two species, the Wistar rat is very sensitive to radiation-induced lung cancer while the Syrian hamster is very resistant. To illustrate problems involved in using tissue weighting factors, rat trachea and deep lung tissues were compared. The similar level of chromosome damage observed in these two tissues would predict that the risk for cancer induction would be the same. However, even though large numbers of deep lung tumors result from inhaled radon, under the same exposure conditions there has never been a tracheal tumor observed. Finally, the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) used to generate "quality factors" that convert exposure and dose from different types of radiation to a single measure of risk, is discussed. Important risk comparisons are done at very low doses, where the response to the reference radiation has been shown to either increase or decrease as a function of dose. Thus, the RBE and the subsequent risk predicted is more dependent on the background response of the endpoint and

  15. Is the Linear No-Threshold Dose-Response Paradigm Still Necessary for the Assessment of Health Effects of Low Dose Radiation?

    OpenAIRE

    Seong, Ki Moon; Seo, Songwon; Lee, Dalnim; Kim, Min-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo

    2016-01-01

    Inevitable human exposure to ionizing radiation from man-made sources has been increased with the proceeding of human civilization and consequently public concerns focus on the possible risk to human health. Moreover, Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents after the 2011 East-Japan earthquake and tsunami has brought the great fear and anxiety for the exposure of radiation at low levels, even much lower levels similar to natural background. Health effects of low dose radiation less than 100 m...

  16. Phosphoproteomics profiling of human skin fibroblast cells reveals pathways and proteins affected by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Miller, John H.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Du, Xiuxia; Livesay, Eric A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Yingchun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2010-11-30

    Background: High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage, however the precise relationships between long term health effects, including cancer, and low dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose dependent responses to radiation. Principle Findings: We have identified 6845 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins) from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy) primary human skin fibroblasts one hour post-exposure. Dual statistical analyses based on spectral counts and peak intensities identified 287 phosphopeptides (from 231 proteins) and 244 phosphopeptides (from 182 proteins) that varied significantly following exposure to 2 and 50 cGy respectively. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role of MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. Conlcusions: Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provides a basis for the systems level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at

  17. Uncertainty of dose measurement in radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1996-01-01

    The major standard organizations of the world have addressed the issue of reporting uncertainties in measurement reports and certificates. There is, however, still some ambiguity in the minds of many people who try to implement the recommendations in real life. This paper is a contribution...... to the running debate and presents the author's view, which is based upon experience in radiation processing dosimetry. The origin of all uncertainty components must be identified and can be classified according to Type A and Type B, but it is equally important to separate the uncertainty components into those...... that contribute to the observable uncertainty of repeated measurements and those that do not. Examples of the use of these principles are presented in the paper....

  18. Analysis of Radiation Impact on White Mice through Radiation Dose Mapping in Medical Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutikno, Madnasri; Susilo; Arya Wijayanti, Riza

    2016-08-01

    A study about X-ray radiation impact on the white mice through radiation dose mapping in Medical Physic Laboratory is already done. The purpose of this research is to determine the minimum distance of radiologist to X-ray instrument through treatment on the white mice. The radiation exposure doses are measured on the some points in the distance from radiation source between 30 cm up to 80 with interval of 30 cm. The impact of radiation exposure on the white mice and the effects of radiation measurement in different directions are investigated. It is founded that minimum distance of radiation worker to radiation source is 180 cm and X-ray has decreased leukocyte number and haemoglobin and has increased thrombocyte number in the blood of white mice.

  19. Radiation Dose Assessments for Fleet-Based Individuals in Operation Tomodachi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    pound-mass per cubic foot (lb ft–3) 1.601 846 × 101 kilogram per cubic meter (kg m–3) Pound-force (lbf avoirdupois) 4.448 222 Newton (N) Energy/Work...dose from natural background radiation (including radon ) for the U.S. population (3.1 mSv [0.31 rem]) as reported in NCRP (2009a). In addition...Figure 23 provides ubiquitous background radiation levels (excluding contributions from radon ) for the prefectures in Japan prior to the FDNPS releases

  20. Radiation dose study in nuclear medicine using GATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguwa, Kasarachi

    Dose as a result of radiation exposure is the notion generally used to disclose the imparted energy in a volume of tissue to a potential biological effect. The basic unit defined by the international system of units (SI system) is the radiation absorbed dose, which is expressed as the mean imparted energy in a mass element of the tissue known as "gray" (Gy) or J/kg. The procedure for ascertaining the absorbed dose is complicated since it involves the radiation transport of numerous types of charged particles and coupled photon interactions. The most precise method is to perform a full 3D Monte Carlo simulation of the radiation transport. There are various Monte Carlo toolkits that have tool compartments for dose calculations and measurements. The dose studies in this thesis were performed using the GEANT4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE) software (Jan et al., 2011) GATE simulation toolkit has been used extensively in the medical imaging community, due to the fact that it uses the full capabilities of GEANT4. It also utilizes an easy to-learn GATE macro language, which is more accessible than learning the GEANT4/C++ programming language. This work combines GATE with digital phantoms generated using the NCAT (NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom) toolkit (Segars et al., 2004) to allow efficient and effective estimation of 3D radiation dose maps. The GATE simulation tool has developed into a beneficial tool for Monte Carlo simulations involving both radiotherapy and imaging experiments. This work will present an overview of absorbed dose of common radionuclides used in nuclear medicine and serve as a guide to a user who is setting up a GATE simulation for a PET and SPECT study.

  1. Radiation dose to physicians’ eye lens during interventional radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahruddin, N. A.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Ang, W. C.; Salehhon, N.; Bakar, K. A.

    2016-03-01

    The demand of interventional radiology has increased, leading to significant risk of radiation where eye lens dose assessment becomes a major concern. In this study, we investigate physicians' eye lens doses during interventional procedures. Measurement were made using TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti) dosimeters and was recorded in equivalent dose at a depth of 0.07 mm, Hp(0.07). Annual Hp(0.07) and annual effective dose were estimated using workload estimation for a year and Von Boetticher algorithm. Our results showed the mean Hp(0.07) dose of 0.33 mSv and 0.20 mSv for left and right eye lens respectively. The highest estimated annual eye lens dose was 29.33 mSv per year, recorded on left eye lens during fistulogram procedure. Five physicians had exceeded 20 mSv dose limit as recommended by international commission of radiological protection (ICRP). It is suggested that frequent training and education on occupational radiation exposure are necessary to increase knowledge and awareness of the physicians’ thus reducing dose during the interventional procedure.

  2. Update on radiation safety and dose reduction in pediatric neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahesh, Mahadevappa [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The number of medical X-ray imaging procedures is growing exponentially across the globe. Even though the overall benefit from medical X-ray imaging procedures far outweighs any associated risks, it is crucial to take all necessary steps to minimize radiation risks to children without jeopardizing image quality. Among the X-ray imaging studies, except for interventional fluoroscopy procedures, CT studies constitute higher dose and therefore draw considerable scrutiny. A number of technological advances have provided ways for better and safer CT imaging. This article provides an update on the radiation safety of patients and staff and discusses dose optimization in medical X-ray imaging within pediatric neuroradiology. (orig.)

  3. Update on radiation safety and dose reduction in pediatric neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Mahadevappa

    2015-09-01

    The number of medical X-ray imaging procedures is growing exponentially across the globe. Even though the overall benefit from medical X-ray imaging procedures far outweighs any associated risks, it is crucial to take all necessary steps to minimize radiation risks to children without jeopardizing image quality. Among the X-ray imaging studies, except for interventional fluoroscopy procedures, CT studies constitute higher dose and therefore draw considerable scrutiny. A number of technological advances have provided ways for better and safer CT imaging. This article provides an update on the radiation safety of patients and staff and discusses dose optimization in medical X-ray imaging within pediatric neuroradiology.

  4. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Agfa computed radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaetzing, R. [Agfa Corp., Greenville, SC (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Radiation dose to patients and its management have become important considerations in modern radiographic imaging procedures, but they acquire particular significance in the imaging of children. Because of their longer life expectancy, children exposed to radiation are thought to have a significantly increased risk of radiation-related late sequelae compared to adults first exposed to radiation later in life. Therefore, current clinical thinking dictates that dose in pediatric radiography be minimized, while simultaneously ensuring sufficient diagnostic information in the image, and reducing the need for repeat exposures. Dose management obviously starts with characterization and control of the exposure technique. However, it extends farther through the imaging chain to the acquisition system, and even to the image processing techniques used to optimize acquired images for display. Further, other factors, such as quality control procedures and the ability to handle special pediatric procedures, like scoliosis exams, also come into play. The need for dose management in modern radiography systems has spawned a variety of different solutions, some of which are similar across different manufacturers, and some of which are unique. This paper covers the techniques used in Agfa Computed Radiography (CR) systems to manage dose in a pediatric environment. (orig.)

  5. A Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Polarimeter Using Superconducting Bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Hanany, S; Johnson, B; Jones, T; Hull, J R; Ma, K B

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation are expected to significantly increase our understanding of the early universe. We present a design for a CMB polarimeter in which a cryogenically cooled half wave plate rotates by means of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing. The design is optimized for implementation in MAXIPOL, a balloon-borne CMB polarimeter. A prototype bearing, consisting of commercially available ring-shaped permanent magnet and an array of YBCO bulk HTS material, has been constructed. We measured the coefficient of friction as a function of several parameters including temperature between 15 and 80 K, rotation frequency between 0.3 and 3.5 Hz, levitation distance between 6 and 10 mm, and ambient pressure between 10^{-7} and 1 torr. The low rotational drag of the HTS bearing allows rotations for long periods of time with minimal input power and negligible wear and tear thus making this technology suitable for a future satellite mission.

  6. Sensors of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation based on mosfet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perevertaylo V. L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The requirements to technology and design of p-channel and n-channel MOS transistors with a thick oxide layer designed for use in the capacity of integral dosimeters of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are defined. The technology of radiation-sensitive MOS transistors with a thick oxide in the p-channel and n-channel version is created.

  7. Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y.; Fois, G.; Edouard, M.; Nemoz, C.; Renier, M.; Requardt, H.; Esteve, F.; Adam, JF.; Elleaume, H.; Bravin, A., E-mail: prezado@esrf.fr [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2009-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation is an innovative tool for the treatment of brain tumors. In the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high atomic number (Z) element and it is irradiated in stereotactic conditions from several entrance angles. The aim of this work was to assess dosimetric properties of the SSRT for preparing clinical trials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To estimate the possible risks, the doses received by the tumor and healthy tissues in the future clinical conditions have been calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE code). The dose enhancement factors have been determined for different iodine concentrations in the tumor, several tumor positions, tumor sizes, and different beam sizes. A scheme for the dose escalation in the various phases of the clinical trials has been proposed. The biological equivalent doses and the normalized total doses received by the skull have been calculated in order to assure that the tolerance values are not reached.

  8. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, Azadeh, E-mail: azadeh.hojreh@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biological Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael, E-mail: michael.Weber@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Homolka, Peter, E-mail: peter.Homolka@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice.

  9. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: I. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using the explicit form of the functions to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies v 1≤ v≤ v 2 are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60-600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T=2.72548 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and σ, and the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the CMB radiation are obtained using the mean amplitude T amp=3.358 mK. It is shown that the Doppler shift leads to a renormalization of the radiation density constant a, the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, and the corresponding constants for the thermodynamic functions. The expressions for new astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant, and number density of CMB photons are obtained. The radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation for the monopole and dipole spectra at redshift z≈1089 are calculated.

  10. Prototype Operational Advances for Atmospheric Radiation Dose Rate Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Garrett, H. B.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Crowley, G.; Reynolds, A.; Azeem, I.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Bacon, S.; Teets, E.; Sim, A.; Dominik, L.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed innovative, new space weather observations that will become part of the toolset that is transitioned into operational use. One prototype operational system for providing timely information about the effects of space weather is SET's Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system. ARMAS will provide the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Through several dozen flights the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time via Iridium satellites, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. We are extending the dose measurement domain above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere with a collaborative project organized by NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) called Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX). In USEWX we will be flying on the ER-2 high altitude aircraft a micro dosimeter for

  11. Radiation dose assessment of ACP hot cell in accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kook, D. H.; Jeong, W. M.; Koo, J. H.; Jeo, I. J.; Lee, E. P.; Ryu, K. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The Advanced spent fuel Condition in Process(ACP) is under development for the effective management of spent fuel which had been generated in nuclear plants. The ACP needs a hot cell where most operations will be performed. To give priority to the environments safety, radiation doses evaluations for the radioactive nuclides in accident cases were preliminarily performed with the meteorological data around facility site. Fire accident prevails over several accidnets. Internal Dose and External Dose evaluation according to short dispersion data for that case show a safe margin for regulation limits and SAR limit of IMEF where this facility will be constructed.

  12. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance.

  13. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.).

  14. Assessment of Environmental Gamma Radiation Dose Rate in Ardabil and Sarein in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Alighadri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Gamma rays, the most energetic photons within the any other wave in the electromagnetic spectrum, pose enough energy to form charged particles and adversely affect human health. Provided that the external exposure of human beings to natural environmental gamma radiation normally exceeds that from all man-made sources combined, environmental gamma dose rate and corresponding annual effective dose were determined in the cities of Ardabil and Sar Ein.Materials and Methods: Outdoor environmental gamma dose rates were measured using an Ion Chamber Survey Meter in 48 selected locations (one in city center and the remaining in cardinal and ordinal directions in Ardabil and Sar Ein. Ten more locations were monitored along the hot springs effluent in Sar Ein. Measurements of gamma radiation dose rate were performed at 20 and 100 cm above the ground for a period of one hour.Results: Average outdoor environmental gamma dose rate were determined as 265, 219, and 208  for Ardabil, Sar Ein, and along the hot spring effluent, respectively. The annual affective dose for Ardabil and Sar Ein residents were estimated to be 1.45 and 1.39 mSv, respectively.Conclusion: Calculated annual effective dose of 1.49 and 1.35 are appreciably higher than the population weighted average exposure to environmental gamma radiation worldwide and that analysis of soil content to different radionuclide is suggested.

  15. Feasibility of radiation dose range capable to cause subacute course of radiation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnyuk V.I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There had been analysed cases of radiation syndrome which clinical picture takes an intermediate place between the acute radiation syndrome (ARS and the chronic radiation syndrome (CRS, and differs from them because of a subacute. This variant of disease can develop as a result of the fractioned or prolonged radiation lasting from several days to several weeks. Development of primary reaction took place only in the extremely hard cases which ends with an early fatality. After the general radiation the marrow failure was characterized by directly expressed formation and restoration period, specific features of which were defined by the radiation duration, a total dose and dose derivative. The most typical outcomes of a subacute radiation syndrome are death from infectious complications in the period of an eruptive phase or leukosis development in the remote period.

  16. Excess relative risk of solid cancer mortality after prolonged exposure to naturally occurring high background radiation in Yangjiang, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Quanfu; Tao Zufan [Ministry of Health, Beijing (China). Lab. of Industrial Hygiene; Akiba, Suminori (and others)

    2000-10-01

    A study was made on cancer mortality in the high-background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China. Based on hamlet-specific environmental doses and sex- and age-specific occupancy factors, cumulative doses were calculated for each subject. In this article, we describe how the indirect estimation was made on individual dose and the methodology used to estimate radiation risk. Then, assuming a linear dose response relationship and using cancer mortality data for the period 1979-1995, we estimate the excess relative risk per Sievert for solid cancer to be -0.11 (95% CI, -0.67, 0.69). Also, we estimate the excess relative risks of four leading cancers in the study areas, i.e., cancers of the liver, nasopharynx, lung and stomach. In addition, we evaluate the effects of possible bias on our risk estimation. (author)

  17. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-07-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  18. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose-response calibration curve, background frequency in the population and dose estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastkhah, E; Zakeri, F; Ghoranneviss, M; Rajabpour, M R; Farshidpour, M R; Mianji, F; Bayat, M

    2016-03-01

    An in vitro study of the dose responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted with the aim of creating calibrated dose-response curves for biodosimetry measuring up to 4 Gy (0.25-4 Gy) of gamma radiation. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay was employed to obtain the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell in blood samples from 16 healthy donors (eight males and eight females) in two age ranges of 20-34 and 35-50 years. The data were used to construct the calibration curves for men and women in two age groups, separately. An increase in micronuclei yield with the dose in a linear-quadratic way was observed in all groups. To verify the applicability of the constructed calibration curve, MN yields were measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes of two real overexposed subjects and three irradiated samples with unknown dose, and the results were compared with dose values obtained from measuring dicentric chromosomes. The comparison of the results obtained by the two techniques indicated a good agreement between dose estimates. The average baseline frequency of MN for the 130 healthy non-exposed donors (77 men and 55 women, 20-60 years old divided into four age groups) ranged from 6 to 21 micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells. Baseline MN frequencies were higher for women and for the older age group. The results presented in this study point out that the CBMN assay is a reliable, easier and valuable alternative method for biological dosimetry.

  19. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation; Praenatale Strahlenexposition. Dosisermittlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Roeser, A. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology

    2015-05-15

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  20. Image quality and radiation dose in cardiac imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van Joris David

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is a major cause of death accounting for 8% of all deaths in the Netherlands. This disease can be detected in an early stage by cardiac imaging. However, this detection comes at the price of a relatively high radiation dose which is potentially harmful for the patient. Despit

  1. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects In the Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Yorke, Ellen; Deasy, Joseph; Nam, Jiho; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2013-01-01

    Publications relating esophageal radiation toxicity to clinical variables and to quantitative dose and dose–volume measures derived from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non–small-cell lung cancer are reviewed. A variety of clinical and dosimetric parameters have been associated with acute and late toxicity. Suggestions for future studies are presented. PMID:20171523

  2. Chronic low-dose radiation protects cells from high-dose radiation via increase of AKT expression by NF-{sub k}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung Sun; Seong, Ki Moon; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Nam, Seon Young [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Exposure to low-dose and low-dose rate of ionizing radiation is an important issue in radiation protection. Low-dose ionizing radiation has been observed to elicit distinctly different responses compared to high-dose radiation, in various biological systems including the reproductive, immune, and hematopoietic systems (Liu et al. 2006). Some data were reported that low-dose radiation could initiate beneficial effects by stimulating cell growth, DNA repair, activation of transcription factors and gene expression (Calabrese et al., 2004). Cells exposed to low-dose radiation can develop adaptive resistance to subsequent high-dose radiation induced DNA damage, gene mutation, and cell death. We previously reported that low-dose of ionizing radiation induced cell survival through the activation of AKT (protein kinase B, PKB) pathway (Park et al., 2009). AKT has been shown to be potently activated in response to a wide variety of growth factors and ionizing radiation. Cell survival against ionizing radiation seems to be associated with the activation of AKT pathway via phosphorylation of its downstream nuclear target molecules. In the present study, we examined the effects of chronic low-dose irradiation in human lung fibroblast cells. The aim was to explore the possibility of a low-dose radiation-induced adaptive cellular response against subsequent challenging high-dose irradiation. In the present study, we examined the regulatory mechanism responsible for cellular response induced by chronic low-dose of ionizing radiation in normal human cells. We found that the level of AKT protein was closely associated with cell survival. In addition, NF-{sub k}B activation by chronic low-dose radiation regulates AKT activation via gene expression and acinus expression. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that chronic low-dose radiation could inhibit the cell death induced by cytotoxic high-dose radiation through the modulation of the level of AKT and acinus proteins via NF-{sub k

  3. On the radiation dose required to cure intracranial germinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibamoto, Yuta [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Frontier Medical Sciences

    1999-09-01

    Despite its high radiosensitivity, intracranial germinoma has most often been treated with a radiation dose of 50 Gy. Relatively old literature suggested that 50 Gy was appropriate, but several newer studies indicate that 40-45 Gy may be sufficient. Regarding this issue, we conducted a phase II study in which the total dose to the primary site was planned to be 40 Gy to tumors <2.5 cm in diameter, 45 Gy to 2.5-4 cm tumors, and 50 Gy to tumors >4 cm, using 1.6-1.8 Gy daily fractions. Thirty-eight patients were enrolled. Within a median follow-up period of 116 months, no patients developed local recurrence, and only two developed CSF dissemination. Intracranial germinoma <4 cm in diameter can be cured with radiation doses of 40-45 Gy. Radiotherapy alone with these reduced doses should be compared with the ongoing protocols of chemotherapy plus further reduced dose (24-30 Gy) radiation in future studies. (author)

  4. Methionine Uptake and Required Radiation Dose to Control Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iuchi, Toshihiko, E-mail: tiuchi@chiba-cc.jp [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hatano, Kazuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Bay Advanced Imaging and Radiation Oncology Clinic, Makuhari, Chiba (Japan); Uchino, Yoshio [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Chiba Ryogo Center, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Makiko [Division of Surgical Pathology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [Division of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the feasibility of radiation therapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on the use of methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET), and the correlation among MET uptake, radiation dose, and tumor control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GBM who underwent MET-PET prior to radiation therapy were enrolled. MET uptake in 30 regions of interest (ROIs) from 22 GBMs, biologically effective doses (BEDs) for the ROIs and their ratios (MET uptake:BED) were compared in terms of whether the ROIs were controlled for >12 months. Results: MET uptake was significantly correlated with tumor control (odds ratio [OR], 10.0; P=.005); however, there was a higher level of correlation between MET uptake:BED ratio and tumor control (OR, 40.0; P<.0001). These data indicated that the required BEDs for controlling the ROIs could be predicted in terms of MET uptake; BED could be calculated as [34.0 × MET uptake] Gy from the optimal threshold of the MET uptake:BED ratio for tumor control. Conclusions: Target delineation based on MET-PET was demonstrated to be feasible for radiation therapy treatment planning. MET-PET could not only provide precise visualization of infiltrating tumor cells but also predict the required radiation doses to control target regions.

  5. Impact of dose calculation algorithm on radiation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Zhou; Chen; Ying; Xiao; Jun; Li

    2014-01-01

    The quality of radiation therapy depends on the ability to maximize the tumor control probability while minimizing the normal tissue complication probability.Both of these two quantities are directly related to the accuracy of dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems.The commonly used dose calculation algorithms in the treatment planning systems are reviewed in this work.The accuracy comparisons among these algorithms are illustrated by summarizing the highly cited research papers on this topic.Further,the correlation between the algorithms and tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability values are manifested by several recent studies from different groups.All the cases demonstrate that dose calculation algorithms play a vital role in radiation therapy.

  6. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  7. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Sharon [National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (Singapore); Back, Michael [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun [National University, Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University, Hospital, Tower Block (Singapore); Lu, Jaide Jay, E-mail: mdcljj@nus.edu.sg [National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (Singapore); National University, Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University, Hospital, Tower Block (Singapore)

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  8. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, E. Ronan, E-mail: ronan@ronanryan.com; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Hsu, Meier [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  9. [Fetus radiation doses from nuclear medicine and radiology diagnostic procedures. Potential risks and radiation protection instructions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Pavlos

    2007-01-01

    Although in pregnancy it is strongly recommended to avoid diagnostic nuclear medicine and radiology procedures, in cases of clinical necessity or when pregnancy is not known to the physician, these diagnostic procedures are to be applied. In such cases, counseling based on accurate information and comprehensive discussion about the risks of radiation exposure to the fetus should follow. In this article, estimations of the absorbed radiation doses due to nuclear medicine and radiology diagnostic procedures during the pregnancy and their possible risk effects to the fetus are examined and then discussed. Stochastic and detrimental effects are evaluated with respect to other risk factors and related to the fetus absorbed radiation dose and to the post-conception age. The possible termination of a pregnancy, due to radiation exposure is discussed. Special radiation protection instructions are given for radiation exposures in cases of possible, confirmed or unknown pregnancies. It is concluded that nuclear medicine and radiology diagnostic procedures, if not repeated during the pregnancy, are rarely an indication for the termination of pregnancy, because the dose received by the fetus is expected to be less than 100 mSv, which indicates the threshold dose for having deterministic effects. Therefore, the risk for the fetus due to these diagnostic procedures is low. However, stochastic effects are still possible but will be minimized if the radiation absorbed dose to the fetus is kept as low as possible.

  10. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F

    2010-03-18

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health.

  11. Radiation Dose Reduction during Radial Cardiac Catheterization: Evaluation of a Dedicated Radial Angiography Absorption Shielding Drape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel, Andrew; Nadelson, Jeffrey; Shroff, Adhir R; Sweis, Ranya; Ferrera, Dean; Vidovich, Mladen I

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Radiation scatter protection shield drapes have been designed with the goal of decreasing radiation dose to the operators during transfemoral catheterization. We sought to investigate the impact on operator radiation exposure of various shielding drapes specifically designed for the radial approach. Background. Radial access for cardiac catheterization has increased due to improved patient comfort and decreased bleeding complications. There are concerns for increased radiation exposure to patients and operators. Methods. Radiation doses to a simulated operator were measured with a RadCal Dosimeter in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The mock patient was a 97.5 kg fission product phantom. Three lead-free drape designs were studied. The drapes were placed just proximal to the right wrist and extended medially to phantom's trunk. Simulated diagnostic coronary angiography included 6 minutes of fluoroscopy time and 32 seconds of cineangiography time at 4 standard angulated views (8 s each), both 15 frames/s. ANOVA with Bonferroni correction was used for statistical analysis. Results. All drape designs led to substantial reductions in operator radiation exposure compared to control (P radiation exposure (72%) was with the L-shaped design. Conclusions. Dedicated radial shielding drapes decrease radiation exposure to the operator by up to 72% during simulated cardiac catheterization.

  12. Exploring the limits of spatial resolution in radiation dose delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Karl; Clark, Brenda G; Huntzinger, Calvin

    2002-08-01

    Flexibility and complexity in patient treatment due to advances in radiotherapy techniques necessitates a simple method for evaluating spatial resolution capabilities of the dose delivery device. Our purpose in this investigation is to evaluate a model that describes the ability of a radiation therapy device to deliver a desired dose distribution. The model is based on linear systems theory and is analogous to methods used to describe resolution degradation in imaging systems. A qualitative analysis of spatial resolution degradation using the model is presented in the spatial and spatial frequency domains. The ability of the model to predict the effects of geometric dose conformity to treatment volumes is evaluated by varying multileaf collimator leaf width and magnitude of dose spreading. Dose distributions for three clinical treatment shapes, circular shapes of varying diameter and one intensity modulated shape are used in the evaluation. We show that the model accurately predicts the dependence of dose conformity on these parameters. The spatial resolution capabilities of different radiation therapy devices can be quantified using the model, providing a simple method for comparing different treatment machine characteristics. Also, as different treatment sites have different resolution requirements this model may be used to tailor machine characteristics to the specific site.

  13. Radiation dose estimation of patients undergoing lumbar spine radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Kwabena Gyekye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose to organs of 100 adult patients undergoing lumbar spine (LS radiography at a University Hospital have been assessed. Free in air kerma measurement using an ionization chamber was used for the patient dosimetry. Organ and effective dose to the patients were estimated using PCXMC (version 1.5 software. The organs that recorded significant dose due to LS radiography were lungs, stomach, liver, adrenals, kidney, pancreas, spleen, galbladder, and the heart. It was observed that the stomach recorded the highest dose (48.2 ± 1.2 μGy for LS anteroposterior (AP. The spleen also recorded the highest dose (41.2 ± 0.5 μGy for LS lateral (LAT. The mean entrance surface air kerma (ESAK of LS LAT (122.2 μGy was approximately twice that of LS AP (76.3 μGy, but the effective dose for both examinations were approximately the same (LS LAT = 8.6 μSv and LS AP = 10.4 μSv. The overall stochastic health effect of radiation to patients due to LS radiography in the University Hospital is independent of the projection of the examination (AP or LAT.

  14. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  15. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radioelements that provide a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Evaluations are also presented for inhaled inert gases and for selected radiopharmaceuticals. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were calculated for these materials. The ratios were integrated with data from biokinetic transfer models to estimate radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. These results are given as tables of deposition and retention in the embryo/fetus as a function of gestational age at exposure and elapsed time following exposure. Methodologies described by MIRD were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed using a model situation that assumed a single injection of 1 {mu}Ci into a woman`s blood; independent calculations were performed for administration at successive months of pregnancy. Gestational -stage-dependent dosimetric tabulations are given together with tables of correlations and relationships. Generalized surrogate dose factors and categorizations are provided in the report to provide for use in operational radiological protection situations. These approaches to calculation yield radiation absorbed doses that can be converted to dose equivalent by multiplication by quality factor. Dose equivalent is the most common quantity for stating prenatal dose limits in the United States and is appropriate for the types of effect that are usually associated with prenatal exposure. If it is desired to obtain alternatives for other purposes, this value can be multiplied by appropriate weighting factors.

  16. Effects of low dose gamma radiation on the early growth of red pepper and the resistance to subsquent high dose of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Baek, M. H.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. B. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Red pepper (capsicum annuum L. cv. Jokwang and cv. Johong) seeds were irradiated with the dose of 0{approx}50 Gy to investigated the effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation. The effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequenct high dose of radiation were enhanced in Johong cultivar but not in Jokwang cultivar. Germination rate and early growth of Johong cultivar were noticeably increased at 4 Gy-, 8 Gy- and 20 Gy irradiation group. Resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at almost all of the low dose irradiation group. Especially it was highest at 4 Gy irradiation group. The carotenoid contents and enzyme activity on the resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at the 4 Gy and 8 Gy irradiation group.

  17. High Precision Cosmology with the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhang, Marzieh

    In this thesis we investigate the two cosmic epochs of inflation and recombination, through their imprints on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. To probe the early universe we develop a map-based maximum-likelihood estimator to measure the amplitude of inflation-induced gravity waves, parametrized by r, from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps. Being optimal by construction, the estimator avoids E-B mixing, a possible source of contamination in the tiny B-mode detection, the target of many current and near future CMB experiments. We explore the leakage from the E- to the B-mode of polarization by using this estimator to study the linear response of the B-mode signal at different scales to variations in the E- mode power. Similarly, for various observational cases, we probe the dependence of r measurement on the signal from different scales of E and B polarization. The estimator is used to make forecasts for Spider-like and Planck-like experimental specifications and to investigate the sky-coverage optimization of the Spider-like case. We compare the forecast errors on r to the results from a similar multipole-based estimator which, by ignoring the mode-mixing, sets a lower limit on the achievable error on r. We find that an experiment with Spider-like specifications with fsky ˜ 0:02--0:2 could place a 2sigma r ≈ 0:014 bound (˜ 95% CL), which rises to 0:02 with an ℓ-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. For the Planck-like survey, a Galaxy-masked ( fsky = 0:75) sky would give 2sigmar ≈ 0:015, rising to ≈ 0:05 with the foreground residuals. We also use a novel information-based framework to compare how different generations of CMB experiments reveal information about the early universe, through their measurements of r. We also probe the epoch of recombination by investigating possible fluctuations in the free electron fraction Xe

  18. Radiation Dose Assessments for Shore-Based Individuals in Operation Tomodachi, Revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ubiquitous background radiation is about 0.310 rem (95 percent confidence interval of 0.094 to 1.21 rem [0.94 to 12.1 mSv]) (NCRP, 2009c). Radon - 222 ...per cubic meter (kg m–3) Pound-force (lbf avoirdupois) 4.448 222 Newton (N) Energy/Work/Power electronvolt (eV) 1.602 177 × 10–19 joule (J) erg...221 E-4. Dose from Ingestion................................................................................ 222 E-5

  19. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Jay; S. P. Mok, Greta; Yang, Ching-Ching; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications.MaterialsImage quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan.ResultsRadiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2±4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95±0.82 and 4.13±0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53±0.5 to 0.16±0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols.ConclusionThe proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  20. Low dose radiation enhances the Locomotor activity of D. melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Buyng Sub; Nam Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Choi, Tae In; Kim, Cha Soon [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Mild stresses at low level including radiation can induce the beneficial effects in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, a large amount of studies in radiation biology have focused on the detrimental effects of high dose radiation (HDR) such as the increased incidence of cancers and developmental diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR) induces biologically favorable effects in diverse fields, for example, cancer development, genomic instability, immune response, and longevity. Our previous data indicated that LDR promotes cells proliferation of which degree is not much but significant, and microarray data explained that LDR irradiated fruit flies showing the augmented immunity significantly changed the program for gene expression of many genes in Gene Ontology (GO) categories related to metabolic process. Metabolic process in development one of major contributors in organism growth, interbreeding, motility, and aging. Therefore, it is valuable to examine whether LDR change the physiological parameters related to metabolism, and how LDR regulates the metabolism in D. melanogaster. In this study, to investigate that LDR influences change of the metabolism, a representative parameter, locomotor activity. In addition, the activation of several cellular signal molecules was determined to investigate the specific molecular mechanism of LDR effects on the metabolism. We explored whether ionizing radiation affects the motility activity. We performed the RING assays to evaluate the locomotor activity, a representative parameter presenting motility of fruit flies. HDR dramatically decreased the motor activity of irradiated flies. Surprisingly, the irradiated flies at low dose radiation in both acute and chronic showed the significantly increased locomotor activity, compared to non-irradiated flies. Irradiation would induce change of the several signal pathways for flies to respond to it. The activation of some proteins involved in the cells proliferation and stress

  1. Problems in evaluating radiation dose via terrestrial and aquatic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, B E; Soldat, J K; Schreckhise, R G; Watson, E C; McKenzie, D H

    1981-12-01

    This review is concerned with exposure risk and the environmental pathways models used for predictive assessment of radiation dose. Exposure factors, the adequacy of available data, and the model subcomponents are critically reviewed from the standpoint of absolute error propagation. Although the models are inherently capable of better absolute accuracy, a calculated dose is usually overestimated by from two to six orders of magnitude, in practice. The principal reason for so large an error lies in using "generic" concentration ratios in situations where site specific data are needed. Major opinion of the model makers suggests a number midway between these extremes, with only a small likelihood of ever underestimating the radiation dose. Detailed evaluations are made of source considerations influencing dose (i.e., physical and chemical status of released material); dispersal mechanisms (atmospheric, hydrologic and biotic vector transport); mobilization and uptake mechanisms (i.e., chemical and other factors affecting the biological availability of radioelements); and critical pathways. Examples are shown of confounding in food-chain pathways, due to uncritical application of concentration ratios. Current thoughts of replacing the critical pathways approach to calculating dose with comprehensive model calculations are also shown to be ill-advised, given present limitations in the comprehensive data base. The pathways models may also require improved parametrization, as they are not at present structured adequately to lend themselves to validation. The extremely wide errors associated with predicting exposure stand in striking contrast to the error range associated with the extrapolation of animal effects data to the human being.

  2. Radiological mapping of Kelantan, Malaysia, using terrestrial radiation dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Sanusi, Syazwan Mohd; Gabdo, Hamman Tukur

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of the environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) in each district of Kelantan state, Malaysia, were carried out using a portable hand-held radiation survey meter and global positioning system. The measurements were done based on geology and soil types of the area. The mean TGRD was found to be 209 nGy h(-1). Few areas of relatively enhanced activity were observed in Pasir Mas, Tanah Merah and Jeli districts, which have a mean TGRD between 300 and 500 nGy h(-1). An isodose map of the area was produced using ArcGIS software version 9.3.

  3. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  4. Radiation dose and radiation risk to foetuses and newborns during X-ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettunen, A. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the way in which the demands set by degree 423/2000 by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health are fulfilled with respect to the most radiosensitive groups, the foetus and the child, by estimating the radiation dose and radiation risk to the foetus from x-ray examinations of an expectant mother's pelvic region, finding out the practice involved in preventing doses to embryos and foetuses and assessing dose practices in cases where an embryo or foetus is or shall be exposed, and by estimating radiation dose and risk due to the radiation received by a new-born being treated in a paediatric intensive care unit. No statistics are available in Finland to indicate how many x-ray examinations of the pelvic region and lower abdomen are made to pregnant patients or to show the dose and risk to the foetus due these examinations. In order to find out the practices in radiological departments concerning the pelvic x-ray examination of fertile woman and the number of foetuses exposed, a questionnaire was sent to all radiation safety officers responsible for the safe use of radiation (n = 290). A total of 173 questionnaires were returned. This study recorded the technique and Dose-Area Product of 118 chest examinations of newborns in paediatric intensive care units. Entrance surface doses and effective doses were calculated separately to each newborn. Based on the patient records, the number of all x-ray examinations during the study was calculated and the effective doses were estimated retrospectively to each child. The radiation risk was estimated both for the foetuses and for the newborns. According to this study, it is rare in Finland to expose a pregnant woman to radiation. On the other hand, with the exception of pelvimetry examinations, there are no compiled statistics concerning the number of pelvic x-ray examinations of a pregnant woman. There was no common practice on how to exclude the possibility of pregnancy. The dose

  5. Survey of pediatric MDCT radiation dose from university hospitals in Thailand. A preliminary for national dose survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla Univ., Hat Yai (Thailand)], e-mail: supikak@yahoo.com; Trinavarat, Panruethai [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Visrutaratna, Pannee [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai Univ., Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2012-09-15

    Background: Increasing pediatric CT usage worldwide needs the optimization of CT protocol examination. Although there are previous published dose reference level (DRL) values, the local DRLs should be established to guide for clinical practice and monitor the CT radiation. Purpose: To determine the multidetector CT (MDCT) radiation dose in children in three university hospitals in Thailand in four age groups using the CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product (DLP). Material and Methods: A retrospective review of CT dosimetry in pediatric patients (<15 years of age) who had undergone head, chest, and abdominal MDCT in three major university hospitals in Thailand was performed. Volume CTDI (CTDIvol) and DLP were recorded, categorized into four age groups: <1 year, 1- < 5 years, 5- <10 years, and 10- <15 years in each scanner. Range, mean, and third quartile values were compared with the national reference dose levels for CT in pediatric patients from the UK and Switzerland according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendation. Results: Per age group, the third quartile values for brain, chest, and abdominal CTs were, respectively, in terms of CTDIvol: 25, 30, 40, and 45 mGy; 4.5, 5.7, 10, and 15.6 mGy; 8.5, 9, 14, and 17 mGy; and in terms of DLP: 400, 570, 610, and 800 mGy cm; 80, 140, 305, and 470 mGy cm; and 190, 275, 560,765 mGy cm. Conclusion: This preliminary national dose survey for pediatric CT in Thailand found that the majority of CTDIvol and DLP values in brain, chest, and abdominal CTs were still below the diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the UK and Switzerland regarding to ICRP recommendation.

  6. Background radiation and individual dosimetry in the costal area of Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoki; Brahmanandhan, G M; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takamura, Noboru; Suyama, Akihiko; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Juto, Norimichi; Raj, Y Lenin; Winsley, Godwin; Selvasekarapandian, S

    2011-07-01

    South coast of India is known as the high-level background radiation area (HBRA) mainly due to beach sands that contain natural radionuclides as components of the mineral monazite. The rich deposit of monazite is unevenly distributed along the coastal belt of Tamil Nadu and Kerala. An HBRA site that laid in 2×7 m along the sea was found in the beach of Chinnavillai, Tamil Nadu, where the maximum ambient dose equivalent reached as high as 162.7 mSv y(-1). From the sands collected at the HBRA spot, the high-purity germanium semi-conductor detector identified six nuclides of thorium series, four nuclides of uranium series and two nuclides belonging to actinium series. The highest radioactivity observed was 43.7 Bq g(-1) of Th-228. The individual dose of five inhabitants in Chinnavillai, as measured by the radiophotoluminescence glass dosimetry system, demonstrated the average dose of 7.17 mSv y(-1) ranging from 2.79 to 14.17 mSv y(-1).

  7. Personal exposure to grass pollen: relating inhaled dose to background concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Hertel, Ole; Smith, Matt

    2013-01-01

    lasted for approximately 25 to 30 minutes and was performed at 2-hour intervals from noon to midevening under moderate exercise by 2 individuals. Results: A median ratio of dose rate to background concentration of 0.018 was recorded, with higher ratio values frequently occurring at 12 to 2 PM, the time...

  8. Radiation Background and Attenuation Model Validation and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peplow, Douglas E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Santiago, Claudio P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-05

    This report describes the initial results of a study being conducted as part of the Urban Search Planning Tool project. The study is comparing the Urban Scene Simulator (USS), a one-dimensional (1D) radiation transport model developed at LLNL, with the three-dimensional (3D) radiation transport model from ORNL using the MCNP, SCALE/ORIGEN and SCALE/MAVRIC simulation codes. In this study, we have analyzed the differences between the two approaches at every step, from source term representation, to estimating flux and detector count rates at a fixed distance from a simple surface (slab), and at points throughout more complex 3D scenes.

  9. 85Kr management trade-offs: a perspective to total radiation dose commitment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Hoenes, G.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Greenborg, J.

    1980-01-01

    Radiological consequences arising from the trade-offs for /sup 85/Kr waste management from possible nuclear fuel resource recovery activities have been investigated. The reference management technique is to release all the waste gas to the atmosphere where it is diluted and dispersed. A potential alternative is to collect, concentrate, package and submit the gas to long-term storage. This study compares the radiation dose commitment to the public and to the occupationally exposed work force from these alternatives. The results indicate that it makes little difference to the magnitude of the world population dose whether /sup 85/Kr is captured and stored or chronically released to the environment. Further, comparisons of radiation exposures (for the purpose of estimating health effects) at very low dose rates to very large populations with exposures to a small number of occupationally exposed workers who each receive much higher dose rates may be misleading. Finally, cost studies (EPA 1976 and DOE 1979a) show that inordinate amounts of money will be required to lower this already extremely small 80-year cumulative world population dose of 0.05 mrem/person (<0.001% of natural background radiation for the same time period).

  10. Correlation of radiation dose and heart rate in dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Kehagias, Dimitrios; Andreou, John (CT and MRI Dept., Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece)), e-mail: fotisdimi@yahoo.gr; Tsantioti, Dimitra (Statistician, Hygeia Hospital, Athens (Greece))

    2011-04-15

    Background: Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) has been widely used since the introduction of 64-slice scanners and dual-source CT technology, but the relatively high radiation dose remains a major concern. Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure and heart rate (HR), in dual-source CTCA. Material and Methods: Data from 218 CTCA examinations, performed with a dual-source 64-slices scanner, were statistically evaluated. Effective radiation dose, expressed in mSv, was calculated as the product of the dose-length product (DLP) times a conversion coefficient for the chest (mSv = DLPx0.017). Heart rate range and mean heart rate, expressed in beats per minute (bpm) of each individual during CTCA, were also provided by the system. Statistical analysis of effective dose and heart rate data was performed by using Pearson correlation coefficient and two-sample t-test. Results: Mean HR and effective dose were found to have a borderline positive relationship. Individuals with a mean HR >65 bpm observed to receive a statistically significant higher effective dose as compared to those with a mean HR =65 bpm. Moreover, a strong correlation between effective dose and variability of HR of more than 20 bpm was observed. Conclusion: Dual-source CT scanners are considered to have the capability to provide diagnostic examinations even with high HR and arrhythmias. However, it is desirable to keep the mean heart rate below 65 bpm and heart rate fluctuation less than 20 bpm in order to reduce the radiation exposure

  11. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  12. Background study of absorbed dose in biological experiments at the Modane Underground Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Nathanael; Marin, Pierre; Castor, Jean; Warot, Guillaume; Incerti, S.; Maigne, Lydia; Sarramia, David; Breton, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Aiming to explore how biological systems respond to ultra-low background environ-ments, we report here our background studies for biological experiments in the Modane Under-ground Laboratory. We find that the minimum radioactive background for biology experiments is limited by the potassium content of the biological sample itself, coming from its nutritive me-dium, which we find in our experimental set-up to be 26 nGy hr-1. Compared to our reference radiation environment in Clermont-Ferrand, biological experiments can be conducted in the Modane laboratory with a radiation background 8.2 times lower than the reference above-ground level. As the radiation background may be further reduced by using different nutritive media, we also provide measurements of the potassium concentration by gamma spectroscopy of yeast extract (63.3±1.2 mg g-1) and tryptone (2.5±0.2 mg g-1) in order to guide media selection in future experiments.

  13. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  14. Erythemal ultraviolet solar radiation doses received by young skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, María-Antonia; Cañada, Javier; Moreno, Juan Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Children are a special group since epidemiological evidence indicates that excessive exposure to sunlight at an early age increases the risk of skin cancer in later life. The purpose of this study is to quantify children's UV exposure when skiing, using dosimeters (VioSpor) placed on the shoulders of 10 participants. The children received a median daily Standard Erythema Dose of 2.1 within a range of 4.9-0.71, this being approximately 35% of the calculated 24 h ambient UV radiation on the horizontal plane. According to the results obtained, young skiers are exposed to UV radiation that can potentially cause skin damage and erythema and increase the risk of skin cancer in the course of a lifetime. These findings emphasise the need for adequate protective measures against solar radiation when skiing. The results also suggest that sun-protection campaigns should be undertaken aimed at children engaged in outdoor sports, including winter activities.

  15. Radiation dose and subsequent risk for stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A; Smith, Susan A; Holowaty, Eric;

    2013-01-01

    To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer.......To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer....

  16. Influence of different treatment techniques on radiation dose to the LAD coronary artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molls Michael

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this proof-of-principle study was to test the ability of an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT technique to reduce the radiation dose to the heart plus the left ventricle and a coronary artery. Radiation-induced heart disease might be a serious complication in long-term cancer survivors. Methods Planning CT scans from 6 female patients were available. They were part of a previous study of mediastinal IMRT for target volumes used in lymphoma treatment that included 8 patients and represent all cases where the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD could be contoured. We compared 6 MV AP/PA opposed fields to a 3D conformal 4-field technique and an optimised 7-field step-and-shoot IMRT technique and evaluated DVH's for several structures. The planning system was BrainSCAN 5.21 (BrainLAB, Heimstetten, Germany. Results IMRT maintained target volume coverage but resulted in better dose reduction to the heart, left ventricle and LAD than the other techniques. Selective dose reduction could be accomplished, although not to the degree initially attempted. The median LAD dose was approximately 50% lower with IMRT. In 5 out of 6 patients, IMRT was the best technique with regard to heart sparing. Conclusion IMRT techniques are able to reduce the radiation dose to the heart. In addition to dose reduction to whole heart, individualised dose distributions can be created, which spare, e.g., one ventricle plus one of the coronary arteries. Certain patients with well-defined vessel pathology might profit from an approach of general heart sparing with further selective dose reduction, accounting for the individual aspects of pre-existing damage.

  17. Pilot website to support international collaboration for dose assessments in a radiation emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, G.K., E-mail: Gordon.Livingston@orise.orau.gov [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, REAC/TS, Radiation Emergency Medicine (REM), P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wilkins, R.C., E-mail: Ruth.Wilkins@hc-sc.gc.ca [Health Canada, Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Ottawa, ON K1A 1C1 (Canada); Ainsbury, E.A., E-mail: liz.ainsbury@hpa.org.uk [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Nuclear terrorism has emerged as a significant threat which could require timely medical interventions to reduce potential radiation casualties. Early dose assessments are critical since optimal care depends on knowing a victim's radiation dose. The dicentric chromosome aberration assay is considered the 'gold standard' to estimate the radiation dose because the yield of dicentrics correlates positively with the absorbed dose. Dicentrics have a low background frequency, are independent of age and gender and are relatively easy to identify. This diagnostic test for radiation exposure, however, is labor intensive and any single or small group of laboratories could easily be overwhelmed by a mass casualty event. One solution to this potential problem is to link the global WHO BioDoseNet members via the Internet so multiple laboratories could work cooperatively to screen specimens for dicentric chromosomes and generate timely dose estimates. Inter-laboratory comparison studies have shown that analysis of electronic chromosome images viewed on the computer monitor produces scoring accuracy equivalent to viewing live images in the microscope. This functional equivalence was demonstrated during a comparative study involving five laboratories constructing {sup 60}Co gamma ray calibration curves and was further confirmed when comparing results of blind dose estimates submitted by each laboratory. It has been further validated in two recent WHO BioDoseNet trial exercises where 20 metaphase images were shared by e-mail and 50 images were shared on a test website created for this purpose. The Internet-based exercise demonstrated a high level of concordance among 20 expert scorers who evaluated the same 50 metaphase spreads selected to exhibit no, low, moderate and severe radiation damage. Nineteen of 20 scorers produced dicentric equivalent counts within the 95% confidence limits of the mean. The Chi-squared test showed strong evidence of homogeneity in the data

  18. Personal radiation monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers (1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, N.D.

    1996-12-01

    Since late 1986, all persons monitored by the Australian Radiation Laboratory have been registered on a data base which maintains records of the doses received by each individual wearer. At present, the Service regularly monitors approximately 30,000 persons, which is roughly 90 percent of those monitored in Australia, and maintains dose histories of over 75,000 people. The skin dose for occupationally exposed workers can be measured by using one of the five types of monitor issued by the Service: Thermoluminescent Dosemeter (TLD monitor), Finger TLD 3, Neutron Monitor, Special TLD and Environmental monitor. The technical description of the monitors is provided along with the method for calculating the radiation dose. 5 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs.

  19. The influence of high doses of radiation in citrine stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, M. I. [Universidade Nove de Julho - UNINOVE, Rua Vergueiro 235/249, 01504-001 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Caldas, L. V. E., E-mail: miteixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The possibility of using samples of Brazilian stones as quartz, amethyst, topaz, jasper, etc. for high-dose dosimetry has been studied in recent years at IPEN, using the techniques of optical absorption (Oa), thermoluminescent (Tl), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and resonance paramagnetic electron (EPR). In this work, the Tl properties of citrine samples were studied. They were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co). The natural citrine stone was extracted from a mine in Minas Gerais state, Brazil; it is a tecto silicate ranked as one of three-dimensional structure, showing clear yellow to golden brown color. The natural citrine stone is classified as quartz (SiO{sub 2}), and it has a lower symmetry and more compact reticulum. The Tl emission curve showed two peaks at 160 grades C and 220 grades C. To remove the Tl peak (160 grades C) of the sintered citrine pellet glow curves, different thermal treatments were tested during several time intervals. The Tl dose-response curve between 50 Gy and 100 kGy, the reproducibility of Tl response and the lower detection dose were obtained. The results show that citrine may be useful as high-dose detectors. (Author)

  20. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  1. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Received by Premature Neonates Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, Mohmmadreza; Zanganeh, Kobra Aria; Dehdashtian, Masoud; Malekian, Arash; Fatahiasl, Jafar

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the radiation dose received by premature neonates using diagnostic radiographies. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 116 premature neonates with gestational age from 25 to 37 weeks; with the diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) and tachypnea, they were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Ahvaz Imam Khomeini Hospital in 2015. For assessing the dose received, the model GR-200 thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) was used. For each premature neonate under radiation, three TLDs separately (one for each) were placed on surfaces of Ch1, T1, and G1 (chest, thyroid, and gonad of first newborn, respectively). Moreover, for the adjacent neonate at a distance of 60 - 100 cm, two TLDs were laid in the surfaces of T2 and G2 (thyroid and gonad of second newborn, respectively). The dose received by TLDs for any baby and the adjacent neonate under the entrance surface dose (ESD) was estimated. Results The mean of neonates’ weight under study was 1,950.78 ± 484.9 g. During the hospitalization period, minimum one and maximum three radiographies were done for any premature neonate. The doses received in the premature neonates to Ch1, T1 and G1 were 0.08 ± 0.01, 0.06 ± 0.01, and 0.05 ± 0.01 mSv, respectively and for adjacent infants for T2 and G2 were 0.003 ± 0.001 and 0.002 ± 0.0009 mSv, respectively. Conclusions In the study, radiation dose received by organs at risk of premature neonates was lower than the international criteria and standards, therefore, also due to the lack of radiation damage threshold, to limit collimator, and the use of the proper filtration, kilovoltage and time during radiography of premature neonates are recommended. PMID:28090228

  2. A Survey of Pediatric CT Protocols and Radiation Doses in South Korean Hospitals to Optimize the Radiation Dose for Pediatric CT Scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Yang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Ah; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jin Seong; KOO, HYUN JUNG

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Children are at greater risk of radiation exposure than adults because the rapidly dividing cells of children tend to be more radiosensitive and they have a longer expected life time in which to develop potential radiation injury. Some studies have surveyed computed tomography (CT) radiation doses and several studies have established diagnostic reference levels according to patient age or body size; however, no survey of CT radiation doses with a large number of patients has yet been...

  3. The effect of pitch and collimation on radiation dose in spiral CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Qi-Jun; TSANG Cheung; FENG Ding-Hua

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of radiation dose to patients in spiral computed tomography (CT) were completed for various collimations, table speeds and pitch. A standard CT head dosimetry phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used for the measurement. The.effect of collimation and pitch on radiation dose was studied. The results indicated that the radiation dose at the given tube current, voltage and rotation speed was inversely proportional to pitch. And the increasing times of dose were as decreasing times of pitch. This regular pattern was tenable for radiation dose at both central holes and peripheral holes of the phantom at pitch = 1, >1 and <1. The collimation had no impact on the radiation dose. The results also indicated that radiation dose at central holes was nearly equal to that at peripheral holes. There was no significant difference between them statistically. The study demonstrates that the pitch in spiral CT scans is the primary parameter and has significant impact on radiation dose.

  4. Radiation signature on exposed cells: Relevance in dose estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Venkatachalam; Perumal; Tamizh; Selvan; Gnana; Sekaran; Venkateswarlu; Raavi; Safa; Abdul; Syed; Basheerudeen; Karthik; Kanagaraj; Amith; Roy; Chowdhury; Solomon; FD; Paul

    2015-01-01

    The radiation is considered as a double edged sword, as its beneficial and detrimental effects have been demonstrated. The potential benefits are being exploited to its maximum by adopting safe handling of radionuclide stipulated by the regulatory agencies. While the occupational workers are monitored by personnel monitoring devices, for general publics, it is not a regular practice. However, it can be achieved by using biomarkers with a potential for the radiation triage and medical management. An ideal biomarker to adopt in those situations should be rapid, specific, sensitive, reproducible, and able to categorize the nature of exposure and could provide a reliable dose estimation irrespective of the time of the exposures. Since cytogenetic markers shown to have many advantages relatively than other markers, the origins of various chromosomal abnormalities induced by ionizing radiations along with dose-response curves generated in the laboratory are presented. Current status of the gold standard dicentric chromosome assay, micronucleus assay, translocation measurement by fluorescence insitu hybridization and an emerging protein marker the g-H2 AX assay are discussed with our laboratory data. With the wide choice of methods, an appropriate assay can be employed based on the net.

  5. Radiation signature on exposed cells: Relevance in dose estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Venkatachalam; Gnana Sekaran, Tamizh Selvan; Raavi, Venkateswarlu; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Kanagaraj, Karthik; Chowdhury, Amith Roy; Paul, Solomon Fd

    2015-09-28

    The radiation is considered as a double edged sword, as its beneficial and detrimental effects have been demonstrated. The potential benefits are being exploited to its maximum by adopting safe handling of radionuclide stipulated by the regulatory agencies. While the occupational workers are monitored by personnel monitoring devices, for general publics, it is not a regular practice. However, it can be achieved by using biomarkers with a potential for the radiation triage and medical management. An ideal biomarker to adopt in those situations should be rapid, specific, sensitive, reproducible, and able to categorize the nature of exposure and could provide a reliable dose estimation irrespective of the time of the exposures. Since cytogenetic markers shown to have many advantages relatively than other markers, the origins of various chromosomal abnormalities induced by ionizing radiations along with dose-response curves generated in the laboratory are presented. Current status of the gold standard dicentric chromosome assay, micronucleus assay, translocation measurement by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and an emerging protein marker the γ-H2AX assay are discussed with our laboratory data. With the wide choice of methods, an appropriate assay can be employed based on the net.

  6. Comparing Environmental Dose Rate Meters: A Method to Determine Natural and Non-natural Variations in External Radiation Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinen, A.J.M.; Slaper, H.; Overwater, R.M.W.; Stoop, P

    2000-07-01

    A method is described to determine low excess dose rates from a radiation source in the environment, which are small compared to the natural fluctuations of the background radiation. First a 'virtual reference dose rate meter' is constructed from data of the national monitoring network, to know the natural variations of the background radiation. Results from this virtual monitor are then compared to data of dose rate meters at sites of interest, to determine non-natural or very local natural variations and excess dose rates. Daily averaged excess dose rates down to 2 to 3 nSv.h{sup -1} can be identified. The method is applied successfully near nuclear installations in the Netherlands and can be used for all types of dose rate meters and sample frequencies. Finally, the calculations to derive the 'virtual reference dose rate meter' can also be used as a quality assessment tool for environmental radiation monitoring networks. (author)

  7. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  8. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  9. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Linda X., E-mail: lhong0812@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Shankar, Viswanathan [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Shen, Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Kuo, Hsiang-Chi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Mynampati, Dinesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Yaparpalvi, Ravindra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Goddard, Lee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Basavatia, Amar; Fox, Jana; Garg, Madhur; Kalnicki, Shalom; Tomé, Wolfgang A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R{sub 50%}); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D{sub 2cm}) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ{sup 2} test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V{sub 100%} {sub PD} ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V{sub 90%} {sub PD} ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D{sub 2cm}, 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives.

  10. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E [Radiology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University and San Carlos University Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ubeda, C [Clinical Sciences Department, Faculty of the Science of Health, Tarapaca University, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile); Leyton, F [Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Miranda, P [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Avenida Antonio Varas 360, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.es

    2008-08-07

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 {mu}Gy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 {mu}Gy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  11. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  12. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); La Quaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  13. Hardening electronic devices against very high total dose radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, B.; Shedd, W.; Roosild, S.; Dolan, R.

    1972-01-01

    The possibilities and limitations of hardening silicon semiconductor devices to the high neutron and gamma radiation levels and greater than 10 to the eighth power rads required for the NERVA nuclear engine development are discussed. A comparison is made of the high dose neutron and gamma hardening potential of bipolar, metal insulator semiconductors and junction field effect transistors. Experimental data is presented on device degradation for the high neutron and gamma doses. Previous data and comparisons indicate that the JFET is much more immune to the combined neutron displacement and gamma ionizing effects than other transistor types. Experimental evidence is also presented which indicates that p channel MOS devices may be able to meet the requirements.

  14. The spectrum of mutation produced by low dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley,Alexander,A; Turner, David,R

    2004-10-31

    Inherited mutations are the basis of evolution and acquired mutations in humans are important in ageing, cancer and possibly various forms of tissue degeneration. Mutations are responsible for many of the long-term effects of radiation. However, sensitive direct detection of mutations in humans has been difficult. The aims of the project were to develop methods for the sensitive enumeration of mutations in DNA, to measure mutation frequencies in a wide variety of tissue types and to quantify the mutational effect of direct oxidative damage produced by radiation, at both high and low doses. The project was successful in developing a sensitive method which could detect mutations directly in the genetic material, DNA at a sensitivity of 1 mutated molecule in 1000000000 unmutated molecules. However a number of methodological problems had to be overcome and lack of ongoing funding made it impossible to fulfill all of the aims of the project

  15. Perspectives on radiation dose estimates for A-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    1986-12-01

    Four decades after the actual events, quantitative characterization of the radiation fields at Hiroshima and Nagasaki continues to be sought, with high accuracy a goal justified by the unique contribution to radiation protection standards that is represented by the medical records of exposed survivors. The most recent effort is distinguished by its reliance on computer modeling and concomitant detail, and by its decentralized direction, both internationally and internally to the US and Japan, with resultant ongoing peer review and wide scope of inquiry. A new system for individual dose estimation has been agreed upon, and its scientific basis has been elaborated in the literature as well as in a comprehensive treatise to be published in the Spring of 1987. In perspective, this new system appears to be an unusually successful achievement that offers the expectation of reliable estimates with the desired accuracy. Some aspects leading to this expectation, along with a caveat, are discussed here. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Exposure to low dose ionising radiation: Molecular and clinical consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Lynn M

    2014-07-10

    This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the experimental data detailing the incidence, mechanism and significance of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). Important discoveries gained from past and present studies are mapped and highlighted to illustrate the pathway to our current understanding of HRS and the impact of HRS on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells. Particular attention is paid to the balance of evidence suggesting a role for DNA repair processes in the response, evidence suggesting a role for the cell cycle checkpoint processes, and evidence investigating the clinical implications\\/relevance of the effect.

  17. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  18. 3D measurement of absolute radiation dose in grid therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trapp, J V [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Warrington, A P [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Partridge, M [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Philps, A [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Leach, M O [Cancer Research UK Clinical MR Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Webb, S [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy through a grid is a concept which has a long history and was routinely used in orthovoltage radiation therapy in the middle of last century to minimize damage to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. With the advent of megavoltage radiotherapy and its skin sparing effects the use of grids in radiotherapy declined in the 1970s. However there has recently been a revival of the technique for use in palliative treatments with a single fraction of 10 to 20 Gy. In this work the absolute 3D dose distribution in a grid irradiation is measured for photons using a combination of film and gel dosimetry.

  19. High background radiation areas of Ram sar in Iran: evaluation of DNA damage by alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoomi, J.R. [Biophysics Department, College of Sciences, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Sh. [Radiation Molecular Genetic Laboratory, National Radiation Protection Department (NRPD), Iranian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (INRA), P.O. Box 14155-4494, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amini, M. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Azad University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghiassi-Nejad, M. [Biophysics Department, College of Sciences, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: ghiassi@mailcity.com

    2006-07-01

    The hot springs in special areas in Ram sar, a northern coastal town in Iran, contain {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn. The natural radiation effects, radiosensitivity or adaptive responses, on the inhabitants of high natural radiation in Ram sar were studied. The single cell gel electrophoresis was used to monitor DNA damages. Three groups of volunteers were selected, one from high natural background radiation areas as the case group and two from normal background radiation areas as controls (control 1 and control 2). The latter one had the similar living situation to case group while the other (control 2) had different living situation from the other groups. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) were separated and irradiated by {sup 6}Co source at five different gamma doses. It was found that the spontaneous level of DNA damage and the induced DNA damage in all challenging doses in case group was considerably higher than control groups (p < 0.05). On the other hand, the repair rate in those volunteers, who received less than 10.2 mSv/y was significantly more than the control groups. In the contrary, individuals who live in homes with more than 10.2 mSv/y had incomplete repair. Additionally the plasma and urinary levels of vitamin C were measured spectrophotometrically. Although the concentration of vitamin C of plasma was equal in case and control 1 groups, the urinary level of vitamin C was found to be lower in the case group.

  20. Radiation Doses to Hanford Workers from Natural Potassium-40

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lynch, Timothy P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weier, Dennis R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The chemical element potassium is an essential mineral in people and is subject to homeostatic regulation. Natural potassium comprises three isotopes, 39K, 40K, and 41K. Potassium-40 is radioactive, with a half life of 1.248 billion years. In most transitions, it emits a β particle with a maximum energy of 0.560 MeV, and sometimes a gamma photon of 1.461 MeV. Because it is ubiquitous, 40K produces radiation dose to all human beings. This report contains the results of new measurements of 40K in 248 adult females and 2,037 adult males performed at the Department of Energy Hanford Site in 2006 and 2007. Potassium concentrations diminish with age, are generally lower in women than in men, and decrease with body mass index (BMI). The average annual effective dose from 40K in the body is 0.149 mSv y-1 for men and 0.123 mSv y-1 women respectively. Averaged over both men and women, the average effective dose per year is 0.136 mSv y-1. Calculated effective doses range from 0.069 to 0.243 mSv y-1 for adult males, and 0.067 to 0.203 mSv y-1 for adult females, a roughly three-fold variation for each gender. The need for dosimetric phantoms with a greater variety of BMI values should be investigated. From our data, it cannot be determined whether the potassium concentration in muscle in people with large BMI values differs from that in people with small BMI values. Similarly, it would be important to know the potassium concentration in other soft tissues, since much of the radiation dose is due to beta radiation, in which the source and target tissues are the same. These uncertainties should be evaluated to determine their consequences for dosimetry.

  1. Modeling Background Radiation in our Environment Using Geochemical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malchow, Russell L.; Marsac, Kara [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Hausrath, Elisabeth [Uniiversity of Nevada, Las Vegas; Haber, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Adcock, Christopher [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2015-02-01

    Radiation occurs naturally in bedrock and soil. Gamma rays are released from the decay of the radioactive isotopes K, U, and Th. Gamma rays observed at the surface come from the first 30 cm of rock and soil. The energy of gamma rays is specific to each isotope, allowing identification. For this research, data was collected from national databases, private companies, scientific literature, and field work. Data points were then evaluated for self-consistency. A model was created by converting concentrations of U, K, and Th for each rock and soil unit into a ground exposure rate using the following equation: D=1.32 K+ 0.548 U+ 0.272 Th. The first objective of this research was to compare the original Aerial Measurement System gamma ray survey to results produced by the model. The second objective was to improve the method and learn the constraints of the model. Future work will include sample data analysis from field work with a goal of improving the geochemical model.

  2. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  3. Acute radiation enteritis caused by dose-dependent radiation exposure in dogs: experimental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Xu, Liu; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2014-12-01

    Accidental or intended radiation exposure in mass casualty settings presents a serious and on-going threat. The development of mitigating and treating agents requires appropriate animal models. Unfortunately, the majority of research on radiation enteritis in animals has lacked specific assessments and targeted therapy. Our study showed beagle dogs, treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for abdominal irradiation, were administered single X-ray doses of 8-30 Gy. The degree of intestinal tract injury for all of the animals after radiation exposure was evaluated with regard to clinical syndrome, endoscopic findings, histological features, and intestinal function. The range of single doses (8 Gy, 10-14 Gy, and 16-30 Gy) represented the degree of injury (mild, moderate, and severe, respectively). Acute radiation enteritis included clinical syndrome with fever, vomiting, diarrhea, hemafecia, and weight loss; typical endoscopic findings included edema, bleeding, mucosal abrasions, and ulcers; and intestinal biopsy results revealed mucosal necrosis, erosion, and loss, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and congestion. Changes in serum diamine oxides (DAOs) and d-xylose represented intestinal barrier function and absorption function, respectively, and correlated with the extent of damage (P enteritis, thus obtaining a relatively objective evaluation of intestinal tract injury based on clinical performance and laboratory examination. The method of assessment of the degree of intestinal tract injury after abdominal irradiation could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for acute radiation enteritis.

  4. Radiation-induced bystander effects and adaptive responses--the Yin and Yang of low dose radiobiology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada)]. E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca; Seymour, Colin [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada)]. E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca

    2004-12-02

    Our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the induction of bystander effects by low doses of high or low LET ionizing radiation is reviewed. The question of what actually constitutes a protective effect is discussed in the context of adaptive (often referred to as hormetic or protective) responses. Finally the review considers critically, how bystander effects may be related to observed adaptive responses or other seemingly protective effects of low doses exposures. Bystander effects induce responses at the tissue level, which are similar to generalized stress responses. Most of the work involving low LET radiation exposure discussed in the existing literature measures a death response. Since many cell populations carry damaged cells without being exposed to radiation (so-called 'background damage'), it is possible that low doses exposures cause removal of cells carrying potentially problematic lesions, prior to exposure to radiation. This mechanism could lead to the production of 'U-shaped' or hormetic dose-response curves. The level of adverse, adaptive or apparently beneficial response will be related to the background damage carried by the original cell population, the level of organization at which damage or harm are scored and the precise definition of 'harm'. This model may be important when attempting to predict the consequences of mixed exposures involving low doses of radiation and other environmental stressors.

  5. X-γ Radiation Dose Survey for HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGXiariying; LIXu; YANGJinwei

    2003-01-01

    X-γ radiation belong to the ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation sinks to energy in organism but produce a disservice to the organism. Just as medicine, the disservice of the radiation towards Organism is decided by to accept radiation quantify, the radiation quantify was named dose. Radiation protection's basic missions is to want to result the dose to fix quantify. In this survey the dose at workplace and its surroundings environments of HL-2A device was measured and the assessment was given out.

  6. Secondary radiation dose during high-energy total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, M.; Raczkowski, M. [Lower Silesian Oncology Center, Medical Physics Department, Wroclaw (Poland); Polaczek-Grelik, K. [University of Silesia, Medical Physics Department, Katowice (Poland); Szafron, B.; Konefal, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the additional dose from secondary neutrons and γ-rays generated during total body irradiation (TBI) using a medical linac X-ray beam. Nuclear reactions that occur in the accelerator construction during emission of high-energy beams in teleradiotherapy are the source of secondary radiation. Induced activity is dependent on the half-lives of the generated radionuclides, whereas neutron flux accompanies the treatment process only. The TBI procedure using a 18 MV beam (Clinac 2100) was considered. Lateral and anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fractions were investigated during delivery of 2 Gy of therapeutic dose. Neutron and photon flux densities were measured using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and semiconductor spectrometry. The secondary dose was estimated applying the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. The main contribution to the secondary dose is associated with fast neutrons. The main sources of γ-radiation are the following: {sup 56}Mn in the stainless steel and {sup 187}W of the collimation system as well as positron emitters, activated via (n,γ) and (γ,n) processes, respectively. In addition to 12 Gy of therapeutic dose, the patient could receive 57.43 mSv in the studied conditions, including 4.63 μSv from activated radionuclides. Neutron dose is mainly influenced by the time of beam emission. However, it is moderated by long source-surface distances (SSD) and application of plexiglass plates covering the patient body during treatment. Secondary radiation gives the whole body a dose, which should be taken into consideration especially when one fraction of irradiation does not cover the whole body at once. (orig.) [German] Die zusaetzliche Dosis durch sekundaere Neutronen- und γ-Strahlung waehrend der Ganzkoerperbestrahlung mit Roentgenstrahlung aus medizinischen Linearbeschleunigern wurde abgeschaetzt. Bei der Emission hochenergetischer Strahlen zur Teletherapie finden hauptsaechlich im Beschleuniger

  7. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  8. The Cosmic Background Radiation circa nu2K

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Prunet, S; Ade, P; Balbi, A; Bock, J J; Borrill, J; Boscaleri, A; Coble, K; Crill, B P; De Bernardis, P; Farese, P; Ferreira, P; Ganga, K; Giacometti, M; Hanany, S; Hivon, E; Hristov, V V; Iacoangeli, A; Jaffe, A; Lange, A; Lee, A; Martinis, L; Masi, S; Mauskopf, P D; Melchiorri, A; Montroy, T; Netterfield, C B; Oh, S; Pascale, E; Piacentini, F; Rabii, B; Rao, S; Richards, P; Romeo, G; Ruhl, J E; Scaramuzzi, F; Sforza, D M; Smoot, G F; Stompor, R; Winant, C; Wu, P

    2000-01-01

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {omega_b,omega_{cdm},Omega_{tot}, Omega_\\Lambda,n_s,\\tau_C, \\sigma_8}. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature (Omega_{tot}=1.08\\pm 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (n_s=1.03\\pm 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates (omega_b=0.030\\pm 0.005 cf. 0.019\\pm 0.002). The CDM density is in th...

  9. AAPM/RSNA Physics Tutorial for Residents: Topics in CT. Radiation dose in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2002-01-01

    This article describes basic radiation dose concepts as well as those specifically developed to describe the radiation dose from computed tomography (CT). Basic concepts of radiation dose are reviewed, including exposure, absorbed dose, and effective dose. Radiation dose from CT demonstrates variations within the scan plane and along the z axis because of its unique geometry and usage. Several CT-specific dose descriptors have been developed: the Multiple Scan Average Dose descriptor, the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) and its variations (CTDI(100), CTDI(w), CTDI(vol)), and the dose-length product. Factors that affect radiation dose from CT include the beam energy, tube current-time product, pitch, collimation, patient size, and dose reduction options. Methods of reducing the radiation dose to a patient from CT include reducing the milliampere-seconds value, increasing the pitch, varying the milliampere-seconds value according to patient size, and reducing the beam energy. The effective dose from CT can be estimated by using Monte Carlo methods to simulate CT of a mathematical patient model, by estimating the energy imparted to the body region being scanned, or by using conversion factors for general anatomic regions. Issues related to radiation dose from CT are being addressed by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the American College of Radiology, and the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the Food and Drug Administration.

  10. The cosmic background radiation circa {nu}2K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, J. Richard; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Prunet, Simon

    2000-01-01

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {l_brace}{omega}{sub b}, {omega}{sub cdm}, {omega}{sub tot}, {omega}{sub {lambda}}, n{sub s}, {tau}{sub C}, {sigma}{sub 8}{r_brace}. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature ({omega}{sub tot} = 1.08 {+-} 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (n{sub s} 1.03 {+-} 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates ({omega}{sub b}-{omega}{sub b}h{sup 2} 0.030 {+-} 0.005 cf. 0.019 {+-} 0.002). The CDM density is in the expected range ({omega}{sub cdm} 0.17{+-}0.02). Even stranger is the CMB+LSS evidence that the density of the universe is dominated by unclustered energy akin to the cosmological constant ({omega}{sub {lambda}} = 0.66 {+-} 0.06), at the same level as that inferred from high redshift supernova observations. We also sketch the CMB+LSS implications for massive neutrinos.

  11. Cardiovascular risks associated with low dose ionizing particle radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Yan

    Full Text Available Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton ((1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV and iron ion ((56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in (56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, (56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  12. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the extragalactic far infrared background radiation using COBE FIRAS instrument data

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Using the explicit form of the function to describe the average spectrum of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 0.15 - 2.4 THz frequency interval, the radiative and thermodynamic properties, such as the total emissivity, total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, enthalpy density, and internal energy density are calculated. The calculated value of the total intensity received in the 0.15 - 2.4 THz frequency interval is 13.6 nW m^-2 sr^-1, and comprises about 19.4 % of the total intensity expected from the energy released by stellar nucleosynthesis over cosmic history. The radiative and thermodynamic functions of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation are calculated at redshift z = 1.5.

  13. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism is dose-dependent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littley, M.D.; Shalet, S.M.; Beardwell, C.G.; Robinson, E.L.; Sutton, M.L. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK) Withington Hospital, Manchester (UK))

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced hypopituitarism has been studies prospectively for up to 12 years in 251 adult patients treated for pituitary disease with external radiotherapy, ranging in dose from 20 Gy in eight fractions over 11 days to 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 21 days. Ten further patients were studied 2-4 years after whole-body irradiation for haematological malignancies using 12 Gy in six fractions over 3 days and seven patients were studied 3-11 years after whole-brain radiotherapy for a primary brain tumour (30 Gy, eight fractions, 11 days). Five years after treatment, patients who received 20 Gy had an incidence of TSH deficiency of 9% and in patients treated with 35-37 Gy, 40 Gy and 42-45 Gy, the incidence of TSH deficiency increased significantly with increasing dose. A similar relationship was observed for both ACTH and gonadotrophin deficiencies when the 20 Gy group was compared to patients treated with 35-45 Gy. Growth hormone deficiency was universal by 5 years over the dose range 35-45 Gy. In seven patients who were treated with 30 Gy in eight fractions over 11 days, deficiencies were observed at a similar frequency to the 40 Gy group (15 fractions, 21 days). No evidence of pituitary dysfunction was detected in the ten patients who received 12 Gy (six fractions, 3 days). (author).

  14. What physicians think about the need for informed consent for communicating the risk of cancer from low-dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsli, Tijen [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA (United States); University of Tennessee, Pediatric Intensive Care, Memphis, TN (United States); Kalra, Mannudeep K. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Self, Julie L.; Rosenfeld, Jason Anders; Butler, Susan [Emory University, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Atlanta, GA (United States); Simoneaux, Stephen [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2009-09-15

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, a subsidiary of the Food and Drug Administration, has declared that X-ray radiation at low doses is a human carcinogen. The purpose of our study was to determine if informed consent should be obtained for communicating the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiation-based imaging. Institutional review board approval was obtained for the prospective survey of 456 physicians affiliated with three tertiary hospitals by means of a written questionnaire. Physicians were asked to state their subspecialty, number of years in practice, frequency of referral for CT scanning, level of awareness about the risk of radiation-induced cancer associated with CT, knowledge of whether such information is provided to patients undergoing CT, and opinions about the need for obtaining informed consent as well as who should provide information about the radiation-induced cancer risk to patients. Physicians were also asked to specify their preference among different formats of informed consent for communicating the potential risk of radiation-induced cancer. Statistical analyses were performed using the chi-squared test. Most physicians stated that informed consent should be obtained from patients undergoing radiation-based imaging (71.3%, 325/456) and the radiology department should provide information about the risk of radiation-induced cancer to these patients (54.6%, 249/456). The informed consent format that most physicians agreed with included modifications to the National Institute of Environmental Health Services report on cancer risk from low-dose radiation (20.2%, 92/456) or included information on the risk of cancer from background radiation compared to that from low-dose radiation (39.5%, 180/456). Most physicians do not know if patients are informed about cancer risk from radiation-based imaging in their institutions. However, they believe that informed consent for communicating the risk of radiation-induced cancer

  15. Low-radiation-dose dual-phase MDCT protocol with split contrast media dose and time optimization: protocol design for renal donors evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura Univ. (Egypt)), email: bazeed@mans.eun.eg; Fooshang, Fawzy F (National Inst. of Urology and Nephrology (Egypt)); Ahmed, Magdy Aly (Nephrology Dept., Armed Forces Hospitals Southern Region (Saudi Arabia))

    2011-10-15

    Background A routine, multiphase, computed tomography (CT) protocol is associated with high radiation exposure to potential kidney donors. To reduce radiation exposure, several authors have suggested a reduction in the number of phases. Purpose To evaluate a low-radiation-dose, dual-phase protocol (i.e. a protocol with an unenhanced phase and combined vascular and excretory phase) for the preoperative evaluation of potential renal donors. Material and Methods Sixty-five potential renal donors were divided into two groups. The first group was scanned with a routine quadric-phase protocol (non-contrast, arterial, venous, and delayed), and the second group was scanned with a triple-phase protocol (dual phase protocol + venous phase). In the second group, we replaced CT angiography with a routine abdominal CT technique. In addition to the evaluation of renal arteries, veins, and excretory systems, the radiation dose of the suggested protocol was compared to that of the routine quadric-phase protocol. Results The suggested protocol was efficient in the evaluation of renal arteries, veins, and excretory systems in all studied potential renal donors. Renal arteries were well visualized in the combined vascular excretory phase using the routine abdominal CT technique; no significant difference was noted when these results were compared to those obtained from the CT angiography used in the quadric-phase protocol. The mean effective radiation dose of our suggested dual-phase protocol was only 34% of the dose resulting from the routine quadric-phase protocol. Conclusion Use of a low-radiation, dual-phase, CT protocol, which relied on both an unenhanced phase and a combined vascular and excretory phase, significantly reduced radiation dose. Furthermore, the proposed protocol provides adequate visualization of renal arteries and veins, and affords sufficient opacification of the urinary tract using improved acquisition triggering

  16. Technology Development for Radiation Dose Measurement and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Hwan; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, T. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The correction factors essential for the operation of In-Vivo counting system were produced and implemented into a field operation for the improvement of accuracy in measurement of the radioactivity inside a human body. The BiDAS2007 code which calculate an internal dose was developed by upgrading the former code prepared in the previous stage of this project. The method of using the multibioassy data, the maximum likelihood function and the Bayesian statistics were established to an internal dose based on the measurement data of radioactivity, intakes and retention of radioactivity in a human body and it can improve the accuracy in estimation of the intakes of radioactivity and the committed effective dose equivalent. In order to solve the problem of low detection efficiency of the conventional Bonner Sphere (BS) to a high energy neutron, the extended BS's were manufactured and the technique for neutron field spectrometry was established. The fast neutron and gamma spectrometry system with a BC501A scintillation detector was also prepared. Several neutron fluence spectra at several nuclear facilities were measured and collected by using the extended BS. The spectrum weighted responses of some neutron monitoring instruments were also derived by using these spectra and the detector response functions. A high efficient TL material for the neutron personal dosimeter was developed. It solved the main problem of low thermal stability and high residual dose of the commercial TLDs and has the sensitivity to neutron and to gamma radiation with 40 and 10 times higher respectively than them.

  17. Optimization of extracranial stereotactic radiation therapy of small lung lesions using accurate dose calculation algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polednik Martin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare and to validate different dose calculation algorithms for the use in radiation therapy of small lung lesions and to optimize the treatment planning using accurate dose calculation algorithms. Methods A 9-field conformal treatment plan was generated on an inhomogeneous phantom with lung mimics and a soft tissue equivalent insert, mimicking a lung tumor. The dose distribution was calculated with the Pencil Beam and Collapsed Cone algorithms implemented in Masterplan (Nucletron and the Monte Carlo system XVMC and validated using Gafchromic EBT films. Differences in dose distribution were evaluated. The plans were then optimized by adding segments to the outer shell of the target in order to increase the dose near the interface to the lung. Results The Pencil Beam algorithm overestimated the dose by up to 15% compared to the measurements. Collapsed Cone and Monte Carlo predicted the dose more accurately with a maximum difference of -8% and -3% respectively compared to the film. Plan optimization by adding small segments to the peripheral parts of the target, creating a 2-step fluence modulation, allowed to increase target coverage and homogeneity as compared to the uncorrected 9 field plan. Conclusion The use of forward 2-step fluence modulation in radiotherapy of small lung lesions allows the improvement of tumor coverage and dose homogeneity as compared to non-modulated treatment plans and may thus help to increase the local tumor control probability. While the Collapsed Cone algorithm is closer to measurements than the Pencil Beam algorithm, both algorithms are limited at tissue/lung interfaces, leaving Monte-Carlo the most accurate algorithm for dose prediction.

  18. Comparative transcriptome analysis of rice seedlings induced by different doses of heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Sun, Yeqing; Wang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as a main factor causing biological effects on plant seeds. To investigate the different effects on genome-wide gene expression of low-dose and high-dose ion radiation, we carried out ground-base carbon particle HZE experiments with different cumulative doses (0Gy, 0.2Gy, 2Gy) to rice seeds and then performed comparative transcriptome analysis of the rice seedlings. We identified a total of 2551 and 1464 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in low-dose and high-dose radiation groups, respectively. Gene ontology analyses indicated that low-dose and high-dose ion radiation both led to multiple physiological and biochemical activities changes in rice. By Gene Ontology analyses, the results showed that only one process-oxidation reduction process was enriched in the biological process category after high-dose ion radiation, while more processes such as response to biotic stimulus, heme binding, tetrapyrrole binding, oxidoreductase activity, catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity were significantly enriched after low-dose ion radiation. The results indicated that the rice plants only focused on the process of oxidation reduction to response to high-dose ion radiation, whereas it was a coordination of multiple biological processes to response to low-dose ion radiation. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of radiation stress-responsive genes, we identified several DEGs-encoding TFs. AP2/EREBP, bHLH, C2H2, MYB and WRKY TF families were altered significantly in response to ion radiation. Mapman analysis speculated that the biological effects on rice seedlings caused by the radiation stress might share similar mechanisms with the biotic stress. Our findings highlight important alterations in the expression of radiation response genes, metabolic pathways, and TF-encoding genes in rice seedlings exposed to low-dose and high-dose ion radiation.

  19. Individual Dose Monitor of External Radiation Personnel in IMP (1996~2001)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    For evaluating the individual annual effective dose of eternal radiation personnel in IMP, we monitored individual dose of external radiation personnel every year. The monitoring results are shown in Table 1, from which it is known from 1998 to 2001, we monitored 1099 workers, the mean annual effective dose is 0.13 mSv.

  20. A method to adjust radiation dose-response relationships for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane Lindegaard; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical risk factors for radiation induced toxicity have been identified in the literature. Here, we present a method to quantify the effect of clinical risk factors on radiation dose-response curves and apply the method to adjust the dose-response for radiation pneumonitis for patients...

  1. Study of radiation exposure dose in young dental patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, Atsushi (Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1983-08-01

    In order to clarify the trend in dental radiography for young patients up to 18 years old and the accompanying radiation exposures, surveys were made at Fukuoka Dental College Hospital and thirty-five dental offices in Fukuoka city and Kitakyushu city. Each kind of radiography increased in average number with age and 16-18 group was given 4.60 times of radiography of one kind or another in the clinic of college hospital. In the dental offices, the number of radiography taken was about one-fourth that of the clinic of college hospital. Although exposure dose varies with exposure factors, distance and angle of exposure, in addition to time factor, were found to affect doses subtly. In the clinic of college hospital the average of estimated doses to organs per person per year were 105.4 mrad (25.2 mrad for 5-year-old children) in the salivary gland, 55.9 mrad (18.9 mrad for 5-year-old) in the thyroid gland, 52.1 mrad (15.0 mrad for 5-year-old) in the lens of the eye and 52.2 mrad (8.7 mrad for 5-year-old) in the sella turcica. In the dental offices, the same average of estimated doses to organs were 40.5 mrad (7.4 mrad for 5-year-old) in the salivary gland, 17.4 mrad (8.0 mrad for 5-year-old) in the thyroid gland, 12.2 mrad (6.1 mrad for 5-year-old) in the lens of eye and 13.1 mrad (1.3 mrad for 5-year-old) in the sella turcica. In all kinds of radiograpy, the estimated doses in genital glands were in ..mu..rad. In the dental offices, both the percentage of young patients to all patients and the radiographing rate were lower as compared with those in the clinic of college hospital. The estimated doses were also lower at one-half to one-fifth and those by age and by organ were found to be one-tenth or lower.

  2. Coronary computed tomography angiography using ultra-low-dose contrast media: radiation dose and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Sei; Kamata, Teruaki; Imai, Atsuko; Ohara, Tomoki; Takewa, Mitsuhiko; Ohe, Ryoko; Miyaji, Kazuaki; Yoshida, Junichi; Kodama, Kazuhisa

    2013-08-01

    To analyze the invasiveness and image quality of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with 80 kV. We enrolled 181 patients with low body weight and low calcium level. Of these, 154 patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 280 HU/80 kV (n = 51); 350 HU/80 kV (n = 51); or 350 HU/120 kV (n = 52). The amount of contrast media (CM) was decided with a CT number-controlling system. Twenty-seven patients were excluded because of an invalid time density curve by timing bolus. The predicted amount of CM, volume CT dose index, dose-length product, effective dose, image noise, and 5-point image quality were measured. The amounts of CM for the 80 kV/280 HU, 80 kV/350 HU, and 120 kV/350 HU groups were 10 ± 4 mL, 15 ± 7 mL, and 30 ± 6 mL, respectively. Although image noise was greater at 80 than 120 kV, there was no significant difference in image quality between 80 kV/350 HU and 120 kV/350 HU (p = 0.390). There was no significant difference in image quality between 80 kV/280 HU and 80 kV/350 HU (4.4 ± 0.7 vs. 4.7 ± 0.4, p = 0.056). The amount of CM and effective dose was lower for 80 kV CCTA than for 120 kV CCTA. CCTA at 80 kV/280 HU may decrease the amount of CM and radiation dose necessary while maintaining image quality.

  3. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  4. Galactic cosmic ray induced radiation dose on terrestrial exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Atri, Dimitra; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias

    2013-01-01

    This past decade has seen tremendous advancements in the study of extrasolar planets. Observations are now made with increasing sophistication from both ground and space based instruments, and exoplanets are characterized with increasing precision. There is a class of particularly interesting exoplanets, falling in the habitable zone, which is defined as the area around a star where the planet is capable of supporting liquid water on its surface. Theoretical calculations also suggest that close-in exoplanets are more likely to have weaker planetary magnetic fields, especially in case of super earths. Such exoplanets are subjected to a high flux of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) due to their weak magnetic moments. GCRs are energetic particles of astrophysical origin, which strike the planetary atmosphere and produce secondary particles, including muons, which are highly penetrating. Some of these particles reach the planetary surface and contribute to the radiation dose. Along with the magnetic field, another fac...

  5. Radiation background simulation and verification at the LHC and its upgrades.

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The high collision rates at the new energy regime of the LHC gives rise to unprecedented radiation environments, especially in the inner regions of the experiments. Deleterious effects of radiation on the experiments include: damage to detectors and electronics; fake backgrounds in the selection and reconstruction of interesting physics events; single event upsets causing disruption in the data readout; radio-activation of components making access for maintenance difficult. High fidelity codes such as FLUKA and GEANT4 are necessary for simulating the complex radiation backgrounds in detail. The results can then be used for predicting detector system behaviour and performance over the lifetime of the project. In this talk the following will be covered: First the Monte Carlo tools used to simulate the radiation backgrounds will be discussed, which include the transport codes FLUKA and GEANT4, as well as the collision event generators PHOJET and PYTHIA. Examples of the predictions at the ATLAS experiment will be...

  6. Steepness of the radiation dose-response curve for dose-per-fraction escalation keeping the number of fractions fixed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Søren M

    2005-01-01

    Clinically, there is growing interest in strategies for intensifying radiation therapy by escalating the dose per fraction. This paper considers the steepness of the dose-response curve in this case. The steepness of a radiation dose-response curve is most conveniently quantified by the normalized dose-response gradient, gamma. Under the assumption of a linear-quadratic dose-effect model, a simple analytical relationship is derived between the gamma-value for a dose-response curve generated by varying the total dose while keeping the number of fractions constant, i.e. escalating the dose per fraction, and the gamma-value for a dose-response curve generated by varying the total dose while keeping the dose per fraction constant. This formulation is compared with clinical dose-response data from the literature and shown to be in good agreement with the observations. Some implications of this formulation for non-uniform dose distributions delivered using 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are briefly discussed.

  7. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship for Heart Disease With Low-Dose Radiation Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eugene [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Corbett, James R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Marsh, Robin B.; Feng, Mary; Jagsi, Reshma; Kessler, Marc L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ficaro, Edward C. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pierce, Lori J., E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify cardiac radiation therapy (RT) exposure using sensitive measures of cardiac dysfunction; and to correlate dysfunction with heart doses, in the setting of adjuvant RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: On a randomized trial, 32 women with node-positive left-sided breast cancer underwent pre-RT stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion scans. Patients received RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes to doses of 50 to 52.2 Gy. Repeat SPECT-CT scans were performed 1 year after RT. Perfusion defects (PD), summed stress defects scores (SSS), and ejection fractions (EF) were evaluated. Doses to the heart and coronary arteries were quantified. Results: The mean difference in pre- and post-RT PD was −0.38% ± 3.20% (P=.68), with no clinically significant defects. To assess for subclinical effects, PD were also examined using a 1.5-SD below the normal mean threshold, with a mean difference of 2.53% ± 12.57% (P=.38). The mean differences in SSS and EF before and after RT were 0.78% ± 2.50% (P=.08) and 1.75% ± 7.29% (P=.39), respectively. The average heart Dmean and D95 were 2.82 Gy (range, 1.11-6.06 Gy) and 0.90 Gy (range, 0.13-2.17 Gy), respectively. The average Dmean and D95 to the left anterior descending artery were 7.22 Gy (range, 2.58-18.05 Gy) and 3.22 Gy (range, 1.23-6.86 Gy), respectively. No correlations were found between cardiac doses and changes in PD, SSS, and EF. Conclusions: Using sensitive measures of cardiac function, no clinically significant defects were found after RT, with the average heart Dmean <5 Gy. Although a dose response may exist for measures of cardiac dysfunction at higher doses, no correlation was found in the present study for low doses delivered to cardiac structures and perfusion, SSS, or EF.

  8. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Zhang

    Full Text Available MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL would be needed.

  9. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daniel G; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed.

  10. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere and inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence, and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  11. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  12. Radiation protection: doses estimation and optimization; Radioprotection: estimation des doses et optimisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanff, P.; Aubert, B.; Lebreton, C.; Rehel, J.L.; Brisse, H.; Madec, L.; Gaboriaud, G.; Lemoine, T.; Neuenschwander, S.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Tack, D.; Gevenois, P.A.; Robilliard, M.; Bayol, A

    2006-10-15

    The objectives were to bring notions relative to the safety of the procedures, notably in term of irradiation and the good use of the examinations in hospitals: biology, imaging, functional tests, endoscopy. The various approached subjects are: knowledge of the medical exposures to the ionising radiations, indicators for the dose to patient; The point on the collection of the data necessary for the update of the diagnostic reference levels, 2 years after the appearance of the order of February 12., 2004; Determination of the exposure of the premature babies in intensive care of neonates in the Beclere hospital; Calculation of the effective dose for T.D.M. acquisitions: comparison of dedicated software available on the market; Analysis of the system of automatic modulation of the load in T.D.M. on pediatric phantoms; dosimetry study of scanner examinations with automatic modulation of the load on pediatric phantoms; optimization image quality/dose in pediatric computed tomography with contrast product: use of a factor of merit. (N.C.)

  13. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  14. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  15. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-02-07

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

  16. Radiation Sialadenitis Induced by High-dose Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Jaetae [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Radioactive iodine ({sup 131}I) is accumulated in the thyroid tissue and plays an important role in the treatment of differentiated papillary and follicular cancers after thyroidectomy. Simultaneously, {sup 131}I is concentrated in the salivary glands and secreted into the saliva. Dose-related damage to the salivary parenchyma results from the {sup 131}I irradiation. Salivary gland swelling and pain, usually involving the parotid, can be seen. The symptoms may develop immediately after a therapeutic dose of {sup 131}I and/or months later and progress in intensity with time. In conjunction with the radiation sialadenitis, secondary complications reported include xerostomia, taste alterations, infection, increases in caries, facial nerve involvement, candidiasis, and neoplasia. Prevention of {sup 131}I sialadenitis may involve the use of sialogogic agents to hasten the transit time of the radioactive iodine through the salivary glands. However, studies are not available to delineate the efficacy of this approach. Treatment of the varied complications that may develop encompass numerous approaches and include gland massage, sialogogic agents, duct probing, antibiotics, mouthwashes, good oral hygiene, and adequate hydration. Recently interventional sialoendoscopy has been introduced an effective tool for the management of patients with {sup 131}I-induced sialadenitis that is unresponsive to medical treatment.

  17. Palliative radiation treatment of cutaneous mycosis fungoides - a dose response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotter, G.W.; Baglan, R.J.; Wasserman, T.H.; Mill, W.

    1983-10-01

    Between 1966 and 1981, 20 patients (191 lesions) underwent palliative radiation therapy for control of biopsy-proven cutaneous mycosis fungoides. Six patients (47 lesions) and an additional 34 lesions from the remaining 14 patients with complete response to treatment were excluded from the study because of follow-up of less than one year. Included in the remaining 110 lesions were all recurrences and all partial responses. The modalities for treatment included superficial X rays, Cobalt-60 or electron beam irradiation. The total tumor doses employed ranged from 600-4000 cGy. The 110 lesions (14 patients) were retrospectively analyzed to determine the dose required for local control of the lesions. Fifty-three percent of the lesions were classified as plaques, 20% as tumors less than or equal to 3 cm in diameter, and 27% as tumors > 3 cm in diameter. Complete response to treatment was observed in 95% of the plaque lesions, 95% of the tumors less than or equal to 3 cm in diameter and 93% of tumor > 3 cm in diameter. A complete response to treatment was noted in all lesions receiving greater than 2000 cGy. In the total population of lesions having a complete response, a local infield recurrence rate of 42% was noted in the group receiving less than or equal to 1000 cGy, 32% in those receiving 1001-2000 cGy, 21% in those receiving 2001-3000 cGy, and 0% in the group receiving > 3000 cGy. The data from this study indicate that tumor doses equivalent to at least 3000 cGy at 200 cGy per fraction, five fractions per week (TDF greater than or equal to) are needed for adquate local control of cutaneous mycosis fungoides lesions.

  18. Association of elevated radiation dose with mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, Puja B.; Prakash, Sheena; Tahir, Usman; Kort, Smadar; Gruberg, Luis; Jeremias, Allen, E-mail: allen.jeremias@stonybrook.edu

    2014-09-15

    Objectives: This study sought to identify clinical and procedural predictors of elevated radiation dose received by patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and to determine if elevated radiation dose was predictive of mortality in this population. Background: Little data exist regarding the impact of excessive radiation burden on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing PCI. Methods: The study population included 1,039 patients who underwent PCI for an AMI between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2008 at an academic tertiary care teaching hospital. Cumulative skin dose (measured in milligray [mGy]) was selected as a measurement of patient radiation burden. Clinical and procedural variables were analyzed in multiple logistic and linear regression models to determine predictors of higher skin dose, and its impact was evaluated on all-cause intermediate-term mortality at two years. Results: Median skin dose was 2120 mGy (IQR 1379–3190 mGy) in the overall population, of which 153 (20.8%) patients received an elevated skin dose (defined as a skin dose > 4,000 mGy). Independent predictors of elevated skin dose included male gender, obesity, multivessel intervention, and presentation with a non-ST-elevation MI (NSTEMI) versus an ST-elevation MI (STEMI). Increased skin dose was not predictive of intermediate-term mortality by multivariate analysis in the overall population or in either subgroup of STEMI and NSTEMI. Conclusions: In this contemporary observational study examining patients with AMI undergoing PCI, male gender, obesity, multivessel intervention, and presentation with a NSTEMI were associated with increased radiation exposure.

  19. Estimating radiation effective doses from whole body computed tomography scans based on U.S. soldier patient height and weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Brian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to explore how a patient's height and weight can be used to predict the effective dose to a reference phantom with similar height and weight from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan when machine-based parameters are unknown. Since machine-based scanning parameters can be misplaced or lost, a predictive model will enable the medical professional to quantify a patient's cumulative radiation dose. Methods One hundred mathematical phantoms of varying heights and weights were defined within an x-ray Monte Carlo based software code in order to calculate organ absorbed doses and effective doses from a chest abdomen pelvis scan. Regression analysis was used to develop an effective dose predictive model. The regression model was experimentally verified using anthropomorphic phantoms and validated against a real patient population. Results Estimates of the effective doses as calculated by the predictive model were within 10% of the estimates of the effective doses using experimentally measured absorbed doses within the anthropomorphic phantoms. Comparisons of the patient population effective doses show that the predictive model is within 33% of current methods of estimating effective dose using machine-based parameters. Conclusions A patient's height and weight can be used to estimate the effective dose from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan. The presented predictive model can be used interchangeably with current effective dose estimating techniques that rely on computed tomography machine-based techniques.

  20. Towards individualized dose constraints: Adjusting the QUANTEC radiation pneumonitis model for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Farr, Katherina P.;

    2014-01-01

    Background. Understanding the dose-response of the lung in order to minimize the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) is critical for optimization of lung cancer radiotherapy. We propose a method to combine the dose-response relationship for RP in the landmark QUANTEC paper with known clinical risk...... factors, in order to enable individual risk prediction. The approach is validated in an independent dataset. Material and methods. The prevalence of risk factors in the patient populations underlying the QUANTEC analysis was estimated, and a previously published method to adjust dose......-response relationships for clinical risk factors was employed. Effect size estimates (odds ratios) for risk factors were drawn from a recently published meta-analysis. Baseline values for D50 and γ50 were found. The method was tested in an independent dataset (103 patients), comparing the predictive power of the dose......-only QUANTEC model and the model including risk factors. Subdistribution cumulative incidence functions were compared for patients with high/low-risk predictions from the two models, and concordance indices (c-indices) for the prediction of RP were calculated. Results. The reference dose- response relationship...

  1. The Inhibitory Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation in IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Mi Joo

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has different biological effects according to dose and dose rate. In particular, the biological effect of low-dose radiation is unclear. Low-dose whole-body gamma irradiation activates immune responses in several ways. However, the effects and mechanism of low-dose radiation on allergic responses remain poorly understood. Previously, we reported that low-dose ionizing radiation inhibits mediator release in IgE-mediated RBL-2H3 mast cell activation. In this study, to have any physiological relevance, we investigated whether low-dose radiation inhibits allergic responses in activated human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells, mouse models of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the late-phase cutaneous response. High-dose radiation induced cell death, but low-dose ionizing radiation of <0.5 Gy did not induce mast cell death. Low-dose ionizing radiation that did not induce cell death significantly suppressed mediator release from human mast cells (HMC-1(5C6 and LAD2 cells that were activated by antigen-antibody reaction. To determine the inhibitory mechanism of mediator released by low-dose ionizing radiation, we examined the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules such as Lyn, Syk, phospholipase Cγ, and protein kinase C, as well as the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i. The phosphorylation of signaling molecules and [Ca2+]i following stimulation of FcεRI receptors was inhibited by low dose ionizing radiation. In agreement with its in vitro effect, ionizing radiation also significantly inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration, cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-α, IL-4, IL-13, and symptoms of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction and the late-phase cutaneous response in anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-sensitized mice. These results indicate that ionizing radiation inhibits both mast cell-mediated immediate- and delayed-type allergic reactions in vivo and in vitro.

  2. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, You, E-mail: you.song@niva.no [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Rosseland, Bjørn Olav [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Tollefsen, Knut Erik [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • First study on early stress responses in salmon exposed to low-dose gamma radiation. • Dramatic dose-dependent transcriptional responses characterized. • Multiple modes of action proposed for gamma radiation. - Abstract: Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48 h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280 mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15 mGy radiation

  3. Radiation dose measurements during kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography imaging in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sathish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Radiation dose to the eye, breast, and the surface of the pelvis have been arrived at during CBCT. The doses measured on patients agreed closely with those measured on humanoid phantom and with published values.

  4. Randomized comparison of operator radiation exposure comparing transradial and transfemoral approach for percutaneous coronary procedures: Rationale and design of the minimizing adverse haemorrhagic events by TRansradial access site and systemic implementation of angioX - RAdiation Dose study (RAD-MATRIX)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Sciahbasi (Alessandro); A. Calabrò (Anna); A. Sarandrea (Alessandro); S. Rigattieri (Stefano); F. Tomassini (Francesco); G. Sardella (Gennaro); D. Zavalloni (Dennis); B. Cortese (Bernardo); U. Limbruno (Ugo); M. Tebaldi (Matteo); A. Gagnor (Andrea); P. Rubartelli (Paolo); A. Zingarelli (Antonio); M. Valgimigli (Marco)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Radiation absorbed by interventional cardiologists is a frequently under-evaluated important issue. Aim is to compare radiation dose absorbed by interventional cardiologists during percutaneous coronary procedures for acute coronary syndromes comparing transradial and transfe

  5. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation using COBE FIRAS instrument data

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Use formulas to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, enthalpy density, and internal energy density in the finite range of frequencies are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60 - 600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T = 2.728 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and the Stefan-Bol...

  6. COMPARISON OF NATURAL BACKGROUND DOSE RATES FOR RESIDENTS OF THE AMARGOSA VALLEY, NV, TO THOSE IN LEADVILLE, CO, AND THE STATES OF COLORADO AND NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Moeller and L. C. Sun

    2006-02-24

    In the latter half of 2005, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published a Proposed Rule (40 CFR Part 197) for establishing a dose rate standard for limiting radionuclide releases from the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository during the time period from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} years after closure. The proposed standard was based on the difference in the estimated total dose rate from natural background in the Amargosa Valley and the ''average annual background radiation'' for the State of Colorado. As defined by the USEPA, ''natural background radiation consists of external exposures from cosmic and terrestrial sources, and internal exposures from indoor exposures to naturally-occurring radon''. On the basis of its assessments, the USEPA estimated that the difference in the dose rate in the two identified areas was 3.5 mSv y{sup -1}. The purpose of this review was to provide an independent evaluation and review of this estimate. One of the first observations was that, because site-specific dose rate measurements for the Amargosa Valley ''were not available'', the dose rates for various sources of natural background in that area, used by the USEPA in its assessment, were based on modifications of the average values for the State of Nevada. A second observation was that the conversion factor applied in estimating the dose rates due to exposures to indoor radon and its decay products was a factor of 2 higher than the currently accepted value. Further review revealed that site-specific data for many natural background sources in the Amargosa Valley were available. One particularly important observation was that about 91% of the residents of that area live in mobile homes which, due to their construction and design, have indoor radon concentrations comparable to, or less than, those outdoors. For that reason, alone, the USEPA estimate of the average dose rate for

  7. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose study to determine the baseline for environmental radiological health practices in Melaka state, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Sahrone, Sallehudin; Wagiran, Husin

    2005-12-01

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured throughout Melaka, Malaysia, over a period of two years, with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. Results obtained are shown in tabular, graphic and cartographic form. The values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly over different soil types and for different underlying geological characteristics present in the study area. The values ranged from 54 +/- 5 to 378 +/- 38 nGy h(-1). The highest terrestrial gamma dose rates were measured over soil types of granitic origin and in areas with underlying geological characteristics of an acid intrusive (undifferentiated) type. An isodose map of terrestrial gamma dose rate in Melaka was drawn by using the GIS application 'Arc View'. This was based on data collected using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector survey meter. The measurements were taken at 542 locations. Three small 'hot spots' were found where the dose rates were more than 350 nGy h(-1). The mean dose rates in the main population areas in the mukims (parishes) of Bukit Katil, Sungai Udang, Batu Berendam, Bukit Baru and Bandar Melaka were 154 +/- 15, 161 +/- 16, 160 +/- 16, 175 +/- 18 and 176 +/- 18 nGy h(-1), respectively. The population-weighted mean dose rate throughout Melaka state is 172 +/- 17 nGy h(-1). This is lower than the geographical mean dose rate of 183 +/- 54 nGy h(-1). The lower value arises from the fact that most of the population lives in the central area of the state where the lithology is dominated by sedimentary rocks consisting of shale, mudstone, phyllite, slate, hornfels, sandstone and schist of Devonian origin which have lower associated dose rates. The mean annual effective dose to the population from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 0.21 mSv. This value is higher than the world average of 0.07 mSv.

  8. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2014; Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung. Jahresbericht 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Loebke-Reinl, Angelika; Peter, Josef (comps.) [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The annual report 2014 on ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses covers the following topics: (1) Actual data and their evaluation: natural environmental radioactivity, artificial environmental radioactivity, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposures from medical applications, handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. (2) Fundamentals and general information: legal basis and explanations, basic information on natural environmental radioactivity, basic information on artificial radioactivity in the environment, basic information on occupational radiation exposure, basic information on radiation exposures from medical applications, basic information on the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, basic information on non-ionizing radiation. (3) Tables.

  9. A technique for multi-dimensional optimization of radiation dose, contrast dose, and image quality in CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Abadi, Ehsan; Sanders, Jeremiah; Becchetti, Marc; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Segars, Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to substantiate the interdependency of image quality, radiation dose, and contrast material dose in CT towards the patient-specific optimization of the imaging protocols. The study deployed two phantom platforms. First, a variable sized phantom containing an iodinated insert was imaged on a representative CT scanner at multiple CTDI values. The contrast and noise were measured from the reconstructed images for each phantom diameter. Linearly related to iodine-concentration, contrast to noise ratio (CNR), was calculated for different iodine-concentration levels. Second, the analysis was extended to a recently developed suit of 58 virtual human models (5D-XCAT) with added contrast dynamics. Emulating a contrast-enhanced abdominal image procedure and targeting a peak-enhancement in aorta, each XCAT phantom was "imaged" using a CT simulation platform. 3D surfaces for each patient/size established the relationship between iodine-concentration, dose, and CNR. The Sensitivity of Ratio (SR), defined as ratio of change in iodine-concentration versus dose to yield a constant change in CNR was calculated and compared at high and low radiation dose for both phantom platforms. The results show that sensitivity of CNR to iodine concentration is larger at high radiation dose (up to 73%). The SR results were highly affected by radiation dose metric; CTDI or organ dose. Furthermore, results showed that the presence of contrast material could have a profound impact on optimization results (up to 45%).

  10. Basic research of the relationship between irradiation dose and volume in radiation-induced pulmonary injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Qing-song; WANG Ping; WANG Jing; WANG Wei; WANG Jun; YUAN Zhi-yong

    2009-01-01

    Background Irradiation dose and volume are the major physical factors of radiation-induced lung injury.The study investigated the relationships between the irradiation dose and volume in radiation-induced lung injury by setting up a model of graded volume irradiation of the rat lung.Methods Animals were randomly assigned to three groups.The ELEKTA precise 2.03 treatment plan system was applied to calculate the irradiation dose and volume.The treatment plan for the three groups was:group 1 received a "high dose to a small volume" (25% volume group) with the mean irradiation volume being 1.748 cm3 (25% lung volume);the total dose and mean lung dose (MLD) were 4610 cGy and 2006 cGy,respectively (bilateral AP-PA fields,source to axis distance (SAD)=100 cm,6MVX,single irradiation);Group 2 received a "low dose to a large volume" (100% volume group) with the mean irradiation volume being 6.99 cm3 (100% lung volume);the total dose was 1153 cGy.MLD was 2006 cGy,which was the same as that of group 1 (bilateral AP-PA fields,SAD = 100 cm,6MVX,single irradiation);Group 3 was a control group.With the exception of receiving no irradiation,group 3 had rest steps that were the same as those of the experimental groups.After irradiation,functional,histopathological,and CT changes were compared every two weeks till the 16th week.Results Functionally,after irradiation breath rate (BR) increases were observed in both group 1 and group 2,especially during the period of 6th-8th weeks.The changes of BR in the 100% volume group were earlier and faster.For the 25% volume group,although pathology was more severe,hardly any obvious increase in BR was observed.Radiographic changes were observed during the early period (the 4th week) and the most obvious changes manifested during the mediated period (the 8th week).The extensiveness of high density and the decreased lung permeability were presented in the 100% volume group,and ground glass opacity and patchy consolidation were presented in the 25

  11. TU-C-18A-01: Models of Risk From Low-Dose Radiation Exposures: What Does the Evidence Say?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushberg, J [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Boreham, D [McMaster University, Ontario, CA (Canada); Ulsh, B

    2014-06-15

    At dose levels of (approximately) 500 mSv or more, increased cancer incidence and mortality have been clearly demonstrated. However, at the low doses of radiation used in medical imaging, the relationship between dose and cancer risk is not well established. As such, assumptions about the shape of the dose-response curve are made. These assumptions, or risk models, are used to estimate potential long term effects. Common models include 1) the linear non-threshold (LNT) model, 2) threshold models with either a linear or curvilinear dose response above the threshold, and 3) a hormetic model, where the risk is initially decreased below background levels before increasing. The choice of model used when making radiation risk or protection calculations and decisions can have significant implications on public policy and health care decisions. However, the ongoing debate about which risk model best describes the dose-response relationship at low doses of radiation makes informed decision making difficult. This symposium will review the two fundamental approaches to determining the risk associated with low doses of ionizing radiation, namely radiation epidemiology and radiation biology. The strengths and limitations of each approach will be reviewed, the results of recent studies presented, and the appropriateness of different risk models for various real world scenarios discussed. Examples of well-designed and poorly-designed studies will be provided to assist medical physicists in 1) critically evaluating publications in the field and 2) communicating accurate information to medical professionals, patients, and members of the general public. Equipped with the best information that radiation epidemiology and radiation biology can currently provide, and an understanding of the limitations of such information, individuals and organizations will be able to make more informed decisions regarding questions such as 1) how much shielding to install at medical facilities, 2) at

  12. A comparative analysis of exposure doses between the radiation workers in dental and general hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Nam Hee; Chung, Woon Kwan; Dong, Kyung Rae; Ju, Yong Jin; Song, Ha Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Research and investigation is required for the exposure dose of radiation workers to work in the dental hospital as increasing interest in exposure dose of the dental hospital recently accordingly, study aim to minimize radiation exposure by making a follow-up study of individual exposure doses of radiation workers, analyzing the status on individual radiation exposure management, prediction the radiation disability risk levels by radiation, and alerting the workers to the danger of radiation exposure. Especially given the changes in the dental hospital radiation safety awareness conducted the study in order to minimize radiation exposure. This study performed analyses by a comparison between general and dental hospital, comparing each occupation, with the 116,220 exposure dose data by quarter and year of 5,811 subjects at general and dental hospital across South Korea from January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2012. The following are the results obtained by analyzing average values year and quarter. In term of hospital, average doses were significantly higher in general hospitals than detal ones. In terms of job, average doses were higher in radiological technologists the other workers. Especially, they showed statistically significant differences between radiological technologists than dentists. The above-mentioned results indicate that radiation workers were exposed to radiation for the past 5 years to the extent not exceeding the dose limit (maximum 50 mSv y{sup -1}). The limitation of this study is that radiation workers before 2008 were excluded from the study. Objective evaluation standards did not apply to the work circumstance or condition of each hospital. Therefore, it is deemed necessary to work out analysis criteria that will be used as objective evaluation standard. It will be necessary to study radiation exposure in more precise ways on the basis of objective analysis standard in the future. Should try to minimize the radiation individual dose of

  13. Radiation dose reduction in perfusion CT imaging of the brain: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed E; Afat, Saif; Brockmann, Marc A; Nikoubashman, Omid; Brockmann, Carolin; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Wiesmann, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) of the brain is widely used in the settings of acute ischemic stroke and vasospasm monitoring. The high radiation dose associated with PCT is a central topic and has been a focus of interest for many researchers. Many studies have examined the effect of radiation dose reduction in PCT using different approaches. Reduction of tube current and tube voltage can be efficient and lead to a remarkable reduction of effective radiation dose while preserving acceptable image quality. The use of novel noise reduction techniques such as iterative reconstruction or spatiotemporal smoothing can produce sufficient image quality from low-dose perfusion protocols. Reduction of sampling frequency of perfusion images has only little potential to reduce radiation dose. In the present article we aimed to summarize the available data on radiation dose reduction in PCT imaging of the brain.

  14. Design of a total-dose radiation hardened monolithic CMOS DC-DC boost converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhi; Yu Hongbo; Liu Youbao [Xi' an Institute of Microelectronics Technology, Xi' an 710054 (China); Ning Hongying, E-mail: liuzhi6048@126.com [Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an 710048 (China)

    2011-07-15

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a monolithic CMOS DC-DC boost converter that is hardened for total dose radiation. In order to improve its radiation tolerant abilities, circuit-level and device-level RHBD (radiation-hardening by design) techniques were employed. Adaptive slope compensation was used to improve the inherent instability. The H-gate MOS transistors, annular gate MOS transistors and guard rings were applied to reduce the impact of total ionizing dose. A boost converter was fabricated by a standard commercial 0.35 {mu}m CMOS process. The hardened design converter can work properly in a wide range of total dose radiation environments, with increasing total dose radiation. The efficiency is not as strongly affected by the total dose radiation and so does the leakage performance. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  15. Determination of Radiation Absorbed Dose to Primary Liver Tumors and Normal Liver Tissue Using Post Radioembolization 90Y PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Mohan Srinivas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radioembolization with Yttrium-90 (90Y microspheres is becoming a more widely used transcatheter treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Using post-treatment 90Y PET/CT scans,the distribution of microspheres within the liver can be determined and quantitatively assessesed . We studied the radiation dose of 90Y delivered to liver and treated tumors.Methods: This retrospective study of 56 patients with HCC, including analysis of 98 liver tumors, measured and correlated the dose of radiation delivered to liver tumors and normal liver tissue using glass microspheres (TheraSpheres® to the frequency of complications with mRECIST. 90Y PET/CT and triphasic liver CT scans were used to contour treated tumor and normal liver regions and determine their respective activity concentrations. An absorbed dose factor was used to convert the measured activity concentration (Bq/mL to an absorbed dose (Gy.Results: The 98 studied tumors received a mean dose of 169 Gy (mode 90-120 Gy;range 0-570 Gy. Tumor response by mRECIST criteria was performed for 48 tumors that had follow up scans. There were 21 responders (mean dose 215 Gy and 27 nonresponders (mean dose 167 Gy. The association between mean tumor absorbed dose and response suggests a trend but did not reach statistical significance (p=0.099. Normal liver tissue received a mean dose of 67 Gy (mode 60-70 Gy; range 10-120 Gy. There was a statistically significant association between absorbed dose to normal liver and the presence of two or more severe complications (p=0.036.Conclusion: Our cohort of patients showed a possible dose response trend for the tumors. Collateral dose to normal liver is nontrivial and can have clinical implications. These methods help us understand whether patient adverse events, treatment success, or treatment failure can be attributed to the dose which the tumor or normal liver received.

  16. Comparison of acute and subacute genitourinary and gastrointestinal adverse events of radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, permanent implant brachytherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Konishi, Koji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki; Bijl, Henk P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Langendijk, Johannes A; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: To examine acute and subacute urinary and rectal toxicity in patients with localized prostate cancer monotherapeutically treated with the following four radiotherapeutic techniques: intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, low-dose-ra

  17. Radiolytic yield of ozone in air for low dose neutron and x-ray/gamma-ray radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J.; Su, S.; Blakeley, R. E.; Koonath, P.; Hecht, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation ionizes surrounding air and produces molecular species, and these localized effects may be used as a signature of, and for quantification of, radiation. Low-level ozone production measurements from radioactive sources have been performed in this work to understand radiation chemical yields at low doses. The University of New Mexico AGN-201 M reactor was used as a tunable radiation source. Ozone levels were compared between reactor-on and reactor-off conditions, and differences (0.61 to 0.73 ppb) well below background levels were measured. Simulations were performed to determine the dose rate distribution and average dose rate to the air sample within the reactor, giving 35 mGy of mixed photon and neutron dose. A radiation chemical yield for ozone of 6.5±0.8 molecules/100 eV was found by a variance weighted average of the data. The different contributions of photons and neutrons to radiolytic ozone production are discussed.

  18. Radiation therapy of intracranial germinomas: optimum radiation dose and treatment volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sei Kyung [Eulji Medical College, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To evaluate the possibility of decreasing the radiation dose and to determine optimum treatment volume in intracranial germinomas. Forty five patients with pathologically-verified or presumed germinomas by a radiosensitivity test who had been treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone between 1971 and 1992 were retrospectively analyzed. The average age was 17.2 years with 68.9% of the patients being between the ages of 10-20. The male and female ratio was 2.2:1. The locations of the primary tumors were at the pineal regions in 14 patients; the suprasellar regions in 12 patients; and multiple sites in 12 patients. Treatment volumes varied from a small local field (1Q) to the whole brain (7) or entire neuroaxis irradiation(28). All the cases after 1982 received craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Radiation .doses were 41-59 Gv (median 48.5 Gy) to the primary tumor site and 19.5-36 Gy (median 24 Gy) to the neuroaxis. The median follow-up period was 82 months with a range of 2-260 months. All the patients showed complete response after AT. Four patients suffered from recurrence 14. 65. 76, and 170 months after AT,. respectively, and two patients died with intercurrent disease. One of four recurrent cases was salvaged by re-irradiation. Therefore, a 5 and 10 year overall survival was 95.3 % and 84.7 % respectively. Five and ten year disease free survival was 97.6 % and 88.8 % respectively. All the recurrences occurred in the patients who received local RT (3/10) or whole brain RT (1/7) with a radiation dose of 48-50 Gy. None of the patients who received CSJ suffered recurrence. There was no recurrence among the 15 patients who received 45 Gy to the primary site and the 18 patients who received 24 Gy (6 patients received 19.5 Gy) to the neuroaxis. CSI is recommended for the treatment of intracranial germinomas. The radiation dose can be safely decreased to {<=}45 Gy on a primary tumor site and 19.5 Gy on the spine.

  19. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy, E-mail: berringtona@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  20. Complexity analysis of the UV radiation dose time series

    CERN Document Server

    Mihailovic, Dragutin T

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Lempel-Ziv and sample entropy measures to assess the complexity in the UV radiation activity in the Vojvodina region (Serbia) for the period 1990-2007. In particular, we have examined the reconstructed daily sum (dose) of the UV-B time series from seven representative places in this region and calculated the Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) and Sample Entropy (SE) values for each time series. The results indicate that the LZC values in some places are close to each other while in others they differ. We have devided the period 1990-2007 into two subintervals: (a) 1990-1998 and (b) 1999-2007 and calculated LZC and SE values for the various time series in these subintervals. It is found that during the period 1999-2007, there is a decrease in their complexities, and corresponding changes in the SE, in comparison to the period 1990-1998. This complexity loss may be attributed to increased (i) human intervention in the post civil war period (land and crop use and urbanization) and military activities i...

  1. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim Yiting [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kastan, Michael B. [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Matsui, William, E-mail: matsuwi@jhmi.edu [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore L., E-mail: deweete@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 {mu}g per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  2. Analysis of chronic radiation exposure at small doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestinina, L.Y. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the late effects of radiation exposure among residents of settlements located on the territory of the East-Urals Radiation Trace (EURT) in the Southern Urals. In 1957 an explosion occurred at the depot of radioactive waste in the Southern Urals. An area of 23000 km{sup 2} was contaminated, with contamination density of over 0.1 Ci/m{sup 2} for {sup 90}Sr. There were 217 populated ares on that territory with total population about 270000. The residents of 22 villages with contamination density of over 4 Ci/km{sup 2} for {sup 90}Sr were evacuated. The times of evacuation differed from 7 to 670 days since the accident, depending on the level of contamination. In 1988-1993 an individualized registry was created at the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM) which included information on the residents of 22 evacuated villages and a proportion of unevacuated residents of the EURT area. Currently, the registry contains data on 30000 residents. Of that number 17000 persons were born before, and 12000 after the accident (including about 9000 offspring of exposed residents evacuated from the EURT, and about 3000 persons who were born after the accident and have been living permanently in the EURT area). Over the 35-year period since the accident the residents have received mean effective doses ranging from 23 to 530 mSv. The mean effective doses received by permanent residents range from 5 to 60 mSv. The cohort of people exposed on the EURT territory was identified based on the information contained in the registry. If a person happened to be in the EURT area at the time of the accident, he/she was considered to be eligible for inclusion in the cohort. Over the 35-year period (from 1957 through 1992) 29.5% of 17872 residents died, and 35% of the original cohort were lost to follow-up for different reasons. To enable an analysis a control group was established which included residents of villages located outside, but close

  3. Characterization of Radiation Hardened Bipolar Linear Devices for High Total Dose Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Steven S.; Harris, Richard D.; Rax, Bernard G.; Thorbourn, Dennis O.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation hardened linear devices are characterized for performance in combined total dose and displacement damage environments for a mission scenario with a high radiation level. Performance at low and high dose rate for both biased and unbiased conditions is compared and the impact to hardness assurance methodology is discussed.

  4. Lower Bound on the Cosmic TeV Gamma-ray Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation in the GeV band. However, investigation on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation still remains sparse. Here, we report the lower bound on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background spectrum placed by the cumulative flux of individual detected extragalactic TeV sources including blazars, radio galaxies, and starburst galaxies. The current limit on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background above 0.1 TeV is obtained as $3\\times10^{-8} (E/100~{\\rm GeV})^{-0.6} \\exp(-E/2000~{\\rm GeV})~{\\rm [GeV/cm^2/s/sr]} < E^2dN/dE < 1\\times10^{-7} (E/100~{\\rm GeV})^{-0.5}~{\\rm [GeV/cm^2/s/sr]}$, where the upper bound is set by requirement that the cascade flux from the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation can not exceed the measured cosmic GeV gamma-ray background spectrum (Inoue & Ioka 2012). Two nearby blazars, Mrk 421 and Mrk 501, explain ~70% of the cumulative flux at 0.8-4 TeV, while extreme blaza...

  5. Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposures on Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta; Neumann, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty on how low (≤0.1 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR) affect human cells, partly due to a lack of suitable experimental model systems for such studies. The uncertainties arising from low-dose IR human data undermine practical societal needs to predict health risks emerging from diagnostic medical tests’ radiation, natural background radiation, and environmental radiological accidents. To eliminate a variability associated with remarkable differences in radioresponses of hundreds of differentiated cell types, we established a novel, human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-based model to examine the radiobiological effects in human cells. Our aim is to comprehensively elucidate the gene expression changes in a panel of various hESC lines following low IR doses of 0.01; 0.05; 0.1 Gy; and, as a reference, relatively high dose of 1 Gy of IR. Here, we examined the dynamics of transcriptional changes of well-established IR-responsive set of genes, including CDKN1A, GADD45A, etc. at 2 and 16 h post-IR, representing “early” and “late” radioresponses of hESCs. Our findings suggest the temporal- and hESC line-dependence of stress gene radioresponses with no statistically significant evidence for a linear dose-response relationship within the lowest doses of IR exposures. PMID:24398983

  6. Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposures on Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta Sokolov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great deal of uncertainty on how low (≤0.1 Gy doses of ionizing radiation (IR affect human cells, partly due to a lack of suitable experimental model systems for such studies. The uncertainties arising from low-dose IR human data undermine practical societal needs to predict health risks emerging from diagnostic medical tests’ radiation, natural background radiation, and environmental radiological accidents. To eliminate a variability associated with remarkable differences in radioresponses of hundreds of differentiated cell types, we established a novel, human embryonic stem cell (hESC-based model to examine the radiobiological effects in human cells. Our aim is to comprehensively elucidate the gene expression changes in a panel of various hESC lines following low IR doses of 0.01; 0.05; 0.1 Gy; and, as a reference, relatively high dose of 1 Gy of IR. Here, we examined the dynamics of transcriptional changes of well-established IR-responsive set of genes, including CDKN1A, GADD45A, etc. at 2 and 16 h post-IR, representing “early” and “late” radioresponses of hESCs. Our findings suggest the temporal- and hESC line-dependence of stress gene radioresponses with no statistically significant evidence for a linear dose-response relationship within the lowest doses of IR exposures.

  7. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Phillip J; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Yepes, Pablo; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-01-01

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors. PMID:20865142

  8. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  9. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  10. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation. PMID:26795421

  11. Trends in Radiation Doses to Patients from Medical X-ray Examinations in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olga Iacob; Irina Anca Popescu [Institute of Public Health, Iassy (Romania); Mihai Radu Iacob [University ' Al. I. Cuza' Iassy (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    Even if the doses received by patients during 2005 survey are lower than those estimated in the 2000 national survey on diagnostic medical radiation exposure by 27 percent, on average, their values still indicate an urgent need to develop radiation protection and optimization activities for X ray examinations, especially in pediatrics radiology. The increasing attention given in last years to radiation protection for conventional examinations, with development of national patient dosimetry protocols and reference doses, new radiation protection legislation and norms have played a significant part in this substantial reduction in effective doses. (N.C.)

  12. Measurement of the Radiation Dose Rates of Patients Receiving Treatment with I-131 Using Telescopic Radiation Survey Meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia Lahfi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In order to discharge the patients receiving treatment with large radiation doses of 131I for thyroid cancer, it is necessary to measure and evaluate the external dose rates of these patients. The aim of the study was to assess a new method of external dose rate measurement, and to analyze the obtained results as a function of time. Materials and Methods In this study, a telescopic radiation survey meter was utilized to measure the external dose rates of a sample population of 192 patients receiving treatment with high-dose 131I at one, 24, and 48 hours after dose administration. Results The proposed technique could reduce the occupational radiation exposure of the physicist by a factor of 1/16. Moreover, the external dose rates of both genders rapidly decreased with time according to bi-exponential equations, which could be attributed to the additional factors associated with iodine excretion, as well as the physiology of the body in terms of 131I uptake. Conclusion According to the results of this study, telescopic radiation survey meter could be used to measure the external dose rates of patients receiving treatment with 131I. Furthermore, the average difference in the radiation exposure between female and male patients was calculated to be less than 17%.

  13. Dosimetry experiences and lessons learned for radiation dose assessment in Korean nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young; Son, Jung Kwon

    2013-07-01

    Since the first Korean nuclear power plant (NPP), Kori 1, commenced operation in 1978, a total of 21 NPPs had been put into operation in Korea by the end of 2011. Radiation doses of NPP workers have been periodically evaluated and controlled within the prescribed dose limit. Radiation dose assessment is carried out monthly by reading personal dosemeters for external radiation exposure, which have traceability in compliance with strict technical guidelines. In the case of the internal radiation exposure, workers who have access to the possible area of polluted air are also evaluated for their internal dose after maintenance task. In this article, the overall situation and experience for the assessment and distribution of radiation doses in Korean NPPs is described.

  14. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: II. Extragalactic far infrared background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using formula to describe the average spectrum of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval at mean temperature T=18.5 K, the radiative and thermodynamic properties, such as the total emissivity, total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure are calculated. The value for the total intensity received in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval is equal to 13.6 nW m-2 sr-1. This value is about 19.4 % of the total intensity expected from the energy released by stellar nucleosynthesis over cosmic history. The radiative and thermodynamic functions of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation are calculated at redshift z=1.5.

  15. Radiation dose to patient and personnel during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, W.H.; Jones, D.; Gibbons, R.P.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation dose to the patient and personnel was determined during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy treatment of 60 patients. Surface radiation dose to the patient's back from the fluoroscopy unit on the side with the kidney stone averaged 10 rem (100 mSv.) per case, although the range was wide (1 to 30 rem). The surface dose from the opposing biplane x-ray unit was less, averaging 5.5 rem (55 mSv.) per case but again with a wide range (0.1 to 21 rem). Exit dose at the lower abdomen averaged 13 mrem. (0.13 mSv.) per case and estimated female gonad dose averaged 100 mrem. (1.2 mSv.). Radiation dose to personnel working in the extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy suite averaged less than 2 mrem. (0.02 mSv.) per case, making it a procedure that is safe in regard to radiation exposure.

  16. Fluctuations of the microwave background radiation in the adiabatic and entropic theories of galaxy formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Zel' dovich, Y.B.; Syunyaev, R.A.

    1978-09-01

    The evolution of adiabatic and nonisentropic density perturbations during the hydrogen recombination era in the universe and the temperature fluctuations of the microwave background radiation generated at that period have been calculated numerically. The results support the principal estimates and conclusions given in a 1970 analysis of the problem.

  17. Measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 6. 3 cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandolesi, N.; Calzolari, P.; Cortiglioni, S.; Morigi, G.

    1984-06-15

    We present results of a measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at a wavelength of 6.3 cm. We obtained the value T/sub CBR/ = 2.71 +- 0.20 K. This is in good agreement with, and has a smaller error than, any previous measurement at equal or longer wavelengths.

  18. Radiometric mapping of Goiania urban area: natural and artificial radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Nivaldo C.; Dias, Danila C.S.; Guerrero, Eder T. Z.; Alberti, Heber L.C., E-mail: ncsilva@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: danilacdias@gmail.com, E-mail: edertzg@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: heber@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Santos, Eliane E.; Pimenta, Lucinei R.; Costa, Heliana F., E-mail: esantos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: lucinei@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: heliana@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In the city of Goiania it is common to observe in some social groups, such as medical society, academy and communication (media), the association between cancer incidence and the 1987's Goiania radiological accident. Moreover, data of Population-Base Cancer Register published in 2010 by INCA (Instituto Nacional do Cancer), reveals that Goiania figures among the three cities where the major increases in cancer incidence were observed. Therefore, this project aims to provide a dose rate database over Goiania's road network aiming to: 1) assess the level radiation dose to which the population is exposed and 1) provide technical support for social communication of Brazilian Commission for Nuclear Energy. The monitoring was accomplished by using a mobile system (EBERLINE FHT 1376) which includes a 5-liter plastic scintillator detector coupled with a GPS (Global Positioning System) and a portable computer. This system allowed the recording of both the geographical coordinates and the dose rate of each single point. Using a NBR (Natural Background Rejection) the system is able to discriminate between natural and artificial radiation. After the field campaign, the raw data were then treated in a Geographical Information System (GIS) using the ArcGis software in order to produce dose maps. Therefore, this paper will present the results of the current stage of this research encompassing the monitoring of streets located on seven regions Goiania - divided in for administrative purposes. It is important to point out that more than 175175 individual data were collected with results ranging from 13 to 490 nSv/h. (author)

  19. Radiation dose reduction in chest CT—Review of available options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Takeshi, E-mail: tkubo@kuhpkyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2, Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kauczor, Hans Ulrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Clinic Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hatabu, Hiroto, E-mail: hhatabu@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The present status of proliferating CT examinations was presented. • Technical improvements of CT scanners for radiation dose reduction were reviewed. • Advantage and disadvantage of methods for CT radiation dose reduction were discussed. • Evidences for safety of CT radiation dose reduction were reviewed. - Abstract: Computed tomography currently accounts for the majority of radiation exposure related to medical imaging. Although technological improvement of CT scanners has reduced the radiation dose of individual examinations, the benefit was overshadowed by the rapid increase in the number of CT examinations. Radiation exposure from CT examination should be kept as low as reasonably possible for patient safety. Measures to avoid inappropriate CT examinations are needed. Principles and information on radiation dose reduction in chest CT are reviewed in this article. The reduction of tube current and tube potential are the mainstays of dose reduction methods. Study results indicate that routine protocols with reduced tube current are feasible with diagnostic results comparable to conventional standard dose protocols. Tube current adjustment is facilitated by the advent of automatic tube current modulation systems by setting the appropriate image quality level for the purpose of the examination. Tube potential reduction is an effective method for CT pulmonary angiography. Tube potential reduction often requires higher tube current for satisfactory image quality, but may still contribute to significant radiation dose reduction. Use of lower tube potential also has considerable advantage for smaller patients. Improvement in image production, especially the introduction of iterative reconstruction methods, is expected to lower radiation dose significantly. Radiation dose reduction in CT is a multifaceted issue. Understanding these aspects leads to an optimal solution for various indications of chest CT.

  20. Cancer mortality in the high background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China during the period between 1979 and 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Zufan [Ministry of Health, Beijing (China). Lab. of Industrial Hygiene; Zha Yongru; Akiba, Suminori (and others)

    2000-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate cancer risk associated with the low-level radiation exposure of an average annual effective dose of 6.4 mSv (including internal exposure) in the high background-radiation areas (HBRA) in Yangjiang, China. The mortality survey consisted of two steps, i.e., the follow-up of cohort members and the ascertainment of causes of death. The cohort members in HBRA were divided into three dose-groups on the basis of environmental dose-rates per year. The mortality experiences of those three dose groups were compared with those in the residents of control areas by means of relative risk (RR). During the period 1987-1995, we observed 926,226 person-years by following up 106,517 subjects in the cohort study, and accumulated 5,161 deaths, among which 557 were from cancers. We did not observe an increase in cancer mortality in HBRA (RR=0.96, 96% CI, 0.80 to 1.15). The combined data for the period 1979-95 included 125,079 subjects and accumulated 1,698,316 person-years, observed 10,415 total deaths and 1,003 cancer deaths. The relative risk of all cancers for whole HBRA as compared with the control area was estimated to be 0.99 (95% CI, 0.87 to 1.14). The relative risks of cancers of the stomach, colon, liver, lung, bone, female breast and thyroid within whole HBRA were less than one, while the risks for leukemia, cancers of the nasopharynx, esophagus, rectum, pancreas, skin, cervix uteri, brain and central nervous system, and malignant lymphoma were larger than one. None of them were significantly different from RR=1. Neither homogeneity tests nor trend tests revealed any statistically significant relationship between cancer risk and radiation dose. We did not find any increased cancer risk associated with the high levels of natural radiation in HBRA. On the contrary, the mortality of all cancers in HBRA was generally lower than that in the control area, but not statistically significant. (author)

  1. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  2. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach.

  3. [Evaluating radiation dose load in medical personnel of radiologic diagnostic departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunov, B V; Koroleva, E P

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with materials on radiation hygienic evaluation of radiologic diagnostic departments in various medical institutions of Moscow. The studies covered work of medical staffers in X-ray examination and in contact with short-lived isotope generators. The authors outlined the examination types and stages with maximal radiation danger. Disimetric information obtained during the study helped to calculate values of equivalent, effective doses of radiation for medical personnel and maximal potential doses.

  4. Measurement of radiation dose to ovaries from CT of the head and trunk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Habdhan, M.A.M.; Kinsara, A.R. [King Abdul Aziz Univ., Nuclear Engineering Dept., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2001-07-01

    With the rise in concern about doses received by patients over recent years, there has been a growing requirement for information on typical doses and the range of dose received during Computerized Tomography (CT). This study was performed for the assessment of radiation dose to the ovaries from various CT protocols for head and trunk imaging. Thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used for the dosimetry measurement in an anthropomorphic Rando Alderson phantom. The wanted (obligatory) and unwanted (non-useful) radiation doses delivered to the ovaries during CT examinations of head, facial bone, orbits, abdomen, chest, pelvis, neck, nasopharynx, cervical spine, lumber spine and sacroiliac joint were assessed. The results are compared with the corresponding values published in the literature. A comparison of the received dose from CT examinations and general radiography examinations by the ovaries was made. It is found that relatively high doses of unwanted radiation are delivered with computerized tomography. (author)

  5. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedford, Joel

    2014-04-18

    Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of γ-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase

  6. A Flat Universe from High-Resolution Maps of the Cosmic MicrowaveBackground Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Bernardis, P.; Ade, P.A.R.; Bock, J.J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill,J.; Boscaleri, A.; Coble, K.; Crill, B.P.; De Gasperis, G.; Farese, P.C.; Ferreira, P.G.; Ganga, K.; Giacometti, M.; Hivon, E.; Hristov, V.V.; Iacoangeli, A.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lange, A.E.; Martinis, L.; Masi, S.; Mason,P.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Melchiorri, A.; Miglio, L.; Montroy, T.; Netterfield,C.B.; Pascale, E.; Piacentini, F.; Pogosyan, D.; Prunet, S.; Rao, S.; Romeo, G.; Ruhl, J.E.; Scaramuzzi, F.; Sforna, D.; Vittorio, N.

    2000-04-28

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K Cosmic Microwave Background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole {ell}{sub peak} = (197 {+-} 6), with an amplitude DT{sub 200} = (69 {+-} 8){mu}K. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favored by standard inflationary scenarios.

  7. Radiation-Hydrodynamical Collapse of Pregalactic Clouds in the Ultraviolet Background

    CERN Document Server

    Kitayama, T; Umemura, M; Susa, H; Ikeuchi, S

    2000-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of the UV background radiation on the collapse of pregalactic clouds, we implement a radiation-hydrodynamical calculation, combining one-dimensional spherical hydrodynamics with an accurate treatment of the radiative transfer of ionizing photons. Both absorption and scattering of UV photons are explicitly taken into account. It turns out that a gas cloud contracting within the dark matter potential does not settle into hydrostatic equilibrium, but undergoes run-away collapse even under the presence of the external UV field. The cloud center is shown to become self-shielded against ionizing photons by radiative transfer effects before shrinking to the rotation barrier. Based on our simulation results, we further discuss the possibility of H2 cooling and subsequent star formation in a run-away collapsing core. The present results are closely relevant to the survival of subgalactic Population III objects as well as to metal injection into intergalactic space.

  8. Correlation between scatter radiation dose at the height of the operators eye and dose to patient for different angiographies projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyton, F.; Nogueira, M. S.; Da Silva, T. A. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Post-graduation in Sciences and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials, Pte. Antonio Carlos No. 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Gubolino, L.; Pivetta, M. R. [Hospital dos Fornecedores de Cana de Piracicaba, Av. Barao de Valenca 616, 13405-233 Piracicaba (Brazil); Ubeda, C., E-mail: leyton.fernando@gmail.com [Tarapaca University, Health Sciences Faculty, Radiological Sciences Center, Av. Gral. Velasquez 1775, 1000007 Arica, Arica and Parinacota (Chile)

    2015-10-15

    Cases of radiation induced cataract among cardiology professionals have been reported in studies. In view of evidence of radiation injuries, the ICRP recommends limiting the radiation dose to the lens to 20 mSv per year for occupational exposure. The aim of this works was to report scattered radiation doses at the height of the operators eye in an interventional cardiology facility from procedures performed without use of radiation protection devices, correlated with different angiographic projections and operational modes. Measurements were made in a cardiac laboratory with an angiography X-ray system GE equipped with flat-panel detector. PMMA plates of 30 x 30 x 5 cm were used to simulate a patient with a thickness of 20 cm. Two fluoroscopy modes (low and normal, 15 frame/s), cine mode 15 frame/s. Four angiographic projections anterior posterior (Ap), lateral (Lat), left anterior oblique caudal (spider) and left anterior oblique cranial (Lao-45/cra-30) and a cardiac protocol for patient between 70 to 90 kg was used. Measurements of phantom entrance doses rate and scatter doses rate were performed with two Unfors Xi plus. The detector measuring scatter radiation was positioned at the usual distance of the cardiologists eyes during working conditions (1 m from the isocenter and 1.7 m from the floor). There is a good linear correlation between the kerma-area product and scatter dose at the lens. An experimental correlation factor of 2.3; 12.0; 12.2 and 17.6 μSv/Gy cm{sup 2} were found for the Ap, Lao/cra, spider and Lat projections, respectively. The entrance dose of PMMA for fluoroscopy low, medium and cine was 13, 39 and 282 mGy/min, respectively to Ap. (Author)

  9. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Ebert@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Foo, Kerwyn [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gulliford, Sarah L. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Angel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Denham, James W. [School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  10. Dose to red bone marrow of infants, children and adults from radiation of natural origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, G M [Childhood Cancer Research Group, University of Oxford, 57 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HJ (United Kingdom); Fell, T P; Harrison, J D [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0RQ, Oxon (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Gerald.Kendall@ccrg.ox.ac.uk

    2009-06-15

    Natural radiation sources contribute much the largest part of the radiation exposure of the average person. This paper examines doses from natural radiation to the red bone marrow, the tissue in which leukaemia is considered to originate, with particular emphasis on doses to children. The most significant contributions are from x-rays and gamma rays, radionuclides in food and inhalation of isotopes of radon and their decay products. External radiation sources and radionuclides other than radon dominate marrow doses at all ages. The variation with age of the various components of marrow dose is considered, including doses received in utero and in each year up to the age of 15. Doses in utero include contributions resulting from the ingestion of radionuclides by the mother and placental transfer to the foetus. Postnatal doses include those from radionuclides in breast-milk and from radionuclides ingested in other foods. Doses are somewhat higher in the first year of life and there is a general slow decline from the second year of life onwards. The low linear energy transfer (LET) component of absorbed dose to the red bone marrow is much larger than the high LET component. However, because of the higher radiation weighting factor for the latter it contributes about 40% of the equivalent dose incurred up to the age of 15.

  11. [18F]Galacto-RGD: synthesis, radiolabeling, metabolic stability, and radiation dose estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubner, Roland; Kuhnast, Bertrand; Mang, Christian; Weber, Wolfgang A; Kessler, Horst; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus

    2004-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in various murine tumor models that radiolabeled RGD-peptides can be used for noninvasive determination of alphavbeta3 integrin expression. Introduction of sugar moieties improved the pharmacokinetic properties of these peptides and led to tracer with good tumor-to-background ratios. Here we describe the synthesis, radiolabeling, and the metabolic stability of a glycosylated RGD-peptide ([18F]Galacto-RGD) and give first radiation dose estimates for this tracer. The peptide was assembled on a solid support using Fmoc-protocols and cyclized under high dilution conditions. It was conjugated with a sugar amino acid, which can be synthesized via a four-step synthesis starting from pentaacetyl-protected galactose. For radiolabeling of the glycopeptide, 4-nitrophenyl-2-[18F]fluoropropionate was used. This prosthetic group allowed synthesis of [18F]Galacto-RGD with a maximum decay-corrected radiochemical yield of up to 85% and radiochemical purity >98%. The overall radiochemical yield was 29 +/- 5% with a total reaction time including final HPLC preparation of 200 +/- 18 min. The metabolic stability of [18F]Galacto-RGD was determined in mouse blood and liver, kidney, and tumor homogenates 2 h after tracer injection. The average fraction of intact tracer in these organs was approximately 87%, 76%, 69%, and 87%, respectively, indicating high in vivo stability of the radiolabeled glycopeptide. The expected radiation dose to humans after injection of [18F]Galacto-RGD has been estimated on the basis of dynamic PET studies with New Zealand white rabbits. According to the residence times in these animals the effective dose was calculated using the MIRDOSE 3.0 program as 2.2 x 10(-2) mGy/MBq. In conclusion, [18F]Galacto-RGD can be synthesized in high radiochemical yields and radiochemical purity. Despite the time-consuming synthesis of the prosthetic group 185 MBq of [18F]Galacto-RGD, a sufficient dose for patient studies, can be produced starting with

  12. Reduction in stray radiation dose using a body-shielding device during external radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuxu; Jiang, Shaohui; Zhang, Quanbin; Lin, Shengqu; Wang, Ruihao; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Guoqian; Lei, Huaiyu; Yu, Hui

    2017-03-01

    With the purpose of reducing stray radiation dose (SRD) in out-of-field region (OFR) during radiotherapy with 6 MV intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), a body-shielding device (BSD) was prepared according to the measurements obtained in experimental testing. In experimental testing, optimal shielding conditions, such as 1 mm lead, 2 mm lead, and 1 mm lead plus 10 mm bolus, were investigated along the medial axis of a phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The SRDs at distances from field edge were then measured and analyzed for a clinical IMRT treatment plan for nasopharyngeal carcinoma before and after shielding using the BSD. In addition, SRDs in anterior, posterior, left and right directions of phantom were investigated with and without shielding, respectively. Also, the SRD at the bottom of treatment couch was measured. SRD decreased exponentially to a constant value with increasing distance from field edge. The shielding rate was 50%-80%; however, there were no significant differences in SRDs when shielded by 1 mm lead, 2 mm lead, or 1 mm lead plus 10 mm bolus (P>0.05). Importantly, the 10 mm bolus absorbed back-scattering radiation due to the interaction between photons and lead. As a result, 1 mm lead plus 10 mm bolus was selected to prepare the BSD. After shielding with BSD, total SRDs in the OFR decreased to almost 50% of those without shielding when irradiated with IMRT beams. Due to the effects of treatment couch and gantry angle, SRDs at distances were not identical in anterior, posterior, left and right direction of phantom without BSD. As higher dose in anterior and lower dose in posterior, SRDs were substantial similarities after shielding. There was no significant difference in SRDs for left and right directions with or without shielding. Interestingly, SRDs in the four directions were similar after shielding. From these results, the BSD developed in this study may significantly reduce SRD in the OFR during

  13. Many-body heat radiation and heat transfer in the presence of a nonabsorbing background medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Boris; Incardone, Roberta; Antezza, Mauro; Emig, Thorsten; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Heat radiation and near-field radiative heat transfer can be strongly manipulated by adjusting geometrical shapes, optical properties, or the relative positions of the objects involved. Typically, these objects are considered as embedded in vacuum. By applying the methods of fluctuational electrodynamics, we derive general closed-form expressions for heat radiation and heat transfer in a system of N arbitrary objects embedded in a passive nonabsorbing background medium. Taking into account the principle of reciprocity, we explicitly prove the symmetry and positivity of transfer in any such system. Regarding applications, we find that the heat radiation of a sphere as well as the heat transfer between two parallel plates is strongly enhanced by the presence of a background medium. Regarding near- and far-field transfer through a gas like air, we show that a microscopic model (based on gas particles) and a macroscopic model (using a dielectric contrast) yield identical results. We also compare the radiative transfer through a medium like air and the energy transfer found from kinetic gas theory.

  14. On the population of primordial star clusters in the presence of UV background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    MacIntyre, M A; Thomas, P A; Intyre, Michael A. Mac; Santoro, Fernando; Thomas, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    We use the algorithm of Cole et al. (2000) to generate merger trees for the first star clusters in a Lambda CDM cosmology under an isotropic UV background radiation field, parametrized by J_21. We have investigated the problem in two ways: a global radiation background and local radiative feedback surrounding the first star clusters. Cooling in the first halos at high redshift is dominated by molecular hydrogen, H_2 - we call these Generation 1 objects. At lower redshift and higher virial temperature, T_vir > 10^4K, electron cooling dominates - we call these generation 2. Radiation fields act to photo-dissociate H_2, but also generate free electrons that can help to catalyse its production. At modest radiation levels, J_{21}/(1+z)^3 ~ 10^{-12}-10^{-7}, the nett effect is to enhance the formation of Generation 1 star-clusters. At higher fluxes the heating from photo-ionisation dominates and halts their production. With a realistic build-up of flux over time, the period of enhanced H_2 cooling is so fleeting as...

  15. Effect of High Dose Natural Ionizing Radiation on the Immune System of the Exposed Residents of Ramsar Town, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoud Attar

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Iran is one of several countries that has regions of high dose natural ionizing radiation. Two wellknownvillages in the suburb of Ramsar Town in the Caspian Sea strip, Taleshmahaleh and Chaparsar,have background radiation that is 13 times higher than normal. This radiation is the result of Radium 226 and Radon gas both of which are highly water soluble.While people living in these regions do not suffer from any major health problems, we decided tostudy the their immune responses to infection and inflammation in order to determine if their habitat affects their immune defense mechanisms as a way of compensating for their exposure to high dose environmental ionizing radiation.Our results showed that the total serum antioxidant level in the exposed people was significantlylower than the individuals not exposed to high dose natural ionizing radiation. The exposedindividuals also had higher lymphocyte-induced IL-4 and IL-10 production, and lower IL-2 and IFN-γ production. In addition, neutrophil NBT, phagocytosis, and locomotion were higher in the exposed group. In contrast, lymphocyte proliferation in response to PHA was unaffected.We conclude that the immune system of individuals exposed to high dose ionizing radiation hasadapted to its environment by shifting from a Type 1 to a Type 2 response to promote antiinflammation.This may be because inflammatory Type 1 responses generate more free radicals thanType 2 responses, in addition to the free radicals generated as a result of high environmental radiation.Thus, the serum total antioxidant level in the exposed residents was lower than the unexposed group.

  16. Does vertebroplasty affect radiation dose distribution?: comparison of spatial dose distributions in a cement-injected vertebra as calculated by treatment planning system and actual spatial dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Yagi, Rie; Nakatani, Miyuki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sano, Akira; Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Harima, Yoko; Sawada, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution.

  17. [Formation of optimum dose fields in contact radiation therapy of malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, L Ia

    2003-01-01

    The definition of the homogeneity of a dose field in the contact radiation therapy for malignant tumors is introduced. The mathematical interpretation of problems in the formation of optimum dose fields, to which the maximum homogeneity of a dose field at the site of lesion corresponds, is presented. It is shown that the problems in the formation of optimum dose fields may be divided into two subsets in relation to whether the sources of radiation are located at the site of lesion or adjacent to the latter (application techniques of radiation). An analytical method for solving a problem in the formation of an optimal dose field in the ring circle by means of one ring source of radiation (the first type of problems). The investigation was conducted with the support of the Russian Fund of Fundamental Investigations (RFFI 01-01-00137).

  18. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  19. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  20. Dose painting to treat single-lobe prostate cancer with hypofractionated high-dose radiation using targeted external beam radiation: Is it feasible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya; Westerly, David C.; Waxweiler, Timothy V.; Ryan, Nicole; Raben, David, E-mail: david.raben@ucdenver.edu

    2015-10-01

    Targeted focal therapy strategies for treating single-lobe prostate cancer are under investigation. In this planning study, we investigate the feasibility of treating a portion of the prostate to full-dose external beam radiation with reduced dose to the opposite lobe, compared with full-dose radiation delivered to the entire gland using hypofractionated radiation. For 10 consecutive patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer, 2 hypofractionated, single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were designed. The first plan (standard hypofractionation regimen [STD]) included the entire prostate gland, treated to 70 Gy delivered in 28 fractions. The second dose painting plan (DP) encompassed the involved lobe treated to 70 Gy delivered in 28 fractions, whereas the opposing, uninvolved lobe received 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Mean dose to the opposing neurovascular bundle (NVB) was considerably lower for DP vs STD, with a mean dose of 53.9 vs 72.3 Gy (p < 0.001). Mean penile bulb dose was 18.6 Gy for DP vs 19.2 Gy for STD (p = 0.880). Mean rectal dose was 21.0 Gy for DP vs 22.8 Gy for STD (p = 0.356). Rectum V{sub 70} (the volume receiving ≥70 Gy) was 2.01% for DP vs 2.74% for STD (p = 0.328). Bladder V{sub 70} was 1.69% for DP vs 2.78% for STD (p = 0.232). Planning target volume (PTV) maximum dose points were 76.5 and 76.3 Gy for DP and STD, respectively (p = 0.760). This study demonstrates the feasibility of using VMAT for partial-lobe prostate radiation in patients with prostate cancer involving 1 lobe. Partial-lobe prostate plans appeared to spare adjacent critical structures including the opposite NVB.

  1. Probing the Light Speed Anisotropy with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A L; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the angular fluctuations in the speed of light with respect to the apex of the dipole of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation using the experimental data obtained with GRAAL facility, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The measurements were based on the stability of the Compton edge of laser photons scattered on the 6 GeV monochromatic electron beam. The results enable to obtain a conservative constraint on the anisotropy in the light speed variations \\Delta c(\\theta)/c < 3 10^{-12}, i.e. with higher precision than from previous experiments.

  2. Rydberg atom detection of the temporal coherence of cosmic microwave background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tscherbul, Timur V

    2013-01-01

    Rydberg atoms immersed in cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherence effects on timescales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix, and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence intensities of the Rydberg atoms. A measurable fluorescence signal can be obtained with a cold trapped ensemble of 1e8 Rydberg atoms subject to 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB), allowing for novel insights into previously unexamined quantum coherence properties of CMB.

  3. The assessment of cytotoxic T cell and natural killer cells activity in residents of high and ordinary background radiation areas of Ramsar-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Borzoueisileh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective radiation dose of human from natural sources is about 2.4 mSv/y and the dose limit for radiation workers is 20 mSv/y. Ramsar, a city in Iran, has been the subject of concern in the last forty years for a high level of radiation measured in some spots as high as 260 mSv/y. Carcinogenesis is one of the most studied effects of radiation especially in high doses. Recent studies showed that the high level of natural radiation received by inhabitants of this area, paradoxically don′t have significant health effect. Natural killer (NK cells and cytotoxic T cells are the most important cells in tumor immune surveillance and CD107a is a widely expressed intracellular protein located in the lysosomal/endosomal membrane. CD107a transiently located on the cell membrane can be used as a marker of CD8 + T cell degranulation following stimulation. It is also expressed, to a lower extent, on activated NK cells. In this study, 60 healthy people were selected randomly and their consent obtained and confounding factors such as sex, age, life-styles was matched then the count of activated NK and CD8 + cells was compared in high and normal background radiation areas inhabitants of Ramsar. After filling the questionnaire and measurement of background radiation, blood samples of 30 healthy people from each region were analyzed immediately by means of flowcytometry. The leukocytes and their subsets were not significantly different between two groups and the count of active cells was higher in control group. The result shows that the changes in immune system occur due to radiation and maybe it is as a result of higher radiosensitivity of activated cells.

  4. Final Technical Report for the grant entitled "Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William, F., Ph.D., D.Sc.

    2006-11-22

    The goal of this proposal was to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS1) gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. The rationale for this is that patients with NBS are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage and haploinsufficiency at this genetic locus provides the potential for genetic susceptibility to low doses of ionizing radiation. Wild type and heterozygous NBS1 mice were irradiated and followed over their lifetime for radiation induced genomic instability, carcinogenesis and non-specific life shortening. No differences in cytogenetic damage, cancer induction or life span were observed between the hypomorphic mice indicating that genetic imbalance at the NBS1 loci does not modulate low dose radiation sensitivity.

  5. Prospects of detecting gravitational background radiation by Doppler tracking interplanetary spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertotti, B.; Carr, B.J.

    1980-03-15

    We examine the theoretical and experimental prospects of detecting a low-frequency, continuous, stochastic background of gravitational waves by Doppler tracking interplanetary spacecraft. From a theoretical standpoint, such a background may have been generated by various postgalactic processes or by pregalactic black hole formation; there could also exist a primordial background which goes back to the beginning of the universe. We review the characteristic frequency and density ranges which one might anticipate for these backgrounds. From an experimental standpoint, one's ability to detect a background is limited by the finite length of the record available and by an imperfect knowledge of the spectrum of various sources of noise. The fundamental contribution to the noise comes from the clock which regulates the frequency of the tracking waves. If one uses a hydrogen maser clock, this noise becomes progressively less important with decreasing frequency: one might hope to detect a critical density of background radiation at frequencies below 10/sup -2/ Hz and a background with 10/sup -4/ times the critical density at frequencies below 10/sup -5/ Hz. It is encouraging that some of the sorts of background which we anticipate from theoretical considerations fall within the observable regime. We discuss the extent to which other sources of noise may exceed the clock noise and the degree to which they can be eliminated.

  6. Accredited dose measurements for validation of radiation sterilized products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1993-01-01

    The activities and services of the accredited Risø High Dose Reference Laboratory are described. The laboratory operates according to the European standard EN 45001 regarding Operation of Testing Laboratories, and it fulfills the requirements of being able to deliver traceable dose measurements f...... of the dosimetric parameters of an irradiation facility. 5. 5. Measurement of absorbed dose distribution in irradiated products. The paper describes these services and the procedures necessary for their execution....

  7. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  8. Quantum Larmor radiation from a moving charge in an electromagnetic plane wave background

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Gen; 10.1142/S0217751X12501424

    2012-01-01

    We extend our previous work [Phys. Rev. D83 045030 (2011)], which investigated the first-order quantum effect in the Larmor radiation from a moving charge in a spatially homogeneous time-dependent electric field. Specifically, we investigate the quantum Larmor radiation from a moving charge in a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave background based on the scalar quantum electrodynamics at the lowest order of the perturbation theory. Using the in-in formalism, we derive the theoretical formula of the total radiation energy from a charged particle in the initial states being at rest and being in a relativistic motion. Expanding the theoretical formula in terms of the Planck constant \\hbar, we obtain the first-order quantum effect on the Larmor radiation. The quantum effect generally suppresses the total radiation energy compared with the prediction of the classical Larmor formula, which is a contrast to the previous work. The reason is explained by the fact that the radiation from a moving charge in a monoc...

  9. Spontaneous and radiation-induced micronucleus frequencies in low dose radiation exposed worker's peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hee Kyung; Lee, Hye Jin; Park, Mi Young; Park, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hwan [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Ki Sup; Lee, Su Jae; Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Choi, Soo Yong; Kang, Chang Mo [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Many studies have been performed to assess the development and application of potentially useful biodosimetry. At present, although chromosome dicentric assay is a sensitive method for dose estimation, it is laborious and requires enough experience for estimation, and without automation its scope for population screening is limited. Therefore, we need an alternative cytogenetic dosimetry to estimate the absorbed dose of victims after low dose exposure such as radiation accidents in hospital workers and workers of radiation related facilities. An alternative and simple cytogenetic technique is the measurement of the micronucleus frequency in cultured human lymphocytes. The reliability of conventional micronucleus (MN) assays is diminished owing to the inclusion of nondividing cells in the estimate, but this problem has been overcome by the development of the cytokinesisblocked (CB) MN assay. The reliable and ease assays of the cytokinesis blocked-approach are obvious advantages in biological monitoring, but there are no developed recognizable and reliable techniques for biological dosimetry of a low dose exposure until recently. Adaptive response is important in determining the biological responses at low doses of radiation and has the potential to impact the shape of the dose-response relationship. We analyzed the frequency of both spontaneous and in vitro {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays-induced MNs to estimate the low dose radiation-exposed workers as a screening test.

  10. Supplementary comparison CCRI(I)-S2 of standards for absorbed dose to water in {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at radiation processing dose levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, D.T.; Allisy-Roberts, P.J. [Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, Pavillon de Breteuil, F-92312 Sevres cedex (France); Desrosiers, M.F. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Sharpe, P.H.G. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Pimpinella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, Rome (Italy); Lourenco, V. [CEA Saclay, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Zhang, Y.L. [National Institute of Metrology, Beijing (China); Miller, A. [Riso High Dose reference Laboratory, Riso DTU, Roskilde (Denmark); Generalova, V. [Institute for Physical-Technical and Radiotechnical Measurements, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sochor, V. [Czech Metrology Institute, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Eight national standards for absorbed dose to water in {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at the dose levels used in radiation processing have been compared over the range from 1 kGy to 30 kGy using the alanine dosimeters of the NIST and the NPL as the transfer dosimeters. The comparison was organized by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, who also participated at the lowest dose level using their radiotherapy-level standard for the same quantity. The national standards are in general agreement within the standard uncertainties, which are in the range from 1 to 2 parts in 10{sup 2}. Evidence of a dose rate effect is presented and discussed briefly. (authors)

  11. Development of MAAP5.0.3 Dose Model for Radiation Environment Effect Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mi Ro [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The equipment survivability assessment under the severe accident conditions should be performed. For the environmental conditions such as the pressure and temperature, they can be calculated using MAAP (Modular Accident Analysis Program) code. However, since MAAP itself cannot calculate the radiation DOSE, MAAP5 DOSE model should be developed in order to calculate the DOSE rate during the severe accidents. In this study, we developed the MAAP5 DOSE model for spent fuel pool of OPR1000 type NPP and calculated the DOSE to assess the survivability of the facilities in spent fuel pool and fuel handling region. Until now, there are so many uncertainties in the analysis for radiation effect during the severe accident. However, in terms of the establishment of the severe accident management strategy, quantitative analysis in order to find the general trend for radiation increase during the severe accident is useful. For the radiation environmental effect analysis, the previous studies are mainly focused inside the containment. However, after the Fukushima accident, the severe accident phenomena in the SFP have been the great issues in the nuclear industry including Korea. So, in this study, the dose rate for spent fuel building when the severe accident happens in the SFP is calculated using MAAP5 DOSE. As expected, the dose rate is increased right after the spent fuel is partially uncovered. However, the amount of dose is less significant since the rate of temperature increase is much faster than the rate of dose increase.

  12. Probing reionization with the cross power spectrum of 21 cm and near-infrared radiation backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Xiao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The cross-correlation between the 21 cm emission from the high-redshift intergalactic medium and the near-infrared (NIR) background light from the high-redshift galaxies promises to be a powerful probe of cosmic reionization. In this paper, we investigate the cross power spectrum during the epoch of reionization. We employ an improved halo approach to derive the distribution of the density field and consider two stellar populations in the star formation model: metal-free stars and metal-poor stars. The reionization history is further generated to be consistent with the electron-scattering optical depth from cosmic microwave background measurements. Then the intensity of NIR background is estimated by collecting emission from stars in the first-light galaxies. On large scales, we find the 21 cm and NIR radiation backgrounds are positively correlated during the very early stages of reionization. However, these two radiation backgrounds quickly become anti-correlated as reionization proceeds. The maximum absolut...

  13. Fluctuations in the High-Redshift Lyman-Werner and Lyman-alpha Radiation Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Holzbauer, Lauren N

    2011-01-01

    We use a new method to model fluctuations of the Lyman-Werner (LW) and Lyman-alpha radiation backgrounds at high redshift. At these early epochs the backgrounds are symptoms of a universe newly lit with its first stars. LW photons (11.5-13.6 eV) are of particular interest because they dissociate molecular hydrogen, the primary coolant in the first minihalos. By using a variation of the halo model, we efficiently generate power spectra for any choice of radiation background. We find that the LW power spectrum typically traces the matter power spectrum at large scales but turns over at the scale corresponding to the effective `horizon' of LW photons (~100 comoving Mpc), unless the sources are extremely rare. The series of horizons that characterize the Lyman-alpha flux profile shape the fluctuations of that background in a similar fashion, though those imprints are washed out once one considers fluctuations in the brightness temperature of the 21-cm signal. The Lyman-alpha background strongly affects the redshi...

  14. Evidence That Lifelong Low Dose Rates of Ionizing Radiation Increase Lifespan in Long- and Short-Lived Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Jerry M; Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Socol, Yehoshua

    2017-01-01

    After the 1956 radiation scare to stop weapons testing, studies focused on cancer induction by low-level radiation. Concern has shifted to protecting "radiation-sensitive individuals." Since longevity is a measure of health impact, this analysis reexamined data to compare the effect of dose rate on the lifespans of short-lived (5% and 10% mortality) dogs and on the lifespans of dogs at 50% mortality. The data came from 2 large-scale studies. One exposed 10 groups to different γ dose rates; the other exposed 8 groups to different lung burdens of plutonium. Reexamination indicated that normalized lifespans increased more for short-lived dogs than for average dogs, when radiation was moderately above background. This was apparent by interpolating between the lifespans of nonirradiated dogs and exposed dogs. The optimum lifespan increase appeared at 50 mGy/y. The threshold for harm (decreased lifespan) was 700 mGy/y for 50% mortality dogs and 1100 mGy/y for short-lived dogs. For inhaled α-emitting particulates, longevity was remarkably increased for short-lived dogs below the threshold for harm. Short-lived dogs seem more radiosensitive than average dogs and they benefit more from low radiation. If dogs model humans, this evidence would support a change to radiation protection policy. Maintaining exposures "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) appears questionable.

  15. Evidence That Lifelong Low Dose Rates of Ionizing Radiation Increase Lifespan in Long- and Short-Lived Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E.; Socol, Yehoshua

    2017-01-01

    After the 1956 radiation scare to stop weapons testing, studies focused on cancer induction by low-level radiation. Concern has shifted to protecting “radiation-sensitive individuals.” Since longevity is a measure of health impact, this analysis reexamined data to compare the effect of dose rate on the lifespans of short-lived (5% and 10% mortality) dogs and on the lifespans of dogs at 50% mortality. The data came from 2 large-scale studies. One exposed 10 groups to different γ dose rates; the other exposed 8 groups to different lung burdens of plutonium. Reexamination indicated that normalized lifespans increased more for short-lived dogs than for average dogs, when radiation was moderately above background. This was apparent by interpolating between the lifespans of nonirradiated dogs and exposed dogs. The optimum lifespan increase appeared at 50 mGy/y. The threshold for harm (decreased lifespan) was 700 mGy/y for 50% mortality dogs and 1100 mGy/y for short-lived dogs. For inhaled α-emitting particulates, longevity was remarkably increased for short-lived dogs below the threshold for harm. Short-lived dogs seem more radiosensitive than average dogs and they benefit more from low radiation. If dogs model humans, this evidence would support a change to radiation protection policy. Maintaining exposures “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) appears questionable.

  16. Radiation Leukemogenesis: Applying Basic Science of Epidemiological Estimates of Low Dose Risks and Dose-Rate Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoel, D. G.

    1998-11-01

    The next stage of work has been to examine more closely the A-bomb leukemia data which provides the underpinnings of the risk estimation of CML in the above mentioned manuscript. The paper by Hoel and Li (Health Physics 75:241-50) shows how the linear-quadratic model has basic non-linearities at the low dose region for the leukemias including CML. Pierce et. al., (Radiation Research 123:275-84) have developed distributions for the uncertainty in the estimated exposures of the A-bomb cohort. Kellerer, et. al., (Radiation and Environmental Biophysics 36:73-83) has further considered possible errors in the estimated neutron values and with changing RBE values with dose and has hypothesized that the tumor response due to gamma may not be linear. We have incorporated his neutron model and have constricted new A-bomb doses based on his model adjustments. The Hoel and Li dose response analysis has also been applied using the Kellerer neutron dose adjustments for the leukemias. Finally, both Pierce's dose uncertainties and Kellerer neutron adjustments are combined as well as the varying RBE with dose as suggested by Rossi and Zaider and used for leukemia dose-response analysis. First the results of Hoel and Li showing a significantly improved fit of the linear-quadratic dose response by the inclusion of a threshold (i.e. low-dose nonlinearity) persisted. This work has been complete for both solid tumor as well as leukemia for both mortality as well as incidence data. The results are given in the manuscript described below which has been submitted to Health Physics.

  17. Supplementary comparison CCRI(I)-S2 of standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co gamma radiation at radiation processing dose levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, D. T.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Desrosiers, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    rate effect is presented and discussed briefly. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication......Eight national standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co gamma radiation at the dose levels used in radiation processing have been compared over the range from 1 kGy to 30 kGy using the alanine dosimeters of the NIST and the NPL as the transfer dosimeters. The comparison was organized...

  18. GATA3 is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to low-dose ionizing radiation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, F.; Molina, M.; Berthier-Vergnes, O.; Lamartine, J. [Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Universite Lyon 1, Lyon, F-69003 (France); CNRS, UMR5534, Centre de Genetique Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Villeurbanne, F-69622 (France); Malet, C.; Ginestet, C. [Centre Leon Berard, Service de Radiotherapie, Lyon F-69008 (France); Martin, M.T. [Laboratoire de Genomique et Radiobiologie de la Keratinopoiese, CEA, IRCM, Evry F-91000 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Background: The general population is constantly exposed to low levels of radiation through natural, occupational or medical irradiation. Even if the biological effects of low-level radiation have been intensely debated and investigated, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to low doses remain largely unknown. Results: The present study investigated the role of GATA3 protein in the control of the cellular and molecular response of human keratinocytes exposed to a 1 cGy dose of X-rays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GATA3 to be able to bind the promoter of 4 genes responding to a 1 cGy exposure. To go further into the role of GATA3 after ionizing radiation exposure, we studied the cellular and molecular consequences of radiation in GATA3 knock-down cells. Knockdown was obtained by lentiviral-mediated expression of an shRNA targeting the GATA3 transcript in differentiated keratinocytes. First, radiosensitivity was assessed: the toxicity, in terms of immediate survival (with XTT test), associated with 1 cGy radiation was found to be increased in GATA3 knock-down cells. The impact of GATA3 knock-down on the transcriptome of X-ray irradiated cells was also investigated, using oligonucleotide micro-arrays to assess changes between 3 h and 72 h post-irradiation in normal vs GATA3 knock-down backgrounds; transcriptome response was found to be completely altered in GATA3 knock-down cells, with a strong induction/repression peak 48 h after irradiation. Functional annotation revealed enrichment in genes known to be involved in chaperone activity, TGF{beta} signalling and stress response. Conclusion: Taken together, these data indicate that GATA3 is an important regulator of the cellular and molecular response of epidermal cells to very low doses of radiation. (authors)

  19. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.; Warren, G. A.; Runkle, R. C.

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  20. A Shallow Underground Laboratory for Low-Background Radiation Measurements and Materials Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Day, Anthony R.; Erikson, Luke E.; Fast, James E.; Forrester, Joel B.; Fuller, Erin S.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Merriman, Jason H.; Myers, Allan W.; Overman, Cory T.; Overman, Nicole R.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Runkle, Robert C.

    2012-11-08

    Abstract: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths worldwide houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This manuscript describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  1. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Cantaloub, M. G.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J.; Forrester, J. B.; Fuller, E. S.; Glasgow, B. D.; Greenwood, L. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Keillor, M. E.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, C. T.; Overman, N. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); and others

    2012-11-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  2. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalseth, C E; Bonicalzi, R M; Cantaloub, M G; Day, A R; Erikson, L E; Fast, J; Forrester, J B; Fuller, E S; Glasgow, B D; Greenwood, L R; Hoppe, E W; Hossbach, T W; Hyronimus, B J; Keillor, M E; Mace, E K; McIntyre, J I; Merriman, J H; Myers, A W; Overman, C T; Overman, N R; Panisko, M E; Seifert, A; Warren, G A; Runkle, R C

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  3. Total dose radiation effects on SOI NMOS transistors with different layouts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Hao; ZHANG Zheng-Xuan; HE Wei; YU Wen-Jie; WANG Ru; CHEN Ming

    2008-01-01

    Partially-depleted Silicon-On-Insulator Negative Channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor (SOI NMOS)transistors with different layouts are fabricated on radiation hard Separation by IMplanted OXygen (SIMOX)substrate and tested using 10 keV X-ray radiation sources.The radiation performance is characterized by transistor threshold voltage shift and transistor leakage currents as a function of the total dose up to 2.0×106 rad(Si).The results show that the total dose radiation effects on NMOS devices are very sensitive to their layout structures.

  4. Radiation dose-volume effects in the lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marks, Lawrence B; Bentzen, Soren M; Deasy, Joseph O;

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects....

  5. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an effect apparently overlooked as yet. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this pol...

  6. On the Light Speed Anisotropy vs Cosmic Microwave Background Dipole: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Guidal, M; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kouznetsov, V; Kunne, Ronald Alexander; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of the Compton edge of the scattered electrons in GRAAL facility in European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole reveals up to 10 sigma variations larger than the statistical errors. We now show that the variations are not due to the frequency variations of the accelerator. The nature of Compton edge variations remains unclear, thus outlining the imperative of dedicated studies of light speed anisotropy.

  7. Health risks associated with low dose diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The health risks to humans associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation have been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses, dose rates, and mixed radiation qualities using a linear no threshold model. Based on this approach, it has been argued that human exposure to low doses of diagnostics X-rays and gamma-rays increase an individual's risk of developing cancer throughout their life-time. Also, repeated medical diagnostic procedures involving low dose exposures will have an additive effect and consequently further increase health risk. The specific aim of this seminar will be to address the relative risk associated with diagnostic X-rays from CT scans and gamma-rays from positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Objectives of the talk will include: 1) Defining low dose exposures at a cellular level and relate that to diagnostic or therapeutic exposures, 2) Describing modern tools in molecular cytogenetics to estimate radiation exposure and assess radiation risk, 3) Identifying the different cellular mechanisms that influence radiation risk at high and low dose exposures and relate that to individual radiation risk. (author)

  8. Radiation dose in computed tomography of the pelvis: comparison of helical and axial scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, A G; Budd, R S; McKenzie, A F

    1997-11-01

    An anthropomorphic Rando phantom was used to compare radiation doses sustained during helical and conventional axial CT of the pelvis. The values obtained with the Rando phantom were validated against cadaveric phantoms, and show good agreement. For the authors' particular CT unit, helical scanning was found to deliver a lower radiation dose than conventional axial scanning. This was most prominent at 1.0-s tube rotation times (average dose ratio 1.24). For realistic scanning parameters and exposure factors, the ratio of radiation dose to pelvic organs can be expected to lie in the range of 40-100 mGy. The whole-body effective dose (ED) depends on selection of scanning parameters and patients anatomy. In a favourable case scenario, the ED for CT scanning of the pelvis in a male can be expected to be between 10 and 20 mSv if the scrotum is not included in the radiation field, while the ED in a female will be approximately 20 mSv. An examination of scatter radiation fall-off curves from a single slice shows that the spread of scatter radiation is only marginally affected by slice thickness. A total of 10-12 cm of human soft tissue acts as a good barrier against internal scattered radiation. The use of such scatter fall-off curves, together with manufacturers' dosimetry specifications, allows a fast estimate of absorbed dose.

  9. Total ionizing dose radiation effects on NMOS parasitic transistors in advanced bulk CMOS technology devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoping, He; Zujun, Wang; Jiangkun, Sheng; Shaoyan, Huang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, total ionizing dose effect of NMOS transistors in advanced CMOS technology are examined. The radiation tests are performed at 60Co sources at the dose rate of 50 rad (Si)/s. The investigation's results show that the radiation-induced charge buildup in the gate oxide can be ignored, and the field oxide isolation structure is the main total dose problem. The total ionizing dose (TID) radiation effects of field oxide parasitic transistors are studied in detail. An analytical model of radiation defect charge induced by TID damage in field oxide is established. The I - V characteristics of the NMOS parasitic transistors at different doses are modeled by using a surface potential method. The modeling method is verified by the experimental I - V characteristics of 180 nm commercial NMOS device induced by TID radiation at different doses. The model results are in good agreement with the radiation experimental results, which shows the analytical model can accurately predict the radiation response characteristics of advanced bulk CMOS technology device. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11305126).

  10. Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} (1 rad d{sup -1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). The literature identifies the developing eggs and young of some species of teleost fish as the most radiosensitive organisms. DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0.1 mGy h{sup -1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic

  11. Radiation doses to paediatric patients and comforters undergoing chest X rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, A; Vlychou, M; Tsougos, I; Theodorou, K

    2011-09-01

    Pneumonia is an important cause of hospital admission among children in the developed world and it is estimated to be responsible for 3-18 % of all paediatric admissions. Chest X ray is an important examination for pneumonia diagnosis and for evaluation of complications. This study aims to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD), organ, effective doses and propose a local diagnostic reference level. The study was carried out at the university hospital of Larissa, Greece. Patients were divided into three groups: organ and effective doses were estimated using National Radiological Protection Board software. The ESD was determined by thermoluminescent dosemeters for 132 children and 76 comforters. The average ESD value was 55 ± 8 µGy. The effective dose for patients was 11.2 ± 5 µSv. The mean radiation dose for comforter is 22 ± 3 µGy. The radiation dose to the patients is well within dose constraint, in the light of the current practice.

  12. Radiation Backgrounds at Cosmic Dawn: X-Rays from Compact Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Madau, Piero

    2016-01-01

    We compute the expected X-ray diffuse background and radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium (IGM) from X-ray binaries prior and during the epoch of reionization. The cosmic evolution of compact binaries is followed using a population synthesis technique that treats separately neutron stars and black hole binaries in different spectral states and is calibrated to reproduce the observed X-ray properties of galaxies at z6. Radiative transfer effects modulate the background spectrum, which shows a characteristic peak between 1 and 2 keV. While the filtering of X-ray radiation through the IGM slightly increases the mean excess energy per photoionization, it also weakens the radiation intensity below 1 keV, lowering the mean photoionization and heating rates. Numerical integration of the rate and energy equations shows that the contribution of X-ray binaries to the ionization of the bulk IGM is negligible, with the electron fraction never exceeding 1%. Direct HeI photoionizations are the main source of IGM ...

  13. Inhalation exposures due to radon and thoron ((222)Rn and (220)Rn): Do they differ in high and normal background radiation areas in India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rosaline; Sapra, B K; Prajith, R; Rout, R P; Jalaluddin, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-09-01

    In India, High Background Radiation Areas (HBRAs) due to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil (thorium and, to a lesser extent, uranium), are located along some parts of the coastal tracts viz. the coastal belt of Kerala, Tamilnadu and Odisha. It is conjectured that these deposits will result in higher emissions of radon isotopes ((222)Rn and (220)Rn) and their daughter products as compared to Normal Background Radiation Areas (NBRAs). While the annual external dose rates contributed by gamma radiations in these areas are about 5-10 times higher, the extent of increase in the inhalation dose rates attributable to (222)Rn and (220)Rn and their decay products is not well quantified. Towards this, systematic indoor surveys were conducted wherein simultaneous measurements of time integrated (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay product concentrations was carried out in around 800 houses in the HBRAs of Kerala and Odisha to estimate the inhalation doses. All gas measurements were carried out using pin-hole cup dosimeters while the progeny measurements were with samplers and systems based on the Direct radon/thoron Progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). To corroborate these passive measurements of decay products concentrations, active sampling was also carried out in a few houses. The results of the surveys provide a strong evidence to conclude that the inhalation doses due to (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay products in these HBRAs are in the same range as observed in the NBRAs in India.

  14. Growth retardation of Paramecium and mouse cells by shielding them from background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Masanobu; Okuyama, Katsuyuki; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Matsuda, Yatsuka; Taniguchi, Ryoichi; Shiomi, Nobuyuki; Yonezawa, Morio; Yagi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s, Planel et al. reported that the growth of paramecia was decreased by shielding them from background radiation. In the 1990s, Takizawa et al. found that mouse cells displayed a decreased growth rate under shielded conditions. The purpose of the present study was to confirm that growth is impaired in organisms that have been shielded from background radiation. Radioprotection was produced with a shielding chamber surrounded by a 15 cm thick iron wall and a 10 cm thick paraffin wall that reduced the γ ray and neutron levels in the chamber to 2% and 25% of the background levels, respectively. Although the growth of Paramecium tetraurelia was not impaired by short-term radioprotection (around 10 days), which disagreed with the findings of Planel et al., decreased growth was observed after long-term (40-50 days) radiation shielding. When mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells were incubated inside or outside of the shielding chamber for 7 days, the number of cells present on the 6th and 7th days under the shielding conditions was significantly lower than that present under the non-shielding conditions. These inhibitory effects on cell growth were abrogated by the addition of a ¹³⁷Cs γ-ray source disk to the chamber. Furthermore, no growth retardation was observed in XRCC4-deficient mouse M10 cells, which display impaired DNA double strand break repair.

  15. A Survey of Pediatric CT Protocols and Radiation Doses in South Korean Hospitals to Optimize the Radiation Dose for Pediatric CT Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Yang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Ah; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jin Seong; Koo, Hyun Jung

    2015-12-01

    Children are at greater risk of radiation exposure than adults because the rapidly dividing cells of children tend to be more radiosensitive and they have a longer expected life time in which to develop potential radiation injury. Some studies have surveyed computed tomography (CT) radiation doses and several studies have established diagnostic reference levels according to patient age or body size; however, no survey of CT radiation doses with a large number of patients has yet been carried out in South Korea. The aim of the present study was to investigate the radiation dose in pediatric CT examinations performed throughout South Korea. From 512 CT (222 brain CT, 105 chest CT, and 185 abdominopelvic CT) scans that were referred to our tertiary hospital, a dose report sheet was available for retrospective analysis of CT scan protocols and dose, including the volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose, and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). At 55.2%, multiphase CT was the most frequently performed protocol for abdominopelvic CT. Tube current modulation was applied most often in abdominopelvic CT and chest CT, accounting for 70.1% and 62.7%, respectively. Regarding the CT dose, the interquartile ranges of the CTDIvol were 11.1 to 22.5 (newborns), 16.6 to 39.1 (≤1 year), 14.6 to 41.7 (2-5 years), 23.5 to 44.1 (6-10 years), and 31.4 to 55.3 (≤15 years) for brain CT; 1.3 to 5.7 (≤1 year), 3.9 to 6.8 (2-5 years), 3.9 to 9.3 (6-10 years), and 7.7 to 13.8 (≤15 years) for chest CT; and 4.0 to 7.5 (≤1 year), 4.2 to 8.9 (2-5 years), 5.7 to 12.4 (6-10 years), and 7.6 to 16.6 (≤15 years) for abdominopelvic CT. The SSDE and CTDIvol were well correlated for patients CT in South Korea. The CTDIvol, DLP, and effective dose were generally lower than in German and UK surveys, except in certain age groups.

  16. Radiation dose is associated with prognosis of small cell lung cancer with superior vena cava syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Bo; Ning, Fang-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Le; Cheng, Yu-Feng; Dong, Xin-Jun; Liu, Chang-Min; Chen, Shao-Shui

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 10% of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cases develop superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). Many SCLC patients with SVCS have relatively limited disease, requiring curative rather than palliative treatment. Besides chemotherapy, radiotherapy is important for treating SCLC with SVCS. We retrospectively evaluated the influence of radiotherapy dose on the prognosis of 57 patients with SCLC with SVCS treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The mean biological equivalent radiation dose was 71.5 Gy. We administered etoposide/cisplatin as sequential and concurrent chemotherapy. All patients received at least one cycle of concurrent chemotherapy. All patients had partial or complete response; SVCS-associated symptoms were reduced in 87.7% (50/57) of patients within 3-10 days after treatment. Radiation dose did not affect 2-year local control (74.2% vs. 80.8%). Patients who received high-dose radiation had a lower 2-year overall survival rate than those who received low-dose radiation (11.6 vs. 33%; P = 0.024). The high dose group median survival was 15.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.2-19.0) compared with 18.7 months (95% CI: 13.9-23.6) in the low dose group. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 22/26 high dose patients (84.6%) and 21/31 low dose patients (67.7%). In the high dose group, 30.8% of patients had grade 3/4 esophagitis compared with 19.4% of low dose patients. Only 29.0% of low dose patients received < 4 cycles of chemotherapy in the first 12 weeks after treatment began compared with 46.2% of high dose patients. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is a tolerable modality for treating stage IIIA/IIIB SCLC with SVCS. Moderate-dose radiotherapy is preferable. PMID:26064339

  17. Animal Studies of Residual Hematopoietic and Immune System Injury from Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Radiation and Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    exposed to background over, LDR radiation causes activation of the DNA repair amounts of electromagnetic (e.g., ionizing) radiation as system, thus...decrease in the subpopulations of rhythm, which formed the basic wave of proliferation, but granulocytes or on a regular increase in the subpopulations also...fission products as other common genotoxic factors present in the environ- ment (e.g., cancerogenic chemicals, toxic metal ions). " Nuclear fuel operators

  18. COMPARISON OF THE PERIPHERAL DOSES FROM DIFFERENT IMRT TECHNIQUES FOR PEDIATRIC HEAD AND NECK RADIATION THERAPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Masahiko; Saigo, Yasumasa; Higuchi, Kenta; Fujimura, Takuya; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi; Akiba, Suminori

    2017-02-25

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver high and homogeneous doses to the target area while limiting doses to organs at risk. We used a pediatric phantom to simulate the treatment of a head and neck tumor in a child. The peripheral doses were examined for three different IMRT techniques [dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC), segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)]. Peripheral doses were evaluated taking thyroid, breast, ovary and testis as the points of interest. Doses were determined using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter, and the COMPASS system was used for three-dimensional dose evaluation. VMAT achieved the lowest peripheral doses because it had the highest monitor unit efficiency. However, doses in the vicinity of the irradiated field, i.e. the thyroid, could be relatively high, depending on the VMAT collimator angle. DMLC and SMLC had a large area of relatively high peripheral doses in the breast region.

  19. [Radiation dose reduction using a non-linear image filter in MDCT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Junya; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Imai, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Yotaro; Kato, Kyoichi; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2010-05-20

    The development of MDCT enabled various high-quality 3D imaging and optimized scan timing with contrast injection in a multi-phase dynamic study. Since radiation dose tends to increase to yield such high-quality images, we have to make an effort to reduce radiation dose. A non-linear image filter (Neuro 3D filter: N3D filter) has been developed in order to improve image noise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical performance and effectiveness of this non-linear image filter using phantoms, and show how we can reduce radiation dose in clinical use of this filter. This N3D filter reduced radiation dose by about 50%, with minimum deterioration of spatial reduction in phantom and clinical studies. This filter shows great potential for clinical application.

  20. Toxicity bioassay in mice exposed to low dose-rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joog Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwang Mo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportion to the dose amount and rate. The association between accumulated radiation dose and adverse effects, which is derived according to continuous low dose-rate radiation exposure, is not clearly elucidated. Our previous study showed that low dose-rate radiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in BALB/c mice at dose levels of ≤2 Gy, but the testis weight decreased at a dose of 2 Gy. In this study, we studied the effects of irradiation at the low dose rate (3.49 mGy/h) in the testes of C57BL/6 mice. Mice exposed to a total dose of 0.02, 0.2, and 2 Gy were found to be healthy and did not show any significant changes in body weight and peripheral blood components. However, mice irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy had significantly decreased testis weight. Further, histological studies and sperm evaluation also demonstrated changes consistent with the findings of decreased testis weight. In fertile patients found to have arrest of sperm maturation, the seminiferous tubules lack the DNMT1 and HDAC1 protein. The decrease of DNMT1 and HDAC1 in irradiated testis may be the part of the mechanism via which low dose-rate irradiation results in teticular injury. In conclusion, despite a low dose-rate radiation, our study found that when mice testis were irradiated with 2 Gy at 3.49 mGy/h dose rate, there was significant testicular and sperm damage with decreased DNMT1 and HDAC1 expression.

  1. Implications of Intercellular Signaling for Radiation Therapy: A Theoretical Dose-Planning Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Recent in vitro results have shown significant contributions to cell killing from signaling effects at doses that are typically used in radiation therapy. This study investigates whether these in vitro observations can be reconciled with in vivo knowledge and how signaling may have an impact on future developments in radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer treatment plans were generated for a series of 10 patients using 3-dimensional conformal therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques. These plans were evaluated using mathematical models of survival following modulated radiation exposures that were developed from in vitro observations and incorporate the effects of intercellular signaling. The impact on dose–volume histograms and mean doses were evaluated by converting these survival levels into “signaling-adjusted doses” for comparison. Results: Inclusion of intercellular communication leads to significant differences between the signalling-adjusted and physical doses across a large volume. Organs in low-dose regions near target volumes see the largest increases, with mean signaling-adjusted bladder doses increasing from 23 to 33 Gy in IMRT plans. By contrast, in high-dose regions, there is a small decrease in signaling-adjusted dose due to reduced contributions from neighboring cells, with planning target volume mean doses falling from 74 to 71 Gy in IMRT. Overall, however, the dose distributions remain broadly similar, and comparisons between the treatment modalities are largely unchanged whether physical or signaling-adjusted dose is compared. Conclusions: Although incorporating cellular signaling significantly affects cell killing in low-dose regions and suggests a different interpretation for many phenomena, their effect in high-dose regions for typical planning techniques is comparatively small. This indicates that the significant signaling effects observed in vitro

  2. Temporal Dependence of Chromosomal Aberration on Radiation Quality and Cellular Genetic Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Krieger, Stephanie; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Goss, Rosalin; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Radiation induced cancer risks are driven by genetic instability. It is not well understood how different radiation sources induce genetic instability in cells with different genetic background. Here we report our studies on genetic instability, particularly chromosome instability using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), in human primary lymphocytes, normal human fibroblasts, and transformed human mammary epithelial cells in a temporal manner after exposure to high energy protons and Fe ions. The chromosome spread was prepared 48 hours, 1 week, 2 week, and 1 month after radiation exposure. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed with whole chromosome specific probes (chr. 3 and chr. 6). After exposure to protons and Fe ions of similar cumulative energy (??), Fe ions induced more chromosomal aberrations at early time point (48 hours) in all three types of cells. Over time (after 1 month), more chromosome aberrations were observed in cells exposed to Fe ions than in the same type of cells exposed to protons. While the mammary epithelial cells have higher intrinsic genetic instability and higher rate of initial chromosome aberrations than the fibroblasts, the fibroblasts retained more chromosomal aberration after long term cell culture (1 month) in comparison to their initial frequency of chromosome aberration. In lymphocytes, the chromosome aberration frequency at 1 month after exposure to Fe ions was close to unexposed background, and the chromosome aberration frequency at 1 month after exposure to proton was much higher. In addition to human cells, mouse bone marrow cells isolated from strains CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 were irradiated with proton or Fe ions and were analyzed for chromosome aberration at different time points. Cells from CBA mice showed similar frequency of chromosome aberration at early and late time points, while cells from C57 mice showed very different chromosome aberration rate at early and late time points. Our results suggest that relative

  3. Background X-ray Radiation Fields Produced by Young Embedded Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred; Holden, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Most star formation in our galaxy occurs within embedded clusters, and these background environments can affect the star and planet formation processes occurring within them. In turn, young stellar members can shape the background environment and thereby provide a feedback mechanism. This work explores one aspect of stellar feedback by quantifying the background X-ray radiation fields produced by young stellar objects. Specifically, the distributions of X-ray luminosities and X-ray fluxes produced by cluster environments are constructed as a function of cluster membership size $N$. Composite flux distributions, for given distributions of cluster sizes $N$, are also constructed. The resulting distributions are wide and the X-ray radiation fields are moderately intense, with the expected flux levels exceeding the cosmic and galactic X-ray backgrounds by factors of $\\sim10-1000$ (for energies 0.2 -- 15 keV). For circumstellar disks that are geometrically thin and optically thick, the X-ray flux from the backgrou...

  4. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  5. Low-dose radiation with 80-kVp computed tomography to diagnose pulmonary embolism: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, Ulf [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Lund, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Trelleborg (Sweden)], E-mail: ulf.nyman@skane.se; Bjoerkdahl, Peter [Dept. of Radiology, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Trelleborg (Sweden); Olsson, Marie-Louise; Gunnarsson, Mikael [Medical Radiation Physics, Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Univ. of Lund, Skaane Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Goldman, Bitte [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Trelleborg (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Background Mounting collective radiation doses from computed tomography (CT) implies an increased risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed populations, especially in the young. Purpose To evaluate radiation dose and image quality at 80-kVp CT to diagnose acute pulmonary embolism (PE) compared with a previous study at 100 and 120 kVp with all other scanning parameters unchanged. Material and Methods A custom-made chest phantom with a 12 mg I/mL-syringe was scanned at 80/100/120 kVp to evaluate relative changes in computed tomographic dose index (CTDIvol), attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Fifty patients underwent 80 kVp 16-row detector CT at 100 'Quality reference' mAs. A total of 350 mg I/kg were injected to compensate for increased CNR at 80 kVp, while 300 mg I/kg had been used at 100/120 kVp. CTDI{sub vol}, dose-length product (DLP), and estimated effective dose were evaluated including Monte Carlo simulations. Pulmonary artery attenuation and noise were measured and CNR calculated. Two radiologists evaluated subjective image quality using a four-grade scale. Results Switching from 120 to 80 kVp in the phantom study decreased radiation dose by 67% while attenuation and noise increased 1.6 and 2.0 times, respectively, and CNR decreased by 16%. Switching from 120 to 80 kVp in the patient studies decreased estimated effective dose from 4.0 to 1.2 mSv (70% decrease) in median while pulmonary artery attenuation and noise roughly doubled from 332 to 653 HU and from 22 to 49 HU, respectively, resulting in similar CNR (13 vs. 12). At 80 kVp all examinations were regarded as adequate (8%) or excellent (92%). Conclusion Switching from 120 to 80 kVp CT without increased mAs but slightly increased iodine dose may be of special benefit to diagnose PE in younger individuals with preserved renal function where the primary aim is to minimize radiation dose and reaching levels below that of scintigraphy.

  6. The Impact of Clinical Stage on Radiation Doses to Organs at Risk Following Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Prospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Yao, Ji-Jin; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Zhang, Wang-Jian; Liu, Guo-Long; Liu, Li-Zhi; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has revolutionized the management of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of clinical stage on radiation doses to organs at risk (OARs) in NPC. Material and Methods: One hundred and forty-eight patients with newly diagnosed and untreated NPC were prospectively enrolled. Based on the anatomic definition and pathogenesis of radiation induced injury, a total of 28 OARs surrounding the nasopharynx were contoured on axial computed tomography (CT) planning images in each patient. Dose-volume histograms, as well as the mean and maximal doses for each structure, were calculated. Results: Radiation doses to 15 OARs (including the brain stem, temporal lobe and eye) were positively correlated with T stage, the radiation doses to 13 OARs (including the brachial plexus, parotid and thyroid) increased significantly with N stage, and the radiation doses to the spinal cord and mandible had no association with T or N stage. Based on the characteristic of excess rates, 9 OARs (e.g. spinal cord, eye, trachea, and et al.) met tolerance doses easily in all stages, 9 OARs (e.g. brain stem, temporal lobe, brachial plexus, and et al.) easily in early stages but with difficulty in advanced stages, and 10 OARs (e.g. cochlea, parotid, thyroid, and et al.) with difficulty in all stages. Conclusions: The radiation doses to most of OARs are associated with T or N stage, and there are three kinds of patterns for them: 1) meet tolerance doses easily in all stages; 2) meet tolerance doses easily in early stages but with difficulty in advanced stages; and 3) meet tolerance doses with difficulty in all stages.

  7. Radiation doses to aquatic organisms from natural radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E; Jones, S R; Saxén, R; Thørring, H; Vives i Batlle, J

    2004-12-01

    A framework for protection of the environment is likely to require a methodology for assessing dose rates arising from naturally occurring radionuclides. This paper addresses this issue for European aquatic environments through a process of (a) data collation, mainly with respect to levels of radioactivity in water sediments and aquatic flora and fauna, (b) the use of suitable distribution coefficients, concentration factors and global data where data gaps are present and (c) the utilisation of a reference organism approach whereby a finite number of suitable geometries are selected to allow dose per unit concentration factors to be derived and subsequent absorbed dose calculations (weighted or unweighted) to be made. The majority of the calculated absorbed dose, for both marine and freshwater organisms, arises from internally incorporated alpha emitters, with 210Po and 226Ra being the major contributors. Calculated doses are somewhat higher for freshwater compared to marine organisms, and the range of doses is also much greater. This reflects both the much greater variability of radionuclide concentrations in freshwater as compared to seawater, and also variability or uncertainty in concentration factor values. This work has revealed a number of substantial gaps in published empirical data especially for European aquatic environments.

  8. Radiation dose measurement and risk estimation for paediatric patients undergoing micturating cystourethrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, A; Theodorou, K; Vlychou, M; Topaltzikis, T; Kanavou, D; Fezoulidis, I; Kappas, C

    2007-09-01

    Micturating cystourethrography (MCU) is considered to be the gold-standard method used to detect and grade vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and show urethral and bladder abnormalities. It accounts for 30-50% of all fluoroscopic examinations in children. Therefore, it is crucial to define and optimize the radiation dose received by a child during MCU examination, taking into account that children have a higher risk of developing radiation-induced cancer than adults. This study aims to quantify and evaluate, by means of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), the radiation dose to the newborn and paediatric populations undergoing MCU using fluoroscopic imaging. Evaluation of entrance surface dose (ESD), organ and surface dose to specific radiosensitive organs was carried out. Furthermore, the surface dose to the co-patient, i.e. individuals helping in the support, care and comfort of the children during the examination, was evaluated in order to estimate the level of risk. 52 patients with mean age of 0.36 years who had undergone MCU using digital fluoroscopy were studied. ESD, surface doses to thyroid, testes/ovaries and co-patients were measured with TLDs. MCU with digital equipment and fluoroscopy-captured image technique can reduce the radiation dose by approximately 50% while still obtaining the necessary diagnostic information. Radiographic exposures were made in cases of the presence of reflux or of the difficulty in evaluating a finding. The radiation surface doses to the thyroid and testes are relatively low, whereas the radiation dose to the co-patient is negligible. The risks associated with MCU for patients and co-patients are negligible. The results of this study provide baseline data to establish reference dose levels for MCU examination in very young patients.

  9. Evaluation of planning dose accuracy in case of radiation treatment on inhomogeneous organ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Yong; Lee, Jae Hee; Kwak, Yong Kook; Ha, Min Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We are to find out the difference of calculated dose of treatment planning system (TPS) and measured dose in case of inhomogeneous organ structure. Inhomogeneous phantom is made with solid water phantom and cork plate. CT image of inhomogeneous phantom is acquired. Treatment plan is made with TPS (Pinnacle3 9.2. Royal Philips Electronics, Netherlands) and calculated dose of point of interest is acquired. Treatment plan was delivered in the inhomogeneous phantom by ARTISTE (Siemens AG, Germany) measured dose of each point of interest is obtained with Gafchromic EBT2 film (International Specialty Products, US) in the gap between solid water phantom or cork plate. To simulate lung cancer radiation treatment, artificial tumor target of paraffin is inserted in the cork volume of inhomogeneous phantom. Calculated dose and measured dose are acquired as above. In case of inhomogeneous phantom experiment, dose difference of calculated dose and measured dose is about -8.5% at solid water phantom-cork gap and about -7% lower in measured dose at cork-solid water phantom gap. In case of inhomogeneous phantom inserted paraffin target experiment, dose difference is about 5% lower in measured dose at cork-paraffin gap. There is no significant difference at same material gap in both experiments. Radiation dose at the gap between two organs with different electron density is significantly lower than calculated dose with TPS. Therefore, we must be aware of dose calculation error in TPS and great care is suggested in case of radiation treatment planning on inhomogeneous organ structure.

  10. A Novel Simple Phantom for Verifying the Dose of Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A standard protocol of dosimetric measurements is used by the organizations responsible for verifying that the doses delivered in radiation-therapy institutions are within authorized limits. This study evaluated a self-designed simple auditing phantom for use in verifying the dose of radiation therapy; the phantom design, dose audit system, and clinical tests are described. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs were used as postal dosimeters, and mailable phantoms were produced for use in postal audits. Correction factors are important for converting TLD readout values from phantoms into the absorbed dose in water. The phantom scatter correction factor was used to quantify the difference in the scattered dose between a solid water phantom and homemade phantoms; its value ranged from 1.084 to 1.031. The energy-dependence correction factor was used to compare the TLD readout of the unit dose irradiated by audit beam energies with 60Co in the solid water phantom; its value was 0.99 to 1.01. The setup-condition factor was used to correct for differences in dose-output calibration conditions. Clinical tests of the device calibrating the dose output revealed that the dose deviation was within 3%. Therefore, our homemade phantoms and dosimetric system can be applied for accurately verifying the doses applied in radiation-therapy institutions.

  11. Commentary: ethical issues of current health-protection policies on low-dose ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzyński, Ludwik; Doss, Mohan; Feinendegen, Ludwig E; Janiak, Marek K; Miller, Mark L; Sanders, Charles L; Scott, Bobby R; Ulsh, Brant; Vaiserman, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of ionizing-radiation-induced cancer is based on the assumption that every radiation dose increment constitutes increased cancer risk for humans. The risk is hypothesized to increase linearly as the total dose increases. While this model is the basis for radiation safety regulations, its scientific validity has been questioned and debated for many decades. The recent memorandum of the International Commission on Radiological Protection admits that the LNT-model predictions at low doses are "speculative, unproven, undetectable and 'phantom'." Moreover, numerous experimental, ecological, and epidemiological studies show that low doses of sparsely-ionizing or sparsely-ionizing plus highly-ionizing radiation may be beneficial to human health (hormesis/adaptive response). The present LNT-model-based regulations impose excessive costs on the society. For example, the median-cost medical program is 5000 times more cost-efficient in saving lives than controlling radiation emissions. There are also lives lost: e.g., following Fukushima accident, more than 1000 disaster-related yet non-radiogenic premature deaths were officially registered among the population evacuated due to radiation concerns. Additional negative impacts of LNT-model-inspired radiophobia include: refusal of some patients to undergo potentially life-saving medical imaging; discouragement of the study of low-dose radiation therapies; motivation for radiological terrorism and promotion of nuclear proliferation.

  12. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose study to determine the baseline for environmental radiological health practices in Melaka state, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Sahrone, Sallehudin; Wagiran, Husin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johore Bahru, Johore, Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2005-12-15

    Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured throughout Melaka, Malaysia, over a period of two years, with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. Results obtained are shown in tabular, graphic and cartographic form. The values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly over different soil types and for different underlying geological characteristics present in the study area. The values ranged from 54 {+-} 5 to 378 {+-} 38 nGy h{sup -1}. The highest terrestrial gamma dose rates were measured over soil types of granitic origin and in areas with underlying geological characteristics of an acid intrusive (undifferentiated) type. An isodose map of terrestrial gamma dose rate in Melaka was drawn by using the GIS application 'Arc View'. This was based on data collected using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector survey meter. The measurements were taken at 542 locations. Three small 'hot spots' were found where the dose rates were more than 350 nGy h{sup -1}. The mean dose rates in the main population areas in the mukims (parishes) of Bukit Katil, Sungai Udang, Batu Berendam, Bukit Baru and Bandar Melaka were 154 {+-} 15, 161 {+-} 16, 160 {+-} 16, 175 {+-} 18 and 176 {+-} 18 nGy h{sup -1}, respectively. The population-weighted mean dose rate throughout Melaka state is 172 {+-} 17 nGy h{sup -1}. This is lower than the geographical mean dose rate of 183 {+-} 54 nGy h{sup -1}. The lower value arises from the fact that most of the population lives in the central area of the state where the lithology is dominated by sedimentary rocks consisting of shale, mudstone, phyllite, slate, hornfels, sandstone and schist of Devonian origin which have lower associated dose rates. The mean annual effective dose to the population from outdoor terrestrial gamma radiation was estimated to be 0.21 mSv. This value is higher than the world average of 0.07 mSv.

  13. Environmental standards for ionizing radiation: theoretical basis for dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, A C

    1983-10-01

    The types of injury attributable to ionizing radiation are subdivided, for purposes of risk assessment and radiological protection, into two broad categories: stochastic effects and nonstochastic effects. Stochastic effects are viewed as probablistic phenomena, varying in frequency but not severity as a function of the dose, without any threshold; nonstochastic effects are viewed as deterministic phenomena, varying in both frequency and severity as a function of the dose, with clinical thresholds. Included among stochastic effects are heritable effects (mutations and chromosome aberrations) and carcinogenic effects. Both types of effects are envisioned as unicellular phenomena which can result from nonlethal injury of individual cells, without the necessity of damage to other cells. For the induction of mutations and chromosome aberrations in the low-to-intermediate dose range, the dose-response curve with high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation generally conforms to a linear nonthreshold relationship and varies relatively little with the dose rate. In contrast, the curve with low-LET radiation generally conforms to a linear-quadratic relationship, rising less steeply than the curve with high-LET radiation and increasing in slope with increasing dose and dose rate. The dose-response curve for carcinogenic effects varies widely from one type of neoplasm to another in the intermediate-to-high dose range, in part because of differences in the way large doses of radiation can affect the promotion and progression of different neoplasms. Information about dose-response relations for low-level irradiation is fragmentary but consistent, in general, with the hypothesis that the neoplastic transformation may result from mutation, chromosome aberration or genetic recombination in a single susceptible cell.

  14. R-CHOP with dose-attenuated radiation therapy could induce good prognosis in gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishima Yuko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment strategy for gastric diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLBCL has not been standardized in such as to the cycles of chemotherapy, dose of radiation, or necessity for the surgery. Although the results of CHOP or R-CHOP treatments have demonstrated the good prognosis, the treatments have been controversial in many cases. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 40 gastric DLBCL patients receiving chemotherapy with or without radiation in our institute. Those in stages II-IV were treated with six cycles of R-CHOP without radiation; for those in stage I, we administered three cycles of R-CHOP with radiation. Results The three-year overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS rates were 95.2 and 91.8%, respectively. Those in stage I obtained 100% of OS. The radiation dose prescribed was 30.6 Gy for CR cases and 39.6 to 40 Gy for PR after chemotherapy. Although survival rates tended to correlate with staging groups or age-adjusted IPI classifications, multivariate statistical analysis did not show clear differences. All 14 patients with initial bleeding were successfully managed without surgery during treatment. Conclusion R-CHOP therapy was very effective for gastric DLBCL. It may be not necessary to use more than 30.6 Gy of radiotherapy in the highly chemo-sensitive cases. Less toxic treatments should be made available to gastric DLBCL patients.

  15. Determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields using extrapolation chamber and GM counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, J.; Christensen, P.

    1995-01-01

    of depth-dose profiles from different beta radiation fields with E(max) values down to 156 keV. Results are also presented from studies of GM counters for use as survey instruments for monitoring beta dose rates at the workplace. Advantages of GM counters are a simple measurement technique and high...

  16. A national survey on radiation dose in CT in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, A.J. van der; Schilham, A.; Stoop, P.; Prokop, M.; Geleijns, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess radiation exposure due to CT in the Netherlands. Methods Twenty-one hospitals participated in a dose survey for the 21 most frequently used CT protocols. Hospitals completed a Web survey with detailed parameters for one patient per protocol, including the dose length product (

  17. Low-Dose Radiation Exposure and Atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchel, R. E. J.; Hasu, M.; Bugden, M.; Wyatt, H.; Little, M. P.; Gola, A.; Hildebrandt, G.; Priest, N. D.; Whitman, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that single low-dose exposures (0.025-0.5 Gy) to low-LET radiation given at either high (about 150 mGy/min) or low (1 mGy/min) dose rate would promote aortic atherosclerosis was tested in female C57BL/6J mice genetically predisposed to this disease (ApoE(-/-)). Mice were exposed eithe

  18. Age-specific radiation dose commitment factors for a one-year chronic intake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenes, G.R.; Soldat, J.K.

    1977-11-01

    During the licensing process for nuclear facilities, radiation doses and dose commitments must be calculated for people in the environs of a nuclear facility. These radiation doses are determined by examining characteristics of population groups, pathways to people, and radionuclides found in those pathways. The pertinent characteristics, which are important in the sense of contributing a significant portion of the total dose, must then be analyzed in depth. Dose factors are generally available for adults, see Reference 1 for example, however numerous improvements in data on decay schemes and half-lives have been made in recent years. In addition, it is advisable to define parameters for calculation of the radiation dose for ages other than adults since the population surrounding nuclear facilities will be composed of various age groups. Further, since infants, children, and teens may have higher rates of intake per unit body mass, it is conceivable that the maximally exposed individual may not be an adult. Thus, it was necessary to develop new radiation-dose commitment factors for various age groups. Dose commitment factors presented in this report have been calculated for a 50-year time period for four age groups.

  19. Comparison of x-radiation doses between conventional and rare earth panoramic radiographic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoczylas, L.J.; Preece, J.W.; Langlais, R.P.; McDavid, W.D.; Waggener, R.G. (Univ. of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The radiation dose to radiobiologically critical organs at various anatomic sites in a phantom was compared with the use of rare earth screen/film combinations and calcium tungstate screen/film combinations. Rare earth screens and films produced a reduction in dose up to 40% to 50% depending on the anatomic site.

  20. Doses to Carotid Arteries After Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M.V.; Brodin, Nils Patrik; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2013-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at an increased risk of stroke because of carotid artery irradiation. However, for early-stage HL involved node radiation therapy (INRT) reduces the volume of normal tissue exposed to high doses. Here, we evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-C...

  1. Levels of thoron and progeny in high background radiation area of southeastern coast of Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, R C; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Sagar, D V; Prasad, G; Shahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Omori, Y; Janik, M; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to radon, (222)Rn, is assumed to be the most significant source of natural radiation to human beings in most cases. It is thought that radon and its progeny are major factors that cause cancer. The presence of thoron, (220)Rn, was often neglected because it was considered that the quantity of thoron in the environment is less than that of radon. However, recent studies have shown that a high thoron concentration was found in some regions and the exposure to (220)Rn and its progeny can equal or several time exceed that of (220)Rn and its progeny. The results of thoron and its progeny measurements in the houses of high background radiation area (HBRA) of the southeastern coast of Odisha, India presented here. This area is one of the high background radiation areas in India with a large deposit of monazite sand which is the probable source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurement of thoron and its progeny in cement, brick and mud houses in the study area. Thoron concentration was measured using RAD-7 and Raduet. A CR-39 track detector was employed for the measurement of environmental thoron progeny, both in active and passive modes. Thoron and its progeny concentrations were found to be comparatively high in the area. A comparison between the results obtained with various techniques is presented in this paper.

  2. Radiation doses of employees of a Nuclear Medicine Department after implementation of more rigorous radiation protection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarska-Bilska, Hanna; Supinska, Aleksandra; Listewnik, Maria H; Zorga, Piotr; Birkenfeld, Bozena

    2013-11-01

    The appropriate radiation protection measures applied in departments of nuclear medicine should lead to a reduction in doses received by the employees. During 1991-2007, at the Department of Nuclear Medicine of Pomeranian Medical University (Szczecin, Poland), nurses received on average two-times higher (4.6 mSv) annual doses to the whole body than those received by radiopharmacy technicians. The purpose of this work was to examine whether implementation of changes in the radiation protection protocol will considerably influence the reduction in whole-body doses received by the staff that are the most exposed. A reduction in nurses' exposure by ~63 % took place in 2008-11, whereas the exposure of radiopharmacy technicians grew by no more than 22 % in comparison with that in the period 1991-2007. Proper reorganisation of the work in departments of nuclear medicine can considerably affect dose reduction and bring about equal distribution of the exposure.

  3. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel, E-mail: Swisher-Mcclure@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert [Division of Urologic Oncology, Department of Surgery, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple University Health System, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment.

  4. Cellular and molecular aspects of the anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Large, Martin

    2015-01-01

    For decades an anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of low-dose X-irradiation (LD-RT) has clinically been well established in the treatment of a plethora of benign diseases and chronic degenerative disorders with empirically identified single doses < 1 Gy to be most effective. Although considerable progress has been achieved in the understanding of immune modulatory effects of ionising radiation, especially in the low-dose range, the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently not fully r...

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography using lower doses of radiation for patients with Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Craig, Orla

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic resonance and ultrasonography have increasing roles in the initial diagnosis of Crohn\\'s disease, but computed tomography (CT) with positive oral contrast agents is most frequently used to identify those with acute extramural complications. However, CT involves exposure of patients to radiation. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT (at a dose comparable to that used to obtain an abdominal radiograph) with conventional-dose CT in patients with active Crohn\\'s disease.

  6. Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Suk Chul [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung-Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yu Mi [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwanghee [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young-Woo [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Soon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-030 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Sun, E-mail: hskimdvm@khnp.co.kr [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-09

    While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4{sup +} T, CD8{sup +} T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1{alpha}, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-{gamma}. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naive T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose {gamma}-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

  7. Radiation dose reduction efficiency of buildings after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Monzen

    Full Text Available Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55 ± 0.04, 0.15 ± 0.02, and 0.19 ± 0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites.

  8. Natural radiation doses for cosmic and terrestrial components in Costa Rica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, Patricia [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Atomicas, Nucleares y Moleculares, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, San Jose (Costa Rica)]. E-mail: pmora@cariari.ucr.ac.cr; Picado, Esteban [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Atomicas, Nucleares y Moleculares, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, San Jose (Costa Rica); Minato, Susumu [Radiation Earth Science Laboratory, Yamaguchi-cho 9-6, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, 461-0024 (Japan)

    2007-01-15

    A study of external natural radiation, cosmic and terrestrial components, was carried out with in situ measurements using NaI scintillation counters while driving along the roads in Costa Rica for the period July 2003-July 2005. The geographical distribution of the terrestrial air-absorbed dose rates and the total effective dose rates (including cosmic) are represented on contour maps. Information on the population density of the country permitted the calculation of the per capita doses. The average effective dose for the total cosmic component was 46.88{+-}18.06 nSv h{sup -1} and the average air-absorbed dose for the terrestrial component was 29.52{+-}14.46 nGy h{sup -1}. The average total effective dose rate (cosmic plus terrestrial components) was 0.60{+-}0.18 mSv per year. The effective dose rate per capita was found to be 83.97 nSv h{sup -1} which gives an annual dose of 0.74 mSv. Assuming the world average for the internal radiation component, the natural radiation dose for Costa Rica will be 2.29 mSv annually.

  9. Low Dose Radiation Hypersensitivity is Caused by p53-dependent Apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enns, L; Bogen, K; Wizniak, J; Murtha, A; Weinfeld, M

    2004-04-08

    Exposure to environmental radiation and the application of new clinical modalities, such as radioimmunotherapy, have heightened the need to understand cellular responses to low dose and low-dose rate ionizing radiation. Many tumor cell lines have been observed to exhibit a hypersensitivity to radiation doses below 50 cGy, which manifests as a significant deviation from the clonogenic survival response predicted by a linear-quadratic fit to higher doses. However, the underlying processes for this phenomenon remain unclear. Using a gel microdrop/flow cytometry assay to monitor single cell proliferation at early times post irradiation, we examined the response of human A549 lung carcinoma, T98G glioma and MCF7 breast carcinoma cell lines exposed to gamma radiation doses from 0 to 200 cGy delivered at 0.18 and 22 cGy/min. The A549 and T98G cells, but not MCF7 cells, showed the marked hypersensitivity at doses <50 cGy. To further characterize the low-dose hypersensitivity, we examined the influence of low-dose radiation on cell cycle status and apoptosis by assays for active caspase-3 and phosphatidylserine translocation (annexin-V binding). We observed that caspase-3 activation and annexin-V binding mirrored the proliferation curves for the cell lines. Furthermore, the low-dose hypersensitivity and annexin-V binding to irradiated A549 and T98G cells were eliminated by treating the cells with pifithrin, an inhibitor of p53. When p53-inactive cell lines (2800T skin fibroblasts and HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells) were examined for similar patterns, we found that there was no HRS and apoptosis was not detectable by annexin-V or caspase-3 assays. Our data therefore suggest that low-dose hypersensitivity is associated with p53-dependent apoptosis.

  10. The impact of involved node, involved field and mantle field radiotherapy on estimated radiation doses and risk of late effects for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, M V; Jørgensen, M; Brodin, N P;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of radiotherapy (RT) is debated for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) due to the late effects of treatment. Radiation doses to the thyroid, heart, lungs, and breasts are compared with the extensive mantle field (MF), Involved Field RT(IFRT), Modified IFRT (m...

  11. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  12. Coherent dynamics of Rydberg atoms in cosmic-microwave-background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Rydberg atoms excited by cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherences on time scales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as slowly decaying (100 ps) quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence. An analytic model shows the dependence of the coherent dynamics on the energy splitting between atomic eigenstates, transition dipole moments, and coherence time of the radiation. Experimental detection of the fluorescence signal from a trapped ensemble of 108 Rydberg atoms is discussed, but shown to be technically challenging at present, requiring cosmic-microwave-background amplification somewhat beyond current practice.

  13. Small-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation and scattering by cloudy plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Peebles, P J E

    1998-01-01

    If the first stars formed soon after decoupling of baryons from the thermal cosmic background radiation (CBR), the radiation may have been last scattered in a cloudy plasma. We discuss the resulting small-scale anisotropy of the CBR in the limit where the plasma clouds are small compared to the mean distance between clouds along a line of sight. This complements the perturbative analysis valid for mildly nonlinear departures from homogeneity at last scattering. We conclude that reasonable choices for the cloud parameters imply CBR anisotropy consistent with the present experimental limits, in agreement with the perturbative approach. This means the remarkable isotropy of the CBR need not contradict the early small-scale structure formation predicted in some cosmogonies.

  14. Dose mapping of dried figs treated by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polonia, I.; Portugal, L.; Andrade, M. E

    1998-06-01

    The irradiation parameters of two varieties of dried figs were determined in a fixed position. The Dose Uniformity (U=Dmax/Dmin) obtained for Fricke Dosimeter was 1.4 and for YR Gammachrome 1.3. The isodose curves were built using a geostatistical gridding method, the Kriging method.

  15. ESTIMATION OF UV RADIATION DOSE IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA WETLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultraviolet (UV) B wavelength range (280 nm to 320 nm) of solar radiation can be a significant biological stressor, and has been hypothesized to be partially responsible for amphibian declines and malformation. This hypothesis has been difficult to evaluate, in part, because ...

  16. Management of patient and staff radiation dose in interventional radiology: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartal, Gabriel; Vano, Eliseo; Paulo, Graciano; Miller, Donald L

    2014-04-01

    The increasing complexity and numbers of interventional fluoroscopy procedures have led to increasing patient doses of radiation and to increasing concern over staff doses. Hybrid rooms incorporate multiple imaging modalities and are used by multidisciplinary teams in interventional fluoroscopy suites and operating theaters. These rooms present additional radiation protection challenges. The new low annual exposure limit for the lens of the eye also requires specific measures to prevent cataracts in operators. The traditional attitude of radiation protection must be changed to one of proactive management of radiation dose and image quality. Incorporation of a comprehensive dose management program into the departmental quality assurance program is now essential. Physicians, radiographers, and medical physicists play an essential role in the safe use of fluoroscopy in medical practice. Efficient use of all imaging modalities (e.g., fluoroscopy, digital subtraction angiography, cone-beam CT) requires knowledge of the effects of different equipment settings on patient and staff doses as well as the skill and competence to optimize these settings for each procedure and patient. Updates and recommendations on radiation protection and dose management programs, including aspects of education and training, are presented.

  17. Nuclear energy and health: and the benefits of low-dose radiation hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Jerry M; Pollycove, Myron

    2009-01-01

    Energy needs worldwide are expected to increase for the foreseeable future, but fuel supplies are limited. Nuclear reactors could supply much of the energy demand in a safe, sustainable manner were it not for fear of potential releases of radioactivity. Such releases would likely deliver a low dose or dose rate of radiation, within the range of naturally occurring radiation, to which life is already accustomed. The key areas of concern are discussed. Studies of actual health effects, especially thyroid cancers, following exposures are assessed. Radiation hormesis is explained, pointing out that beneficial effects are expected following a low dose or dose rate because protective responses against stresses are stimulated. The notions that no amount of radiation is small enough to be harmless and that a nuclear accident could kill hundreds of thousands are challenged in light of experience: more than a century with radiation and six decades with reactors. If nuclear energy is to play a significant role in meeting future needs, regulatory authorities must examine the scientific evidence and communicate the real health effects of nuclear radiation. Negative images and implications of health risks derived by unscientific extrapolations of harmful effects of high doses must be dispelled.

  18. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  19. Standard Guide for Absorbed-Dose Mapping in Radiation Processing Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This document provides guidance in determining absorbed-dose distributions in products, materials or substances irradiated in gamma, X-ray (bremsstrahlung) and electron beam facilities. Note 1—For irradiation of food and the radiation sterilization of health care products, other specific ISO and ISO/ASTM standards containing dose mapping requirements exist. For food irradiation, see ISO/ASTM 51204, Practice for Dosimetry in Gamma Irradiation Facilities for Food Processing and ISO/ASTM 51431, Practice for Dosimetry in Electron and Bremsstrahlung Irradiation Facilities for Food Processing. For the radiation sterilization of health care products, see ISO 11137: 1995, Sterilization of Health Care Products Requirements for Validation and Routine Control Radiation Sterilization. In those areas covered by ISO 11137, that standard takes precedence. ISO/ASTM Practice 51608, ISO/ASTM Practice 51649, and ISO/ASTM Practice 51702 also contain dose mapping requirements. 1.2 Methods of analyzing the dose map data ar...

  20. Do Intermediate Radiation Doses Contribute to Late Rectal Toxicity? An Analysis of Data From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 94-06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses, from 30 to 50 Gy, contribute to the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 1009 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 94-06 were analyzed using three approaches. First, the contribution of intermediate doses to a previously published fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model was determined. Next, the extent to which intermediate doses provide additional risk information, after taking the LKB model into account, was investigated. Third, the proportion of rectum receiving doses higher than a threshold, VDose, was computed for doses ranging from 5 to 85 Gy, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine which of these parameters were significantly associated with time to Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Results: Doses <60 Gy had no detectable impact on the fit of the LKB model, as expected on the basis of the small estimate of the volume parameter (n = 0.077). Furthermore, there was no detectable difference in late rectal toxicity among cohorts with similar risk estimates from the LKB model but with different volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model selected V75 as the only value of VDose significantly associated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: There is no evidence from these data that intermediate doses influence the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Instead, the critical doses for this endpoint seem to be {>=}75 Gy. It is hypothesized that cases of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity occurring among patients with V75 less than approximately 12% may be due to a 'background' level of risk, likely due mainly to biological factors.

  1. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography-guided lung interventions using an iterative reconstruction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, D.H.; Hiss, S.; Borggrefe, J.; Bunck, A.C.; Maintz, D.; Hackenbroch, M. [Cologne University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Mueller, D. [Clinical Science Philips Healthcare GmbH, Munich (Germany). Clinical Science; Hellmich, M. [Cologne University Hospital (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology

    2015-10-15

    To compare the radiation doses and image qualities of computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions using a standard-dose CT (SDCT) protocol with filtered back projection and a low-dose CT (LDCT) protocol with both filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction. Image quality and radiation doses (dose-length product and CT dose index) were retrospectively reviewed for 130 patients who underwent CT-guided lung interventions. SDCT at 120 kVp and automatic mA modulation and LDCT at 100 kVp and a fixed exposure were each performed for 65 patients. Image quality was objectively evaluated as the contrast-to-noise ratio and subjectively by two radiologists for noise impression, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability on a four-point scale. The groups did not significantly differ in terms of diagnostic acceptability and complication rate. LDCT yielded a median 68.6 % reduction in the radiation dose relative to SDCT. In the LDCT group, iterative reconstruction was superior to filtered back projection in terms of noise reduction and subjective image quality. The groups did not differ in terms of beam hardening artifacts. LDCT was feasible for all procedures and yielded a more than two-thirds reduction in radiation exposure while maintaining overall diagnostic acceptability, safety and precision. The iterative reconstruction algorithm is preferable according to the objective and subjective image quality analyses.

  2. Southern Hemisphere Measurement of the Anisotropy in the CosmicMicrowave Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, George F.; Lubin, Phil M.

    1979-06-01

    A recent measurement of the anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation from the southern hemisphere (Lima, Peru) is essentially in agreement with previous measurements from the northern hemisphere. The net anisotropy can be described as a first order spherical harmonic (Doppler) anisotropy of amplitude 3.1 {+-} 0.4 m{sup o}K with a quadrupole anisotropy of less than 1 m{sup o}K. In addition, measurements of the linear polarization yield an upper limit of 1 m{sup o}K, or one part in 3000, at 95% C.L. for the amplitudes of any spherical harmonic through third order.

  3. Cosmological perturbations of quantum mechanical origin and anisotropy of the microwave background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Grishchuk, L P

    1994-01-01

    A theory of quantum-mechanical generation of cosmological perturbations is considered. The conclusion of this study is that if the large-angular-scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation is caused by the long-wavelength cosmological perturbations of quantum mechanical origin, they are, most likely, gravitational waves, rather than density perturbations or rotational perturbations. Some disagreements with previous publications are clarified. This contribution to the Proceedings is based on Reference~[34]. NOTE: To generate an output, please extract and save the file crckapb.sty which appear at the beginning of the main file.

  4. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Constraints on a Modified Chaplygin Gas Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dao-Jun; LI Xin-Zhou

    2005-01-01

    @@ A modified Chaplygin gas model of unifying dark energy and dark matter with the exotic equation of state p = Bρ- A/ρα , which can also explain the recent expansion of the universe, is investigated by means of constraining the location of the peak of the cosmic microwave background radiation spectrum. We find that the result of CMBR measurements does not exclude the nonzero value of parameter B, but allows it in the range -0.35 (<~) B (<~) 0.025.

  5. Measurements of environmental radiation exposure dose rates at selected sites in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, W C; Penna-Franca, E; Ribeiro, C C; Nogueira, A R; Londres, H; Oliveira, A E

    1981-12-01

    Two types of portable instruments were developed by the former Health and Safety Laboratory of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to characterize external gamma radiation fields and to estimate individual exposure dose rates from major natural or fission radionuclides distributed in the soil: a pressurized ionization chamber and a NaI(T1) gamma-ray spectrometer. The two instruments were used to measure environmental radiation exposure rates at three distinct geological areas of Brazil: - in the towns of Guarapari and Meaípe located on the monazite sand belt, ES. - on the vicinities of the uranium mine of Poços de Caldas, MG. - around the site of the Brazilian first nuclear power plant, in Angra dos Reis, RJ. The radiometric survey demonstrated once more the usefulness and versatility of the two instruments used. The measurements around the nuclear installations of Poços de Caldas and Angra dos Reis, allowed a rapid assessment of the local radiation background and its variability, as well as the selection of stations for the routine monitoring program. Radioactive anomalies were detected and characterized previously to the start of plant operations. The survey in Guarapari and Meaípe confirmed the results obtained by Roser and Cullen in 1958 and 1962, except on sites where considerable changes took place since then. The spectrometric measurements gave estimations of the relative proportion of 40K, 238U and 232Th series in the ground and also indications on the homogeneity of their distribution in the soil.

  6. A Dose of Reality: Radiation Analysis for Realistic Human Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilla, J. E.; Lee, K. T.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As with most computational analyses, a tradeoff exists between problem complexity, resource availability and response accuracy when modeling radiation transport from the source to a detector. The largest amount of analyst time for setting up an analysis is often spent ensuring that any simplifications made have minimal impact on the results. The vehicle shield geometry of interest is typically simplified from the original CAD design in order to reduce computation time, but this simplification requires the analyst to "re-draw" the geometry with a limited set of volumes in order to accommodate a specific radiation transport software package. The resulting low-fidelity geometry model cannot be shared with or compared to other radiation transport software packages, and the process can be error prone with increased model complexity. The work presented here demonstrates the use of the DAGMC (Direct Accelerated Geometry for Monte Carlo) Toolkit from the University of Wisconsin, to model the impacts of several space radiation sources on a CAD drawing of the US Lab module. METHODS The DAGMC toolkit workflow begins with the export of an existing CAD geometry from the native CAD to the ACIS format. The ACIS format file is then cleaned using SpaceClaim to remove small holes and component overlaps. Metadata is then assigned to the cleaned geometry file using CUBIT/Trelis from csimsoft (Registered Trademark). The DAGMC plugin script removes duplicate shared surfaces, facets the geometry to a specified tolerance, and ensures that the faceted geometry is water tight. This step also writes the material and scoring information to a standard input file format that the analyst can alter as desired prior to running the radiation transport program. The scoring results can be transformed, via python script, into a 3D format that is viewable in a standard graphics program. RESULTS The CAD model of the US Lab module of the International Space Station, inclusive of all the

  7. Biaxial lidar efficiency rising based on improving of spatial selectivity and stability against background radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agishev, R.R.; Bajazitov, R.A.; Galeyev, M.M. [Kazan State Technical Univ., Tatarstan (Russian Federation). Dept. of Radioelectronic and Quantum Systems

    1996-12-31

    A criterion of spatial-angular efficiency (SAE) of remote electro-optical systems for atmosphere monitoring is formulated. The dependencies of the SAE from normalized range and minimal operating range for different optical receiving schemes of ground-based biaxial lidar are analyzed. It is shown that low SAE of traditional VIS and NIR systems are a main cause of a low signal-to-background-noise ratio at the photodetector input, the considerable measurements errors. and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters reconstruction. The most effective protection against sky background radiation in such systems consists in forming an angular field according to the introduced SAE criterion. Some approaches to achieve high value of the SAE-parameter for receiving system optimization are discussed.

  8. Biaxial lidar efficiency increase based on improving spatial selectivity and stability against background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Bajazitov, Ravil A.; Galeyev, Marat M.

    1996-11-01

    A criterion of spatial-angular efficiency (SAE) of remote electro-optical systems for atmosphere monitoring is formulated. The dependencies of the SAE from normalized range and minimal operating range for different optical receiving schemes of ground-based biaxial LIDAR are analyzed. It is shown that low SAE of traditional VIS & NIR systems is a main cause of a low signal-to-background-noise ratio at the photodetector input, the considerably measurements errors, and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters reconstruction. The most effective protection against sky background radiation in such systems consists in forming an angular field according to the introduced SAE criterion. Some approaches to achieve high value of the SAE-parameter for receiving system optimization are discussed.

  9. Radiation doses from radiation sources of neutrons and photons by different computer calculation; Tecniche di calcolo di intensita` di dose da sorgenti di radiazione neutronica e fotonica con l`uso di codici basati su metodologie diverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, F.; Lippolis, G.; Bruno, S.G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondella (Italy)

    1995-11-01

    In the present paper the calculation technique aspects of dose rate from neutron and photon radiation sources are covered with reference both to the basic theoretical modeling of the MERCURE-4, XSDRNPM-S and MCNP-3A codes and from practical point of view performing safety analyses of irradiation risk of two transportation casks. The input data set of these calculations -regarding the CEN 10/200 HLW container and dry PWR spent fuel assemblies shipping cask- is frequently commented as for as connecting points of input data and understanding theoretic background are concerned.

  10. Patient absorbed radiation doses estimation related to irradiation anatomy; Estimativa de dose absorvida pelo paciente relacionada a anatomia irradiada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Flavio Augusto Penna; Soares, Amanda Anastacio; Kahl, Gabrielly Gomes, E-mail: prof.flavio@gmail.com, E-mail: amanda-a-soares@hotmail.com, E-mail: gabriellygkahl@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Eduacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Developed a direct equation to estimate the absorbed dose to the patient in x-ray examinations, using electric, geometric parameters and filtering combined with data from irradiated anatomy. To determine the absorbed dose for each examination, the entrance skin dose (ESD) is adjusted to the thickness of the patient's specific anatomy. ESD is calculated from the estimated KERMA greatness in the air. Beer-Lambert equations derived from power data mass absorption coefficients obtained from the NIST / USA, were developed for each tissue: bone, muscle, fat and skin. Skin thickness was set at 2 mm and the bone was estimated in the central ray of the site, in the anteroposterior view. Because they are similar in density and attenuation coefficients, muscle and fat are treated as a single tissue. For evaluation of the full equations, we chose three different anatomies: chest, hand and thigh. Although complex in its shape, the equations simplify direct determination of absorbed dose from the characteristics of the equipment and patient. The input data is inserted at a single time and total absorbed dose (mGy) is calculated instantly. The average error, when compared with available data, is less than 5% in any combination of device data and exams. In calculating the dose for an exam and patient, the operator can choose the variables that will deposit less radiation to the patient through the prior analysis of each combination of variables, using the ALARA principle in routine diagnostic radiology sector.

  11. Life span of C57 mice as influenced by radiation dose, dose rate, and age at exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, J.F.; Thomas, R.G.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1982-10-01

    This study was designed to measure the life shortening of C57BL/6J male mice as a result of exposure to five external doses from /sup 60/Co gamma radiation delivered at six different dose rates. Total doses ranged from 20 to 1620 rad at exposure rates ranging from 0.7 to 36,000 R/day. The ages of the mice at exposure were newborn, 2, 6, or 15 months. Two replications were completed. Although death was the primary endpoint, we did perform gross necropsies. The life span findings are variable, but we found no consistent shortening compared to control life spans. Therefore, we cannot logically extrapolate life shortening to lower doses, from the data we have obtained. In general, the younger the animals were at the beginning of exposure, the longer their life spans were compared to those of controls. This relationship weakened at the higher doses and dose rates, as mice in these categories tended not to have significantly different life spans from controls. Using life span as a criterion, we find this study suggests that some threshold dosage may exist beyond which effects of external irradiation may be manifested. Up to this threshold, there is no shortening effect on life span compared to that of control mice. Our results are in general agreement with the results of other researchers investigating human and other animal life span effects on irradiation.

  12. Completeness of reporting of radiation therapy planning, dose, and delivery in veterinary radiation oncology manuscripts from 2005 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyerleber, Michele A; McEntee, Margaret C; Farrelly, John; Podgorsak, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Surrounding a shift toward evidence-based medicine and widespread adoption of reporting guidelines such as the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement, there has been a growing body of literature evaluating the quality of reporting in human and veterinary medicine. These reviews have consistently demonstrated the presence of substantive deficiencies in completeness of reporting. The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of reporting in veterinary radiation oncology manuscripts in regards to treatment planning methods, dose, and delivery and to introduce a set of reporting guidelines to serve as a standard for future reporting. Forty-six veterinary radiation oncology manuscripts published between 2005 and 2010 were evaluated for reporting of 50 items pertaining to patient data, treatment planning, radiation dose, delivery of therapy, quality assurance, and adjunctive therapy. A mean of 40% of checklist items were reported in a given manuscript (range = 8-75%). Only 9/50 (18%) checklist items were reported in > or = 80% manuscripts. The completeness of reporting was best in regards to a statement of prescription radiation protocol (91-98% reported) and worst in regards to specification of absorbed dose within target volumes and surrounding normal tissues (0-6% reported). No manuscripts met the current International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) dose specification recommendations. Incomplete reporting may stem from the predominance of retrospective manuscripts and the variability of protocols and equipment in veterinary radiation oncology. Adoption of reporting guidelines as outlined in this study is recommended to improve the quality of reporting in veterinary radiation oncology.

  13. The Effect of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Astrobiological Model Lichen Circinaria gyrosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Rosa; Zélia Miller, Ana; Cubero, Beatriz; Martín-Cerezo, M. Luisa; Raguse, Marina; Meeßen, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    The lichen Circinaria gyrosa is an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions and to a simulated martian environment. Therefore, it became part of the currently operated BIOMEX experiment on board the International Space Station and the recent STARLIFE campaign to study the effects of four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation. The samples were irradiated with helium and iron ions at doses up to 2 kGy, with X-rays at doses up to 5 kGy and with γ rays at doses from 6 to 113 kGy. Results on C. gyrosa's resistance to simulated space ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII), (ii) epifluorescence microscopy, (iii) confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence show no significant changes up to a dose of 1 kGy (helium ions), 2 kGy (iron ions), 5 kGy (X-rays) - the maximum doses applied for those radiation qualities - as well as a dose of 6 kGy of γ irradiation, which was the lowest dose applied for this low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Significant damage in a dose-related manner was observed only at much higher doses of γ irradiation (up to 113 kGy). These data corroborate the findings of the parallel STARLIFE studies on the effects of ionizing radiation on the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, its isolated photobiont, and the lichen Xanthoria elegans.

  14. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose measurement and health hazard along river Alaknanda and Ganges in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerna Sharma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurement of absorbed dose rate in air due to exposure from outdoor terrestrial γ radiation and assessment of consequent public health hazard continues to be of environmental and public concern. Present study was aimed to establish a baseline data of annual effective dose and to assess the associated health risk from outdoor terrestrial γ radiation along the river Alaknanda and Ganges of India. Terrestrial γ radiation exposure doses (excluding cosmic radiation were measured using a Plastic Scintillation Counter. Absorbed dose rates in air were measured at eight designated locations from Nandprayag to Allahabad along the river. From the average absorbed dose rates, annual effective dose (AED and excess life time cancer risks (ELCR were calculated by standard method. Results showed that absorbed dose rates in air ranged between 81.33 ± 2.34 nSv.h−1 and 144 ± 5.77 nSv.h−1 and calculated AED ranged between 0.10 ± 0.012 mSv.y−1 to 0.18 ± 0.007 mSv.y−1 at the designated locations along these rivers. Calculated ELCR were found in the range of 0.375 × 10−3 to 0.662 × 10−3. Present study measured the outdoor γ radiation levels along the rivers. The calculated annual effective doses and life time cancer risk were found higher than the world average value at higher altitudes. But the measured doses and calculated risks at plains were close to that of reported average values.

  15. Effect of radiation dose level on the detectability of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, Sara A.; Svalkvist, Angelica; Maansson, Lars Gunnar; Baath, Magnus [University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Gothenburg (Sweden); Johnsson, Aase A.; Vikgren, Jenny; Flinck, Agneta; Boijsen, Marianne; Fisichella, Valeria A. [University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    To investigate the detectability of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis at reduced radiation dose levels. Eighty-six patients were included in the study and were examined with tomosynthesis and computed tomography (CT). Artificial noise was added to simulate that the tomosynthesis images were acquired at dose levels corresponding to 12, 32, and 70 % of the default setting effective dose (0.12 mSv). Three observers (with >20, >20 and three years of experience) read the tomosynthesis cases for presence of nodules in a free-response receiver operating characteristics (FROC) study. CT served as reference. Differences between dose levels were calculated using the jack-knife alternative FROC (JAFROC) figure of merit (FOM). The JAFROC FOM was 0.45, 0.54, 0.55, and 0.54 for the 12, 32, 70, and 100 % dose levels, respectively. The differences in FOM between the 12 % dose level and the 32, 70, and 100 % dose levels were 0.087 (p = 0.006), 0.099 (p = 0.003), and 0.093 (p = 0.004), respectively. Between higher dose levels, no significant differences were found. A substantial reduction from the default setting dose in chest tomosynthesis may be possible. In the present study, no statistically significant difference in detectability of pulmonary nodules was found when reducing the radiation dose to 32 %. (orig.)

  16. Radiation as an immunological adjuvant: current evidence on dose and fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eDemaria

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation to a cancer site has the ability to convert the irradiated tumor in an immunogenic hub. However, radiation is a complex modifier of the tumor microenvironment and, by itself, is seldom sufficient to induce a therapeutically significant anti-tumor immune response, since it can also activate immune suppressive pathways. While several combinations of local radiation and immunotherapy have been shown in pre-clinical models to induce powerful anti-tumor immunity, the optimal strategy to achieve this effect remains to be defined. When used in vivo, radiation effects on tumors depend on the dose per fraction applied, the number of fractions used, and the total dose. Moreover, the interplay of these three variables is contingent upon the tumor setting studied, both in preclinical and clinical applications. To enable repair of the collateral damage to the normal tissue, radiation is usually given in multiple fractions, usually of 2 Gy. Generally, the use of larger fractions is limited to sterotactic applications, whereby optimal immobilization reduces inter and intra-fraction movement and permits a very conformal delivery of dose to the target, with optimal exclusion of normal tissue. Translation of the partnership of radiation and immunotherapy to the clinic requires a careful consideration of the radiation regimens used. To date, little is known on whether different dose/fractionation regimens have a specific impact on the anti-tumor immune response. Most experiments combining the two modalities were conducted with single fractions of radiotherapy. However, there is at least some evidence that when combined with some specific immunotherapy approaches, the ability of radiation to promote anti-tumor immunity is dependent on the dose and fractionation employed. We critically review the available in vitro and in vivo data on this subject and discuss the potential impact of fractionation on the ability of radiation to synergize with

  17. Fetal radiation dose estimates for I-131 sodium iodide in cases where conception occurs after administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.B.; Stabin, M.G. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    After administration of I-131 to the female patient, the possibility of radiation exposure of the embryo/fetus exists if the patient becomes pregnant while radioiodine remains in the body. Fetal radiation dose estimates for such cases were calculated. Doses were calculated for various maternal thyroid uptakes and time intervals between administration and conception, including euthyroid and hyperthyroid cases. The maximum fetal dose calculating was about 9.8E-03 mGy/MBq, which occurred with 100% maternal thyroid uptake and a 1 week interval between administration and conception. Placental crossover of the small amount of radioiodine remaining 90 days after conception was also considered. Such crossover could result in an additional fetal dose of 9.8E-05 mGy/MBq and a maximum fetal thyroid self dose of 3.5E-04 mGy/MBq.

  18. MCz diode response as a high-dose gamma radiation dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Goncalves, J.A.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Depto. de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo-PUC/SP, Rua Marques de Paranagua no 111-01303 050 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Khoury, H.J. [Nuclear Energy Department, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco-UFPE, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire no 1000-50740 540 Recife/PE (Brazil); Napolitano, C.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Haerkoenen, J. [Helsinki Institute of Physics-HIP, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Bueno, C.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Caixa Postal 11049 - 05422 970 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Depto. de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo-PUC/SP, Rua Marques de Paranagua no 111-01303 050 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil)], E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br

    2008-02-15

    This work presents the preliminary results obtained with a high-resistivity magnetic Czochralski (MCz) silicon diode processed at the Helsinki Institute of Physics as a high-dose gamma dosimeter in radiation processing. The irradiation was performed using a {sup 60}Co source (Gammacell 220, MDS Nordion) within total doses from 100 Gy up to 3 kGy at a dose rate of 3 kGy/h. In this interval, the dosimetric response of the diode is linear with a correlation coefficient (r{sup 2}) higher than 0.993. However, without any irradiation procedure, the device showed a small sensitivity dependence on the accumulated dose. For total dose of 3 kGy, the observed decrease was about 2%. To clarify the origin of this possible radiation damage effect, some studies are under way.

  19. Verification of absorbed dose using diodes in cobalt-60 radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhi, Muhammad Asghar; Fatmi, Shahab; Chughtai, Gul M; Arshad, Muhammad; Shakil, Muhammad; Rahmani, Uzma Mahmood; Imran, Malik Younas; Buzdar, Saeed Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this work was to enhance the quality and safety of dose delivery in the practice of radiation oncology. To achieve this goal, the absorbed dose verification program was initiated by using the diode in vivo dosimetry (IVD) system (for entrance and exit). This practice was implemented at BINO, Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Diodes were calibrated for making absorbed dose measurements. Various correction factors (SSD, dose non-linearity, field size, angle of incidence, and wedge) were determined for diode IVD system. The measurements were performed in phantom in order to validate the IVD procedure. One hundred and nineteen patients were monitored and 995 measurements were performed. For phantom, the percentage difference between measured and calculated dose for entrance setting remained within ±2% and for exit setting ±3%. For patient measurements, the percentage difference between measured and calculated dose remained within ±5% for entrance/open fields and ±7% for exit/wedge/oblique fields. One hundred and nineteen patients and 995 fields have been monitored during the period of 6 months. The analysis of all available measurements gave a mean percent deviation of ±1.19% and standard deviation of ±2.87%. Larger variations have been noticed in oblique, wedge and exit measurements. This investigation revealed that clinical dosimetry using diodes is simple, provides immediate results and is a useful quality assurance tool for dose delivery. It has enhanced the quality of radiation dose delivery and increased/improved the reliability of the radiation therapy practice in BINO.

  20. Radiation dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to levels of pulsed fluoroscopy: a comparative study with technical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Juraj Artner, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, RKU, GermanyBackground: The sacroiliac (SI joint is frequently the primary source of low back pain. Over the past decades, a number of different SI injection techniques have been used in its diagnosis and therapy. Despite the concerns regarding exposure to radiation, image-guided injection techniques are the preferred method to achieve safe and precise intra-articular needle placement. The following study presents a comparison of radiation doses, calculated for fluoroscopy and CT-guided SI joint injections in standard and low-dose protocol and presents the technical possibility of CT-guidance with maximum radiation dose reduction to levels of fluoroscopic-guidance for a precise intra-articular injection technique.Objective: To evaluate the possibility of dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels and to compare the doses of pulsed-fluoroscopy-, CT-guidance, and low-dose CT-guidance for intra-articular SI joint injections.Study design: Comparative study with technical considerations.Methods: A total of 30 CT-guided intra-articular SI joint injections were performed in January 2012 in a developed low-dose mode and the radiation doses were calculated. They were compared to 30 pulsed-fluoroscopy-guided SI joint injections, which were performed in the month before, and to five injections, performed in standard CT-guided biopsy mode for spinal interventions. The statistical significance was calculated with the SPSS software using the Mann–Whitney U-Test. Technical details and anatomical considerations were provided.Results: A significant dose reduction of average 94.01% was achieved using the low-dose protocol for CT-guided SI joint injections. The radiation dose could be approximated to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels.Conclusion: Radiation dose of CT-guided SI joint injections can be

  1. Pharmacological doses of daily ascorbate protect tumours from radiation damage after a single dose of radiation in an intracranial mouse glioma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole eGrasso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumour environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionising radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumour, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitising GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy of radiation combined with a one hour exposure to ascorbate (5 mM sensitised murine glioma GL261cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy of whole brain radiation combined with daily intra-peritoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg in an intra-cranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumour-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain eight days after tumour implantation, a second group received daily intra-peritoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8-45 after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumour progression, intra-peritoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumour progression. Tumour progression was faster in tumour-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumours treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumour micro-environment which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant.

  2. Pharmacological doses of daily ascorbate protect tumors from radiation damage after a single dose of radiation in an intracranial mouse glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V; Castro, M Leticia; Field, Cameron S; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8-45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant.

  3. RADIATION HYGIENIC MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT OF POPULATION DOSES IN RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED AREAS OF TULA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Chichura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal. The analyses of radiation hygienic monitoring conducted in Tula region territories affected by the Chernobyl NPP accident regarding cesium-137 and strontium- 90 in the local foodstuffs and the analyses of populational annual effective dose. The materials and methods. The survey was conducted in Tula Region since 1997 to 2015. Over that period, more than fifty thousand samples of the main foodstuffs from the post-Chernobyl contaminated area were analyzed. Simultaneously with that, the external gamma - radiation dose rate was measured in the fixed control points. The dynamics of cesium -137 and strontium-90 content in foodstuffs were assessed along with the maximum values of the mean annual effective doses to the population and the contribution of the collective dose from medical exposures into the structure of the annual effective collective dose to the population. The results. The amount of cesium-137 and strontium -90 in the local foodstuffs was identified. The external gamma- radiation dose rate values were found to be stable and not exceeding the natural fluctuations range typical for the middle latitudes of Russia’s European territory. The maximum mean annual effective dose to the population reflects the stable radiation situation and does not exceed the permissible value of 1 mSv. The contribution of the collective dose from medical exposures of the population has been continuously reducing as well as the average individual dose to the population per one medical treatment under the annual increase of the medical treatments quantities. The conclusion. There is no exceedance of the admissible levels of cesium-137 and strontium- 90 content in the local foodstuffs. The mean annual effective dose to the population has decreased which makes it possible to transfer the settlements affected by the Chernobyl NPP accident to normal life style. This is covered by the draft concept of the settlements’ transfer to normal life style.

  4. The biobehavioral and neuroimmune impact of low-dose ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Jason M; Blevins, Neil A; Meling, Daryl D; Peterlin, Molly B; Gridley, Daila S; Cengel, Keith A; Freund, Gregory G

    2011-01-01

    In the clinical setting, repeated exposures (10–30) to low-doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 200 cGy), as seen in radiotherapy for cancer, causes fatigue. Almost nothing is known, however, about the fatigue inducing effects of a single exposure to environmental low-dose ionizing radiation that might occur during high-altitude commercial air flight, a nuclear reactor accident or a solar particle event (SPE). To investigate the short-term impact of low-dose ionizing radiation on mouse biobehaviors and neuroimmunity, male CD-1 mice were whole body irradiated with 50 cGy or 200 cGy of gamma or proton radiation. Gamma radiation was found to reduce spontaneous locomotor activity by 35% and 36%, respectively, 6 h post irradiation. In contrast, the motivated behavior of social exploration was un-impacted by gamma radiation. Examination of pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts in the brain demonstrated that gamma radiation increased hippocampal TNF-α expression as early as 4 h post-irradiation. This was coupled to subsequent increases in IL-1RA (8 h and 12 h post irradiation) in the cortex and hippocampus and reductions in activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) (24 h post irradiation) in the cortex. Finally, restraint stress was a significant modulator of the neuroimmune response to radiation blocking the ability of 200 cGy gamma radiation from impairing locomotor activity and altering the brain-based inflammatory response to irradiation. Taken together, these findings indicate that low-dose ionizing radiation rapidly activates the neuroimmune system potentially causing early onset fatigue-like symptoms in mice. PMID:21958477

  5. A method of reducing background radiance for emissivity-compensated radiation thermometry of silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, T; Toyoda, Y; Seo, T

    2013-02-01

    We studied the spectral and directional emissivities of silicon wafers using an optical polarization technique. Based on simulation and experimental results, we developed two radiation thermometry methods for silicon wafers: one is based on the polarized emissivity-invariant condition and the other is based on the relationship between the ratio of the p- and s-polarized radiance and the polarized emissivity. These methods can be performed at temperatures above 600 °C and over a wide wavelength range (0.9-4.8 μm), irrespective of the dielectric film thickness and the substrate resistivity, which depends on the dopant concentration. The temperature measurements were estimated to have expanded uncertainties (k = 2) of less than 5 °C. With a view to practically applying these methods, we investigated a method to reduce the intense background radiance produced by high-intensity heating lamps. We found that the background radiance can be greatly reduced by using a radiometer that is sensitive to wavelengths of 4.5 or 4.8 μm and suitable geometrical arrangements of a quartz plate. This opens up the possibility of using the two proposed radiation thermometry methods in practical applications.

  6. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  7. What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-04-01

    The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates.

  8. Natural background. gamma. radiation exposure in the metropolitan area of the valley of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the natural background radiation have been made at numerous places throughout the world. Very little work in this field has been done in developing countries. In Mexico the natural radiation to which the population is exposed has not been assessed. This dissertation represents a pioneer study in this environmental area. The radiation exposure which occupants within buildings receive as a result of naturally occurring radionuclides present in construction materials is the principal focus. Data were collected between August 1979 and November 1980. Continuous monitoring was done with TLDs placed on site for periods of 3 to 6 months. The instrumentation used for real-time measurements was a portable NaI (TI) scintillation detector. In addition, radiometric measurements were performed on construction materials commonly used in Mexican homes. Based on TLD readings taken within 75 dwellings, the typical indoor exposure for a resident of the study area is 9.2 ..mu..Rh/sup -1/. The average reading of the 152 indoor scintillometer surveys was 9.5 ..mu..Rh/sup -1/, the outdoor reading 7.5 ..mu..Rh/sup -1/. Results of one-way and multiway analyses of the exposure data to determine the effect due to building materials type, geologic subsoil, age of dwelling, and elevation are also presented. The results of 152 indoor scintillometer surveys are described.

  9. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  10. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  11. Criteria for the Formation of Population III Objects in the Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kitayama, T; Umemura, M; Ikeuchi, S

    2001-01-01

    We explore possibilities of collapse and star formation in Population III objects exposed to the external ultraviolet background (UVB) radiation. Assuming spherical symmetry, we solve self-consistently radiative transfer of photons, non-equilibrium H2 chemistry, and gas hydrodynamics. Although the UVB does suppress the formation of low mass objects, the negative feedback turns out to be weaker than previously suggested. In particular, the cut-off scale of collapse drops significantly below the virial temperature 10^4 K at weak UV intensities, due to both self-shielding of the gas and H2 cooling. Clouds above this cut-off tend to contract highly dynamically, further promoting self-shielding and H2 formation. For plausible radiation intensities and spectra, the collapsing gas can cool efficiently to temperatures well below 10^4 K before rotationally supported and the final H2 fraction reaches 10^{-3}. Our results imply that star formation can take place in low mass objects collapsing in the UVB. The threshold b...

  12. Cancer-associated fibroblasts from human NSCLC survive ablative doses of radiation but their invasive capacity is reduced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellevik Turid

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs are significant components of solid malignancies and play central roles in cancer sustainability, invasion and metastasis. In this study we have investigated the invasive capacity and matrix remodelling properties of human lung CAFs after exposure to ablative doses of ionizing radiation (AIR, equivalent to single fractions delivered by stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SART for medically inoperable stage-I/II non-small-cell lung cancers. Methods CAFs were isolated from lung tumour specimens from 16 donors. Initially, intrinsic radiosensitivity was evaluated by checking viability and extent of DNA-damage response (DDR at different radiation doses. The migrative and invasive capacities of CAFs were thereafter determined after a sub-lethal single radiation dose of 18 Gy. To ascertain the mechanisms behind the altered invasive capacity of cells, expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs were measured in the conditioned media several days post-irradiation, along with expression of cell surface integrins and dynamics of focal contacts by vinculin-staining. Results Exposing CAFs to 1 × 18 Gy resulted in a potent induction of multiple nuclear DDR foci (> 9/cell with little resolution after 120 h, induced premature cellular senescence and inhibition of the proliferative, migrative and invasive capacity. AIR promoted MMP-3 and inhibited MMP-1 appearance to some extent, but did not affect expression of other major MMPs. Furthermore, surface expression of integrins α2, β1 and α5 was consistently enhanced, and a dramatic augmentation and redistribution of focal contacts was observed. Conclusions Our data indicate that ablative doses of radiation exert advantageous inhibitory effects on the proliferative, migratory and invasive capacity of lung CAFs. The reduced motility of irradiated CAFs might be a consequence of stabilized focal contacts via integrins.

  13. Low Dose Radiation Cancer Risks: Epidemiological and Toxicological Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Hoel, PhD

    2012-04-19

    The basic purpose of this one year research grant was to extend the two stage clonal expansion model (TSCE) of carcinogenesis to exposures other than the usual single acute exposure. The two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis incorporates the biological process of carcinogenesis, which involves two mutations and the clonal proliferation of the intermediate cells, in a stochastic, mathematical way. The current TSCE model serves a general purpose of acute exposure models but requires numerical computation of both the survival and hazard functions. The primary objective of this research project was to develop the analytical expressions for the survival function and the hazard function of the occurrence of the first cancer cell for acute, continuous and multiple exposure cases within the framework of the piece-wise constant parameter two-stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis. For acute exposure and multiple exposures of acute series, it is either only allowed to have the first mutation rate vary with the dose, or to have all the parameters be dose dependent; for multiple exposures of continuous exposures, all the parameters are allowed to vary with the dose. With these analytical functions, it becomes easy to evaluate the risks of cancer and allows one to deal with the various exposure patterns in cancer risk assessment. A second objective was to apply the TSCE model with varing continuous exposures from the cancer studies of inhaled plutonium in beagle dogs. Using step functions to estimate the retention functions of the pulmonary exposure of plutonium the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model was to be used to estimate the beagle dog lung cancer risks. The mathematical equations of the multiple exposure versions of the TSCE model were developed. A draft manuscript which is attached provides the results of this mathematical work. The application work using the beagle dog data from plutonium exposure has not been completed due to the fact

  14. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Ploen, J.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination...... of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D-50,D-i, and the normalized dose-response gradient, gamma(50,i). Results: A highly...... significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D-50,D-TRG1 = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), gamma(50,TRG1) = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D-50,D-TRG1&2 = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy...

  15. Low-dose X-ray radiation induces structural alterations in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Round, Ekaterina; Erofeev, Ivan; Weik, Martin; Ishchenko, Andrii; Gushchin, Ivan; Mishin, Alexey; Willbold, Dieter; Büldt, Georg; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2014-10-01

    X-ray-radiation-induced alterations to protein structures are still a severe problem in macromolecular crystallography. One way to avoid the influence of radiation damage is to reduce the X-ray dose absorbed by the crystal during data collection. However, here it is demonstrated using the example of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) that even a low dose of less than 0.06 MGy may induce structural alterations in proteins. This dose is about 500 times smaller than the experimental dose limit which should ideally not be exceeded per data set (i.e. 30 MGy) and 20 times smaller than previously detected specific radiation damage at the bR active site. To date, it is the lowest dose at which radiation modification of a protein structure has been described. Complementary use was made of high-resolution X-ray crystallography and online microspectrophotometry to quantitatively study low-dose X-ray-induced changes. It is shown that structural changes of the protein correlate with the spectroscopically observed formation of the so-called bR orange species. Evidence is provided for structural modifications taking place at the protein active site that should be taken into account in crystallographic studies which aim to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of bR function.

  16. Mechanisms of Enhanced Cell Killing at Low Doses: Implications for Radiation Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Peter J. Johnston; Dr. George D. Wilson

    2003-10-15

    We have shown that cell lethality actually measured after exposure to low-doses of low-LET radiation, is markedly enhanced relative to the cell lethality previously expected by extrapolation of the high-dose cell-killing response. Net cancer risk is a balance between cell transformation and cell kill and such enhanced lethality may more than compensate for transformation at low radiation doses over a least the first 10 cGy of low-LET exposure. This would lead to a non-linear, threshold, dose-risk relationship. Therefore our data imply the possibility that the adverse effects of small radiation doses (<10 cGy) could be overestimated in specific cases. It is now important to research the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of low-dose hypersensitivity to cell killing, in order to determine whether this can be generalized to safely allow an increase in radiation exposure limits. This would have major cost-reduction implications for the whole EM program.

  17. Effect of fractionation and rate of radiation dose on human leukemic cells, HL-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, J.G.; Song, C.W.; Kim, T.H.; Levitt, S.H.

    1985-03-01

    The capacity of HL-60 cells, human acute promyelocytic leukemic cells established in culture, to repair sublethal radiation damage was estimated from the response of the cells to fractionated irradiation or to a single irradiation at difference dose rates. After exposure of cells to a single dose of X rays at a dose rate of 78 rad/min, the survival curve was characterized by n = 2.5, D/sub q/ = 80 rad, and D/sub 0/ = 83.2 rad. Split-dose studies demonstrated that the cells were able to repair a substantial portion of sublethal radiation damage in 2 hr. The response of the cells to irradiation at different dose rates decreased with a decrease in the dose rates, which could be attributed to repair of sublethal radiation damage. The possibility that some of the malignant hemopoietic cells, if not all, may possess a substantial capacity to repair sublethal radiation damage should not be underestimated in planning total-body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation.

  18. A Criterion for Photoionization of Pregalactic Clouds Exposed to Diffuse Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Yukiko; Umemura, Masayuki

    1998-07-01

    To elucidate the permeation of cosmic ultraviolet (UV) background radiation into a pregalactic cloud and the subsequent ionization, the frequency-dependent radiative transfer equation is solved, coupled with the ionization process, for a spherical top-hat cloud composed of pure hydrogen. The calculations properly involve scattering processes of ionizing photons that originate from radiative recombination. As a result, it is shown that the self-shielding, although it is often disregarded in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, could start to emerge shortly after the maximum expansion stages of density fluctuations. Quantitatively, the self-shielding is prominent above a critical number density of hydrogen, which is given by ncrit = 1.4 × 10-2 cm-3 (M/108 Msolar)-1/5I3/521 for 104 K gas, where M is the cloud mass and the UV background intensity is assumed to be Iν = 10-21I21(ν/νL)-1 ergs cm-2 s-1 sr-1 Hz-1, with νL being the Lyman limit frequency. The weak dependence of ncrit upon the mass is worth noting. The corresponding critical optical depth (τcrit) turns out to be independent of either M or I21, which is τcrit = 2.4 for 104 K gas. The present analysis reveals that the Strömgren approximation leads to overestimation of the photoionization effects. Also, the self-shielded neutral core is no longer sharply separated from surrounding ionized regions; a low but noticeable degree of ionization is caused by high-energy photons even in the self-shielded core. The present results may be substantial when one considers the biasing by photoionization against low-mass galaxy formation.

  19. Unique signatures of natural background radiation on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most frequently observed major consequences of ionizing radiation are chromosomal lesions and cancers, although the entire genome may be affected. Owing to its haploid status and absence of recombination, the human Y chromosome is an ideal candidate to be assessed for possible genetic alterations induced by ionizing radiation. We studied the human Y chromosome in 390 males from the South Indian state of Kerala, where the level of natural background radiation (NBR is ten-fold higher than the worldwide average, and that from 790 unexposed males as control. RESULTS: We observed random microdeletions in the Azoospermia factor (AZF a, b and c regions in >90%, and tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism (CNP of 11 different Y-linked genes in about 80% of males exposed to NBR. The autosomal homologues of Y-linked CDY genes largely remained unaffected. Multiple polymorphic copies of the Y-linked genes showing single Y-specific signals suggested their tandem duplication. Some exposed males showed unilocus duplication of DAZ genes resulting in six copies. Notably, in the AZFa region, approximately 25% of exposed males showed deletion of the DBY gene, whereas flanking genes USP9Y and UTY remained unaffected. All these alterations were detected in blood samples but not in the germline (sperm samples. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to high levels of NBR correlated with several interstitial polymorphisms of the human Y chromosome. CNPs and enhanced transcription of the SRY gene after duplication are envisaged to compensate for the loss of Y chromosome in some cells. The aforesaid changes, confined to peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggest a possible innate mechanism protecting the germline DNA from the NBR. Genome analysis of a larger population focusing on greater numbers of genes may provide new insights into the mechanisms and risks of the resultant genetic damages. The present work demonstrates unique signatures of NBR on human Y chromosomes

  20. Radioactivity of Tobacco Leaves and Radiation Dose Induced from Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Papastefanou

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece and before cigarette production was studied in order to find out any association between the root uptake of radionuclides from soil ground by the tobacco plants and the effective dose induced to smokers from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides , such as 226Ra and 210Pb of the uranium series and 228Ra of the thorium series and/or man-made radionuclides, such as 137Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the activities of the radioisotopes of radium, 226Ra and 228Ra in the tobacco leaves reflected their origin from the soil by root uptake rather than fertilizers used in the cultivation of tobacco plants. Lead-210 originated from the air and was deposited onto the tobacco leaves and trapped by the trichomes. Potassium-40 in the tobacco leaves was due to root uptake either from soil or from fertilizer. The cesium radioisotopes 137Cs and 134Cs in tobacco leaves were due to root uptake and not due to deposition onto the leaf foliage as they still remained in soil four years after the Chernobyl reactor accident, but were absent from the atmosphere because of the rain washout (precipitation and gravitational settling. The annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers for 226Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 μSv/y (average 79.7 μSv/y, while for 228Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 μSv/y (average 67.1 μSv/y and for 210Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 μSv/y (average 104.7 μSv/y, that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective doses of the three radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 μSv/y (average 251.5 μSv/y. The annual effective dose from 137Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 nSv/y (average 199.3 nSv/y.

  1. Dependence of Radiation Damage in Stainless Steel on Irradiation Dose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The accelerator driven radioactive clean nuclear power system (ADS) is a novel innovative idea forthe sustainable development of nuclear power system. The spallation neutron source system is one of thethree key parts of ADS, which provides source neutrons of about 1018 s-1 for the burning-up of fuels.Stainless steel (SS) is used for the beam window and target materials of the spallation neutron sourcesystem. It is irradiated by high-energy and intense protons and/or neutrons during operation. Theaccumulated displacement damage dose could reach a couple of hundred dpa (displacement per atom) per

  2. Decreasing the effective radiation dose in pediatric