WorldWideScience

Sample records for background radiation dose-rates

  1. Natural background radiation and estimation of gonadal dose rate of population of Chittagong region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostofa, M.N.; Ahmed, J.U. (Chittagong Univ. (Bangladesh). Dept. of Physics); Ahmed, R.; Ishaque, A.M. (Nuclear Medicine Center, Chittagong (Bangladesh)); Ahmed, K. (Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Dacca (Bangladesh))

    1981-07-01

    A survey was made on the background radiation to estimate the gonadal dose rate in the district of Chittagong from the year 1978 to 80. This was done with the help of a calibrated Nuclear Chicago transistorized survey meter. The measurements were made in different types of dwellings and occupational buildings constructed with wood, straw/bamboo, tin/bamboo, tin/brick and single and multistoried buildings of brick and concrete. For measurement of outdoor radiation the investigating areas taken were the roads, fields and the Karnafuly river. The variation in the population dose rate as well as gonadal dose rate were observed in different types of dwellings and occupational buildings including outdoors. The average population dose rate including cosmic ray intensity was found to be 172.41+-8.61 mrad/year. Thus, the annual gonadal dose rate due to gamma radiation was found to be 137.92+-6.89 mrad/year.

  2. Background radiation dose-rates to non-human biota in a high mountain habitat in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, J.E.; Gelsvik, R.; Kålås, J.A.;

    2009-01-01

    with activity concentrations reported for reindeer muscle sampled at proximate locations, falling at a level of some 10s of Bq kg-1 by fresh weight. Statistical analyses of the data showed that bank vole and shrew 210Po data constitute different populations with different mean ranks. Unweighted dose-rates......Determination of background radiation dose-rates is important in the process of assessing risks to the environment from exposure to human activities both in terms of deriving the incremental dose-rate and as a point of reference for evaluating the significance of the exposure level. A consideration...... attributable to the presence of internally distributed 210Po were calculated to be 0.07 μGy h-1 for Bank vole....

  3. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  4. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  5. Background gamma terrestrial dose rate in Nigerian functional coal mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the background terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates at different indoor and outdoor locations on the surfaces of Okpara underground and Okaba open cast mines in Nigeria were made. Two duly calibrated low-level gamma survey metres were held 1 m above the ground surface for these measurements. Measurements were also made at various locations inside the mine tunnel at the Okpara mine. Results indicate that the indoor background gamma radiation is comparable for both mining environments. The mean outdoor gamma dose rate determined for the Okaba mining environment is 10.4 nGy h-1 as against 11.7 nGy h-1 for Okpara. The ranges are 8.5-16.5 nGy h-1 for the Okpara measurements and 7.5-14.0 nGy h-1 for Okaba. Thus, the outdoor gamma dose rates appear to be generally lower at the Okaba open cast mine than at Okpara. The indoor dose rate values range from 11.0 to 17.0 nGy h-1 in both environments. These indoor measurements have nearly the same mean values 14.4 and 14.5 nGy h-1 for Okpara and Okaba environments, respectively. The indoor to outdoor dose rate ratio is 1.2 for Okpara and 1.4 for Okaba. These values are in consonance with the corresponding ratio given in literature. Dose rate measurements inside the mine tunnel at the Okpara mine are higher than the surface indoor measurements ranging from 13.5 to 20.5 nGy h-1 with a mean of 16.5 nGy h-1. The higher dose rate values measured in the mine tunnel are attributable to the concentration of radon in the 'closed' environment of the mine tunnel. (authors)

  6. Terrestrial gamma dose rate, radioactivity and radiological hazards in the rocks of an elevated radiation background in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurabu, Wedad Ali; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Heryansyah, Arien; Alnhary, Anees; Fadhl, Shadi

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate natural radiation and radioactivity in the rock and to assess the corresponding health risk in a region of elevated background radiation in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen. The mean external gamma dose rate was 374 nGy h(-1) which is approximately six times the world average. The measured results were used to compute annual effective dose equivalent, collective effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk, which are 2.298 mSv, 61.95 man Sv y(-1) and 8.043  ×  10(-3), respectively. Rocks samples from different geological formations were analyzed for quantitative determination of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The specific activity of the rocks samples ranges from 7  ±  1 Bq Kg(-1) to 12 513  ±  329 Bq Kg(-1) for (232)Th, from 6  ±  1 Bq kg(-1) to 3089  ±  74 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra and 702  ±  69 Bq kg(-1) to 2954  ±  285 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K. (232)Th is the main contributor to gamma dose rate from the rock samples. Indicators of radiological health impact, radium equivalent activity and external hazard index are 3738 Bq kg(-1) and 10.10, respectively. The mean external hazard index was ten times unity in the studied locations in Juban District, which is higher than the recommended value. PMID:26909670

  7. Background internal dose rates of earthworm and arthropod species in the forests of Aomori, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we measured the concentrations of several natural radionuclides in samples of one earthworm species and 11 arthropod species collected from four coniferous forests in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, Japan, and we assessed the background internal radiation dose rate for each species. Dose rates were calculated by using the radionuclide concentrations in the samples and dose conversion coefficients obtained from the literature. The mean internal dose rate in the earthworm species was 0.28 μGy h-1, and the mean internal dose rates in the arthropod species ranged between 0.036 and 0.69 μGy h-1. (author)

  8. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  9. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  10. Characteristics of radiation dose rate distribution in living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural radiation survey has been performed to characterize the gamma and cosmic ray dose rate distribution in living environment. Various places/environments which we encounter in our daily life were measured with high precision dose rate meter equipped with a pulse height spectrum-to-dose rate converter and a 7.6 cm diameter spherical NaI (Tl) scintillation detector. Several aspects of dose rate distribution have been found through these data; typical and interesting examples are as follows. (1) Gamma ray dose rates were measured inside and outside wooden houses in snowy season and in snowless season to see the effect of snow cover to the diminution of terrestrial gamma ray dose rate. The snow cover turned to be less effective inside a house than outside for the diminution of gamma ray dose rate. (2) Gamma ray dose rates were measured in a 2-storied concrete residence during its construction. The dose rate increased with progressing the construction, which implies that the indoor gamma ray dose rate depends not only on the building material but also on the building structure, that is the solid angle to the natural gamma ray sources such as the floor, ceiling and walls. (3) Continuous measurement was performed while a person made a business trip to Tokyo. Both gamma and cosmic ray dose rate showed a marked variation from place to place, which was found to be caused by the change of environmental conditions such as the nature and geometrical arrangement of the surrounding materials. Based on these data it was known that the gamma ray dose rate generally shows upward tendency and the cosmic ray dose rate downward in artificial environment compared with natural environment. (author)

  11. Background internal dose rates of earthworm and arthropod species in the forests of Aomori, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured naturally occurring radionuclides in samples from an earthworm species and 11 arthropod species collected in coniferous forests in Rokkasho, Aomori, Japan, to assess background internal radiation dose rates. The rates were calculated from the measured concentrations of the radionuclides and dose coefficients from the literature. The mean internal dose rate of composite earthworm samples was 0.35 μGy h-1, whereas the mean dose rates of the arthropod samples ranged from 36 nGy h-1 to 0.79 μGy h-1. Polonium-210 was the radionuclide with the highest contribution to the internal dose rate for all the species, except the longhorn beetle. (author)

  12. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  13. Radiological mapping of Kelantan, Malaysia, using terrestrial radiation dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Sanusi, Syazwan Mohd; Gabdo, Hamman Tukur

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of the environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) in each district of Kelantan state, Malaysia, were carried out using a portable hand-held radiation survey meter and global positioning system. The measurements were done based on geology and soil types of the area. The mean TGRD was found to be 209 nGy h(-1). Few areas of relatively enhanced activity were observed in Pasir Mas, Tanah Merah and Jeli districts, which have a mean TGRD between 300 and 500 nGy h(-1). An isodose map of the area was produced using ArcGIS software version 9.3. PMID:26540360

  14. Radiological mapping of Kelantan, Malaysia, using terrestrial radiation dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Sanusi, Syazwan Mohd; Gabdo, Hamman Tukur

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of the environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) in each district of Kelantan state, Malaysia, were carried out using a portable hand-held radiation survey meter and global positioning system. The measurements were done based on geology and soil types of the area. The mean TGRD was found to be 209 nGy h(-1). Few areas of relatively enhanced activity were observed in Pasir Mas, Tanah Merah and Jeli districts, which have a mean TGRD between 300 and 500 nGy h(-1). An isodose map of the area was produced using ArcGIS software version 9.3.

  15. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h−1 to 500 nGy h−1. The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h−1. This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h−1 (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation. - Highlights: • A methodology is presented to reduce terrestrial gamma dose rate field survey. • Geological background of acid intrusive of granitic type has the highest dose rates. • The mean dose rate is 2 times higher than the world average. • Isodose map of terrestrial gamma radiation for Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was produced

  16. Car-borne survey of natural background gamma dose rate in Çanakkale region, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan, S; Arıkan, I H; Oğuz, F; Özdemir, T; Yücel, B; Varinlioğlu, A; Köse, A

    2012-01-01

    Natural background gamma radiation was measured along roads in the environs of Çanakkale region by using a car-borne spectrometer system with a plastic gamma radiation detector. In addition, activity concentrations of ²³⁸U, ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th and ⁴⁰K in soil samples from the Çanakkale region were determined by using a gamma spectrometer with an HPGe detector. A total of 92,856 data of the background gamma dose rate were collected for the Çanakkale region. The background gamma dose rate of the Çanakkale region was mapped using ArcGIS software, applying the geostatistical inverse distance-weighted method. The average and population-weighted average of the gamma dose are 55.4 and 40.6 nGy h⁻¹, respectively. The corresponding average annual effective dose to the public ranged from 26.6 to 96.8 µSv. PMID:21362693

  17. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanusi, M S M; Ramli, A T; Gabdo, H T; Garba, N N; Heryanshah, A; Wagiran, H; Said, M N

    2014-09-01

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h(-1) to 500 nGy h(-1). The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h(-1). This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h(-1) (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation.

  18. Assessment of Environmental Gamma Radiation Dose Rate in Ardabil and Sarein in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Alighadri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Gamma rays, the most energetic photons within the any other wave in the electromagnetic spectrum, pose enough energy to form charged particles and adversely affect human health. Provided that the external exposure of human beings to natural environmental gamma radiation normally exceeds that from all man-made sources combined, environmental gamma dose rate and corresponding annual effective dose were determined in the cities of Ardabil and Sar Ein.Materials and Methods: Outdoor environmental gamma dose rates were measured using an Ion Chamber Survey Meter in 48 selected locations (one in city center and the remaining in cardinal and ordinal directions in Ardabil and Sar Ein. Ten more locations were monitored along the hot springs effluent in Sar Ein. Measurements of gamma radiation dose rate were performed at 20 and 100 cm above the ground for a period of one hour.Results: Average outdoor environmental gamma dose rate were determined as 265, 219, and 208  for Ardabil, Sar Ein, and along the hot spring effluent, respectively. The annual affective dose for Ardabil and Sar Ein residents were estimated to be 1.45 and 1.39 mSv, respectively.Conclusion: Calculated annual effective dose of 1.49 and 1.35 are appreciably higher than the population weighted average exposure to environmental gamma radiation worldwide and that analysis of soil content to different radionuclide is suggested.

  19. Recommended de minimis radiation dose rates for Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A de minimis dose or dose rate as used in this report represents a level of risk which is generally accepted as being of no significance to an individual, or in the case of a population, of no significance to society. The doses corresponding to these levels of risk are based on current scientific knowledge. Dose rates recommended in this report are as follows: a de minimis individual dose rate of 10 μSv a-1, based on a risk level that would generally be regarded as negligible in comparison with other risks; and a de minimis collective dose rate of 1 person-Sv a-1, based on an imperceptible increase above the normal incidences of cancer and genetic defects in the exposed population. The concept of de minimis is to be distinguished from 'exempt from regulation' (below regulatory concern). The latter involves broader social and economic factors which encompass but are not limited to the purely risk-based factors addressed by the de minimis dose. De minimis is one of the factors that determine the exemption of sources or practices that may result in doses below or above the de minimis level. Although these de minimis dose rates should be considered in developing criteria and guidelines for deriving quantities and concentrations of radioactive substances that may be exempted from regulation, this document is only concerned with establishing de minimis dose rates, not with exempting sources and practices

  20. Distribution of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in the eastern coastal area of Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Sahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Prasad, G; Omori, Y; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is one of the important radiation exposures on the earth's surface that results from the three primordial radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The elemental concentration of these elements in the earth's crust could result in the anomalous variation of the terrestrial gamma radiation in the environment. The geology of the local area plays an important role in distribution of these radioactive elements. Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured around the eastern coastal area of Odisha with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. The values of the terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly at different locations in the study area. The values of the terrestrial gamma dose rate ranged from 77 to 1651 nGy h(-1), with an average of 230 nGy h(-1). During the measurement of the terrestrial gamma dose rate, sand and soil samples were also collected for the assessment of natural radionuclides. The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K from these samples were measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry with a NaI(Tl) detector. Activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K ranged from 15.6 to 69 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 46.7 Bq kg(-1), from 28.9 to 973 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 250 Bq kg(-1) and from 139 to 952 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 429, respectively. The detailed significance of these studies has been discussed from the radiation protection point of view. PMID:22874894

  1. Vertical distribution of radiation dose rates in the water of a brackish lake in Aomori Prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seasonal radiation dose rates were measured with glass dosemeters housed in watertight cases at various depths in the water of Lake Obuchi, a brackish lake in Aomori Prefecture, Japan, during fiscal years 2011-2013 to assess the background external radiation dose to aquatic biota in the lake. The mean radiation dose in the surface water of the lake was found to be 27 nGy h-1, which is almost the same as the absorption dose rate due to cosmic ray reported in the literature. Radiation dose rates decreased exponentially with water depth down to a depth of 1 m above the bottom sediment. In the water near the sediment, the dose rate increased with depth owing to the emission of γ-rays from natural radionuclides in the sediment. (authors)

  2. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  3. Dose-rate effect for DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of dose rate on clonogenic cell survival and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) has been examined in a human bladder carcinoma cell line, RT112, treated with ionizing radiation. Cell survival changed markedly over the range of dose rates used (0.01-1.28 Gy/min) with the curves becoming shallower and straighter as the dose rate was lowered. Similarly, the number of DSBs measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) immediately after irradiation varied with dose rate. Fewer DSBs were detectable after low-dose-rate irradiation. However, when a 4-h repair period was allowed after irradiation, cells treated at all dose rates exhibited approximately the same amount of damage. The final level of unrejoined DSBs, as detected by PFGE, therefore does not correlate with cell survival at different dose rates. 16 refs., 2 figs

  4. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  5. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  6. Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} (1 rad d{sup -1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). The literature identifies the developing eggs and young of some species of teleost fish as the most radiosensitive organisms. DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0.1 mGy h{sup -1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic

  7. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of 60Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD50 obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  8. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  9. Occurence and implications of radiation dose-rate effects for material aging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Kenneth T.; Clough, Roger L.

    A number of commercial cable materials, including ethylene propylene rubber and crosslinked polyolefin insulations and chloroprene and chlorosulfonated polyethylene jackets have been radiation aged in air and nitrogen at radiation dose rates ranging from approximately 10 3 to 10 6{rad}/{hr}. Material degradation was followed using ultimate tensile properties (elongation and tensile strength), swelling measurements and infrared spectroscopy. The tensile results indicate that in air environments radiation dose rate effects are important for all four materials, with more mechanical damage occurring as the dose rate is lowered. These results are interpreted as coming from a competition between crosslinking and oxidative scission in which scission becomes more important as the dose rate is lowered. The swelling results offer direct evidence in support of this interpretation. In addition the infrared results show increased carbonyl content at lower dose rates, also indicative of increased oxidation. The conclusions of this study have important implications for the qualification of elastomeric materials for nuclear applications, since they clearly indicate that the mechanism of degradation is quite different (and the amount usually more severe) under low dose rate exposures compared to the mechanism occurring under the high dose rate exposures normally utilized for stimulating the natural aging.

  10. Dose rate and fractionation: Relative importance in radiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal dose rate and fractionation schedules for total body irradiation (TBI) in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are presently unknown. This study compares several fractionation and dose rate schedules that are currently in clinical use. C/sub 3/H/HeJ were given TBI and the bone marrow survival fraction was calculated using the CFU's assay. Irradiation was given as low dose rate (LDR) at 5 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) at 80 cGy/min, in single fraction (SF) and fractionated (FX) regimens. These results indicate no increase in survival for the normal bone marrow stem cells with fractionation either at high or low dose-rates. In fact, fractionation seemed to decrease the bone marrow survival over single fraction radiation

  11. Space Radiation Quality Factors and the Delta Ray Dose and Dose-Rate Reduction Effectiveness Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Cacao, Eliedonna; Alp, Murat

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the authors recommend that the dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor used for space radiation risk assessments should be based on a comparison of the biological effects of energetic electrons produced along a cosmic ray particles path in low fluence exposures to high dose-rate gamma-ray exposures of doses of about 1 Gy. Methods to implement this approach are described. PMID:26808878

  12. Optimum design for the primary cooling system in BWRs to control shutdown radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of radiation dose rate at the time of shutdown is an important task for smoothly performing the regular inspection and maintenance works in nuclear power plants as the number of those plants in operation has increased. Hitachi Ltd. has investigated the industrially applicable measures to reduce dose rate to suppress the exposure dose per year in 1100 MWe class BWR nuclear power plants below 200 Man-Rem. The exposure dose in normal checking works during a regular inspection is regarded to be macroscopically dependent on the dose rate of piping in recirculation system. Thus, it was found that the above target can be achieved by suppressing the dose rate on piping surface to 30 mR/h. For further reduction if iron crud and 60Co ions contributing to the increase of dose rate, in addition to the oxygen injection into the feed water system and the duplicated condensate purification system, the use of corrosion-resistant steel and low cobalt material has been attempted. However, high temperature water to be filtrated can not be passed through the purification system because it employs ion exchange resin. Therefore, the optimum capacity is selected for the purification system in view of the reduction of dose rate and plant thermal efficiency. Hitachi Ltd. recommends the application of this system, considering the evaluation of contribution by the code predicting dose rate increase and estimating economy. The above measures will achieve the exposure dose target of 200 Man-Rem/year. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  13. INFLUENCE OF DOSE RATE ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE TO LOW- AND HIGH-LET RADIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie eWozny

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC treatment failure is mostly explained by loco-regional progression or intrinsic radioresistance. Radiotherapy has recently evolved with the emergence of heavy ion radiations or new fractionation schemes of photon therapy which modify the dose-rate of treatment delivery. The aim of the present study was then to evaluate the in vitro influence of a dose rate variation during conventional radiotherapy or carbon ion hadrontherapy treatment in order to improve the therapeutic care of patient. In this regard, two HNSCC cell lines were irradiated with photons or 72MeV/n carbon ions at a dose rate of 0.5, 2 or 10Gy/min.For both radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, the change in dose rate significantly affected cell survival in response to photon exposure, this variation of radiosensitivity was associated to the number of initial and residual DNA double-strand breaks. By contrast, the dose rate change did not affect neither cell survival nor the residual DNA double-strand breaks after carbon ion irradiation. As a result, the Relative Biological Efficiency at 10% survival increased when the dose rate decreased.In conclusion, in the radiotherapy treatment of HNSCC, it is advised to remain very careful when modifying the classical schemes towards altered-fractionation. At the opposite, as the dose rate does not seem to have any effects after carbon ion exposure, there is less need to adapt hadrontherapy treatment planning during active system irradiation

  14. Effect of different ionizing radiation dose rates on the Staphylococcal enterotoxin in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples weighing 50g each were prepared from allotments of back with skin MDCM, to the EEB contamination or not (control). Each sample of MDCM contaminated or not with EEB was conditioned in low density polyethylene bag, frozen (-18 ± 1 deg C) for one night in a tunnel and irradiated with gamma rays from 60Co source in this state with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy (5.7 kGy.h-1 - higher dose rate, 1.8 kGy.h-1 - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h-1 - lower dose rate) and 3.0 kGy (8.4 kGy.h-'1 - higher dose rate, 2.4 kGy.h-1 - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h-1 - lower dose rate). Irradiated or non irradiated MDCM samples were processed to the EEB extraction, according to the VIDAS Staph enterotoxin II kit (bioMerieux) manufacturer protocol. The calculation to determinate the MDCM EEB recovery after the sample (control or irradiated) processing were carried out applying the principle of mass balance, along the whole process. Described experiment was performed in triplicate. Results showed that the irradiation process was effective to remove the MDCM EEB, to both 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy. According to the expected, doses of 3.0 kGy showed the highest values of MDCM EEB removal. Regarding the effect of dose rate of radiation on the removal of EEB of the MDCM, it could be observed only for samples irradiated with 1.5 kGy radiation dose; in these processing conditions, the highest value of EEB removal was obtained for samples processed with low radiation dose rate. (author)

  15. Effects of Proton Radiation Dose, Dose Rate and Dose Fractionation on Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ware, J.H.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X. S.; Rusek, A.; Kennedy, A R

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05–0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals...

  16. Effect of radiation dose-rate on hematopoietic cell engraftment in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Glass

    Full Text Available Although exceptionally high radiation dose-rates are currently attaining clinical feasibility, there have been relatively few studies reporting the biological consequences of these dose-rates in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT. In zebrafish models of HCT, preconditioning before transplant is typically achieved through radiation alone. We report the comparison of outcomes in adult zebrafish irradiated with 20 Gy at either 25 or 800 cGy/min in the context of experimental HCT. In non-transplanted irradiated fish we observed no substantial differences between dose-rate groups as assessed by fish mortality, cell death in the kidney, endogenous hematopoietic reconstitution, or gene expression levels of p53 and ddb2 (damage-specific DNA binding protein 2 in the kidney. However, following HCT, recipients conditioned with the higher dose rate showed significantly improved donor-derived engraftment at 9 days post transplant (p ≤ 0.0001, and improved engraftment persisted at 31 days post transplant. Analysis for sdf-1a expression, as well as transplant of hematopoietic cells from cxcr4b -/- zebrafish, (odysseus, cumulatively suggest that the sdf-1a/cxcr4b axis is not required of donor-derived cells for the observed dose-rate effect on engraftment. Overall, the adult zebrafish model of HCT indicates that exceptionally high radiation dose-rates can impact HCT outcome, and offers a new system for radiobiological and mechanistic interrogation of this phenomenon. Key words: Radiation dose rate, Total Marrow Irradiation (TMI, Total body irradiation (TBI, SDF-1, Zebrafish, hematopoietic cell transplant.

  17. Radiation response of industrial materials: Dose-rate and morphology implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejka, Anthony J.

    2007-08-01

    Industrial uses of ionizing radiation mostly rely upon high current, high dose-rate (100 kGy/s) electron beam (EB) accelerators. To a lesser extent, industry uses low dose-rate (2.8 × 10-3 kGy/s) radioactive Cobalt-60 as a gamma source, generally for some rather specific purposes, as medical device sterilization and the treatment of food and foodstuffs. There are nearly nine times as many (∼1400) high current EB units in commercial operation than gamma sources (∼160). However, gamma sources can be easily scaled-down so that much research on materials effects is conducted using gamma radiation. Likewise, laboratories are more likely to have very low beam current and consequently low dose-rate accelerators such as Van de Graaff generators and linear accelerators. With the advent of very high current EB accelerators, X-ray processing has become an industrially viable option. With X-rays from high power sources, dose-rates can be modulated based upon accelerator power and the attenuation of the X-ray by the distance of the material from the X-ray target. Dose and dose-rate dependence has been found to be of consequence in several commercial applications which can employ the use of ionizing radiation. The combination of dose and dose-rate dependence of the polymerization and crosslinking of wood impregnants and of fiber composite matrix materials can yield more economically viable results which have promising commercial potential. Monomer and oligomer structure also play an important role in attaining these desirable results. The influence of morphology is shown on the radiation response of olefin polymers, such as ethylene, propylene and isobutylene polymers and their copolymers. Both controlled morphology and controlled dose-rate have commercial consequences. These are also impacted both by the adroit selection of materials and through the possible use of X-ray processing.

  18. Using RADFET for the real-time measurement of gamma radiation dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelković, Marko S.; Ristić, Goran S.; Jakšić, Aleksandar B.

    2015-02-01

    RADFETs (RADiation sensitive Field Effect Transistors) are integrating ionizing radiation dosimeters operating on the principle of conversion of radiation-induced threshold voltage shift into absorbed dose. However, one of the major drawbacks of RADFETs is the inability to provide the information on the dose rate in real-time using the conventional absorbed dose measurement technique. The real-time monitoring of dose rate and absorbed dose can be achieved with the current mode dosimeters such as PN and PIN diodes/photodiodes, but these dosimeters have some limitations as absorbed dose meters and hence they are often not a suitable replacement for RADFETs. In that sense, this paper investigates the possibility of using the RADFET as a real-time dose rate meter so that it could be applied for simultaneous online measurement of the dose rate and absorbed dose. A RADFET sample, manufactured by Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland, was tested as a dose rate meter under gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source. The RADFET was configured as a PN junction, such that the drain, gate and source terminals were grounded, while the radiation-induced current was measured at the bulk terminal, whereby the bulk was successively biased with 0 , 10 , 20  and 30 V. In zero-bias mode the radiation-induced current was unstable, but in the biased mode the current response was stable for the investigated dose rates from 0.65  to 32.1 Gy h-1 and up to the total absorbed dose of 25 Gy. The current increased with the dose rate in accordance with the power law, whereas the sensitivity of the current read-out was linear with respect to the applied bias voltage. Comparison with previously analyzed PIN photodiodes has shown that the investigated RADFET is competitive with PIN photodiodes as a gamma radiation dose rate meter and therefore has the potential to be employed for the real-time monitoring of the dose rate and absorbed dose.

  19. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Stark

    Full Text Available Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris during its pre-terrestrial stages of development -embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later, to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  20. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development -embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae

  1. Use of virtual reality to estimate radiation dose rates in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operators in nuclear plants receive radiation doses during several different operation procedures. A training program capable of simulating these operation scenarios will be useful in several ways, helping the planning of operational procedures so as to reduce the doses received by workers, and to minimize operations' times. It can provide safe virtual operation training, visualization of radiation dose rates, and estimation of doses received by workers. Thus, a virtual reality application, a free game engine, has been adapted to achieve the goals of this project. Simulation results for Argonauta research reactor of Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear are shown in this paper. A database of dose rate measurements, previously performed by the radiological protection service, has been used to display the dose rate distribution in the region of interest. The application enables the user to walk in the virtual scenario, displaying at all times the dose accumulated by the avatar. (author)

  2. Calculation of radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide contained in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents some results that we used MCNP5 program to calculate radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide in building materials. Since then, the limits of radionuclide content in building materials are discussed. The calculation results by MCNP are compared with those calculated by analytical method. (author)

  3. Determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields using extrapolation chamber and GM counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, J.; Christensen, P.

    1995-01-01

    The extrapolation chamber measurement method is the basic method for the determination of dose rates in beta radiation fields and the method has been used for the establishment of beta calibration fields. The paper describes important details of the method and presents results from the measurement...... of depth-dose profiles from different beta radiation fields with E(max) values down to 156 keV. Results are also presented from studies of GM counters for use as survey instruments for monitoring beta dose rates at the workplace. Advantages of GM counters are a simple measurement technique and high...... sensitivity. GM responses were measured from exposures in different beta radiation fields using different filters in front of the GM detector and the paper discusses the possibility of using the results from GM measurements with two different filters in an unknown beta radiation field to obtain a value of the...

  4. Low LET radiation dose rate effect and free radical production and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors previously published the finding that LD-50/30 varied with the reciprocal cube root of x- or gamma-radiation dose rate in a number of studies by others in mice and rats. Human skin erythema also appeared to fit the relationship. Broyles subsequently employed a modification of the relationship with particular interest in dose rates of less than 6 rad per day. Having noted a deflection of actual data from reciprocal cube root- predicted values at higher dose rates in the earlier utilized studies, they modified the original relationship with the finding of a better fit of data from a broad variety of endpoints to predicted values. These end-points include E. Coli survival, murine lens opacification, spermatogonia depletion, and abnormal liver anaphases, skin erythema in man and swine, LD 50/4 in mice and rats, LD-50/30 in mice, rats, and swine, and LD-50/60 in sheep. ED-50 specific loss of dose-rate effect appears to occur with several of the quoted parameters at very high dose rates (greater than 1000 rad per minute). The possible role of oxygen depletion and free radical production and survival

  5. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  6. Environmental gamma dose rate monitoring along Mumbai-Pune route using environmental radiation monitor with navigational aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continuous environmental radiation monitor with navigational aid (ERMNA) for mapping natural gamma radiation background on country wide scale by deployment in railway coaches, has been designed. The system makes use of Indian railway network which is one of the widest network of railways in the world covering nearly complete length and breadth of the country. The system uses an energy compensated (within ± 30%) GN detectors for measurement of environmental dose rate due to natural background, a global positioning system (GPS) for on-line acquisition of positional co-ordinates (longitude and latitude) and an 8085 based data acquisition and processing unit. This system is deployed in guard's cabin of a train. The dose rate data tagged with positional co-ordinates and collected by the system during train journey is down loaded into a Lap Top PC for storage, analysis and graphical representation. The system has been used for background monitoring between Mumbai and Pune. The dose rates recorded over a period of three months ranging from November 1996 to February 1997 along the route show no change in the values which vary from 4 μr/h to 6 μR/h along the route. It drops down to <3 μR/h within tunnels en route. (author)

  7. Experimental long-term exposures of fish to low dose rate gamma- or alpha-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While it is well known that α-radiation is much more damaging than γ-radiation (on an equal absorbed dose basis) to man and mammals, there are no data available to compare the effects of these radiations on fish. As many authorised disposals of radioactivity are made to sea or rivers and include α- and γ-emitters it is important that such data is obtained so that estimates of the combined biological damaging effects may be made. This paper describes experiments made to examine the comparative effects of chronic exposure to α- or γ-radiation on reproductive endpoints in a representative fish, the zebrafish Danio rerio. Fish were exposed to γ-radiation or α-radiation for approximately 1 year. The fish were allowed to breed once per week and for each breeding opportunity the total numbers of eggs, numbers of eggs viable at 24 hours and eggs hatching successfully were recorded. Dose rate groups were 300, 1000 or 7400μGy h-1 for γ-radiation and 9.6, 19, 84 and 214μGy h-1 for α-radiation. None of the α-radiation groups showed significant effects on any measure of egg production while among γ-radiation groups only the highest, 7400μGy h-1 group showed an effect. This was a rapid decrease in total number of eggs and viable eggs laid per opportunity, leading to a failure to lay any after 20 weekly opportunities. There was, however, no significant decrease in any group in the hatch rate of eggs which were viable at 24 hours. Comparison of the highest α-radiation dose rate which produced no effect (214μGy h-1) and the γ-radiation dose rate which had a significant effect (7400μGy h-1) gives a relative biological effect (RBEα) of <35. (author)

  8. Remote Sensing of Radiation Dose Rate by Customizing an Autonomous Robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of radiation dose was measured by customizing an autonomous cleaning robot 'Roomba' and a scintillation counter. The robot was used as a vehicle carrying the scintillation survey meter, and was additionally equipped with an H8 micro computer to remote-control the vehicle and to send measured data. The data obtained were arranged with position data, and then the distribution map of the radiation dose rate was produced. Manual, programmed and autonomous driving tests were conducted, and all performances were verified. That is, for each operational mode, the measurements both with moving and with discrete moving were tried in and outside of a room. Consequently, it has been confirmed that remote sensing of radiation dose rate is possible by customizing a robot on market.

  9. Model of radiation-induced gain degradation of NPN bipolar junction transistor at different dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qifeng, Zhao; Yiqi, Zhuang; Junlin, Bao; Wei, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Ionizing-radiation-induced current gain degradation in NPN bipolar junction transistors is due to an increase in base current as a result of recombination at the surface of the device. A model is presented which identifies the physical mechanism responsible for current gain degradation. The increase in surface recombination velocity due to interface states results in an increase in base current. Besides, changing the surface potential along the base surface induced by the oxide-trapped charges can also lead to an increased base current. By combining the production mechanisms of oxide-trapped charges and interface states, this model can explain the fact that the current gain degradation is more severe at a low dose rate than at a high dose rate. The radiations were performed in a Co60 source up to a total dose of 70 krad(Si). The low dose rate was 0.1 rad(Si)/s and the high dose rate was 10 rad(Si)/s. The model accords well with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61076101, 61204092).

  10. Radiation-induced 1/f noise degradation of PNP bipolar junction transistors at different dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi-Feng, Zhao; Yi-Qi, Zhuang; Jun-Lin, Bao; Wei, Hu

    2016-04-01

    It is found that ionizing-radiation can lead to the base current and the 1/f noise degradations in PNP bipolar junction transistors. In this paper, it is suggested that the surface of the space charge region of the emitter-base junction is the main source of the base surface 1/f noise. A model is developed which identifies the parameters and describes their interactive contributions to the recombination current at the surface of the space charge region. Based on the theory of carrier number fluctuation and the model of surface recombination current, a 1/f noise model is developed. This model suggests that 1/f noise degradations are the result of the accumulation of oxide-trapped charges and interface states. Combining models of ELDRS, this model can explain the reason why the 1/f noise degradation is more severe at a low dose rate than at a high dose rate. The radiations were performed in a Co60 source up to a total dose of 700 Gy(Si). The low dose rate was 0.001 Gy(Si)/s and the high dose rate was 0.1 Gy(Si)/s. The model accords well with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61076101 and 61204092).

  11. Dose rate effects in radiation degradation of polymer-based cable materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaček, V.; Bartoníček, B.; Hnát, V.; Otáhal, B.

    2003-08-01

    Cable ageing under the nuclear power plant (NPP) conditions must be effectively managed to ensure that the required plant safety and reliability are maintained throughout the plant service life. Ionizing radiation is one of the main stressors causing age-related degradation of polymer-based cable materials in air. For a given absorbed dose, radiation-induced damage to a polymer in air environment usually depends on the dose rate of the exposure. In this work, the effect of dose rate on the degradation rate has been studied. Three types of NPP cables (with jacket/insulation combinations PVC/PVC, PVC/PE, XPE/XPE) were irradiated at room temperature using 60Co gamma ray source at average dose rates of 7, 30 and 100 Gy/h with the doses up to 590 kGy. The irradiated samples have been tested for their mechanical properties, thermo-oxidative stability (using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC), and density. In the case of PVC and PE samples, the tested properties have shown evident dose rate effects, while the XPE material has shown no noticeable ones. The values of elongation at break and the thermo-oxidative stability decrease with the advanced degradation, density tends to increase with the absorbed dose. For XPE samples this effect can be partially explained by the increase of crystallinity. It was tested by the DSC determination of the crystalline phase amount.

  12. COMPARISON OF NATURAL BACKGROUND DOSE RATES FOR RESIDENTS OF THE AMARGOSA VALLEY, NV, TO THOSE IN LEADVILLE, CO, AND THE STATES OF COLORADO AND NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Moeller and L. C. Sun

    2006-02-24

    In the latter half of 2005, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published a Proposed Rule (40 CFR Part 197) for establishing a dose rate standard for limiting radionuclide releases from the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository during the time period from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} years after closure. The proposed standard was based on the difference in the estimated total dose rate from natural background in the Amargosa Valley and the ''average annual background radiation'' for the State of Colorado. As defined by the USEPA, ''natural background radiation consists of external exposures from cosmic and terrestrial sources, and internal exposures from indoor exposures to naturally-occurring radon''. On the basis of its assessments, the USEPA estimated that the difference in the dose rate in the two identified areas was 3.5 mSv y{sup -1}. The purpose of this review was to provide an independent evaluation and review of this estimate. One of the first observations was that, because site-specific dose rate measurements for the Amargosa Valley ''were not available'', the dose rates for various sources of natural background in that area, used by the USEPA in its assessment, were based on modifications of the average values for the State of Nevada. A second observation was that the conversion factor applied in estimating the dose rates due to exposures to indoor radon and its decay products was a factor of 2 higher than the currently accepted value. Further review revealed that site-specific data for many natural background sources in the Amargosa Valley were available. One particularly important observation was that about 91% of the residents of that area live in mobile homes which, due to their construction and design, have indoor radon concentrations comparable to, or less than, those outdoors. For that reason, alone, the USEPA estimate of the average dose rate for

  13. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim Yiting [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kastan, Michael B. [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Matsui, William, E-mail: matsuwi@jhmi.edu [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore L., E-mail: deweete@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 {mu}g per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  14. Radiation dose-rate resistivity degradation in ceramic insulators and assessment of the consequences in fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under neutron and/or gamma absorbed dose-rates typical of fusion reactor conditions, common ceramic insulators such as Al2O3, MgO, MgAl2O3, etc., exhibit a significant instantaneous decrease in their dc resistivity. Ceramic insulators in lightly shielded normal-conducting magnets, direct convertors and first wall applications are shown to be the most affected. Depending on conductor design, magnet location, absorbed dose-rate and applied voltages, it is demonstrated that the resulting leakage currents in the ceramic material are potentially capable of producing significant Joule heating rates which may lead to thermal runaway and subsequent insulator destruction. The theoretical background for this effect is presented and the rather sparse experimental data base reviewed. Recommendations are given for computing worst case radiation-induced conductivity increases as a function of absorbed dose rate. The possible ameliorating influences of long term fluence damage are then discussed. The practical consequences of ceramic resistivity degradation are quantitatively assessed by consideration of resulting leakage current Joule heating in the extruded conductor of a typical normal-conducting magnet. Relationships are derived to compute dose-rate-dependent leakage currents and Joule heating rates as a function of several magnet parameters

  15. Measurements of environmental radiation exposure dose rates at selected sites in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, W C; Penna-Franca, E; Ribeiro, C C; Nogueira, A R; Londres, H; Oliveira, A E

    1981-12-01

    Two types of portable instruments were developed by the former Health and Safety Laboratory of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to characterize external gamma radiation fields and to estimate individual exposure dose rates from major natural or fission radionuclides distributed in the soil: a pressurized ionization chamber and a NaI(T1) gamma-ray spectrometer. The two instruments were used to measure environmental radiation exposure rates at three distinct geological areas of Brazil: - in the towns of Guarapari and Meaípe located on the monazite sand belt, ES. - on the vicinities of the uranium mine of Poços de Caldas, MG. - around the site of the Brazilian first nuclear power plant, in Angra dos Reis, RJ. The radiometric survey demonstrated once more the usefulness and versatility of the two instruments used. The measurements around the nuclear installations of Poços de Caldas and Angra dos Reis, allowed a rapid assessment of the local radiation background and its variability, as well as the selection of stations for the routine monitoring program. Radioactive anomalies were detected and characterized previously to the start of plant operations. The survey in Guarapari and Meaípe confirmed the results obtained by Roser and Cullen in 1958 and 1962, except on sites where considerable changes took place since then. The spectrometric measurements gave estimations of the relative proportion of 40K, 238U and 232Th series in the ground and also indications on the homogeneity of their distribution in the soil.

  16. Remote Sensing of Radiation Dose Rate by a Robot for Outdoor Usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, the design and prototyping of a telemetry system, in which GPS, camera, and scintillation counter were mounted on a crawler type traveling vehicle, were conducted for targeting outdoor usage such as school playground. As a result, the crawler type traveling vehicle can be operated smoothly in the school grounds of brick and asphalt. The results were as follows: (1) It was confirmed that the crawler type traveling vehicle can be operated smoothly in the school grounds of brick and asphalt (running speed: 17[m/min]). (2) It was confirmed that the location information captured by GPS is visible on the Google map, and that the incorporation of video information is also possible to play. (3)A radiation dose rate of 0.09[μSv / h] was obtained in the ground. The value is less than the 1/40 ([3.8μSv / h]) allowable radiation dose rate for children in Fukushima Prefecture.(4)As a further work, modifying to program traveling, the measurement of the distribution of the radiation dose rate in a school of Fukushima Prefecture, and class delivery on radiation measurement will be carried out.

  17. Assessment of potential radiation dose rates to marine organisms around the Korean Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Myung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ho [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is very difficult to set a regulatory guidance or criteria for the protection of non-human species from the ionizing radiation, because there are no generally or internationally accepted methods for demonstrating the compliance with such criteria. It is needed that Korea develop the primary dose rate standards for the protection of both aquatic and terrestrial biota in the near future. The potential dose rates due to both external and internal radiation exposures to marine organisms such as plaice/flounder, gray mullet, and brown seaweed collected within territorial seas around the Korean Peninsula were estimated. The total dose rates to plaice/flounder, gray mullet and brown seaweed due to {sup 40}K, a primordial radionuclide in marine environment, were found to be 0.2%, 0.08% and 0.3% of approximately the values of the Derived Consideration Reference Levels (DCRLs, i.e. 1-10 mGy d{sup -1}), respectively, as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publication 124. The total dose rates to marine fishes and brown seaweed due to anthropogenic radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 239+240}Pu were considered to be negligible compared to the total dose rate due to {sup 40}K. The external exposure to benthic fish due to all radionuclides was much higher than that of pelagic fish. From this study, it is recommended that the further study is required to develop a national regulatory guidance for the evaluation of doses to non-human species.

  18. Reaction rate theory of radiation exposure: Effects of the dose rate on mutation frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Issei

    2014-01-01

    We develop a kinetic reaction model for the cells having the irradiated DNA molecules due to the ionizing radiation exposure. Our theory simultaneously accounts for the time-dependent reactions of the DNA damage, the DNA mutation, the DNA repair, and the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in a tissue with a minimal set of model parameters. In contrast to the existing theories for the radiation exposition, we do not assume the relationships between the total dose and the induced mutation frequency. We show good agreement between theory and experiment. Importantly, our result shows a new perspective that the key ingredient in the study of the irradiated cells is the rate constants depending on the dose rate. Moreover, we discuss the universal scaling function for mutation frequencies due to the irradiation at low dose rates.

  19. Emesis as a Screening Diagnostic for Low Dose Rate (LDR) Total Body Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarata, Andrew S; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Demidenko, Eugene; Flood, Ann B; Swartz, Harold M; Ali, Arif N

    2016-04-01

    Current radiation disaster manuals list the time-to-emesis (TE) as the key triage indicator of radiation dose. The data used to support TE recommendations were derived primarily from nearly instantaneous, high dose-rate exposures as part of variable condition accident databases. To date, there has not been a systematic differentiation between triage dose estimates associated with high and low dose rate (LDR) exposures, even though it is likely that after a nuclear detonation or radiologic disaster, many surviving casualties would have received a significant portion of their total exposure from fallout (LDR exposure) rather than from the initial nuclear detonation or criticality event (high dose rate exposure). This commentary discusses the issues surrounding the use of emesis as a screening diagnostic for radiation dose after LDR exposure. As part of this discussion, previously published clinical data on emesis after LDR total body irradiation (TBI) is statistically re-analyzed as an illustration of the complexity of the issue and confounding factors. This previously published data includes 107 patients who underwent TBI up to 10.5 Gy in a single fraction delivered over several hours at 0.02 to 0.04 Gy min. Estimates based on these data for the sensitivity of emesis as a screening diagnostic for the low dose rate radiation exposure range from 57.1% to 76.6%, and the estimates for specificity range from 87.5% to 99.4%. Though the original data contain multiple confounding factors, the evidence regarding sensitivity suggests that emesis appears to be quite poor as a medical screening diagnostic for LDR exposures. PMID:26910032

  20. Radiation dose-rate meter using an energy-sensitive counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation dose-rate meter is described comprising: an energy-sensitive radiation detecting element which generates at an output thereof ionization current pulses having an amplitude proportional to the charge quanta deposited in the radiation detecting element by detected photons of ionizing radiation; a charge-sensitive preamplifier connected to the output of the radiation detecting element; a filter amplifier having a selected filter time constant for generating fixed width pulses at an output thereof in response to each of the step voltage pulses from the preamplifier having an amplitude proportional to the amplitude of each of the step voltage pulses applied to an input thereof; a multi-level discriminator means responsive to the voltage pulses at the output of the filter amplifier for generating a train of count pulses at an output thereof in response to each of the fixed width pulses; and a count rate meter means connected to the output of the multi-level discriminator means of registering the count pulses of each of the train of count pulses as a quantized measure of the radiation dose-rate per unit time of the detected photons of ionizing radiation

  1. Effects of radiation types and dose rates on selected cable-insulating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, F.; Maier, P.; Okada, S.; Schönbacher, H.

    A series of radiation tests have been carried out on halogen-free cable-insulating and cable-sheathing materials comprising commercial LDPE, EPR, EVA and SIR compounds. samples were irradiated at five different radiation sources, e.g. a nuclear reactor, fuel elements, a 60Co source, and in the stray radiation field of high-energy proton and electron accelerators at CERN and DESY. The integrated doses were within 50-5000 kGy and the dose rates within 10 mGy/s-70 Gy/s. Tensile tests and gel-fraction measurements were carried out. The results confirm that LDPEs are very sensitive to long-term ageing effects, and that important errors exceeding an order of magnitude can be made when assessing radiation damage by accelerated tests. On the other hand, well-stabilized LDPEs and the cross-linked rubber compounds do not show large dose-rate effects for the values given above. Furthermore, the interpretation of the elongation-at-break data and their relation to gel-fraction measurements show that radiation damage is related to the total absorbed dose irrespective of the different radiation types used in this experiment.

  2. Development of evaluation tool for radiation dose rate distribution in PCV of Hamaoka BWR plants based on water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an evaluation tool for the radiation dose rate distribution of the work areas in the primary containment vessel (PCV) of Units 3, 4 (BWR5) and 5 (ABWR) at Hamaoka NPS. This tool has been constructed based on the transport behavior of radioactive corrosion products in the primary cooling water of BWR. This tool can be used to evaluate quantitatively the effects of the dose reduction methods by water chemistry control or radiation management. It is composed of two calculation codes; water chemistry code (ACTTUBE) and radiation dose rate code (RADTUBE). ACTTUBE calculates the piping dose rates based on the mass balance of corrosion products, 6 kinds of metal and 5 kinds of radionuclide, among the parts of primary cooling water, such as reactor water, feed water, fuel rod surface and out-of-core piping surface. RADTUBE calculates the dose rate distribution based on the radiation shielding calculation from a calculation result of ACTTUBE. Additionally, this tool has a visualization function of calculated radiation dose rate distribution in the PCV by using a wireless controller and 3D glasses/monitor in order to improve user convenience. The accuracy of the tool's calculation results was evaluated using the water chemistry data and radiation dose rate data of the Hamaoka plants. As a result, it was confirmed that this tool had sufficient accuracy to be used in the evaluation of radiation dose rates for the radiation management of actual plants. (author)

  3. Effects of dose, dose-rate and fraction on radiation-induced breast and lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results from a large Canadian epidemiologic cohort study of low-LET radiation and cancer will be described. This is a study of 64,172 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canada between 1930 and 1952, of whom many received substantial doses to breast and lung tissue from repeated chest fluoroscopies. The mortality of the cohort between 1950 and 1987 has been determined by computerized record linkage to the National Mortality Data Base. There is a strong positive association between radiation and breast cancer risk among the females in the cohort, but in contrast very little evidence of any increased risk in lung cancer. The results of this and other studies suggest that the effect of dose-rate and/or fractionation on cancer risk may will differ depending upon the particular cancer being considered. (author)

  4. The role of dose rate in radiation cancer risk: evaluating the effect of dose rate at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels using key events in critical pathways following exposure to low LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Preston, R. Julian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: This review evaluates the role of dose rate on cell and molecular responses. It focuses on the influence of dose rate on key events in critical pathways in the development of cancer. This approach is similar to that used by the U.S. EPA and others to evaluate risk from chemicals. It provides a mechanistic method to account for the influence of the dose rate from low-LET radiation, especially in the low-dose region on cancer risk assessment. Molecular, cellular, and tissues changes are observed in many key events and change as a function of dose rate. The magnitude and direction of change can be used to help establish an appropriate dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). Conclusions: Extensive data on key events suggest that exposure to low dose-rates are less effective in producing changes than high dose rates. Most of these data at the molecular and cellular level support a large (2–30) DREF. In addition, some evidence suggests that doses delivered at a low dose rate decrease damage to levels below that observed in the controls. However, there are some data human and mechanistic data that support a dose-rate effectiveness factor of 1. In summary, a review of the available molecular, cellular and tissue data indicates that not only is dose rate an important variable in understanding radiation risk but it also supports the selection of a DREF greater than one as currently recommended by ICRP (2007) and BEIR VII (NRC/NAS 2006). PMID:27266588

  5. Gamma radiation at a human relevant low dose rate is genotoxic in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M.; Instanes, Christine; Andersen, Jill M.; Brede, Dag A.; Dertinger, Stephen D.; Lind, Ole C.; Brandt-Kjelsen, Anicke; Bjerke, Hans; Salbu, Brit; Oughton, Deborah; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann K.

    2016-09-01

    Even today, 70 years after Hiroshima and accidents like in Chernobyl and Fukushima, we still have limited knowledge about the health effects of low dose rate (LDR) radiation. Despite their human relevance after occupational and accidental exposure, only few animal studies on the genotoxic effects of chronic LDR radiation have been performed. Selenium (Se) is involved in oxidative stress defence, protecting DNA and other biomolecules from reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is hypothesised that Se deficiency, as it occurs in several parts of the world, may aggravate harmful effects of ROS-inducing stressors such as ionising radiation. We performed a study in the newly established LDR-facility Figaro on the combined effects of Se deprivation and LDR γ exposure in DNA repair knockout mice (Ogg1‑/‑) and control animals (Ogg1+/‑). Genotoxic effects were seen after continuous radiation (1.4 mGy/h) for 45 days. Chromosomal damage (micronucleus), phenotypic mutations (Pig-a gene mutation of RBCCD24‑) and DNA lesions (single strand breaks/alkali labile sites) were significantly increased in blood cells of irradiated animals, covering three types of genotoxic activity. This study demonstrates that chronic LDR γ radiation is genotoxic in an exposure scenario realistic for humans, supporting the hypothesis that even LDR γ radiation may induce cancer.

  6. Dose Rate Effects on The Radiation Oxidation of Polyethylene: Electron Beam vs Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yields and spatial distribution of the oxidation products stemming from the oxidation of LLPE films induced by 60-Co gamma and by irradiation with 300 kev, 0.3 mA electrons in the dose range 0.04 kGy/h - 0.6 kGy/h (gamma) and at 1.5 kGy/hr ( e-beam) have been determined by applying a methodology involving FTIR microscopy (carbonyl products, resolution 10 μ), iodometric analysis (peroxides). The FTIR and EPR spectroscopies coupled with the multilayer technique (resolution 25 μ) were also employed for carrying on measurements of the film depth profiles of peroxyl radicals and their alky radicals precursors, radical decay kinetics, 'free' and ' bound' hydroperoxides and alcools. With gamma radiations the products yields are enhanced following the decrease of the dose rate from 0.7 to 0.04 kGy/h without substantial effect on the film depth distributions which appear rather uniform. Using e-beam (dose rate 1.5 kGy/h) a low level concentration limit is attained confined within the first 50 μ which is about 1 order of magnitude smaller as compared to gamma. The mechanistic implications inherent to the experimental results as well as the practical consequences related to the use of radiooxidation as a tool for inducing graft copolymerization reactions are discussed

  7. Gamma radiation measurements and dose rates in commercially-used natural tiling rocks (granites)

    CERN Document Server

    Tzortzis, M; Christofides, S; Christodoulides, G

    2003-01-01

    The gamma radiation in samples of a variety of natural tiling rocks (granites) imported in Cyprus for use in the building industry was measured, employing high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The rock samples were pulverized, sealed in 1 litre plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory with a live-time between 10 and 14 hours each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined for Th-232 (range from 1 to 906 Bq/kg), U-238 (from 1 to 588 Bq/kg) and K-40 (from 50 to 1606 Bq/kg). Elemental concentrations mean values of (35.2 +- 8.4) ppm, (6.2 +- 1.8) ppm and (4.0 +- 0.2) % were deduced, for thorium, uranium and potassium, respectively. The total absorbed dose rates in air calculated from the concentrations of the three radionuclides, Th-232 and U-238 series and K-40, ranged from 7 to 1209 nGy/h for full utilization of the materials, from 4 to 605 nGy/h for half utilization and from 2 to 302 nGy/h for one quarter utilization. The total effective dose rates per pers...

  8. Effects of dose rates on radiation-induced replenishment of intestinal stem cells determined by Lgr5 lineage tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An understanding of the dynamics of intestinal Lgr5+ stem cells is important for elucidating the mechanism of colonic cancer development. We previously established a method for evaluating Lgr5+ stem cells by tamoxifen-dependent Lgr5-lineage tracing and showed that high-dose-rate radiation stimulated replenishment of colonic stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on stem cell maintenance. Tamoxifen (4OHT)-injected Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2 × ROSA-LSL-LacZ mice were used, LacZ-labeled colonic crypts were enumerated, and the loss of LacZ+ crypts under low-dose-rate radiation was estimated. After 4OHT treatment, the number of LacZ-labeled Lgr5+ stem cells was higher in the colon of infant mice than in adult mice. The percentage of LacZ-labeled crypts in infant mice rapidly decreased after 4OHT treatment. However, the percentage of labeled crypts plateaued at ∼2% at 4 weeks post-treatment and remained unchanged for up to 7 months. Thus, it will be advantageous to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose-rate radiation. Next, we determined the percentages of LacZ-labeled crypts irradiated with 1 Gy administered at different dose rates. As reported in our previous study, mice exposed to high-dose-rate radiation (30 Gy/h) showed a marked replenishment (P = 0.04). However, mice exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (0.003 Gy/h) did not exhibit accelerated stem-cell replenishment (P = 0.47). These findings suggest the percentage of labeled crypts can serve as a useful indicator of the effects of dose rate on the stem cell pool. (author)

  9. Radiation dose rate map interpolation in nuclear plants using neural networks and virtual reality techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the most recent development results of a simulation tool for assessment of radiation dose exposition by nuclear plant's personnel, using artificial intelligence and virtual reality technologies. The main purpose of this tool is to support training of nuclear plants' personnel, to optimize working tasks for minimisation of received dose. A finer grid of measurement points was considered within the nuclear plant's room, for different power operating conditions. Further, an intelligent system was developed, based on neural networks, to interpolate dose rate values among measured points. The intelligent dose prediction system is thus able to improve the simulation of dose received by personnel. This work describes the improvements implemented in this simulation tool.

  10. The radiation sensitivity of the haemopoietic microenvironment - effect of dose rate on ectopic ossicle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The haemopoietic microenvironment (HM) consists of a complex mixture of cellular types and extra-cellular matrix. It is essential for prolonged haemopoiesis in both the normal situation and after bone marrow transplantation. The competence of the HM can be assessed by ectopic grafting of femoral marrow. A complete haemopoietic organ develops at the site of implantation. Stem cells (CFU-S) which inhabit the ossicle formed after ectopic implantation can be measured, to assess the function of the engrafted HM to support haemopoiesis. Using this functional endpoint the radiation sensitivity of the HM has been examined at both high and low dose rates, and it is concluded that high doses of γ-irradiation delivered at 4 Gy/min or 0.016 Gy/min have widely different effects on the HM, the former proving much more damaging than the latter. 16 refs.; 2 figs

  11. M-BAND Study of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells: Radiation Quality and Dose Rate Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is its ability to identify both inter- (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra- (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome) chromosome aberrations simultaneously. To study the detailed rearrangement of low- and high-LET radiation induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) in vitro, we performed a series of experiments with Cs-137 gamma rays of both low and high dose rates, neutrons of low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions of high dose rate, with chromosome 3 painted with multi-binding colors. We also compared the chromosome aberrations in both 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures. Results of these experiments revealed the highest chromosome aberration frequencies after low dose rate neutron exposures. However, detailed analysis of the radiation induced inversions revealed that all three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intra-chromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by inter-chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges. The location of the breaks involved in chromosome exchanges was analyzed along the painted chromosome. The breakpoint distribution was found to be randomly localized on chromosome 3 after neutron or Fe ion exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering breakpoints was observed after -ray exposure. Our comparison of chromosome aberration yields between 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures indicated a significant difference for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures. These experimental results indicated that the track structure of the radiation and the cellular/chromosome structure can both affect radiation-induced chromosome

  12. Simulation of absorbed dose rate due to synchrotron radiation and shielding thickness for radiation safety at Indus-2 using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indus-2 is a 2.5 GeV electron synchrotron radiation source at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), India. 26 synchrotron radiation (SR) beam lines are planned in Indus-2 for various research applications, of several are in operation and many are in installation stage. For experiments SR beam is brought in air. Due to intense flux of SR and low energy, the dose rate in the direct beam is high and there is a potential for radiation exposure. Appropriate shielding hutches are needed to house the beamlines and protect the workers from the radiation hazard. Simulations were carried out using computer code FLUKA to find out the absorbed dose in water due to SR and required shielding thickness in the forward direction to reduce dose within acceptable limits. SR spectrum from Indus-2 in the range 4-100 keV was used for simulating the absorbed dose and shielding thickness. It was found that the absorbed dose rate is of the order of 105 Gy/h for the design parameters of Indus-2 (2.5 GeV and 300 mA). Forward shielding thickness of 3 mm lead was found to be sufficient to reduce the dose rate to acceptable level for continuously occupied area (<1μSv/h). The details of the simulation and results are presented in the paper. (author)

  13. Effect of the dose rate of ionizing radiation on the dielectric properties of polyethylene and polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the dose rate of γ-irradiation on the dielectric properties of LDPE and PTFE was studied. Measurements were taken for dose rates D = 10-3-1 Gy/s, and different irradiation conditins (air and vacuum). The dielectric losses (tan δ) of LDPE γ-irradiated in air with a decrease in the dose rate proportional to D-0.5 because of radiaiton-induced oxidation reaction. For irradiated PTFE, the dependence tan δ on the dose rate is determined by competition between the processes of recombination of primary radicals and their oxidation

  14. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  15. Lifetime radiation risks from low-dose rate radionuclides in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the largest, long-term (25-yr) animal studies on the effects of low-dose internal irradiation is almost completed. Some 335 beagles were given continuous exposure to graded 90Sr [low linear energy transfer (LET)] in their diets (D-dogs) through adulthood. A second group (R-dogs) was given fractionated doses of 225Ra (high LET) as young adults. A third group of 44 was given a single injection of 90Sr as adults (S-dogs) to compare single to continuous dosages. All dogs were followed through their lifetimes. Only one of the 848 dogs is still alive. The animals were whole-body counted over their entire life span and were examined frequently for assessment of medical status. There were no acute radiation lethalities. Analyses of the large data base from these dogs have begun and preliminary indications are that 90Sr, which was tested over a 1500-fold skeletal dose rate range, does not cause significant life shortening at average accumulation skeletal doses of ∼2500 rads (25 Gy) and that a curvilinear dose response curve for life shortening was seen at higher accumulation doses. The data will be discussed in terms of modern epidemiological concepts and quantifications will be related to certain parameters of human risk from acute or chronic radiation exposures

  16. LET and dose rate effect on radiation-induced copolymerization in physical gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Seiko, E-mail: Nakagawa.Seiko@iri-tokyo.jp [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, 2-4-10 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Kimura, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Hiroki, Akihiro [Environmental Radiation Processing Group, Environment and Industrial Materials Research Division, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: •LET and dose rate effect on polymerization in gel was almost the same as in solution. •The ratio of the dose rate effect in the gel was higher than that in solution. •The initiation and termination processes show the difference on the dose rate effect. -- Abstract: N{sub 2}-saturated 2-propanol solutions containing styrene and maleimide were gelled by the addition of hydroxypropylcellulose and irradiated by proton, He and C-ion beams. The trend in the dose rate and LET effects on the yield and molecular weight distribution of the polymer produced in the gel was almost the same in the solution. On the contrary, the dose rate effect in the gel was higher than that in the solution. This effect was accelerated for irradiations by proton as well as heavier ion with a higher LET value.

  17. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examining the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute [gamma]-radiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. It was concluded that oligodendrocytes in irradiated cultures had significantly lower functional capacity than did unirradiated controls. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. At DIC 14, the group irradiated in a single fraction had significantly lower oligodendrocyte counts than any group given split doses; all irradiated cultures had marked depression of MBP synthesis, but to significant differences referable to time interval between doses. At DIC 21, cultures irradiated at intervals of 0 h to 2 h had similar oligodendrocyte counts to one another, but these counts were significantly lower than in cultures irradiated at intervals of 4 h to 6 h; MBP levels remained depressed at DIC 21 for all irradiated cultures. The oligodendrocyte response to dose rate (0.03 to 1.97 Gy/min) was evaluated at DIC 14 and DIC 21. Exposure at 0.03 Gy/min suppressed oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 21 less than did higher dose rates in 5-Gy irradiated cultures.

  18. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE−/− Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempf, Stefan; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko;

    2016-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumula......Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days...... with cumulative doses of 0.3 Gy and 6.0 Gy, respectively. ApoE deficient mutant C57Bl/6 mouse was used as an Alzheimer´s model. Using mass spectrometry, a marked alteration in the phosphoproteome was found at both dose rates. The radiation-induced changes in the phosphoproteome were associated with the control...... that several molecular targets induced by chronic low-dose-rate radiation overlap with those of Alzheimer´s pathology. It may suggest that ionising radiation functions as a contributing risk factor to this neurodegenerative disease....

  19. Low Dose-Rate Effects on Chromosomal Aberrations in Workers Occupationally Exposed to Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Occupational exposure to ionising radiation can be assessed by chromosomal aberrations detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Blood samples were collected from 47 occupationally exposed individuals (X-ray diagnostic machines and industrial gamma defectoscopy). The chromosomal aberrations were analysed from at least 500 metaphases per person and their frequencies were compared with those obtained from 110 control individuals. It has been noticed the higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the exposed group related to the control. The increase was analysed according to the age groups (31-40, 41-50, and 51-60), sex and duration of employment. The higher frequency of dicentrics was not directly correlated with the age or duration of employment in the exposed group. The acentric fragments were encountered with much higher frequency in the exposed group. The chromosomal aberrations induced by low dose-rate in occupationally exposed people revealed the degree of individual sensitivity and the severity of the initial damage depending on the biological-pathological conditions. (author)

  20. The radiobiological effect of intra-fraction dose-rate modulation in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewes, J. M.; Suchowerska, N.; Jackson, M.; Zhang, M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2008-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) achieves optimal dose conformity to the tumor through the use of spatially and temporally modulated radiation fields. In particular, average dose rate and instantaneous dose rate (pulse amplitude) are highly variable within a single IMRT fraction. In this study we isolate these variables and determine their impact on cell survival. Survival was assessed using a clonogenic assay. Two cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were examined: melanoma (MM576) and non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460). The survival fraction was observed to be independent of instantaneous dose rate. A statistically significant trend to increased survival was observed as the average dose rate was decreased, for a constant total dose. The results are relevant to IMRT practice, where average treatment times can be significantly extended to allow for movement of the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Our in vitro study adds to the pool of theoretical evidence for the consequences of protracted treatments. We find that extended delivery times can substantially increase the cell survival. This also suggests that regional variation in the dose-rate history across a tumor, which is inherent to IMRT, will affect radiation dose efficacy.

  1. Simulation of the low-Earth-orbit dose rates using secondary radiations from the HZE particles at NIRS-HIMAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, H; Suzuki, M; Ando, K; Fujitaka, K

    2001-01-01

    In order to study biological effects from cyclic dose rates encountered at the low-Earth orbit (LEO), an experimental facility was designed in the Biology room of the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (NIRS-HIMAC). An incubator placed in this facility is irradiated repeatedly by secondary radiations from HZE-particle beams supplied for independent users. The daily-average dose rate (1.4 mGy d-1) measured for 223 days and short-term dose rates measured for selected beam conditions were comparable to the dose rates observed in past LEO missions. Severe solar particle events can be simulated with hourly maximum dose rate of 2.8 mGy h-1. Preliminary measurements using CR-39 and TLD indicated that the dominant LET range is less than 5 keV micrometers-1. These results demonstrate the possibility of this facility for radiobiology studies of the effects of low dose rates comparable to the LEO environment. PMID:11771537

  2. Estimates of Radiation Dose Rates Near Large Diameter Sludge Containers in T Plant

    CERN Document Server

    Himes, D A

    2002-01-01

    Dose rates in T Plant canyon during the handling and storage of large diameter storage containers of K Basin sludge were estimated. A number of different geometries were considered from which most operational situations of interest can be constructed.

  3. Injury to the blood-testis barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to ionising radiation induces male infertility, accompanied by increasing permeability of the blood-testis barrier. However, the effect on male fertility by low-dose-rate chronic radiation has not been investigated. In this study, the effects of low-dose-rate chronic radiation on male mice were investigated by measuring the levels of tight-junction-associated proteins (ZO-1 and occludin-1), Niemann-Pick disease type 2 protein (NPC-2) and anti-sperm antibody (AsAb) in serum. BALB/c mice were exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (3.49 mGy h-1) for total exposures of 0.02 (6 h), 0.17 (2 d) and 1.7 Gy (21 d). Based on histological examination, the diameter and epithelial depth of seminiferous tubules were significantly decreased in 1.7-Gy-irradiated mice. Compared with those of the non-irradiated group, 1.7-Gy-irradiated mice showed significantly decreased ZO-1, occludin-1 and NPC-2 protein levels, accompanied with increased serum AsAb levels. These results suggest potential blood-testis barrier injury and immune infertility in male mice exposed to low-dose-rate chronic radiation. (authors)

  4. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min-1. The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  5. Gamma Radiation Measurements and Dose Rates in Commonly Used Building Materials in Cyprus

    CERN Document Server

    Michael, F; Parpottas, Y

    2010-01-01

    A first comprehensive study is presented on radioactivity concentrations and dose rates in 87 commonly used materials, manufactured or imported in Cyprus, for building purposes. The natural radioactivity of K-40, Th-232, U-238 and Ra-226 is determined using high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. The respective dose rates and the associated radiological effect indices are also calculated. A comparison of the measured specific activity values with the corresponding world average values shows that most of them are below the world average activity values. The annual indoor effective dose rates received by an individual from three measured imported granites and four measured imported ceramics are found to be higher than the world upper limit value of 1 mSv y-1. Hence, these materials should have a restricted use according to their corresponding calculated activity concentration index values and the related EC 1999 guidelines.

  6. Relative effect of radiation dose rate on hemopoietic and nonhemopoietic lethality of total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were undertaken to determine the influence of dose rate on the toxicity of total-body irrdiation (TBI) with and without syngeneic bone-marrow rescue in mice. The results showed a much greater dose-rate dependence for death from nonhemopoietic toxicity than from bone-marrow ablation, with the ratio of LD50's increasing from 1.73 at 25 cGy/min to 2.80 at 1 cGy/min. At the higher dose rates, dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity resulted from late organ injury, affecting the lungs, kidneys, and liver. At 1 cGy/min the major dose-limiting nonhemopoietic toxicity was acute gastrointestinal injury. The implications of these results in the context of TBI in preparation for bone-marrow transplantation are discussed. 15 refs., 4 figs

  7. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Zhang

    Full Text Available MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL would be needed.

  8. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low Dose & Low Dose-Rate Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedford, Joel

    2014-04-18

    Our laboratory has, among other things, developed and used the gamma H2AX focus assay and other chromosomal and cell killing assays to show that differences in this DNA double strand break (dsb) related response can be clearly and distinctly demonstrated for cells which are mildly hyper-radiosensitive such as those associated with A-T heterozygosity. We have found this level of mild hypersensitivity for cells from some 20 to 30 % of apparently normal individuals and from apparently normal parents of Retinoblastoma patients. We found significant differences in gene expression in somatic cells from unaffected parents of Rb patients as compared with normal controls, suggesting that these parents may harbor some as yet unidentified genetic abnormality. In other experiments we sought to determine the extent of differences in normal human cellular reaponses to radiation depending on their irradiation in 2D monolayer vs 3D organized acinar growth conditions. We exmined cell reproductive death, chromosomal aberration induction, and the levels of γ-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 hours of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose-responses of these cells under the 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur. In another series of studies in collaboration with Dr Chuan Li, with supprt from this current grant. We reported a role for apoptotic cell death in promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration in mice. Apoptotic cells released growth signals that stimulated the proliferation of progenitor or stem cells. In yet another collaboration with Dr, B. Chen with funds from this grant, the relative radiosensitivity to cell killing as well as chromosomal instability of 13 DNA-PKcs site-directed mutant cell lines (defective at phosphorylation sites or kinase

  9. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daniel G; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed.

  10. An international intercomparison of passive dosemeters, electronic dosemeters and dose rate meters used for environmental radiation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Thompson, I.M.G.

    1995-01-01

    To assist towards the harmonisation within the EC countries, the Eastern European countries and the USA, of the measurement of environmental dose rates from photon radiation an EC sponsored intercomparison of environmental dose rate meters, electronic dosemeters and TL dosemeters was performed...... during 1994. The intercomparison was organised by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig, Germany, and by the Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark. This paper describes the intercomparison experiments performed at the newly established Riso Natural Environmental Radiation...... Measurement Stations during the period 12 to 18 June 1994. The chief aims of the experiments were to allow the participants to check their home calibrations of their detectors and to intercompare the dosemeter responses of the individual environmental radiation measurement systems used in the USA, Eastern...

  11. The Effect of Dose Rate on Composite Durability When Exposed to a Simulated Long-Term Lunar Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; O'Rourke, Mary Jane; Hill, Charles; Nutt, Steven; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration of space beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) requires a safe living and working environment for crew. Composite materials are one type of material being investigated by NASA as a multi-functional structural approach to habitats for long-term use in space or on planetary surfaces with limited magnetic fields and atmosphere. These materials provide high strength with the potential for decreased weight and increased radiation protection of crew and electronics when compared with conventional aluminum structures. However, these materials have not been evaluated in a harsh radiation environment, as would be experienced outside of LEO or on a planetary surface. Thus, NASA has been investigating the durability of select composite materials in a long-term radiation environment. Previously, NASA exposed composite samples to a simulated, accelerated 30-year radiation treatment and tensile stresses similar to those of a habitat pressure vessel. The results showed evidence of potential surface oxidation and enhanced cross-linking of the matrix. As a follow-on study, we performed the same accelerated exposure alongside an exposure with a decreased dose rate. The slower dose ]rate is comparable to a realistic scenario, although still accelerated. Strain measurements were collected during exposure and showed that with a fastdose rate, the strain decreased with time, but with a slow ]dose rate, the strain increased with time. After the radiation exposures, samples were characterized via tensile tests, flexure tests, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The results of these tests will be discussed.

  12. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynaldo, S. R. [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology, Posgraduate Course in Science and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Benavente C, J. A.; Da Silva, T. A., E-mail: sirr@cdtn.br [Development Centre of Nuclear Technology / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (Bss 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, metrology laboratories are required to verify the reliability of the Bss-2 system by performing additional verification measurements. In the CDTN Calibration Laboratory, the absorbed dose rates and their angular variation in the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 85}Kr beta radiation fields were studied. Measurements were done with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. In comparison to the certificate values provided by the Bss-2, absorbed dose rates measured with the extrapolation chamber differed from -1.4 to 2.9% for the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and -0.3% for the {sup 85}Kr fields; their angular variation showed differences lower than 2% for incidence angles up to 40-degrees and it reached 11% for higher angles, when compared to ISO values. Measurements with the radiochromic film showed an asymmetry of the radiation field that is caused by a misalignment. Differences between the angular variations of absorbed dose rates determined by both dosimetry systems suggested that some correction factors for the extrapolation chamber that were not considered should be determined. (Author)

  13. Measurement of absorbed dose rate of gamma radiation for lead compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraswamy, B.; Dhananjaya, N.; Manjunatha, H. C.

    2010-07-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate the absorbed dose rate using both theoretical and measured mass energy attenuation coefficient of gamma for the lead compounds such as PbNO 3, PbCl 2, PbO 2 and PbO using various gamma sources such as 22Na (511, 1274), 137Cs (661.6), 54Mn (835) and 60Co (1173, 1332 keV).

  14. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews new estimates of the LD50 in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD50s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively

  15. Determination of scattered gamma radiation in the calibration of environmental dose rate meters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1992-01-01

    Practical free-field and shadow-shield calibration techniques using a variety of environmental dose rate meters were studied, and experimental and theoretical determinations were made of the contribution of scattered photons to the air kerma rate from certificated Cs-137, Co-60 and Ra-226 gamma...... calculated. The Monte Carlo code used enables the scatter components from ground and air to be separated. Calculated relative air kerma rates scattered from ground and air for the radionuclides Cs-137, Co-60 and Ra-226 are listed with the aim of recommending these values in practical free-field calibrations...

  16. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews new estimates of the L50 in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD50s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively

  17. Dose, dose-rate and field size effects on cell survival following exposure to non-uniform radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; McMahon, Stephen J.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-05-01

    For the delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), highly modulated fields are used to achieve dose conformity across a target tumour volume. Recent in vitro evidence has demonstrated significant alterations in cell survival occurring out-of-field which cannot be accounted for on the basis of scattered dose. The radiobiological effect of area, dose and dose-rate on out-of-field cell survival responses following exposure to intensity-modulated radiation fields is presented in this study. Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay in human prostate cancer (DU-145) and primary fibroblast (AG0-1522) cells following exposure to different modulated field configurations delivered using a X-Rad 225 kVp x-ray source. Uniform survival responses were compared to in- and out-of-field responses in which 25-99% of the cell population was shielded. Dose delivered to the out-of-field region was varied from 1.6-37.2% of that delivered to the in-field region using different levels of brass shielding. Dose rate effects were determined for 0.2-4 Gy min-1 for uniform and modulated exposures with no effect seen in- or out-of-field. Survival responses showed little dependence on dose rate and area in- and out-of-field with a trend towards increased survival with decreased in-field area. Out-of-field survival responses were shown to scale in proportion to dose delivered to the in-field region and also local dose delivered out-of-field. Mathematical modelling of these findings has shown survival response to be highly dependent on dose delivered in- and out-of-field but not on area or dose rate. These data provide further insight into the radiobiological parameters impacting on cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields highlighting the need for refinement of existing radiobiological models to incorporate non-targeted effects and modulated dose distributions.

  18. Experimental and Simulation of Gamma Radiation Dose Rate for High Exposure Building Material

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Natural radioactivity concentrations in high exposure building materials are commonly used in Iran, which is measured a direct exposure by using {\\gamma}-ray spectrometry. The values for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were in the ranges 3.8 - 94.2, 6.5 - 172.2 and 556.9 - 1539.2 Bqkg-1, respectively. The absorbed dose rates in the standard dwelling room due to 238U, 232Th series and 40K were calculated with MCNPX code. The simulation and experimental results were between 7.95 - 41.74 and 8.36 - 39.99 nGy h-1, respectively. These results were compared with experimental outing and there was overlap closely. The simulation results are able to develop for any kind of dwelling places.

  19. Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh and others were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh and others paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh and others work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion

  20. Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-01-14

    In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or

  1. Health Risks From Low Doses and Low Dose-Rates of Ionizing Radiation. Session 5: Future of Radiation Protection Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Donald A

    2016-03-01

    The system of radiological protection is a prospective approach to protection of individuals in all exposure situations. It must be applied equitably across all age groups and all populations. This is a very different circumstance from dose assessment for a particular individual where the unique characteristics of the individual and the exposure can be taken into account. Notwithstanding the ongoing discussions on the possible shape of the dose response at low doses and dose rates, the prospective system of protection has therefore historically used a linear assumption as a pragmatic, prudent and protective approach. These radiation protection criteria are not intended to be a demarcation between "safe" and "unsafe" and are the product of a risk-informed judgement that includes inputs from science, ethics, and experience. There are significant implications for different dose response relationships. A linear model allows for equal treatment of an exposure, irrespective of the previously accumulated exposure. In contrast, other models would predict different implications. Great care is therefore needed in separating the thinking around risk assessment from risk management, and prospective protection for all age groups and genders from retrospective assessment for a particular individual. In the United States, the prospective regulatory structure functions effectively because of assumptions that facilitate independent treatment of different types of exposures, and which provide pragmatic and prudent protection. While the a linear assumption may, in fact, not be consistent with the biological reality, the implications of a different regulatory model must be considered carefully. PMID:26808877

  2. Radiation Dose-Rate Extraction from the Camera Image of Quince 2 Robot System using Optical Character Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In the case of the Japanese Quince 2 robot system, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras were used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. The Quince 2 robot measured radiation in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The CCD camera with wide field-of-view (fisheye) lens reads indicator of the dosimeter loaded on the Quince 2 robot, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation. The camera image with gamma ray dose-rate information is transmitted to the remote control site via VDSL communication line. At the remote control site, the radiation information in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor can be perceived by monitoring the camera image. To make up the radiation profile in the surveyed refueling floor, the gamma ray dose-rate information in the image should be converted to numerical value. In this paper, we extract the gamma ray dose-rate value in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor using optical character recognition method

  3. Dose rate dependence of radiation-induced lattice defects and performance degradation in npn Si bipolar transistors by 2-MeV electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayama, K. [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 2569-2 Koshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)], E-mail: hayama@ee.knct.ac.jp; Takakura, K.; Ohyama, H. [Kumamoto National College of Technology, 2569-2 Koshi, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan); Kuboyama, S. [JAXA, 2-1-1 Sengen, Ibaraki 305-8505 75 (Japan); Simoen, E.; Mercha, A.; Claeys, C. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2007-12-15

    Total-dose response of npn Si transistors by 2-MeV electrons is presented for different dose rates. The base current increases after irradiation, whereas the collector current decreases. Therefore, the current gain ({beta}) decreases by irradiation. The degradation of electrical properties by 2-MeV electrons for low dose rate is higher than that for high dose rate. Similar dose rate dependence of the radiation-induced electron trap densities is observed by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements.

  4. Dose rate dependence of radiation-induced lattice defects and performance degradation in npn Si bipolar transistors by 2-MeV electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, K.; Takakura, K.; Ohyama, H.; Kuboyama, S.; Simoen, E.; Mercha, A.; Claeys, C.

    2007-12-01

    Total-dose response of npn Si transistors by 2-MeV electrons is presented for different dose rates. The base current increases after irradiation, whereas the collector current decreases. Therefore, the current gain ( β) decreases by irradiation. The degradation of electrical properties by 2-MeV electrons for low dose rate is higher than that for high dose rate. Similar dose rate dependence of the radiation-induced electron trap densities is observed by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements.

  5. A comparison of the biological effects of 125I seeds continuous low-dose-rate radiation and 60Co high-dose-rate gamma radiation on non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmin Wang

    Full Text Available To compare the biological effects of 125I seeds continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR radiation and 60Co γ-ray high-dose-rate (HDR radiation on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells.A549, H1299 and BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 125I seeds CLDR radiation or 60Co γ-ray HDR radiation. The survival fraction was determined using a colony-forming assay. The cell cycle progression and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry (FCM. The expression of the apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3, cleaved-caspase-3, PARP, cleaved-PARP, BAX and Bcl-2 were detected by western blot assay.After irradiation with 125I seeds CLDR radiation, there was a lower survival fraction, more pronounced cell cycle arrest (G1 arrest and G2/M arrest in A549 and H1299 cells, respectively and a higher apoptotic ratio for A549 and H1299 cells than after 60Co γ-ray HDR radiation. Moreover, western blot assays revealed that 125I seeds CLDR radiation remarkably up-regulated the expression of Bax, cleaved-caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP proteins and down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 proteins in A549 and H1299 cells compared with 60Co γ-ray HDR radiation. However, there was little change in the apoptotic ratio and expression of apoptosis-related proteins in normal BEAS-2B cells receiving the same treatment.125I seeds CLDR radiation led to remarkable growth inhibition of A549 and H1299 cells compared with 60Co HDR γ-ray radiation; A549 cells were the most sensitive to radiation, followed by H1299 cells. In contrast, normal BEAS-2B cells were relatively radio-resistant. The imbalance of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio and the activation of caspase-3 and PARP proteins might play a key role in the anti-proliferative effects induced by 125I seeds CLDR radiation, although other possibilities have not been excluded and will be investigated in future studies.

  6. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  7. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D. [Russian Academy of Science, Vladicaucas (Russian Federation); Jones, J.; Gonda, S. [NASA -Johnson Space Center, Houston (United States); Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G. [Antioxida nt Research Institute, Premier Micronutrient Corporation, Novato (United States); Kirchin, V. [Moscow State Veterinary and Biotechnology Acade my, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rachael, C. [University Space Research Association, Colorado (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  8. Differences in rates of decrease of environmental radiation dose rates by ground surface property in Fukushima City after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakamu, Takeyasu; Kanda, Hideyuki; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Miyake, Masao; Hayakawa, Takehito; Katsuda, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Yayoi; Okouchi, Toshiyasu; Hazama, Akihiro; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2013-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011, the environmental radiation dose in Fukushima City increased. On 11 April, 1 mo after the earthquake, the environmental radiation dose rate at various surfaces in the same area differed greatly by surface property. Environmental radiation measurements continue in order to determine the estimated time to 50% reduction in environmental radiation dose rates by surface property in order to make suggestions for decontamination in Fukushima. The measurements were carried out from 11 April to 11 November 2011. Forty-eight (48) measurement points were selected, including four kinds of ground surface properties: grass (13), soil (5), artificial turf (7), and asphalt (23). Environmental radiation dose rate was measured at heights of 100 cm above the ground surface. Time to 50% reduction of environmental radiation dose rates was estimated for each ground surface property. Radiation dose rates on 11 November had decreased significantly compared with those on 11 April for all surface properties. Artificial turf showed the longest time to 50% reduction (544.32 d, standard error: 96.86), and soil showed the shortest (213.20 d, standard error: 35.88). The authors found the environmental radiation dose rate on artificial materials to have a longer 50% reduction time than that on natural materials. These results contribute to determining an order of priority for decontamination after nuclear disasters.

  9. Rat skin carcinogenesis as a basis for estimating risks at low doses and dose rates of various types of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F. J.; Vanderlaan, M.; Strickland, P.; Albert, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The recovery rate, age dependence and latent period for tumor induction in rat skin were measured for single and split doses of radiation, and the data were analyzed in terms of a general model in an attempt to estimate the expected tumor response for various types of radiation given at low dose rates for long periods of time. The dorsal skin of male rats was exposed to electrons, x rays, or protons in either single or split doses for several doses and the tumor responses were compared during 80 weeks of observation. A two stage model incorporating a reversible or recoverable mode was developed and various parameters in the model, including recovery rate, dose-response coefficients, and indices of age sensitivity, were evaluated experimentally. The measured parameters were then utilized to calculate expected tumor responses for exposure periods extending for duration of life. The calculations indicated that low dose rates could be markedly (/sup 1///sub 100/ to /sup 1///sub 1000/) less effective in producing tumors than the same dose given in a short or acute exposure, although the magnitude of the reduction in effectiveness declines as the dose declines.

  10. High dose rate sup 60 Co-RALS intraluminal radiation therapy for advanced biliary tract cancer with obstructive jaundice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Toshiaki; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Iwata, Kazuro; Ohishi, Hajime; Uchida, Hideo (Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    High-dose-rate intraluminal irradiation with a {sup 60}Co remote afterloading system, using our newly developed applicator, was performed in 15 cases of advanced biliary tract cancer (2 gallbladder cancers, 13 cholangiocarcinomas). The applicator which was thin with an outer diameter of 14 Fr had a double lumen which included a small lumen for a guide wire for easy exchange to a drainage tube. Therefore, the irradiation procedure could be easily finished in a short time within little distress to the patient. The tumor marker CA1 19-9 was useful in assessing the therapeutic effect and follow-up observation after treatment. The average tube-free period and survival time were 5.9 months and 8.3 months, respectively. Histopathological examination of the cases autopsied showed that the combination of intraluminal (30 Gy) and external (30 Gy) irradiation offered good local control of the cancer that was within 1 cm from the source. Cholangiocarcinoma with relatively short length of obstruction, stage III or stage IV when the cancer infiltration was localized around the bile duct, achieved a comparatively long survival time. It was suggested that the combined use of high-dose-rate intraluminal radiotherapy, with precisely delivered radical radiation to tumors localized in the bile duct wall, and external radiotherapy delivered as additional radiation to the surrounding bile duct would provide radiotherapeutic advantage and contribute to survival after treatment for advanced biliary tract cancer. (author).

  11. Local microwave background radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Domingos

    2006-01-01

    An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

  12. Effect of radiation dose rate and cyclophosphamide on pulmonary toxicity after total body irradiation in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) is still a major complication after total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT). It is difficult to determine the exact role of radiation in this multifactorial complication, especially because most of the experimental work on lung damage was done using localized lung irradiation and not TBI. We have thus tested the effect of radiation dose rate and combining cyclophosphamide (CTX) with single fraction TBI on lung damage in a mouse model for BMT. Methods and Materials: TBI was given as a single fraction at a high dose rate (HDR, 0.71 Gy/min) or a low dose rate (LDR, 0.08 Gy/min). CTX (250 mg/kg) was given 24 h before TBI. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed 4-6 h after the last treatment. Lung damage was assessed using ventilation rate (VR) and lethality between 28 and 180 days (LD(50(28))-180). Results: The LD50 for lung damage, ± standard error (SE), increased from 12.0 (± 0.2) Gy using single fraction HDR to 15.8 (± 0.6) Gy using LDR. Adding CTX shifted the dose-response curves towards lower doses. The LD50 values for the combined treatment were 5.3 (± 0.2) and 3.5 (± 0.2) Gy for HDR and LDR, respectively. This indicates that the combined effect of CTX and LDR was more toxic than that of combined CTX and HDR. Lung damage evaluated by VR demonstrated two waves of VR increase. The first wave of VR increase occurred after 6 weeks using TBI only and after 3 weeks in the combined CTX-TBI treatment, irrespective of total dose or dose rate. The second wave of VR elevation resembled the IP that follows localized thoracic irradiation in its time of occurrence. Conclusions: Lung damage following TBI could be spared using LDR. However, CTX markedly enhances TBI-induced lung damage. The combination of CTX and LDR is more toxic to the lungs than combining CTX and HDR

  13. Modeling of transient ionizing radiation effects in bipolar devices at high dose-rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FJELDLY,T.A.; DENG,Y.; SHUR,M.S.; HJALMARSON,HAROLD P.; MUYSHONDT,ARNOLDO

    2000-04-25

    To optimally design circuits for operation at high intensities of ionizing radiation, and to accurately predict their a behavior under radiation, precise device models are needed that include both stationary and dynamic effects of such radiation. Depending on the type and intensity of the ionizing radiation, different degradation mechanisms, such as photoelectric effect, total dose effect, or single even upset might be dominant. In this paper, the authors consider the photoelectric effect associated with the generation of electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor. The effects of low radiation intensity on p-II diodes and bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) were described by low-injection theory in the classical paper by Wirth and Rogers. However, in BJTs compatible with modem integrated circuit technology, high-resistivity regions are often used to enhance device performance, either as a substrate or as an epitaxial layer such as the low-doped n-type collector region of the device. Using low-injection theory, the transient response of epitaxial BJTs was discussed by Florian et al., who mainly concentrated on the effects of the Hi-Lo (high doping - low doping) epilayer/substrate junction of the collector, and on geometrical effects of realistic devices. For devices with highly resistive regions, the assumption of low-level injection is often inappropriate, even at moderate radiation intensities, and a more complete theory for high-injection levels was needed. In the dynamic photocurrent model by Enlow and Alexander. p-n junctions exposed to high-intensity radiation were considered. In their work, the variation of the minority carrier lifetime with excess carrier density, and the effects of the ohmic electric field in the quasi-neutral (q-n) regions were included in a simplified manner. Later, Wunsch and Axness presented a more comprehensive model for the transient radiation response of p-n and p-i-n diode geometries. A stationary model for high-level injection in p

  14. Knowledge on radiation dose-rate for risk communication on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sense of anxiety on radiation after Fukushima Dai-ichi accident has not disappeared because of the nightmare scenario on radiation cultivated through the Cold War era starting at the atomic bomb dropping at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the present paper, from the viewpoint of establishing the social acceptance of nuclear power plants as well as new reasonable regulation, biological defense in depth (production of anti-oxidants, DNA repair, cell death/apoptosis, and immune defense mechanisms) found in a few decades are presented in comparison with the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for the induction of cancer in the range up to 100 mSv (as single or annual doses) applied for the present regulation. (author)

  15. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute γ-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain

  16. Survival of tumor bearing mice by sequencing of low dose rate (LDR) neutron and photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cf-252 neutron radiation (NT) has been shown to be effective therapy for bulky, hypoxic human tumor and to produce consistent rapid clearance and 5 year cures. NT has been found to be more or less effective depending upon the schedule in which it is used and upon mixing with photon radiation. In an effort to study this scheduling and photon effect, LSA tumor was irradiated in vivo in a hypoxic, advanced state, in different schedules in combination of NT with Co-60 photons. The LSA lymphoma of C57BL/ym mice represents an accurate system to assess dose-response of tumor cells in vivo. Mean survival time was used as endpoint. A high RBE for LDR Cf-252 NT was observed with a RBE(n) of -- 5.0. The effect was not greatly sensitive to sequence in which photons were used. Comparison studies were also tested relative to LDR Cs-137 photon radiation. The results support the high efficacy of LDR NT for destruction of hypoxic tumor in vivo

  17. Oligodendroglial response to ionizing radiation: Dose and dose-rate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    An in vitro system using neuroglia from neonatal rat brain was developed to examine the morphologic, immunocytochemical and biochemical response of oligodendroglia to ionizing radiation. Following acute {gamma}-irradiation at day-in-culture (DIC) 8, oligodendrocyte counts at DIC 14 were 55% to 65% of control values after 2 Gy, and 29% to 36% after 5 Gy. Counts increased to near-normal levels at DIC 21 in the 2 Gy group and to 75% of normal in the 5 Gy group. Myelin basic protein levels (MBP) at DIC 14 were 60% of control values after 2 Gy, and 40% after 5 Gy. At DIC 21, MBP after 2 Gy was 45% greater than that observed at DIC 14, but MBP, as a fraction of age-matched control values, dropped from 60% to 50%. Following 5 Gy, absolute MBP changed little between DIC 14 and DIC 21, but decreased from 40% to 25% of control cultures. The response to split-dose irradiation indicated that nearly all sublethal damage in the oligodendrocyte population (and its precursors) was repaired within 3 h to 4 h. A new compartmental cell model for radiation response in vitro of the oligodendrocyte population is proposed and examined in relation to the potential reaction to radiation injury in the brain.

  18. Evaluation of the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of occupational radiation dose rate during fluoroscopically guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimisation of radiological protection for operators working with fluoroscopically guided procedures has to be performed during the procedure, under varying and difficult conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate on optimisation of occupational radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures. Individual radiation dose measurements, using a system for real-time visualisation, were performed in a cardiology laboratory for three cardiologists and ten assisting nurses. Radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were not displayed to the staff were compared to radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were displayed. When the radiation dose rates were displayed to the staff, one cardiologist and the assisting nurses (as a group) significantly reduced their personal radiation doses. The median radiation dose (Hp(10)) per procedure decreased from 68 to 28 μSv (p = 0.003) for this cardiologist and from 4.3 to 2.5 μSv (p = 0.001) for the assisting nurses. The results of the present study indicate that a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate may have a positive impact on optimisation of occupational radiological protection. In particular, this may affect the behaviour of staff members practising inadequate personal radiological protection. (paper)

  19. Life span of C57 mice as influenced by radiation dose, dose rate, and age at exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to measure the life shortening of C57BL/6J male mice as a result of exposure to five external doses from 60Co gamma radiation delivered at six different dose rates. Total doses ranged from 20 to 1620 rad at exposure rates ranging from 0.7 to 36,000 R/day. The ages of the mice at exposure were newborn, 2, 6, or 15 months. Two replications were completed. Although death was the primary endpoint, we did perform gross necropsies. The life span findings are variable, but we found no consistent shortening compared to control life spans. Therefore, we cannot logically extrapolate life shortening to lower doses, from the data we have obtained. In general, the younger the animals were at the beginning of exposure, the longer their life spans were compared to those of controls. This relationship weakened at the higher doses and dose rates, as mice in these categories tended not to have significantly different life spans from controls. Using life span as a criterion, we find this study suggests that some threshold dosage may exist beyond which effects of external irradiation may be manifested. Up to this threshold, there is no shortening effect on life span compared to that of control mice. Our results are in general agreement with the results of other researchers investigating human and other animal life span effects on irradiation

  20. Measurement of radiocesium concentration in trees using cumulative gamma radiation dose rate detection systems - A simple presumption for radiocesium concentration in living woods using glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihara, T.; Hashida, S.N. [Plant Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Environmental Science, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), 1646 Abiko, Chiba 270-1194 (Japan); Kawachi, N.; Suzui, N.; Yin, Y.G.; Fujimaki, S. [Radiotracer Imaging Gr., Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Nagao, Y.; Yamaguchi, M. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Radiocesium from the severe accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant on 11 March 2011 contaminates large areas. After this, a doubt for forest products, especially of mushroom, is indelible at the areas. Pruned woody parts and litters are containing a considerable amount of radiocesium, and generates a problem at incineration and composting. These mean that more attentive survey for each subject is expected; however, the present survey system is highly laborious/expensive and/or non-effective for this purpose. On the other hand, we can see a glass-badge based gamma radiation dose rate detection system. This system always utilized to detect a personal cumulative radiation dose, and thus, it is not suitable to separate a radiation from a specific object. However, if we can separate a radiation from a specific object and relate it with the own radiocesium concentration, it would enable us to presume the specific concentration with just an easy monitoring but without a destruction of the target nature and a complicated process including sampling, pre-treatment, and detection. Here, we present the concept of the measurement and results of the trials. First, we set glass-badges (type FS, Chiyoda Technol Corp., Japan) on a part of bough (approximately 10 cm in diameter) of Japanese flowering cherry trees (Prunus x yedoensis cv. Somei-Yoshino) with four different settings: A, a direct setting without any shield; B, a setting with an aluminum shield between bough and the glass-badge; C, a setting with a lead shield between bough and the glass-badge; D, a setting with a lead shield covering the glass-badge to shut the radiation from the surrounding but from bough. The deduction between the amount of each setting should separate a specific radiation of the bough from unlimited radiation from the surrounding. Even if the hourly dose rate is not enough to count the difference, a moderate cumulative dose would clear the difference. In fact, results demonstrated a

  1. Dose rate effects in the radiation damage of the plastic scintillators of the CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the reduction of light output by plastic scintillators irradiated in the CMS detector during the 8 TeV run of the Large Hadron Collider and show that they indicate a strong dose rate effect. The damage for a given dose is larger for lower dose rate exposures. The results agree with previous measurements of dose rate effects, but are stronger due to the very low dose rates probed. We show that the scaling with dose rate is consistent with that expected from diffusion effects.

  2. Ruthenium-106 brachytherapy for thick uveal melanoma: reappraisal of apex and base dose radiation and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberi, Ramin; Sedaghat, Ahad; Azma, Zohreh; Nojomi, Marzieh; Falavarjani, Khalil Ghasemi; Nazari, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes of ruthenium-106 (106Ru) brachytherapy in terms of radiation parameters in patients with thick uveal melanomas. Material and methods Medical records of 51 patients with thick (thickness ≥ 7 mm and < 11 mm) uveal melanoma treated with 106Ru brachytherapy during a ten-year period were reviewed. Radiation parameters, tumor regression, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and treatment-related complications were assessed. Results Fifty one eyes of 51 consecutive patients including 25 men and 26 women with a mean age of 50.5 ± 15.2 years were enrolled. Patients were followed for 36.1 ± 26.5 months (mean ± SD). Mean radiation dose to tumor apex and to sclera were 71 (± 19.2) Gy and 1269 (± 168.2) Gy. Radiation dose rates to tumor apex and to sclera were 0.37 (± 0.14) Gy/h and 6.44 (± 1.50) Gy/h. Globe preservation was achieved in 82.4%. Preoperative mean tumor thickness of 8.1 (± 0.9) mm decreased to 4.5 (± 1.6) mm, 3.4 (± 1.4) mm, and 3.0 (± 1.46) mm at 12, 24, and 48 months after brachytherapy (p = 0.03). Four eyes that did not show regression after 6 months of brachytherapy were enucleated. Secondary enucleation was performed in 5 eyes because of tumor recurrence or neovascular glaucoma. Tumor recurrence was evident in 6 (11.8%) patients. Mean Log MAR (magnification requirement) visual acuity declined from 0.75 (± 0.63) to 0.94 (± 0.5) (p = 0.04). Best corrected visual acuity of 20/200 or worse was recorded in 37% of the patients at the time of diagnosis and 61.7% of the patients at last exam (p = 0.04). Non-proliferative and proliferative radiation-induced retinopathy was observed in 20 and 7 eyes. Conclusions Thick uveal melanomas are amenable to 106Ru brachytherapy with less than recommended apex radiation dose and dose rates. PMID:26985199

  3. Simulated Microgravity and Low-Dose/Low-Dose-Rate Radiation Induces Oxidative Damage in the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao Wen; Nishiyama, Nina C; Pecaut, Michael J; Campbell-Beachler, Mary; Gifford, Peter; Haynes, Kristine E; Becronis, Caroline; Gridley, Daila S

    2016-06-01

    Microgravity and radiation are stressors unique to the spaceflight environment that can have an impact on the central nervous system (CNS). These stressors could potentially lead to significant health risks to astronauts, both acutely during the course of a mission or chronically, leading to long-term, post-mission decrements in quality of life. The CNS is sensitive to oxidative injury due to high concentrations of oxidizable, unsaturated lipids and low levels of antioxidant defenses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oxidative damage in the brain cortex and hippocampus in a ground-based model for spaceflight, which includes prolonged unloading and low-dose radiation. Whole-body low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) gamma radiation using (57)Co plates (0.04 Gy at 0.01 cGy/h) was delivered to 6 months old, mature, female C57BL/6 mice (n = 4-6/group) to simulate the radiation component. Anti-orthostatic tail suspension was used to model the unloading, fluid shift and physiological stress aspects of the microgravity component. Mice were hindlimb suspended and/or irradiated for 21 days. Brains were isolated 7 days or 9 months after irradiation and hindlimb unloading (HLU) for characterization of oxidative stress markers and microvessel changes. The level of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein, an oxidative specific marker for lipid peroxidation, was significantly elevated in the cortex and hippocampus after LDR + HLU compared to controls (P environment-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27243749

  4. Radiation and Reason Why radiation at modest dose rates is quite harmless and current radiation safety regulations are flawed

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Data on the impact of ionising radiation on life are examined in the light of evolutionary biology. This comparison confirms that fear of nuclear radiation is not justified by science itself; rather it originates in a failure of public trust in nuclear science, a relic of the international politics of the Cold War era. Current ionisation safety regulations appease this fear but without scientific support and they need fundamental reformulation. This should change the reaction to accidents like Fukushima, the cost of nuclear energy and the application of nuclear technology to the supply of food and fresh water. Such a boost to the world economy would require that more citizens study and appreciate the science involved – and then tell others -- not as much fun as the Higgs, perhaps, but no less important! www.radiationandreason.com

  5. Remote Background Radiation Monitoring Using Zigbee Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamisu A. Adamu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a solution of remote background radiation monitoring, based on the concept of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN, is presented. Radiation dose rate measured by the sensor node is sent to the monitoring station through ZigBee wireless network operated on 2.4 GHz unlicensed Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM band. The system is calibrated for use for ionizing radiation dose rate range of between naturally occurring background radiation and 1.02 mSv/h. Power consumption of the sensor node is kept low by operating the node ZigBee radio with low duty cycle: i.e by keeping the radio awake only during data transmission/reception. Two ATmega8 microcontrollers, one each for sensor node and the monitoring station, are programmed to perform interfacing, data processing, and control functions. The system range of coverage is 124m for outdoor (line of site deployment and 56.8m for indoor application where 5 brick walls separated the sensor node and the monitoring station. Range of coverage of the system is extendable via the use of ZigBee router(s.

  6. Enhancement of viability of radiosensitive (PBMC) and resistant (MDA-MB-231) clones in low-dose-rate cobalt-60 radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Patricia Lima, E-mail: patricialfalcao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil); Motta, Barbara Miranda; Lima, Fernanda Castro de; Lima, Celso Vieira; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Objective: in the present study, the authors investigated the in vitro behavior of radio-resistant breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231) cells line and radiosensitive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), as a function of different radiation doses, dose rates and postirradiation time kinetics, with a view to the interest of clinical radiotherapy. Materials and methods: the cells were irradiated with Co-60, at 2 and 10 Gy and two different exposure rates, 339.56 cGy.min{sup -1} and the other corresponding to one fourth of the standard dose rates, present over a 10-year period of cobalt therapy. Post-irradiation sampling was performed at pre-established kinetics of 24, 48 and 72 hours. The optical density response in viability assay was evaluated and a morphological analysis was performed. Results: radiosensitive PBMC showed decrease in viability at 2 Gy, and a more significant decrease at 10 Gy for both dose rates. MDAMB-231 cells presented viability decrease only at higher dose and dose rate. The results showed MDA-MB-231 clone expansion at low dose rate after 48-72 hours post-radiation. Conclusion: low dose rate shows a possible potential clinical impact involving decrease in management of radio-resistant and radiosensitive tumor cell lines in cobalt therapy for breast cancer. (author)

  7. Enhancement of viability of radiosensitive (PBMC and resistant (MDA-MB-231 clones in low-dose-rate cobalt-60 radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Lima Falcão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: In the present study, the authors investigated the in vitro behavior of radio-resistant breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 cells line and radiosensitive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, as a function of different radiation doses, dose rates and postirradiation time kinetics, with a view to the interest of clinical radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The cells were irradiated with Co-60, at 2 and 10 Gy and two different exposure rates, 339.56 cGy.min–1 and the other corresponding to one fourth of the standard dose rates, present over a 10-year period of cobalt therapy. Post-irradiation sampling was performed at pre-established kinetics of 24, 48 and 72 hours. The optical density response in viability assay was evaluated and a morphological analysis was performed. Results: Radiosensitive PBMC showed decrease in viability at 2 Gy, and a more significant decrease at 10 Gy for both dose rates. MDAMB- 231 cells presented viability decrease only at higher dose and dose rate. The results showed MDA-MB-231 clone expansion at low dose rate after 48–72 hours post-radiation. Conclusion: Low dose rate shows a possible potential clinical impact involving decrease in management of radio-resistant and radiosensitive tumor cell lines in cobalt therapy for breast cancer.

  8. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137Cs, 241Am and 109Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10-2 to 103 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  9. Estimation of absorbed radiation dose rates in wild rodents inhabiting a site severely contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose rates of radiation absorbed by wild rodents inhabiting a site severely contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident were estimated. The large Japanese field mouse (Apodemus speciosus), also called the wood mouse, was the major rodent species captured in the sampling area, although other species of rodents, such as small field mice (Apodemus argenteus) and Japanese grass voles (Microtus montebelli), were also collected. The external exposure of rodents calculated from the activity concentrations of radiocesium (134Cs and 137Cs) in litter and soil samples using the ERICA (Environmental Risk from Ionizing Contaminants: Assessment and Management) tool under the assumption that radionuclides existed as the infinite plane isotropic source was almost the same as those measured directly with glass dosimeters embedded in rodent abdomens. Our findings suggest that the ERICA tool is useful for estimating external dose rates to small animals inhabiting forest floors; however, the estimated dose rates showed large standard deviations. This could be an indication of the inhomogeneous distribution of radionuclides in the sampled litter and soil. There was a 50-fold difference between minimum and maximum whole-body activity concentrations measured in rodents at the time of capture. The radionuclides retained in rodents after capture decreased exponentially over time. Regression equations indicated that the biological half-life of radiocesium after capture was 3.31 d. At the time of capture, the lowest activity concentration was measured in the lung and was approximately half of the highest concentration measured in the mixture of muscle and bone. The average internal absorbed dose rate was markedly smaller than the average external dose rate (<10% of the total absorbed dose rate). The average total absorbed dose rate to wild rodents inhabiting the sampling area was estimated to be approximately 52 μGy h−1 (1.2 mGy d−1), even 3 years after

  10. Frequency of chromosome aberration and dose/dose rate effects in the mouse exposed to long-term low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have been conducting long term irradiation experiments in the mouse with the dose rate as low as unreported hitherto and have shown with highly sensitive methods to detect chromosomal aberration, that there is the positive dose rate effect under even such a condition, of which details are described herein. According to the definition of United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCER) (1993), the low dose rate is 137Cs-gamma-ray at the low dose rate of 1 or 20 mGy/22 h/day (total, 125-615 or 100-8000 mGy, respectively). Other groups received radiations of 0 Gy (non-irradiated, age-matched control), 200-8000 mGy at 200 mGy/22 h/day, 400-8000 mGy at 400 mGy/22 h/day, or 250-2000 mGy at 890 mGy/min. At the defined days after exposure, mice were sacrificed, their spleens were dissected out, splenic cells were cultured for 48 hr, and their chromosome specimens were prepared to be stained with Giemsa or FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). Dicentric (dic) and translocation chromosomal aberrations were found to increase even with the lowest total (accumulated) dose, where the frequency was significantly higher than that in control. Comparison of the regression slopes at each dose rate of the relation between dose and aberration revealed the difference dependent on the rate, thus demonstrating the presence of dose rate effect. Dose/dose rate effect factor (DDREF) calculated by authors' procedure (at 1000-100 mGy: DDREF=17.8-4.5 for dic by FISH; 24.5-5.2 for dic+ring chromosome by Giemsa) was thought important in the risk assessment of low dose radiation and also revealed a problem in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (1991) calculation of the factor. (K.T.)

  11. Operational specification and forecasting advances for Dst, LEO thermospheric densities, and aviation radiation dose and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    Space weather’s effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun’s photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the magnetosphere, thermosphere, and even troposphere are key regions that are affected. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has developed and is producing innovative space weather applications. Key operational systems for providing timely information about the effects of space weather on these domains are SET’s Magnetosphere Alert and Prediction System (MAPS), LEO Alert and Prediction System (LAPS), and Automated Radiation Measurements for Aviation Safety (ARMAS) system. MAPS provides a forecast Dst index out to 6 days through the data-driven, redundant data stream Anemomilos algorithm. Anemomilos uses observational proxies for the magnitude, location, and velocity of solar ejecta events. This forecast index is used by satellite operations to characterize upcoming geomagnetic storms, for example. In addition, an ENLIL/Rice Dst prediction out to several days has also been developed and will be described. LAPS is the SET fully redundant operational system providing recent history, current epoch, and forecast solar and geomagnetic indices for use in operational versions of the JB2008 thermospheric density model. The thermospheric densities produced by that system, driven by the LAPS data, are forecast to 72-hours to provide the global mass densities for satellite operators. ARMAS is a project that has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on aircraft to capture the real-time radiation environment due to Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The dose and dose-rates are captured on aircraft, downlinked in real-time via the Iridium satellites, processed on the ground, incorporated into the most recent NAIRAS global radiation climatology data runs, and made available to end users via the web and

  12. Changes in the Number of Double-Strand DNA Breaks in Chinese Hamster V79 Cells Exposed to γ-Radiation with Different Dose Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreyan N. Osipov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A comparative investigation of the induction of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs in the Chinese hamster V79 cells by γ-radiation at dose rates of 1, 10 and 400 mGy/min (doses ranged from 0.36 to 4.32 Gy was performed. The acute radiation exposure at a dose rate of 400 mGy/min resulted in the linear dose-dependent increase of the γ-H2AX foci formation. The dose-response curve for the acute exposure was well described by a linear function y = 1.22 + 19.7x, where “y” is an average number of γ-H2AX foci per a cell and “x” is the absorbed dose (Gy. The dose rate reduction down to 10 mGy/min lead to a decreased number of γ-H2AX foci, as well as to a change of the dose-response relationship. Thus, the foci number up to 1.44 Gy increased and reached the “plateau” area between 1.44 and 4.32 Gy. There was only a slight increase of the γ-H2AX foci number (up to 7 in cells after the protracted exposure (up to 72 h to ionizing radiation at a dose rate of 1 mGy/min. Similar effects of the varying dose rates were obtained when DNA damage was assessed using the comet assay. In general, our results show that the reduction of the radiation dose rate resulted in a significant decrease of DSBs per cell per an absorbed dose.

  13. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pancreatic and prostate cancer using pulsed low–dose rate delivery techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Kang, Shengwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sichuan Cancer Hospital, Chengdu (China); Lin, Mu-han; Chen, Xiaoming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, Fu; Guo, Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eye Ear Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Lili [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie, E-mail: charlie.ma@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reirradiation of patients who were previously treated with radiotherapy is vastly challenging. Pulsed low–dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates treatment planning techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-based PLDR treatment of various sites, including cases with pancreatic and prostate cancer. A total of 20 patients with clinical recurrence were selected for this study, including 10 cases with pancreatic cancer and 10 with prostate cancer. Large variations in the target volume were included to test the ability of IMRT using the existing treatment planning system and optimization algorithm to deliver uniform doses in individual gantry angles/fields for PLDR treatments. Treatment plans were generated with 10 gantry angles using the step-and-shoot IMRT delivery technique, which can be delivered in 3-minute intervals to achieve an effective low dose rate of 6.7 cGy/min. Instead of dose constraints on critical structures, ring structures were mainly used in PLDR-IMRT optimization. In this study, the PLDR-IMRT plans were compared with the PLDR-3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans and the PLDR-RapidArc plans. For the 10 cases with pancreatic cancer that were investigated, the mean planning target volume (PTV) dose for each gantry angle in the PLDR-IMRT plans ranged from 17.6 to 22.4 cGy. The maximum doses ranged between 22.9 and 34.8 cGy. The minimum doses ranged from 8.2 to 17.5 cGy. For the 10 cases with prostate cancer that were investigated, the mean PTV doses for individual gantry angles ranged from 18.8 to 22.6 cGy. The maximum doses per gantry angle were between 24.0 and 34.7 cGy. The minimum doses per gantry angle ranged from 4.4 to 17.4 cGy. A significant reduction in the organ at risk (OAR) dose was observed with the PLDR-IMRT plan when compared with that using the PLDR-3DCRT

  14. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  15. Preliminary results of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy using high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Re Na; Suh, Hyun Suk [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    To determine the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From January 2001 to December 2002, 30 patients with cervical cancer were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-FU) and definitive radiation therapy. The median age was 58 (range 34 {approx} 74) year old. The pathology of the biopsy sections was squamous cell carcinoma in 29 patients and one was adenocarcinoma. The distribution to FIGO staging system was as follow: stage IB, 7 (23%); IIA, 3 (10%); IIB, 12 (40%); IIIA, 3 (10%); IIIB, 5 (17%). All patients received pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) to a total dose of 45 {approx} 50.4 Gy (median: 50.4 Gy) over 5 {approx} 5.5 weeks. Ir-192 HDR intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) was given after a total dose of 41.1 Gy. HDR-ICBT was performed twice a week, with a fraction point. A dose of 4 Gy and median dose to point A was 28 Gy (range: 16 {approx} 32 Gy) in 7 fractions. The median cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at point A (EBRT + ICBT) was 88 Gy{sub 10} (range:77 {approx} 94 Gy{sub 10}). The median cumulative BED at ICRU 38 reference point (EBRT + ICBT) was 131 Gy{sub 3} (range: 122 {approx} 140 Gy{sub 3}) at point A, 109 Gy{sub 3} (range:88{approx} 125 Gy{sub 3}) at the rectum and 111 Gy{sub 3} (range: 91 {approx} 123 Gy{sub 3}) at the urinary bladder. Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) and 5-FU (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered intravenously at 2 weeks interval from the first day of radiation for median 5 (range:2 {approx} 6) cycles. The assessment was performed at 1 month after completion of radiation therapy by clinical examination and CT scan. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range:8{approx} 50 months). The complete response rate after concurrent chemo radiation therapy was 93.3%. The 3-yr actuarial pelvic control rate was 87% and 3-yr actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 93% and 87%, respectively. The local failure

  16. A dosimetric study of polyethylene glycol hydrogel in 200 prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We sought to analyze the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel on rectal doses in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Between July 2009 and April 2013, we treated 200 clinically localized prostate cancer patients with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy. Half of the patients received a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided transperineal injection of 10 mL PEG hydrogel (DuraSeal™ Spinal Sealant System; Covidien, Mansfield, MA) in their anterior perirectal fat immediately prior to the first HDR brachytherapy treatment and 5 mL PEG hydrogel prior to the second HDR brachytherapy treatment. Prostate, rectal, and bladder doses and prostate–rectal distances were calculated based upon treatment planning CT scans. Results: There was a success rate of 100% (100/100) with PEG hydrogel implantation. PEG hydrogel significantly increased the prostate–rectal separation (mean ± SD, 12 ± 4 mm with gel vs. 4 ± 2 mm without gel, p < 0.001) and significantly decreased the mean rectal D2 mL (47 ± 9% with gel vs. 60 ± 8% without gel, p < 0.001). Gel decreased rectal doses regardless of body mass index (BMI). Conclusions: PEG hydrogel temporarily displaced the rectum away from the prostate by an average of 12 mm and led to a significant reduction in rectal radiation doses, regardless of BMI

  17. Mortality risk coefficients for radiation-induced cancer at high doses and dose-rates, and extrapolation to the low dose domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liniecki, J

    1989-01-01

    Risk coefficients for life-long excessive mortality due to radiation-induced cancers are presented, as derived in 1988 by the U.N. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), principally on the basis of follow-up from A-bomb survivors in Japan, over the period from 1950 through 1985. The data are based on the new, revised dosimetry (DS 86) in the two cities, and reflect the effects of high and intermediate doses of basically low LET radiation delivered instantaneously. The author presents arguments relevant to the extrapolation of the risk to the low dose (dose rate) domain, as outlined by UNSCEAR in its 1986, and the NCRP (USA) in its 1980, (no 64), reports. The arguments are based on models and dose-response relationships for radiation action, derived from data on cellular radiobiology, animal experiments on radiation-induced cancers and life shortening, as well as the available limited human epidemiological evidence. The available information points to the lower effectiveness of sparsely ionizing radiation at low doses and low dose-rates, as compared with that observed for high, acutely delivered doses. The possible range of the reduction values (DREF) is presented. For high LET radiations, the evidence is less extensive and sometimes contradictory; however, it does not point to a reduction of the effectiveness at low doses/dose-rates, relative to the high dose domain. Practical consequences of these facts are considered. PMID:2489419

  18. Evaluation of background ionising radiation levels within Gwagwalada town, Abuja

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The background ionising radiation levels within Gwagwalada Town, Abuja has been carried out using Atomtex 1117M Radiation Monitor. Readings were taken in twelve different locations. Twenty different readings were taken at each location and the mean equivalent dose rate was used to calculate the annual equivalent dose rate. A total of 240 measurements were taken across the 12 locations in the study Area. It was observed that the average dose equivalent varied from 0.105±0.008 μSv/h to 0.114±0.015μSv/h with a mean of 0.109±0.013 μSv/h. The mean value from Ungwan Bassa shows the highest equivalent dose rate while the equivalent dose rate from Phase 3 was the lowest. Ungwan Dodo, Ungwan Gwari recorded the second and third highest in-situ gamma radiation of 0.113±0.013 μSv/h and 0.112±0.012 μSv/h respectively. The result shows that the entire equivalent dose rates of all the locations were below the value of the Standard Background Radiation of 0.133 μSv/h. The study also revealed that the average annual equivalent dose rate is 0.192±0.005 mSv/y which is lower than the value of 1.0 mSv/yr averaged over five consecutive years according to the dose limit recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP).

  19. Effect of absorbed dose rate of ionizing radiation on decomposition of rare earth nitrates disposed in porous corundum foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of irradiation with different dose rates on the process of rare earth nitrate (neodymium) decomposition on corundum foam was studied. By the method of thermal analysis it has been shown that irradiation decreases the temperature of decomposition of neodymium nitrate, while growth of the dose rate increases the depth of Nd(NO3)3·nH2O decomposition process(including denitration). The presence of x-phase of Al2O3 in the samples facilitates irreversible immobilization of fission products, decreasing considerably the temperature of matrix interaction with applied neodymium nitrate with formation of NdAlO3 phase. 5 refs., 3 figs

  20. Low-dose-rate high-let radiation cytogenetic effects on mice in vivo as model of space radiation action on mammalian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokina, Svetlana; Zaichkina, Svetlana; Rozanova, Olga; Aptikaeva, Gella; Romanchenko, Sergei; Smirnova, Helene; Dyukina, Alsu; Peleshko, Vladimir

    At present time little is known concerning the biological effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation exposure in space. The currently available experimental data on the biological effect of low doses of chronic radiation with high-LET values, which occur under the conditions of aircraft and space flights, have been primarily obtained in the examinations of pilots and astronauts after flights. Another way of obtaining this kind of evidence is the simulation of irradiation conditions during aircraft and space flights on high-energy accelerators and the conduction of large-scale experiments on animals under these conditions on Earth. In the present work, we investigated the cytogenetic effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation in the dose ranges of 0.2-30 cGy (1 cGy/day) and 0.5-16 cGy (0.43 cGy/day) in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the Serpukhov accelerator of 70 GeV protons that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights on SHK mice in vivo. The dose dependence, adaptive response (AR) and the growth of solid tumor were examined. For induction of AR, two groups of mice were exposed to adapting doses of 0.2-30 cGy and the doses of 0.5-16 cGy of high-LET radiation. For comparison, third group of mice from unirradiated males was chronically irradiated with X-rays at adapting doses of 10 cGy (1 cGy/day). After a day, the mice of all groups were exposed to a challenging dose of 1.5 Gy of X-rays (1 Gy/min). After 28 h, the animals of all groups were killed by the method of cervical dislocation. Bone marrow specimens for calculating micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were prepared by a conventional method with minor modifications. The influence of adapting dose of 16 cGy on the growth of solid tumor of Ehrlich ascite carcinoma was estimated by measuring the size of the tumor at different times after the inoculation of ascitic cells s.c. into the femur. It was

  1. Effect of dose rate, temperature and impurity content on the radiation damage in the electron irradiated NaCl crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubinko, V.I.; Turkin, A.A.; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den

    2000-01-01

    The dependencies of void formation and radiolytic sodium accumulation on the irradiation dose, dose rate, temperature and impurity content are analyzed within a framework of a theoretical model, which is based on a new mechanism of dislocation climb. The mechanism involves the production of V-F cent

  2. Late biological effects of ionizing radiation as influenced by dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic sensitivity to neoplastic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A most comprehensive investigation is in progress at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to study the late biological effects of whole-body exposure to gamma irradiation as they may be influenced by total dose, dose rate, age at exposure and genetic background. Strain C57B1/6J mice of four age groups (newborn, 2, 6 and l5 months) were given five doses (20, 60, 180, 540, and 1620 rads) of gamma rays, with each dose being delivered at six dose rates (0.7, 2.1, 6.3, 18.9, 56.7 rads/day and 25 rads/min). Forty to sixty mice were used in each of the approximately 119 dose/dose-rate and age combinations. The study was done in two replications with an equal number of mice per replicaton. Strain RF/J mice were used in a companion study to investigate the influence of genetic background on the type and magnitude of effect. Results of the first and second replications of the l5-month-old age group and data on the influence of genetic background on biological response have been completed, and the results show no significant life shortening within the dose and dose-rate range used. It was also concluded that radiaton-induced neoplastic transformaton was significantly greater in mice with a known genetic sensitivity to neoplastic disease than in mammals which do not normally have a significant incidence of tumours. (author)

  3. Influence of dose, dose rate, and radiation quality on radiation carcinogenesis and life shortening in RFM and BALB/C mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects produced by 137Cs gamma rays delivered at a high (45 rads/min) or intermediate (8.2 rads/day) dose rate and the effect of fission neutrons at a high (25 rads/min) and low (1 rad/day) rate in a population of nearly 30,000 RFM and 11,000 BALB/c mice have been studied. Gamma ray doses ranged from 10 to 400 rads with the RFM's and from 50-400 rads with the BALB/c's, while neutron doses ranged from 5 to 200 rads with both strains. The present paper will present an overview of these data and the general findings while subsequent publications will present detailed analyses of each aspect. A variety of neoplasms were sensitive to induction after radiation exposure, including tumors of both reticular tissue origin (leukemia, lymphoma, etc.) and solid tumors. For the RFM, thymic lymphomas were the dominant reticular tissue neoplasm while the majority of solid tumors were either lung adenomas or fit into the broad category of endocrine related tumors, including ovarian, pituitary, harderian, and uterine tumors. The BALB/c was much less sensitive to induction of reticular tissue neoplasms. The tumors that were most sensitive to induction included malignant lung carcinomas, mammary adenocarcinomas and ovarian tumors. In general for both life shortening and tumor induction after gamma ray exposures, when the low to intermediate dose range was sufficiently defined, linearity could be rejected and a dose squared or linear-dose squared relationship adequately fit the data. For neutron exposures, on the other hand, linear relationships were the general finding. The RBE for neutrons varied with tumor type and total dose level. For gamma ray irradiation, the intermediate dose rate resulted in a decreased effectiveness in all cases, while for neutron exposures the dose rate relationships were more complex

  4. An insight in to effect of dose, dose rate and confounding factors on radiation induced DNA damage and repair using comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce a variety of DNA lesions such as single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs), and oxidative damage to bases, interstrand cross-links and locally multiplies damaged sites (LMDs). However, the most dangerous DNA lesions which are responsible for the origin of lethal effects, mutagenesis, genomic instability and carcinogenesis are the DSBs and LMDs. Humans are at high risk of exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation either through environmental or occupational exposures. It is known that following exposure to doses below 10 cGy mammalian cells adapt to subsequent higher doses of ionizing radiation exposures a phenomenon known as adaptive response. Neither the changes induced by low dose ionizing radiation nor the biochemical pathways that signal this low dose radiation effect are well studied. The genetic effect of ionizing radiation depends on the radiation dose as well as on the dose rate at which it is delivered. The radiation induced cellular effects such as chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, micronucleus formation, transformation, mutations and changes in gene expression can cause cancer, cell death or damage can transmitted to subsequent generations. Contradictory reports exist in literature about variation in genetic response as function of dose and dose rates. There are different methods available to detect the DNA damage such as Neutral and Alkaline elution assay, DNA unwinding assay, Comet assay, Halo assay, FISH-comet assay, gamma-H2AX. Comet assay is a valuable technique which allows detection of DNA damage and repair at single cell level and provides a unique opportunity to investigate intercellular differences in any eukaryotic cell population. Thus, there is need to evaluate the utility and accuracy of different techniques used for estimation of radiation induced DNA damage. Here, we report our observations on the effect of low-dose, low dose rates, low dose limit, type of radiation

  5. Use of three-dimensional radiation therapy planning tools and intraoperative ultrasound to evaluate high dose rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We performed a pilot study to evaluate the quality of high dose rate (HDR) prostate implants using a new technique combining intraoperative real-time ultrasound images with a commercially available 3-dimensional radiation therapy planning (3D RTP) system. Methods and Materials: Twenty HDR prostate implants performed by four different physicians on a phase I/II protocol were evaluated retrospectively. Radiation therapy (RT) consisted of pelvic external beam RT (EBRT) to a dose of 46 Gy in 2-Gy fractions over 5 weeks and 2 HDR implants (prescribed dose of 950 cGy per implant). Our in-house real-time geometric optimization technique was used in all patients. Each HDR treatment was delivered without moving the patient. Ultrasound image sets were acquired immediately after needle placement and just prior to HDR treatment. The ultrasound image sets, needle and source positions and dwell times were imported into a commercial computerized tomography (CT) based 3D RTP system. Prostate contours were outlined manually caudad to cephalad. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the prostate were evaluated for each implant. Results: Four patients with stage T2a carcinoma, 4 with stage T2b, and 3 with stage T1c were studied. The median number of needles used per implant was 16 (range 14-18). The median treated volume of the implant (volume of tissue covered by the 100% isodose surface) was 82.6 cc (range 52.6-96.3 cc). The median target volume based on the contours entered in the 3D RTP system was 44.83 cc (range 28.5-67.45 cc). The calculated minimum dose to the target volume was 70% of the prescribed dose (range 45-97%). On average 92% of the target volume received the prescribed dose (range 75-99%). The mean homogeneity index (fraction of the target volume receiving between 1.0 to 1.5 times the prescribed dose) was 80% or 0.8 (range 0.55-0.9). These results compare favorably to recent studies of permanent implants which report a minimum target volume dose of 43% (range 29

  6. Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, R. C.; Murthy, J.

    1993-12-01

    The UVX experiment was carried on the Space Shuttle Columbia between 1986 January 12 and 19 (STS-61C). Several ultraviolet spectrometers were used to obtain measurements of the diffuse ultraviolet background at 8 locations in the sky. We have reanalysed the UVX measurements of the surface brightness of the diffuse ultraviolet background above b = 40 using the dust-scattering model of Onaka & Kodaira (1991), which explicitly takes into account the variation of the source function with galactic longitude. The range of allowed values of interstellar grain albedoJa, and scattering asymmetry parameter g, is considerably expanded over those of a previous analysis. The new chi square probability contours come close to, but do not include, the values of a and g found for the interstellar grains by Witt et al. (1992) using the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) on the Astro mission. If we hypothesize in additon to the dust-scattered light an extragalactic component, of 300 1 100 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 A-1, attenuated by a cosecant b law, the new reduction of the UVX data gives complete consistency with the Witt et al. determination of the optical parameters of the grains in the ultraviolet. This work was supported by United States Air Force Contract F19628-93-K-0004, and by National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant NASA NAG5-619. We are grateful for the encouragement of Dr. Stephan Price, and we thank Dr. L. Danly for information. Onaka, T., & Kodaira, K. 1991, ApJ, 379, 532 Witt, A. N., Petersohn, J. K., Bohlin, R. C., O'Connell, R. W., Roberts, M. S., Smith, A. M., & Stecher, T. P. 1992, ApJ, 395, L5

  7. Evaluation on radiation features of the KUR deuterium neutron irradiation equipment. Neutron energy spectra and neutron- and gamma-ray absorption dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deuterium irradiation equipment at reactor for research in Kyoto University (KUR) was reformed at main aim of upgrading of neutron capture therapy (NCT) from November, 1995 to March, 1996. Neutron energy spectra at reference radiation position evaluated on a partial radiation mode by multiple activated foil method, was introduced. As a result of carrying out a simulation calculation using two dimensional transmission calculation supposing medical radiation using the obtained spectra, experimental results could be followed satisfactorily in total. And, comparison with differential absorption dose rate measured by using twin-type ionization box and semiconductor detector for medical probe was also carried out. (G.K.)

  8. Impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy plan delivery using the pretreatment portal dosimetry quality assurance and setting up the workflow at hospital levels

    OpenAIRE

    Karunakaran Kaviarasu; N Arunai Nambi Raj; Krishna Murthy, K.; A Ananda Giri Babu; Bhaskar Laxman Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan delivery by comparing the gamma agreement between the calculated and measured portal doses by pretreatment quality assurance (QA) using electronic portal imaging device dosimetry and creating a workflow for the pretreatment IMRT QA at hospital levels. As the improvement in gamma agreement leads to increase in the quality of IMRT treatment delivery, gamma evaluation was...

  9. Evaluation of quality characteristics and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meats treated with different dose rates of ionizing radiation and use of antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mechanically Deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used in traditional meat products, in greater proportion in those emulsified, replacing meat raw materials more expensive. The raw material can have high MDCM the microbial load, as a result of contamination during processing or failure during the evisceration. The irradiation process is accepted as one of the most effective technologies when compared to conventional techniques of preservation, to reduce contamination of pathogens and spoilage. However, little information is available about the use and effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation processing. Irradiation causes chemical changes in food, a major cause of deterioration of quality of raw or cooked meat products during refrigerated storage, frozen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation on the production of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS), color, microbiological and sensory characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken added or without added antioxidants, during the cold storage and evaluation of functional properties. The results showed that among the tested dose rates using cobalt-60 source, dose rate of 4.04 kGy.h-1 was the best for processing MDCM. Furthermore, the use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to reduce lipid oxidation generated by irradiation of the samples, showed a synergistic effect to the processing with ionizing radiation in reduction of psychrotrophic bacteria count and contributed to a better sensory quality. The use of radiation in the processing FDMI did not adversely affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  10. Correlation between regional oncological mortality and natural radiation background in the CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of published geological data (maps) an attempt was made to correlate the regional distribution of oncological mortality with the dose rate of the natural radiation background in the Czech Socialist Republic. No relationship was observed between the two parameters in the whole area of the CSR; for districts with an increased dose rate of the background or with high mortality the statistical relationship proved an inverse relationship: the higher the background dose rate the lower the oncological mortality and vice versa. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 22 refs

  11. Dose Rate Effects in Linear Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Allan; Swimm, Randall; Harris, R. D.; Thorbourn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Dose rate effects are examined in linear bipolar transistors at high and low dose rates. At high dose rates, approximately 50% of the damage anneals at room temperature, even though these devices exhibit enhanced damage at low dose rate. The unexpected recovery of a significant fraction of the damage after tests at high dose rate requires changes in existing test standards. Tests at low temperature with a one-second radiation pulse width show that damage continues to increase for more than 3000 seconds afterward, consistent with predictions of the CTRW model for oxides with a thickness of 700 nm.

  12. Genetic effect of low dose rate radiation on human cells immortalized with the hTERT gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We established immortal human cells by introducing the hTERT gene into skin fibroblast cells obtained from normal (SuSa) and ataxia telangiectasia (AT: AT1OS) individuals of Japanese origin. These immortalized cells showed the same characteristics as the original cells except expanded life span. We irradiated SuSa/T-n and AT1OS/T-n cells with low-dose-rate (LDR; 0.3 mGy/min) irradiation at confluent state in low-serum medium. Then, survival rate and micronucleus frequency of each cell line were analyzed. In SuSa/T-n cells, frequency of HPRT mutation induction was also determined by 6TG selection. In SuSa/T-n cells, survival rate and micronucleus frequency showed higher resistance after irradiation with LDR than high-dose-rate (HDR; 2 Gy/min) irradiation. In contrast, no significant difference was observed in survival and micronucleus induction in AT1OS/T-n cells between HDR and LDR irradiation, suggesting that AT1OS/T-n cells may have some defect in DNA repair activity. In SuSa/T-n cells, the frequency of HPRT mutation after LDR irradiation decreased to approximately one eighth that after HDR irradiation. (author)

  13. A Study on the radiation effects for the function and structure of rabbit blood platelets in various dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Kohichi (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    Mature peripheral platelets in rabbits were irradiated with a total 10 Gy of {sup 60}Co-{gamma} rays at the average dose rates of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 1.7 Gy/min. The effects was evaluated from the functional aspect by determining the ability of platelets to aggregate and replease, and the metabolic aspect by examining the kinetics of prostaglandin in platelets. In addition, platelet structure was compared using an electron microscope. The ability of platelets to aggregate and release was accelerated in all irradiated groups, compared with a non-irradiated group, especially in groups with average dose rates of 0.5 Gy/min and 1.0 Gy/min. The amount of MDA, a final product of prostaglandin in platelets, increased in all irradiated groups in comparison with the non-irradiated group, especially in the 0.5 Gy/min, 1.0 Gy/min and 1.5 Gy/min groups. Observation with a scanning electron microscope revealed a clear rock-like appearance of the surface of aggregates of platelets and a larger number of pseudopodia with longer projections in the 1.0 Gy/min group than in the non-irradiated group. Moreover, the surfaces of the aggregates in the 1.7 Gy/min group, but the adhension between psudopodia of the platelet aggregates was weaker than that of 1.0 Gy/min group. In observation with a transmission electron microscope, dense bodies that released their contents were noticed in platelet aggregates, and a stenopeic appearance between psudopodia and between platelets, and density aggregated platelets were observed in the 1.0 Gy/min irradiated group. Vacuolation of granules in platelets was more marked in aggregates of 1.7 Gy/min group than in that of the non-irradiated group, and large numbers of platelets with uneven surfaces were observed. Therefore, the effects of dose rates were found to be closely related to changes in structures, as well as to the inner function of platelets. (author).

  14. Significance of epidemiological and cytogenetic studies on high background radiation area residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some area in the world are known as background levels of radiation are 3-5 times higher than the world average. The studies in high background area (HBRA) residents provide important direct information on the biological and health effects of chronic low dose rate radiation. (author)

  15. Radiation protection in an animal research unit with pet: Occupational doses and dose rates produced by animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the occupational doses of technologists working at an Animal Research Unit using PET radiotracers and on the environmental dose rates produced by the animals (mice, rats and monkeys). In particular, whole body and extremity monitoring is reported and related with the workload. The study shows that doses not only depend on the amount of activity injected but also on the type of animals and radiotracers managed. The extremities, with a great variability of the doses received, are the limiting organs as far as regulatory dose limits for workers are concerned. Mean H∗(10) rates in contact and at 20 cm from the animals, when they are handled by the technologist, range from around 1 mSv/h to 20 μSv/h, respectively.

  16. Measurement of terrestrial gamma radiation dose-rate (TGRD) level in soil samples from the district of Rembau, Malaysia, using high-purity Germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assesses the gamma radiation levels and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th, 238U and 40K in soil samples collected from the district of Rembau, Malaysia using High-purity Germanium (HPGe) Detectors. A 105 measurement were performed on surface soil using NaI (Tl) gamma-ray detector with crystal size 1x1, covering about 83% land of the Rembau district. The concentration of the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th, 238U and 40K in soil samples collected were determined by using HPGe detector based on high-resolution gamma spectrometry system at Malaysia Nuclear Agency. The range of natural gamma radiation measured was from 114±14 nGy h−1 to 857±14 nGy h−1. The range of activity concentrations of U, Th and °K in soil from the studied areas varies from 151-401 Bq kg−1, 113-342 Bq kg−1 and 674-1526 Bq kg−1 with mean values of 245 Bq kg−1, 186 Bq kg−1 and 1152 Bq kg1 respectively. The mean values of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate measured in Rembau district is 383±18 nGy h−1 compared to the Malaysian average is 92 nGy h−1 and world average is 59 nGy h−1 (UNSCEAR, 2000). The average annual dose from such terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates to an individual in Rembau district, assuming a tropical rural setting is estimated to be 0.78 mSv per year, which is considered to be within the normal range for doses from natural sources. An isodose map for the Rembau district has been plotted

  17. Effects of ground surface decontamination on the air radiation dose rate. Results of a decontamination trial at a playground lot in a Fukushima residential area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency decontaminated schools, playgrounds, swimming pools, and houses in nonevacuated, less-contaminated areas in Fukushima for environmental restoration. A small, 150 m2 playground lot in the residential area was chosen for decontamination demonstration, which used routinely available tools and commodities to carry out the work. The surfaces of playground lot equipment, such as swings, slides, and horizontal iron bars, were completely decontaminated by brushing with water and/or detergent. Side gutters around the playground lot were cleaned by removing the mud and then brushed and washed with a high-pressure water jet (7 MPa). The air dose rate at the playground lot was dominated by radiation from the ground surface and adjacent surroundings, such as apartments and rice fields. Two or three centimeters of the surface soil contaminated with cesium was removed manually with shovels, hoes, and other gardening tools. This significantly reduced the average air dose rate of the entire playground lot from 1.5 μSv/h before decontamination to 0.6 μSv/h. These results showed that ground surface decontamination can contribute measurably to the reduction in air dose rate in relatively small areas in residential areas. (author)

  18. Radiation dose in the high background radiation area in Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christa, E P; Jojo, P J; Vaidyan, V K; Anilkumar, S; Eappen, K P

    2012-03-01

    A systematic radiological survey has been carried out in the region of high-background radiation area in Kollam district of Kerala to define the natural gamma-radiation levels. One hundred and forty seven soil samples from high-background radiation areas and five samples from normal background region were collected as per standard sampling procedures and were analysed for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K by gamma-ray spectroscopy. External gamma dose rates at all sampling locations were also measured using a survey meter. The activities of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K was found to vary from 17 to 3081 Bq kg(-1), 54 to 11976 Bq kg(-1) and BDL (67.4 Bq kg(-1)) to 216 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in the study area. Such heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides in the region may be attributed to the deposition phenomenon of beach sand soil in the region. Radium equivalent activities were found high in several locations. External gamma dose rates estimated from the levels of radionuclides in soil had a range from 49 to 9244 nGy h(-1). The result of gamma dose rate measured at the sampling sites using survey meter showed an excellent correlation with dose rates computed from the natural radionuclides estimated from the soil samples. PMID:21515614

  19. Adaptive response and genetic instability induced by a low-dose rate radiation simulating the high-altitude flight conditions on mice in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In the present work, we investigated the effect of a low-dose rate of high-LET radiation that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights on mice in vivo. The dose dependence, adaptive response, and genetic instability in generation F1 born from males irradiated under these conditions were examined in polychromatic erythrocytes of bone marrow using the micronucleus test. Two-month-old males of SHK white mongrel mice were used. Irradiation was performed for 24 h a day in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the U-70 accelerator of 70 GeV protons (Serpukhov), which adequately simulates radiation field formed in the atmosphere at a height of about 10 km, to accumulate doses of 11.5, 21.5 and 31.5 cGy (1 cGy/day). The experiments demonstrated that: 1) irradiation of mice in vivo with these doses of low dose rate high-LET radiation leads to an increase in cytogenetic damage in polychromatic erythrocytes; 2) irradiation of mice with these doses induces no adaptive response in polychromatic erythrocytes as opposite to γ-radiation; and 3) in mice of the F1 generation born from males irradiated with doses of 11.5, 21.5 and 31.5 cGy, an increase in sensitivity to additional irradiation with a dose of 1.5 Gy of γ-radiation and the absence of adaptive response compared with the descendants of unirradiated males occur. These data indicate a genetic instability in generation F1 born from irradiated males.

  20. Diamond gamma dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CVD (chemical vapor deposition) diamond detectors for X and gamma dose rate monitoring have been fabricated and tested in the 1 mGy/h to 1 kGy/h range. They show excellent performances in terms of sensitivity and linearity. Radiation hardness measurement under 60-Co gamma rays have demonstrated long term stability for integrated doses up to 500 kGy. (authors)

  1. Low dose radiation hypersensitivity and clustered DNA damages in human fibroblasts exposed to low dose and dose rate protons or 137CS y-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett P. V.; Bennett, P.V.; Keszenman, D.J.; Johnson, A.M.; Sutherland, B.M.; Wilson, P.F.

    2013-05-14

    Effective radioprotection for human space travelers hinges upon understanding the individual properties of charged particles. A significant fraction of particle radiation astronauts will encounter in space exploratory missions will come from high energy protons in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and/or possible exposures to lower energy proton flux from solar particle events (SPEs). These potential exposures present major concerns for NASA and others, in planning and executing long term space exploratory missions. We recently reported cell survival and transformation (acquisition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar) frequencies in apparently normal NFF-28 primary human fibroblasts exposed to 0-30 cGy of 50MeV, 100MeV (SPE-like), or 1000 MeV (GCR-like) monoenergetic protons. These were modeled after 1989 SPE energies at an SPE-like low dose-rate (LDR) of 1.65 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) of 33.3 cGy/min delivered at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL.

  2. Dose rate mapping of VMAT treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, Mark; Popescu, I Antoniu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Human tissues exhibit a varying response to radiation dose depending on the dose rate and fractionation scheme used. Dose rate effects have been reported for different radiations, and tissue types. The literature indicates that there is not a significant difference in response for low-LET radiation when using dose rates between 1 Gy min(-1) and 12 Gy min(-1) but lower dose rates have an observable sparing effect on tissues and a differential effect between tissues. In intensity-modulated radiotherapy such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) the dose can be delivered with a wide range of dose rates. In this work we developed a method based on time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations to quantify the dose rate frequency distribution for clinical VMAT treatments for three cancer sites, head and neck, lung, and pelvis within both planning target volumes (PTV) and normal tissues. The results show a wide range of dose rates are used to deliver dose in VMAT and up to 75% of the PTV can have its dose delivered with dose rates  <1 Gy min(-1). Pelvic plans on average have a lower mean dose rate within the PTV than lung or head and neck plans but a comparable mean dose rate within the organs at risk. Two VMAT plans that fulfil the same dose objectives and constraints may be delivered with different dose rate distributions, particularly when comparing single arcs to multiple arc plans. It is concluded that for dynamic plans, the dose rate range used varies to a larger degree than previously assumed. The effect of the dose rate range in VMAT on clinical outcome is unknown.

  3. Dose rate mapping of VMAT treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, Mark; Antoniu Popescu, I.; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Human tissues exhibit a varying response to radiation dose depending on the dose rate and fractionation scheme used. Dose rate effects have been reported for different radiations, and tissue types. The literature indicates that there is not a significant difference in response for low-LET radiation when using dose rates between 1 Gy min-1 and 12 Gy min-1 but lower dose rates have an observable sparing effect on tissues and a differential effect between tissues. In intensity-modulated radiotherapy such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) the dose can be delivered with a wide range of dose rates. In this work we developed a method based on time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations to quantify the dose rate frequency distribution for clinical VMAT treatments for three cancer sites, head and neck, lung, and pelvis within both planning target volumes (PTV) and normal tissues. The results show a wide range of dose rates are used to deliver dose in VMAT and up to 75% of the PTV can have its dose delivered with dose rates  <1 Gy min-1. Pelvic plans on average have a lower mean dose rate within the PTV than lung or head and neck plans but a comparable mean dose rate within the organs at risk. Two VMAT plans that fulfil the same dose objectives and constraints may be delivered with different dose rate distributions, particularly when comparing single arcs to multiple arc plans. It is concluded that for dynamic plans, the dose rate range used varies to a larger degree than previously assumed. The effect of the dose rate range in VMAT on clinical outcome is unknown.

  4. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  5. [{sup 131}I]Iodoazomycin arabinoside for low-dose-rate isotope radiotherapy: radiolabeling, stability, long-term whole-body clearance and radiation dosimetry estimates in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Piyush [Department of Oncologic Imaging, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N8 (Canada); McQuarrie, Steven A. [Department of Oncologic Imaging, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N8 (Canada); Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N8 (Canada); Zhou, Aihya [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N8 (Canada); McEwan, Alexander J.B. [Department of Oncologic Imaging, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N8 (Canada); Wiebe, Leonard I. [Department of Oncologic Imaging, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N8 (Canada) and Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2N8 (Canada)]. E-mail: leonard.wiebe@ualberta.ca

    2005-08-01

    Background: The preliminary characterization of [{sup 131}I]iodoazomycin arabinoside ([{sup 131}I]IAZA) as a potential radiotherapeutic radiopharmaceutical is described. Methods: High-specific-activity [{sup 131}I]IAZA was prepared in therapeutic doses (up to 3 GBq per batch) by isotope exchange in pivalic acid melt and was purified on Sep-Pak cartridges. Stability in 15% ethanol in saline at 4 deg C was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. IAZA cytotoxicity (IC{sub 50}, {approx}0.1 mM) against both murine (EMT-6) and human (143B, 143B-LTK) tumor cells determined by MTT test was in the range previously reported for EMT-6 cells using a clonogenic assay. Tissue radioactivity levels were measured in a murine tumor model for the 24- to 168-h postinjection period. Radiation dose estimates obtained from the tissue activity levels for this period were calculated from pharmacokinetic (WinNonlin) and dosimetry (MIRD and RAdiation Dose Assessment Resource) parameters. Results: The radioiodination efficiency was >90%, but with systematic losses during Sep-Pak purification, the recovered yields of [{sup 131}I]IAZA were {approx}75%. The product (specific activity, 4.6-6.4 GBq/{mu}mol) was stable for at least 2 weeks, with only {approx}6% degradation over this storage period. Extended biodistribution studies in Balb/c mice bearing implanted EMT-6 tumors showed that the highest tumor/blood radioactivity ratio (T/B; 4.8) occurred 24 h after dosing; the T/B ratio was {approx}1.5 at the end of the 7-day study. The 24- to 168-h tissue radioactivity data fit a one-compartment model except for liver data, which best fit a two-compartment model. Dosimetry estimates showed a tumor self-dose of 7.4 mGy/MBq, which is several-fold higher than for the liver or the kidney. Conclusions: [{sup 131}I]IAZA can be efficiently radiolabeled at high specific activity, purified by a simple Sep-Pak technique and stored with little radiolysis or chemical decomposition at these specific

  6. A background radiation survey along the transcontinental railway in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports a survey, carried out during a period from October 31 to November 3, 1994 in Australia, as well as some basic techniques of train-borne measurements for estimating outdoor gamma-ray dose rates. Surface rock and bedrock data are presented for convenience for geological analysis. Cosmic-ray dose rates estimated from atmospheric pressure data are also presented for researchers who are interested in total background radiation dose rates. It was found that gamma levels can be high in the western area. The dose rate data were based on the shielding correction factor evaluated at platforms in many stations. To confirm the validity of this method, the data from train-borne surveys in central Japan were compared with the present Australian data. There were, to some extent, correlations between them. The present study suggests that the train-borne measurements are useful for surveying wide area in a short time with an error of about 20%. (N.K.)

  7. Dose rate levels around industrial gamma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose rate levels around two gamma ray sources utilized in a mining corporation have been determined. Both gamma ray sources are 137Cs and are installed in a mining corporation to measure on-line the density of mine products. Dose rate levels were calculated in several sites around the 137Cs sources using two active and several passive thermoluminescent dosemeters. Using the 137Cs' gamma factor dose rates were calculated in all the points. A comparison between the measured and calculated dose rate levels was carried out. Calculated dose rate levels was obtained for three cases: first, assuming the sources were bare, second, assuming the sources inside their shielding and the third, adding an extra shield to reduce the dose rate levels to those similar to local background. (author)

  8. Evaluation of the detriment associated with exposure at low doses and low dose rates in the radiation protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Questions about quantifying the radiological risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation have been debated repeatedly for a variety of exposure situations, including, among others, medical irradiation, discharges from nuclear facilities, transportation of radioactive waste, and potential nuclear accidents. This paper aims to shed light on the link between exposure and risk, focusing on the items that constitute the detriment associated with this exposure. The management of the risk associated with it relies on a cautious hypothesis of a linear no-threshold relation between exposure and risk of death or detriment. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) published General Recommendations in 1966 that recognised this relation, but did not publish a quantification of the risk until 1977. The Commission introduced the concept of effective dose as a risk indicator that makes it possible to determine dose limits according to the risk associated with them. In 1990, the Commission proposed a revision of the quantification and construction of detriment. New limits, based on risk quantification and, for the first time, risk tolerability, were proposed. The optimisation of radiation protection - keeping radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable in light of the economic and social context - became the key principle of the radiation protection system. The use of detriment makes it possible to use economic tools to guide the decision process for this optimisation - by assessing the monetary value of human life. This concept, widely used in health economics during the 1980's, has been criticised by many and must be used cautiously. ICRP published the latest quantifications of detriment in 2007. Detriment is thus an indicator that assesses the risk of death associated with exposure to ionising radiation for an average individual. Its construction relies on simplifying assumptions that are needed to implement a robust and effective radiation

  9. New method of gamma dose-rate measurement using energy-sensitive counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of charge quantization and pulse-rate measurement was developed to monitor low-level gamma dose rates using energy-sensitive, air-equivalent counters. Applying this concept, the charge from each detected photon is quantized by level-sensitive comparators so that the resulting total output pulse rate is proportional to dose rate. The concept was tested with a proportional counter and a solid-state detector for wide-range dose-rate monitoring applications. The prototypic monitors cover a dose-rate range from background radiation levels 10 μR/h) to 10 R/h

  10. Automation of the monitoring in real time of the absorbed dose rate in air due to the environmental gamma radiation in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center of Protection and Hygiene of the Radiations (CPHR) like center rector of the National Net of Environmental Radiological Surveillance (RNVRA), it has strengthened their detection capacity and of answer before a situation of radiological emergency. The measurements of the absorbed dose rate in air due to the environmental gamma radiation in the main stations of the Net are obtained in real time and the CPHR receives the data coming from these posts at one time relatively short. To improve the operability of the RNVRA it was necessary to complete the facilities of existent monitoring using 4 automatic measurement stations with probes of gamma detection, implementing in this way a measurement system on real time. On the other hand the software were developed: GenironProbeFech, to obtain the data of the probes, DataMail for the shipment of the same ones by electronic mail and GammaRed that receives and processes the data in the rector center. (Author)

  11. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji, E-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Kodama, Yasko, E-mail: ykodama@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz, E-mail: miya@fea.unicamp.br, E-mail: pereira@fea.unicamp.br [Campinas State University (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Food Sciences

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18{+-}1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  12. Characterization of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, Douglas D.; Cherkashyna, Nataliia; Scherzinger, Julius; Khaplanov, Anton; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Fissum, Kevin G.; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kirstein, Oliver; Ehlers, Georg; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Hornbach, Donald E.; Iverson, Erik B.; Newby, Robert J.; Hall-Wilton, Richard J.; Bentley, Phillip M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a survey of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA during routine daily operation. A broad range of detectors was used to characterize primarily the neutron and photon fields throughout the facility. These include a WENDI-2 extended range dosimeter, a thermoscientific NRD, an Arktis 4He detector, and a standard NaI photon detector. The information gathered from the detectors was used to map out the neutron dose rates throughout the facility and also the neutron dose rate and flux profiles of several different beamlines. The survey provides detailed information useful for developing future shielding concepts at spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden.

  13. Sexual Functioning Among Endometrial Cancer Patients Treated With Adjuvant High-Dose-Rate Intra-Vaginal Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damast, Shari, E-mail: shari.damast@yale.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldfarb, Shari [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Eaton, Anne; Patil, Sujata [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mosenkis, Jeffrey [Department of Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bennett, Antonia [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Atkinson, Thomas [Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Jewell, Elizabeth; Leitao, Mario; Barakat, Richard; Carter, Jeanne [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Basch, Ethan [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We used the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD) and factors associated with diminished sexual functioning in early stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with simple hysterectomy and adjuvant brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 104 patients followed in a radiation oncology clinic completed questionnaires to quantify current levels of sexual functioning. The time interval between hysterectomy and questionnaire completion ranged from <6 months to >5 years. Multivariate regression was performed using the FSFI as a continuous variable (score range, 1.2-35.4). SD was defined as an FSFI score of <26, based on the published validation study. Results: SD was reported by 81% of respondents. The mean ({+-} standard deviation) domain scores in order of highest-to-lowest functioning were: satisfaction, 2.9 ({+-}2.0); orgasm, 2.5 ({+-}2.4); desire, 2.4 ({+-}1.3); arousal, 2.2 ({+-}2.0); dryness, 2.1 ({+-}2.1); and pain, 1.9 ({+-}2.3). Compared to the index population in which the FSFI cut-score was validated (healthy women ages 18-74), all scores were low. Compared to published scores of a postmenopausal population, scores were not statistically different. Multivariate analysis isolated factors associated with lower FSFI scores, including having laparotomy as opposed to minimally invasive surgery (effect size, -7.1 points; 95% CI, -11.2 to -3.1; P<.001), lack of vaginal lubricant use (effect size, -4.4 points; 95% CI, -8.7 to -0.2, P=.040), and short time interval (<6 months) from hysterectomy to questionnaire completion (effect size, -4.6 points; 95% CI, -9.3-0.2; P=.059). Conclusions: The rate of SD, as defined by an FSFI score <26, was prevalent. The postmenopausal status of EC patients alone is a known risk factor for SD. Additional factors associated with poor sexual functioning following treatment for EC included receipt of laparotomy and lack of vaginal lubricant use.

  14. Dose rate effect in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that the minor losses of nutrients associated with radiation processing may be further reduced by irradiating foods at the high dose rates generally associated with electron beams from accelerators, rather than at the low dose rates typical of gamma irradiation (e.g. 60Co). This review briefly examines available comparative data on gamma and electron irradiation of foods to evaluate these suggestions. (137 refs., 27 tabs., 11 figs.)

  15. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications. [Radiation dose rates from shielded spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Tang, J.S.; Cramer, S.N.; Gauthey, J.C.; Kirk, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Radon-222 dose rates to burrowing mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Beresford, N.A.; Barnett, C.L.; Potter, E. D.; Vives I Batlle, J.; Barlow, T.S.; Copplestone, D.

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of absorbed dose rates as a consequence of exposure of wildlife to natural background radionuclides are required to put results of assessments conducted for releases of radionuclides from licensed sites into context. There have been recent review papers in which estimated dose rates to marine, freshwater and terrestrial wildlife (specifically the ICRP Reference Animals and Plants (ICRP 2008)) from 40K and radionuclides in the 238U and 232Th series have been presented (Beresford et a...

  17. Effective treatment of Stage I uterine papillary serous carcinoma with high dose-rate vaginal apex radiation (192Ir) and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a morphologically distinct variant of endometrial carcinoma that is associated with a poor prognosis, high recurrence rate, frequent clinical understaging, and poor response to salvage treatment. We retrospectively analyzed local control, actuarial overall survival (OS), actuarial disease-free survival (DFS), salvage rate, and complications for patients with Federation International of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) (1988) Stage I UPSC. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis describes 38 patients with FIGO Stage I UPSC who were treated with the combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, total abdominal hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO), with or without a surgical staging procedure. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with a combination of low dose-rate (LDR) uterine/vaginal brachytherapy using 226Ra or 137Cs and conventional whole-abdomen radiation therapy (WART) or whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Of 20 patients (10%) in this treatment group, 2 received cisplatin chemotherapy. Eighteen patients were treated with high dose-rate (HDR) vaginal apex brachytherapy using 192Ir with an afterloading device and cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) chemotherapy (5 of 18 patients). Only 6 of 20 UPSC patients treated with combination LDR uterine/vaginal brachytherapy and conventional external beam radiotherapy underwent complete surgical staging, consisting of TAH/BSO, pelvic/para-aortic lymph node sampling, omentectomy, and peritoneal fluid analysis, compared to 15 of 18 patients treated with HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy. Results: The 5-year actuarial OS for patients with complete surgical staging and adjuvant radiation/chemotherapy treatment was 100% vs. 61% for patients without complete staging (p = 0.002). The 5-year actuarial OS for all Stage I UPSC patients treated with postoperative HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy and systemic chemotherapy was 94% (18

  18. Early observed transient prostate-specific antigen elevations on a pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and fractionated MRI guided High Dose Rate brachytherapy boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report early observation of transient PSA elevations on this pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Eleven patients with intermediate-risk and high-risk localized prostate cancer received MRI guided HDR brachytherapy (10.5 Gy each fraction) before and after a course of external beam radiotherapy (46 Gy). Two patients continued on hormones during follow-up and were censored for this analysis. Four patients discontinued hormone therapy after RT. Five patients did not receive hormones. PSA bounce is defined as a rise in PSA values with a subsequent fall below the nadir value or to below 20% of the maximum PSA level. Six previously published definitions of biochemical failure to distinguish true failure from were tested: definition 1, rise >0.2 ng/mL; definition 2, rise >0.4 ng/mL; definition 3, rise >35% of previous value; definition 4, ASTRO defined guidelines, definition 5 nadir + 2 ng/ml, and definition 6, nadir + 3 ng/ml. Median follow-up was 24 months (range 18–36 mo). During follow-up, the incidence of transient PSA elevation was: 55% for definition 1, 44% for definition 2, 55% for definition 3, 33% for definition 4, 11% for definition 5, and 11% for definition 6. We observed a substantial incidence of transient elevations in PSA following combined external beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Such elevations seem to be self-limited and should not trigger initiation of salvage therapies. No definition of failure was completely predictive

  19. External beam radiation therapy and a low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Tobin J.; Hutchinson, Sean Z.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Cruz, Alex A.; Figura, Nicholas B.; Nethers, Kevin; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Heysek, Randy V.; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and a low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy boost without or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through August 2011, 120 intermediate-risk or high-risk prostate cancer patients were treated with EBRT to a total dose of 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions and a palladium-103 LDR brachytherapy boost of 10,000 cGy (n = 90) or an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost of 11,000 cGy (n = 30). ADT, consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist ± an anti-androgen, was administered to 29/92 (32%) intermediate-risk patients for a median duration of 4 months and 26/28 (93%) high-risk patients for a median duration of 28 months. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-12.8 years). There was no statistically-significant difference in biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), or overall survival (OS) without or with ADT. Also, there was no statistically-significant difference in bDFS, DMFS, or OS with a palladium-103 vs. an iodine-125 LDR brachytherapy boost. Conclusions: There was no statistically-significant difference in outcomes with the addition of ADT, though the power of the current study was limited. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0815 and 0924 phase III trials, which have accrual targets of more than 1,500 men, will help to clarify the role ADT in locally-advanced prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT and a brachytherapy boost. Palladium-103 and iodine-125 provide similar bDFS, DMFS, and OS. (author)

  20. Mapping the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation - cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R., E-mail: elaine@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salles, Krause C.S.; Prado, Nadya M.C., E-mail: krausesalles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nadya@ime.ib.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this work is to statically and graphically describe the exposure of the Brazilian population to natural background radiation. in this stage, doses due to cosmic rays is being assessed based on sea level dose rates, corrected by latitude and altitude, according to the model recommended by UNSCEAR. In this work, the doses were estimated for ali Brazilian municipalities with more than 100.000 inhabitants. The 253 municipalities selected for this study include about 52% of the Brazilian population. Average dose rate was estimated to be about 50 n Sv/h with a variation coefficient of 31%. The estimated doses have shown a strong influence of altitude on dose rates, with a correlation coefficient of 0,998 for ao exponential fit. This result confirms previous studies that show a large effect of the altitude 00 exposure from cosmic radiation. Considering the same occupation and shielding conditions used by UNSCEAR as global averages, average annual dose was estimated to be 0,37 (0,24 - 0,76) mSv/y, very close to UNSCEAR worldwide average of 0,38 (0,3 - 1,0) mSv/y. (author)

  1. Calculating the background radiation in the vicinity of the beam catchers of the ELBE radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ELBE radiation sources comprises beam catchers in the experimenting sites which absorb the primary electron beam as well as the generated secondary radiation. The beam catcher consists of an ultrapure graphite absorber enclosed in a water-cooled stainless steel shell. Background radiation is shielded by iron, lead and heavy concrete. The beam parameters and the position of the beam catchers differ between experimenting sites. In order to determine the dose dependence of photon and neutron fluence and the dose equivalent at the cooling shell of the beam catcher, simulations were carried out using the FLUKA code. Radiation energies of 20 MeV and 50 MeV and electron fluxes of 1 mA were considered. The spatial and energetic distributions of the dose rate equivalent provide a basis for dimensioning of the radiation shields. The calculated distributions of the energy dose rate in the beam catcher serve as a basis for assessing thermal loads on materials and for designing the cooling system. (orig.)

  2. Rate of long term bleaching in FK 51 optical glass darkened by Co60 ionizing radiation at dose rates of 10 krad/hr and 7 rad/hr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

    1997-07-01

    A previous paper presented long term bleaching data on various glasses exposed to 10.6 krad of ionizing radiation. All the glasses reported except FK 51 have readily available `G` glass equivalents that are stabilized to the natural space environment. Yet, FK 51, because of its location on the Abbe diagram is extremely useful in certain lens design applications. To more fully explore the bleaching of FK 51, after the initial dose of 10.6 krad at 11.8 krad/hour, we irradiated three more samples at a similar dose rate but to different total doses. Since the dose rate for this study was significantly higher than the dose rate anticipated for glasses in as shielded space-based lens system (tilde 3 rad/day), additional data were obtained at a lower rate of 7 rad/hour. While this dose rate is still higher than the anticipated operational rate, it is more than 1000 times lower than the dose 011 011 011 rate used for our initial studies. The bleaching rate for the samples exposed at the lower dose rate is considerably less than for the samples exposed at the higher rate.

  3. Natural background radiation in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published airborne gamma ray survey data from 33 areas of Canada were used to compile information on the average ground level exposure from natural radiation. The exposures at ground level were calculated from the surface concentrations of potassium, uranium and thorium. The highest levels of radioactivity were found in northern Canada and were generally related to granitic rocks; the lowest levels with the Athabasca sandstone. Summer outdoor exposure rates have a population-weighted average of 3.7 +- 2.3 μR.h-1, of which 48 percent orginated from potassium, 43 percent from the thorium series and 9 percent from the uranium series. This low level of radioactivity, compared to worldwide data, has resulted from erosion of a geologically old continental crust in which radioactivity decreases with depth. When seasonal variations of soil moisture and snow cover are considered, the annual population-weighted average outdoor exposure rate decreases to 2.8 +- 1.7 μR.h-1 corresponding to an annual outdoor dose-equivalent of 150 +- 90 μSV. Factors increasing the annual outdoor dose-equivalent are cosmic radiation (320 +- 30 μSV) and the internal radioactivity of the body (190 μSV). Using the ratio between indoor and outdoor values for worldwide published data, the average annual Canadian whole-body dose-equivalent from all sources of natural radiation is estimated to be 690 +-130 μSV

  4. Direct 2-Arm Comparison Shows Benefit of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost vs External Beam Radiation Therapy Alone for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khor, Richard [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Tai, Keen-Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Chander, Sarat; Van Dyk, Sylvia; Garth, Margaret [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott, E-mail: Scott.Williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients treated for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer with a single schedule of either external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost or EBRT alone. Methods and Materials: From 2001-2006, 344 patients received EBRT with HDRB boost for definitive treatment of intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. The prescribed EBRT dose was 46 Gy in 23 fractions, with a HDR boost of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions. This cohort was compared to a contemporaneously treated cohort who received EBRT to 74 Gy in 37 fractions, using a matched pair analysis. Three-dimensional conformal EBRT was used. Matching was performed using a propensity score matching technique. High-risk patients constituted 41% of the matched cohorts. Five-year clinical and biochemical outcomes were analyzed. Results: Initial significant differences in prognostic indicators between the unmatched treatment cohorts were rendered negligible after matching, providing a total of 688 patients. Median biochemical follow-up was 60.5 months. The 5-year freedom from biochemical failure was 79.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74.3%-85.0%) and 70.9% (95% CI, 65.4%-76.0%) for the HDRB and EBRT groups, respectively, equating to a hazard ratio of 0.59 (95% CI, 0.43-0.81, P=.0011). Interaction analyses showed no alteration in HDR efficacy when planned androgen deprivation therapy was administered (P=.95), but a strong trend toward reduced efficacy was shown compared to EBRT in high-risk cases (P=.06). Rates of grade 3 urethral stricture were 0.3% (95% CI, 0%-0.9%) and 11.8% (95% CI, 8.1%-16.5%) for EBRT and HDRB, respectively (P<.0001). No differences in clinical outcomes were observed. Conclusions: This comparison of 2 individual contemporaneously treated HDRB and EBRT approaches showed improved freedom from biochemical progression with the HDR approach. The benefit was more pronounced in intermediate- risk patients but needs to be weighed against

  5. Direct 2-Arm Comparison Shows Benefit of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost vs External Beam Radiation Therapy Alone for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients treated for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer with a single schedule of either external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost or EBRT alone. Methods and Materials: From 2001-2006, 344 patients received EBRT with HDRB boost for definitive treatment of intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. The prescribed EBRT dose was 46 Gy in 23 fractions, with a HDR boost of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions. This cohort was compared to a contemporaneously treated cohort who received EBRT to 74 Gy in 37 fractions, using a matched pair analysis. Three-dimensional conformal EBRT was used. Matching was performed using a propensity score matching technique. High-risk patients constituted 41% of the matched cohorts. Five-year clinical and biochemical outcomes were analyzed. Results: Initial significant differences in prognostic indicators between the unmatched treatment cohorts were rendered negligible after matching, providing a total of 688 patients. Median biochemical follow-up was 60.5 months. The 5-year freedom from biochemical failure was 79.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74.3%-85.0%) and 70.9% (95% CI, 65.4%-76.0%) for the HDRB and EBRT groups, respectively, equating to a hazard ratio of 0.59 (95% CI, 0.43-0.81, P=.0011). Interaction analyses showed no alteration in HDR efficacy when planned androgen deprivation therapy was administered (P=.95), but a strong trend toward reduced efficacy was shown compared to EBRT in high-risk cases (P=.06). Rates of grade 3 urethral stricture were 0.3% (95% CI, 0%-0.9%) and 11.8% (95% CI, 8.1%-16.5%) for EBRT and HDRB, respectively (P<.0001). No differences in clinical outcomes were observed. Conclusions: This comparison of 2 individual contemporaneously treated HDRB and EBRT approaches showed improved freedom from biochemical progression with the HDR approach. The benefit was more pronounced in intermediate- risk patients but needs to be weighed against

  6. Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayle Woloschak

    2009-12-16

    As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

  7. Radiation background of Black Sea coastal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the project is to establish the level of radiation background and its sources in the Black Sea coastal environment. Marine samples will be collected in the Black Sea Coast area. The content of different radionuclides will be analyzed and the results will be used in a GIS application. The gamma emitting radionuclides will be measured in ultralow radiation background in the Romanian underground laboratory in salt mine in Slanic-Prahova. The main expected results is an up to date quantification of the radiation sources of the background of the Black Sea coastal environment. (authors)

  8. Measurement of radioactivity in an elevated radiation background area of Western Ghats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manigandan P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of monitoring the exposure of the general public to natural radioactivity, the activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples in an elevated radiation background area of Western Ghats was determined using gamma-ray spectrometry. Average values of the activity concentration of radionuclides, outdoor terrestrial gamma dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent and radiation hazard indices from soil activity were estimated. The activity concentrations of 232Th and average outdoor terrestrial gamma dose rate were found to be higher than the world average, possibly affecting the Western Ghats environment in general. Therefore, radiological risks to the general population from ionizing radiation from the naturally occurring radionuclides in the soil are considered to be significant. How- ever, other radiological hazard indices were found to be within permissible limits.

  9. Confounding factors in radiation epidemiology and their comparability between high background radiation areas and control areas in Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Confounding factors in radiation epidemiology and their comparability among the four different dose-rate groups in high background radiation areas were studied. Methods: The demography data were collected by a specific registration method. For the components of diet and life style, the samples were taken by a stratified random sampling method. Results: The sex-, age-distributions and the life expectancy of the members of a cohort 35 years old and above in the four dose-rate groups were similar to each other. The components of diet were constituted mostly of grains and vegetables with less meat, eggs and milk. The percentages of cigarette smokers were 27.7%-31.3% in both male and female subjects and the percentages of alcohol drinkers were 4.0%-6.9% in them. Conclusion: The results show that there is good comparability between the four dose-rate groups except for background radiation level, and it is suggested that the taken food consisting of grains and vegetables may be a beneficial factor leading to low incidence of malignancies in this area

  10. Gamma radiation background measurements from Spacelab 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, William S.; Gregory, John C.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    1989-01-01

    A Nuclear Radiation Monitor incorporating a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was flown as part of the verification flight instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission, July 29 to August 6, 1985. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with better than 20 s resolution throughout most of the mission in the energy range 0.1 to 30 MeV. Knowledge of the decay characteristics and the geomagnetic dependence of the counting rates enable measurement of the various components of the Spacelab gamma-ray background: prompt secondary radiation, earth albedo, and delayed induced radioactivity. The status of the data analysis and present relevant examples of typical background behavior are covered.

  11. Specific-locus experiments show that female mice exposed near the time of birth to low-LET ionizing radiation exhibit both a low mutational response and a dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Female mice were exposed to 300 R of 73-93 R/min X-radiation either as fetuses at 18.5d post conception (p.c.) or within 9h after birth. Combining the similar results from these 2 groups yielded a specific-locus mutation frequency of 9.4x10-8 mutation/locus/R, which is statistically significantly higher than the historical-control mutation frequency, but much lower than the rate obtained by irradiating mature and maturing oocytes in adults. Other females, exposed at 18.5 days p.c. to 300 R of 0.79 R/min γ-radiation, yielded a mutation frequency that was statistically significantly lower than the frequency at high dose rates. The low-dose-rate group also had markedly higher fertility. It appears that the doe-rate effect for mutations induced near the time of birth may be more pronounced than that reported for mature and maturing oocytes of adults. A hypothesis sometimes advanced to explain low mutation frequencies recovered from cell populations that experience considerable radiation-induced cell killing is that there is selection against mutant cells. The reason for the relatively low mutational response following acute irradiation in the experiments is unknown; however, the finding of a dose-rate effect in these oocytes in the presence of only minor radiation-induced cell killing (as judged from fertility) makes it seem unlikely that selection was responsible for the low mutational response following acute exposure. Had selection been an important factor, the mutation frequency should have increased when oocyte killing was markedly reduced. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  12. Controllable forms of natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RENA is a research programm into the controllable forms of natural background radiation, which cover the activities originating from the naturally occurring radionuclides enhanced by human intervention. In the RENA-program emphasis lays upon the policy aspects of environmental-hygienic, economical and governmental character. (H.W.). 15 refs.; 2 tabs

  13. Characteristics of changes in the number of yH2AX and Rad51 protein foci in human skin fibroblasts after prolonged exposure to low-dose rate X-ray radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozerov I.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to compare the repair process of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells after acute versus prolonged exposure to X-ray irradiation with different dose rates. Material and methods. Studies were performed on primary human fibroblasts isolated from skin biopsies of healthy volunteers (women, 29 and 30 years. Cells were irradiated using an X-ray machine RUB RUST-M1 (JSC "Ruselectronics", Moscow, Russia at 37°C temperature with a dose rate of 400 mGy/min (200 kV, 2*2.4 mA, a filter of 1.5mm AI or 4 mGy/min (50 kV, 2*0.4 mA, a filter of 1.5 mm AI. Immuno-cytochemical protein staining was utilized for yH2AX and Rad51 foci analysis. Results. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (yH2AX and the key protein of homologous recombination Rad51 foci formation and disappearance kinetics were investigated simultaneously in primary human dermal fibroblasts after acute and prolonged exposure to X-ray radiation at a same dose. It was shown that the relative yield of yH2AX foci per dose reduces with decrease in dose rate, while the relative yield of Rad51 foci conversely increases. Conclusion. Our findings suggest the fundamental differences in the ratio of non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination DNA repair in acute versus prolonged irradiated cells.

  14. An investigation of gamma background radiation in Hamadan province, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general population, everywhere in the world is exposed to a small dose of ionising radiation from natural sources. Stochastic effects such as cancer and genetic disorders are caused when living creatures are exposed to low doses. In Iran, it is measured in some cities, especially in high-background areas such as Ramsar, but so far there is no measurement in the Hamadan province. Hamadan is located in the west of Iran. Measurements were performed using a RDS-110 survey meter, CaSO4:Dy thermoluminescence dosimetries (TLDs) and a Harshaw 4000 TLD reader. To estimate the dose rate outdoors, four stations along the main directions (north, south, west and east) and one in the town centre were selected. Mean annual X and gamma equivalent dose in Hamadan province are 1.12±0.22 and 1.66±0.07 mSv, which related to RDS-110 survey meter and TLDs measurements, respectively. The TLDs and RDS-110 results are representative of the external photon radiation doses for the selected monitoring locations and for those locations for the hours during which the measurements were taken, respectively. Maximum and minimum of external photon radiation doses are related to Hamadan and Kaboudar-Ahang towns, respectively. According to the results of the study, it seems that the annual X and gamma equivalent dose in Hamadan province exceeded the global mean external exposure amounts by the UNSCEAR, and further studies are needed to measure internal exposures to determine the total environmental radiation level in Hamadan province. (authors)

  15. Comparison of acute and subacute genitourinary and gastrointestinal adverse events of radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, permanent implant brachytherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Konishi, Koji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki; Bijl, Henk P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Langendijk, Johannes A; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: To examine acute and subacute urinary and rectal toxicity in patients with localized prostate cancer monotherapeutically treated with the following four radiotherapeutic techniques: intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, low-dose-ra

  16. Results of concomitant chemoradiation for cervical cancer using high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy: Study of JROSG (Japan Radiation Oncology Study Group)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Koh-Ichi (Dept. of Radiology, Sapporo Medical Univ., School of Medicine, Sapporo (JP)); Sakurai, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki (Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Gunna Univ., School of Medicine, Gunna (JP)) (and others)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to clarify outcome for concurrent chemoradiation (CT-RT) in locally advanced cervix cancer in Japan. This is a non-randomized retrospective analysis of 226 patients treated with definitive CT-RT or radiotherapy alone (RT alone) in nine institutions between 2001 and 2003. External irradiation consisted of whole pelvic irradiation and pelvic side wall boost irradiation, using a central shield during the latter half of the treatment with the anteroposterior parallel opposing technique. The external beam irradiation was performed with 1.8 or 2 Gy per fraction. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR) was performed in all cases. In chemotherapy, platinum based drugs were used alone or in combination with other drugs such as 5FU. Grade of late complications was scaled retrospectively with CTCv2.0. Overall survival rate at 50 months of stage Ib, II and III, IV was 82% and 66% in CR-RT and 81% and 43% in R alone, respectively. Disease-free survival rate at 50 months of stage Ib, II and III, IV was 74% and 59% in CR-RT and 76% and 52% in R alone, respectively. There was no significant difference between CT-RT and RT for overall survival and disease free survival. Univariate analysis suggested that loco-regional control was better with CT-RT, but multivariate analysis could not confirm this finding. Compared to RT alone, CT-RT caused significantly more acute and late complications. Thus, late complication (grade 3-4) free survival rate at 50 month was 69% for CT-RT and 86% for RT alone (p<0.01). The therapeutic window with concomitant radiochemotherapy and HDR brachytherapy may be narrow, necessitating a close control of dose volume parameters and adherence to systems for dose prescription

  17. Dose-rate mapping and search of radioactive sources in Estonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ylaetalo, S.; Karvonen, J.; Ilander, T.; Honkamaa, T.; Toivonen, H.

    1996-12-01

    The Estonian Ministry of Environment and the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) agreed in 1995 on a radiation mapping project in Estonia. The country was searched to find potential man-made radioactive sources. Another goal of the project was to produce a background dose-rate map over the whole country. The measurements provided an excellent opportunity to test new in-field measuring systems that are useful in a nuclear disaster. The basic idea was to monitor road sides, cities, domestic waste storage places and former military or rocket bases from a moving vehicle by measuring gamma spectrum and dose rate. The measurements were carried out using vehicle installed systems consisting of a pressurised ionisation chamber (PIC) in 1995 and a combination of a scintillation spectrometer (NaI(TI)) and Geiger-Mueller-counter (GM) in 1996. All systems utilised GPS-satellite navigation signals to relate the measured dose rates and gamma-spectra to current geographical location. The data were recorded for further computer analysis. The dose rate varied usually between 0.03-0.17 {mu}Sv/h in the whole country, excluding a few nuclear material storage places (in Saku and in Sillamae). Enhanced dose rates of natural origin (0.17-0.5 {mu}Sv/h) were measured near granite statues, buildings and bridges. No radioactive sources were found on road sides or in towns or villages. (orig.) (14 refs.).

  18. Dose-rate mapping and search of radioactive sources in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Estonian Ministry of Environment and the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) agreed in 1995 on a radiation mapping project in Estonia. The country was searched to find potential man-made radioactive sources. Another goal of the project was to produce a background dose-rate map over the whole country. The measurements provided an excellent opportunity to test new in-field measuring systems that are useful in a nuclear disaster. The basic idea was to monitor road sides, cities, domestic waste storage places and former military or rocket bases from a moving vehicle by measuring gamma spectrum and dose rate. The measurements were carried out using vehicle installed systems consisting of a pressurised ionisation chamber (PIC) in 1995 and a combination of a scintillation spectrometer (NaI(TI)) and Geiger-Mueller-counter (GM) in 1996. All systems utilised GPS-satellite navigation signals to relate the measured dose rates and gamma-spectra to current geographical location. The data were recorded for further computer analysis. The dose rate varied usually between 0.03-0.17 μSv/h in the whole country, excluding a few nuclear material storage places (in Saku and in Sillamae). Enhanced dose rates of natural origin (0.17-0.5 μSv/h) were measured near granite statues, buildings and bridges. No radioactive sources were found on road sides or in towns or villages. (orig.) (14 refs.)

  19. The biological effect of 125I seed continuous low dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Hong-Qing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effectiveness and mechanism of 125I seed continuous low-dose-rate irradiation on colonic cell line CL187 in vitro. Methods The CL187 cell line was exposed to radiation of 60Coγ ray at high dose rate of 2 Gy/min and 125I seed at low dose rate of 2.77 cGy/h. Radiation responses to different doses and dose rates were evaluated by colony-forming assay. Under 125I seed low dose rate irradiation, a total of 12 culture dishes were randomly divided into 4 groups: Control group, and 2, 5, and 10 Gy irradiation groups. At 48 h after irradiation, apoptosis was detected by Annexin and Propidium iodide (PI staining. Cell cycle arrests were detected by PI staining. In order to investigate the influence of low dose rate irradiation on the MAPK signal transduction, the expression changes of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and Raf under continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDR and/or EGFR monoclonal antibodies were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Results The relative biological effect (RBE for 125I seeds compared with 60Co γ ray was 1.41. Apoptosis rates of CL187 cancer cells were 13.74% ± 1.63%, 32.58% ± 3.61%, and 46.27% ± 3.82% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 1.67% ± 0.19%. G2/M cell cycle arrests of CL187 cancer cells were 42.59% ± 3.21%, 59.84% ± 4.96%, and 34.61% ± 2.79% after 2 Gy, 5 Gy, and 10 Gy irradiation, respectively; however, the control group apoptosis rate was 26.44% ± 2.53%. P 2/M cell cycle arrest. After low dose rate irradiation, EGFR and Raf expression increased, but when EGFR was blocked by a monoclonal antibody, EGFR and Raf expression did not change. Conclusion 125I seeds resulted in more effective inhibition than 60Co γ ray high dose rate irradiation in CL187 cells. Apoptosis following G2/M cell cycle arrest was the main mechanism of cell-killing effects under low dose rate irradiation. CLDR could

  20. Cosmic microwave background radiation: anisotropies and polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Sergio Vitorino de Borba; Guaitolini Junior, J.T. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The development of cosmological models which describe correctly the universe we live in is becoming more reliable, as the improvement of the measure tools provides us with more accurate information. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB) was discovered accidentally by Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson in early 60s, becoming a strong evidence in favor of the Big Bang model. This radiation, typical of a blackbody with maximum intensity in the microwave band, was already predicted by Gamov, Alpher and Herman and it's originated from the uncoupling between radiation and matter in recombination, at z = 1088. Nowadays, since no other observable in Cosmology provides us with information of such a distant past, studying CMB is of great importance for the process of the comprehension of the universe. The detection of small anisotropies at the temperatures distribution, which remain even after considering the universe recent phenomena and effects of referential movements, evidenced that the primordial universe was closer to the thermodynamic equilibrium and that the appearance of small inhomogeneities were the beginning of the formation of the structures we see today. These small anisotropies are important because from them it is possible to observe polarization at CMB. In a universe so perfectly homogeneous and isotropic, polarization would never exist. In this work, we calculate the behavior of light propagation in a disturbed universe, obtaining anisotropies from the potential variation at the radiation way and from the peculiar velocity of matter which spread radiation in our direction. At this point, the next purpose is to theoretically calculate these anisotropies in an alternative cosmological example, such as in Brans-Dicke theory or a model of an universe filled with a viscous fluid. Besides, with the Stokes Parameters describing the radiation field, we study the CMB polarization, in particular analyzing the polarization tensor in a 2-sphere as

  1. Radionuclides and radiation indices of high background radiation area in Chavara-Neendakara placer deposits (Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Thomas Derin

    Full Text Available The present paper describes a detailed study on the distribution of radionuclides along Chavara - Neendakara placer deposit, a high background radiation area (HBRA along the Southwest coast of India (Kerala. Judged from our studies using HPGe gamma spectrometric detector, it becomes evident that Uranium ((238U, Thorium ((232Th and Potassium ((40K are the major sources for radioactivity prevailing in the area. Our statistical analyses reveal the existence of a high positive correlation between (238U and (232Th, implicating that the levels of these elements are interdependent. Our SEM-EDAX analyses reveal that titanium (Ti and zircon (Zr are the major trace elements in the sand samples, followed by aluminum, copper, iron, ruthenium, magnesium, calcium, sulphur and lead. This is first of its kind report on the radiation hazard indices on this placer deposit. The average absorbed dose rates (9795 nGy h(-1 computed from the present study is comparable with the top-ranking HBRAs in the world, thus offering the Chavara-Neendakara placer the second position, after Brazil; pertinently, this value is much higher than the World average. The perceptibly high absorbed gamma dose rates, entrained with the high annual external effective dose rates (AEED and average annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE values existing in this HBRA, encourage us to suggest for a candid assessment of the impact of the background radiation, if any, on the organisms that inhabit along this placer deposit. Future research could effectively address the issue of the possible impact of natural radiation on the biota inhabiting this HBRA.

  2. Background radiation and childhood leukemia: A nationwide register-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkilä, Atte; Erme, Sini; Arvela, Hannu; Holmgren, Olli; Raitanen, Jani; Lohi, Olli; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-11-01

    High doses of ionizing radiation are an established cause of childhood leukemia. However, substantial uncertainty remains about the effect of low doses of radiation, including background radiation and potential differences between genetic subgroups of leukemia have rarely been explored. We investigated the effect of the background gamma radiation on childhood leukemia using a nationwide register-based case-control study. For each of the 1,093 cases, three age- and gender matched controls were selected (N = 3,279). Conditional logistic regression analyses were adjusted for confounding by Down syndrome, birth weight (large for gestational age), and maternal smoking. Complete residential histories and previously collected survey data of the background gamma radiation in Finland were used to assess the exposure of the study subjects to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. Overall, background gamma radiation showed a non-significant association with the OR of childhood leukemia (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97, 1.05 for 10 nSv/h increase in average equivalent dose rate to red bone marrow). In subgroup analyses, age group 2-childhood leukemia, particularly at age 2-<7 years. Our findings suggest a larger effect of radiation on leukemia with high hyperpdiploidy than other subgroups, but this result requires further confirmation. PMID:27405274

  3. Risk from radionuclides: a frog's perspective : Accumulation of 137Cs in a riparian wetland, radiation doses, and effects on frogs and toads after low-dose rate exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Karolina

    2006-01-01

    Threats from man-made radionuclides include waste issues, increasing number of power plants, underground bomb testing, nuclear weapons, and “dirty bombs”. Until recently the ionizing radiation protection system focused on protecting humans with an implied protection of biota. However, goals of sustainable development and precautionary principles for human activity are leading to an inclusion of plant and animal populations in the protection system. From this perspective, the present thesis ex...

  4. Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium at the EMS 2009 Annual Meeting - September 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.; von Borstel, Robert C.; Brenner,; Redpath, J. Leslie; Erickson, Barbra E.; Brooks,

    2009-11-12

    The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects.

  5. A database for a meta-analysis of cancer risk in animals at low doses and dose rates of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of animal experiments listed in the International Radiobiology Archives (I.R.A.), complemented with data published in peer-reviewed literature since 1996 have been assembled in one data base and the induction of cancer at low doses has been analyzed. In total, approximately 100 separate, independent sets of experimental data have been studied. The main objective of this work is to provide information on radiation risk in the 0-500 mGy range. The data analyzed were those for which no significant reduction of life span was observed in exposed animals; or doses did not exceed 1 Gy; or no cancer was observed in exposed animals. With these criteria data sets with organ doses well in excess of 1 Gy were taken into account. In animals with a low natural incidence of cancer, the difference between the observed number of cancer cases and the prediction of the Linear No-threshold (LNT) hypothesis was compared in each experiment. Following intake of alpha emitters, the number of cancers observed is about 60% of the number of number predicted by the LNT, and only about 56% following intake of beta emitters. In some experiments, statistically weak protective effects were observed following the intake of alpha emitters, whereas apparently statistically strong protective effects were observed in some groups of animals exposed to beta radiation. In animals exposed to low LET radiation and neutrons, both clear excess cancer risk and clear cancer deficits were observed. In a second series of analysis, the several modeling approaches were used to model dose-response. Linear, logistic and probit regression models were examined. For all the data sets examined in this work, the analysis of the data using the LOGISTIC model seems to indicate surplus of negative slopes in the dose-response fits. Finer analyses are underway to determine what parameters are common to experiments which display similar dose-response relationships. If they exist in a sufficient number of experiments

  6. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  7. Assessment of background gamma radiation and determination of excess lifetime cancer risk in Sabzevar City, Iran in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Eslami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Background gamma radiation levels vary in different locations and depended on many factors such as radiation properties of soil, building materials as well as construction types which human lives on it. People are always exposed to ionizing radiation, which could badly influence their health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the background gamma-ray dose rate and the estimated annual effective dose equivalent and determination of excess lifetime cancer risk in Sabzevar City, Iran. Methods: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the dose rate of background gamma radiation in outdoor an indoor areas, 26 stations were selected using the map of the Sabzevar City. The amount of gamma radiation was measured at 4 months (September to January in 2014 year. The dosimeter used in this study was a survey meter, that is designed for monitoring radiation of x, gamma and beta rays. Results: The obtained results show that there are significant differences between the indoor and outdoor exposures (P> 0.05. We did not observe significant differences between the time of sampling and sampling locations, (P<0.05. The minimum and maximum values of dose rate were found 66±20 nSvh-1 and 198±28 nSvh-1. The annual effective dose for Sabzevar residents was estimated to be 0.85 mSv and also the amount of excess lifetime cancer risk was estimated 3.39×10-3. Conclusion: According to the results, the excess lifetime cancer risk and the annual effective dose for the Sabzavar City residents due to the background gamma radiation was higher than the global average (0.5 mSv. The epidemiological studies have been proposed to evaluate the risk of chronic diseases associated with natural radiation exposure among residents.

  8. Evidence for the Cellular Basis of Intestinal Death in Mice, from an Analysis of Dose-Effect Relationships Modified by Quality of Radiation, Dose Rate, Fractionation and Anoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When animals are killed by radiation, as by other toxic agents, the dose-effect relationship may be characterized by the LD50 together with the 'spread' or variance of the observations. It is generally accepted that the type of dose-effect curve (a probability curve) obtained in such experiments is to be ascribed to subtle and uncontrollable biological variations within any group of experimental animals. Conditions of irradiation have been used such that the values of LD50 might be widely different, e.g. for intestinal death (at 4-5 days) the LD50 for animals exposed to fast electrons while breathing oxygen was 1020 rad, while for animals breathing nitrogen it was 2800 rad. In that example, the variances of the two sets of data were in exactly the same ratio as the LD50 values, so that the anoxia operated as a dose-modifying agent. For other methods of modifying the LD50, however, this was not true: for example when the LD50 was increased from 1200 to 1600 rad by fractionation the variance remained constant. A computer programme was set up to perform probit analyses on animal survival curves, and to test whether 'dose modification' or 'parallel slopes' (i.e. variances proportional to LD50 values, or constant variances) provides the better model for the comparison of the results of irradiation in any two sets of conditions. It was found , in general, that conditions which give true dose modification of cell survival curves (e.g. anoxia) are also dose-modifying for the animal survival curves, whereas conditions which act as if to change the shoulder of a cell survival curve, but not its slope (e.g. dose fractionation) act similarly in respect of animal survival curves. Thus the biological variability which expresses itself in the probability curve for animal survival seems to be closely linked with the survival curve for the particular cell population the depletion of which leads to the gastro-intestinal • syndrome. (author)

  9. Study of the radiation levels in low dose rate brachytherapy zones of the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses; Estudio de los Niveles de Radiacion en Zonas de Braquiterapia de Baja Tasa de Dosis del Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa J, N.; Mora Y, B. [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: navorf01@yahoo.es

    2006-07-01

    The present study has as objective to evaluate the radiation levels of the Brachytherapy work areas of low dose rate (Gammateque, nurses station and of hospitalization rooms of patients RIC of 4th, 5th Floor-East) and to estimate the effective dose of the occupationally exposed personnel and the public in general. The measurements of the dose rate in these areas, were registered with a radiations monitor Inspector trademark, during a period of 60 days, without altering the routinary work conditions. The more high levels of environmental dose equivalent rate registered in the different work areas its are of 1.41 and 47.78 {mu}Sv/h rooms 1 and 2 in the Gammateque environments, in the hospitalization rooms of the 4th and 5th floor in the point 1 are of 40.77 and 23.67, {mu}Sv/h respectively and in the point 2 are of 129.19 and 39.93, {mu}Sv/h respectively, and in the nurses station of the 4th and 5th floor its are respectively of 7.62 u Sv/h and 0.45 u Sv/h. According to the carried out measurements and the permanency in the work place is possible to estimate the effective dose involved to the occupationally exposed personnel. The personnel that works in Gammateque could be receiving respectively as maximum dose 0.61 mSv/month, and the personnel that works in the nurses station of 13.17 and 0.78 mSv/year in the 4th and 5th floor. These registered differences among the two floors are due to that the 5th floor counts with the shielding systems (screen) contrary to the 4th, another of the factors is the distribution form of the patient beds RIC. We should have present that the radiation levels although in some cases it is very high, however, they are below of the permissible limits according to standards, but it is still possible to reduce even more, the radiation levels in the critical points fulfilling with the ALARA principle. (Author)

  10. Preliminary survey of outdoor gamma dose rates in Lesvos Island (Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petalas, Anastasios B; Vogiannis, Efstratios; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Halvadakis, Constantinos P

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the first attempt to record the radioactive background due to gamma radiation in Lesvos Island (Greece). The study reports the results from 335 outdoor total gamma effective dose rate measurements conducted using GPS navigation and a Geiger-Muller detector (Bicron, Micro Sievert) on the whole surface of the island together with a digital map produced by appropriate mapping GIS programme. The study also reports the measurements of outdoor gamma dose rates due to the 238U, 232Th and 40K radionuclides as estimated via in situ gamma-ray spectrometry measurements performed at 26 sites using a 3 x 3 inch NaI (thallium activated) portable detector. The results from the outdoor total gamma effective dose rates range between 0.0023 and 0.28 microSv h(-1). The highest outdoor total gamma effective dose rates (0.013-0.28 microSv h(-1)) were detected in the northeastern part of the island and the intermediate rates (0.066-0.13 microSv h(-1)) in the central region. The outdoor gamma dose rates due to 238U, 232Th and 40K radionuclides range between 1.7 +/- 0.8 and 154 +/- 7 nGy h(-1) with an average of 86 +/- 6 nGy h(-1). The average contribution of each of the examined radionuclides (238U, 232Th and 40K) to the total gamma dose rate was found to be equal to 12 +/- 4% for 238U, 58 +/- 6% for 232Th and 29 +/- 7% for 40K, respectively. PMID:15728423

  11. Variation of OER with dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) has been measured as a function of dose rate from 276 Gy/hr to 0.89 Gy/hr for V-79 cells irradiated at 230C or 370C. As dose rate is decreased, the OER initially increases, from a value of 3.0 to a maximum value of 3.7 to 4.0, at a dose rate between 20 and 60 Gy/hr. The OER subsequently decreases with further dose rate reduction to a minimum value of 2.4 at the lowest dose rate. Similar experiments conducted with cells in nutrient deprived conditions exhibited a monotonic decrease in OER from 3.0 to 1.7 with dose rate reduction. These experimental findings can be understood in terms of the sublethal damage repair capability of cells under different pO2 and nutrient conditions

  12. Thermal radiation of various gravitational backgrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Akhmedov, Emil T.; Akhmedova, Valeria; Pilling, Terry; Singleton, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple and general procedure for calculating the thermal radiation coming from any stationary metric. The physical picture is that the radiation arises as the quasi--classical tunneling of particles through a gravitational barrier. We show that our procedure can reproduce the results of Hawking and Unruh radiation. We also show that under certain kinds of coordinate transformations the temperature of the thermal radiation will change in the case of the Schwarzschild black holes. ...

  13. The OER at low-dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing interest in the treatment of human cancers with multifraction beam therapy at low dose-rates, on the assumption that the OER at low dose-rates is smaller than that at high dose-rates. A comparison has therefore been made of various published values of OER as a function of γ dose-rate for Vicia faba, HeLa cells, P388 cells, hamster cells and chromosome aberrations. The mean value of the OER at low dose-rate was about 20% lower than the mean OER obtained at high dose-rate, although two OER values at low dose-rates were significantly lower than the other reported values. There are technical difficulties associated with maintaining the test systems under hypoxic conditions for long periods of time and the observed decrease in cloning efficiency of hypoxic control cells indicates that cells can be damaged by this treatment alone. It is therefore possible that the high dose-rate OER values would have been reduced if the cells irradiated at high dose-rates under oxic and anoxic conditions had had a pre-treatment period of storage under anoxic conditions. (U.K.)

  14. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have compared dose-rate effects for γ-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  15. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  16. Comparison of computational models for estimation of whole body and organ radiation dose in rainbow trout from uptake of iodine-131 - Comparison of rainbow trout phantoms for estimation of whole body and organ radiation dose rates from uptake of iodine-131 in freshwater systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Nicole E. [Department of Environmental and Engineering Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, 29634 (United States); Johnson, Thomas E.; Ruedig, Elizabeth; Pinder, John E. III [Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, 1681 Campus Delivery, Fort Collins, Colorado, 80523 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Internal radiation dose rates to biota are typically calculated utilizing dose conversion factors (DCF), which are values for absorbed dose rate per activity concentration (i.e. mGy d{sup -1} per Bq g{sup -1}). The current methodology employed by both the ICRP and within the ERICA Integrated Approach for calculating dose conversion coefficients is to use Monte Carlo modeling of a homogeneously distributed radionuclide within an ellipsoidal phantom chosen to represent a particular organism. It has been shown that for whole-body DCF, homogenous distribution is a reasonable assumption for electrons, and is associated with an uncertainty of less than 30% for photons. However, if a radionuclide has a specific tissue tropism (e.g. iodine-131 in thyroid) a much higher dose will be received by the organ or tissue than by the whole body. Internal organs are modeled generically as spheres within the ellipsoid phantom, due to the complex and variable nature of organ structure and arrangement within different types of organisms. Ratios of whole-body to organ mass offer conservative conversions of whole-body to organ specific DCF (Gomez-Ros et al 2008), but may considerably overestimate the organ dose; more accurate estimates can be made based on specific absorbed fractions and activity concentrations. Establishment of appropriate screening levels in the regulatory paradigm requires incorporation of sufficient knowledge of dose effects; the ICRP currently lists no derived consideration reference levels for organs, meaning that specific risks associated with organ dose rates are unavailable (ICRP 108). Model comparison and refinement is important in the process of determining both dose rates and dose effects, and here we develop and compare three models for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): the simple geometry described above, a more specific geometry employing anatomically relevant organ size and location, and voxel reconstruction of internal anatomy obtained from CT imaging

  17. Research on the determination of 235U fission number by delayed γ-rays absorbed dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The determination method of 235U fission number by detecting fission products using HPGe detector has been established before. But in some special cases, we need to get the fission number in-time in high intensity radiation environment. HPGe detector has its limitation due to the complex y spectrum accompany with high flux. Purpose: To get rid of the limitation mentioned above, a new method is introduced by detecting the delayed γ-rays absorbed dose rates. Methods: By using independent fission yield together with radioactive decay dates from CENDL 3.0 and ENDF BVII.1, dynamic calculation for total absorbed dose rate in air 1 meter from the source whose compositions were thermal neutron-induced fission products of 235U has been done. Results: A set of absorbed dose rate data of 235U fission products irradiated through fast rabbit irradiation system on Xi'an pulse reactor was recorded. The deviation of the fission neutron number between method by γ-rays absorbed dose rates and method by HPGe detector is 7%. Conclusion: It's feasible to determine the fission neutron number of 235U using delayed γ-rays absorbed dose rates in a high intensity radiated environment. (authors)

  18. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

  19. Computed Tomography–Guided Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Combination With Regional Positive Lymph Node Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Peripheral Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jian-wen; Lin, Sheng; Luo, Hui-Qun; Wen, Qing-Lian; He, Li-Jia; Shang, Chang-Ling; Ren, Pei-Rong; Yang, Hong-Ru; Pang, Hao-Wen; Yang, Bo; He, Huai-Lin [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Chen, Yue, E-mail: chenyue5523@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, Jing-Bo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical safety, adverse events, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in combination with regional positive lymph node intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced peripheral non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a prospective, officially approved phase 1 trial. Primary tumors were treated with HDR brachytherapy. A single 30-Gy dose was delivered to the 90% isodose line of the gross lung tumor volume. A total dose of at least 70 Gy was administered to the 95% isodose line of the planning target volume of malignant lymph nodes using 6-MV X-rays. The patients received concurrent or sequential chemotherapy. We assessed treatment efficacy, adverse events, and radiation toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 28 months (range, 7-44 months). There were 3 cases of mild pneumothorax but no cases of hemothorax, dyspnea, or pyothorax after the procedure. Grade 3 or 4 acute hematologic toxicity was observed in 5 patients. During follow-up, mild fibrosis around the puncture point was observed on the CT scans of 2 patients, but both patients were asymptomatic. The overall response rates (complete and partial) for the primary mass and positive lymph nodes were 100% and 92.3%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 90.9% and 67%, respectively, with a median OS of 22.5 months. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that HDR brachytherapy is safe and feasible for peripheral locally advanced NSCLC, justifying a phase 2 clinical trial.

  20. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgar.ben-josef@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abrams, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Leslie, William [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M. [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local

  1. Assessing dose rate distributions in VMAT plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeprang, P.-H.; Volken, W.; Terribilini, D.; Frauchiger, D.; Zaugg, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Manser, P.

    2016-04-01

    Dose rate is an essential factor in radiobiology. As modern radiotherapy delivery techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) introduce dynamic modulation of the dose rate, it is important to assess the changes in dose rate. Both the rate of monitor units per minute (MU rate) and collimation are varied over the course of a fraction, leading to different dose rates in every voxel of the calculation volume at any point in time during dose delivery. Given the radiotherapy plan and machine specific limitations, a VMAT treatment plan can be split into arc sectors between Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine control points (CPs) of constant and known MU rate. By calculating dose distributions in each of these arc sectors independently and multiplying them with the MU rate, the dose rate in every single voxel at every time point during the fraction can be calculated. Independently calculated and then summed dose distributions per arc sector were compared to the whole arc dose calculation for validation. Dose measurements and video analysis were performed to validate the calculated datasets. A clinical head and neck, cranial and liver case were analyzed using the tool developed. Measurement validation of synthetic test cases showed linac agreement to precalculated arc sector times within  ±0.4 s and doses  ±0.1 MU (one standard deviation). Two methods for the visualization of dose rate datasets were developed: the first method plots a two-dimensional (2D) histogram of the number of voxels receiving a given dose rate over the course of the arc treatment delivery. In similarity to treatment planning system display of dose, the second method displays the dose rate as color wash on top of the corresponding computed tomography image, allowing the user to scroll through the variation over time. Examining clinical cases showed dose rates spread over a continuous spectrum, with mean dose rates hardly exceeding 100 cGy min-1 for conventional

  2. Influence of dose rate on leukemogenesis in mice irradiated by gamma rays at a high dose rate or low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of the effect of dose rate on tumorigenesis, focusing on myeloid leukemia, one of the typical neoplasias induced by radiation. In the experiment, C3H/He male mice were irradiated with gamma-rays at various doses at a dose rate of 0.88Gy/min, or 0.30mGy/min or 0.016mGy/min, and equations of dose response curves for leukemia were derived from data on the incidence in each group by the least square method. Each equation fitted well with the linear quadratic equation by coefficiency of more than 90%. The extent of the dose rate effect was expressed as dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) based on the definition by ICRP-Publication 60. We obtained DDREF by dividing the slope factor of the tangential line of group H (0.88Gy/min) by that of group L-1 (0.30mGy/min) or L-2 (0.016mGy/min), the tangential lines being drawn from the value of the incidence of the control group on the dose response curve. The value of group H to group L-1 was 12.00/1.71=7.022, and that of group H to group L-2 was 12.00/2.56=4.69. These values indicated that reduction of the dose rate caused a decrease in the induction of leukemia, ranging between the values 2 and 10 in the NCRP 1990 report. (author)

  3. Dose-rate, rbe, and oer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the theories and experimental data dealing with dose-rate effect, relative biological effectiveness (rbe), and oxygen enhancement ratio (oer) for mammalian cells, indicate that neither the theories nor the experimental data themselves are helpful in establishing general rules regarding variations of rbe or oer with dose-rate. There are inconsistencies among the theories which are often at variance with experimental data, which too, are inconsistent among themselves. (orig.)

  4. A survey of senile dementia in the high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of long-term low dose and low dose-rate ionizing radiation exposure on the prevalence rate of senile dementia, further assess the effects of low-dose radiation exposure on central nervous system and study the pathogen of senile dementia, and provide direct observational data of human beings. Methods: A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of senile dementia was carried out in high background radiation areas in Yangjiang, Guangdong Province, China. The survey was conducted in two stages. For the initial screening, Hasegawa Dementia Scale (HDS) was used for all subjects. In the second stage, the stage of diagnosis, special questionnaires of healthy state of old people were sued. The final diagnoses were made according to the third revised edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM III-R) of American Psychiatric Association. Results: 1018 inhabitants aged 65 years and over, including 513 persons in HBRA and 505 in CA were observed. According to DSM III-R, 61 cases (31 cases in HBRA and 30 cases in CA) of senile dementia were diagnosed. The prevalence rates of senile dementia are 6.04% in HBRA and 5.94% in CA, the total prevalence rate being 5.99%. Conclusion: No significant statistical difference in the prevalence rate of senile dementia between the two areas was found, suggesting that the prevalence rate of senile dementia in these areas is not associated with the high background radiation exposure

  5. Cosmic far-ultraviolet background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated that interstellar dust grains forward-scatter far-ultraviolet radiation extremely strongly: the value of the Henyey-Greenstein scattering parameter g at 1425 A is shown to be at least 0.75; the actual value is very likely greater than 0.9. Also, observations of the Virgo cluster of galaxies sets a limit tau > 2 x 1025 sec on the life-time of 17-20 eV/c2 heavy neutrinos, if such neutrinos are responsible for the gravitational binding of the cluster. (Auth.)

  6. Total ionizing dose effects of domestic SiGe HBTs under different dose rate

    CERN Document Server

    Mo-Han, Liu; Wu-Ying, Ma; Xin, Wang; Qi, Guo; Cheng-Fa, He; Ke, Jiang; Xiao-Long, Li; Ming-Zhu, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    The total ionizing radiation (TID) response of commercial NPN silicon germanium hetero-junction bipolar transistors (SiGe HBTs) produced domestic were investigated under the dose rate of 800mGy(Si)/s and 1.3mGy(Si)/s with Co-60 gamma irradiation source, respectively. The changes of the transistor parameter such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current before and after irradiation are investigated. The results of the experiments shows that for the KT1151, the radiation damage have slightly difference under the different dose rate after the prolonged annealing, shows an time dependent effect(TDE). But for the KT9041, the degradations of low dose rate irradiation are more higher than the high dose rate, demonstrate that there have potential enhanced low dose rate sensitive(ELDRS) effect exist on KT9041. The underlying physical mechanisms of the different dose rates response induced by the gamma ray are detailed discussed.

  7. Total ionizing dose effects of domestic SiGe HBTs under different dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mo-Han; Lu, Wu; Ma, Wu-Ying; Wang, Xin; Guo, Qi; He, Cheng-Fa; Jiang, Ke; Li, Xiao-Long; Xun, Ming-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    The total ionizing radiation (TID) response of commercial NPN silicon germanium hetero-junction bipolar transistors (SiGe HBTs) produced domestically are investigated under dose rates of 800 mGy(Si)/s and 1.3 mGy(Si)/s with a Co-60 gamma irradiation source. The changes of transistor parameters such as Gummel characteristics, and excess base current before and after irradiation, are examined. The results of the experiments show that for the KT1151, the radiation damage is slightly different under the different dose rates after prolonged annealing, and shows a time dependent effect (TDE). For the KT9041, however, the degradations of low dose rate irradiation is higher than for the high dose rate, demonstrating that there is a potential enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS) effect for the KT9041. The possible underlying physical mechanisms of the different dose rates responses induced by the gamma rays are discussed.

  8. Radon-thoron exposures in high background radiation areas: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radon-thoron measurements reported in literature for the high background radiation areas (HBRAs) of the world are summarised here. The most important areas covered are the Radon Spas and the thorium bearing monazite deposits. Special mention is made of the ongoing programmes of radon-thoron survey in the monazite beach areas of India; preliminary measurements indicate significant levels of thoron exposures. The diurnal and seasonal variations are quite wide underscoring the importance of carrying out integrated measurements for meaningful assessments of population exposures. Radon-thoron inhalation dose rates upto 30 mSv/y have been measured in lran as well as India. It has been generally observed that the cumulative population doses due to radon-thoron inhalation are as high as those due to the external exposures in these HBRAs. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  9. Variations of dose rate observed by MSL/RAD in transit to Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jingnan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Hassler, Donald M; Posner, Arik; Heber, Bernd; Köhler, Jan; Rafkin, Scot; Ehresmann, Bent; Appel, Jan K; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Brinza, David E; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Günther

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To predict the cruise radiation environment related to future human missions to Mars, the correlation between solar modulation potential and the dose rate measured by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) has been analyzed and empirical models have been employed to quantify this correlation. Methods: The instrument RAD, onboard Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures a broad spectrum of energetic particles along with the radiation dose rate during the 253-day cruise phase as well as on the surface of Mars. With these first ever measurements inside a spacecraft from Earth to Mars, RAD observed the impulsive enhancement of dose rate during solar particle events as well as a gradual evolution of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) induced radiation dose rate due to the modulation of the primary GCR flux by the solar magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activities and heliospheric rotation. Results: We analyzed the dependence of the dose rate measured by RAD on solar modulatio...

  10. Importance of dose-rate and cell proliferation in the evaluation of biological experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. B.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclei of cells within the bodies of astronauts traveling on extended missions outside the geomagnetosphere will experience single traversals of particles with high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) (e.g., one iron ion per one hundred years, on average) superimposed on a background of tracks with low LET (approximately one proton every two to three days, and one helium ion per month). In addition, some cell populations within the body will be proliferating, thus possibly providing increasing numbers of cells with 'initiated' targets for subsequent radiation hits. These temporal characteristics are not generally reproduced in laboratory experimental protocols. Implications of the differences in the temporal patterns of radiation delivery between conventionally designed radiation biology experiments and the pattern to be experienced in space are examined and the importance of dose-rate and cell proliferation are pointed out in the context of radiation risk assessment on long mission in space.

  11. Epidemiological investigation of radiological effects in high background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this investigation is to provide some information for providing whether any detrimental effects exist in a large population whose families have been continuously exposed to a low dose rate radiation. Two areas in Yangjiang Country, characterized by high background radiation (HBR) with environmental gamma exposure, large population size and long-term inhabitants, were selected for evaluation of late effects of HBR. The areas with normal radiation background close to the Yangjiang Country were selected as control areas. Up to 1986 approximately one million person-years in each area in both HBR and control areas have been observed. No increase of cancer mortality was found in the HBR areas; on the contrary, cancer mortality tended to be lower in the HBR areas than the control areas. The prevalence of hereditary diseases and congenital defects was similar in both HBR and control areas, but the frequency of Down's syndrome was higher in the HBR areas (through within the normal range) than the control areas. A possible explanation is the difference of age of maternity between the HBR and control areas, and the extremely low frequency in the control areas. Possible factors influencing the incidence of mutationbased diseases were comparable in the HBR and control groups. However, the cultural and educational levels were somewhat different, probably affecting health status and family planning. It is likely that there may be a dose threshold for cancer incidence, but this remains to be determined by further research. (N.K.)

  12. Diamond gamma dose rate monitor; Debitmetre gamma en diamant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, A.; Chambaud, P.; Tromson, D.; Bergonzo, P.; Foulon, F.; Joffre, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Electronique et d' Instrumentation Nucleaire, LETI, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1999-07-01

    CVD (chemical vapor deposition) diamond detectors for X and gamma dose rate monitoring have been fabricated and tested in the 1 mGy/h to 1 kGy/h range. They show excellent performances in terms of sensitivity and linearity. Radiation hardness measurement under 60-Co gamma rays have demonstrated long term stability for integrated doses up to 500 kGy. (authors)

  13. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  14. Variation of OER with dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OER has been measured from 276 Gy/hr to 0.89 Gy/hr for V-79 cells irradiated at 230 or 370C. As dose rate is decreased, the OER initially increased from 3.1 to a maximum of 4.0. Then, the OER decreases to a minimum of 2.4 at lower dose rates. Experiments with cells in nutrient poor conditions (HBSS without glucose) show a monotonic decrease in OER from 3.1 to 1.7. These findings are due to the differences in SLD repair capability and kinetics of cells under different pO/sub 2/ and nutrient conditions

  15. Solar modulation of dose rate onboard the Mir station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G D; Shurshakov, V A; Tsetlin, V V

    1997-12-01

    Models of the radiation belts that are currently used to estimate exposure for astronauts describe the environment at times of either solar minimum or solar maximum. Static models, constructed using data acquired prior to 1970 during a solar cycle with relatively low solar radio flux, have flux uncertainties of a factor of two to live and dose-rate uncertainties of a factor of about two. The inability of these static models to provide a dynamic description of the radiation belt environment limits our ability to predict radiation exposures for long-duration missions in low earth orbits. In an attempt to add some predictive capability of these models, we studied the measured daily absorbed dose rate on the Mir orbital station over roughly the complete 22nd solar cycle that saw some of the highest solar flux values in the last 40 y. We show that the daily trapped particle dose rate is an approximate power law function of daily atmospheric density. Atmospheric density values are in turn obtained from standard correlation with observed solar radio noise flux. This correlation improves, particularly during periods of high solar activity, if the density at roughly 400 days earlier time is used. This study suggests the possibility of a dose- and flux-predictive trapped-belt model based on atmospheric density. PMID:11542263

  16. Endophytic fungi of the Genus Penicillium isolated of Platypodium elegans from environments of high dose rate of ionizing radiation; Fungos endofiticos do genero Penicillium isolados de Platypodium elegans provenientes de locais de alta taxa de radiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Victor da

    1999-07-01

    The present work had as objective to isolate and to identify endophytic microorganisms and were exposed to stress situations, using for this ionizing radiations, these highly mutagen and in high doses, lethal to all the alive organisms. The endophytic microorganisms were obtained the starting from the species arboreal Platypodium elegans Vog., one of them developed in radioactive land in the area of Ipora/Go and other, developed in land Background in the city of Abadia de Goias/GO. The rates of dose of environmental radiation were shown sharply different, being in Ipora (Anomaly 2) with a value of approximately 140 {mu}R/h and in Abadia de Goias with approximately 20 {mu}R/H, both measured the area of root of the tree close to. Tests through PCR-RAPD were accomplished with the isolated ones, for verification of the similarity of its genetic characteristics and possible polymorphism among its DNA's . The isolated ones were studied with relationship to the effects of the gamma radiation, being used as source {sup 60} Co, with doses of 25 to 2131 Gy. These lineages had the same behavior practically with relationship to the resistance of the gamma radiation, declining strongly at levels of approximately 700 Gy. The isolated ones tested were identified at microscope for morphology, being of the Genus Penicillium, with the same genetic characteristics in agreement with PCR/RAPD, being just observed a polymorphism area in its DNA's. In spite of a lineage to have been isolated of a tree developed in radioactive land, any difference was observed among its resistance to the gamma radiation in comparison to the isolated lineage of tree developed in land radiometric background. (author)

  17. Influence of the dose rate in the PVDF degradation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: adriananuclear@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: maritzargual@gmail.com [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InsTEC), Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba); Faria, Luiz O., E-mail: farialo@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from gamma radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation by products such as peroxide degradation. Radiation cross-linking technologies include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, polymer recycling, hydrogels etc. The degradation of PVDF polymer exposed to gamma irradiation in oxygen atmosphere in high dose rate has been studied and compared to obtained under smaller dose rates. The samples were irradiated with a Co-60 source at constant dose rate (12 kGy/h and 2,592 kGy/h), with doses ranging from 100 kGy to 3,000 kGy. Different dose rate determine the prevalence of the processes being evaluated in this work by thermal measurements and infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the degradation processes involve chain scissions and crosslink formation. The formation of oxidation products was shown at the surface of the irradiated film. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. Thermogravimetric studies reveal that the irradiation induced the increasing residues and decrease of the temperature of the decomposition start. (author)

  18. THE BACKGROUND RADIATION AND EXPOSURE LEVELS AT VARIOUS SOUTH AFRICAN WEST COAST MILITARY UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Bezuidenhout

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The West Coast of South Africa between St Helena Bay to the north and Langebaan Lagoon to the south is characterised by numerous granite protrusions. These outcrops are elements of the underlying Cape Granite Suite, which forms the bedrock of a large part of the Western Cape. Granite contains high levels of natural radionuclides, which results in high levels of natural background radiation in the surrounding area. The impacts of these high levels of radiation exposure on military personal are of concern. There are four military units located in this part of the West Coast, namely SAS Saldanha, 4 Special Forces Regiment, Langebaan Road Air Force Base and the Military Academy. Different sites in and around these military units were selected and soil samples were taken. Laboratory gamma ray measurements were done to determine the levels of natural radioactive nuclides in the soil samples. The radioactive nuclide concentrations were interpolated and then mapped with the help of geographic information systems (also known as geospatial information systems or GIS software. An evaluation of the annual dose rate of military personnel at the units on the West Coast was made and found to range between 0,017 mSv/y and 0,163 mSv/y. These values were mapped and compared to the average global annual dose rate of 0,070 mSv/y. This article reports on an investigation of these results and the overall exposure levels of personnel from the various military units on the West Coast of South Africa.

  19. Relationship of HepG2 cell sensitivity to continuous low dose-rate irradiation with ATM phosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quelin Mei; Jianyong Yang; Duanming Du; Zaizhong Cheng; Pengcheng liu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of ATM phosphorylation in HepG2 cells and its effect on HepG2 cell survival under a continuous low dose-rate irradiation.Methods: HepG2 cells were exposed to equivalent doses of irradiation delivered at either a continuous low dose-rate (7.76 cGy/h) or a high dose-rate (4500 cGy/h).The ATM phosphorylated proteins and surviving fraction of HepG2 cell after low dose-rate irradiation were compared with that after equivalent doses of high dose-rate irradiation.Results: The phosphorylation of ATM protein was maximal at 0.5 Gy irradiation delivered at either a high dose-rate or a continuous low dose-rate.As the radiation dose increased, the phosphorylation of ATM protein decreased under continuous low dose-rate irradiation.However, the phosphorylation of ATM protein was remained stable under high dose-rate irradiation.When the phosphorylation of ATM protein under continuous low dose-rate irradiation was equal to that under high dose-rate irradiation, there was no significant difference in the surviving fraction of HepG2 cells between two ir-radiation methods (P>0.05).When the phosphorylation of ATM protein significantly decreased after continuous low dose-rate irradiation compared with that after high dose-rate irradiation, increased amounts of cell killing was found in low dose-rate irradiation (P<0.01).Conclusion: Continuous low dose-rate irradiation increases HepG2 cells radiosensitivity compared with high dose-rate irradiation.The increased amounts of cell killing following continuous low dose-rate exposures are associated with reduced ATM phosphorylated protein.

  20. Development and characterization of a novel variable low-dose rate irradiator for in vivo mouse studies

    OpenAIRE

    Olipitz, Werner; Hembrador, Sheena; Davidson, Matthew; Yanch, Jacquelyn C; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation exposure of humans generally results in low doses delivered at low dose-rate. Our limited knowledge of the biological effects of low dose radiation is mainly based on data from the atomic bomb long-term survivor study (LSS) cohort. However, the total doses and dose-rates in the LSS cohort are still higher than most environmental and occupational exposures in humans. Importantly, the dose-rate is a critical determinant of health risks stemming from radiation exposure. Understanding t...

  1. Measurements of background gamma radiation on Spacelab 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Gregory, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear radiation monitor (NRM) which was flown as part of the verification instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission (July 29 - August 6, 1985) recorded spectra every 20 seconds and counting rates in coarse energy bands on finer time scales. The gamma radiation environment on Spacelab is characterized by cosmic-ray and trapped proton secondary radiation in the Spacelab/Shuttle, earth albedo radiation, and delayed induced radioactivity in the detector and surrounding materials. It is found that passages through South Atlantic Anomaly protons produce a well-defined background enhancement.

  2. Evaluation of quality characteristics and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meats treated with different dose rates of ionizing radiation and use of antioxidants; Avaliacao de caracteristicas de qualidade e propriedades funcionais da carne mecanicamente separada de frango tratada com diferentes taxas de dose de radiacao ionizante e uso de antioxidantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula

    2012-07-01

    The Mechanically Deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used in traditional meat products, in greater proportion in those emulsified, replacing meat raw materials more expensive. The raw material can have high MDCM the microbial load, as a result of contamination during processing or failure during the evisceration. The irradiation process is accepted as one of the most effective technologies when compared to conventional techniques of preservation, to reduce contamination of pathogens and spoilage. However, little information is available about the use and effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation processing. Irradiation causes chemical changes in food, a major cause of deterioration of quality of raw or cooked meat products during refrigerated storage, frozen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation on the production of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS), color, microbiological and sensory characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken added or without added antioxidants, during the cold storage and evaluation of functional properties. The results showed that among the tested dose rates using cobalt-60 source, dose rate of 4.04 kGy.h-1 was the best for processing MDCM. Furthermore, the use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to reduce lipid oxidation generated by irradiation of the samples, showed a synergistic effect to the processing with ionizing radiation in reduction of psychrotrophic bacteria count and contributed to a better sensory quality. The use of radiation in the processing FDMI did not adversely affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  3. The OER at low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author comments on a letter (Kal, H.B., and Barendsen, G.W., 1976, Br. J. Radiol., vol. 49, 1049) reviewing published values of the OER for low dose-rate γ-rays. Artefacts of the system may have been responsible for one very low OER value taken from work carried out in the early 1960s, but later work in which these problems were eliminated still yielded OER values significantly lower than for acute X- or γ-ray exposures. Consideration is given to significance of this reduction in OER for γ-rays at the low dose-rates characteristic of interstitial implants. The performance of these interstitial implants may be comparable with the most sophisticated and expensive pion or heavy ion treatments. (U.K.)

  4. Inverse dose rate effect in tumour cells measured by the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of the dose rate of low LET radiation from high (Gy/min) to low (Gy/h) usually leads to a reduced effect as measured by the survival methods. If the dose rate is reduced, cells are able to repair sublethal damage even during irradiation. During the last few years a comet assay has been widely used to measure DNA damage induction and repair in single cells. In our study we used the alkaline version of the comet assay for comparison of high (0.833 Gy/min) and low dose rate (0.0707 Gy/min) effects on DNA damage and repair in R1 rat rhabdomyosarcoma and Me45 human malignant melanoma cells. Cells gathered from exponential culture by trypsynization were suspended in a growth medium and irradiated at room temperature, with 5 Gy of photons X generated by linear accelerator at both dose rates. Comets were analysed automatically using self-made software for measurement of percentage DNA in the tail, and tail moment and inertia. Our results show that tail inertia is the best parameter expressing DNA damage and repair. Although the level of DNA damage induced by low dose rate was comparable with that induced by a high dose rate, the damage induced by the low dose rate are repair more slowly than after high dose rate irradiation. This inverse dose rate effect suggest that nature of damage can differ in both groups. (author)

  5. The origin of the diffuse background gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV, and evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation were observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of big-bang cosmology, and connect these processes with the galaxy formation theory. A test of the theory is in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeK to 100 GeV energy range which are made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. The theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon-symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are discussed.

  6. The origin of the diffuse background gamma-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations have now provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV. There is some evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation have been observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of the big-band cosmology and tie in these processes with galaxy fromation theory. A crucial test of the theory may lie in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV energy range which may be made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. A discussion of the theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are given.

  7. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to 4K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials

  8. Comparison in vivo Study of Genotoxic Action of High- Versus Very Low Dose-Rate γ-Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Osipov; Klokov, D. Y.; Elakov, A. L.; Rozanova, O M; Zaichkina, S. I.; Aptikaeva, G. F.; Akhmadieva, A. Kh.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare genotoxicity induced by high- versus very low dose-rate exposure of mice to γ-radiation within a dose range of 5 to 61 cGy using the single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay and the micronucleus test. CBA/lac male mice were irradiated at a dose rate of 28.2 Gy/h (high dose rate) or 0.07 mGy/h (very low dose rate). The comet assay study on spleen lymphocytes showed that very low dose-rate irradiation resulted in a statistically significant incre...

  9. Survival of tumor cells after proton irradiation with ultra-high dose rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belka Claus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may in the future be used in radiation therapy. Laser-driven particle beams are pulsed and ultra high dose rates of >109 Gy s-1may be achieved. Here we compare the radiobiological effects of pulsed and continuous proton beams. Methods The ion microbeam SNAKE at the Munich tandem accelerator was used to directly compare a pulsed and a continuous 20 MeV proton beam, which delivered a dose of 3 Gy to a HeLa cell monolayer within Results At 10 h after pulsed irradiation, the fraction of G2 cells was significantly lower than after irradiation with the continuous beam, while all other endpoints including colony formation were not significantly different. We determined the relative biological effectiveness (RBE for pulsed and continuous proton beams relative to x-irradiation as 0.91 ± 0.26 and 0.86 ± 0.33 (mean and SD, respectively. Conclusions At the dose rates investigated here, which are expected to correspond to those in radiation therapy using laser-driven particles, the RBE of the pulsed and the (conventional continuous irradiation mode do not differ significantly.

  10. Assessment of the ambient dose rate around research reactors by thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memon Tanveer A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of radiation levels in and around the nuclear research reactors is essential to safe-guarding life and the environment. Background radiation monitoring at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science & Technology (PINSTECH has been carried out since the early sixties, before the criticality of the 5 MW Pakistan Research Reactor, so as to confirm the safe operation of PINSTECH nuclear facilities. In the present study, ambient dose rate levels were measured around PINSTECH by using TLD-200 (G-2 cards installed at 15 different locations over a five year period (1998-2002. The mean dose rates for individual locations in the said period ranged from 0.14 ± 0.01 to 0.19 ± 0.03 µSv/h, with a mean value of 0.16 ± 0.03 µSv/h. The cu- mulative average annual effective dose equivalent spread over 5 years was 204.4 ± 17 µSv. The data were compared with the world and averages in other countries. It was concluded that, from the health hazard point of view, the operation of research reactors and other nuclear facilities at PINSTECH presents no risk to public health.

  11. Scalar Radiation in the Background of a Naked Singularity

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Anshuman; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2013-01-01

    We study scalar radiation spectra from a particle in circular orbit, in the background of the Janis-Newman-Winicour (JNW) naked singularity. The differences in the nature of the spectra, from what one obtains with a Schwarzschild black hole, is established. We also compute the angular distribution of the spectra.

  12. Physical characteristics of the Selectron high dose rate intracavitary afterloader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenery, S.G.A.; Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B. (Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1985-08-01

    The physics measurements on a Selectron high dose-rate afterloading cobalt-60 unit are reported. The installation was found to be acceptable from the standpoint of radiation safety and cost effectiveness; hospital bed space was saved as treatment could be on an outpatient basis. A source calibration 4% higher than the value stated by the manufacturer was obtained. Measurement of the ratio of exposure rate in water to that in air confirmed the calibration and the applicability of correction factors for routine clinical dosimetry recommended in the literature.

  13. Comparison between calculation methods of dose rates in gynecologic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In treatments with radiations for gynecologic tumors is necessary to evaluate the quality of the results obtained by different calculation methods for the dose rates on the points of clinical interest (A, rectal, vesicle). The present work compares the results obtained by two methods. The Manual Calibration Method (MCM) tri dimensional (Vianello E., et.al. 1998), using orthogonal radiographs for each patient in treatment, and the Theraplan/T P-11 planning system (Thratonics International Limited 1990) this last one verified experimentally (Vianello et.al. 1996). The results show that MCM can be used in the physical-clinical practice with a percentile difference comparable at the computerized programs. (Author)

  14. Radioactivity measurements and dose rate calculations using ERICA tool in the terrestrial environment of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulou, Maria; Florou, Heleny; Manolopoulou, Metaxia

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the radioactivity levels to which terrestrial non-human biota were exposed are examined. Organisms (grass and herbivore mammals) and abiotic components (soil) were collected during the period of 2010 to 2014 from grasslands where sheep and goats were free-range grazing. Natural background radionuclides ((226)Ra, (228)Ra, (228)Th) and artificial radionuclides ((137)Cs, (134)Cs, (131)I) were detected in the collected samples using gamma spectrometry. The actual measured activity concentrations and site-specific data of the studied organisms were imported in ERICA Assessment Tool (version 1.2.0) in order to provide an insight of the radiological dose rates. The highest activity concentrations were detected in samples collected from Lesvos island and the lowest in samples collected from Attiki and Etoloakarnania prefectures. The highest contribution to the total dose rate was clearly derived from the internal exposure and is closely related to the exposure to alpha emitters of natural background ((226)Ra and (228)Th). The Fukushima-derived traces of (137)Cs, (134)Cs, and (131)I, along with the residual (137)Cs, resulted in quite low contribution to the total dose rate. The obtained results may strengthen the adaptation of software tools to a wider range of ecosystems and may be proved useful in further research regarding the possible impact of protracted low level ionizing radiation on non-human biota. This kind of studies may contribute to the effective incorporation of dosimetry tools in the development of integrated environmental and radiological impact assessment policies.

  15. Radioactivity measurements and dose rate calculations using ERICA tool in the terrestrial environment of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulou, Maria; Florou, Heleny; Manolopoulou, Metaxia

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the radioactivity levels to which terrestrial non-human biota were exposed are examined. Organisms (grass and herbivore mammals) and abiotic components (soil) were collected during the period of 2010 to 2014 from grasslands where sheep and goats were free-range grazing. Natural background radionuclides ((226)Ra, (228)Ra, (228)Th) and artificial radionuclides ((137)Cs, (134)Cs, (131)I) were detected in the collected samples using gamma spectrometry. The actual measured activity concentrations and site-specific data of the studied organisms were imported in ERICA Assessment Tool (version 1.2.0) in order to provide an insight of the radiological dose rates. The highest activity concentrations were detected in samples collected from Lesvos island and the lowest in samples collected from Attiki and Etoloakarnania prefectures. The highest contribution to the total dose rate was clearly derived from the internal exposure and is closely related to the exposure to alpha emitters of natural background ((226)Ra and (228)Th). The Fukushima-derived traces of (137)Cs, (134)Cs, and (131)I, along with the residual (137)Cs, resulted in quite low contribution to the total dose rate. The obtained results may strengthen the adaptation of software tools to a wider range of ecosystems and may be proved useful in further research regarding the possible impact of protracted low level ionizing radiation on non-human biota. This kind of studies may contribute to the effective incorporation of dosimetry tools in the development of integrated environmental and radiological impact assessment policies. PMID:26897581

  16. Remote Afterloading High Dose Rate Brachytherapy AMC EXPERIANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Gyong; Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyong; Yi, Byong Yong [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Remote afterloading high dose rate brachytherapy(HDRB) is a new technology and needs new biological principle for time and dose schedule. Here, authors attempt to evaluate the technique and clinical outcome in 116 patients, 590 procedures performed at Asan Medical Center for 3 years. From Sep. 1985 to Aug 1992, 471 procedures of intracavitary radiation in 55 patients of cervical cancer and 26 of nasopharyngeal cancer, 79 intraluminal radiation in 12 of esophageal cancer, 11 of endobronchial cancer and 1 Klatskin tumor and 40 interstitial brachytherapy in 4 of breast cancer, 1 sarcoma and 1 urethral cancer were performed. Median follow-up was 7 months with range 1-31 months. All procedures except interstitial were performed under the local anesthesia and they were all well tolerated and completed the planned therapy except 6 patients. 53/58 patients with cervical cancer and 22/26 patients with nasopharynx cancer achieved CR. Among 15 patients with palliative therapy, 80% achieves palliation. We will describe the details of the technique and results in the text. To evaluate biologic effects of HDRB and optimal time/dose/fractionation schedule, we need longer follow-up. But authors feel that HDRB with proper fractionation schedule may yield superior results compared to the low dose rate brachytherapy considering the advantages of HDRB in safety factor for operator, better control of radiation dose and volume and patients comfort over the low dose brachytherapy.

  17. Background Radiation Measurements at High Power Research Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ashenfelter, J; Baldenegro, C X; Band, H R; Barclay, G; Bass, C D; Berish, D; Bowden, N S; Bryan, C D; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, R; Classen, T; Davee, D; Dean, D; Deichert, G; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Dwyer, D A; Fan, S; Gaison, J K; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilje, K; Glenn, A; Green, M; Han, K; Hans, S; Heeger, K M; Heffron, B; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S; Langford, T J; Littlejohn, B R; Martinez, D; McKeown, R D; Morrell, S; Mueller, P E; Mumm, H P; Napolitano, J; Norcini, D; Pushin, D; Romero, E; Rosero, R; Saldana, L; Seilhan, B S; Sharma, R; Stemen, N T; Surukuchi, P T; Thompson, S J; Varner, R L; Wang, W; Watson, S M; White, B; White, C; Wilhelmi, J; Williams, C; Wise, T; Yao, H; Yeh, M; Yen, Y -R; Zhang, C; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including $\\gamma$-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  18. Search for radiative decays of cosmic background neutrino using cosmic infrared background energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to search for the neutrino radiative decay by fitting a photon energy spectrum of the cosmic infrared background to a sum of the photon energy spectrum from the neutrino radiative decay and a continuum. By comparing the present cosmic infrared background energy spectrum observed by AKARI and Spitzer to the photon energy spectrum expected from neutrino radiative decay with a maximum likelihood method, we obtained a lifetime lower limit of 3.1x1012 to 3.8x1012 years at 95% confidence level for the third generation neutrino v3 in the v3 mass range between 50 and 150 meV/c2 under the present constraints by the neutrino oscillation measurements. In the left-right symmetric model, the minimum lifetime of v3 is predicted to be 1.5x1017 years for m3 of 50 meV/c2. We studied the feasibility of the observation of the neutrino radiative decay with a lifetime of 1.5x1017 years, by measuring a continuous energy spectrum of the cosmic infrared background. (author)

  19. Suppressing Background Radiation Using Poisson Principal Component Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tandon, P; Dubrawski, A; Labov, S; Nelson, K

    2016-01-01

    Performance of nuclear threat detection systems based on gamma-ray spectrometry often strongly depends on the ability to identify the part of measured signal that can be attributed to background radiation. We have successfully applied a method based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to obtain a compact null-space model of background spectra using PCA projection residuals to derive a source detection score. We have shown the method's utility in a threat detection system using mobile spectrometers in urban scenes (Tandon et al 2012). While it is commonly assumed that measured photon counts follow a Poisson process, standard PCA makes a Gaussian assumption about the data distribution, which may be a poor approximation when photon counts are low. This paper studies whether and in what conditions PCA with a Poisson-based loss function (Poisson PCA) can outperform standard Gaussian PCA in modeling background radiation to enable more sensitive and specific nuclear threat detection.

  20. Alternative application for the radiation background in the development of the atlas database of atmospheric radiation

    CERN Document Server

    De la Hoz, Ivan Arturo Morales

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays radiation is one of the variables to be considered in the environmental forecasting and it is meaningful in the increase of global warming, together greenhouse effect. The radiation considered by the meteorological organizations depends on the World Radiometric Reference (WRR), the World Standard Group (WSG), addressed by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). This work is based on the cosmic microwave background, as a variable to be estimated in order to get information about the incident radiation in the Earth's atmosphere, as a valuable and meaningful contribution in the building of the radiation atlas by the (UPME) and (IDEAM). Due to the fact that the variables considered are ultraviolet and infrared radiation, ozone column, direct radiation and diffuse radiation, the last two get the global radiation, and are the only ones to be evaluated by the national meteorological organizations in the country. The study of the cosmic background radiation as a research project will provide data which ...

  1. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation and its Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, Edward

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and its faint polarization have provided a unique means to constrain the physical state of the early Universe. Continued advances in instrumentation, observation, and analysis have revealed polarized radiation signatures associated with gravitational lensing and have heightened the prospects for using precision polarimetry to experimentally confront the inflationary paradigm. Characterization of this relic radiation field has the power to constrain or reveal the detailed properties of astroparticle species and long wave gravitational radiation. On going and planned CMB polarization efforts from the ground, balloon, and space borne platforms will be briefly surveyed. Recent community activities by the Inflation Probe Science Interest Group (IPSIG) will also be summarized. NASA PCOS mini-symposium (invited IPSIG talk).

  2. Robust ray-tracing algorithms for interactive dose rate evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than ever, it is essential today to develop simulation tools to rapidly evaluate the dose rate received by operators working on nuclear sites. In order to easily study numerous different scenarios of intervention, computation times of available softwares have to be all lowered. This mainly implies to accelerate the geometrical computations needed for the dose rate evaluation. These computations consist in finding and sorting the whole list of intersections between a big 3D scene and multiple groups of 'radiative' rays meeting at the point where the dose has to be measured. In order to perform all these computations in less than a second, we first propose a GPU algorithm that enables the efficient management of one big group of coherent rays. Then we present a modification of this algorithm that guarantees the robustness of the ray-triangle intersection tests through the elimination of the precision issues due to floating-point arithmetic. This modification does not require the definition of scene-dependent coefficients ('epsilon' style) and only implies a small loss of performance (less than 10%). Finally we propose an efficient strategy to handle multiple ray groups (corresponding to multiple radiative objects) which use the previous results.Thanks to these improvements, we are able to perform an interactive and robust dose rate evaluation on big 3D scenes: all of the intersections (more than 13 million) between 700 000 triangles and 12 groups of 100 000 rays each are found, sorted along each ray and transferred to the CPU in 470 milliseconds. (author)

  3. Radiative feedback from an early X-ray background

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, S C O; Glover, Simon C.O.; Brand, Peter W.J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The first generation of stars (commonly known as population III) are expected to form in low-mass protogalaxies in which molecular hydrogen is the dominant coolant. Radiation from these stars will rapidly build up an extragalactic ultraviolet background capable of photodissociating H2, and it is widely believed that this background will suppress further star formation in low-mass systems. However, star formation will also produce an extragalactic X-ray background. This X-ray background, by increasing the fractional ionization of protogalactic gas, promotes H2 formation and reduces the effectiveness of ultraviolet feedback. In this paper, we examine which of these backgrounds has the dominant effect. Using a simple model for the growth of the UV and X-ray backgrounds, together with a detailed one-dimensional model of protogalactic chemical evolution, we examine the effects of the X-ray backgrounds produced by a number of likely source models. We show that in several cases, the resulting X-ray background is str...

  4. Pulsed electrons of ultrahigh dose-rate effect in decreasing ferric ions of a Fricke dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rawi, A.M.; Saleh, M.M.; Al-Meshadani, N.A.F.; Al-Fakhri, K.A.K. (Baghdad Univ. (Iraq). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of ferric ions produced in a Fricke dosimeter containing 10/sup -3/ M ferrous sulphate by high intensities of radiation was found to decrease with increasing dose-rates. A G(Fe/sup 3 +/) of 8.2 has been determined with dose-rates generated by the Febetron accelerator in the range 10/sup 27/ to 10/sup 29/ eVl/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/. An almost identical G(Fe/sup 3 +/) for this range of dose-rates has been evaluated by Thomas and Hart using an entirely different method.

  5. Pulsed electrons of ultrahigh dose-rate effect in decreasing ferric ions of a Fricke dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yield of ferric ions produced in a Fricke dosimeter containing 10-3 M ferrous sulphate by high intensities of radiation was found to decrease with increasing dose-rates. A G(Fe3+) of 8.2 has been determined with dose-rates generated by the Febetron accelerator in the range 1027 to 1029 eVl-1 sec-1. An almost identical G(Fe3+) for this range of dose-rates has been evaluated by Thomas and Hart using an entirely different method. (author)

  6. Wormhole solution of BD theory in an anisotropic radiation background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nasre Esfahani

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available   Time-dependent wormhole solution of the BD theory in an anisotropic radiation background is presented. It is also found that the BD scalar field depends only on time. This time dependency is in power-law form. It is shown that the wormhole geometry is valid for ω ≥ -3/2, and for any arbitrary positive values of . The GR limit of our solution is obtained for ω=0 , not for ω→∞ . Though the BD field can be non-exotic, the background material is entirely exotic.

  7. Nature of the Background Ultraviolet Radiation Field at High Redshifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Archana Samantaray; Pushpa Khare

    2000-06-01

    We have tried to determine the flux of the ultraviolet background radiation field from the column density ratios of various ions in several absorption systems observed in the spectra of QSOs. We find that in most cases the flux is considerably higher than what has been estimated to be contributed by the AGNs. The excess flux could originate locally in hot stars. In a few cases we have been able to show that such galactic flux can only contribute a part of the total required flux. The results suggest that the background gets a significant contribution from an unseen QSO population.

  8. Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor (DDREF); Der Dosis- und Dosisleistungs-Effektivitaetsfaktor (DDREF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, Joachim [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2016-08-01

    For practical radiation protection purposes it is supposed that stochastic radiation effects a determined by a proportional dose relation (LNT). Radiobiological and radiation epidemiological studies indicated that in the low dose range a dependence on dose rates might exist. This would trigger an overestimation of radiation risks based on the LNT model. OCRP had recommended a concept to combine all effects in a single factor DDREF (dose and dose-Rate effectiveness factor). There is still too low information on cellular mechanisms of low dose irradiation including possible repair and other processes. The Strahlenschutzkommission cannot identify a sufficient scientific justification for DDREF and recommends an adaption to the actual state of science.

  9. Study of Natural Background Radiation around Gurvanbulag Uranium Deposit Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhbat, N.; Norov, N.; Bat-Erdene, B.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Otgooloi, B.

    2009-03-01

    In this work, we will show the study of natural background radiation level around the Gurvanbulag (GB) uranium deposit area in the eastern part of Mongolia. We collected environmental soil samples from 102 points around GB Uranium deposit. Collected samples were measured by HPGe gamma spectrometer at Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia. The averaged activity concentrations of Ra-226, Th-232, K-40, and Cs-137 were 37.1, 29, 939, and 17.7 Bq/kg, respectively.

  10. Backgrounds of computer-assisted treatment planning in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of ionising radiation and living materials causes biological damage of tempory or permanent nature. In radiation therapy this phenomenon is used in a controlled fashion in order to stop the proliferation of malignant cells, while at the same time limiting the permanent damage to healthy tissues and organs to at least tolerable levels. Because of the often relatively small differences in response of malignant growths and normal tissues, the margins between tolerable and intolerable are so small that the greatest precision in treatment planning and execution is required. The nature of this treatment agent implies that the radiation therapist has to rely very much on instrumentally obtained and processed information, in all phases of this medical activities around the patient. In this paper a description is given of the backgrounds of computer-assisted methods which have enabled modern individualised and optimised planning for therapy with high energy X- and gamma beams. (orig.)

  11. CERN-derived analysis of lunar radiation backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Svoboda, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The Moon produces radiation which background-limits scientific experiments there. Early analyses of these backgrounds have either failed to take into consideration the effect of charm in particle physics (because they pre-dated its discovery), or have used branching ratios which are no longer strictly valid (due to new accelerator data). We are presently investigating an analytical program for deriving muon and neutrino spectra generated by the Moon, converting an existing CERN computer program known as GEANT which does the same for the Earth. In so doing, this will (1) determine an accurate prompt neutrino spectrum produced by the lunar surface; (2) determine the lunar subsurface particle flux; (3) determine the consequence of charm production physics upon the lunar background radiation environment; and (4) provide an analytical tool for the NASA astrophysics community with which to begin an assessment of the Moon as a scientific laboratory versus its particle radiation environment. This will be done on a recurring basis with the latest experimental results of the particle data groups at Earth-based high-energy accelerators, in particular with the latest branching ratios for charmed meson decay. This will be accomplished for the first time as a full 3-dimensional simulation.

  12. Evaluation of the natural background radiation in City Sopron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaits, T. [West Hungary Univ., Institute of Forestry Mechanics (Hungary); Divos, F. [West Hungary Univ., National Radiation Control System - Sopron Unit (Hungary); Kavasi, N. [Veszprem Univ., Dept. of Radiochemistry (Hungary); Boka, Z. [West Hungary Univ., Dept. of Geodetics and Remote Sensing (Hungary)

    2006-07-01

    In the Postgraduate School of the Faculty of Forestry of the University of West Hungary a project with the topic Research of natural radioactive isotopes in our built and natural environs is being run. Preparing this map is an organic part of this PhD research. The measurements are being made in Sopron city and in its next surroundings, trying to estimate, which dose of radiation a citizen of Sopron is exposed, according to his age and lifestyle. The measurements completely cover the built-up area of Sopron, moreover they exceed the confines, so thus they provide information about the natural areas in the vicinity of the city. In figures, the detection carried out in an area of 24 square kilometres, working with a grid mesh of 200 metres. A sodium-iodide detector was used. We have faced several anomalies while mapping. These are the following: On Main Square (Foter), Ursulin Square (Orsolya ter), Paulites Square (Palosok tere, where a higher dose can be measured, due to granite cobbles, used to cover the pavements of the squares and streets. This was confirmed by the gamma spectrometric examination of the granite stones. In these areas, a triple of the mean dose-rate of 70-90 n Sv/h in Sopron was detected. The highest values of 400 n Sv/h were detected in the cinder-covered car-park of the paint store in Koszegi Street. The total gamma activity concentration of the cinder used in the car-park was nearly 2000 Bq/kg. A triple to a quadruple of the natural level was detected in the vicinity of the chimney of the former thermal power plant and the brick factory. The detection was carried out in four directions with raising range starting by the chimneys, which has spectacularly shown, that the sedimentation of the aerosols can be tracked is a function of distance. The measurements have also shown, that there is a significant difference between dose-levels of the natural areas beyond the eastern and western edge of the city, which can be explained with the different

  13. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of penile carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petera, J.; Odrazka, K.; Zouhar, M.; Bedrosova, J.; Dolezel, M. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2004-02-01

    Background: interstitial low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy allows conservative treatment of T1-T2 penile carcinoma. High-dose-rate (HDR) is often considered to be dangerous for interstitial implants because of a higher risk of complications, but numerous reports suggest that results may be comparable to LDR. Nevertheless, there are no data in the literature available regarding HDR interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the penis. Case report: a 64-year-old man with T1 NO MO epidermoid carcinoma of the glans is reported. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy was performed using the stainless hollow needle technique and a breast template for fixation and good geometry. The dose delivered was 18 x 3 Gy twice daily. Results: after 232 days from brachytherapy, the patient was without any evidence of the tumor, experienced no serious radiation-induced complications, and had a fully functional organ. Conclusion: HDR interstitial brachytherapy is feasible in selected case of penis carcinoma, when careful planning and small single fractions are used. (orig.)

  14. Vertebrate radiations of the Jehol Biota and their environmental background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhonghe

    2004-01-01

    @@ Significant progress has been made in recent years in the studies of various groups of the Jehol Biota, particularly concerning the origin of birds and their flight as well as the evolution of Early Cretaceous birds, dinosaurs, mammals, insects and flowering plants[1-5]. As a result, the Jehol Biota has become well known to both the scientific community and the public. The studies on the Jehol Biota also revealed the patterns and processes of the evolutionary radiations of many major groups of Early Cretaceous animals and plants, such as the earliest known radiation of angiosperms and birds, early differentiation of mammals and many Cretaceous dinosaurian groups. Notably, the radiations of the Jehol vertebrates share some similar patterns attributable to the particular environmental background. For instance, the Jehol vertebrate radiations are highlighted by the presence of abundant arboreal adaptations and herbivorous forms, thus closely linked to the forest environments. In addition, the differentiation of habitats and diets is also characteristic of the evolutionary radiations of pterosaurs, dinosaurs, birds and mammals in the Jehol Biota.

  15. Effects of emitter junction and passive base region on low dose rate effect in bipolar devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low dose rate effect in bipolar devices consists in the increase of peripheral surface recombination current with dose rate decrease. This is due to the more rapid positive oxide charge and interface trap density build-up as the dose rate becomes lower. High dose rate elevated temperature irradiation is proposed for simulation if the low dose rate effect. In the present we tried to separate the effect of radiation-induced charge in the thick passivation oxide over the emitter junction and passive base regions of npn bipolar transistor. Its goal is to improve bipolar device design for use in space environments and nuclear installations. Three experiments were made during this work. 1. Experiment on radiation-induced charge neutralization (RICN) effect under elevated temperature was performed to show transistor degradation dependence on emitter-base bias. 2. High dose rate elevated and room temperature irradiation of bipolar transistors were performed to separate effects of emitter-junction and passive base regions. 3. Pre- and post- irradiation hydrogen ambient storage was used to investigate its effect on radiation-induced charge build-up over the passive base region. All experiments were performed with npn and pnp transistors. (authors)

  16. Dose rate effects on the thermoluminescence kinetics properties of MWCVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, S.; Chernov, V.; Melendrez, R.; Soto-Puebla, D.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; Barboza-Flores, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, AP 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora 83190 (Mexico); Cruz-Zaragoza, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-543 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Favalli, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, TP800,Via E. Fermi, 21020 Ispra (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    Dose rate effects are important in thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeter applications because a certain absorbed dose given at different dose rates may result in a different TL yield. The present work reports about the dose rate effects on TL glow curves and kinetics properties of microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) diamond films grown on (100) silicon. The diamond films were exposed to {gamma} radiation at 20.67, 43.4 and 81.11 Gy min{sup -1} dose rates in the range of 0.05-10 kGy. The films showed a linear dose behavior up to 2 kGy and reached saturation for higher doses. The TL intensity varied as a function of dose rate and the samples had a maximum TL response for relatively lower dose rates. A single first order kinetics TL peak was typical for low doses while at higher doses two first order kinetics peaks were necessary to fit the glow curves. The results indicate that dose rate effects may be significant in dosimetric applications of MWCVD diamond. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Inverse dose-rate effect for mutation induction by γ-rays in human lymphoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to define further the effects of differences in recombinational proficiency on cell survival and mutation by ionizing radiation, we exposed the syngenic cell lines TK6 and WTK1 to continuous low dose-rate γ-irradiation. We previously demonstrated that acute X-ray exposure results in lower survival and lower mutation induction at both the thymidine kinase (tk) and the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) loci in TK6 cells compared with WTK1 cells. These differences were attributed in part to reduced levels of recombination in the TK6 line relative to WTK1. Using a low dose rate 137Cs irradiator, we exposed asynchronous growing populations of these cells to γ-rays at 14.3, 6.7 and 2.7 cGy/h. Both cell lines exhibited a dose-rate effect on survival. Compared with acute doses, the low dose-rates also protected against mutation induction at the hrpt locus in WTK1, but protection was inversely related to dose-rate. There was also a slight inverse dose-rate effect in TK6, with mutation induction at the lowest dose-rate exceeding that at acute exposures. (Author)

  18. 3D-image-guided high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for salvage treatment of locally persistent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Yu-Feng; Cao, Xin-Ping; Xu, Jia; Ye, Wei-Jun; Gao, Yuan-Hong; Teh, Bin S.; Wen, Bi-Xiu

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the therapeutic benefit of 3D-image-guided high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (3D-image-guided HDR-BT) used as a salvage treatment of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with locally persistent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods Thirty-two patients with locally persistent NPC after full dose of IMRT were evaluated retrospectively. 3D-image-guided HDR-BT treatment plan was performed on a 3D treatment planning system (PLATO BPS 14.2). The...

  19. DNA repair and damage pathway related cancer suppressor genes in low-dose-rate irradiated AKR/J an IR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Bong, Jin Jong; Kang, Yumi; Choi, Moo Hyun; Lee, Hae Un; Yoo, Jae Young; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    It has been reported that low-dose-rate radiation stimulates the immune response, prolongs life span and inhibits carcinogenesis. The high dose-rate radiation influences the expression of DNA repair and damage-related genes. In contrast, DNA repair and damage signaling triggered by low-dose-rate irradiation remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the differential expression of DNA repair and damage pathway related genes in the thymus of AKR/J and ICR mice after 100th day low-dose-rate irradiation. Our findings demonstrated that low-dose-rate γ -radiation suppressed tumorigenesis.

  20. External dose rate in Unirea salt mine, Slanic-Prahova, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margineanu, R M; Apostu, A M; Duliu, O G; Bercea, S; Gomoiu, C M; Cristache, C I

    2009-05-01

    The distribution of the external dose rate within the former Unirea salt mine, host of the Low-Level Background Laboratory was determined and compared with calculated values based on the experimentally determined content of natural radioactive elements in the mine walls. The average external dose rate was found to be 1.3+/-0.3 nSv h(-1), close to calculated one of 1.4+/-0.2 nSv h(-1). PMID:19231217

  1. External dose rate in Unirea salt mine, Slanic-Prahova, Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margineanu, R.M.; Apostu, A.M. [National Institute of Research and Development for Physics and Nuclear Engineering ' Horia-Hulubei' , P.O. Box MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania); Duliu, O.G. [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, 077152 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania)], E-mail: duliu@b.astral.ro; Bercea, S.; Gomoiu, C.M.; Cristache, C.I. [National Institute of Research and Development for Physics and Nuclear Engineering ' Horia-Hulubei' , P.O. Box MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania)

    2009-05-15

    The distribution of the external dose rate within the former Unirea salt mine, host of the Low-Level Background Laboratory was determined and compared with calculated values based on the experimentally determined content of natural radioactive elements in the mine walls. The average external dose rate was found to be 1.3{+-}0.3 nSv h{sup -1}, close to calculated one of 1.4{+-}0.2 nSv h{sup -1}.

  2. Cosmic Rays Induced Background Radiation on Board of Commercial Flights

    CERN Document Server

    Pinilla, S; Núñez, L A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the total integrated flux of cosmic radiation which a commercial aircraft is exposed to along specific flight trajectories. To study the radiation background during a flight and its modulation by effects such as altitude, latitude, exposure time and transient magnetospheric events, we perform simulations based on Magnetocosmics and CORSIKA codes, the former designed to calculate the geomagnetic effects on cosmic rays propagation and the latter allows us to simulate the development of extended air showers in the atmosphere. In this first work, by considering the total flux of cosmic rays from 5 GeV to 1 PeV, we obtained the expected integrated flux of secondary particles on board of a commercial airplane during the Bogot\\'a-Buenos Aires trip by point-to-point numerical integration.

  3. Excess cancer risk among inhabitants in the high background radiation area of Yangjiang, China (1979-1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mortality among the inhabitants in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang, Guangdong Province, China was first reported internationally in 1980. Most of the inhabitants lived in the study areas for six or more generations. External radiation dose from the natural sources, including thorium, was estimated to be 2.10 mSv/a in the HBRA and 0.77 mSv/a in the control area (CA). Regarding internal radiation exposure, it was estimated that internal radiation doses in the HBRA and the CA were 4.27 mSv/a and 1.65 mSv/a, respectively. The epidemiological studies had failed to show any excess risk of cancer. The major purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of continuous low dose-rate exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation on excess cancer risk. In this report, we present the results of cancer mortality analysis during the period 1979-1998, adding 3 years to the previous reports. (author)

  4. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy as the sole radiation modality in the management of patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy: preliminary results of a pilot trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We present the preliminary findings of our in-house protocol treating the tumor bed alone after lumpectomy with low-dose-rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy in selected patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: Since March 1, 1993, 60 women with early-stage breast cancer were entered into a protocol of tumor bed irradiation only using an interstitial LDR implant with iodine-125. Patients were eligible if the tumor was ≤3 cm, margins were ≥2 mm, there was no extensive intraductal component, the axilla was surgically staged, and a postoperative mammogram was performed. Implants were placed using a standardized template either at the time of reexcision or shortly after lumpectomy. A total of 50 Gy was delivered at 0.52 Gy/h over a period of 96 h to the lumpectomy bed plus a 2-cm margin. Perioperative complications, cosmetic outcome, and local control were assessed. Results: The median follow-up for all patients is 20 months. Three patients experienced minimal perioperative pain that required temporary nonnarcotic analgesics. There have been four postoperative infections which resolved with oral antibiotics. No significant skin reactions related to the implant were noted and no patient experienced impaired would healing. Early cosmetic results reveal minimal changes consisting of transient hyperpigmentation of the skin at the puncture sites and temporary induration in the tumor bed. Good to excellent cosmetic results were noted in all 19 patients followed up a minimum of 24 months posttherapy. To date, 51 women have obtained 6-12-month follow-up mammograms and no recurrences have been noted. All patients currently have no physical signs of recurrence, and no patient has failed regionally or distantly. Conclusion: Treatment of the tumor bed alone with LDR interstitial brachytherapy appears to be well tolerated, and early results are promising. Long-term follow-up of these patients is

  5. External-Beam Radiation Therapy and High–Dose Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Long-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy in High and Very High Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Data on Clinical Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combined long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and dose escalation with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2007, 200 patients with high-risk prostate cancer (32.5%) or very high-risk prostate cancer (67.5%) were prospectively enrolled in this Phase II trial. Tumor characteristics included a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen of 15.2 ng/mL, a clinical stage of T2c, and a Gleason score of 7. Treatment consisted of 54 Gy of external irradiation (three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [3DCRT]) followed by 19 Gy of HDR brachytherapy in four twice-daily treatments. ADT started 0–3 months before 3DCRT and continued for 2 years. Results: One hundred and ninety patients (95%) received 2 years of ADT. After a median follow-up of 3.7 years (range, 2–9), late Grade ≥2 urinary toxicity was observed in 18% of the patients and Grade ≥3 was observed in 5%. Prior transurethral resection of the prostate (p = 0.013) and bladder D50 ≥1.19 Gy (p = 0.014) were associated with increased Grade ≥2 urinary complications; age ≥70 (p = 0.05) was associated with Grade ≥3 urinary complications. Late Grade ≥2 gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in 9% of the patients and Grade ≥3 in 1.5%. CTV size ≥35.8 cc (p = 0.007) and D100 ≥3.05 Gy (p = 0.01) were significant for increased Grade ≥2 complications. The 5-year and 9-year biochemical relapse-free survival (nadir + 2) rates were 85.1% and 75.7%, respectively. Patients with Gleason score of 7–10 had a decreased biochemical relapse-free survival (p = 0.007). Conclusions: Intermediate-term results at the 5-year time point indicate a favorable outcome without an increase in the rate of late complications.

  6. Calculation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are presented for the calculation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation from radioactive decay. A dose-rate conversion factor is defined as the dose-equivalent rate per unit radionuclide concentration. Exposure modes considered are immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and irradiation from a contaminated ground surface. For each radiation type and exposure mode, dose-rate conversion factors are derived for tissue-equivalent material at the body surface of an exposed individual. In addition, photon dose-rate conversion factors are estimated for 22 body organs. The calculations are based on the assumption that the exposure medium is infinite in extent and that the radionuclide concentration is uniform. The dose-rate conversion factors for immersion in contaminated air and water then follow from the requirement that all of the energy emitted in the radioactive decay is absorbed in the infinite medium. Dose-rate conversion factors for ground-surface exposure are calculated at a reference location above a smooth, infinite plane using the point-kernel integration method and known specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in air

  7. Dosimetric verification of calculated D max dose rate in half-blocked cobalt beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central beam in half-blocked irradiations passes through the edge of the marked skin field instead of the geometrical centre, hence any point in the skin field receives the same primary radiation as for the full field (at collimator) due to dose uniformity across the field. The backscatter radiation should be assessed accurately in order to arrive at dose rate

  8. Train-borne measurements of background radiation along the railways in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey done in New Zealand to estimate the outdoor gamma-ray dose rates using a technique of an improved version of one used previously in Australia was reported together with the cosmic-ray dose rates estimated from atmospheric pressure data. A battery-operated portable digital NaI(Tl) (1''φ x 2'') scintillation survey-meter was used for measurement on board regular service of passenger trains. The calibration of count rates into absorbed dose rates was done through simultaneous measurements with a 3''φ x 2'' NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer at different dose levels in a natural outdoor environment. Since the survey was carried out inside the train, data were converted to ones outdoors using the regression line. Influence of cliffs, tunnels and waters was corrected by author's model based on the place of the detector. For cosmic-ray dose rates, theoretical data by O'Brien were used. The survey was performed over a period of 3 days, from 22 to 24, February 1998. The route was that from Invercargill to Auckland through Picton/Wellington which was of 1,617 km distance, of which measured data were presented graphically. The mean of the terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates was found to be 62.7 nGy/h. The data were compared with ones by Matthews and found to scatter within the range of their statistical errors, which thus suggested that the data represented the outdoor radiation levels fairly well. (K.H.)

  9. Environmental dose rate assessment of ITER using the Monte Carlo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to radiation is one of the main sources of risk to staff employed in reactor facilities. The staff of a tokamak is exposed to a wide range of neutrons and photons around the tokamak hall. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER is a nuclear fusion engineering project and the most advanced experimental tokamak in the world. From the radiobiological point of view, ITER dose rates assessment is particularly important. The aim of this study is the assessment of the amount of radiation in ITER during its normal operation in a radial direction from the plasma chamber to the tokamak hall. To achieve this goal, the ITER system and its components were simulated by the Monte Carlo method using the MCNPX 2.6.0 code. Furthermore, the equivalent dose rates of some radiosensitive organs of the human body were calculated by using the medical internal radiation dose phantom. Our study is based on the deuterium-tritium plasma burning by 14.1 MeV neutron production and also photon radiation due to neutron activation. As our results show, the total equivalent dose rate on the outside of the bioshield wall of the tokamak hall is about 1 mSv per year, which is less than the annual occupational dose rate limit during the normal operation of ITER. Also, equivalent dose rates of radiosensitive organs have shown that the maximum dose rate belongs to the kidney. The data may help calculate how long the staff can stay in such an environment, before the equivalent dose rates reach the whole-body dose limits.

  10. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1�}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  11. Automation of the monitoring in real time of the absorbed dose rate in air due to the environmental gamma radiation in Cuba; Automatizacion del monitoreo en tiempo real de la tasa de dosis absorbida en aire debido a la radiacion gamma ambiental en Cuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez L, O.; Capote F, E.; Carrazana G, J.A.; Manzano de Armas, J.F.; Alonso A, D.; Prendes A, M.; Zerquera, J.T.; Caveda R, C.A. [CPHR, Calle 20, No. 4113 e/41 y 47, Playa, La Habana, 11300, A.P. 6195 C.P. 10600 (Cuba); Kalberg, O. [Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) (Sweden); Fabelo B, O.; Montalvan E, A. [CIAC, Camaguey (Cuba); Cartas A, H. [CEAC, Cienfuegos (Cuba); Leyva F, J.C. [CISAT (Cuba)]. e-mail: orlando@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Protection and Hygiene of the Radiations (CPHR) like center rector of the National Net of Environmental Radiological Surveillance (RNVRA), it has strengthened their detection capacity and of answer before a situation of radiological emergency. The measurements of the absorbed dose rate in air due to the environmental gamma radiation in the main stations of the Net are obtained in real time and the CPHR receives the data coming from these posts at one time relatively short. To improve the operability of the RNVRA it was necessary to complete the facilities of existent monitoring using 4 automatic measurement stations with probes of gamma detection, implementing in this way a measurement system on real time. On the other hand the software were developed: GenironProbeFech, to obtain the data of the probes, DataMail for the shipment of the same ones by electronic mail and GammaRed that receives and processes the data in the rector center. (Author)

  12. The survival of aerobic and anoxic human glioma and melanoma cells after irradiation at ultrahigh and clinical dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This in vitro study was undertaken to determine if ultrahigh dose rates could improve the radiation response of human tumors. Two cell lines, human glioma (U-87 MG), which is radioresistant, and human melanoma (HT-144), which is radiosensitive, were irradiated at ultrahigh and high dose rates under aerobic and anoxic conditions to determine if their oxygen enhancement ratios are modified by dose rate. In fact, the survival curves, and hence the oxygen enhancement ratios, were found to be independent of the dose rate. The oxygen enhancement ratio for glioma cells irradiated in plateau phase was 2.8 (± 0.3). The oxygen enhancement ratio was 2.7 (± 0.4) for melanoma cells in plateau phase and 2.8 (± 0.3) in exponential phase. These results indicate that there is no advantage in treating these tumors using ultrahigh dose rate instead of conventional dose rates. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Chromosome aberration, cancer mortality and hormetic phenomena among inhabitants in areas of high background radiation in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deqing, Chen; Luxin, Wei (High Background Radiation Research Group, Beijing (China))

    1991-12-01

    The respective average annual doses are about 330 and 110 mR/yr, in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) in Yangjiang County and the control areas (CA) in Enping and Taishan Counties. Both the HBRA and CA are in Guangdong Province which borders the South China Sea. The frequencies of chromosome aberration in circulating lymphocytes were examined for persons residing in the HBRA and CA. Those in the HBRA had increased frequencies of detectable abnormalities in stable aberrations (translocations and inversions) and unstable aberrations (dicentrics and rings). Previous reports have shown that when samples of circulating lymphocytes taken from inhabitants were tested in vitro for mitotic responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and for the degree of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) induced by UV-irradiation, there were higher responsiveness and UDS rates for those in the HBRA than in the CA. In contrast, mortality from all cancers and those from leukemia, breast and lung cancers that are inducible by radiation was not higher in the HBRA. Although the differences in the cancer mortality rates for the HBRA and CA are not significant, the findings are compatible with the assumption that the lower mortality from cancer in the HBRA is the result of the hormetic effects of the three-fold higher dose rate of background radiation in that areas. This assumption requires further study. (author).

  14. Dose rate on the environment generated by a gamma irradiation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the absorbed dose rate calculation on the surroundings of a gamma irradiation plant is developed. In such plants, a part of the radiation emitted upwards reach the outdoors. The Compton scatterings on the wall of the exhausting pipes through de plant roof and on the outdoors air are modelled. The absorbed dose rate generated by the scattered radiation reaching the outdoors floor is calculated. The results of the models, to be used for the irradiation plant design and for the environmental studies, are showed on tables and graphics. (author)

  15. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer. Low dose rate to high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n=341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer. (author)

  16. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer: low dose rate to high dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2003-03-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n = 341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer.

  17. Inhalation exposures due to radon and thoron ((222)Rn and (220)Rn): Do they differ in high and normal background radiation areas in India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rosaline; Sapra, B K; Prajith, R; Rout, R P; Jalaluddin, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-09-01

    In India, High Background Radiation Areas (HBRAs) due to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil (thorium and, to a lesser extent, uranium), are located along some parts of the coastal tracts viz. the coastal belt of Kerala, Tamilnadu and Odisha. It is conjectured that these deposits will result in higher emissions of radon isotopes ((222)Rn and (220)Rn) and their daughter products as compared to Normal Background Radiation Areas (NBRAs). While the annual external dose rates contributed by gamma radiations in these areas are about 5-10 times higher, the extent of increase in the inhalation dose rates attributable to (222)Rn and (220)Rn and their decay products is not well quantified. Towards this, systematic indoor surveys were conducted wherein simultaneous measurements of time integrated (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay product concentrations was carried out in around 800 houses in the HBRAs of Kerala and Odisha to estimate the inhalation doses. All gas measurements were carried out using pin-hole cup dosimeters while the progeny measurements were with samplers and systems based on the Direct radon/thoron Progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). To corroborate these passive measurements of decay products concentrations, active sampling was also carried out in a few houses. The results of the surveys provide a strong evidence to conclude that the inhalation doses due to (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay products in these HBRAs are in the same range as observed in the NBRAs in India. PMID:26065929

  18. The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, G D

    2009-02-13

    In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is

  19. Cosmic Background Radiation and `ether-drift' experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Consoli, M; Rapisarda, A

    2016-01-01

    `Ether-drift' experiments have played a crucial role for the origin of relativity. Though, a recent re-analysis shows that those original measurements where light was still propagating in gaseous systems, differently from the modern experiments in vacuum and in solid dielectrics, indicate a small universal anisotropy which is naturally interpreted in terms of a non-local thermal gradient. We argue that this could possibly be the effect, on weakly bound gaseous matter, of the temperature gradient due to the Earth's motion within the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR). Therefore, a check with modern laser interferometers is needed to reproduce the conditions of those early measurements with today's much greater accuracy. We emphasize that an unambiguous confirmation of our interpretation would have far reaching consequences. For instance, it would also imply that all physical systems on the moving Earth are exposed to a tiny energy flow, an effect that, in principle, could induce forms of self-organization in ma...

  20. Far Infrared Spectrometry of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    I describe two experiments to measure the cosmic background radiation near 1 mm wavelength. The first was a ground-based search for spectral lines, made with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and an InSb detector. The second is a measurement of the spectrum from 3 to 18 cm{sup -1}, made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer. It is a polarizing Michelson interferometer, cooled in liquid helium, and operated with a germanium bolometer. I give the theory of operation, construction details, and experimental results. The first experiment was successfully completed but the second suffered equipment malfunction on its first flight. I describe the theory of Fourier transformations and give a new understanding of convolutional phase correction computations. I discuss for infrared bolometer calibration procedures, and tabulate test results on nine detectors. I describe methods of improving bolometer sensitivity with immersion optics and with conductive film blackening.

  1. Characteristic angular scales in cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the stochasticity in temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. We show that the angular fluctuation of the temperature is a Markov process with a Markov angular scale, Markov 1.01-0.07+0.09. We characterize the complexity of the CMB fluctuations by means of a Fokker-Planck or Langevin equation and measure the associated Kramers-Moyal coefficients for the fluctuating temperature field T(n-circumflex) and its increment, ΔT = T(n-circumflex1) - T(n-circumflex2). Through this method we show that temperature fluctuations in the CMB have fat tails compared to a Gaussian distribution. (author)

  2. Radioactivity in the groundwater of a high background radiation area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabana, E I; Kinsara, A A

    2014-11-01

    Natural radioactivity was measured in groundwater samples collected from 37 wells scattered in an inhabited area of high natural background radiation, in a purpose of radiation protection. The study area is adjacent to Aja heights of granitic composition in Hail province, Saudi Arabia. Initial screening for gross α and gross β activities showed levels exceeded the national regulation limits set out for gross α and gross β activities in drinking water. The gross α activity ranged from 0.17 to 5.41 Bq L(-)(1) with an average value of 2.15 Bq L(-)(1), whereas gross β activity ranged from 0.48 to 5.16 Bq L(-)(1), with an average value of 2.60 Bq L(-)(1). The detail analyses indicated that the groundwater of this province is contaminated with uranium and radium ((226)Ra and (228)Ra). The average activity concentrations of (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra and (228)Ra were 0.40, 0.77, 0.29 and 0.46 Bq L(-)(1), respectively. The higher uranium content was found in the samples of granitic aquifers, whereas the higher radium content was found in the samples of sandstone aquifers. Based on the obtained results, mechanism of leaching of the predominant radionuclides has been discussed in detail.

  3. Adjuvant radiation therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer: experience with combination of external radiation therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy; Radioterapia adjuvante no tratamento do cancer de endometrio: experiencia com a associacao de radioterapia externa e braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Michael Jenwei; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro Soares; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio de Assis; Ferrigno, Robson; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Salvajoli, Joao Victor [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radioterapia]. E-mail: michael.chen@ig.com.br; Nishimoto, Ines Nobuko [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudos

    2005-12-01

    Objective: To review the results of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) combined with high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) for the treatment of endometrial carcinoma. Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated 141 patients treated with EBRT and HDR-BT after surgery between January 1993 and January 2001. EBRT was performed with a median dose of 45 Gy, and HDR-BT was performed with a median dose of 24 Gy, with four weekly insertions of 6 Gy. The median age of the patients was 63 years and the disease stage distribution was: CS I (FIGO), 52.4%; CS II, 13.5%; CS III, 29.8%; CS IV, 4.3%. Results: With a median follow-up of 53.7 months, the disease free survival (DFS) at five years was: CS I, 88.0%; CS II, 70.8%; CS III, 55.1%; CS IV, 50.0% (p = 0.0003). Global survival after five years was: CS I, 79.6%; CS II, 74.0%; CS III, 53.6%; CS IV, 100.0% (p = 0.0062). Factors affecting the DFS were histological grade and serous-papillary histology. Recurrence of the disease was observed in 33 cases, 13 (9.2%) of these occurred in the pelvis, vagina or vaginal vault. EBRT + HDR-BT of the vaginal vault allowed disease control in 90.8% of the cases. Conclusion: Radiation therapy is essential for loco-regional control of endometrial cancer and can achieve excellent cure rates in the initial stages. In more advanced stages, therapeutic failure frequently appears as distant metastases suggesting the need for complementary systemic therapy using new treatment modalities, particularly chemotherapy. (author)

  4. High dose rate intraluminal irradiation in recurrent endobronchial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seagren, S.L.; Harrell, J.H.; Horn, R.A.

    1985-12-01

    Palliative therapy for previously irradiated patients with symptomatic recurrent endobronchial malignancy is a difficult problem. We have had the opportunity to treat 20 such patients with high dose rate (50-100 rad/min) endobronchial brachytherapy. Eligible patients had received previous high dose thoracic irradiation (TDF greater than or equal to 90), a performance status of greater than or equal to 50, and symptoms caused by a bronchoscopically defined and implantable lesion. The radiation is produced by a small cobalt-60 source (0.7 Ci) remotely afterloaded by cable control. The source is fed into a 4 mm diameter catheter which is placed with bronchoscopic guidance; it may oscillate if necessary to cover the lesion. A dose of 1,000 rad at 1 cm from the source is delivered. We have performed 22 procedures in 20 patients, four following YAG laser debulking. Most had cough, some with hemoptysis. Eight had dyspnea secondary to obstruction and three had obstructive pneumonitis. In 12, symptoms recurred with a mean time to recurrence of 4.3 months (range 1-9 months). Eighteen patients were followed-up and reexamined via bronchoscope 1-2.5 months following the procedure; two were lost to follow-up. All had at least 50 percent clearance of tumor, and six had complete clearance; most regressions were documented on film or videotape. In six, the palliation was durable. The procedure has been well tolerated with no toxicity. We conclude that palliative endobronchial high dose rate brachytherapy is a useful palliative modality in patients with recurrent endobronchial symptomatic carcinoma.

  5. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility. (author)

  6. Investigation of background radiation and associated anomalies in Rifle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to examining anomalies and establishing the background gamma exposure rate range, the study presents a formula to convert thousand counts per minute (kcpm) from a gamma scintillator to microroentgen per hour (μRh) for the Rifle region. Also, a method is presented to identify contaminated areas containing excess 226Ra, by using a GR-410 gamma spectrometer. This method is suggested to be applied to all property surveys in the Rifle area. The Wasatch Formation, which outcrops extensively in the Rifle area, was found to have a major influence on the background radiation. Varying potassium concentrations and naturally occurring uranium in this rock unit reveal varying gamma exposure rates. Examining RaTh ratios from laboratory analysis of soil samples or use of RaTh ratios from GR-410 gamma spectrometer readings on site allows discrimination between mill related contamination and naturally occuring radioactivity. Radioactive coal clinkers were found used as fill material throughout the Rifle region and have been determined to be a product of the mill and subject to remediation. Finally, windblown mill tailings contamination is addressed in some detail. Mill tailings redistributed from the Rifle uranium mill tailings piles by prevailing winds were detected extensively on vicinity properties in Rifle. Some radioactive components of the windblown tailings were found to have leached into the subsurface soil. The combination of Wasatch Formation, radioactive coal clinkers, and windblown tailings accounts for many of the anomalous gamma exposure rates observed by the radiological survey teams. 11 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  7. A Graphical review of radiogenic animal cancer data using the 'dose and dose-rate map'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been investigating the effects of low dose or low dose rate irradiation on mice, using our low dose-rate irradiation facilities. In these studies, we found that the effects were highly dependent on both total dose and dose rate. To show this visually, we proposed the 'dose and dose-rate map (DDR map),' and plotted the results of our laboratory and our co-workers. The map demonstrated that dose and dose rate plane could be divided into three areas; an area where harmful effects are observed, an area where no harmful effects are observed and another area, between previous two areas, where certain protective functions are enhanced As this map would be a powerful tool to find some trend among the vast numbers of data relating the biological effects of ionizing radiation, we have developed a computer program which plots the collected data on the DDR map sorting by experimental conditions. In this study we graphically reviewed and analyzed the data relating to the lifespan studies of animals with a view to determining the relationships between doses and dose rates of ionizing radiation and cancer incidence. The data contains about 800 sets of experiments, which concerns 187,000 animals exposed to gamma ray or X-ray and their 112,000 controls, and total of about 30,000 cancers in exposed animals and 14,000 cancers in controls. About 800 points of data were plotted on the DDR map. The plot showed that the divided three areas in the DDR map were generally confirmed by these 800 points of data, and in some particular conditions, exempli gratia (e.g.) sarcoma, the biologically effective area is extended to relatively high dose and dose rate area. (author)

  8. Effect of Dose Rate Variation on Dose Distribution in IMRT with a Dynamic Multileaf Collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate dose distribution differences when the dose rates are randomly changed in intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a dynamic multileaf collimator. Two IMRT treatment plans including small-field and large-field plans were made using a commercial treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Each plan had three sub-plans according to various dose rates of 100, 400, and 600 MU/min. A chamber array (2D-Array Seven729, PTW-Freiburg) was positioned between solid water phantom slabs to give measurement depth of 5 cm and backscattering depth of 5 cm. Beam deliveries were performed on the array detector using a 6 MV beam of a linear accelerator (Clinac 21EX, Varian, Palo Alto, CA) equipped with 120-leaf MLC (Millenium 120, Varian). At first, the beam was delivered with same dose rates as planned to obtain reference values. After the standard measurements, dose rates were then changed as follows: 1) for plans with 100 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 MU/min, 2) for plans with 400 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 500 and 600 MU/min, 3) for plans with 600 MU/min, dose rate was varied to 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 MU/min. Finally, using an analysis software (Verisoft 3.1, PTW-Freiburg), the dose difference and distribution between the reference and dose-rate-varied measurements was evaluated. For the small field plan, the local dose differences were -0.8, -1.1, -1.3, -1.5, and -1.6% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100 MU/min reference), +0.9, +0.3, +0.1, -0.2, and -0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 400 MU/min reference) and +1.4, +0.8, +0.5, +0.3, and +0.2% for the dose rate of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 MU/min, respectively (for 600 MU/min reference). On the other hand, for the large field plan, the pass-rate differences were -1.3, -1.6, -1.8, -2.0, and -2.4% for the dose rate of 200, 300, 400, 500, 600 MU/min, respectively (for 100

  9. Social economical and psychological considerations in conveying potential radiation risks from high level natural background radiation to the residents of Ramsar, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-rays and radioactivity were discovered more than 100 years ago but the need for protection against very low doses of ionizing radiation and especially different levels of natural radiation is still among the most controversial matters in radiobiology and radiation protection. According to formal reports, some areas in Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, are the inhabited areas with the highest levels of natural radiation studied so far. A population of about 2000 is exposed to average annual radiation levels of 10.2 mGy y''-1 and the highest recorded external gamma dose rates are about 130 mGy y''-1. We have previously shown that in high background radiation areas (HBRAs), cultured human lymphocytes of the inhabitants whose cumulative radiation doses were as much as 170 times more than those of a control area when subjected to 1.5 Gy challenge dose,were significantly more radioresistant compared to the residents of the control area (Mortazavi et al. 2002a,b, Mortazavi and Karam 2002, Ghiassi-Najed et al. 2002). The people who live in these areas are usually unaware of the high levels of natural radiation in their environment. Studies performed on the residents of these areas have indicated that the effective dose of the inhabitants, in some cases, is much higher than the dose limits for occupational irradiation. Considering recent policies of ICRP regarding suggesting dose limits for exposure to natural sources of ionizing including radon, it seems that the inhabitants should become familiar with the possible risks of the exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. They should also realize that studies performed over the past years have indicated no detrimental effect. On the other hand, according to ICRP suggestions and considering the experiences in other countries, especially evacuation of the residents of contaminated areas after Chernobyl accident, setting any radiation protection regulation for the inhabitants without considering social, economic and

  10. A retrospective study on the transition of radiation dose rate and iodine distribution in patients with I-131-treated well-differentiated thyroid cancer to improve bed control shorten isolation periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate for how long patients should be isolated after I-131 treatment for thyroid cancer according to the guidelines issued by the Japanese Ministry of Welfare. We reviewed 92 therapies performed in 76 patients who were administered I-131 at our hospital from July 2007 to September 2009. Fifty-six patients were given 2220 or 2960 MBq I-131 at the first therapy, and 29 patients underwent 36 repeated therapies using 2960, 3700, 5550 or 7400 MBq I-131. We surveyed radioactivity for a 1 cm dose equivalent rate at 1 m intervals at 30 and 48 h after administration of I-131, obtained planar scintigrams at 48 h, and surveyed radioactivity repeatedly until it fell to under 30 μSv/h. The radioactivity was under 30 μSv/h at 30 h in 51 out of 92 cases (55%). Among the remaining 41 (45%) cases, 27 (29%) and 32 (35%) cases showed decreased radioactivity under 30 μSv/h at 48 and 72 h, respectively, and it remained higher than 30 μSv/h at 72 h in another 9 cases (10%). In 5 (38%) of the 13 cases with bone metastasis, the radioactivity remained over 30 μSv/h after 72 h, and scintigrams showed strong accumulation in bone metastases. Among the 27 cases demonstrating below 30 μSv/h at 48 h, 26 showed radioactivity being below 50 μSv/h at 30 h, while it was above 50 μSv/h at 30 h in all 14 cases which demonstrated above 30 μSv/h at 48 h. We compared the radioactivity levels of 27 cases under 30 μSv/h at 48 h and 14 cases over 30 μSv/h at 48 h using a cutoff value of under 50 μSv/h at 30 h to release patient at 48 h, the positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 100 and 93%, respectively, and radioactivity was found to differ significantly (P<0.001). To predict external radiation levels at 48 h, it is helpful to consider external radiation levels at 30 h after treatment. Consideration of intracellular uptake in thyroid cancer, especially in cases of bone metastases, digestive tract function, and renal function, is

  11. Effects of orientation of substrate on the enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) in NPN transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wu; ZHENG Yu-Zhan; WANG Yi-Yuan; REN Di-Yuan; GUO Qi; WANG Zhi-Kuan; WANG Jian-An

    2011-01-01

    The radiation effects and annealing characteristics of two types of domestic NPN bipolar junction transistors, fabricated with different orientations, were investigated under different dose-rate irradiation. The experimental results show that both types o

  12. Effects of orientation of substrate on the enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) in NPN transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wu; ZHENG Yu-Zhan; WANG Yi-Yuan; REN Di-Yuan; GUO Qi; WANG Zhi-Kuan; WANG Jian-An

    2011-01-01

    The radiation effects and annealing characteristics of two types of domestic NPN bipolar junction transistors, fabricated with different orientations, were investigated under different dose-rate irradiation. The experimental results show that both types of the NPN transistors exhibit remarkable Enhanced Low-Dose-Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS). After irradiation at high or low dose rate, the excess base current of NPN transistors obviously increased, and the current gain would degrade rapidly. Moreover, the decrease of collector current was also observed. The NPN transistor with (111) orientation was more sensitive to ionizing radiation than that with (100) orientation. The underlying mechanisms of various experimental phenomena are discussed in detail in this paper.

  13. Effects of orientation of substrate on the enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) in NPN transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wu; Zheng, Yu-Zhan; Wang, Yi-Yuan; Ren, Di-Yuan; Guo, Qi; Wang, Zhi-Kuan; Wang, Jian-An

    2011-02-01

    The radiation effects and annealing characteristics of two types of domestic NPN bipolar junction transistors, fabricated with different orientations, were investigated under different dose-rate irradiation. The experimental results show that both types of the NPN transistors exhibit remarkable Enhanced Low-Dose-Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS). After irradiation at high or low dose rate, the excess base current of NPN transistors obviously increased, and the current gain would degrade rapidly. Moreover, the decrease of collector current was also observed. The NPN transistor with orientation was more sensitive to ionizing radiation than that with orientation. The underlying mechanisms of various experimental phenomena are discussed in detail in this paper.

  14. A Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Polarimeter Using Superconducting Bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Hanany, S; Johnson, B; Jones, T; Hull, J R; Ma, K B

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation are expected to significantly increase our understanding of the early universe. We present a design for a CMB polarimeter in which a cryogenically cooled half wave plate rotates by means of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing. The design is optimized for implementation in MAXIPOL, a balloon-borne CMB polarimeter. A prototype bearing, consisting of commercially available ring-shaped permanent magnet and an array of YBCO bulk HTS material, has been constructed. We measured the coefficient of friction as a function of several parameters including temperature between 15 and 80 K, rotation frequency between 0.3 and 3.5 Hz, levitation distance between 6 and 10 mm, and ambient pressure between 10^{-7} and 1 torr. The low rotational drag of the HTS bearing allows rotations for long periods of time with minimal input power and negligible wear and tear thus making this technology suitable for a future satellite mission.

  15. Background Radiation Studies at LHCb Using Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Daquino, G G; Folger, G

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the feasibility studies performed to evaluate the background radiation levels in the LHCb experiment with Geant4. LHCb is one of the experiments that will operate at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) under construction at CERN. The simulation toolkit Geant4 has been used to model the interactions of particles with the detector. Geant4 is a software toolkit developed and maintained by a world-wide collaboration of physicists and computer scientists. The principal monitored distributions in this study are the dose and the fluence of certain particles in specific locations of the experiment. The dose is defined as the energy delivered in a volume per unit of the volume mass, while the fluence is defined as the number of particles passing through a surface per unit of area. Energy spectra need also to be evaluated to take into account the energy distribution of these particles, since specific problems in the electronics can be caused by particles of certain energies. For ...

  16. Dose and Dose Rates on Board Aircraft. A review of a recent EC-publication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compilation of measured and calculated dose and dose rate results onboard aircraft has recently been reported by a EURADOS working group1 (EC, 2004). More than 10,000 experimental dose rate results and more than 300 experimental route dose values have been compared with calculated values for the same flight conditions. The results cover the period from 1990 to 2003 and cover then one solar cycle. In general the agreement between calculations and measurements is within 30 %. The report concludes that all codes and measurement methods have sufficient accuracy for radiation protection purposes when used as described

  17. Benchmark Experiment of Dose Rate Distributions Around the Gamma Knife Medical Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, K.; Kosako, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sonoki, I.

    2014-06-01

    Dose rate measurements around a gamma knife apparatus were performed by using an ionization chamber. Analyses have been performed by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5. The nuclear library used for the dose rate distribution of 60Co was MCPLIB04. The calculation model was prepared with a high degree of fidelity, such as the position of each Cobalt source and shielding materials. Comparisons between measured results and calculated ones were performed, and a very good agreement was observed. It is concluded that the Monte Carlo calculation method with its related nuclear data library is very effective for such a complicated radiation oncology apparatus.

  18. Benchmark Experiment of Dose Rate Distributions Around the Gamma Knife Medical Apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, K., E-mail: koji_oishi@shimz.co.jp [Institute of Technology, Shimizu Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Kosako, K. [Institute of Technology, Shimizu Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Y.; Sonoki, I. [Giken Kogyo Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-06-15

    Dose rate measurements around a gamma knife apparatus were performed by using an ionization chamber. Analyses have been performed by using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5. The nuclear library used for the dose rate distribution of {sup 60}Co was MCPLIB04. The calculation model was prepared with a high degree of fidelity, such as the position of each Cobalt source and shielding materials. Comparisons between measured results and calculated ones were performed, and a very good agreement was observed. It is concluded that the Monte Carlo calculation method with its related nuclear data library is very effective for such a complicated radiation oncology apparatus.

  19. Cosmic background radiation spectral distortion and radiative decays of relic neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently observed excess of photons on a short wavelength side of the peak of a cosmic background radiation spectrum can be described by radiative decays of relic neutral particles. The lifetime and mass of a decaying particle must satisfy the following conditions: 2x109 s14 s, 0.4 eV-9-8x10-8) μb, and the interaction of new particles with the usual matter must be rather strong. The generalization of the standard SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) model is presented which includes new particles with the desired properties. 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. MAGIK: a Monte Carlo system for computing induced residual activation dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photon dose rate from the induced activity produced by sustained bombardment of materials by neutrons and charged particles may present a significant radiation hazard. To minimize this hazard, the material configuration must be so designed that the photon dose rate decays to an acceptable level soon after the source beam is turned off. MAGIK calculates the time-independent photon dose rates that result from activities produced by nucleon-nucleus and meson-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies. The system has been used both for high-energy accelerator studies and for fusion reactor studies. In the MAGIK system the lengthy photon transport calculations are carried out independent of time, and the time dependence is introduced in the final program, thereby permitting study of various operating scenarios with a minimum computing cost

  1. Postoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Ronald E.; Kal, Henk B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to show the efficiency of keloidectomy and postoperative interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 35 patients with 54 keloids were treated postoperatively with HDR brachytherapy. T

  2. Integer Programs for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Needle and Dose Planning that Directly Optimize Clinical Objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Siauw, Ko-Ay Timmy

    2012-01-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a radiation therapy for cancer in the prostate, cervix, breast, head, and neck, including other sites. In HDR brachytherapy, hollow needles are inserted or placed near the cancer site. Radiation is delivered to the patient by a radioactive source which is sequentially threaded through the needles. The dose distribution is controlled by altering the dwell times, the time spent at pre-defined positions on the needles.HDR brachytherapy has a 90\\% cancer-free...

  3. Extreme variations of air dose rates in east Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    This report analyses the data of air (ambient) dose rates measured at 164 points in eastern Fukushima during a period of half a year after 10 June 2011. It is found that at some locations the values decreased or increased extraordinarily although on average the overall dose rates decreased significantly faster than the theoretically predicted rate. Among them the nine most extreme points are selected and analysed. It is found that behind these extraordinary behaviours of air dose rates there exists the combination of wind/rain and artificial structures such as sloped pavements.

  4. ELDRS and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yu-Zhan; LU Wu; REN Di-Yuan; WANG Gai-Li; YU Xue-Feng; GUO Qi

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistors are investigated in this article.The results show that the vertical NPN transistors exhibit more degradation at low dose rate,and that this degradation is attributed to the increase on base current.The oxide trapped positive charge near the SiO2-Si interface and interface traps at the interface can contribute to the increase on base current and the two-stage hydrogen mechanism associated with space charge effect can well explain the experimental results.

  5. Determination of Absorbed and Effective Dose from Natural Background Radiation around a Nuclear Research Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Musa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study presents result of outdoor absorbed dose rate and estimated effective dose from the naturally occurring radionuclides 232Th and 238U series 40K, around a Nuclear Research Reactor at the Centre for Energy Research and Training (CERT, Zaria, Nigeria. Approach: A high-resolution in situ ?-ray spectrometry was used to carry out the study. CERT houses a 30Kw Research Reactor and other neutron and gamma sources for Research and Training. Results: The values of absorbed dose rate in air for 232Th, 238U and 40K range from 8.2 ± 2.5-24.5 ± 3.6 nGy h?1, 1.9 ± 1.2-4.6 ± 2.5 nGy h?1 and 12.2 ± 5-38 ± 6.7n Gy h?1 respectively . The estimated total annual effective dose outdoor for the sites range from 27.3-79.9 ?Sv y?1.Conclusions: This showed that radiation exposure level for the public is lower than the recommended value of 1 mSv y?1.Hence, the extensive usage of radioactive materials within and around CERT does not appear to have any impact on the radiation burden of the environment.

  6. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  7. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    CERN Document Server

    Foust, D J

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  8. GARDEC, Estimation of dose-rates reduction by garden decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: GARDEC estimates the reduction of dose rates by garden decontamination. It provides the effect of different decontamination Methods, the depth of soil to be considered, dose-rate before and after decontamination and the reduction factor. 2 - Methods: This code takes into account three Methods of decontamination : (i)digging a garden in a special way, (ii) a removal of the upper layer of soil, and (iii) covering with a shielding layer of soil. The dose-rate conversion factor is defined as the external dose-rate, in the air, at a given height above the ground from a unit concentration of a specific radionuclide in each soil layer

  9. High Precision Cosmology with the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhang, Marzieh

    In this thesis we investigate the two cosmic epochs of inflation and recombination, through their imprints on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. To probe the early universe we develop a map-based maximum-likelihood estimator to measure the amplitude of inflation-induced gravity waves, parametrized by r, from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps. Being optimal by construction, the estimator avoids E-B mixing, a possible source of contamination in the tiny B-mode detection, the target of many current and near future CMB experiments. We explore the leakage from the E- to the B-mode of polarization by using this estimator to study the linear response of the B-mode signal at different scales to variations in the E- mode power. Similarly, for various observational cases, we probe the dependence of r measurement on the signal from different scales of E and B polarization. The estimator is used to make forecasts for Spider-like and Planck-like experimental specifications and to investigate the sky-coverage optimization of the Spider-like case. We compare the forecast errors on r to the results from a similar multipole-based estimator which, by ignoring the mode-mixing, sets a lower limit on the achievable error on r. We find that an experiment with Spider-like specifications with fsky ˜ 0:02--0:2 could place a 2sigma r ≈ 0:014 bound (˜ 95% CL), which rises to 0:02 with an ℓ-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. For the Planck-like survey, a Galaxy-masked ( fsky = 0:75) sky would give 2sigmar ≈ 0:015, rising to ≈ 0:05 with the foreground residuals. We also use a novel information-based framework to compare how different generations of CMB experiments reveal information about the early universe, through their measurements of r. We also probe the epoch of recombination by investigating possible fluctuations in the free electron fraction Xe

  10. Experiences from studies of leukemia, background radiation and other factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation seems to induce myeloid leukemia of the acute and chronic type, and also acute lymphatic leukemia but not chronic lymphatic leukemia. The effects of low dose radiation in this context as well as for other malignancies, are currently a matter of controversy. On the basis of literary data the carcinogenic effect, and in particular the leukemia inducing effect, of low dose irradiation is discussed. It is concluded that only further studies in the low dose range can create a definite basis for a risk assessment with regard to ionizing radiation. The risk estimates obtained may not necessarily reflect an initiating effect of ionizing radiation, but could involve late stage effects exerted over time. However, such possibilities have so far achieved little attention

  11. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Simon, Steven L [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wojcik, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardis, Elisabeth [Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM-Hospital del Mar) and CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica - CIBERESP, Barcelona (Spain); Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot [Radiobiology and Epidemiology Department, Radiological and Human Health Division, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Hayata, Isamu [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)], E-mail: jhendry2002uk@yahoo.com

    2009-06-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of {sup 222}Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case-control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case-control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors.

  12. Gamma dose rate in natural radioactivity of bricks of different local regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the radiation hazard due to natural radioactivity in bricks and to calculate the gamma radiation dose rate from the bricks used in Sri Lankan buildings. Specific activities of the natural radionuclides in sixteen clay and four cement brick samples collected from kilns in different areas in Sri Lanka were analysed by gamma ray spectrometry. The gamma radiation hazard associated with these bricks was assessed according to the values of two different indices, Radium equivalent activity and representative level index. In terms of the radium equivalent a criterion has been used to limit the annual radiation dose from building materials to 1.5 mGy. Ra sub eq is convenient for comparing the specific activities of materials containing different concentrations of the radionuclides measured and the values ranged from 50-365 Bq per kg in the samples measured in this study. Based on these values an annual external radiation dose ranging from 0.21 - 1.48 mGy per year is calculated inside buildings constructed using bricks.Absorbed dose rates in air was calculated using dose coefficient values 0.0414, 0.623 and 0.461 nGy per hour per Bq per Kg for K sup 40, Th sup 232 and Ra sup 226 respectively. If the entire day is spent inside a typical masonry building the activity utilization index is unity by definition and is deemed to imply a dose rate of 80 nGy per hour. (0.70 mGy per year) In the present study the dose rate from cement bricks is less than this value ranging from 0.35-0.57 mGy per year. However, 10 of the clay bricks gave a dose rate greater than this value. The highest dose rate measured was 1.475 mGy per year from Mahiyangana which double the typical value 0.70 mGy per year

  13. Radiation Background and Attenuation Model Validation and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peplow, Douglas E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Santiago, Claudio P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-05

    This report describes the initial results of a study being conducted as part of the Urban Search Planning Tool project. The study is comparing the Urban Scene Simulator (USS), a one-dimensional (1D) radiation transport model developed at LLNL, with the three-dimensional (3D) radiation transport model from ORNL using the MCNP, SCALE/ORIGEN and SCALE/MAVRIC simulation codes. In this study, we have analyzed the differences between the two approaches at every step, from source term representation, to estimating flux and detector count rates at a fixed distance from a simple surface (slab), and at points throughout more complex 3D scenes.

  14. Dose rate estimation in work areas of PHWR from radio-iodines in reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission product activity in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) leads to external exposure apart from activation products. In pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR) 60 to 80 percent of the collective dose is due to external dose component and tritium uptake by the radiation workers contribute the remaining. In order to develop suitable method to reduce the collective dose to radiation workers it is required to identify the source term and the critical radio nuclide which contribute dose rate in the work areas. The radioactive isotopes in KGS-1 and KGS-2 RCS during operation and shut down of the reactor are quantified by HPGe based gamma spectrometer and dose rate contribution due to each isotope is evaluated. Dose rate in the area where primary coolant system equipment's are located is measured during reactor operation and shutdown. Comparison of activity in the coolant and the dose rate before and after reactor shut down indicates that dose rate in the measured area is mainly contributed by short lived isotopes of iodine, especially 134I. Concentration of radio-iodines in the RCS due to tramp uranium in the pressure tube and fuel cladding is evaluated and the results are compared with activity measured in the RCS. Large deviation of short-lived isotopes of iodine in RCS from the calculated value was studied. It is shown that primary coolant cleanup system is not much effective to remove this activity. The global Delayed Neutron Monitoring system (DNM) counts are compared with of iodine-134 activity. Measures to reduce short-lived radio-iodines in the RCS and exposure control is suggested. (author)

  15. Theory and data for estimating the risk at low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological protection bases the Linear Non-Threshold (LNT) model for estimating the risk at low doses and dose rates. Incorporation of risk concept into radiological protection brought the LNT model that implies that there is no wholly ''safe'' dose of radiation. Epidemiological studies have provided statistically reasonable basis for the LNT model for radiological protection. In estimating the cancer risk at low dose and dose rate using the atomic bomb survivor data, the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) is estimated. Theoretical and methodological issues on the DDREF emerged from the biological points of view. The International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) indicated that uncertainty analysis of the risk suggests that the LNT model is more reasonable than the threshold model with uncertain threshold doses. The latest epidemiological studies at low dose rates support LNT models. The gap between biology and epidemiology is increasing although some issues already exist in risk estimation at low doses. To get more scientifically reliable risk estimate, the dialogue between biology and epidemiology is needed to construct the framework of risk estimation such as biologically-based carcinogenesis models. (author)

  16. Correlation-study about the ambient dose rate and the weather conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Masato; Hatano, Yuko; Aoyama, Tomoo; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Kita, Kazuyuki; Ishizuka, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    The long-term radiation risks are believed to be heavily affected by the resuspension process. We therefore focus on the surface-atmosphere exchange process of released radioactive materials in this study. Radioactive materials were deposited on the soil and float in the air, and such complicated process are influenced by the weather conditions deeply. We need to reveal the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate. In this study, we study the correlation between the weather conditions and the ambient dose rate with the correction of the decrease due to the radioactive decay. We found that there is a negative correlation between the ambient dose rate and the soil water content by the correlation coefficient. Using this result, we reconstruct the ambient dose rate from the weather conditions by the multiple regression analysis and found that the reconstructed data agree with the observation very well. Using Kalman filter, which can be sequentially updates the state estimate, we obtained such a good agreement.

  17. Surface dose rate calibration of Sr-90 plane ophthalmic applicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calibration of an imported strontium-90 ophthalmic applicator at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology) has disclose a significant discrepancy in dose rate calibration (32%-35%) with that quoted by the manufacturer. The University of Wisconsin has investigated this discrepancy and found that both laboratories use similar techniques and a version of the Bragg-Gray equation to yield dose rate estimates. Experimental results indicate a strong relationship between the size of the collecting electrode used in the extrapolation chamber and the resulting estimate of absorbed dose rate. Calibration of these applicators is reviewed and suggestions for improvement and further research are proposed

  18. Hawking's radiation in non-stationary rotating de Sitter background

    CERN Document Server

    Ibohal, Ng; 10.1007/s10509-011-0606-0

    2011-01-01

    Hawking's radiation effect of Klein-Gordon scalar field, Dirac particles and Maxwell's electromagnetic field in the non-stationary rotating de Sitter cosmological space-time is investigated by using a method of generalized tortoise co-ordinates transformation. The locations and the temperatures of the cosmological horizons of the non-stationary rotating de Sitter model are derived. It is found that the locations and the temperatures of the rotating cosmological model depend not only on the time but also on the angle. The stress-energy regularization techniques are applied to the two dimensional analog of the de Sitter metrics and the calculated stress-energy tensor contains the thermal radiation effect.

  19. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy.

  20. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  1. Dose Rates from Plutonium Metal and Beryllium Metal in a 9975 Shipping Container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A parametric study was performed of the radiation dose rates that might be produced if plutonium metal and beryllium metal were shipped in the 9975 shipping package. These materials consist of heterogeneous combinations plutonium metal and beryllium. The plutonium metal content varies up to 4.4 kilograms while the beryllium metal varies up to 4 kilograms. This paper presents the results of that study

  2. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis, E-mail: acapellizzon@hcancer.org.br [A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia

    2016-05-15

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. (author)

  3. Detecting a non-Gaussian stochastic background of gravitational radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Drasco, S; Drasco, Steve; Flanagan, Eanna E.

    2002-01-01

    We derive a detection method for a stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by events where the ratio of the average time between events to the average duration of an event is large. Such a signal would sound something like popcorn popping. Our derivation is based on the somewhat unrealistic assumption that the duration of an event is smaller than the detector time resolution.

  4. Detecting a non-Gaussian stochastic background of gravitational radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Drasco, Steve; Flanagan, Eanna E.

    2001-01-01

    We derive a detection method for a stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by events where the ratio of the average time between events to the average duration of an event is large. Such a signal would sound something like popcorn popping. Our derivation is based on the somewhat unrealistic assumption that the duration of an event is smaller than the detector time resolution.

  5. Dose rate effects on array CCDs exposed by Co-60 γ rays induce saturation output degradation and annealing tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental tests of dose rate and annealing effects on array charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are presented. The saturation output voltage (VS) versus the total dose at the dose rates of 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 and 50 rad(Si)/s are compared. Annealing tests are performed to eliminate the time-dependent effects. The VS degradation levels depend on the dose rates. The VS degradation mechanism induced by dose rate and annealing effects is analyzed. The VS at 20 krad(Si) with the dose rate of 0.03 rad(Si)/s are supplemented to assure the degradation curves between the dose rates of 0.1 and 0.01 rad(Si)/s. The CCDs are divided into two groups, with one group biased and the other unbiased during 60Co γ radiation. The VS degradation levels of the biased CCDs during radiation are more severe than that of the unbiased CCDs

  6. A study of microscopic dose rate distribution of 99Tcm-MIBI in the liver of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: A microdosimetry model was tried to develop an accurate way to evaluate absorbed dose rates in target cell nuclei from radiopharmaceuticals. Methods: Microscopic frozen section autoradiography was used to determine the subcellular locations of 99Tcm-MIBI relative to the tissue histology in the liver of mice after injection of 99Tcm-MIBI via tail for two hours, and a mathematical model was developed to evaluate the microscopic dose rates in cell nuclei. The Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema was also used to evaluate the dose rates at the same time, and a comparison of the results of the two methods was conducted to determine which method is better to accurately estimate microscopic dose rates. Results: The spatial distribution of 99Tcm-MIBI in the liver of mice at subcellular level was not uniform, and the differences between the microdosimetry model and MIRD schema were significant (P99Tcm-labeled pharmaceuticals at the microscopic level

  7. Dose Rate Determination from Airborne Gamma-ray Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The standard method for determination of ground level dose rates from airborne gamma-ray is the integral count rate which for a constant flying altitude is assumed proportional to the dose rate. The method gives reasonably results for natural radioactivity which almost always has the same energy...... distribution. When manmade radioactivity is present, this is no longer the case. Another method based on giving the counts of different channels a different weighting has been examined. The new method is more robust against varying energy distribution, and for energies above 200 keV it gives excellent results....

  8. Evaluation of Background Ionization Radiation Level in some selected Dumpsites in Delta State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Avwiri, O Gregory; Emmanuel, O Esi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the evaluation of background Ionization radiation level (BIR) in some selected Dumpsites in Uvwie, Udu and Ughelli North Local government area of Delta State, Nigeria. Background ionization radiation measurements were carried out in five Dumpsites. An in- situ measurement was done using a well calibrated nuclear radiation meters Radalert-100 and a geographical positioning system (GPS). Readings were taken once in a week for one month in ten different locations within eac...

  9. Dose-effect relationship of dicentric and ring chromosomes in lymphocytes of individuals living in the high background radiation areas in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomes of 39 healthy family members (3 generations from 13 families) living both in the high-level background radiation areas (HBRA) and the control areas (CA) were studied. Cumulative dose from birth to the time of blood sampling was estimated by calculating measured exposure rate in each individual. The cumulative doses ranged 30.9-358.9 and 6.0-59.2 mGy for HBRA and CA, respectively. Peripheral lymphocyte chromosome preparations were made according to our improved method. Dicentric and ring chromosomes (Dic+Rc) were scored in average 2,527 cells per individual in HBRA and 2,694 cells in CA under a microscope equipped with an automated stage. A positive correlation between Dic+Rc and age was found in HBRA, while no such dose relationship was clear in CA. The frequency of Dic+Rc linearly increases over lifetime due to chronic low dose exposure and it is likely that the activation of repair enzymes is not triggered in the present HBRA. Threshold dose (rate) of the induction of chromosome aberrations, if any, is below the present dose (rate) level. (author)

  10. Determination of environmental radioactivity (238U, 232Th and 40K) and indoor natural background radiation level in Chennai city (Tamilnadu State), India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babai, K S; Poongothai, S; Punniyakotti, J

    2013-01-01

    An extensive study on the determination of the natural radioactivity ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) levels in soil samples of Chennai city, India has been undertaken and the results of the same are compared with the levels reported in other Indian cities as well as other parts of the world. The radioactivity content in the soil samples, the absorbed dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, internal and external hazard indices were calculated and compared with UNSCEAR 2000 recommended values. In addition to the above, mapping of indoor natural background gamma radiation levels has been made using thermo luminescent dosemeters throughout Chennai city and the same are reported. PMID:22847868

  11. Intraluminal High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Tumors of Gastrointestinal Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : Intraluminal High dose rate brachytherapy is an accepted treatment for the tumors of GI tract. However, there is only some limited clinical data for intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy for the tumors of GI tract. Materials and Methods : Between February 1991 and July 1993, 18 patients who have the tumors of GI tract (esophageal cancer-8 cases, rectal cancer-10 cases) were treated with high dose rae iridium-192 afterloading system )Microselectron-HDR, Nucletron CO, Netherland) at the department of therapeutic radiology, St. Mary's hospital, Catholic university medical college. Age rage was 47-87 years with a mean age 71 years. All patients were treated with intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy within two weeks after conventional external radiation therapy and received 3-5 Gy/fraction 3-4 times per week to a total dose 12-20 Gy (mean 17 Gy). Standard fractionation and conventional dose were delivered for external radiation therapy. Total dose of external radiation therapy ranged 41.4-59.4 Gy (mean 49.6 Gy). Median follow up was 19 months. Results : The analysis was based on 18 patients. The complete response and partial response in esophageal cancer was similar (38%). Two year rates for survival and median survival were 13% and 10 months, respectively. Among 10 patients of rectal cancers, partial response was obtained in 6 patients (60%). There was no complete response in the patients with rectal cancer, but good palliative results were achieved in all patients. Conclusion : Although the number of patients was not large and the follow up period was relatively short, these findings suggested that intraluminal high dose rate brachytherapy could be useful in the treatment of the patients with advanced tumors of GI tract

  12. Effects of trapped proton flux anisotropy on dose rates in low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G D; Kushin, V V; Akatov YuA; Myltseva, V A

    1999-06-01

    Trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) have a rather narrow pitch angle distribution and exhibit east-west anisotropy. In low Earth orbits, the E-W effect results in different amounts of radiation dose received by different sections of the spacecraft. This effect is best studied on missions in which the spacecraft flies in a fixed orientation. The magnitude of the effect depends on the particle energy and altitude through the SAA. In this paper, we describe a clear example of this effect from measurements of radiation dose rates and linear energy transfer spectra made on Space Shuttle flight STS-94 (28.5 degree inclination x 296 km altitude). The ratio of dose rates from the two directions at this location in the mid-deck was 2.7. As expected from model calculations, the spectra from the two directions are different, that is the ratio is energy dependent. The data can be used to distinguish the anisotropy models. The flight carried an active tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and passive thermoluminscent detectors (TLDs), and two types of nuclear emulsions. Using nuclear emulsions, charged particles and secondary neutron energy spectra were measured. The combined galactic cosmic radiation+trapped charged particle lineal energy spectra measured by the TEPC and the linear energy transfer spectrum measured by nuclear emulsions are in good agreement. The charged particle absorbed dose rates varied from 112 to 175 microGy/day, and dose equivalent rates from 264.3 to 413 microSv/day. Neutrons in the 1-10 MeV contributed a dose rate of 3.7 microGy/day and dose equivalent rate of 30.8 microSv/day, respectively. PMID:11543145

  13. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  14. ACDOS2: an improved neutron-induced dose rate code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To calculate the expected dose rate from fusion reactors as a function of geometry, composition, and time after shutdown a computer code, ACDOS2, was written, which utilizes up-to-date libraries of cross-sections and radioisotope decay data. ACDOS2 is in ANSI FORTRAN IV, in order to make it readily adaptable elsewhere

  15. Fast shutter for low background radiation environments at SPR III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast shutter system has been developed and used to isolate experiments from the radiation emitted after the main pulse of the Sandia Pulse Reactor, SPR 3. In about 15 ms the system moves a massive 20 kg shield in front of the beam port aperture in the facility shield wall. A second gravity-driven shutter is dropped into place in about 200 ms. The total attenuation achieved in the beam intensity is about a factor of one hundred. The shutter assembly was used, along with a sensitive detection system, to observe the gamma ray flux emitted by various materials activated by the neutron beam at levels nine orders of magnitude smaller than the gamma flux level at the target during the reactor pulse

  16. Effects of deprivation of background environmental radiation on cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present results from an experiment aimed at investigating whether living cells are influenced by background ionizing radiation. Parallel human cell cultures were set-up in two separate laboratories and maintained for several months under identical conditions but for a 80 x different level of background ionizing radiation. Periodically, the cell cultures were monitored for the onset of divergences in biochemical behavior, using two distinct cellular biology assays, namely micronuclei induction and activity of enzymes implicated in the management of oxidative stress. To reveal any subtle modifications, responses were also amplified by subjecting cell cultures to acute stress induced by exposure to moderately high doses of ionizing radiation. Compared to reference radiation background conditions, cultures maintained in a reduced background radiation environment handled the consequences of acute stress with diminished efficacy.

  17. Pre operational background radiation monitoring around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site - a decade long experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-operational environmental background radiation monitoring around nuclear power plants is very important to understand baseline values existing in the site and also to identify any hot spots of naturally occurring high background radiation areas and their sources. These baseline measurements will act as a benchmark for future comparison after the reactors go into operation. The radiation measurements are continued during the operational phase of the plant and the results are compared to see whether there is any impact of the operation of the plant on the environment. A comprehensive background radiation monitoring plan has been in vogue at site from 2004 to meet this objective. This paper describes the different monitoring strategies adopted around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site and throws light on the pre operational background radiation levels in the environment

  18. Self-amplifying Hawking radiation and its background: a numerical study

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhauer, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study an analogue black hole with two horizons with similar parameters to a recent experiment. We find that the Hawking radiation exists on a background which contains a density oscillation, a zero-frequency ripple. The Hawking radiation evolves from spontaneous to self-amplifying, while the background ripple grows steadily with no qualitative change. It is seen that the self-amplifying Hawking radiation has a non-zero frequency. The background ripple appears even before the inner horizon is created, in contrast to predictions. This work is in agreement with the recent observation of self-amplifying Hawking radiation, and explains some of the features seen. In contrast to recent works, our study differentiates between the Hawking radiation observed, and the evolution of the background.

  19. How does radiative feedback from a UV background impact reionization?

    CERN Document Server

    Sobacchi, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    An ionizing UV background (UVB) inhibits gas accretion and photo-evaporates gas from the shallow potential wells of small, dwarf galaxies. During cosmological reionization, this effect can result in negative feedback: suppressing star-formation inside HII regions, thus impeding their continued growth. It is difficult to model this process, given the enormous range of scales involved. We tackle this problem using a tiered approach: combining parameterized results from single-halo collapse simulations with large-scale models of reionization. In the resulting reionization models, the ionizing emissivity of galaxies depends on the local values of the reionization redshift and the UVB intensity. We present a physically-motivated analytic expression for the average minimum mass of star-forming galaxies, which can be readily used in modeling galaxy formation. We find that UVB feedback: (i) delays the end stages of reionization by less than 0.5 in redshift; (ii) results in a more uniform distribution of HII regions, ...

  20. Standardization of high-dose measurement of electron and gamma ray absorbed doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense electron beams and gamma radiation fields are used for sterilizing medical devices, treating municipal wastes, processing industrial goods, controlling parasites and pathogens, and extending the shelf-life of foods. Quality control of such radiation processes depends largely on maintaining measurement quality assurance through sound dosimetry procedures in the research leading to each process, in the commissioning of that process, and in the routine dose monitoring practices. This affords documentation as to whether satisfactory dose uniformity is maintained throughout the product and throughout the process. Therefore, dosimetry at high doses and dose rates must in many radiation processes be standardized carefully, so that 'dosimetry release' of a product is verified. This standardization is initiated through preliminary dosimetry intercomparison studies such as those sponsored recently by the IAEA. This is followed by establishing periodic exercises in traceability to national or international standards of absorbed dose and dose rate. Traceability is achieved by careful selection of dosimetry methods and proven reference dosimeters capable of giving sufficiently accurate and precise 'transfer' dose assessments: (1) they must be calibrated or have well-established radiation-yield indices; (2) their radiation response characteristics must be reproducible and cover the dose range of interest; (3) they must withstand the rigours of back-and-forth mailing between a central standardizing laboratory and radiation processing facilities, without excessive errors arising due to instabilities, dosimeter batch non-uniformities, and environmental and handling stresses. (author)

  1. Modeling Background Radiation in our Environment Using Geochemical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malchow, Russell L.; Marsac, Kara [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Hausrath, Elisabeth [Uniiversity of Nevada, Las Vegas; Haber, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Adcock, Christopher [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2015-02-01

    Radiation occurs naturally in bedrock and soil. Gamma rays are released from the decay of the radioactive isotopes K, U, and Th. Gamma rays observed at the surface come from the first 30 cm of rock and soil. The energy of gamma rays is specific to each isotope, allowing identification. For this research, data was collected from national databases, private companies, scientific literature, and field work. Data points were then evaluated for self-consistency. A model was created by converting concentrations of U, K, and Th for each rock and soil unit into a ground exposure rate using the following equation: D=1.32 K+ 0.548 U+ 0.272 Th. The first objective of this research was to compare the original Aerial Measurement System gamma ray survey to results produced by the model. The second objective was to improve the method and learn the constraints of the model. Future work will include sample data analysis from field work with a goal of improving the geochemical model.

  2. Monte Carlo calculation of dose rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon emitters in soil

    CERN Document Server

    Clouvas, A; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2000-01-01

    The dose rate conversion factors D/sub CF/ (absorbed dose rate in air per unit activity per unit of soil mass, nGy h/sup -1/ per Bq kg/sup -1/) are calculated 1 m above ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. Three Monte Carlo codes are used: 1) The MCNP code of Los Alamos; 2) The GEANT code of CERN; and 3) a Monte Carlo code developed in the Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo results is tested by the comparison of the unscattered flux obtained by the three Monte Carlo codes with an independent straightforward calculation. All codes and particularly the MCNP calculate accurately the absorbed dose rate in air due to the unscattered radiation. For the total radiation (unscattered plus scattered) the D/sub CF/ values calculated from the three codes are in very good agreement between them. The comparison between these results and the results deduced previously by other authors indicates a good ag...

  3. Low Dose Rate Radiosensitization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma In Vitro and in Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C. Cuneo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transarterial radioembolization (TARE with 90Y microspheres delivers low dose rate radiation (LDR to intrahepatic tumors. In the current study, we examined clonogenic survival, DNA damage, and cell cycle distribution in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cell lines treated with LDR in combination with varying doses and schedules of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, gemcitabine, and sorafenib. Radiosensitization was seen with 1 to 3 μM 5-FU (enhancement ratio 2.2–13.9 and 30 to 100 nM gemcitabine (enhancement ratio 1.9–2.9 administered 24 hours before LDR (0.26 Gy/h to 4.2 Gy. Sorafenib radiosensitized only at high concentrations (3–10 μM when administered after LDR. For a given radiation dose, greater enhancement was seen with LDR compared to standard dose rate therapy. Summarizing our clinical experience with low dose rate radiosensitization, 13 patients (5 with HCC, 8 with liver metastases were treated a total of 16 times with TARE and concurrent gemcitabine. Six partial responses and one complete response were observed with a median time to local failure of 7.1 months for all patients and 9.9 months for patients with HCC. In summary, HCC is sensitized to LDR with clinically achievable concentrations of gemcitabine and 5-FU in vitro. Encouraging responses were seen in a small cohort of patients treated with TARE and concurrent gemcitabine. Future studies are needed to validate the safety and efficacy of this approach.

  4. Measurement of after-heat production and dose rates of spent AVR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the afterheat production and dose rate of spent AVR fuel elements prepared by the ORIGEN computer program are verified by measurements. Individual measurements of afterheat and dose rate were implemented on 17 AVR fuel elements with decay periods of 150 days and more than four years, and burnups between 4.1 and 16.4% fima were implemented in the HOT CELLS at the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre. The radiation energy absorbed in the fuel elements and converted into heat was measured with a calorimeter, whereas the emitted radiation fraction was determined via dose rate measurements. The measured results for fuel elements with decay periods of more than one year are in good agreement with the data from ORIGEN. In the case of fuel elements with shorter decay periods (approx. 150 days) in part considerably lower values were measured which can be explained by the fact that the power gradient in time of the fuel elements in the reactor can vary considerably whereas mean are included in the ORIGEN computations assuming full-load operation. (orig./HP))

  5. MCNPCX calculations of dose rates and spectra in experimental channels of the CTEx irradiating facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Renato G.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Junior, Luis M., E-mail: renatoguedes@ime.eb.br, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: vellozo@cbpf.br, E-mail: luisjrmoreira@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Vital, Helio C., E-mail: vital@ctex.eb.br [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Barra de Guaratiba, RJ (Brazil); Rusin, Tiago, E-mail: tiago.rusin@mma.gov.br [Ministerio do Meio Ambiente, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    MCNPX simulations have been performed in order to calculate dose rates as well as spectra along the four experimental channels of the gamma irradiating facility at the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (CTEx). Safety, operational and research requirements have led to the need to determine both the magnitude and spectra of the leaking gamma fluxes. The CTEx experimental facility is cavity type with a moveable set of 28 horizontally positioned rods, filled with Cesium-137 chloride and doubly encased in stainless steel that yields an approximately plane 42 kCi-source that provides a maximum dose rate of about 1.5 kG/h into two irradiating chambers. The channels are intended for irradiation tests outside facility. They would allow larger samples to be exposed to lower gamma dose rates under controlled conditions. Dose rates have been calculated for several positions inside the channels as well as at their exits. In addition, for purposes related to the safety of operators and personnel, the angles submitted by the exiting beams have also been evaluated as they spread when leaving the channels. All calculations have been performed by using a computational model of the CTEx facility that allows its characteristics and operation to be accurately simulated by using the Monte Carlo Method. Virtual dosimeters filled with Fricke (ferrous sulfate) were modeled and positioned throughout 2 vertical channels (top and bottom) and 2 horizontal ones (front and back) in order to map dose rates and gamma spectrum distributions. The calculations revealed exiting collimated beams in the order of tenths of Grays per minute as compared to the maximum 25 Gy / min dose rate in the irradiator chamber. In addition, the beams leaving the two vertical channels were found to exhibit a widespread cone-shaped distribution with aperture angle ranging around 85 deg. The data calculated in this work are intended for use in the design of optimized experiments (better positioning of samples and

  6. A survey in Portuguese X-ray fluoroscopy equipment: dose rates and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray fluoroscopy is essential in both diagnosis and medical intervention, although it may contribute to significant radiation doses to patients that have to be optimised and justified. Therefore, it is crucial to the patient to be exposed to the lowest achievable dose without compromising the image quality. The purpose of this study was to perform an analysis of the quality control measurements, particularly dose rates, contrast and spatial resolution of Portuguese fluoroscopy equipment and also to provide a contribution to the establishment of reference levels for the equipment performance parameters. Measurements carried out between 2007 and 2013 on 143 fluoroscopy equipment distributed by 34 nationwide health units were analysed. The measurements suggest that image quality and dose rates of Portuguese equipment are congruent with other studies, and in general, they are as per the Portuguese law. However, there is still a possibility of improvements intending optimisation at a national level. (authors)

  7. Use of silicon photodiode optically connected to scintillator in measurement of gamma dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilar, O. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky); Petr, I. (Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Fakulta Jaderna a Fysikalne Inzenyrska)

    1984-06-01

    Contributing to the signal which is produced in the photodiode by direct interaction with radiation may also be light photons produced by scintillation in the scintillator which is in optical contact with the photodiode. The scintillator/photodiode combination may increase sensitivity in comparison with the photodiode alone. The energy dependence of the detector will change according to the scintillator material and size. The configuration is described of a detector with CsI(Tl) scintillator. The detector is suitable for medium and large dose rates, the limiting factor for measuring small dose rates is the intensity of the photodiode dark current and its temperature dependence. A higher sensitivity of the designed detector configuration may be achieved by selecting a scintillator with a more suitable emission spectrum or by technological modifications of the photodiode.

  8. Open-source hardware and software and web application for gamma dose rate network operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German Federal Office for Radiation Protection operates a network of about 1800 gamma dose rate stations as a part of the national emergency preparedness plan. Each of the six network centres is capable of operating the network alone. Most of the used hardware and software have been developed in-house under open-source license. Short development cycles and close cooperation between developers and users ensure robustness, transparency and fast maintenance procedures, thus avoiding unnecessary complex solutions. This also reduces the overall costs of the network operation. An easy-to-expand web interface has been developed to make the complete system available to other interested network operators in order to increase cooperation between different countries. The interface is also regularly in use for education during scholarships of trainees supported, e.g. by the 'international Atomic Energy Agency' to operate a local area dose rate monitoring test network. (authors)

  9. The Cosmic Background Radiation circa ν2K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, J. Richard; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Prunet, Simon

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {ωb, ωcdm, Ωtot, ΩΛ, ns, τC, σ8}. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature (Ωtot = 1.08 +/- 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (ns = 1.03 +/- 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates (ωb --- Ωbh2 = 0.030 +/- 0.005 cf. 0.019 +/- 0.002). The CDM density is in the expected range (ωcdm = 0.17+/-0.02). Even stranger is the CMB+LSS evidence that the density of the universe is dominated by unclustered energy akin to the cosmological constant (ΩΛ = 0.66 +/- 0.06), at the same level as that inferred from high redshift supernova observations. We also sketch the CMB+LSS implications for massive neutrinos.

  10. The Cosmic Background Radiation circa nu2K

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Prunet, S; Ade, P; Balbi, A; Bock, J J; Borrill, J; Boscaleri, A; Coble, K; Crill, B P; De Bernardis, P; Farese, P; Ferreira, P; Ganga, K; Giacometti, M; Hanany, S; Hivon, E; Hristov, V V; Iacoangeli, A; Jaffe, A; Lange, A; Lee, A; Martinis, L; Masi, S; Mauskopf, P D; Melchiorri, A; Montroy, T; Netterfield, C B; Oh, S; Pascale, E; Piacentini, F; Rabii, B; Rao, S; Richards, P; Romeo, G; Ruhl, J E; Scaramuzzi, F; Sforza, D M; Smoot, G F; Stompor, R; Winant, C; Wu, P

    2000-01-01

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {omega_b,omega_{cdm},Omega_{tot}, Omega_\\Lambda,n_s,\\tau_C, \\sigma_8}. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature (Omega_{tot}=1.08\\pm 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (n_s=1.03\\pm 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates (omega_b=0.030\\pm 0.005 cf. 0.019\\pm 0.002). The CDM density is in th...

  11. Characteristics and verification of a car-borne survey system for dose rates in air: KURAMA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The car-borne survey system KURAMA-II, developed by the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, has been used for air dose rate mapping after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. KURAMA-II consists of a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector, a GPS device, and a control device for data processing. The dose rates monitored by KURAMA-II are based on the G(E) function (spectrum-dose conversion operator), which can precisely calculate dose rates from measured pulse-height distribution even if the energy spectrum changes significantly. The characteristics of KURAMA-II have been investigated with particular consideration to the reliability of the calculated G(E) function, dose rate dependence, statistical fluctuation, angular dependence, and energy dependence. The results indicate that 100 units of KURAMA-II systems have acceptable quality for mass monitoring of dose rates in the environment. - Highlights: • KURAMA-II is a car-borne survey system developed by Kyoto University. • A spectrum-dose conversion operator for KURAMA-II was calculated and examined. • We examined the radiation characteristics of KURAMA-II such as energy dependence. • KURAMA-II has acceptable quality for environmental mass dose rate monitoring

  12. The cosmic background radiation circa {nu}2K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, J. Richard; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Prunet, Simon

    2000-01-01

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {l_brace}{omega}{sub b}, {omega}{sub cdm}, {omega}{sub tot}, {omega}{sub {lambda}}, n{sub s}, {tau}{sub C}, {sigma}{sub 8}{r_brace}. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature ({omega}{sub tot} = 1.08 {+-} 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (n{sub s} 1.03 {+-} 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates ({omega}{sub b}-{omega}{sub b}h{sup 2} 0.030 {+-} 0.005 cf. 0.019 {+-} 0.002). The CDM density is in the expected range ({omega}{sub cdm} 0.17{+-}0.02). Even stranger is the CMB+LSS evidence that the density of the universe is dominated by unclustered energy akin to the cosmological constant ({omega}{sub {lambda}} = 0.66 {+-} 0.06), at the same level as that inferred from high redshift supernova observations. We also sketch the CMB+LSS implications for massive neutrinos.

  13. Using rainfall radar data to improve interpolated maps of dose rate in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiemstra, Paul H., E-mail: p.hiemstra@geo.uu.nl [University of Utrecht, Department of Physical Geography, P.O. Box 80.115, 3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands); Pebesma, Edzer J., E-mail: edzer.pebesma@uni-muenster.de [University of Muenster, Institute for Geoinformatics, Weseler Strasse 253, 48151 Muenster (Germany); Heuvelink, Gerard B.M. [Environmental Sciences Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Twenhoefel, Chris J.W. [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Antonie van Leeuwenhoeklaan 9, 3721 MA Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2010-12-01

    The radiation monitoring network in the Netherlands is designed to detect and track increased radiation levels, dose rate more specifically, in 10-minute intervals. The network consists of 153 monitoring stations. Washout of radon progeny by rainfall is the most important cause of natural variations in dose rate. The increase in dose rate at a given time is a function of the amount of progeny decaying, which in turn is a balance between deposition of progeny by rainfall and radioactive decay. The increase in progeny is closely related to average rainfall intensity over the last 2.5 h. We included decay of progeny by using weighted averaged rainfall intensity, where the weight decreases back in time. The decrease in weight is related to the half-life of radon progeny. In this paper we show for a rainstorm on the 20th of July 2007 that weighted averaged rainfall intensity estimated from rainfall radar images, collected every 5 min, performs much better as a predictor of increases in dose rate than using the non-averaged rainfall intensity. In addition, we show through cross-validation that including weighted averaged rainfall intensity in an interpolated map using universal kriging (UK) does not necessarily lead to a more accurate map. This might be attributed to the high density of monitoring stations in comparison to the spatial extent of a typical rain event. Reducing the network density improved the accuracy of the map when universal kriging was used instead of ordinary kriging (no trend). Consequently, in a less dense network the positive influence of including a trend is likely to increase. Furthermore, we suspect that UK better reproduces the sharp boundaries present in rainfall maps, but that the lack of short-distance monitoring station pairs prevents cross-validation from revealing this effect.

  14. Monte-Carlo determination of dose rates in spherical PWR shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An operating nuclear reactor is a source of potentially dangerous nuclear radiation. It emits many different types of nuclear radiations. However, the neutrons and gamma rays are the main sources of radiation to give the contributions to the radiation situation in the reactor during operation, and the principal concern of reactor shielding. In current study the neutron and gamma radiation dose rates at different depths in concrete bio-shield of a PWR are calculated in spherical model by M-C simulation with using MCNP4C2. The simulation results are compared with the results obtained from similar calculations based on S8P3 spherical approximation with using the ANISN code. (author)

  15. Distribution of background radiation and radioactive materials in Aomori Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan is now being constructed in Rokkasho Village, Aomori Prefecture and large amounts of Pu and U will be treated in the plant. Therefore, we made a plan for getting background levels of Pu, U and other related radionuclides in soil samples around the plant beginning with plowed fields, then rice fields, orchards, forests and un-cultivated fields, ie a different field type, year by year. This is the first report of results for plowed fields. The soil samples were collected at 13 plowed fields in Rokkasho and three control sites in Tohoku Town, Hachinohe City and Hirosaki City. Five core samples of 75 mmφ, down to approximately 1 m deep, were taken in each field in 2001. Three to five layers were distinguished by a visual inspection, and the same layers from each of the five cores were combined. When depth profiles of layers for some cores were different from those of others, those cores were separately treated. Concentrations of 137Cs and 210Pb in the sample were measured with γ-ray spectrometers using Ge detectors. Pu, U and Th in the soil samples were analyzed with a ICP-MS. Since fields under yam (Dioscorea babatus) cultivation are dug up to approximately 1 m deep at harvesting, depth profiles of fallout radionuclides were heavily disturbed for most fields in Rokkasho. The mean and standard deviation of inventory of Pu (239+240Pu) in three fields where have not cultivated yam in Rokkasho was 120 ± 50 Bq m-2. The mean inventory was similar to that in Hachinohe City. However, the inventory was approximately a half of that in Hirosaki City. The Pu concentrations very well correlated with 137Cs (r=0.97), and the ratio of Pu/137Cs was 0.037 ± 0.007, which is a typical value for global fallout. This showed that the movements of Pu and 137Cs in soil were similar in spite of heavy soil disturbance, and the ratio could be used for distinguishing the plant Pu from global fallout. Since the concentrations of

  16. Activity concentration of 137Cs in soil samples from Punjab province (Pakistan) and estimation of gamma-ray dose rate for external exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjab is one of the most populated provinces of Pakistan having 34 districts. There is always a need to have baseline background level information about 137Cs and the corresponding gamma-ray doses to the population. In this respect, soil samples were collected to a depth of 30-50 cm from all 34 district headquarters of the Punjab province of Pakistan and 137Cs activity concentrations were measured. 137Cs activity concentration was found to be in the range from 1.1 ± 1.0 to 5.3 ± 2.5 Bq kg-1. The average value of estimated external gamma-ray dose rate from all 34 districts of Punjab province was computed to be 0.18 ± 0.07 nSv h-1 from 137Cs in soil samples. The measured 137Cs activity concentration range was compared with the reported ranges in the literature from some of the other locations in the world. Results obtained in this study show that 137Cs concentration is of a lower level in the investigated area. The average value of estimated external effective dose rate is found far below the dose rate limit of 1.0 mSv y-1 for members of the general public recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) as well as the external gamma radiation dose of 0.48 mSv y-1 received per head from the natural sources of radiation assessed by UNSCEAR (2000). It is concluded that 137Cs soil contamination does not pose radiation hazards to the population in the investigated areas. (authors)

  17. Gamma ray dose rates in the Weh Island, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Weh Island is located at the northern most part of Great Sumatera Fault system which has NW-SE trend elongated from Bands Aceh until Semangko Bay about 1650 km within Sumatera Island. We had conducted the measurement of gamma ray dose rate in Weh Island of Sumatera in Indonesia. From about 15 observation points, we found that the average of gamma ray dose rate was 50.8 ± 4.8 nGy/h. From the present study, natural intensity of radioactivity could be checked and can be concluded into the following; 1) There are two high radioactive level zones in the investigating area. One of them is the east zone in accordance with valleys and erosion zone along the structure line (Great Sumatra fault). 2) The other zone is the central part of this area. Even if this zone looks lineament geographically, it indicates the existence of fault line. (author)

  18. 空气伽马吸收剂量率影响因素研究%Influencing Factors of the Gamma Air-Absorbed Dose Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷荫; 王南萍; 付宸; 储星铭

    2012-01-01

    The influencing factors of gamma air-absorbed dose rate are studied to improve the precision of environmental radiation monitoring data. Background radiation measurement, increasing of the radon concentration and changing of humidity are done to discuss the two major influencing factors, I. e. the concentration and relative humidity of radon and radon progeny in the air. The radon concentration in the air are measured with scintillation radon monitor ( ZnS ( Ag) ) , electronic radon detector ( RAD7 ) and ionization chamber radon detector ( Alpha-GUARD) , and gamma air-absorbed dose rate with X--y dose rate meter (CKL-3120). The gamma air-absorbed dose rate, radon concentration, temperature, relative humidity and atmospheric pressure in the air are monitored together. Results show gamma air-absorbed dose rate indicates a poor correlation with radon concentration and relative humidity of the air.%为提高辐射环境监测数据的准确度,对空气伽马吸收剂量率影响因素进行了研究.针对空气伽马吸收剂量率两个主要影响参数一空气氡及其子体浓度和相对湿度,分另別进行了室内外本底测量、增加氡浓度和改变相对湿度实验.采用闪烁室测氡仪(ZnS(Ag)型)、静电收集室测氡仪(RAD7)和电离室测氡仪(AlphaGUARD)测量空气氡浓度,用X-γ剂量率仪( CKL-3120)测量空气伽马吸收剂量率.联合观测空气伽马吸收剂量率、空气氡浓度、温度、相对湿度和大气压强,实验结果表明:空气氡浓度、相对湿度与空气伽马吸收剂量率呈现弱的正相关.

  19. Combined scintillation detector for gamma dose rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L.; Novakova, O.; Jursova, L. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1990-01-01

    The specifications are described of a newly developed scintillation detector, essentially consisting of a plastic scintillator completed with inorganic scintillators ZnS(Ag) and NaI(Tl). The gamma dose rate is derived from the photomultiplier anode current. The composition and sizes of the scintillators and the capsule are selected so as to minimise the energy dependence errors and directional dependence errors of the detector response over a wide range of energies and/or angles. (author).

  20. Dose rates monitoring using a remote-controlled robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the research project MOSTAR was developed a little light dose rate meter based on a plastic scintillator which can be applied for remote measurements. Poster presents the results of measurements with this detector placed on a mobile robot. The measurement was carried out during a field experiment with dispersion of La-140 in Boletice and on a polygon in Trebic where 'lost' point sources were placed (authors)

  1. Telomere Length in Human Adults and High Level Natural Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Birajalaxmi Das; Divyalakshmi Saini; Seshadri, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telomere length is considered as a biomarker of aging, stress, cancer. It has been associated with many chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Although, telomere shortening due to ionizing radiation has been reported in vitro, no in vivo data is available on natural background radiation and its effect on telomere length. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present investigation is an attempt to determine the telomere length among human adults residing in high level na...

  2. Cancer mortality in the high background radiation areas of Yangjiang, China during the period between 1979 and 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Zufan [Ministry of Health, Beijing (China). Lab. of Industrial Hygiene; Zha Yongru; Akiba, Suminori (and others)

    2000-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate cancer risk associated with the low-level radiation exposure of an average annual effective dose of 6.4 mSv (including internal exposure) in the high background-radiation areas (HBRA) in Yangjiang, China. The mortality survey consisted of two steps, i.e., the follow-up of cohort members and the ascertainment of causes of death. The cohort members in HBRA were divided into three dose-groups on the basis of environmental dose-rates per year. The mortality experiences of those three dose groups were compared with those in the residents of control areas by means of relative risk (RR). During the period 1987-1995, we observed 926,226 person-years by following up 106,517 subjects in the cohort study, and accumulated 5,161 deaths, among which 557 were from cancers. We did not observe an increase in cancer mortality in HBRA (RR=0.96, 96% CI, 0.80 to 1.15). The combined data for the period 1979-95 included 125,079 subjects and accumulated 1,698,316 person-years, observed 10,415 total deaths and 1,003 cancer deaths. The relative risk of all cancers for whole HBRA as compared with the control area was estimated to be 0.99 (95% CI, 0.87 to 1.14). The relative risks of cancers of the stomach, colon, liver, lung, bone, female breast and thyroid within whole HBRA were less than one, while the risks for leukemia, cancers of the nasopharynx, esophagus, rectum, pancreas, skin, cervix uteri, brain and central nervous system, and malignant lymphoma were larger than one. None of them were significantly different from RR=1. Neither homogeneity tests nor trend tests revealed any statistically significant relationship between cancer risk and radiation dose. We did not find any increased cancer risk associated with the high levels of natural radiation in HBRA. On the contrary, the mortality of all cancers in HBRA was generally lower than that in the control area, but not statistically significant. (author)

  3. Spectrum of the cosmic background radiation: early and recent measurements from the White Mountain Research Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The White Mountain Research Station has provided a support facility at a high, dry, radio-quiet site for measurements that have established the blackbody character of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This finding has confirmed the interpretation of the radiation as a relic of the primeval fireball and helped to establish the hot Big Bang theory as the standard cosmological model

  4. Radiological Dose Rate Mapping of D-D/D-T Neutron Generator Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: DD/DT reaction neutron generators are used as sources of 2.5 MeV/14 MeV neutrons in laboratories for various purposes. 14 MeV neutron generators are proposed to be located at several positions in the ITER vessel for calibrating neutron/gamma diagnostic systems. Detailed knowledge of the radiation dose rates around the neutron generators is essential to obtain data on personnel exposures, calibration time, optimizing the number of calibration points with accuracy and radiological protection of the personnel involved with operation of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron sources. This work describes the studies carried out towards verifying the neutron and gamma dose rates near DD/DT neutron sources and the adequacy of bulk shielding to meet the stipulated dose limits in personnel occupancy areas of a neutron generator lab. Shielding adequacy was verified by experimental measurements at various locations inside and outside the neutron generator hall during different conditions. The experimental measurements were validated by Monte Carlo simulation code FLUKA, taking into account the geometry and structural details of source and the surrounding materials. Ambient neutron and gamma dose rate profiles and dose rate spectra at various locations are presented in this work. Measurements show a good agreement (up to 20% deviation) with FLUKA simulations. This study has served in generating detailed radiological dose rate maps around 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron generators for various source neutron yields and also in benchmarking the Monte Carlo simulation methods adopted for dose rate evaluations and shield design of such facilities. This study has also yielded valuable information on the response of the various radiological monitoring instruments and the recently procured personnel neutron/gamma dosimeters (MGP-make) for use in mixed neutron and gamma fields in the vicinity of D-D (2.5 MeV) and D-T (14 MeV) generator based neutron sources. Work supported by the Health

  5. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in

  6. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  7. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living organisms have developed complex biological system which protects themselves against environmental radiation, and irradiation with proper dose, dose-rate and irradiation time can stimulate their biological responses against oxidative stress evoked by the irradiation. Because reactive oxygen species are involved in various human diseases, non-toxic low dose/low dose-rate radiation can be utilized for the amelioration of such diseases. In this study, we used mouse experimental models for fatty liver, nephritis, diabetes, and ageing to elucidate the ameliorative effect of low dose/low dose-rate radiation in relation to endogenous antioxidant activity. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. The irradiation increases hepatic anti-oxidative system involving glutathione and glutathione peroxidase, suggesting that endogenous radical scavenger is essential for the ameliorative effect of low dose radiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced nephritis. The irradiation increases catalase and decreases superoxide dismutase in kidney. The result suggests that low dose radiation reduced generation of hydroxide radical generation by reducing cellular hydroperoxide level. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy at 12 week of age ameliorates incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice through the suppression of inflammatory activity of splenocytes, and resultant apoptosis of β-cells in pancreas. The irradiation activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which coordinately diminish intracellular reactive oxygen species. Continuous irradiation at 0.70 mGy/hr from 10 week of age elongates life span, and suppresses alopecia in type II diabetesmice. The irradiation improved glucose clearance without affecting insulin-resistance, and increased pancreatic catalase activity. The results suggest that continuous low dose-rate irradiation protect

  8. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  9. Radiobiological analysis of region with higher radiation background. The effect of the background on the isomorphism of some enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to establish the the time when the prolong impact of slightly increased radiation background get over the compensator mechanisms of living systems. The object of investigation was the ecosystem of the Bay of Wromos (Black Sea, BG) and its surroundings where the flotation slack from an uranium mine was disposed. radioactivity. The following radiobiological picture of the site is obtained according to measurements performed: the alpha-activity of the beach sands is higher than one of the slack and is different in plants; the beta-activity is higher compared to controls in all samples investigated; the gamma spectra show high concentration of the members of U-238 and Th-232 series. The biological effect provoked by this heightened radiation background is studied by means of the isoenzymes as indicators of changes on molecular level. The isoenzyme spectra of lactate dehydrogenase and butyrol dehydrogenase is studied by vertical electrophoresis. The following species are tested: Tettigonia candata charp, Galliptumus italicus, Grillus campestris and Lumbicus terrestrial. An increase in activity and quantity of enzymes as well as changes of their isoenzyme spectra is observed. Calliptumus italicus could be used as a bio indicator of contamination, as it show better separation of the LDH and BDH-isoforms of LDH and BDH, and is more wide-spread. The increase in activity and quantity of some isoenzyme fractions in the conditions of this experiment is one of the possible mechanisms for increase in radioresistance of the living systems. 3 tabs., 2 figs., 8 refs

  10. Evaluation of biochemical response on early prostate cancer: comparison between treatment with external beam radiation alone and in combination with high-dose rate conformal brachytherapy boost; Avaliacao da resposta bioquimica no cancer inicial de prostata: experiencia uninstitucional comparando teleterapia exclusiva ou associada a braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Douglas Guedes de; Chen, Michael Jenwei; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis; Maia, Maria Aparecida Conte; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo Ribeiro dos Santos; Fogaroli, Ricardo Cesar; Ferrigno, Robson; Salvajoli, Joao Victor [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radioterapia]. E-mail: dougepm@uol.com.br; Nishimoto, Ines Nobuko [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudos

    2004-08-01

    Objective: To compare the biochemical response in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy alone or in combination with conformal brachytherapy boost. Materials and methods: From November 1997 to January 2000, 74 patients received 45 Gy of pelvic external irradiation and four were treated with high dose rate iridium-192 conformal boost implants of 4 Gy each (BT). These were compared with 29 other patients treated with 45 Gy of pelvic external irradiation followed by a 24 Gy of bilateral ARC boost (RT) from October 1996 to February 2000. Some patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Three-year actuarial biochemical control rates (BC3) and pretreatment biochemical response predictors such as prostate-specific antigen pretreatment (PSAi), Gleason score (GS) and clinical stage (CS), were evaluated. Results: Median follow-up was of 25 months for the RT group and 37 months for the BT group. BC3 was 51% versus 73% (p = 0.032) for RT and BT, respectively. Comparisons of biochemical control by treatment group stratified by PSAi showed that BC3 for RT versus BT was 85.7% versus 79.1% (p = 0.76) for PSAi {<=}10 ng/mL and 38% versus 68% (p = 0.023) for PSAi > 10 ng/mL, respectively. For patients with GS {<=} 6, BC3 was 37% versus 80% (p = 0.001) for RT versus BT and, for patients with GS > 6, BC3 was 78% versus 55% (p = 0.58) for RT versus BT, respectively. For patients with CS {<=} T2a, BC3 was 36% versus 74% (p 0.018) for RT versus BT and, for patients with CS > T2a, BC3 was 73% versus 69% (p 0.692) for RT versus BT, respectively. The relative risk of biochemical relapse was 2.3 (95% IC: 1.0-5.1) for patients in RT group compared to the BT group. When adjusted for PSAi and GS, the relative risk of biochemical relapse was 2.4 (95% IC: 1.0-5.7). Conclusion: The treatment modality was an independent prognostic factor for biochemical relapse, with a significant improvement in the biochemical control with BT

  11. Determination of dose rate from natural radionuclide in porcelain dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are three main aims that make this study particularly important and interesting to radiometric studies. Firstly, it will provides information on the concentration composition of natural and the associated man-made radioactivity of imported dental porcelain materials to be used by most dental laboratories in Great Jamahiriya. Since these materials do not pass radiation inspection tests before their entry or use and there is a large variety of supply source of these dental materials to be used for all dental works on Libyan patients, anomalies can be identified easily. Secondly, the analysis of selective elemental abundance (U, Th, and K ) and dose rate calculations may be used to calculate effective dose rates to dental laboratory technicians and also to the patient who will be using these specific materials. This research project will provide the first results of such measurements and the corresponding average annual effective dose rates equivalent to the patients using these materials and also to the dental technician and doctors work in the various dental laboratories that make use of these materials in their daily work. A total number of 30 dental powder samples were collected from a number of dental laboratories around Tripoli area will be analyzed. In this research project, the results from this preliminary survey regarding Th, U and K elemental concentrations in a wide variety of dental materials by means of high-resolution X-ray spectrometry will be presented. Further results from these investigations concerning activity concentrations and the associated dose rates, effective dose and the committed dose due to the use of these materials are going to be calculated and compared with other published data elsewhere and recommendation of their use will be derived accordingly. (author)

  12. Influence of Relative Humidity, Dose Rate and Dose Fractionation on Gamma Dose Response of Glycine Dosimetric System

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh H. Shinde; T. Mukherjee

    2011-01-01

    Glycine dosimeter based on spectrophotometric read-out method has great potential for gamma dosimetry in low dose applications of radiation processing. However, external factors such as relative humidity, dose rate, and dose fractionation, may have a profound effect on its gamma dose response Influence of these factors on the gamma dose response of glycine dosimeter was studied in the present work.

  13. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  14. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-02-07

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

  15. X-ray equipment for dental diagnostics with a dose-rate controller influencing the exposure voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a synoptic picture is taken of teeth or jaw the X-ray tube and the film carrier with the film and a radiation detector are moving around the patient's head. The detector signal is connected to the input of the actual value of the dose-rate controller containing a scanning and stop circuit with a storing time roughly corresponding to the exposure of three teeth. After the shot the actual value of the dose rate is adjusted to the desired value, thus a constant quality of the following pictures being achieved. (RW)

  16. Effects of very low dose-rate 90Sr/90Y exposure on the acute moist desquamation response of pig skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and objectives: Previous data, predominantly involving high dose-rate fractionated irradiation with incomplete repair intervals, had indicated that the kinetics of repair of sublethal damage for acute radiation reactions in pig skin could best be defined by a biphasic repair model with half-times for repair of 0.2 and 5.4 h, partition coefficient 0.5. To further test the validity of this finding and obtain a better estimate of the repair rate of the slow component of repair, the acute response of pig skin to very low dose-rates (VLDR), originally estimated to be 0.0067-0.0244 Gy/min, was investigated as part of a 4 fraction irradiation protocol involving an overall treatment time of 90Sr/90Y plaques. Irradiation with a 4 fraction protocol included 3 equal, high dose-rate, fractions with full repair, followed by a fourth VLDR fraction. The total doses administered were originally planned to represent the dose associated with the predicted ED20, ED50 and ED80 (75% of total biological dose given at high dose-rate and 25% at VLDR) calculated on the basis of the repair kinetic parameters obtained from earlier studies. However, during the analysis a revision to the physical dosimetry was identified; this had been overlooked prior to the start of the study. Following completion of irradiation the irradiated sites were examined weekly and the presence or absence of moist desquamation recorded. Results: The incidence of moist desquamation was slightly higher than expected on the basis of the parameters used to calculate iso-effective doses, at least in part as a consequence of the change to the dosimetry. Using likelihood methods and the original dose estimates, the best model based estimate of the dose-rate correction factor for the LDR and VLDR plaques was 1.29. This was comparable with the physical calibration factor, median value 1.23. The VLDR fraction associated with a 50% incidence of moist desquamation, based on experimental observation, was 23.2 ± 0

  17. Neutron equivalent dose-rate measuring according to the single-sphere albedo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reproduces the results of calibration radiation using the single-sphere albedo measuring method. It was done for the purpose of optimising the arrangement of detectors on the surface of the sphere and reduce the diameter of the moderator sphere from hitherto 30 cm whilst in addition determining the energy- and direction-dependency of a neutron equivalent dose-rate meter with He-3 detectors. Optimisation of the detector arrangement on the sphere's surface resulted in a corresponding boron-plastic capsulation with detector depths inside or outside the moderator di=-6 mm, and da=5 mm with albedo neutron detectors and thermal neutron detectors, respectively. (orig./DG)

  18. Total dose and dose rate models for bipolar transistors in circuit simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Phillip Montgomery; Wix, Steven D.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a model for total dose effects in bipolar junction transistors for use in circuit simulation. The components of the model are an electrical model of device performance that includes the effects of trapped charge on device behavior, and a model that calculates the trapped charge densities in a specific device structure as a function of radiation dose and dose rate. Simulations based on this model are found to agree well with measurements on a number of devices for which data are available.

  19. Outdoor {gamma}-ray dose rate in Mutsu city and environmental factors affecting outdoor {gamma}-ray dose rate in IES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyogi, Takashi; Hisamatsu, Shun' ichi; Inaba, Jiro [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Dept. of Radioecology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Previously, we surveyed outdoor {gamma}-ray dose rates throughout Aomori Prefecture from 1992 to 1995, and found a mean annual dose rate of 28 nGy h{sup -1}. Relatively high dose rates were also observed in several areas (municipalities) of the survey locations. In this study, we examined the detailed distribution of the {gamma}-ray dose rate in one such high dose rate area, Mutsu City. Glass dosemeters were used for the monitoring of cumulative {gamma}-ray dose rate at 10 locations in the city. The dose rate from each radioactive nuclide in the ground at the monitoring locations was measured by using an in situ {gamma}-ray spectrometer with a Ge detector. The results obtained with the glass dosemeters showed that the {gamma}-ray dose rates in Mutsu City varied from 17 to 32 nGy h{sup -1}. Although the dose rates were almost the same as the mean dose in Aomori Prefecture (1992-1995), the rates were lower than other high dose rate areas which had already been measured. The in situ {gamma}-ray spectrometry revealed that these relatively high dose rates were mainly caused by {sup 40}K and Th series radionuclides in the local ground. The effect of meteorological conditions on the {gamma}-ray dose rate was studied at a monitoring station in the IES site. The dose rate was continuously recorded by a DBM NaI(Tl) scintillation detector system. The mean dose rate obtained when precipitation was sensed was 26 nGy h{sup -1} and higher than when no precipitation was sensed (24 nGy h{sup -1}). (author)

  20. Dosimetric systems of high dose, dose rate and dose uniformity in food and medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    implants with a weight of 1393 g the maximum dose rate of 6.5276 kGy /h, the minimum dose rate of 3.5684 kGy /h and the dose uniformity of 1 83 were determined. Then, based on the minimum dose rate irradiation times were calculated for different doses to evaluate in the microbial decontamination of food (3, 5, 8 and 12 kGy) and the sterilization of medical material by radiation (15, 20, 25 and 40 kGy), corroborating the applied doses with routine dosimeters of ethanol chlorobenzene (1-100 kGy) and perspex network 4034 (5-50 kGy). Other routine dosimeters used in different applications according to the doses range are Gafchromic Hd (40-400 Gray) for induced mutation by radiation and the development of new varieties of plants, the sterile insect technique to eradicate pests, quarantine treatment to solve plant health problems. Ambar Perspex 3042 C (3-15 kGy) for microbial decontamination of dried foods, spices, aromatic herbs, medicinal plants, etc. GEX B-3000 (1-140 kGy) and FWT (0.5-200 kGy) for sterilization of medical and pharmaceutical material, cosmetics, biological tissues, etc. The minimum dose rate allowing to calculate the irradiation times to apply the desired dose for the research or industrial processes, taking into account the density and geometry of product. Is notorious the difference in dose uniformity in food (1, 16) and medical material (1, 83) due to the geometry and relative density of the products within the irradiation cylinder. (author)

  1. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation using COBE FIRAS instrument data

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Use formulas to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, enthalpy density, and internal energy density in the finite range of frequencies are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60 - 600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T = 2.728 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and the Stefan-Bol...

  2. Effect of dose-rate of gamma irradiation (60Co) on the anti nutritional compounds phytic acid and antitrypsin on soybean (glycine max L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation on the effect of gamma irradiation at different dose-rate on the anti-nutritional compounds (phytic acid and antitrypsin) and the color of soybean has been conducted. The purpose of the study was to analyze the influence of the dose-rate on the rate of change of anti-nutritional compounds and color. Samples were irradiated with dose-rates of 1.30; 3.17; 5.71 and 8.82 kGy/hour with irradiation time varied from 0.5 to 55 hours. Phytic acid content and antitrypsin activity, as well as their L α b color values were analyzed. Results showed that a simple first order kinetics model can be used to describe changes in the concentration of the anti-nutritional compounds and color soybeans during the radiation processing. Data indicate that irradiation process at higher dose-rate (shorter time) is more effective in destroying anti-nutritional compounds as compared to that of irradiation process at lower dose-rate (longer time). Furthermore, irradiation process at higher dose-rate (shorter time) also have less detrimental effect on color of the soybean and the resulted soybean flour as compared to that of irradiation process at lower dose-rate (longer time). These findings suggest that irradiation process at a same dose may potentially be optimized by selecting the most appropriate combination of dose-rate and time of irradiation. (author)

  3. PCP METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, S.

    2011-08-23

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials, are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This study describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials perform, under both normal and accident conditions, the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within regulatory limits. 10 CFR 71.33(b)(1)(2)&(3) state radioactive and fissile materials must be identified and their maximum quantity, chemical and physical forms be included in an application. Furthermore, the U.S. Federal Regulations require application contain an evaluation demonstrating the package (i.e., the packaging and its contents) satisfies the external radiation standards for all packages (10 CFR 71.31(2), 71.35(a), & 71.47). By placing the contents in a He leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large external dose rate. Quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings described in this report provides bounding mass limits for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. Methodology calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels

  4. Low dose rate caesium-137 implant time of intracavitary brachytherapy source of a selected oncology center in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    John Owusu Banahene; Emmanuel Ofori Darko; Baffour Awuah

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment time taken for a radioactive source is found to be very important in intracavitary brachytherapy treatment. The duration of the treatment time depends on the prescribed dose requested to a reference point and the calculated dose rate to the same point. The duration of the treatment time of source is found to depend on the tumour stage. In this work, the treatment time of implant has been calculated for a Caesium-137 low dose rate brachytherapy source at an oncology f...

  5. Dose-rate dependence of epitaxial diodes response for gamma dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, J.A.C.; Santos, T.C. dos; Barbosa, R.F.; Pascoalino, K.C.S.; Bueno, C.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CTR/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes

    2011-07-01

    Full text: In this work, we present the preliminary results about the evaluation of dose-rate influence on the response of rad-hard epitaxial (EPI) diodes for on-line gamma-ray dosimetry using Co-60 irradiators. The diodes used were processed at University of Hamburg on n-type 75 micrometer thick epitaxial silicon layer (nominal resistivity of 69 Ohm.cm) grown on a highly doped n-type 300 micrometer thick Czochralski (Cz) silicon substrate. Two samples of EPI diodes were investigated: EPI-08 and EPI-10 - both non-irradiated previously. These devices, with 5mm x 5mm active area, were housed in a PMMA probe and connected, in a photovoltaic mode, to a Keithley 617 electrometer. The EPI-10 device irradiation was performed in the Radiation Technology Center at IPEN-CNEN/SP using a Co-60 irradiator (Gammacell 220 - Nordion) which delivers a dose rate of 2.16 kGy/h, while the EPI-08 device irradiation was performed in Nuclear Energy Department at UFPE/PE using the same model Co-60 irradiator, but with a dose-rate of 7.47 kGy/h. During the irradiation, the devices photocurrents were monitored as a function of the exposure time. The diodes were irradiated at room temperature. The dose-response curves of the EPI diodes were achieved through the integration of the current signals as a function of the exposure time. The normalized current signals as a function of the dose evidenced a decrease of about 60 percent from the initial current for the first 100 kGy dose received. After 500 kGy of exposure, the current signals stabilize (ou maintain stable). The dose-response curves behave as a second order polynomial fit, with correlation coefficients of about 0.99991 and 0.99995, respectively to EPI-10 and EPI-08 diodes. The preliminary results obtained evinced that the EPI diodes response are not dose-rate dependent within the range of 2.16 kGy/h up to 7.47 kGy/h. On the other hand, the devices studied are tolerant to radiation damages for total absorbed doses of approximately 550

  6. Calibration procedure for thermoluminescent dosemeters in water absorbed doses for Iridium-192 high dose rate sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters are used in brachytherapy services quality assurance programs, with the aim of guaranteeing the correct radiation dose supplied to cancer patients, as well as with the purpose of evaluating new clinical procedures. This work describes a methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water for 192Ir high dose rate sources. The reference dose used is measured with an ionization chamber previously calibrated for 192Ir energy quality, applying the methodology proposed by Toelli. This methodology aims to standardizing the procedure, in a similar form to that used for external radiotherapy. The work evolves the adaptation of the TRS-277 Code of the International Atomic Energy Agency, for small and big cavities, through the introduction for non-uniform experimental factor, for the absorbed dose in the neighborhood of small brachytherapy sources. In order to simulate a water medium around the source during the experimental work, an acrylic phantom was used. It guarantees the reproducibility of the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeter's location in relation to the radiation source. The values obtained with the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeters, exposed to a 192Ir high dose rate source, were compared and correction factors for different source-detector distances were determined for the thermoluminescent dosimeters. A numeric function was generated relating the correction factors and the source-detector distance. These correction factors are in fact the thermoluminescent dosimeter calibration factors for the 192Ir source considered. As a possible application of this calibration methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters, a practical range of source-detector distances is proposed for quality control of 192Ir high dose rate sources. (author)

  7. External gamma-ray dose rate and radon concentration in indoor environments covered with Brazilian granites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, R M; Juri Ayub, J; Cid, A S; Cardoso, R; Lacerda, T

    2011-11-01

    Health hazard from natural radioactivity in Brazilian granites, covering the walls and floor in a typical dwelling room, was assessed by indirect methods to predict external gamma-ray dose rates and radon concentrations. The gamma-ray dose rate was estimated by a Monte Carlo simulation method and validated by in-situ measurements with a NaI spectrometer. Activity concentrations of (232)Th, (226)Ra, and (40)K in an extensive selection of Brazilian commercial granite samples measured by using gamma-ray spectrometry were found to be 4.5-450 Bq kg(-1), 4.9-160 Bq kg(-1) and 190-2029 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The maximum external gamma-ray dose rate from floor and walls covered with the Brazilian granites in the typical dwelling room (5.0 m × 4.0 m area, 2.8 m height) was found to be 120 nGy h(-1), which is comparable with the average worldwide exposure to external terrestrial radiation of 80 nGy h(-1) due to natural sources, proposed by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Radon concentrations in the room were also estimated by a simple mass balance equation and exhalation rates calculated from the measured values of (226)Ra concentrations and the material properties. The results showed that the radon concentration in the room ventilated adequately (0.5 h(-1)) will be lower than 100 Bq m(-3), value recommended as a reference level by the World Health Organization. PMID:21729819

  8. Evaluation of High Level Environmental Background Radiation Areas and its Variation in Ramsar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyeb Allahverdi Pourfallah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation from natural sources is a continuing and inescapable feature of life on earth. For most individuals, this exposure exceeds that from all man-made sources combined. Materials and Methods In this study, the annual effective dose in high level environmental background radiation areas (HLEBRAs of northern city of Ramsar in Iran was determined. For dosimetry, a gamma radiation dosimeter was used. Measurements were performed in more than 90 points in five districts with HLEBR around and near hot springs. Results In some areas, the annual effective dose from outdoor external gamma radiation in HLEBRAs (30 mSv/y exceeded the annual effective dose limit for radiation workers. Our results are evident that the population dose from normal background radiation in HLEBRAs is 200 times higher than corresponding values in Ramsar sea shore. To estimate the cosmic ray contribution, dose measurements were performed on the sea surface one km off the sea shore. Conclusion The observed differences over locations and measured doses between this study and the others revealed the dynamic nature of this phenomenon, and necessitate performing the periodic studies in these areas. Moreover, cytogenetic and immunologic researches for studying the long term effects of these high level environmental radiations on the residents of these HLEBRAs are necessary.

  9. Neutron equivalent dose rates at the surroundings of the electron linear accelerator operated by the university of Sao Paulo - Physics institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the determination of the neutron dose rates at the surroundings of an electron linear accelerators it is necessary the knowledge of the neutron spectrum or its mean energy, because the conversion factor of the flux in equivalent dose rates, is strongly dependent on the neutron energy. Taking this fact into consideration, equivalent dose rates were determined in the three representative sites of the IF/USP Linear Electron Accelerator. Also, due to the radiation field be pulsed, a theoretical and experimental study has been realized to evaluate the effect produced by the variation of the field on the detector. (author)

  10. Modeling the variations of Dose Rate measured by RAD during the first MSL Martian year: 2012-2014

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jingnan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Rafkin, Scot; Hassler, Donald M; Posner, Arik; Heber, Bernd; Koehler, Jan; Ehresmann, Bent; Appel, Jan K; Boehm, Eckart; Boettcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Soenke; Brinza, David E; Lohf, Henning; Martin, Cesar; Kahanpaeae, H; Reitz, Guenther

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the {energy spectra} of both energetic charged and neutral particles along with the radiation dose rate at the surface of Mars. With these first-ever measurements on the Martian surface, RAD observed several effects influencing the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) induced surface radiation dose concurrently: [a] short-term diurnal variations of the Martian atmospheric pressure caused by daily thermal tides, [b] long-term seasonal pressure changes in the Martian atmosphere, and [c] the modulation of the primary GCR flux by the heliospheric magnetic field, which correlates with long-term solar activity and the rotation of the Sun. The RAD surface dose measurements, along with the surface pressure data and the solar modulation factor, are analysed and fitted to empirical models which quantitatively demonstrate} how the long-term influences ([b] and [c]) are related to the measured dose rates. {Correspondingly we ...

  11. Dose rate mapping and quantitative analysis of radioactive deposition with simple monitoring instruments in Finland after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews the Finnish dose-rate mapping equipment and the system to process the obtained results, which were used immediately after the 1986 Chernobyl accident. We present the results of the external gamma-radiation monitoring carried out with simple civil-defence gamma monitoring instruments and compare them with the subsequent deposition mapping performed with research-grade instruments. The analysis shows that the quality of radiation mapping is good enough for decision makers to direct protective measures to the right areas. This review also demonstrates that a simple stationary external gamma radiation monitoring network can be effectively used for early warning in radiation emergency situations. (orig.)

  12. Dose rate mapping and quantitative analysis of radioactive deposition with simple monitoring instruments in Finland after the Chernobyl accident.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivukoski, J. [Ministry of the Interior, Rescue Dept., Helsinki (Finland); Paatero, J. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland)], E-mail: janne.koivukoski@intermin.fi

    2013-03-01

    This article reviews the Finnish dose-rate mapping equipment and the system to process the obtained results, which were used immediately after the 1986 Chernobyl accident. We present the results of the external gamma-radiation monitoring carried out with simple civil-defence gamma monitoring instruments and compare them with the subsequent deposition mapping performed with research-grade instruments. The analysis shows that the quality of radiation mapping is good enough for decision makers to direct protective measures to the right areas. This review also demonstrates that a simple stationary external gamma radiation monitoring network can be effectively used for early warning in radiation emergency situations. (orig.)

  13. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  14. Radial HI Profiles at the Periphery of Galactic Disks: The Role of Ionizing Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Abramova, O V

    2012-01-01

    Observations of neutral hydrogen in spiral galaxies reveal a sharp cutoff in the radial density profile at some distance from the center. Using 22 galaxies with known HI distributions as an example, we discuss the question of whether this effect can be associated exclusively with external ionizing radiation, as is commonly assumed. We show that before the surface density reaches $\\sigma_{\\textrm{HI}}\\le 0.5 {\\cal M}_\\odot/{\\textrm {pc}}^2$(the same for galaxies of different types), it is hard to expect the gas to be fully ionized by background radiation. For two of 13 galaxies with a sharp drop in the HI profile, the "steepening" can actually be caused by ionization. At the same time, for the remaining galaxies, the observed cutoff in the radial HI profile is closer to the center than if it was a consequence of ionization by background radiation and, therefore, it should be caused by other factors.

  15. Monte Carlo dosimetric study of the medium dose rate CSM40 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 137Cs medium dose rate (MDR) CSM40 source model (Eckert and Ziegler BEBIG, Germany) is in clinical use but no dosimetric dataset has been published. This study aims to obtain dosimetric data for the CSM40 source for its use in clinical practice as required by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Penelope2008 and Geant4 Monte Carlo codes were used to characterize this source dosimetrically. It was located in an unbounded water phantom with composition and mass density as recommended by AAPM and ESTRO. Due to the low photon energies of 137Cs, absorbed dose was approximated by collisional kerma. Additional simulations were performed to obtain the air-kerma strength, sK. Mass–energy absorption coefficients in water and air were consistently derived and used to calculate collisional kerma. Results performed with both radiation transport codes showed agreement typically within 0.05%. Dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function are provided for the CSM40 and compared with published data for other commercially available 137Cs sources. An uncertainty analysis has been performed. The data provided by this study can be used as input data and verification in the treatment planning systems. - Highlights: • A dosimetric dataset is obtained for the 137Cs medium dose rate CSM40 source model. • Along-away table and TG-43 formalism parameters and functions are derived as recommended by AAPM-ESTRO. • This can be used as input data and verification in the treatment planning systems used in clinical practice

  16. Determination of uncertainties in the calculation of dose rates at transport and storage casks; Unsicherheiten bei der Berechnung von Dosisleistungen an Transport- und Lagerbehaeltern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schloemer, Luc Laurent Alexander

    2014-12-17

    The compliance with the dose rate limits for transport and storage casks (TLB) for spent nuclear fuel from pressurised water reactors can be proved by calculation. This includes the determination of the radioactive sources and the shielding-capability of the cask. In this thesis the entire computational chain, which extends from the determination of the source terms to the final Monte-Carlo-transport-calculation is analysed and the arising uncertainties are quantified not only by benchmarks but also by variational calculi. The background of these analyses is that the comparison with measured dose rates at different TLBs shows an overestimation by the values calculated. Regarding the studies performed, the overestimation can be mainly explained by the detector characteristics for the measurement of the neutron dose rate and additionally in case of the gamma dose rates by the energy group structure, which the calculation is based on. It turns out that the consideration of the uncertainties occurring along the computational chain can lead to even greater overestimation. Concerning the dose rate calculation at cask loadings with spent uranium fuel assemblies an uncertainty of (({sup +21}{sub -28}) ±2) % (rel.) for the total gamma dose rate and of ({sup +28±23}{sub -55±4}) % (rel.) for the total neutron dose rate are estimated. For mixed-loadings with spent uranium and MOX fuel assemblies an uncertainty of ({sup +24±3}{sub -27±2}) % (rel.) for the total gamma dose rate and of ({sup +28±23}{sub -55±4}) % (rel.) for the total neutron dose rate are quantified. The results show that the computational chain has not to be modified, because the calculations performed lead to conservative dose rate predictions, even if high uncertainties at neutron dose rate measurements arise. Thus at first the uncertainties of the neutron dose rate measurement have to be decreased to enable a reduction of the overestimation of the calculated dose rate afterwards. In the present thesis

  17. The 1999 Lauriston S. Taylor lecture--back to background: natural radiation and radioactivity exposed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, N H

    2000-08-01

    I am profoundly grateful for being chosen as the twenty-third presenter of the Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture, and I share this honor with a list of distinguished scientists, including my husband, who pay tribute to the premier leader in radiation protection. In 1938, Laurie was working for the National Bureau of Standards and chaired the Advisory Committee on X-ray and Radium Protection, a group of 8 persons, who set the pace for all forthcoming radiation standards. NBS had, since 1913, been standardizing essentially all of the radium offered for sale in the U.S., and the problem arose to revise the handbook on proper conditions for handling radium based on the then current knowledge. This resulted in Handbook 23 (1938) superseding the 1934 work. At the time Laurie was a scientist working in the measurements side of radiation and though he contributed much to that field, his name is inseparably linked with guidance in radiation protection. Today we pay tribute for his leadership that he carried out with intelligence, grace, and personal warmth. My talk today deals mostly with measured data for naturally occurring internal radiation emitters and how these data can be used for predictive purposes in estimating the dose and risk from internal body contamination. This stresses the "and Measurements" part of the Council's title. The topic of this year's NCRP Annual Meeting is "Radiation Protection in Medicine: Contemporary Issues." I believe that physicians and State and Federal agencies will have to cope with complaints following various exposure situations resulting from the cleanup of background radionuclides during closure at nuclear facilities, military use of radioactivity, and occurrences of high natural background in some locations. They will find comfort in the knowledge that existing background radiation data can be the basis for predictions of realistic dose and risk in most situations. PMID:10910381

  18. Radiation-Hydrodynamical Collapse of Pregalactic Clouds in the Ultraviolet Background

    CERN Document Server

    Kitayama, T; Umemura, M; Susa, H; Ikeuchi, S

    2000-01-01

    To elucidate the effects of the UV background radiation on the collapse of pregalactic clouds, we implement a radiation-hydrodynamical calculation, combining one-dimensional spherical hydrodynamics with an accurate treatment of the radiative transfer of ionizing photons. Both absorption and scattering of UV photons are explicitly taken into account. It turns out that a gas cloud contracting within the dark matter potential does not settle into hydrostatic equilibrium, but undergoes run-away collapse even under the presence of the external UV field. The cloud center is shown to become self-shielded against ionizing photons by radiative transfer effects before shrinking to the rotation barrier. Based on our simulation results, we further discuss the possibility of H2 cooling and subsequent star formation in a run-away collapsing core. The present results are closely relevant to the survival of subgalactic Population III objects as well as to metal injection into intergalactic space.

  19. Profiles of comprehensive dose to population in the high background radiation area in Chhattrapur, Odisha, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the profiles of radiation dose due to natural radioactivity to the populations inhabiting in the High Background Radiation Area (HBRA) of the monazite bearing region in Odisha has been carried out by radiation monitoring of twenty four villages in this region. Comprehensive effective dose was computed taking all the path routes of exposure into consideration; the average effective dose was 4.7±1.0 mSv/y which ranged between 1.4±0.2-6.3±1.3 mSv/y. The contributions of terrestrial radiation, inhalation of radon, thoron progenies and ingestion of food and water to the total dose was 51%, 28% and 13%, respectively. (author)

  20. The relation of the dose distributions with the dose rates in static intensity modulated radiotherapy using Varian's linear accelarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the dose distributions with different dose rates, and approach a reference to the dose rate for radiation. Methods: Three classic static intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans of prostate cancer, lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma were chosen for the study. For each plan, the dose verification of three different dose rates (100, 300 and 600 MU/min) was performed with the Varian 600CD linear accelerator by using the 2-DICA of I'mRT Matrixx. With the Pinncale planning system, each segment was used as a beam to form another IMRT plan. The OmniPro-I'mRT V1.6 was applied to compare the segments in the two IMRT plans, and then the actual weights were obtained. The simulated plans at different dose rate were designed when setting the weights back into the planning system. Results: With the increase of dose rate, the passing ratio of the verification decreased and the Dmax, Dmin, Dmean and D95 of the planning tumor volume increased. The high dose area expanded significantly in target regions, and the 95% isodose line extended. At the dose rate of 600 MU/min, The D95 of GTVnd in nasopharyngeal carcinoma increased by 5.33% than the original plan with the V110 up to 19. 38%. The irradiation dose of the organs at risk (OARs) increased. For the case of lymphoma, the V20 of the lungs in the original plan and the three simulated plans were 31.77%, 32. 11%, 32.60% and 33.26%, respectively. For the case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, the V30 of the right parotid were 48.75%, 49. 56%, 51.65% and 53.91%, respectively. Conclusions: With the increase of dose rate in static IMRT , the actual dose distribution deviates the original plan , and the high dose area and the OARs dose increases. The higher dose rate is suboptimal when the dose of the OARs is proximate to the tolerance limit. (authors)

  1. A review of the studies on the high background radiation areas of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important places among the well documented high background radiation areas (HBRA) of the world inhabited by sizable populations are : Guarapari (Brazil), Yangjiang (China), Chavara and Manavalakkurichy (India), and Ramsar (Iran). While the source of the high background radiation is monazite deposits in the first three cases, radium in soil/water and radon in air are the sources of high background radiation in Ramsar. In India, there are quite a few monazite placer deposits along its long coastal line: Ullal (Karnataka), Chavara (Kerala), Manavalakkurichy and Kalpakkam (Tamilnadu), and Chatrapur (Orissa). During the last three decades many investigations have been carried out in these areas covering various aspects such as radiation dosimetry, biological effects, ecological effects, epidemiology etc. Reports, often vague and inconclusive, continue to appear in literature on topics like genetic effects, cancer risk, hormesis, radon dose estimates etc. A summary of all the important results reported so far, as well as some thoughts on possible future programmes in these areas are presented. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  2. Spatial and depth wise characterization of radionuclides and minerals in various beach sediments from high background radiation area, Kerala, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity concentrations (238U, 232Th and 40K) and mineralogical characterization of different layer (upper surface, first, second and third feet) Kerala beach sediments have been assessed with an aim of evaluating the radioactivity content profile, its relation to specific minerals and their distributions (spatial and depth wise). The eight different radiological indices are calculated for all samples and compared with either recommended values or the world average values of radioactivity content of the three primordial radionuclides to assess the complete radiological profile of the sediments. The radioactivity study suggests that the average specific activities of radionuclides (238U and 232Th) are higher than the world average values as given in UNSCEAR reports and all radiological parameters in all layer samples are more than the recommended safety levels. These results are on the expected lines since the samples are from a well-known high background radiation area. Using FTIR, mineralogical characteristics of the sediments were analyzed and the extinction coefficient is calculated to find the relative distribution of major minerals. The calculated values show that the amount of major minerals decreases in the order of quartz>calcite>kaolinite>microcline feldspar in all layers. To confirm the results obtained from FTIR, XRD analysis was also carried out. The observations made through the XRD technique are matched with FTIR observations. Statistical analyses (cluster and factor analysis) are carried out to assess the relation between the radionuclides and minerals, and also assess their distribution patterns in different layers. The analyses suggest that the concentration of 40K may have a strong association with the light mineral calcite and also suggest that spatial distributions of 40K and calcite are almost similar in every layer. The concentrations of 238U, 232Th and absorbed dose rate are evenly distributed (spatial) and other variables are randomly

  3. Radionuclides and Radiation Indices of High Background Radiation Area in Chavara-Neendakara Placer Deposits (Kerala, India)

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Thomas Derin; Perumal Vijayagopal; Balasubramaniam Venkatraman; Ramesh Chandra Chaubey; Anilkumar Gopinathan

    2012-01-01

    The present paper describes a detailed study on the distribution of radionuclides along Chavara - Neendakara placer deposit, a high background radiation area (HBRA) along the Southwest coast of India (Kerala). Judged from our studies using HPGe gamma spectrometric detector, it becomes evident that Uranium ((238)U), Thorium ((232)Th) and Potassium ((40)K) are the major sources for radioactivity prevailing in the area. Our statistical analyses reveal the existence of a high positive correlation...

  4. On the population of primordial star clusters in the presence of UV background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    MacIntyre, M A; Thomas, P A; Intyre, Michael A. Mac; Santoro, Fernando; Thomas, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    We use the algorithm of Cole et al. (2000) to generate merger trees for the first star clusters in a Lambda CDM cosmology under an isotropic UV background radiation field, parametrized by J_21. We have investigated the problem in two ways: a global radiation background and local radiative feedback surrounding the first star clusters. Cooling in the first halos at high redshift is dominated by molecular hydrogen, H_2 - we call these Generation 1 objects. At lower redshift and higher virial temperature, T_vir > 10^4K, electron cooling dominates - we call these generation 2. Radiation fields act to photo-dissociate H_2, but also generate free electrons that can help to catalyse its production. At modest radiation levels, J_{21}/(1+z)^3 ~ 10^{-12}-10^{-7}, the nett effect is to enhance the formation of Generation 1 star-clusters. At higher fluxes the heating from photo-ionisation dominates and halts their production. With a realistic build-up of flux over time, the period of enhanced H_2 cooling is so fleeting as...

  5. Late effects of chronic low dose-rate γ-rays irradiation on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate late biological effects of chronic low dose-rate radiation, the life-span and pathological changes were evaluated in mice which had been continuously irradiated with gamma-rays for 400 days. Two hundred (100 male and 100 female) specific-pathogen-free (SPF) B6C3F1 mice at six weeks of age were purchased every month. After a 2-week quarantine, they were divided into 4 groups (1 unirradiated control and 3 irradiated). Irradiation was performed using 137Cs gamma-rays at dose-rates of 20 mGy/day, 1 mGy/day and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8000 mGy, 400 mGy and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until they died a natural death. Results of the monthly microbiological examinations confirmed that the mice were maintained under SPF-conditions throughout the experimental period. A total of 4000 mice have been admitted into the experiment since it started in February 1996, all of which have received their predetermined doses and have been transferred to the animal room. Data on the 20 mGy/day group of both sexes suggested a shortened life span. The most common lethal neoplasms in pooled data of unirradiated control and irradiated male mice in order of frequency were neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, liver, and lung. In female mice, neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, soft tissue, and endocrine system were common. (author)

  6. OER of californium-252 at low dose rate for growth inhibition in Vicia faba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OER of 252Cf, at low dose rate, has been determined for growth inhibition in Vicia faba roots. A new strain ''BelB'' was used; it was found to be more resistant to prolonged anoxia. Two sets of linear 252Cf sources were used (linear activity 0.31 and 0.47 (μg.cm-1)) in somewhat different geometrical arrangements. The (n+γ) 252Cf dose rates at the level of the root tips were 0.11 and 0.13 Gy.h-1 respectively. The relative contribution of the γ component Dsub(γ) to the total absorbed dose Dsub(n+γ) at the level of the root tips was evaluated Dsub(γ)/Dsub(n+γ)=0.35 for the first source-geometry and 0.42 for the second source-geometry. The reference radiation was the γ emission of 192Ir, used in the same geometrical conditions and for similar irradiation times. Irradiations performed in aerobic and anoxic conditions were alternated. OER values of 1.4 +- 0.1 and 1.5 +- 0.1 were observed for the 252Cf emission with the first and second source-geometry respectively. The corresponding OER values for 192Ir were 2.3 +- 0.2 and 2.6 +- 0.1; the derived oxygen gain factors were then equal to 1.6 and 1.7 repectively

  7. Calculation method for gamma-dose rates from spherical puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lagrangian puff-models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of atmospheric releases. Basic output from such models are concentrations of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for points far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using the volume integral requires significant computer time. The volume integral for the gamma dose could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor due to the fact that the same correction factors are used for all isotopes. The authors describe a more elaborate correction method. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma-dose rate as a function of the puff dispersion parameter (δp) and the distance from the puff centre for four energy groups. The release of energy for each radionuclide in each energy group has been calculated and tabulated. Based on these tables and a suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses takes very short time and is almost independent of the number of radionuclides. (au) (7 tabs., 7 ills., 12 refs.)

  8. Probing the Light Speed Anisotropy with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A L; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the angular fluctuations in the speed of light with respect to the apex of the dipole of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation using the experimental data obtained with GRAAL facility, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The measurements were based on the stability of the Compton edge of laser photons scattered on the 6 GeV monochromatic electron beam. The results enable to obtain a conservative constraint on the anisotropy in the light speed variations \\Delta c(\\theta)/c < 3 10^{-12}, i.e. with higher precision than from previous experiments.

  9. Rydberg atom detection of the temporal coherence of cosmic microwave background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tscherbul, Timur V

    2013-01-01

    Rydberg atoms immersed in cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherence effects on timescales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix, and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence intensities of the Rydberg atoms. A measurable fluorescence signal can be obtained with a cold trapped ensemble of 1e8 Rydberg atoms subject to 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB), allowing for novel insights into previously unexamined quantum coherence properties of CMB.

  10. Photon and neutron dose evaluation in experimental hall of Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation measurement in Indus-1 experimental hall and Control Room area was performed for evaluating the photon and neutron dose rates during various operating conditions. The measurements were carried out using VICTOREEN 451 P and LUDLUM Model 2363 survey meter for photon and neutron dose rate measurement respectively. From the measurements, it was seen that during Indus-1 injection, maximum photon dose rate of 410 μSv/h and maximum neutron dose rate of 15.9 μSv/h was observed at one of the hot spots (front of pre-mirror, Beam Line-1). At experimental station of the beam lines, the neutron dose rates observed were in the range 1.0 - 3.4 μSv/h whereas the photon dose rates were up to 0.9 μSv/h. During Indus-1 storage condition, the radiation levels were near background levels except at one of the hot spots (pre-mirror, BL-4) where photon and neutron dose rates observed were 6.3 μSv/h and 45.1 μSv/h respectively. During Indus-2 injection neutron dose rates ranging from background to 3.3 μSv/h were observed in the sitting area at experimental station whereas photon dose rate was noticed up to 0.4 μSv/h. For the control room area, neutron dose rates up to a maximum of 3 μSv/h were observed during Indus-1 injection only. During other operation modes, dose rates in control room are of background level. Details of the measurements and results are presented in the paper. (author)

  11. Modelling the dynamics of ambient dose rates induced by radiocaesium in the Fukushima terrestrial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Marc-André; Mourlon, Christophe; Calmon, Philippe; Manach, Erwan; Debayle, Christophe; Baccou, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Since the Fukushima accident, Japanese scientists have been intensively monitoring ambient radiations in the highly contaminated territories situated within 80 km of the nuclear site. The surveys that were conducted through mainly carborne, airborne and in situ gamma-ray measurement devices, enabled to efficiently characterize the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of air dose rates induced by Caesium-134 and Caesium-137 in the terrestrial systems. These measurements revealed that radiation levels decreased at rates greater than expected from physical decay in 2011-2012 (up to a factor of 2), and dependent on the type of environment (i.e. urban, agricultural or forest). Unlike carborne measurements that may have been strongly influenced by the depuration of road surfaces, no obvious reason can be invoked for airborne measurements, especially above forests that are known to efficiently retain and recycle radiocaesium. The purpose of our research project is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the data acquired by Japanese, and identify the environmental mechanisms or factors that may explain such decays. The methodology relies on the use of a process-based and spatially-distributed dynamic model that predicts radiocaesium transfer and associated air dose rates inside/above a terrestrial environment (e.g., forests, croplands, meadows, bare soils and urban areas). Despite the lack of site-specific data, our numerical study predicts decrease rates that are globally consistent with both aerial and in situ observations. The simulation at a flying altitude of 200 m indicated that ambient radiation levels decreased over the first 12 months by about 45% over dense urban areas, 15% above evergreen coniferous forests and between 2 and 12% above agricultural lands, owing to environmental processes that are identified and discussed. In particular, we demonstrate that the decrease over evergreen coniferous regions might be due the combined effects of canopy

  12. Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  13. Are the inhabitants of high background radiation areas of Ramsar more radioresistant? scope of the problem and the need for future studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background/objective: Ramsar in northern Iran is among the world's well-known areas with highest levels of natural radiation. Annual exposure levels in areas with elevated levels of natural radiation in Ramsar are up to 260 mGy y-1 and average exposure rates are about 10 mGy y-1 for a population of about 2000 residents. Due to the local geological features, which include high levels of radium in rocks, soils, and groundwater, Ramsar residents are also exposed to high levels of alpha activity in the form of ingested radium and radium decay progeny as well as very high radon levels (over 1000 MBq m-3) in their dwellings. In some cases, the inhabitants of these areas receive doses much higher than the current ICRP-60 dose limit of 20 mSv y-1 set for radiation workers. The extraordinary levels of natural radiation in Ramsar prompted us to assess the radiation susceptibility of the residents. Material and methods: venous blood samples were taken from 7 healthy blood donors of both sexes who lived in some areas of Ramsar with highest levels of natural radiation(dose rates were up to 155μ Sv h-1) and 5 healthy persons from a nearby control area. Standard condition for cell cultivation, irradiation and analysis of chromosome aberrations was used. The cells were exposed to the challenge dose of 1.5 Gy of Co-60 gamma ray 48 hours after PHA stimulation. Using mean chromosomal aberration per cell, the expected numbers of aberrations were calculated. Results: Lymphocytes of Ramsar residents when subjected to 1.5 Gy of Gamma rays, showed fewer chromosome aberrations compared to residents in a nearby control area. These findings clearly show that high levels of natural radiation may induce radio adaptive response. Interestingly. Conclusion: this radio adaptation phenomenon was found in individuals who received doses as much as a few hundred times more than the inhabitants of a nearby control area. More research is needed to precisely clarify if it is possible to relax the

  14. Probing reionization with the cross power spectrum of 21 cm and near-infrared radiation backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Xiao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The cross-correlation between the 21 cm emission from the high-redshift intergalactic medium and the near-infrared (NIR) background light from the high-redshift galaxies promises to be a powerful probe of cosmic reionization. In this paper, we investigate the cross power spectrum during the epoch of reionization. We employ an improved halo approach to derive the distribution of the density field and consider two stellar populations in the star formation model: metal-free stars and metal-poor stars. The reionization history is further generated to be consistent with the electron-scattering optical depth from cosmic microwave background measurements. Then the intensity of NIR background is estimated by collecting emission from stars in the first-light galaxies. On large scales, we find the 21 cm and NIR radiation backgrounds are positively correlated during the very early stages of reionization. However, these two radiation backgrounds quickly become anti-correlated as reionization proceeds. The maximum absolut...

  15. Influence of Relative Humidity, Dose Rate and Dose Fractionation on Gamma Dose Response of Glycine Dosimetric System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh H. Shinde

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Glycine dosimeter based on spectrophotometric read-out method has great potential for gamma dosimetry in low dose applications of radiation processing. However, external factors such as relative humidity, dose rate, and dose fractionation, may have a profound effect on its gamma dose response Influence of these factors on the gamma dose response of glycine dosimeter was studied in the present work.

  16. Biological consequences of increased natural radiation background for Microtus oeconomus Pall. populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudyasheva, Alevtina G. [Radioecology Department, Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 28 Kommunisticheskaya ul., Syktyvkar 167982, Komi Republic (Russian Federation); Shishkina, Ludmila N. [Emanuel Institute of Biochemical Physics RAS, Kosygina 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Shevchenko, Oksana G. [Radioecology Department, Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 28 Kommunisticheskaya ul., Syktyvkar 167982, Komi Republic (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shevchenko@ib.komisc.ru; Bashlykova, Ludmila A.; Zagorskaya, Nadezhda G. [Radioecology Department, Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 28 Kommunisticheskaya ul., Syktyvkar 167982, Komi Republic (Russian Federation)

    2007-09-15

    The results of long-term investigations (1981-1999) on the state of Microtus oeconomus Pall. (tundra vole) population, living under the increased natural radiation background for a long time (for more than 100 generations), are presented. Population density dynamics, morphophysiological parameters, state of the lipid peroxidation regulatory system in different tissues and the cytogenetic effects in bone marrow cells of animals have been analyzed. It is shown that tundra voles from the studied radioactively contaminated areas differ from those on natural radiation background area for the parameters measured. The results of this long-term investigation show that qualitatively new sub-populations of tundra vole on these areas have evolved, which are able to survive in radioactively contaminated environment.

  17. Modeling Low-Dose-Rate Effects in Irradiated Bipolar-Base Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirba, C.R.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Graves, R.J.; Michez, A.; Milanowski, R.J.; Saigne, F.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Witczak, S.C.

    1998-10-26

    A physical model is developed to quantify the contribution of oxide-trapped charge to enhanced low-dose-rate gain degradation in bipolar junction transistors. Multiple-trapping simulations show that space charge limited transport is partially responsible for low-dose-rate enhancement. At low dose rates, more holes are trapped near the silicon-oxide interface than at high dose rates, resulting in larger midgap voltage shifts at lower dose rates. The additional trapped charge near the interface may cause an exponential increase in excess base current, and a resultant decrease in current gain for some NPN bipolar technologies.

  18. On the Light Speed Anisotropy vs Cosmic Microwave Background Dipole: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Guidal, M; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kouznetsov, V; Kunne, Ronald Alexander; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of the Compton edge of the scattered electrons in GRAAL facility in European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole reveals up to 10 sigma variations larger than the statistical errors. We now show that the variations are not due to the frequency variations of the accelerator. The nature of Compton edge variations remains unclear, thus outlining the imperative of dedicated studies of light speed anisotropy.

  19. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an effect apparently overlooked as yet. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this pol...

  20. Physics and quality assurance of low dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this course is to review the physical principles underlying design, clinical application and execution of interstitial and intracavitary implants in the classical low dose-rate (LDR) range. This year, the course will focus on quality assurance of sources, applicators and treatment planning software. In addition, development of procedures and QA checks designed optimize treatment delivery accuracy and patient safety during each individual procedure will be reviewed. The level of presentation will be designed to accommodate both physicists and physicians. Implementation of recently published AAPM Task Group reports (no. 40, 'Comprehensive Quality Assurance' and No. 43, 'Dosimetry of Interstitial Brachytherapy Sources') will be reviewed. Outline: (A) General Principles (1) QA endpoints: temporal accuracy, positional accuracy, dose delivery accuracy, and safety of the patient, personnel, and the institution (2) QA procedure development: forms, checklists, test development and design of treatment delivery procedures (B) QA of treatment delivery devices (1) Source acceptance testing and QA a) calibration and source strength specification standards b) leakage tests and source geometry verification (2) Applicator acceptance testing and QA (3) Remote afterloading devices (4) Treatment planning systems a) graphic input/output devices, implant geometry reconstruction, and graphical display b) dose calculation accuracy i) review of brachytherapy dose calculation algorithms ii) dosimetric benchmarks available: Task Group 43 report (C) Procedure-specific QA 1) Organization of treatment delivery team 2) Preplanning and preparation 3) Applicator insertion 4) Radiographic examination of the implant, prescription, and treatment calculation 5) Source insertion 6) Treatment planning and physicist review of treatment plans 7) QA during patient treatment and removal of sources and applicators

  1. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  2. Growth retardation of paramecium and mouse cells by shielding them from background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1970s and 1980s, Planel et al. reported that the growth of paramecia was decreased by shielding them from background radiation. In the 1990s, Takizawa et al. found that mouse cells displayed a decreased growth rate under shielded conditions. The purpose of the present study was to confirm that growth is impaired in organisms that have been shielded from background radiation. Radioprotection was produced with a shielding chamber surrounded by a 15 cm thick iron wall and a 10 cm thick paraffin wall that reduced the γ ray and neutron levels in the chamber to 2% and 25% of the background levels, respectively. Although the growth of Paramecium tetraurelia was not impaired by short-term radioprotection (around 10 days), which disagreed with the findings of Planel et al., decreased growth was observed after long-term (40-50 days) radiation shielding. When mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells were incubated inside or outside of the shielding chamber for 7 days, the number of cells present on the 6th and 7th days under the shielding conditions was significantly lower than that present under the non-shielding conditions. These inhibitory effects on cell growth were abrogated by the addition of a 137Cs γ-ray source disk to the chamber. Furthermore, no growth retardation was observed in XRCC4-deficient mouse M10 cells, which display impaired DNA double strand break repair. (author)

  3. Radiation Backgrounds at Cosmic Dawn: X-Rays from Compact Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Madau, Piero

    2016-01-01

    We compute the expected X-ray diffuse background and radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium (IGM) from X-ray binaries prior and during the epoch of reionization. The cosmic evolution of compact binaries is followed using a population synthesis technique that treats separately neutron stars and black hole binaries in different spectral states and is calibrated to reproduce the observed X-ray properties of galaxies at z6. Radiative transfer effects modulate the background spectrum, which shows a characteristic peak between 1 and 2 keV. While the filtering of X-ray radiation through the IGM slightly increases the mean excess energy per photoionization, it also weakens the radiation intensity below 1 keV, lowering the mean photoionization and heating rates. Numerical integration of the rate and energy equations shows that the contribution of X-ray binaries to the ionization of the bulk IGM is negligible, with the electron fraction never exceeding 1%. Direct HeI photoionizations are the main source of IGM ...

  4. The different biological effects of single, fractionated and continuous low dose rate irradiation on CL187 colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the biological effectiveness of single, fractionated and continuous low dose rate irradiation on the human colorectal cancer cell line CL187 in vitro and explore the cellular mechanisms. The CL187 cells were exposed to radiation of 6 MV X-ray at a high dose rate of 4Gy/min and 125I seed at a low dose rate of 2.77 cGy/h. Three groups were employed: single dose radiation group (SDR), fractionated dose radiation group (FDR) by 2Gy/f and continuous low dose rate radiation group (CLDR). Four radiation doses 2, 4, 6 and 8Gy were chosen and cells without irradiation as the control. The responses of CL187 cells to distinct modes of radiation were evaluated by the colony-forming assay, cell cycle progression as well as apoptosis analysis. In addition, we detected the expression patterns of DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and Ku80 by Western blotting. The relative biological effect for 125I seeds compared with 6 MV X-ray was 1.42. 48 hrs after 4Gy irradiation, the difference between proportions of cells at G2/M phase of SDR and CLDR groups were statistically significant (p = 0.026), so as the FDR and CLDR groups (p = 0.005). 48 hrs after 4Gy irradiation, the early apoptotic rate of CLDR group was remarkably higher than SDR and FDR groups (CLDR vs. SDR, p = 0.001; CLDR vs. FDR, p = 0.02), whereas the late apoptotic rate of CLDR group increased significantly compared with SDR and FDR group (CLDR vs. SDR, p = 0.004; CLDR vs. FDR, p = 0.007). Moreover, DNA-PKcs and Ku70 expression levels in CLDR-treated cells decreased compared with SDR and FDR groups. Compared with the X-ray high dose rate irradiation, 125I seeds CLDR showed more effective induction of cell apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, 125I seeds CLDR could impair the DNA repair capability by down-regulating DNA-PKcs and Ku70 expression

  5. Commissioning of the electron line of the linac coherent light source dose rate measurements and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy) is the world's first hard X-ray Free Electron Laser machine. It uses high energy electrons delivered by a linac to create ultrafast and brilliant X-ray pulses that can be used as a 'high-speed' camera to obtain images of atoms and molecules. LCLS is a pioneer machine and, as such, its design has encountered unprecedented challenges, the solutions to which will benefit future facilities of its kind across the globe. This article describes the radiation protection aspects of LCLS electron beamlines. Special emphasis is put on the successful commissioning of the LCLS electron line, where, for all examined loss sources, the measured prompt and residual dose rates are in agreement with or below the values predicted through detailed Monte Carlo simulations, used earlier to design the shielding. (author)

  6. A gauge for measuring the dose rate and activity of ophthalmic applicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gauge is developed for determining the dose rate distribution and surface activity of ophthalmic brachytherapy applicators, particularly 106Ru applicators. A plastic Φ2x2 mm scintillator is used as the radiation detector, featuring a high pulse count rate, which results in a law 0.5% random error, due to good counting statistics. Automatic gain control of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) is achieved using a LED as the reference light source. The PMT operates in pulse mode. Long term gain variation due to fatigue of the PMT or ambient temperature variation is thus compensated for. The count rate error due to inaccurate setting of the high voltage supply of the PMT is 0.4%, and the instability error over 7 hours of continuous operation does not exceed 102%, peak-to-peak. (author)

  7. Background X-ray Radiation Fields Produced by Young Embedded Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred; Holden, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Most star formation in our galaxy occurs within embedded clusters, and these background environments can affect the star and planet formation processes occurring within them. In turn, young stellar members can shape the background environment and thereby provide a feedback mechanism. This work explores one aspect of stellar feedback by quantifying the background X-ray radiation fields produced by young stellar objects. Specifically, the distributions of X-ray luminosities and X-ray fluxes produced by cluster environments are constructed as a function of cluster membership size $N$. Composite flux distributions, for given distributions of cluster sizes $N$, are also constructed. The resulting distributions are wide and the X-ray radiation fields are moderately intense, with the expected flux levels exceeding the cosmic and galactic X-ray backgrounds by factors of $\\sim10-1000$ (for energies 0.2 -- 15 keV). For circumstellar disks that are geometrically thin and optically thick, the X-ray flux from the backgrou...

  8. Telomere length in human adults and high level natural background radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birajalaxmi Das

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomere length is considered as a biomarker of aging, stress, cancer. It has been associated with many chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Although, telomere shortening due to ionizing radiation has been reported in vitro, no in vivo data is available on natural background radiation and its effect on telomere length. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present investigation is an attempt to determine the telomere length among human adults residing in high level natural radiation areas (HLNRA and the adjacent normal level radiation areas (NLNRA of Kerala coast in Southwest India. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 310 individuals (HLNRA: N = 233 and NLNRA: N = 77. Telomere length was determined using real time q-PCR. Both telomere (T and single copy gene (S specific primers were used to calculate the relative T/S and expressed as the relative telomere length. The telomere length was determined to be 1.22+/-0.15, 1.12+/-0.15, 1.08+/-0.08, 1.12+/-0.11, respectively, among the four dose groups (5.00 mGy per year, which did not show any dose response. The results suggested that the high level natural chronic radiation did not have significant effect on telomere length among young adult population living in HLNRA, which is indicative of better repair of telomeric ends. No significant difference in telomere length was observed between male and female individuals. In the present investigation, although the determination of telomere length was studied among the adults with an age group between 18 to 40 years (mean maternal age: 26.10+/-4.49, a negative correlation was observed with respect to age. However, inter-individual variation was (0.81-1.68 was clearly observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this preliminary investigation, we conclude that elevated level of natural background radiation has no significant effect on telomere length among the adult population residing in HLNRAs of

  9. Implementation of microsource high dose rate (mHDR) brachytherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachytherapy using remote afterloading of a single high dose rate 192Ir microsource was developed in the 1970s. After its introduction to clinics, this system has spread rapidly among developed Member States and has become a highly desirable modality in cancer treatment. This technique is now gradually being introduced to the developing Member States. The 192Ir sources are produced with a high specific activity. This results in a high dose rate (HDR) to the tumour and shorter treatment times. The high specific activity simultaneously results in a much smaller source (so-called micro source, around I mm in diameter) which may be easily inserted into tissue through a thin delivery tube, the so-called interstitial treatment, as well as easily inserted into body cavities, the so-called intracavitary or endoluminal treatment. Another advantage is the ability to change dwell time (the time a source remains in one position) of the stepping source which allows dose distribution to match the target volume more closely. The purpose of this TECDOC is to advise radiation oncologists, medical physicists and hospital administrators in hospitals which are planning to introduce 192Ir microsource HDR (mHDR) remote afterloading systems. The document supplements IAEA-TECDOC-1040, Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects, and will facilitate implementation of this new brachytherapy technology, especially in developing countries. The operation of the system, 'how to use the system', is not within the scope of this document. This TECDOC is based on the recommendations of an Advisory Group meeting held in Vienna in April 1999

  10. Early effects comparison of X-rays delivered at high-dose-rate pulses by a plasma focus device and at low dose rate on human tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virelli, A; Zironi, I; Pasi, F; Ceccolini, E; Nano, R; Facoetti, A; Gavoçi, E; Fiore, M R; Rocchi, F; Mostacci, D; Cucchi, G; Castellani, G; Sumini, M; Orecchia, R

    2015-09-01

    A comparative study has been performed on the effects of high-dose-rate (DR) X-ray beams produced by a plasma focus device (PFMA-3), to exploit its potential medical applications (e.g. radiotherapy), and low-DR X-ray beams produced by a conventional source (XRT). Experiments have been performed at 0.5 and 2 Gy doses on a human glioblastoma cell line (T98G). Cell proliferation rate and potassium outward currents (IK) have been investigated by time lapse imaging and patch clamp recordings. The results showed that PFMA-3 irradiation has a greater capability to reduce the proliferation rate activity with respect to XRT, while it does not affect IK of T98G cells at any of the dose levels tested. XRT irradiation significantly reduces the mean IK amplitude of T98G cells only at 0.5 Gy. This work confirms that the DR, and therefore the source of radiation, is crucial for the planning and optimisation of radiotherapy applications.

  11. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm3 was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable reduction

  12. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  13. Anomalies in Natural Background Levels Associated with Minerals with Elevated Radionuclide Concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper, the results of terrestrial natural background measurements in seven Chinese provinces are discussed. They have been generated as part of a mapping system based on sampling grids of 4 and 16 km2 to provide geochemical data for uranium, thorium and potassium, and complemented by gamma dose rate measurements 1 m above the ground. Points of elevated dose rates were identified as being due to human activities involving minerals with elevated activity concentrations. The number of these instances, and thus the general level of background radiation, is increasing. The result of the analysis indicates that control of activities involving such minerals needs to be considered. (author)

  14. Research And Investigation To Establish The Database Of Environment Radiation Background For Vietnam (Phase 2009 -2011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setting up data base of natural radiation background serves for planning socio-economics development in a province as well as the whole country and estimating annual effective dose of population. Beside external irradiation dose caused by the natural radioisotopes in the series 238U, 232Th and 40K in soil, population has been received internal dose caused by the above radioisotopes taken in the body from several ways. In order to complete the database of national radiation background and go to estimate annual effective radiation dose of population in the whole country, this project focus to carry out the works as following: (i) Setting up database of radiation background in the whole country: 150 soil samples that collected in the districts of 46 provinces have been analyzed. The average activity concentration of 238U, 232Th and 40K are 37.86 Bq/kg, 58.88 Bq/kg and 462.78 Bq/kg, respectively. The outdoor, indoor and total annual effective doses are calculated: 0.087±0.036 mSv; 0.488±0.202 mSv and 0.576± 0.240 mSv, respectively. (ii) Setting up database of radiation background of province Ninh Thuan and Quang Nam: The detailed database of radiation background of all villages in Ninh Thuan and Quang Nam has been established. 84 soil samples in Ninh Thuan and 311 in Quang Nam were collected for analyze. The indoor and outdoor radon concentration at sampling positions has been measured. The average activities of 238U, 232Th, 40K, and 222Rn isotopes in Ninh Thuan are reported: 33.50 Bq/kg, 55.43 Bq/kg, 701.12 Bq/kg and 12.1 Bq/m3, 9.5 Bq/m3, respectively. The outdoor, indoor and total annual effective doses in Ninh Thuan are calculated: 0.095±0.029 mSv; 0.529±0.162 mSv and 0.624± 0.382 mSv, respectively. The average activities of 238U, 232Th, 40K, and 222Rn isotopes in Quang Nam are reported: 44.47 Bq/kg, 52.68 Bq/kg, 459.33 Bq/kg, 18.0 Bq/m3. The outdoor, indoor and total annual effective doses are calculated: 0.086±0.039 mSv; 0.482±0.216 mSv and 0.568± 0

  15. Levels of thoron and progeny in high background radiation area of southeastern coast of Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, R C; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Sagar, D V; Prasad, G; Shahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Omori, Y; Janik, M; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to radon, (222)Rn, is assumed to be the most significant source of natural radiation to human beings in most cases. It is thought that radon and its progeny are major factors that cause cancer. The presence of thoron, (220)Rn, was often neglected because it was considered that the quantity of thoron in the environment is less than that of radon. However, recent studies have shown that a high thoron concentration was found in some regions and the exposure to (220)Rn and its progeny can equal or several time exceed that of (220)Rn and its progeny. The results of thoron and its progeny measurements in the houses of high background radiation area (HBRA) of the southeastern coast of Odisha, India presented here. This area is one of the high background radiation areas in India with a large deposit of monazite sand which is the probable source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurement of thoron and its progeny in cement, brick and mud houses in the study area. Thoron concentration was measured using RAD-7 and Raduet. A CR-39 track detector was employed for the measurement of environmental thoron progeny, both in active and passive modes. Thoron and its progeny concentrations were found to be comparatively high in the area. A comparison between the results obtained with various techniques is presented in this paper.

  16. Determination of differential dose rates in a mixed beta and gamma field using shielded Al2O3:C : Results of Monte Carlo modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M.C.; Nathan, R.; Murray, A.S.;

    2003-01-01

    Mixed beta and gamma heterogeneous radiation fields are found in many circumstances, ranging from retrospective dosimetry to medical therapy treatments. It can be very important to provide a direct measurement of the contribution to dose rate from beta particles and gamma rays separately...... outline the results of our modelling of the most appropriate encapsulation for Al2O3: C luminescence dosimeters when used to measure the dose rate from natural radiation fields. We consider a configuration where one Al2O3: C chip of a pair is enclosed in a beta-thin light-tight package (which would allow...

  17. Chromosome aberrations and micronucleus in continuously irradiated mice for a low dose rate of {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Jun; Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Tanaka, Kimio; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Delayed chromosomal instability is developed by radiation after several cell divisions in cultured rodent and human cells. The genetic instability might be related to cancer development and it has been mainly found in cultured rodent and human cells irradiated at high dose rate. It has not been well studied whether the genetic instability is induced by prolonged irradiation with low dose rate in vivo or not. Mice irradiated with 20 mGy/day for 5-8 Gy were analyzed by FISH to estimate the chromosome aberration rate and micronucleus incidence in spleen and bone marrow cells. Spleen cells in mice exposed to 8 Gy have higher incidence of monosomy and trisomy than non-exposed mice. The number of cells with 2-4 micronuclei in 10,000 scored spleen cells is also higher in 5-8 Gy exposed mice. These numerical chromosome aberrations are not induced directly by radiation exposure. These results indicate that prolonged {sup 137}Cs {gamma} ray-irradiation with low dose rates of 20 mGy/day induces delayed chromosome instability in mice. (author)

  18. Natural background radiation induces cytogenetic radioadaptive response more effectively than occupational exposure in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsar, a city in the north part of Iran, has the highest level of natural background radiation in the world. We compared induction of cytogenetic radioadaptive response by High Natural Background Radiation (HNBR) in Ramsar and X-Ray occupational exposure as inducing doses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. 30 healthy control individuals, living in Ramsar but in ordinary background radiation areas (inducing dose = 0), 15 healthy individuals from Talesh Mahalleh, a region with extraordinary level of background radiation (max. inducing dose = 260 mGy/year) and 7 X-Ray radiographers working in Ramsar hospital located in normal natural background of ionising radiation (max. inducing dose = 20 mGy/year) were evaluated. Peripheral blood samples were prepared and exposed to challenge dose of 0 and 2 Gy. Lymphocytes were scored using analysis of metaphase, for the presence of chromosomal aberrations (simple deletion, dicentrics and rings). An adaptive response was observed in HNBR and radiation workers groups in comparison with sham controls. Also, compared with occupationally exposed group a significant marked increase in adaptive response was observed in HNBR group. These findings indicate that both natural background radiation and occupational exposure could induce cytogenetic radioadaptive response and it is more significant regarding to natural background ionising radiation. (author)

  19. Public exposure due to external gamma background radiation in boundary areas of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooya, S M Hosseini; Dashtipour, M R; Enferadi, A; Orouji, T

    2015-09-01

    A monitoring program in boundary areas of a country is an appropriate way to indicate the level of public exposure. In this research, gamma background radiation was measured using TL dosimeters at 12 boundary areas as well as in the capital city of Iran during the period 2010 to 2011. The measurements were carried out in semi-annual time intervals from January to June and July to December in each year. The maximum average dose equivalent value measured was approximately 70 μSv/month for Tehran city. Also, the average dose values obtained were less than 40 μSv/month for all the cities located at the sea level except that of high level natural radiation area of Ramsar, and more than 55 μSv/month for the higher elevation cities. The public exposure due to ambient gamma dose equivalent in Iran is within the levels reported by UNSCEAR. PMID:26057985

  20. Coherent dynamics of Rydberg atoms in cosmic-microwave-background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Rydberg atoms excited by cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherences on time scales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as slowly decaying (100 ps) quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence. An analytic model shows the dependence of the coherent dynamics on the energy splitting between atomic eigenstates, transition dipole moments, and coherence time of the radiation. Experimental detection of the fluorescence signal from a trapped ensemble of 108 Rydberg atoms is discussed, but shown to be technically challenging at present, requiring cosmic-microwave-background amplification somewhat beyond current practice.

  1. High dose rate 192Ir calibration: Indonesia experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indonesia with a population of more than 200 Million people which spread on about 5000 islands, up to now only has 23 radiotherapy centers and some not active anymore. As mention by Parkin et al that Cervix/Utery and breast cancer are the most estimated numbers of new cases of cancers in women for developing countries, stomach and lung cancers in men. Indonesia as a developing country is likely similar to other developing countries on numbers of new cases of cancers in women. But quite different in men, in Indonesia the most common cancers are nasopharynx and thyroid cancers. The use of lr-192 sources in high dose-rate (HDR) remotely afterloaded brachytherapy treatments have greatly increased in recent years and variety of such sources are commercially available. Nine radiotherapy centers in Indonesia installed Nucletron microSelectron HDR remote afterloader. Based on the data of CiptoMangunkusurno Hospital, Jakarta that the most common cancers are the cervix, breast, nasopharynx and thyroid cancers which of percentage are about 31%, 25 %, 13%, and 6 % respectively. It means that the use of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy has to be an effective tool in the treatments. Two methods have been studied and applied to calibrate HDR 192Ir brachytherapy in Indonesia, especially for Nucletron microSelectron HDR 192lr remote afterloader brachytherapy. Calibration of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source has been done by Cavity lonization Chamber and with Well Type lonization Chamber. First, 0.6 cc of NE Farmer type dosimeter that was calibrated to 60Co and 250 kV of x-rays in air kerma was used in this experiment. Position of measurement (detector and source) at the center of the room and about 1 meter from the floor. Eight variation of distances from 10 cm to 40 cms have been carried out measurement as recommended by IAEA-TECDOC-1079. Correction have been given for scatters, non-uniformity, and attenuation. To solve the problem of scatter correction factor was used Matlab programming. A

  2. Measurements of External Gamma Radiation in the Area of Low Natural Background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The automatic radiation monitoring in Slovenia incorporates measurements of external gamma radiation, aerosol radioactivity, radon progeny monitoring and radioactive deposition. At the moment, 44 gamma measuring probes are distributed uniformly over the territory of Slovenia, belonging to different institutions and integrated in a common network administered by the SNSA. External gamma radiation is measured by the system of probes with two GM tubes operating at different radiation ranges. The measuring stations used are mostly supplied by the Slovenian manufacturer AMES, type MFM-202 (in further text referred to as MFM), and partially by the Finish company RADOS Technology Oy, type ALNOR RD-02L (in further text referred to as ALNOR). These probes are normally installed within an undisturbed area (grassland), fixed at a standard height of 1 m above the ground and connected via radio or telephone to local data gathering stations. Within the scope of automatic monitoring, the data thus collected are also analyzed, used for alarming, archived and prepared for on-line presentation on the Internet. The difference between ALNOR and MFM probes is shown to be constant even in the condition of low natural background. If we take into account previous measurements which were made in order to check instrument calibrations, one can conclude that the difference is a linear shift that can be either added to the ALNOR results or subtracted from the MFM results. It is supposed to be due to inherent instrument radioactivity and electronic noise. One manufacturer (ALNOR) chose to subtract this instrument background from the measured results, the other one (MFM) did not. (author)

  3. Expression of Genes Associated with DNA Damage Sensing in Human Fibroblasts Exposed to Low-dose-rate Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Mehta, Satish; Hammond, Diane; Pierson, Duane; Jeevarajan, Antony; Cucinotta, Francis; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the molecular response to low-dose and low-dose-rate radiation exposure is essential for the extrapolation of high-dose radiation risks to those at dose levels relevant to space and other environmental concerns. Most of the reported studies of gene expressions induced by low-dose or low-dose-rate radiation were carried out on exponentially growing cells. In the present study, we analyzed expressions of 84 genes associated with DNA damage sensing using real time PCR in human fibroblasts in mostly G1 phase of the cell cycle. The cells were exposed continuously to gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.8 cGy/hr for 1, 2, 6 or 24 hrs at 37 C throughout the exposure. The total RNA was isolated immediately after the exposure was terminated. Of the 84 genes, only a few showed significant changes of the expression level. Some of the genes (e.g. DDit3 and BTG2) were found to be up or down regulated only after a short period of exposure, while other genes (e.g. PRKDC) displayed a highest expression level at the 24 hr time point. The expression profiles for the exposed cells which had a smaller portion of G1 cells indicated more cell cycle signaling and DNA repair genes either up or down regulated. Interestingly, the panel of genes changed from radiation exposure in G1 cells is different from the panel in cells having less G1 arrest cells. The gene expression profile of the cells responding to low-dose-radiation insult apparently depends on the cell growth stage. The response pathway in G1 cells may differ from that in exponentially growing cells.

  4. Natural background radiation and 137Cs inventories in southern Nevada. Preliminary report on fallout, December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External radiation measurements and soil sampling were performed at 28 sites in southern Nevada as part of an extensive radiological survey to determine residual levels of fission products and transuranic nuclides in Utah and Nevada as a result of nuclear weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during 1951 to 1958. The natural background exposure rate was found to vary by about a factor of two. The 137Cs inventories tended to be lower than expected indicating the effects of wind erosion. Cobalt-60 and 241Am were detected at several sites which were reported to be hotspots in post-shot radiological surveys

  5. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Constraints on a Modified Chaplygin Gas Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dao-Jun; LI Xin-Zhou

    2005-01-01

    @@ A modified Chaplygin gas model of unifying dark energy and dark matter with the exotic equation of state p = Bρ- A/ρα , which can also explain the recent expansion of the universe, is investigated by means of constraining the location of the peak of the cosmic microwave background radiation spectrum. We find that the result of CMBR measurements does not exclude the nonzero value of parameter B, but allows it in the range -0.35 (<~) B (<~) 0.025.

  6. Cosmological perturbations of quantum mechanical origin and anisotropy of the microwave background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Grishchuk, L P

    1994-01-01

    A theory of quantum-mechanical generation of cosmological perturbations is considered. The conclusion of this study is that if the large-angular-scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation is caused by the long-wavelength cosmological perturbations of quantum mechanical origin, they are, most likely, gravitational waves, rather than density perturbations or rotational perturbations. Some disagreements with previous publications are clarified. This contribution to the Proceedings is based on Reference~[34]. NOTE: To generate an output, please extract and save the file crckapb.sty which appear at the beginning of the main file.

  7. Biaxial lidar efficiency rising based on improving of spatial selectivity and stability against background radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agishev, R.R.; Bajazitov, R.A.; Galeyev, M.M. [Kazan State Technical Univ., Tatarstan (Russian Federation). Dept. of Radioelectronic and Quantum Systems

    1996-12-31

    A criterion of spatial-angular efficiency (SAE) of remote electro-optical systems for atmosphere monitoring is formulated. The dependencies of the SAE from normalized range and minimal operating range for different optical receiving schemes of ground-based biaxial lidar are analyzed. It is shown that low SAE of traditional VIS and NIR systems are a main cause of a low signal-to-background-noise ratio at the photodetector input, the considerable measurements errors. and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters reconstruction. The most effective protection against sky background radiation in such systems consists in forming an angular field according to the introduced SAE criterion. Some approaches to achieve high value of the SAE-parameter for receiving system optimization are discussed.

  8. Photon dose rates estimation for CANDU spent fuel transport and intermediate dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear energy world wide development is accompanied by huge quantities of spent nuclear fuel accumulation. Shielding analyses are an essential component of the nuclear safety, the estimations of radiation doses in order to reduce them under specified limit values being the main task here. According to IAEA data, more than 10 millions packages containing radioactive materials are annually world wide transported. The radioactive material transport safety must be carefully settled. Last decade, both for operating reactors and future reactor projects, a general trend to raise the discharge fuel burnup has been world wide registered. For CANDU type reactors, one of the most attractive solutions seems to be SEU fuel utilization. In the paper there are estimated the CANDU spent fuel photon dose rates at the shipping cask/ storage basket wall for two different fuel projects after a defined cooling period in the NPP pools. The CANDU fuel projects considered were the CANDU standard 37 rod fuel bundle with natural UO2 and SEU fuels. In order to obtain radionuclide inventory and irradiated fuel characteristics, ORIGEN-S code has been used. The spent fuel characteristics are presented, comparatively, for both types of CANDU fuels. By means of the same code the photon source profiles have been calculated. The shielding calculations both for spent fuel transport and intermediate storage have been performed by using Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code. The ORIGEN-S and MORSE-SGC codes are both included in ORNL's SCALE 4.4a program package. A photon dose rates comparison between the two types of CANDU fuels has been also performed, both for spent fuel transport and intermediate dry storage. (authors)

  9. Late effects of chronic low dose-rate γ-rays irradiation on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate late biological effects of chronic low dose-rate radiation, the life-span and pathological changes were evaluated in mice that were continuously irradiated with gamma-rays for 400 days. Two hundred (100 male and 100 female) specific-pathogen-free (SPF) B6C3F1 mice at six weeks of age were purchased every month. After a 2-week quarantine, they were divided into 4 groups (1 unirradiated control and 3 irradiated). Irradiation was performed using 137Cs gamma-rays at dose-rates of 20 mGy (22 h-day)-1, 1 mGy (22 h-day)-1 and 0.05 mGy (22 h-day)''-1 with accumulated doses equivalent to 8,000 mGy, 400 mGy and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until they died a natural death. Results of the monthly microbiological examinations confirmed that the mice were maintained under SPF-conditions throughout the experimental period. A total of 4,000 mice have been admitted into the experiment since it started in February 1996, all of which have received their predetermined doses and have been transferred to the animal room. Data on the 20 mGy (22 h-day)-1 group of both sexes suggested a shortened life span. The most common lethal neoplasms in pooled data of unirradiated control male mice and irradiated male mice in order of frequency were neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, liver, lung, and soft tissue. In female mice, neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, soft tissue, endocrine system, and liver were most common. (author)

  10. Surface activity distribution measurements and establishment of a dose rate map inside the destroyed Chernobyl reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Gamma Locator designed for contamination survey inside the reactor hall of the 4th unit of Chernobyl NNP has been developed. The device consists of a detector head and a remote control computer connected by a 150 m long cable. The detector head (dimensions: 500 mm by 500 mm by 400 mm; weight: about 40 kg) is a collimated scintillation gamma detector (the collimation angle is 10 deg.). It is installed on a scanning unit and was placed inside the reactor hall. The Gamma Locator scans all surfaces of the reactor hall with angular steps (≤ 1 deg. vertically as well as horizontally) and the particle fluence from the corresponding direction is recorded. The distance between the device head and the measured surface is instantaneously registered by a laser distance gauge. Inside the collimator there is a small CCD camera which makes it possible to obtain a visible image of the measured surface. The effective surface activity levels are presented in colour on the screen of the control computer. The gamma detector essentially consists of a CsI(TI) scintillator crystal (φ 8 mm in diameter, 2.5 mm in thickness) and a Si photodiode. The detector energy resolution is about 8% for radiation from 137Cs. The exposure dose rate distribution in the reactor hall is estimated from the measured effective surface activities /137Cs is the main gamma emitting isotope inside the reactor hall). The results of dose rate calculations are presented in colour superposed on a drawing of the reactor hall. (au)

  11. Surface activity distribution measurements and establishment of a dose rate map inside the destroyed Chernobyl reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesnokov, A.V.; Fedin, V.I.; Gulyaev, A.A. [RECOM Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1999-02-01

    A Gamma Locator designed for contamination survey inside the reactor hall of the 4th unit of Chernobyl NNP has been developed. The device consists of a detector head and a remote control computer connected by a 150 m long cable. The detector head (dimensions: 500 mm by 500 mm by 400 mm; weight: about 40 kg) is a collimated scintillation gamma detector (the collimation angle is 10 deg.). It is installed on a scanning unit and was placed inside the reactor hall. The Gamma Locator scans all surfaces of the reactor hall with angular steps ({<=} 1 deg. vertically as well as horizontally) and the particle fluence from the corresponding direction is recorded. The distance between the device head and the measured surface is instantaneously registered by a laser distance gauge. Inside the collimator there is a small CCD camera which makes it possible to obtain a visible image of the measured surface. The effective surface activity levels are presented in colour on the screen of the control computer. The gamma detector essentially consists of a CsI(TI) scintillator crystal ({phi} 8 mm in diameter, 2.5 mm in thickness) and a Si photodiode. The detector energy resolution is about 8% for radiation from {sup 137}Cs. The exposure dose rate distribution in the reactor hall is estimated from the measured effective surface activities ({sup 137}Cs is the main gamma emitting isotope inside the reactor hall). The results of dose rate calculations are presented in colour superposed on a drawing of the reactor hall. (au) 1 tab., 28 ills., 16 refs.

  12. Gamma-ray dose rates in igneous rock terrains in the Japanese Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air absorbed dose rates evaluated from uranium, thorium and potassium contents in rock samples have been compared with SiO2 and K2O data in order to understand lithologic characteristics of terrestrial γ-ray dose rate levels in igneous rock terrains. The comparison showed that the dose rate increased with increasing SiO2 or K2O content of rock. The models of partial melting of rock and crystallization differentiation of magma were used to analyze this trend quantitatively. As a result, a semi-empirical formula could be derived for expressing the dose rate as a function of K2O content of rock. (author)

  13. Environmental gamma radiation monitoring at Visakhapatnam using Thermoluminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The external background radiation levels at Visakhapatnam have been measured. The measurements were performed using CaSO4: Dy thermoluminescence dosimeters at 15 locations in and around Visakhapatnam at one meter above the ground. The range of annual average dose rate measured was 0.79-1.86 mGy/year in air based on the analysis of thermoluminescence dosimeters. Spot readings of the background radiation levels were taken using hand held radiation survey meter. (author)

  14. On-Line High Dose-Rate Gamma Ray Irradiation Test of the CCD/CMOS Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, test results of gamma ray irradiation to CCD/CMOS cameras are described. From the CAMS (containment atmospheric monitoring system) data of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant station, we found out that the gamma ray dose-rate when the hydrogen explosion occurred in nuclear reactors 1{approx}3 is about 160 Gy/h. If assumed that the emergency response robot for the management of severe accident of the nuclear power plant has been sent into the reactor area to grasp the inside situation of reactor building and to take precautionary measures against releasing radioactive materials, the CCD/CMOS cameras, which are loaded with the robot, serve as eye of the emergency response robot. In the case of the Japanese Quince robot system, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras are used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. In the preceding assumptions, a major problem which arises when dealing with CCD/CMOS cameras in the severe accident situations of the nuclear power plant is the presence of high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. In the case of the DBA (design basis accident) situations of the nuclear power plant, in order to use a CCD/CMOS camera as an ad-hoc monitoring unit in the vicinity of high radioactivity structures and components of the nuclear reactor area, a robust survivability of this camera in such intense gamma-radiation fields therefore should be verified. The CCD/CMOS cameras of various types were gamma irradiated at a

  15. A method of reducing background radiance for emissivity-compensated radiation thermometry of silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, T; Toyoda, Y; Seo, T

    2013-02-01

    We studied the spectral and directional emissivities of silicon wafers using an optical polarization technique. Based on simulation and experimental results, we developed two radiation thermometry methods for silicon wafers: one is based on the polarized emissivity-invariant condition and the other is based on the relationship between the ratio of the p- and s-polarized radiance and the polarized emissivity. These methods can be performed at temperatures above 600 °C and over a wide wavelength range (0.9-4.8 μm), irrespective of the dielectric film thickness and the substrate resistivity, which depends on the dopant concentration. The temperature measurements were estimated to have expanded uncertainties (k = 2) of less than 5 °C. With a view to practically applying these methods, we investigated a method to reduce the intense background radiance produced by high-intensity heating lamps. We found that the background radiance can be greatly reduced by using a radiometer that is sensitive to wavelengths of 4.5 or 4.8 μm and suitable geometrical arrangements of a quartz plate. This opens up the possibility of using the two proposed radiation thermometry methods in practical applications.

  16. Estimation of collective effective dose due to natural background radiation in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henaish, B. A.; Tawfik, A. A.; Abu Zaid, H.; Gomaa, M. A.

    1994-07-01

    During the last few years, worldwide attention has been directed towards the estimation of natural background radiation levels. Several environmental monitoring networks have been established for systematic data collection and exchange of information.In the present study, measurements of annual effective dose from terrestrial γ-rays are carried out at pre-selected sites within several Egyptian governorates by using a calibrated gas-filled GM-detector connected to a microcomputer system. Contribution of the secondary cosmic-rays, which is of prime importance at sea level, is achieved by carrying out computation based on theoretical considerations.Terrestrial effective dose in Egypt is found to be between 106 and 371 μSv/yr, meanwhile the computed cosmic rays contribution is 260-296 μSv/yr. Accordingly, the annual collective effective dose due to natural background radiation is about 27,253 Man Sv for the last Egyptian population count (1989) considering 0.8 and 0.2 indoor and outdoor occupancy factors.

  17. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  18. A method of reducing background radiance for emissivity-compensated radiation thermometry of silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, T; Toyoda, Y; Seo, T

    2013-02-01

    We studied the spectral and directional emissivities of silicon wafers using an optical polarization technique. Based on simulation and experimental results, we developed two radiation thermometry methods for silicon wafers: one is based on the polarized emissivity-invariant condition and the other is based on the relationship between the ratio of the p- and s-polarized radiance and the polarized emissivity. These methods can be performed at temperatures above 600 °C and over a wide wavelength range (0.9-4.8 μm), irrespective of the dielectric film thickness and the substrate resistivity, which depends on the dopant concentration. The temperature measurements were estimated to have expanded uncertainties (k = 2) of less than 5 °C. With a view to practically applying these methods, we investigated a method to reduce the intense background radiance produced by high-intensity heating lamps. We found that the background radiance can be greatly reduced by using a radiometer that is sensitive to wavelengths of 4.5 or 4.8 μm and suitable geometrical arrangements of a quartz plate. This opens up the possibility of using the two proposed radiation thermometry methods in practical applications. PMID:23464239

  19. Background radiation in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.A., area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background radiation levels in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area are elevated when compared to much of the US. Soil K, U, and Th are somewhat elevated compared to average values in this country and generate roughly 60 mrem per year to the average resident. Cosmic ray contribution, due to the mean elevation of 5,200 ft above sea level, is 80 mrem/yr-well over the average for the US. Thirty percent of the homes in Albuquerque contain indoor radon levels over the EPA action level of 4 pCi/l compared to 10-12% of homes for the entire US. Indoor radon contributes about 100-300 mrem/yr. Total contributions from other minor sources are under 10 mrem/yr. Thus total background radiation received by Albuquerque residents is about 330-530 mrem/yr, well in excess of the rest of the US. The spread in mrem values is due to variations in the contribution from indoor radon

  20. The Natural Background Gamma Radiation Exposure in the Metropolitan Area of the Valley of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mary Feild

    Measurements of the natural background radiation have been made at numerous places throughout the world. Very little work in this field has been done in developing countries. In Mexico the natural radiation to which the population is exposed has not been assessed. This dissertation represents a pioneer study in this environmental area. The radiation exposure which occupants within buildings receive as a result of naturally occurring radionuclides present in construction materials is the principal focus. Data were collected between August 1979 and November 1980. Continuous monitoring was done with TLDs placed on site for periods of 3 to 6 months. The instrumentation used for "real-time" measurements was a portable NaI (Tl) scintillation detector. In addition, radiometric measurements were performed on construction materials commonly used in Mexican homes. Based on TLD readings taken within 75 dwellings, the typical indoor exposure for a resident of the study area is 9.2 (mu)Rh('-1). The average reading of the 152 indoor scintillometer surveys was 9.5 (mu)Rh('-1), the outdoor reading 7.5 (mu)Rh('-1). Results of one-way and multi-way analyses of the exposure data to determine the effect due to building materials type, geologic subsoil, age of dwelling, and elevation are also presented. The results of 152 indoor scintillometer surveys are described.

  1. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  2. Radiative transfer in a clumpy universe; 2, the ultraviolet extragalactic background

    CERN Document Server

    Haardt, F; Haardt, Francesco; Madau, Piero

    1995-01-01

    We present a detailed calculation of the propagation of AGN-like ionizing radiation through the intergalactic space. We model the ionization state of absorbing clouds, and show that the universe will be more opaque above 4\\,Ryd than previously estimated. Singly ionized helium in \\Lya forest clouds and Lyman-limit systems is found to be very efficient in reprocessing soft X-ray, helium-ionizing photons into ultraviolet, hydrogen-ionizing ones. We demonstrate that a significant fraction of the absorbed primary photons (emitted, e.g., by quasar sources) will be reradiated by the photoionized gas through \\Lya line emission, two-photon continuum, and recombination continuum radiation. In the light of new data and recent studies, we also reassess the contribution of the QSOs observed in optical surveys to the UV extragalactic background, and find that the stochastic reprocessing of quasar Lyman continuum radiation by hydrogen and helium along the line of sight will significantly affect the amplitude spectral shape,.