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Sample records for background modifies phenotypes

  1. Genetic background of phenotypic variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A noteworthy feature of the living world is its bewildering variability. A key issue in several biological disciplines is the achievement of an understanding of the hereditary basis of this variability. Two opposing, but not necessarily irreconcilable conceptions attempt to explain the underlying mechanism. The gene function paradigm postulates that phenotypic variance is generated by the polymorphism in the coding sequences of genes. However, comparisons of a great number of homologous gene and protein sequences have revealed that they predominantly remained functionally conserved even across distantly related phylogenic taxa. Alternatively, the gene regulation paradigm assumes that differences in the cis-regulatory region of genes do account for phenotype variation within species. An extension of this latter concept is that phenotypic variability is generated by the polyrnorphism in the overall gene expression profiles of gene networks.In other words, the activity of a particular gene is a system property determined both by the cis-regulatory sequences of the given genes and by the other genes of a gene network, whose expressions vary among individuals, too. Novel proponents of gene function paradigm claim that functional genetic variance within the coding sequences of regulatory genes is critical for the generation of morphological polymorphism. Note, however, that these developmental genes play direct regulatory roles in the control of gene expression.

  2. Constraining modified theories of gravity with gravitational wave stochastic background

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria; Kokkotas, Kostas; Schneider, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The direct discovery of gravitational waves has finally opened a new observational window on our Universe, suggesting that the population of coalescing binary black holes is larger than previously expected. These sources produce an unresolved background of gravitational waves, potentially observables by ground-based interferometers. In this paper we investigate how modified theories of gravity, modeled using the ppE formalism, affect the expected signal, and analyze the detectability of the resulting stochastic background by current and future ground-based interferometers. We find the constraints that AdLIGO would be able to set on modified theories, showing that they may significantly improve the current bounds obtained from astrophysical observations of binary pulsars.

  3. Can background cosmology hold the key for modified gravity tests?

    CERN Document Server

    Ceron-Hurtado, Juan J; Li, Baojiu

    2016-01-01

    Modified gravity theories are a popular alternative to dark energy as a possible explanation for the observed accelerating cosmic expansion, and their cosmological tests are currently an active research field. Studies in recent years have been increasingly focused on testing these theories in the nonlinear regime, which is computationally demanding. Here we show that, under certain circumstances, a whole class of theories can be ruled out by using background cosmology alone. This is possible because certain classes of models (i) are fundamentally incapable of producing specific background expansion histories, and (ii) said histories are incompatible with local gravity tests. As an example, we demonstrate that a popular class of models, $f(R)$ gravity, would not be viable if observations suggest even a slight deviation of the background expansion history from that of the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm.

  4. Hand Gesture Recognition Using Modified 1$ and Background Subtraction Algorithms

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    Hazem Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computers and computerized machines have tremendously penetrated all aspects of our lives. This raises the importance of Human-Computer Interface (HCI. The common HCI techniques still rely on simple devices such as keyboard, mice, and joysticks, which are not enough to convoy the latest technology. Hand gesture has become one of the most important attractive alternatives to existing traditional HCI techniques. This paper proposes a new hand gesture detection system for Human-Computer Interaction using real-time video streaming. This is achieved by removing the background using average background algorithm and the 1$ algorithm for hand’s template matching. Then every hand gesture is translated to commands that can be used to control robot movements. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve high detection rate and small recognition time under different light changes, scales, rotation, and background.

  5. Genetic background of nonmutant Piebald-Virol-Glaxo rats does not influence nephronophthisis phenotypes

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    Yengkopiong JP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jada Pasquale Yengkopiong, Joseph Daniel Wani LakoJohn Garang Memorial University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bor, Jonglei State, Republic of South SudanBackground: Nephronophthisis (NPHP, which affects multiple organs, is a hereditary cystic kidney disease (CKD, characterized by interstitial fibrosis and numerous fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. It is caused by mutations in NPHP genes, which encode for ciliary proteins known as nephrocystins. The disorder affects many people across the world and leads to end-stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to determine if the genetic background of the nonmutant female Piebald-Virol-Glaxo (PVG/Seac-/- rat influences phenotypic inheritance of NPHP from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats.Methods: Mating experiments were performed between mutant Lewis polycystic kidney male rats with CKD and nonmutant PVG and Wistar Kyoto female rats without cystic kidney disease to raise second filial and backcross 1 progeny, respectively. Rats that developed cystic kidneys were identified. Systolic blood pressure was determined in each rat at 12 weeks of age using the tail and cuff method. After euthanasia, blood samples were collected and chemistry was determined. Histological examination of the kidneys, pancreas, and liver of rats with and without cystic kidney disease was performed.Results: It was established that the genetic background of nonmutant female PVG rats did not influence the phenotypic inheritance of the CKD from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats. The disease arose as a result of a recessive mutation in a single gene (second filial generation, CKD = 13, non-CKD = 39, Χ2 = 0.00, P ≥ 0.97; backcross 1 generation, CKD = 67, non-CKD = 72, Χ2 = 0.18, P > 0.05 and inherited as NPHP. The rats with CKD developed larger fluid-filled cystic kidneys, higher systolic blood pressure, and anemia, but there were no extrarenal cysts and disease did not lead to

  6. Evaluation of Potential Modifiers of the Cardiac Phenotype in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Deborah A.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Mei, Minghua; Zackai, Elaine; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The phenotype associated with deletion of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region is highly variable, yet little is known about the source of this variability. Cardiovascular anomalies, including tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic arch type B, perimembranous ventricular septal defects, and aortic arch anomalies, occur in approximately 75% of individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. METHODS Data from 343 subjects enrolled in a study of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were used to evaluate potential modifiers of the cardiac phenotype in this disorder. Subjects with and without cardiac malformations, and subjects with and without aortic arch anomalies were compared with respect to sex and race. In addition, in the subset of subjects from whom a DNA sample was available, genotypes for variants of four genes that are involved in the folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway and that have been implicated as risk factors for other birth defects were compared. Five variants in four genes were genotyped by heteroduplex or restriction digest assays. The chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used to evaluate the association between the cardiac phenotype and each potential modifier. RESULTS The cardiac phenotype observed in individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion was not significantly associated with either sex or race. The genetic variants that were evaluated also did not appear to be associated with the cardiovascular phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Variation in the cardiac phenotype observed between individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion does not appear to be related to sex, race, or five sequence variants in four folate-related genes that are located outside of the 22q11.2 region. PMID:18770859

  7. The expression of HSP in human skeletal muscle. Effects of muscle fiber phenotype and training background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Mattias; Mackey, Abigail L; Langberg, Henning;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Exercise-induced adaptations of skeletal muscle are related to training mode and can be muscle fibre type specific. This study aimed to investigate heat shock protein expression in type I and type II muscle fibres in resting skeletal muscle of subjects with different training backgrounds...... HSPs in human skeletal muscle is influenced by muscle fibre phenotype. The fibre type specific expression of HSP70 is influenced by resistance and endurance training whereas those of αB-crystallin and HSP27 are influenced only by endurance training suggesting the existence of a training......-modality specific action on the adaptive processes including heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  8. MC1R Mutations Modify the Classic Phenotype of Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 (OCA2)

    OpenAIRE

    Richard A. King; Willaert, Rebecca K.; Schmidt, Ramona M.; Pietsch, Jacy; Savage, Sarah; Brott, Marcia J.; Fryer, James P.; Summers, C Gail; William S Oetting

    2003-01-01

    The heterogeneous group of disorders known as oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) shares cutaneous and ocular hypopigmentation associated with common developmental abnormalities of the eye. Mutations of at least 11 loci produce this phenotype. The majority of affected individuals develop some cutaneous melanin; this is predominantly seen as yellow/blond hair, whereas fewer have brown hair. The OCA phenotype is dependent on the constitutional pigmentation background of the family, with more OCA pigm...

  9. An interview study of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thon, R.; Vondeling, H.; Lassen, J.; Hansen, A.K.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2009-01-01

    An interview study was carried out with the aim of clarifying the reasons for the limited use of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice (GMM) and identifying issues hindering its implementation. A total of 15 users of GMM participated in semi-structured face-to-face interviews, whi

  10. An interview study of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thon, R.; Vondeling, H.; Lassen, J.; Hansen, A.K.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2009-01-01

    An interview study was carried out with the aim of clarifying the reasons for the limited use of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice (GMM) and identifying issues hindering its implementation. A total of 15 users of GMM participated in semi-structured face-to-face interviews, whi

  11. Age modifies the genotype-phenotype relationship for the bitter receptor TAS2R38

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    Duke Fujiko F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of TAS2R38 haplotypes and age on human bitter taste perception. Results Children (3 to 10 yrs, adolescents (11 to 19 yrs and adults (mostly mothers, 20 to 55 yrs (N = 980 were measured for bitter taste thresholds for 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP and genotyped for three polymorphisms of the AS2R38 gene (A49P, V262A, I296V. Subjects were grouped by haplotype and age, as well as sex and race/ethnicity, and compared for PROP thresholds. Subjects with the same haplotype were similar in bitter threshold regardless of race/ethnicity (all ages or sex (children and adolescents; all p-values > 0.05 but age was a modifier of the genotype-phenotype relationship. Specifically, AVI/PAV heterozygous children could perceive a bitter taste at lower PROP concentrations than could heterozygous adults, with the thresholds of heterozygous adolescents being intermediate (p 0.05 perhaps because there is less variation in taste perception among these homozygotes. Conclusions These data imply that the change in PROP bitter sensitivity which occurs over the lifespan (from bitter sensitive to less so is more common in people with a particular haplotype combination, i.e., AVI/PAV heterozygotes.

  12. MutLα heterodimers modify the molecular phenotype of Friedreich ataxia.

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    Vahid Ezzatizadeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Friedreich ataxia (FRDA, the most common autosomal recessive ataxia disorder, is caused by a dynamic GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of FXN gene, resulting in down-regulation of frataxin expression. Studies of cell and mouse models have revealed a role for the mismatch repair (MMR MutS-heterodimer complexes and the PMS2 component of the MutLα complex in the dynamics of intergenerational and somatic GAA repeat expansions: MSH2, MSH3 and MSH6 promote GAA repeat expansions, while PMS2 inhibits GAA repeat expansions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine the potential role of the other component of the MutLα complex, MLH1, in GAA repeat instability in FRDA, we have analyzed intergenerational and somatic GAA repeat expansions from FXN transgenic mice that have been crossed with Mlh1 deficient mice. We find that loss of Mlh1 activity reduces both intergenerational and somatic GAA repeat expansions. However, we also find that loss of either Mlh1 or Pms2 reduces FXN transcription, suggesting different mechanisms of action for Mlh1 and Pms2 on GAA repeat expansion dynamics and regulation of FXN transcription. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both MutLα components, PMS2 and MLH1, have now been shown to modify the molecular phenotype of FRDA. We propose that upregulation of MLH1 or PMS2 could be potential FRDA therapeutic approaches to increase FXN transcription.

  13. Elevated oxidative membrane damage associated with genetic modifiers of Lyst-mutant phenotypes.

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    Colleen M Trantow

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available LYST is a large cytosolic protein that influences the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, and mutation of the encoding gene, LYST, can cause Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Recently, Lyst-mutant mice were recognized to also exhibit an iris disease resembling exfoliation syndrome, a common cause of glaucoma in humans. Here, Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes were used in a search for genes that influence Lyst pathways. In a candidate gene-driven approach, albino Lyst-mutant mice homozygous for a mutation in Tyr, whose product is key to melanin synthesis within melanosomes, exhibited complete rescue of Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes. In a genetic background-driven approach using a DBA/2J strain of congenic mice, an interval containing Tyrp1 enhanced Lyst-dependent iris phenotypes. Thus, both experimental approaches implicated the melanosome, an organelle that is a potential source of oxidative stress, as contributing to the disease phenotype. Confirming an association with oxidative damage, Lyst mutation resulted in genetic context-sensitive changes in iris lipid hydroperoxide levels, being lowest in albino and highest in DBA/2J mice. Surprisingly, the DBA/2J genetic background also exposed a late-onset neurodegenerative phenotype involving cerebellar Purkinje-cell degeneration. These results identify an association between oxidative damage to lipid membranes and the severity of Lyst-mutant phenotypes, revealing a new mechanism that contributes to pathophysiology involving LYST.

  14. Phenotypic divergence in two lines of L-Fabp-/- mice reflects substrain differences and environmental modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Elizabeth P; Kennedy, Susan; Xie, Yan; Luo, Jianyang; Jiang, Hui; Ory, Daniel S; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2015-10-15

    Phenotypic divergence in diet-induced obesity (DIO) and hepatic steatosis has been reported in two independently generated lines of L-Fabp(-/-) mice [New Jersey (NJ) L-Fabp(-/-) vs. Washington University (WU) L-Fabp(-/-) mice]. We performed side-by-side studies to examine differences between the lines and investigate the role of genetic background, intestinal microbiota, sex, and diet in the divergent phenotypes. Fasting-induced steatosis was attenuated in both L-Fabp(-/-) lines compared with C57BL/6J controls, with restoration of hepatic triglyceride levels following adenoviral L-Fabp rescue. Both lines were protected against DIO after high-saturated-fat diet feeding. Hepatic steatosis was attenuated in WU but not NJ L-Fabp(-/-) mice, although this difference between the lines disappeared upon antibiotic treatment and cohousing. In contrast, there was phenotypic divergence in L-Fabp(-/-) mice fed a high cocoa butter fat diet, with WU L-Fabp(-/-) mice, but not NJ L-Fabp(-/-) mice, showing protection against both DIO and hepatic steatosis, with some sex-dependent (female > male) differences. Dense mapping revealed no evidence of unintended targeting, duplications, or deletions surrounding the Fabp1 locus in either line and only minor differences in mRNA expression of genes located near the targeted allele. However, a C57BL/6 substrain screen showed that the NJ L-Fabp(-/-) line contains ∼40% C57BL/6N genomic DNA, despite reports that these mice were backcrossed six generations. Overall, these findings suggest that some of the phenotypic divergence between the two L-Fabp(-/-) lines may reflect unanticipated differences in genetic background, underscoring the importance of genetic background in phenotypic characterization. PMID:26251469

  15. Genetic and environmental backgrounds responsible for the changes in the phenotype of MS in Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2012-10-01

    There are two distinct phenotypes of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Asians, manifesting as opticospinal (OSMS) and conventional (CMS) forms. In Japan, the results of four nationwide surveys of MS conducted between 1972 and 2004 have revealed a four-fold increase in the estimated number of clinically definite MS patients in 2003 compared with 1972; a shift in the peak age at onset from the early 30s in 1989 to the early 20s in 2003; a successive proportional decrease in optic-spinal involvement in clinically definite MS patients; an increase in the number of CMS patients with Barkhof brain lesions with advancing birth year and a decrease in the number of OSMS patients with LESCLs. These findings suggest that MS phenotypes are drastically altered by environmental factors such as latitude and "Westernization". Helicobacter pylori infection rates, reflecting sanitary conditions in infancy, are significantly different between CMS and OSMS patients. Both phenotypes show distinct HLA class II gene associations. Therefore, changes in environmental factors may have differentially influenced susceptibility to each disease subtype, given that disease susceptibility is only partly genetically determined. PMID:25877266

  16. Hypomorphic phenotype of Foxn1 gene-modified rats by CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Teppei; Hara, Hiromasa; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Hochi, Shinichi; Hirabayashi, Masumi

    2016-08-01

    The Foxn1 gene is known as a critical factor for the differentiation of thymic and skin epithelial cells. This study was designed to examine the phenotype of Foxn1-modified rats generated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Guide-RNA designed for first exon of the Foxn1 and mRNA of Cas9 were co-injected into the pronucleus of Crlj:WI zygotes. Transfer of 158 injected zygotes resulted in the birth of 50 offspring (32 %), and PCR identified five (10 %) as Foxn1-edited. Genomic sequencing revealed the deletion of 44 or 60 bp from and/or insertion of 4 bp into the Foxn1 gene in a single allele. The number of T-cells in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of mutant rats decreased markedly. While homozygous deleted mutant rats had no thymus, the mutant rats were not completely hairless and showed normal performance in delivery and nursing. Splicing variants of the indel-mutation in the Foxn1 gene may cause hypomorphic allele, resulting in the phenotype of thymus deficiency and incomplete hairless. In conclusion, the mutant rats in Foxn1 gene edited by the CRISPR/Cas9 system showed the phenotype of thymus deficiency and incomplete hairless which was characterized by splicing variants. PMID:26931321

  17. Constraining Modified Theories of Gravity with Gravitational-Wave Stochastic Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Andrea; Marassi, Stefania; Ferrari, Valeria; Kokkotas, Kostas; Schneider, Raffaella

    2016-08-26

    The direct discovery of gravitational waves has finally opened a new observational window on our Universe, suggesting that the population of coalescing binary black holes is larger than previously expected. These sources produce an unresolved background of gravitational waves, potentially observable by ground-based interferometers. In this Letter we investigate how modified theories of gravity, modeled using the parametrized post-Einsteinian formalism, affect the expected signal, and analyze the detectability of the resulting stochastic background by current and future ground-based interferometers. We find the constraints that Advanced LIGO would be able to set on modified theories, showing that they may significantly improve the current bounds obtained from astrophysical observations of binary pulsars. PMID:27610838

  18. Mapping gravitational-wave backgrounds in modified theories of gravity using pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R; Taylor, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    We extend our previous work on applying CMB techniques to the mapping of gravitational-wave backgrounds to backgrounds which have non-GR polarisations. Our analysis and results are presented in the context of pulsar-timing array observations, but the overarching methods are general, and can be easily applied to LIGO or eLISA observations using appropriately modified response functions. Analytic expressions for the pulsar-timing response to gravitational waves with non-GR polarisation are given for each mode of a spin-weighted spherical-harmonic decomposition of the background, which permit the signal to be mapped across the sky to any desired resolution. We also derive the pulsar-timing overlap reduction functions for the various non-GR polarisations, finding analytic forms for anisotropic backgrounds with scalar-transverse ("breathing") and vector-longitudinal polarisations, and a semi-analytic form for scalar-longitudinal backgrounds. Our results indicate that pulsar-timing observations will be completely i...

  19. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Constraints on a Modified Chaplygin Gas Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dao-Jun; LI Xin-Zhou

    2005-01-01

    @@ A modified Chaplygin gas model of unifying dark energy and dark matter with the exotic equation of state p = Bρ- A/ρα , which can also explain the recent expansion of the universe, is investigated by means of constraining the location of the peak of the cosmic microwave background radiation spectrum. We find that the result of CMBR measurements does not exclude the nonzero value of parameter B, but allows it in the range -0.35 (<~) B (<~) 0.025.

  20. Arrhythmogenic Biophysical Phenotype for SCN5A Mutation S1787N Depends upon Splice Variant Background and Intracellular Acidosis.

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    Rou-Mu Hu

    Full Text Available SCN5A is a susceptibility gene for type 3 long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and sudden infant death syndrome. INa dysfunction from mutated SCN5A can depend upon the splice variant background in which it is expressed and also upon environmental factors such as acidosis. S1787N was reported previously as a LQT3-associated mutation and has also been observed in 1 of 295 healthy white controls. Here, we determined the in vitro biophysical phenotype of SCN5A-S1787N in an effort to further assess its possible pathogenicity.We engineered S1787N in the two most common alternatively spliced SCN5A isoforms, the major isoform lacking a glutamine at position 1077 (Q1077del and the minor isoform containing Q1077, and expressed these two engineered constructs in HEK293 cells for electrophysiological study. Macroscopic voltage-gated INa was measured 24 hours after transfection with standard whole-cell patch clamp techniques. We applied intracellular solutions with pH7.4 or pH6.7. S1787N in the Q1077 background had WT-like INa including peak INa density, activation and inactivation parameters, and late INa amplitude in both pH 7.4 and pH 6.7. However, with S1787N in the Q1077del background, the percentages of INa late/peak were increased by 2.1 fold in pH 7.4 and by 2.9 fold in pH 6.7 when compared to WT.The LQT3-like biophysical phenotype for S1787N depends on both the SCN5A splice variant and on the intracellular pH. These findings provide further evidence that the splice variant and environmental factors affect the molecular phenotype of cardiac SCN5A-encoded sodium channel (Nav1.5, has implications for the clinical phenotype, and may provide insight into acidosis-induced arrhythmia mechanisms.

  1. A new mouse model for marfan syndrome presents phenotypic variability associated with the genetic background and overall levels of Fbn1 expression.

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    Bruno L Lima

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease of connective tissue caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 encoding gene FBN1. Patients present cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal manifestations, and although being fully penetrant, MFS is characterized by a wide clinical variability both within and between families. Here we describe a new mouse model of MFS that recapitulates the clinical heterogeneity of the syndrome in humans. Heterozygotes for the mutant Fbn1 allele mgΔloxPneo, carrying the same internal deletion of exons 19-24 as the mgΔ mouse model, present defective microfibrillar deposition, emphysema, deterioration of aortic wall and kyphosis. However, the onset of a clinical phenotypes is earlier in the 129/Sv than in C57BL/6 background, indicating the existence of genetic modifiers of MFS between these two mouse strains. In addition, we characterized a wide clinical variability within the 129/Sv congenic heterozygotes, suggesting involvement of epigenetic factors in disease severity. Finally, we show a strong negative correlation between overall levels of Fbn1 expression and the severity of the phenotypes, corroborating the suggested protective role of normal fibrillin-1 in MFS pathogenesis, and supporting the development of therapies based on increasing Fbn1 expression.

  2. Identification of genetic modifiers of behavioral phenotypes in serotonin transporter knockout rats

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    Nijman Isaäc J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variation in the regulatory region of the human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 has been shown to affect brain functionality and personality. However, large heterogeneity in its biological effects is observed, which is at least partially due to genetic modifiers. To gain insight into serotonin transporter (SERT-specific genetic modifiers, we studied an intercross between the Wistar SERT-/- rat and the behaviorally and genetically divergent Brown Norway rat, and performed a QTL analysis. Results In a cohort of >150 intercross SERT-/- and control (SERT+/+ rats we characterized 12 traits that were previously associated with SERT deficiency, including activity, exploratory pattern, cocaine-induced locomotor activity, and abdominal and subcutaneous fat. Using 325 genetic markers, 10 SERT-/--specific quantitative trait loci (QTLs for parameters related to activity and exploratory pattern (Chr.1,9,11,14, and cocaine-induced anxiety and locomotor activity (Chr.5,8 were identified. No significant QTLs were found for fat parameters. Using in silico approaches we explored potential causal genes within modifier QTL regions and found interesting candidates, amongst others, the 5-HT1D receptor (Chr. 5, dopamine D2 receptor (Chr. 8, cannabinoid receptor 2 (Chr. 5, and genes involved in fetal development and plasticity (across chromosomes. Conclusions We anticipate that the SERT-/--specific QTLs may lead to the identification of new modulators of serotonergic signaling, which may be targets for pharmacogenetic and therapeutic approaches.

  3. ENU Mutagenesis Screen to Establish Motor Phenotypes in Wild-Type Mice and Modifiers of a Pre-Existing Motor Phenotype in Tau Mutant Mice

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    Xin Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modifier screening is a powerful genetic tool. While not widely used in the vertebrate system, we applied these tools to transgenic mouse strains that recapitulate key aspects of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, such as tau-expressing mice. These are characterized by a robust pathology including both motor and memory impairment. The phenotype can be modulated by ENU mutagenesis, which results in novel mutant mouse strains and allows identifying the underlying gene/mutation. Here we discuss this strategy in detail. We firstly obtained pedigrees that modify the tau-related motor phenotype, with mapping ongoing. We further obtained transgene-independent motor pedigrees: (i hyperactive, circling ENU 37 mice with a causal mutation in the Tbx1 gene—the complete knock-out of Tbx1 models DiGeorge Syndrome; (ii ENU12/301 mice that show sudden jerky movements and tremor constantly; they have a causal mutation in the Kcnq1 gene, modelling aspects of the Romano-Ward and Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndromes; and (iii ENU16/069 mice with tremor and hypermetric gait that have a causal mutation in the Mpz (Myelin Protein Zero gene, modelling Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1B. Together, we provide evidence for a real potential of an ENU mutagenesis to dissect motor functions in wild-type and tau mutant mice.

  4. Genetic modifiers of sickle cell anemia in the BABY HUG cohort: influence on laboratory and clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Vivien A; Luo, Zhaoyu; Flanagan, Jonathan M; Howard, Thad A; Thompson, Bruce W; Wang, Winfred C; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ware, Russell E

    2013-07-01

    The recently completed BABY HUG trial investigated the safety and efficacy of hydroxyurea in infants with sickle cell anemia (SCA). To investigate the effects of known genetic modifiers, genomic DNA on 190 randomized subjects were analyzed for alpha thalassemia, beta-globin haplotype, polymorphisms affecting endogenous fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (XmnI, BCL11A, and HBS1L-MYB), UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms, and the common G6PD A(-) mutation. At study entry, infants with alpha thalassemia trait had significantly lower mean corpuscular volume, total bilirubin, and absolute reticulocyte count. Beta-globin haplotypes associated with milder disease had significantly higher hemoglobin and %HbF. BCL11A and XmnI polymorphisms had significant effects on baseline HbF, while UGT1A1 promoter polymorphisms significantly influenced baseline serum bilirubin. At study exit, subjects randomized to placebo still exhibited laboratory effects of alpha thalassemia and other modifiers, while those assigned hydroxyurea had treatment effects that exceeded most genetic influences. The pain phenotype was influenced by HbF modifiers in both treatment groups. These data document that genetic polymorphisms do modify laboratory and clinical phenotypes even in very young patients with SCA. The hydroxyurea effects are more potent, however, indicating that treatment criteria should not be limited to certain genetic subsets, and supporting the use of hydroxyurea for all young patients with SCA. PMID:23606168

  5. Modified Hodge test: A useful and the low-cost phenotypic method for detection of carbapenemase producers in Enterobacteriaceae members

    OpenAIRE

    Ramana, K. V; Rao, Ratna; Sharada, CH. V; Kareem, MA; Reddy, L. Rajashekar; Ratna Mani, MS

    2013-01-01

    Background: The global spread of antimicrobial resistance has acquired greater significance in the public health perspective. Drug resistance has posed a threat for the management of various hospital-acquired infections (HAI). For bacteria producing extended spectrum ß lactamase, carbapenems are the drug of choice. However, treatment failures are still a cause of concern due to carbapenemase producers. Aim: Various phenotypic and genotypic methods are available for the detection of carbapenem...

  6. The effects of host age, host nuclear background and temperature on phenotypic effects of the virulent Wolbachia strain popcorn in Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, K Tracy; Thomson, Linda J; Ary A Hoffmann

    2003-01-01

    Because of their obligate endosymbiotic nature, Wolbachia strains by necessity are defined by their phenotypic effects upon their host. Nevertheless, studies on the influence of host background and environmental conditions upon the manifestation of Wolbachia effects are relatively uncommon. Here we examine the behavior of the overreplicating Wolbachia strain popcorn in four different Drosophila melanogaster backgrounds at two temperatures. Unlike other strains of Wolbachia in Drosophila, popc...

  7. Modified Hodge Test versus Indirect Carbapenemase Test: Prospective Evaluation of a Phenotypic Assay for Detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC) in Enterobacteriaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Mathers, Amy J.; Carroll, Joanne; Sifri, Costi D.; Hazen, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    The currently recommended phenotypic test for the detection of carbapenemase-producing members of the family Enterobacteriaceae is the modified Hodge test (MHT). However, the MHT lacks specificity. Here we demonstrate an alternative phenotypic test, the indirect carbapenemase test, for the detection of blaKPC-producing isolates that has specificity superior to that of the MHT for non-Klebsiella Enterobacteriaceae.

  8. A modified protocol to maximize differentiation of human preadipocytes and improve metabolic phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Mi-Jeong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Fried, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    Adipose stromal cells proliferate and differentiate into adipocytes, providing a valuable model system for studies of adipocyte biology. We compared differentiation protocols for human preadipocytes and report on their metabolic phenotypes. By simply prolonging the adipogenic induction period from the first 3 days to 7 days, the proportion of cells (passage 5–6) acquiring adipocyte morphology increased from 30–70% to over 80% in human subcutaneous preadipocytes. These morphological changes we...

  9. A histone mutant reproduces the phenotype caused by loss of histone-modifying factor Polycomb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengelly, Ana Raquel; Copur, Ömer; Jäckle, Herbert; Herzig, Alf; Müller, Jürg

    2013-02-01

    Although many metazoan enzymes that add or remove specific modifications on histone proteins are essential transcriptional regulators, the functional significance of posttranslational modifications on histone proteins is not well understood. Here, we show in Drosophila that a point mutation in lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3-K27) fails to repress transcription of genes that are normally repressed by Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), the methyltransferase that modifies H3-K27. Moreover, differentiated H3-K27 mutant cells show homeotic transformations like those seen in PRC2 mutant cells. Taken together, these analyses demonstrate that H3-K27 is the crucial physiological substrate that PRC2 modifies for Polycomb repression. PMID:23393264

  10. Detailed phenotypic and molecular analyses of genetically modified mice generated by CRISPR-Cas9-mediated editing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijal A Parikh

    Full Text Available The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted for use as a genome editing tool. While several recent reports have indicated that successful genome editing of mice can be achieved, detailed phenotypic and molecular analyses of the mutant animals are limited. Following pronuclear micro-injection of fertilized eggs with either wild-type Cas9 or the nickase mutant (D10A and single or paired guide RNA (sgRNA for targeting of the tyrosinase (Tyr gene, we assessed genome editing in mice using rapid phenotypic readouts (eye and coat color. Mutant mice with insertions or deletions (indels in Tyr were efficiently generated without detectable off-target cleavage events. Gene correction of a single nucleotide by homologous recombination (HR could only occur when the sgRNA recognition sites in the donor DNA were modified. Gene repair did not occur if the donor DNA was not modified because Cas9 catalytic activity was completely inhibited. Our results indicate that allelic mosaicism can occur following -Cas9-mediated editing in mice and appears to correlate with sgRNA cleavage efficiency at the single-cell stage. We also show that larger than expected deletions may be overlooked based on the screening strategy employed. An unbiased analysis of all the deleted nucleotides in our experiments revealed that the highest frequencies of nucleotide deletions were clustered around the predicted Cas9 cleavage sites, with slightly broader distributions than expected. Finally, additional analysis of founder mice and their offspring indicate that their general health, fertility, and the transmission of genetic changes were not compromised. These results provide the foundation to interpret and predict the diverse outcomes following CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing experiments in mice.

  11. The functions of cardiolipin in cellular metabolism-potential modifiers of the Barth syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Vaishnavi; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2014-04-01

    The phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) plays a role in many cellular functions and signaling pathways both inside and outside of mitochondria. This review focuses on the role of CL in energy metabolism. Many reactions of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, the transport of metabolites required for these processes, and the stabilization of electron transport chain supercomplexes require CL. Recent studies indicate that CL is required for the synthesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) co-factors, which are essential for numerous metabolic pathways. Activation of carnitine shuttle enzymes that are required for fatty acid metabolism is CL dependent. The presence of substantial amounts of CL in the peroxisomal membrane suggests that CL may be required for peroxisomal functions. Understanding the role of CL in energy metabolism may identify physiological modifiers that exacerbate the loss of CL and underlie the variation in symptoms observed in Barth syndrome, a genetic disorder of CL metabolism. PMID:24445246

  12. Staphylococcal phenotypes induced by naturally occurring and synthetic membrane-interactive polyphenolic β-lactam resistance modifiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Palacios

    Full Text Available Galloyl catechins, in particular (--epicatechin gallate (ECg, have the capacity to abrogate β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; they also prevent biofilm formation, reduce the secretion of a large proportion of the exoproteome and induce profound changes to cell morphology. Current evidence suggests that these reversible phenotypic traits result from their intercalation into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We have endeavoured to potentiate the capacity of ECg to modify the MRSA phenotype by stepwise removal of hydroxyl groups from the B-ring pharmacophore and the A:C fused ring system of the naturally occurring molecule. ECg binds rapidly to the membrane, inducing up-regulation of genes responsible for protection against cell wall stress and maintenance of membrane integrity and function. Studies with artificial membranes modelled on the lipid composition of the staphylococcal bilayer indicated that ECg adopts a position deep within the lipid palisade, eliciting major alterations in the thermotropic behaviour of the bilayer. The non-galloylated homolog (--epicatechin enhanced ECg-mediated effects by facilitating entry of ECg molecules into the membrane. ECg analogs with unnatural B-ring hydroxylation patterns induced higher levels of gene expression and more profound changes to MRSA membrane fluidity than ECg but adopted a more superficial location within the bilayer. ECg possessed a high affinity for the positively charged staphylococcal membrane and induced changes to the biophysical properties of the bilayer that are likely to account for its capacity to disperse the cell wall biosynthetic machinery responsible for β-lactam resistance. The ability to enhance these properties by chemical modification of ECg raises the possibility that more potent analogs could be developed for clinical evaluation.

  13. F12-46C/T polymorphism as modifier of the clinical phenotype of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speletas, M; Szilágyi, Á; Csuka, D; Koutsostathis, N; Psarros, F; Moldovan, D; Magerl, M; Kompoti, M; Varga, L; Maurer, M; Farkas, H; Germenis, A E

    2015-12-01

    The factors influencing the heterogeneous clinical manifestation of hereditary angioedema due to C1-INH deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) represent one of the oldest unsolved problems of the disease. Considering that factor XII (FXII) levels may affect bradykinin production, we investigated the contribution of the functional promoter polymorphism F12-46C/T in disease phenotype. We studied 258 C1-INH-HAE patients from 113 European families, and we explored possible associations of F12-46C/T with clinical features and the SERPING1 mutational status. Given that our cohort consisted of related subjects, we implemented generalized estimating equations (GEEs), an extension of the generalized linear model accounting for the within-subject correlation. F12-46C/T carriers exhibited a significantly delayed disease onset (P < 0.001) and did not need long-term treatment (P = 0.02). In a GEE linear regression model, the presence of F12-46C/T was significantly associated with a 7-year delay in disease onset (P < 0.0001) regardless of SERPING1 mutational status. It is concluded that F12-46C/T carriage acts as an independent modifier of C1-INH-HAE severity. PMID:26248961

  14. Production of a Marfan cellular phenotype by expressing a mutant human fibrillin allele on a normal human or murine genetic background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldadah, Z.A.; Dietz, H.C. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Brenn, T. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan Syndrome (MFS) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue caused by defects in fibrillin (FBN1), a 350 kD glycoprotein and principal component of the extracellular microfibril. Previous correlations of mutant transcript level and disease severity suggested a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis. To address this hypothesis we assembled an expression construct containing the mutant allele from a patient with severe MFS. This mutation causes skipping of FBN1 exon 2 and a frame shift, leading to a premature termination codon in exon 4. The predicted peptide would thus consist of 55 wild type and 45 missense amino acids. The construct was stably transfected into cultured human and mouse fibroblasts, and several clonal cell populations were established. Human and mouse cells expressing the truncated peptide exhibited markedly diminished fibrillin deposition and disorganized microfibrillar architecture by immunofluorescence. Pulse-chase analysis of these cells demonstrated normal levels of fibrillin synthesis but substantially decreased fibrillin deposition into the extracellular matrix. These data illustrate that expression of a mutant FBN1 allele, on a background of two normal alleles, is sufficient to disrupt normal fibrillin aggregation and reproduce the MFS cellular phenotype. This provides confirmation of a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis and may offer mutant allele knockout as a strategy for gene therapy. In addition, these data underscore the importance of the FBN1 amino-terminus in normal multimer formation and suggest that expression of the human extreme 5{prime} FBN1 coding sequence may be sufficient, in isolation, to produce an animal model of MFS. Indeed, transgenic mice harboring this mutant allele have been produced, and phenotype analysis is currently in progress.

  15. Direct determination of Cd and Pb in human urine by GFAAS with deuterium-lamp background correction using different chemical modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several authors have contributed to the elaboration of methodology for direct determination of Cd and Pb in urine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). In the proposed approaches, Zeeman background correction systems were predominantly used, without paying much attention to the selection of an appropriate chemical modifier. However, systematic studies on eleven recommended and less commonly used modifiers have resulted in optimization of atomization conditions, so that accurate analysis also with the use of D2-lamp background correction became possible. This was confirmed by comparative measurements using both background correction systems. For determination of Cd in urine, NH4F has been selected resulting in the lowest limit of detection (LOD): 0.07 μg L-1. NH4F promotes efficient atomization at low temperatures and suppresses chloride interference effect. Pd + Sr (nitrate) has been selected as the most adequate modifier for determination of Pb. Its presence raised the maximum tolerable pyrolysis temperature up to 1200oC, which resulted in the maximum reduction of the background signal and the lowest LOD of 1.5 mg L-1 for Pb (10 μL aliquots of dispensed urine). Applying the above modifiers to the analysis of standards and samples, direct aqueous calibration for accurate analysis of diluted and acidified urine samples became possible. Accuracy of the analysis was verified by the use of commercially available quality control reference materials. (authors)

  16. Humans, Fish, and Whales: How Right Whales Modify Calling Behavior in Response to Shifting Background Noise Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Susan E; Groch, Karina; Flores, Paulo; Sousa-Lima, Renata; Urazghildiiev, Ildar R

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the role of behavioral plasticity in the variation of sound production of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) in response to changes in the ambient background noise conditions. Data were collected from southern right whales in Brazilian waters in October and November 2011. The goal of this study was to quantify differences in right whale vocalizations recorded in low background noise as a control, fish chorus noise, and vessel noise. Variation in call parameters were detected among the three background noise conditions and have implications for future studies of noise effects on whale sound production. PMID:26611036

  17. Genetic background modulates behavioral impairments in R6/2 mice and suggests a role for dominant genetic modifiers in Huntington’s disease pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cowin, Randi-Michelle; Bui, Nghiem; Graham, Deanna; Green, Jennie R.; Yuva-Paylor, Lisa A.; Weiss, Andreas; Paylor, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Variability and modification of the symptoms of Huntington’s disease (HD) are commonly observed in both patient populations and animal models of the disease. Utilizing a stable line of the R6/2 HD mouse model, the present study investigated the role of genetic background in the onset and severity of HD symptoms in a transgenic mouse. R6/2 congenic C57BL/6J and C57BL/6J × DBA/2J F1 (B6D2F1) mice were evaluated for survival and a number of behavioral phenotypes. This study reports that the pres...

  18. A Screen for Modifiers of Cilia Phenotypes Reveals Novel MKS Alleles and Uncovers a Specific Genetic Interaction between osm-3 and nphp-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masyukova, Svetlana V; Landis, Dawn E; Henke, Scott J; Williams, Corey L; Pieczynski, Jay N; Roszczynialski, Kelly N; Covington, Jannese E; Malarkey, Erik B; Yoder, Bradley K

    2016-02-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is a ciliopathy in which genetic modifiers may underlie the variable penetrance of clinical features. To identify modifiers, a screen was conducted on C. elegans nphp-4(tm925) mutants. Mutations in ten loci exacerbating nphp-4(tm925) ciliary defects were obtained. Four loci have been identified, three of which are established ciliopathy genes mks-1, mks-2, and mks-5. The fourth allele (yhw66) is a missense mutation (S316F) in OSM-3, a kinesin required for cilia distal segment assembly. While osm-3(yhw66) mutants alone have no overt cilia phenotype, nphp-4(tm925);osm-3(yhw66) double mutants lack distal segments and are dye-filling (Dyf) and osmotic avoidance (Osm) defective, similar to osm-3(mn357) null mutants. In osm-3(yhw66) mutants anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) velocity is reduced. Furthermore, expression of OSM-3(S316F)::GFP reduced IFT velocities in nphp-4(tm925) mutants, but not in wild type animals. In silico analysis indicates the S316F mutation may affect a phosphorylation site. Putative phospho-null OSM-3(S316F) and phospho-mimetic OSM-3(S316D) proteins accumulate at the cilia base and tip respectively. FRAP analysis indicates that the cilia entry rate of OSM-3(S316F) is slower than OSM-3 and that in the presence of OSM-3(S316F), OSM-3 and OSM-3(S316D) rates decrease. In the presence OSM-3::GFP or OSM-3(S316D)::GFP, OSM-3(S316F)::tdTomato redistributes along the cilium and accumulates in the cilia tip. OSM-3(S316F) and OSM-3(S316D) are functional as they restore cilia distal segment formation in osm-3(mn357) null mutants; however, only OSM-3(S316F) rescues the osm-3(mn357) null Dyf phenotype. Despite rescue of cilia length in osm-3(mn357) null mutants, neither OSM-3(S316F) nor OSM-3(S316D) restores ciliary defects in nphp-4(tm925);osm-3(yhw66) double mutants. Thus, these OSM-3 mutations cause NPHP-4 dependent and independent phenotypes. These data indicate that in addition to regulating cilia protein entry or exit

  19. A Screen for Modifiers of Cilia Phenotypes Reveals Novel MKS Alleles and Uncovers a Specific Genetic Interaction between osm-3 and nphp-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V Masyukova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nephronophthisis (NPHP is a ciliopathy in which genetic modifiers may underlie the variable penetrance of clinical features. To identify modifiers, a screen was conducted on C. elegans nphp-4(tm925 mutants. Mutations in ten loci exacerbating nphp-4(tm925 ciliary defects were obtained. Four loci have been identified, three of which are established ciliopathy genes mks-1, mks-2, and mks-5. The fourth allele (yhw66 is a missense mutation (S316F in OSM-3, a kinesin required for cilia distal segment assembly. While osm-3(yhw66 mutants alone have no overt cilia phenotype, nphp-4(tm925;osm-3(yhw66 double mutants lack distal segments and are dye-filling (Dyf and osmotic avoidance (Osm defective, similar to osm-3(mn357 null mutants. In osm-3(yhw66 mutants anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT velocity is reduced. Furthermore, expression of OSM-3(S316F::GFP reduced IFT velocities in nphp-4(tm925 mutants, but not in wild type animals. In silico analysis indicates the S316F mutation may affect a phosphorylation site. Putative phospho-null OSM-3(S316F and phospho-mimetic OSM-3(S316D proteins accumulate at the cilia base and tip respectively. FRAP analysis indicates that the cilia entry rate of OSM-3(S316F is slower than OSM-3 and that in the presence of OSM-3(S316F, OSM-3 and OSM-3(S316D rates decrease. In the presence OSM-3::GFP or OSM-3(S316D::GFP, OSM-3(S316F::tdTomato redistributes along the cilium and accumulates in the cilia tip. OSM-3(S316F and OSM-3(S316D are functional as they restore cilia distal segment formation in osm-3(mn357 null mutants; however, only OSM-3(S316F rescues the osm-3(mn357 null Dyf phenotype. Despite rescue of cilia length in osm-3(mn357 null mutants, neither OSM-3(S316F nor OSM-3(S316D restores ciliary defects in nphp-4(tm925;osm-3(yhw66 double mutants. Thus, these OSM-3 mutations cause NPHP-4 dependent and independent phenotypes. These data indicate that in addition to regulating cilia protein entry or exit, NPHP-4

  20. Mitochondrial genetic background modifies the relationship between traffic-related air pollution exposure and systemic biomarkers of inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharine Wittkopp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria are the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Human mitochondrial haplogroups are linked to differences in ROS production and oxidative-stress induced inflammation that may influence disease pathogenesis, including coronary artery disease (CAD. We previously showed that traffic-related air pollutants were associated with biomarkers of systemic inflammation in a cohort panel of subjects with CAD in the Los Angeles air basin. OBJECTIVE: We tested whether air pollutant exposure-associated inflammation was stronger in mitochondrial haplogroup H than U (high versus low ROS production in this panel (38 subjects and 417 observations. METHODS: Inflammation biomarkers were measured weekly in each subject (≤ 12 weeks, including interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 soluble receptor and tumor necrosis factor-soluble receptor II. We determined haplogroup by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Air pollutants included nitrogen oxides (NOx, carbon monoxide (CO, organic carbon, elemental and black carbon (EC, BC; and particulate matter mass, three size fractions (<0.25 µm, 0.25-2.5 µm, and 2.5-10 µm in aerodynamic diameter. Particulate matter extracts were analyzed for organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, and in vitro oxidative potential of aqueous extracts. Associations between exposures and biomarkers, stratified by haplogroup, were analyzed by mixed-effects models. RESULTS: IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with traffic-related air pollutants (BC, CO, NOx and PAH, and with mass and oxidative potential of quasi-ultrafine particles <0.25 µm. These associations were stronger for haplogroup H than haplogroup U. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that mitochondrial haplogroup U is a novel protective factor for air pollution-related systemic inflammation in this small group of subjects.

  1. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction and slurry sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Aline R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R., E-mail: mgrvale@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-02-01

    In this work, chemical modifiers in solution (Pd/Mg, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd) were compared with permanent modifiers (Ir and Ru) for the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples using slurry sampling and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The analytical line at 283.3 nm was used due to some spectral interference observed at 217.0 nm. The NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} was abandoned due to severe spectral interference even at the 283.3-nm line. For Pd/Mg and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd the optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 °C and 1900 °C, respectively. For Ru and Ir, the integrated absorbance signal was stable up to pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C and 900 °C, respectively, and up to atomization temperature of 1700 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) was 17 ng g{sup −1} using Pd/Mg and 29 ng g{sup −1} using NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd. Among the permanent modifiers investigated, the LOD was 22 ng g{sup −1} Pb for Ir and 10 ng g{sup −1} Pb for Ru. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the certified reference material NIST SRM 695. Although Ru provided lower LOD, which can be attributed to a lower blank signal, only the modifiers in solution showed concordant values of Pb concentration for the NIST SRM 695 and the most of analyzed samples. Moreover, the Pd/Mg modifier provided the highest sensitivity and for this reason it is more suitable for the determination of Pb in fertilizers samples in slurry; besides this it presented a better signal-to-noise ratio than NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd. - Highlights: • Lead has been determined in fertilizers using slurry sampling GF AAS. • The mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrates was found to be the ideal chemical modifier. • Calibration could be carried out against aqueous standard solutions. • The proposed method is much faster than the EPA method, which includes sample digestion.

  2. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction and slurry sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, chemical modifiers in solution (Pd/Mg, NH4H2PO4 and NH4NO3/Pd) were compared with permanent modifiers (Ir and Ru) for the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples using slurry sampling and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The analytical line at 283.3 nm was used due to some spectral interference observed at 217.0 nm. The NH4H2PO4 was abandoned due to severe spectral interference even at the 283.3-nm line. For Pd/Mg and NH4NO3/Pd the optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 °C and 1900 °C, respectively. For Ru and Ir, the integrated absorbance signal was stable up to pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C and 900 °C, respectively, and up to atomization temperature of 1700 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) was 17 ng g−1 using Pd/Mg and 29 ng g−1 using NH4NO3/Pd. Among the permanent modifiers investigated, the LOD was 22 ng g−1 Pb for Ir and 10 ng g−1 Pb for Ru. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the certified reference material NIST SRM 695. Although Ru provided lower LOD, which can be attributed to a lower blank signal, only the modifiers in solution showed concordant values of Pb concentration for the NIST SRM 695 and the most of analyzed samples. Moreover, the Pd/Mg modifier provided the highest sensitivity and for this reason it is more suitable for the determination of Pb in fertilizers samples in slurry; besides this it presented a better signal-to-noise ratio than NH4NO3/Pd. - Highlights: • Lead has been determined in fertilizers using slurry sampling GF AAS. • The mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrates was found to be the ideal chemical modifier. • Calibration could be carried out against aqueous standard solutions. • The proposed method is much faster than the EPA method, which includes sample digestion

  3. Genetic background strongly modifies the severity of symptoms of Hirschsprung disease, but not hearing loss in rats carrying Ednrb(sl mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihua Dang

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is thought to result as a consequence of multiple gene interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate the developing gut. However, it remains unknown whether the single complete deletion of important HSCR-associated genes is sufficient to result in HSCR disease. In this study, we found that the null mutation of the Ednrb gene, thought indispensable for enteric neuron development, is insufficient to result in HSCR disease when bred onto a different genetic background in rats carrying Ednrb(sl mutations. Moreover, we found that this mutation results in serious congenital sensorineural deafness, and these strains may be used as ideal models of Waardenburg Syndrome Type 4 (WS4. Furthermore, we evaluated how the same changed genetic background modifies three features of WS4 syndrome, aganglionosis, hearing loss, and pigment disorder in these congenic strains. We found that the same genetic background markedly changed the aganglionosis, but resulted in only slight changes to hearing loss and pigment disorder. This provided the important evidence, in support of previous studies, that different lineages of neural crest-derived cells migrating along with various pathways are regulated by different signal molecules. This study will help us to better understand complicated diseases such as HSCR and WS4 syndrome.

  4. Randomly detected genetically modified (GM maize (Zea mays L. near a transport route revealed a fragile 45S rDNA phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomar Espinosa Waminal

    Full Text Available Monitoring of genetically modified (GM crops has been emphasized to prevent their potential effects on the environment and human health. Monitoring of the inadvertent dispersal of transgenic maize in several fields and transport routes in Korea was carried out by qualitative multiplex PCR, and molecular analyses were conducted to identify the events of the collected GM maize. Cytogenetic investigations through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of the GM maize were performed to check for possible changes in the 45S rDNA cluster because this cluster was reported to be sensitive to replication and transcription stress. Three GM maize kernels were collected from a transport route near Incheon port, Korea, and each was found to contain NK603, stacked MON863 x NK603, and stacked NK603 x MON810 inserts, respectively. Cytogenetic analysis of the GM maize containing the stacked NK603 x MON810 insert revealed two normal compact 5S rDNA signals, but the 45S rDNA showed a fragile phenotype, demonstrating a "beads-on-a-string" fragmentation pattern, which seems to be a consequence of genetic modification. Implications of the 45S rDNA cluster fragility in GM maize are also discussed.

  5. Identification and mapping stripe rust resistance gene YrLM168a using extreme individuals and recessive phenotype class in a complicate genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junyan; Chen, Guoyue; Wei, Yuming; Liu, Yaxi; Jiang, Qiantao; Li, Wei; Pu, Zhien; Lan, Xiujin; Dai, Shoufen; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Youliang

    2015-12-01

    The identification and characterization of resistance genes effective against stripe rust of wheat is beneficial for modern wheat breeding programs. Molecular markers to such genes facilitate their deployment. The variety Milan has resistance that is effective against the predominant stripe rust races in the Sichuan region. Two resistant and two susceptible F8 lines from a cross between Milan and the susceptible variety Chuannong 16 were used to investigate inheritance of the Milan resistance. Three F2 populations were developed from crosses between the resistant lines and their susceptible sibling lines (LM168a × LM168c, LM168c × LM168a, LM168b × LM168d) and used for genetic analysis and molecular mapping of the genes for resistance. The stripe rust resistance in LM168a and LM168b was conferred by a single dominant gene, temporarily designated as YrLM168a. Forty-five extreme susceptible plants from the F2 families of LM168d × LM168b were genotyped with 836 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to map YrLM168a. YrLM168a was mapped in chromosome 6BL. The nearest flanking markers Xwmc756 and Xbarc146 were 4.6 and 4.6 cM away from the gene at both sides, respectively. The amplification results of twenty extreme resistant (IT 0) and susceptible (IT 4) F2 plants of LM168c × LM168a and LM168a × LM168c with marker Xwmc756 further validated the mapping results. The study suggested that extreme individuals and recessive phenotype class can be successfully used for mapping genes, which should be efficient and reliable. In addition, the flanking markers near YrLM168a should be helpful in marker-assisted breeding. PMID:26113523

  6. The Protective Effect of Minocycline in a Paraquat-Induced Parkinson's Disease Model in Drosophila is Modified in Altered Genetic Backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arati A. Inamdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies link the herbicide paraquat to increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD. We previously reported that Drosophila exposed to paraquat recapitulate PD symptoms, including region-specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Minocycline, a tetracycline derivative, exerts ameliorative effects in neurodegenerative disease models, including Drosophila. We investigated whether our environmental toxin-based PD model could contribute to an understanding of cellular and genetic mechanisms of minocycline action and whether we could assess potential interference with these drug effects in altered genetic backgrounds. Cofeeding of minocycline with paraquat prolonged survival, rescued mobility defects, blocked generation of reactive oxygen species, and extended dopaminergic neuron survival, as has been reported previously for a genetic model of PD in Drosophila. We then extended this study to identify potential interactions of minocycline with genes regulating dopamine homeostasis that might modify protection against paraquat and found that deficits in GTP cyclohydrolase adversely affect minocycline rescue. We further performed genetic studies to identify signaling pathways that are necessary for minocycline protection against paraquat toxicity and found that mutations in the Drosophila genes that encode c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and Akt/Protein kinase B block minocycline rescue.

  7. Associations of allergic sensitization and clinical phenotypes with innate immune response genes polymorphisms are modified by house dust mite allergen exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Kurowski, Marcin; Majkowska-Wojciechowska, Barbara; Wardzyńska, Aleksandra; Kowalski, Marek L

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Polymorphisms within innate immunity genes are associated with allergic phenotypes but results are variable. These associations were not analyzed with respect to allergen exposure. We investigated associations of TLR and CD14 polymorphisms with allergy phenotypes in the context of house dust mite (HDM) exposure. Material and methods Children, aged 12-16 years (n=326), were recruited from downtown and rural locations and assessed by allergist. Skin prick tests, total and HDM-speci...

  8. Mouse Genetic Background Influences the Dental Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    LI, YONG; Konicki, William S.; Wright, J. Timothy; Suggs, Cynthia; Xue, Hui; Kuehl, Melissa A.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Gibson, Carolyn W.

    2013-01-01

    Dental enamel covers the crown of the vertebrate tooth and is considered to be the hardest tissue in the body. Enamel develops during secretion of an extracellular matrix by ameloblast cells in the tooth germ, prior to eruption of the tooth into the oral cavity. Secreted enamel proteins direct mineralization patterns during the maturation stage of amelogenesis as the tooth prepares to erupt. The amelogenins are the most abundant enamel proteins, and are required for normal enamel development....

  9. Comparison of palladium chemical modifiers for the determination of selenium in plasma by Zeeman-effect background corrected electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    former species, It was not possible to stabilize trimethylselenonium to the same extent with this modifier, Peak shapes and appearance times of the atomization signals were equal for the four selenium species with this modifier, The addition of 20 mu g of palladium was used for the analysis of the serum...

  10. Real-time detection of cofactor availability in genetically modified living Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells - Simultaneous probing of different geno- and phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Heiskanen, Arto; Spegel, C.;

    2009-01-01

    strain, ENY.WA-1A. The developed method is based on multichannel detection using microelectrode arrays. Its versatility was demonstrated by using four microelectrode arrays for simultaneously monitoring the NAD(P)H availability of both geno- and phenotypes under the influence of two different carbon...... sources, glucose and fructose, as well as the cytosolic and mitochondrial inhibitor and uncoupler, dicoumarol. The obtained results indicate that the method is capable of accurately and reproducibly (overall relative standard error of mean 3.2%) mapping the real-time responses of the cells with different...... genotype-phenotype combinations. The ENY.WA cells showed the same response to glucose and fructose when dicoumarol was used; fermentative cells indicated the presence of cytosolic inhibition and respiratory cells a net effect of mitochondrial uncoupling. EBY44 cells showed cytosolic inhibition with the...

  11. Human TRMU encoding the mitochondrial 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase is a putative nuclear modifier gene for the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear modifier genes have been proposed to modulate the phenotypic manifestation of human mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1491G mutation associated with deafness in many families world-wide. Here we identified and characterized the putative nuclear modifier gene TRMU encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial protein related to tRNA modification. A 1937 bp TRMU cDNA has been isolated and the genomic organization of TRMU has been elucidated. The human TRMU gene containing 11 exons encodes a 421 residue protein with a strong homology to the TRMU-like proteins of bacteria and other homologs. TRMU is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, but abundantly in tissues with high metabolic rates including heart, liver, kidney, and brain. Immunofluorescence analysis of human 143B cells expressing TRMU-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the human Trmu localizes and functions in mitochondrion. Furthermore, we show that in families with the deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1491G mutation there is highly suggestive linkage and linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers adjacent to TRMU and the presence of deafness. These observations suggest that human TRMU may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations

  12. A Screen for Modifiers of Cilia Phenotypes Reveals Novel MKS Alleles and Uncovers a Specific Genetic Interaction between osm-3 and nphp-4

    OpenAIRE

    Masyukova, Svetlana V.; Dawn E Landis; Henke, Scott J.; Williams, Corey L.; Pieczynski, Jay N.; Roszczynialski, Kelly N.; Jannese E Covington; Malarkey, Erik B.; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is a ciliopathy in which genetic modifiers may underlie the variable penetrance of clinical features. To identify modifiers, a screen was conducted on C. elegans nphp-4(tm925) mutants. Mutations in ten loci exacerbating nphp-4(tm925) ciliary defects were obtained. Four loci have been identified, three of which are established ciliopathy genes mks-1, mks-2, and mks-5. The fourth allele (yhw66) is a missense mutation (S316F) in OSM-3, a kinesin required for cilia distal ...

  13. Elevated paternal glucocorticoid exposure alters the small noncoding RNA profile in sperm and modifies anxiety and depressive phenotypes in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, A K; Fennell, K A; Perreau, V M; Fox, A; O'Bryan, M K; Kim, J H; Bredy, T W; Pang, T Y; Hannan, A J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that physiological and behavioral traits may be transgenerationally inherited through the paternal lineage, possibly via non-genomic signals derived from the sperm. To investigate how paternal stress might influence offspring behavioral phenotypes, a model of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation was used. Male breeders were administered water supplemented with corticosterone (CORT) for 4 weeks before mating with untreated female mice. Female, but not male, F1 offspring of CORT-treated fathers displayed altered fear extinction at 2 weeks of age. Only male F1 offspring exhibited altered patterns of ultrasonic vocalization at postnatal day 3 and, as adults, showed decreased time in open on the elevated-plus maze and time in light on the light-dark apparatus, suggesting a hyperanxiety-like behavioral phenotype due to paternal CORT treatment. Interestingly, expression of the paternally imprinted gene Igf2 was increased in the hippocampus of F1 male offspring but downregulated in female offspring. Male and female F2 offspring displayed increased time spent in the open arm of the elevated-plus maze, suggesting lower levels of anxiety compared with control animals. Only male F2 offspring showed increased immobility time on the forced-swim test and increased latency to feed on the novelty-supressed feeding test, suggesting a depression-like phenotype in these animals. Collectively, these data provide evidence that paternal CORT treatment alters anxiety and depression-related behaviors across multiple generations. Analysis of the small RNA profile in sperm from CORT-treated males revealed marked effects on the expression of small noncoding RNAs. Sperm from CORT-treated males contained elevated levels of three microRNAs, miR-98, miR-144 and miR-190b, which are predicted to interact with multiple growth factors, including Igf2 and Bdnf. Sustained elevation of glucocorticoids is therefore involved in the transmission of paternal

  14. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2. PMID:26647310

  15. Gender as a Modifying Factor Influencing Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Phenotype Severity and Mortality: A Nationwide Multiple Databases Cross-Sectional Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Dogan

    Full Text Available Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is one of the most heterogeneous hereditary disease in terms of age of onset, clinical manifestations, and severity, challenging both medical management and clinical trials. The CTG expansion size is the main factor determining the age of onset although no factor can finely predict phenotype and prognosis. Differences between males and females have not been specifically reported. Our aim is to study gender impact on DM1 phenotype and severity.We first performed cross-sectional analysis of main multiorgan clinical parameters in 1409 adult DM1 patients (>18 y from the DM-Scope nationwide registry and observed different patterns in males and females. Then, we assessed gender impact on social and economic domains using the AFM-Téléthon DM1 survey (n = 970, and morbidity and mortality using the French National Health Service Database (n = 3301.Men more frequently had (1 severe muscular disability with marked myotonia, muscle weakness, cardiac, and respiratory involvement; (2 developmental abnormalities with facial dysmorphism and cognitive impairment inferred from low educational levels and work in specialized environments; and (3 lonely life. Alternatively, women more frequently had cataracts, dysphagia, digestive tract dysfunction, incontinence, thyroid disorder and obesity. Most differences were out of proportion to those observed in the general population. Compared to women, males were more affected in their social and economic life. In addition, they were more frequently hospitalized for cardiac problems, and had a higher mortality rate.Gender is a previously unrecognized factor influencing DM1 clinical profile and severity of the disease, with worse socio-economic consequences of the disease and higher morbidity and mortality in males. Gender should be considered in the design of both stratified medical management and clinical trials.

  16. A sensitized mutagenesis screen identifies Gli3 as a modifier of Sox10 neurocristopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Matera, Ivana; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Loftus, Stacie K.; Hou, Ling; Incao, Arturo; Silver, Debra L.; Rivas, Cecelia; Elliott, Eugene C.; Baxter, Laura L.; Pavan, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency for the transcription factor SOX10 is associated with the pigmentary deficiencies of Waardenburg syndrome (WS) and is modeled in Sox10 haploinsufficient mice (Sox10LacZ/+). As genetic background affects WS severity in both humans and mice, we established an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen to identify modifiers that increase the phenotypic severity of Sox10LacZ/+ mice. Analysis of 230 pedigrees identified three modifiers, named modifier of Sox10 neurocristopat...

  17. Introduction of the Six Major Genomic Deletions of Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) into the Parental Vaccinia Virus Is Not Sufficient To Reproduce an MVA-Like Phenotype in Cell Culture and in Mice▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger-Henschel, Christine; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Wolferstätter, Michael; Kachelriess, Heike; Baur, Karen; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Wagner, Markus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has a highly restricted host range in cell culture and is apathogenic in vivo. MVA was derived from the parental chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) by more than 570 passages in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. During CEF cell passaging, six major deletions comprising 24,668 nucleotides occurred in the CVA genome. We have cloned both the MVA and the parental CVA genome as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and have sequentially introduced the six major MVA deletions into the cloned CVA genome. Reconstituted mutant CVA viruses containing up to six major MVA deletions showed no detectable replication restriction in 12 of 14 mammalian cell lines tested; the exceptions were rabbit cell lines RK13 and SIRC. In mice, CVA mutants with up to three deletions showed slightly enhanced virulence, suggesting that gene deletion in replicating vaccinia virus (VACV) can result in gain of fitness in vivo. CVA mutants containing five or all six deletions were still pathogenic, with a moderate degree of attenuation. Deletion V was mainly responsible for the attenuated phenotype of these mutants. In conclusion, loss or truncation of all 31 open reading frames in the six major deletions is not sufficient to reproduce the specific MVA phenotype of strong attenuation and highly restricted host range. Mutations in viral genes outside or in association with the six major deletions appear to contribute significantly to this phenotype. Host range restriction and avirulence of MVA are most likely a cooperative effect of gene deletions and mutations involving the major deletions. PMID:20668072

  18. Introduction of the six major genomic deletions of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) into the parental vaccinia virus is not sufficient to reproduce an MVA-like phenotype in cell culture and in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger-Henschel, Christine; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Wolferstätter, Michael; Kachelriess, Heike; Baur, Karen; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Wagner, Markus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2010-10-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has a highly restricted host range in cell culture and is apathogenic in vivo. MVA was derived from the parental chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) by more than 570 passages in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. During CEF cell passaging, six major deletions comprising 24,668 nucleotides occurred in the CVA genome. We have cloned both the MVA and the parental CVA genome as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and have sequentially introduced the six major MVA deletions into the cloned CVA genome. Reconstituted mutant CVA viruses containing up to six major MVA deletions showed no detectable replication restriction in 12 of 14 mammalian cell lines tested; the exceptions were rabbit cell lines RK13 and SIRC. In mice, CVA mutants with up to three deletions showed slightly enhanced virulence, suggesting that gene deletion in replicating vaccinia virus (VACV) can result in gain of fitness in vivo. CVA mutants containing five or all six deletions were still pathogenic, with a moderate degree of attenuation. Deletion V was mainly responsible for the attenuated phenotype of these mutants. In conclusion, loss or truncation of all 31 open reading frames in the six major deletions is not sufficient to reproduce the specific MVA phenotype of strong attenuation and highly restricted host range. Mutations in viral genes outside or in association with the six major deletions appear to contribute significantly to this phenotype. Host range restriction and avirulence of MVA are most likely a cooperative effect of gene deletions and mutations involving the major deletions. PMID:20668072

  19. Disabling of the erbB Pathway Followed by IFN-γ Modifies Phenotype and Enhances Genotoxic Eradication of Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Nagai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Reversion of the malignant phenotype of erbB2-transformed cells can be driven by anti-erbB2/neu monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, which disrupt the receptor’s kinase activity. We examined the biologic effects of IFN-γ alone or after anti-erbB2/neu mAb treatment of erbB2-positive cells. IFN-γ had no effect on its own. Treatment of the tumors with anti-erbB2/neu mAbs followed by IFN-γ led to dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in vitro and in vivo with minimal mAb dosing. Sequential therapy enhanced the effects of chemotherapy. Moreover, IFN-γ with mAb treatment of mice with IFNγR knockdown tumors did not demonstrate marked synergistic eradication effects, indicating an unexpected role of IFN-γ on the tumor itself. Additionally, mAb and IFN-γ treatment also induced immune host responses that enhanced tumor eradication. Biochemical analyses identified loss of Snail expression in tumor cells, reflecting diminution of tumor-stem-cell-like properties as a consequence of altered activity of GSK3-β and KLF molecules.

  20. Modifier factors influencing the phenotypic manifestation of the deafness-associated mitochondrial DNA mutations%修饰因子对线粒体DNA突变致聋的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨爱芬; 郑静; 吕建新; 管敏鑫

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial DNA have been found to be one of the most important causes of sensorineural hearing loss. In particular, these mutations often occur in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA genes. Of these, the homoplasmic A1555G and C1494T mutations in the 12S rRNA have been associated with both aminoglycoside induced and nonsyndromic hearing impairment in many families worldwide. Children carrying the A1555G or C1494T mutation are susceptible to the exposure of ototoxic drugs, thereby inducing or worsening hearing loss. Individuals harboring A1555G or C1494T mutation can also develop hearing loss even in the absence of aminoglycoside exposure. However, matrilineal relatives of intra-families or inter-families carrying the A1555G or C1494T mutation exhibit a wide range of severity,age-at-onset, and audiometric configuration of hearing impairment. These indicate that the A1555G or C1494T mutation is a primary factor underlying the development of deafness but insufficient to produce the clinical phenotype. Thus, other modifier factors, such as aminoglycoside (s), mitochondrial DNA haplotype(s) or nuclear modifier gene(s), play a role in the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1555G or C1494T mutation. In this review, we summarize the modifier factors for the phenotypic expression of deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1555G and C1494T mutations and propose the molecular pathogenetic mechanism of maternally inherited deafness.%线粒体DNA突变是引起感音神经性耳聋的重要原因之一,这些突变主要位于线粒体12SrRNA和tRNA基因上.其中12S rRNA基因上的同质性A1555G和C1494T突变与氨基糖甙类抗生素造成的耳聋相关.携带这两个突变的个体对耳毒性药物高度敏感,导致临床上常见的"一针致聋"现象.但携带A1555G或C1494T突变的个体在没用药的情况下也能产生非综合征型耳聋,而且同一家系内和不同家系间的母系成员在听力损失

  1. Background Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Saraiva, Sofia;

    2016-01-01

    This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders.......This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders....

  2. Genetic modification of glaucoma associated phenotypes between AKXD-28/Ty and DBA/2J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabaleta Adriana

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glaucoma is a common disease but its molecular etiology is poorly understood. It involves retinal ganglion cell death and optic nerve damage that is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Identifying genes that modify glaucoma associated phenotypes is likely to provide insights to mechanisms of glaucoma. We previously reported glaucoma in DBA/2J mice caused by recessive alleles at two loci, isa and ipd, that cause iris stromal atrophy and iris pigment dispersion, respectively. A approach for identifying modifier genes is to study the effects of specific mutations in different mouse strains. When the phenotypic effect of a mutation is modified upon its introduction into a new strain, crosses between the parental strains can be used to identify modifier genes. The purpose of this study was to determine if the effects of the DBA/2J derived isa and ipd loci are modified in strain AKXD-28/Ty. Results AKXD-28/Ty mice develop glaucoma characterized by intraocular pressure elevation, retinal ganglion loss, and optic nerve excavation. In AKXD-28/Ty, isa causes an iris stromal atrophy phenotype as in DBA/2J. However, the iris pigment dispersion phenotype associated with ipd in DBA/2J does not occur in AKXD-28/Ty. Additionally, a greater severity and speed of retinal and optic nerve damage following intraocular pressure elevation in AKXD-28/Ty compared to DBA/2J mice suggests that AKXD-28/Ty is more susceptible to pressure-induced cell death. Conclusions The consequences of the ipd and isa mutations are modified in the AKXD-28/Ty background. These strains provide a resource for the identification of modifier genes that modulate pigment dispersion and susceptibility to pressure-induced cell death.

  3. Evaluation of Phenotypic Methods for Detection of Klebsiella Pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. Pneumoniae in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Azimi; Abdolaziz Rastegar-Lari; Malihe Talebi; Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh-Namvar; Somayeh Soleymanzadeh-Moghadam

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the main mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems is potential of Klebsiella pneumoniae to produce K. pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC). KPC is an important type of carbapenemase, which can hydrolyze carbapenems and other beta-lactam antibiotics. Modified Hodge Test (MHT) and  use  of  boronic  acid  as  a  KPC  inhibitor  are  two  types  of  phenotypic methods, which are used for detection of carbanemase-producing bacteria. Specificity of these two phenotypic tests for identi...

  4. The natural radiation background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The components of the natural background radiation and their variations are described. Cosmic radiation is a major contributor to the external dose to the human body whilst naturally-occurring radionuclides of primordial and cosmogenic origin contribute to both the external and internal doses, with the primordial radionuclides being the major contributor in both cases. Man has continually modified the radiation dose to which he has been subjected. The two traditional methods of measuring background radiation, ionisation chamber measurements and scintillation counting, are looked at and the prospect of using thermoluminescent dosimetry is considered

  5. Human CD4-major histocompatibility complex class II (DQw6) transgenic mice in an endogenous CD4/CD8-deficient background: reconstitution of phenotype and human-restricted function

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    To reconstitute the human immune system in mice, transgenic mice expressing human CD4 and human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (DQw6) molecules in an endogenous CD4- and CD8-deficient background (mCD4/8-/-), after homologous recombination, have been generated. We report that expression of human CD4 molecule in mCD4/8-/- mice rescues thymocyte development and completely restores the T cell compartment in peripheral lymphoid organs. Upon vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) challen...

  6. Superoxide dismutase phenotypes in duodenal ulcers: A genetic marker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulekha S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Cu-Zn superoxide dismutases are antioxidative defensive enzymes that catalyze the reduction of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide. Aim:The study focuses on the association of electromorph of superoxide dismutase with duodenal ulcers, which result due to an imbalance between aggressive and defensive factors. Materials and Methods:Endoscopically confirmed 210 duodenal ulcer patients and 185 healthy individuals for comparative analysis were considered for the present study. Phenotyping of superoxide dismutase was carried out by subjecting the RBC membranes to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, using appropriate staining protocols. Results:Statistical analysis of SOD phenotypes revealed a significant increase of SOD AFNx012 allele and Superoxide dismutases (SOD 2-2 phenotype in duodenal ulcer group. Among these individuals, a predominance of Helicobacter pylori infection was observed. The increased preponderance of homozygotes can be explained on the basis of reduced and altered enzyme activity, which may lead to disturbance in homeostasis of antioxidant/oxidant culminating in high lipid peroxidative gastric mucosal tissue damage and ulceration. No variation in the distribution of SOD phenotypes with respect to Helicobacter pylori indicates the role of Mn-SOD rather than Cu-Zn SOD in the Helicobacter pylori infected cases as reported earlier. Conclusions:Superoxide dismutase as a genetic marker / gene modifier, encoding for an antioxidant enzyme in maintaining tissue homeostasis of the gastric mucosa is discussed.

  7. Latent phenotypes pervade gene regulatory circuits.

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Latent phenotypes are non-adaptive byproducts of adaptive phenotypes. They exist in biological systems as different as promiscuous enzymes and genome-scale metabolic reaction networks, and can give rise to evolutionary adaptations and innovations. We know little about their prevalence in the gene expression phenotypes of regulatory circuits, important sources of evolutionary innovations. RESULTS Here, we study a space of more than sixteen million three-gene model regulatory circ...

  8. Latent phenotypes pervade gene regulatory circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Latent phenotypes are non-adaptive byproducts of adaptive phenotypes. They exist in biological systems as different as promiscuous enzymes and genome-scale metabolic reaction networks, and can give rise to evolutionary adaptations and innovations. We know little about their prevalence in the gene expression phenotypes of regulatory circuits, important sources of evolutionary innovations. Results Here, we study a space of more than sixteen million three-gene model regulatory circuit...

  9. Phenotypic plasticity can facilitate adaptive evolution in gene regulatory circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Olivier C; Espinosa-Soto Carlos; Wagner Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Many important evolutionary adaptations originate in the modification of gene regulatory circuits to produce new gene activity phenotypes. How do evolving populations sift through an astronomical number of circuits to find circuits with new adaptive phenotypes? The answer may often involve phenotypic plasticity. Phenotypic plasticity allows a genotype to produce different - alternative - phenotypes after non-genetic perturbations that include gene expression noise, environ...

  10. Phenotypic plasticity can facilitate adaptive evolution in gene regulatory circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa-Soto, C.; Martin, O. C.; Wagner, A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many important evolutionary adaptations originate in the modification of gene regulatory circuits to produce new gene activity phenotypes. How do evolving populations sift through an astronomical number of circuits to find circuits with new adaptive phenotypes? The answer may often involve phenotypic plasticity. Phenotypic plasticity allows a genotype to produce different - alternative - phenotypes after non-genetic perturbations that include gene expression noise, environment...

  11. Phenotypic constraints and phenotypic hitchhiking in a promiscuous enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Andreas; Weikert, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Covarying phenotypic traits can limit natural selection’s ability to modify these traits. Most evolutionary studies on trait covariation use the comparative method to study complex traits of multicellular organisms. Simpler traits have the advantage of being amenable to experimental evolution. Here we study such a simple molecular system, the TEM-1 beta-lactamase protein, a promiscuous enzyme that hydrolyses antibiotics, and thus confers antibiotic resistance to bacteria. We mutagenized large...

  12. Mitochondrial COX2 G7598A Mutation May Have a Modifying Role in the Phenotypic Manifestation of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Induced Deafness Associated with 12S rRNA A1555G Mutation in a Han Chinese Pedigree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianbin; Liu, Qicai; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Can

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that certain mitochondrial haplogroup markers and some specific variants in mitochondrial haplogroup may also influence the phenotypic expression of particular mitochondrial disorders. In this report, the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization were identified in a Chinese pedigree with the aminoglycoside antibiotic (AmAn)-induced deafness and nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL). The pathogenic gene responsible for this hereditary NSHL pedigree was determined by Microarray chip, which possessed the nine NSHL hot-spot mutations, including GJB2 (35delG, 176dell6bp, 235de1C, and 299delAT), GJB3 (538C>T), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2A>G and 2168A>G), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA (C1494T and A1555G). Only the homoplasmic A1555G mutation was detected, which was confirmed by direct sequencing. Also, real-time amplification refractory mutation system quantitative polymerase chain reaction methodology was performed to calculate the A1555G mutation load. The proband's complete mtDNA genome were amplified and direct sequencing was performed to determine the mitochondrial haplogroup and private mutations. The proband's mitochondrial haplogroup belonges to M7b1 and a private mutation MTCOX2 G7598A (p.Ala 5 Thr) is found. Phylogenetic analysis of COX2 polypeptide sequences demonstrates that the alanine residue is relatively conserved, but owing to the missense mutation (p.Ala 5 Thr), its side chain hydrophobicity will be changed, and what is more, as it is adjacent to a glutamine residue, which is highly conserved and hydrophilic, in an evolutionary stable domain; G7598A (p.Ala 5 Thr) may alter the protein secondary structure and physiological function of COX2 and, thus, aggravate the mitochondrial dysfunction conferred by the A1555G mutation. Furthermore, the G7598A mutation is absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls; therefore, G7598A (p.Ala 5 Thr) in the mitochondrial haplogoup M7b1 may have a modifying role, enhancing its penetrance and severity

  13. Phenotypic heterogeneity of Streptococcus mutans in dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupf, S; Hannig, M; Breitung, K; Schellenberger, W; Eschrich, K; Remmerbach, T; Kneist, S

    2008-12-01

    Information concerning phenotypic heterogeneity of Streptococcus mutans in carious dentin is sparse. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) facilitates the phenotypic differentiation of bacteria to the subspecies level. To verify a supposed influence of restorative treatment on the phenotypic heterogeneity of S. mutans, we isolated and compared a total of 222 S. mutans strains from dentin samples of 21 human deciduous molars during caries excavation (T(1)) and 8 wks (T(2)) after removal of the temporary restoration. Phenotypic heterogeneity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS and hierarchical clustering. Thirty-six distinct S. mutans phenotypes could be identified. Although indistinguishable phenotypes were found in the same teeth at T(1) and T(2), as well as in different teeth of individual participants, the phenotypic heterogeneity increased significantly, from 1.4 phenotypes per S. mutans-positive dentin sample at T(1) to 2.2 phenotypes at T(2). We attribute this to an adaptation of S. mutans to the modified environment under the restoration following caries excavation. PMID:19029088

  14. Myelin alters the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages by activating PPARs

    OpenAIRE

    Bogie, Jeroen; Jorissen, Winde; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmierlo, Tim; van Horssen, Jack; Hellings, Niels; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, J. J. A.; Nijland, Philip G.; Zelcer, Noam

    2013-01-01

    Background Foamy macrophages, containing myelin degradation products, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Recent studies have described an altered phenotype of macrophages after myelin internalization. However, mechanisms by which myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype influences lesion progression remain unclear. Results We demonstrate that myelin as well as phosphatidylserine (PS), a phospholipid found in myelin, reduce nitri...

  15. Phenotypic plasticity in the range-margin population of the lycaenid butterfly Zizeeria maha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otaki Joji M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many butterfly species have been experiencing the northward range expansion and physiological adaptation, probably due to climate warming. Here, we document an extraordinary field case of a species of lycaenid butterfly, Zizeeria maha, for which plastic phenotypes of wing color-patterns were revealed at the population level in the course of range expansion. Furthermore, we examined whether this outbreak of phenotypic changes was able to be reproduced in a laboratory. Results In the recently expanded northern range margins of this species, more than 10% of the Z. maha population exhibited characteristic color-pattern modifications on the ventral wings for three years. We physiologically reproduced similar phenotypes by an artificial cold-shock treatment of a normal southern population, and furthermore, we genetically reproduced a similar phenotype after selective breeding of a normal population for ten generations, demonstrating that the cold-shock-induced phenotype was heritable and partially assimilated genetically in the breeding line. Similar genetic process might have occurred in the previous and recent range-margin populations as well. Relatively minor modifications expressed in the tenth generation of the breeding line together with other data suggest a role of founder effect in this field case. Conclusions Our results support the notion that the outbreak of the modified phenotypes in the recent range-margin population was primed by the revelation of plastic phenotypes in response to temperature stress and by the subsequent genetic process in the previous range-margin population, followed by migration and temporal establishment of genetically unstable founders in the recent range margins. This case presents not only an evolutionary role of phenotypic plasticity in the field but also a novel evolutionary aspect of range expansion at the species level.

  16. Mitochondrial COX2 G7598A Mutation May Have a Modifying Role in the Phenotypic Manifestation of Aminoglycoside Antibiotic-Induced Deafness Associated with 12S rRNA A1555G Mutation in a Han Chinese Pedigree

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tianbin; Liu, Qicai; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Can; Ou, Qishui

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that certain mitochondrial haplogroup markers and some specific variants in mitochondrial haplogroup may also influence the phenotypic expression of particular mitochondrial disorders. In this report, the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization were identified in a Chinese pedigree with the aminoglycoside antibiotic (AmAn)-induced deafness and nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL). The pathogenic gene responsible for this hereditary NSHL pedigree was determined by ...

  17. Fine Mapping of an Epilepsy Modifier Gene on Mouse Chromosome 19

    OpenAIRE

    Bergren, Sarah K.; Rutter, Elizabeth D.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels are associated with several types of human epilepsy. Variable expressivity and penetrance are common features of inherited epilepsy caused by sodium channel mutations, suggesting that genetic modifiers may influence clinical severity. The mouse model Scn2aQ54 has an epilepsy phenotype due to a mutation in Scn2a that results in elevated persistent sodium current. Phenotype severity in Scn2aQ54 mice is dependent on the genetic background. Congenic C57B...

  18. Study of modifiers factors associated to mitochondrial mutations in individuals with hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearing impairment is the most prevalent sensorial deficit in the general population. Congenital deafness occurs in about 1 in 1000 live births, of which approximately 50% has hereditary cause in development countries. Non-syndromic deafness can be caused by mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Mutations in mtDNA have been associated with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic deafness in many families worldwide. However, the nuclear background influences the phenotypic expression of these pathogenic mutations. Indeed, it has been proposed that nuclear modifier genes modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the mitochondrial A1555G mutation in the MTRNR1 gene. The both putative nuclear modifiers genes TRMU and MTO1 encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial related to tRNA modification. It has been hypothesizes that human TRMU and also MTO1 nuclear genes may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of deafness-associated mitochondrial mutations. The aim of this work was to elucidate the contribution of mitochondrial mutations, nuclear modifier genes mutations and aminoglycoside exposure in the deafness phenotype. Our findings suggest that the genetic background of individuals may play an important role in the pathogenesis of deafness-associated with mitochondrial mutation and aminoglycoside-induced.

  19. A STUDY COMPARING CHEMICAL PEELING USING MODIFIED JESSNER'S SOLUTION AND 15%TRICHLOROACETIC ACID VERSUS 15% TRICHLOROACETIC ACID IN THE TREATMENT OF MELASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Safoury, Omar Soliman; Zaki, Nagla Mohamed; El Nabarawy, Eman Ahmad; Farag, Eman Abas

    2009-01-01

    Background: Melasma is a symmetric progressive hyperpigmentation of the facial skin that occurs in all races but has a predilection for darker skin phenotypes. Depigmenting agents, laser and chemical peeling as classic Jessner's solution, modified Jessner's solution and trichloroacetic acid have been used alone and in combination in the treatment of melasma. Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the therapeutic effect of combined 15% Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and modified Jessner's...

  20. Metabolomic phenotyping of af cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou;

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and...... possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal...... outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5) was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n...

  1. Bacteria under SOS evolve anticancer phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Weitao Tao; Dallo Shatha F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The anticancer drugs, such as DNA replication inhibitors, stimulate bacterial adhesion and induce the bacterial SOS response. As a variety of bacterial mutants can be generated during SOS, novel phenotypes are likely to be selected under the drug pressure. Presentation of the hypothesis Bacteria growing with cancer cells in the presence of the replication inhibitors undergo the SOS response and evolve advantageous phenotypes for the bacteria to invade the cancer cells in o...

  2. A Regulatory RNA Inducing Transgenerationally Inherited Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lea Møller

    variation in Arabidopsis enables different regulatory networks and mechanisms to shape the phenotypic characteristics. The thesis describes the identification of regulatory RNA encoded by an enzyme encoding gene. The RNA regulates by inducing transgenerationally inherited phenotypes. The function of the RNA...... is dependent on the genetic background illustrating that polymorphisms are found in either interactors or target genes of the RNA. Furthermore, the RNA provides a mechanistic link between accumulation of glucosinolate and onset of flowering....

  3. Phenex: Ontological Annotation of Phenotypic Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Balhoff, James P.; Dahdul, Wasila M; Kothari, Cartik R.; Lapp, Hilmar; John G. Lundberg; Mabee, Paula; Midford, Peter E.; Westerfield, Monte; Vision, Todd J

    2010-01-01

    Background Phenotypic differences among species have long been systematically itemized and described by biologists in the process of investigating phylogenetic relationships and trait evolution. Traditionally, these descriptions have been expressed in natural language within the context of individual journal publications or monographs. As such, this rich store of phenotype data has been largely unavailable for statistical and computational comparisons across studies or integration with other ...

  4. Genetic background determines response to hemostasis and thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Annie E

    2006-10-01

    thrombosis and haemostasis is remarkably different in C57BL/and A/J mice. Three A/J chromosome substitution strains were identified that expressed a phenotype similar to A/J for rebleeding, the C57Bl/6J background could modify the A/J phenotype, and the combination of two A/J QTL could restore the phenotype. The diverse genetic backgrounds and differences in response to vascular injury induced thrombosis and the tail bleeding assay, suggest the potential for identifying novel genetic determinants of thrombotic risk.

  5. Color change, phenotypic plasticity, and camouflage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eStevens

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to change appearance over a range of timescales is widespread in nature, existing in many invertebrate and vertebrate groups. This can include color change occurring in seconds, minutes, and hours, to longer term changes associated with phenotypic plasticity and development. A major function is for camouflage against predators because color change and plasticity enables animals to match their surroundings and potentially reduce the risk of predation. Recently, we published findings (Stevens et al. 2014a showing how shore crabs can change their appearance and better match the background to predator vision in the short term. This, coupled with a number of past studies, emphasizes the potential that animals have to modify their appearance for camouflage. However, the majority of studies on camouflage and color plasticity have focused on a small number of species capable of unusually rapid changes. There are many broad questions that remain about the nature, mechanisms, evolution, and adaptive value of color change and plasticity for concealment. Here, I discuss past work and outline six questions relating to color change and plasticity, as well as major avenues for future work.

  6. Large phenotype jumps in biomolecular evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bardou, F

    2003-01-01

    By defining the phenotype of a biopolymer by its active three-dimensional shape, and its genotype by its primary sequence, we propose a model that predicts and characterizes the statistical distribution of a population of biopolymers with a specific phenotype, that originated from a given genotypic sequence by a single mutational event. Depending on the ratio g0 that characterizes the spread of potential energies of the mutated population with respect to temperature, three different statistical regimes have been identified. We suggest that biopolymers found in nature are in a critical regime with g0 in the range 1-6, corresponding to a broad, but not too broad, phenotypic distribution resembling a truncated Levy flight. Thus the biopolymer phenotype can be considerably modified in just a few mutations.

  7. Introduction of the Six Major Genomic Deletions of Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) into the Parental Vaccinia Virus Is Not Sufficient To Reproduce an MVA-Like Phenotype in Cell Culture and in Mice▿

    OpenAIRE

    Meisinger-Henschel, Christine; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Wolferstätter, Michael; Kachelriess, Heike; Baur, Karen; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Wagner, Markus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has a highly restricted host range in cell culture and is apathogenic in vivo. MVA was derived from the parental chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) by more than 570 passages in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. During CEF cell passaging, six major deletions comprising 24,668 nucleotides occurred in the CVA genome. We have cloned both the MVA and the parental CVA genome as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and have sequentially introduce...

  8. Hanford Site background: Part 3, Groundwater background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents and interprets groundwater background data collected from the unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Site, a U.S. Department of Energy complex located near Richland, Washington. Characterization of background composition is an important component of environmental characterization activities and serves as a basis for distinguishing the presence and significance of contamination. Background data can also be used to assess the levels of baseline risk to which humans or other receptors are typically exposed and to establish remediation goals. Evaluating background on a sitewide basis provides a consistent, technically defensible definition of background as opposed to determining area-specific background compositions for each waste management unit being considered for remediation across the Hanford Site

  9. Determining Which Phenotypes Underlie a Pleiotropic Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Haldar, Tanushree; Witte, John S

    2016-07-01

    Discovering pleiotropic loci is important to understand the biological basis of seemingly distinct phenotypes. Most methods for assessing pleiotropy only test for the overall association between genetic variants and multiple phenotypes. To determine which specific traits are pleiotropic, we evaluate via simulation and application three different strategies. The first is model selection techniques based on the inverse regression of genotype on phenotypes. The second is a subset-based meta analysis ASSET [Bhattacharjee et al., ], which provides an optimal subset of nonnull traits. And the third is a modified Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H) procedure of controlling the expected false discovery rate [Benjamini and Hochberg, ] in the framework of phenome-wide association study. From our simulations we see that an inverse regression-based approach MultiPhen [O'Reilly et al., ] is more powerful than ASSET for detecting overall pleiotropic association, except for when all the phenotypes are associated and have genetic effects in the same direction. For determining which specific traits are pleiotropic, the modified B-H procedure performs consistently better than the other two methods. The inverse regression-based selection methods perform competitively with the modified B-H procedure only when the phenotypes are weakly correlated. The efficiency of ASSET is observed to lie below and in between the efficiency of the other two methods when the traits are weakly and strongly correlated, respectively. In our application to a large GWAS, we find that the modified B-H procedure also performs well, indicating that this may be an optimal approach for determining the traits underlying a pleiotropic signal. PMID:27238845

  10. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callesen Henrik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5 was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6 by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals.

  11. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou;

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and...... established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals....... possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal...

  12. Modified binary particle swam optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangwook Lee; Sangmoon Soak; Sanghoun Oh; Witold Pedrycz; Moongu Jeon

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a modified binary particle swarm optimization(BPSO)which adopts concepts of the genotype-phenotype rep-resentation and the mutation operator of genetic algorithms.Its main feature is that the BPSO can be treated as a continuous PSO.The proposed BPSO algorithm is tested on various benchmark functions,and its performance is compared with that of the original BPSO.Experimental results show that the modified BPSO outperforms the original BPSO algorithm.

  13. Describing the phenotype in Rett syndrome using a population database

    OpenAIRE

    Colvin, L; Fyfe, S.; Leonard, S.; Schiavello, T; ELLAWAY, C; N de Klerk; Christodoulou, J.; Msall, M; Leonard, H

    2003-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the MECP2 gene have been recently identified as the cause of Rett syndrome, prompting research into genotype-phenotype relations. However, despite these genetic advances there has been little descriptive epidemiology of the full range of phenotypes.

  14. Phenotypic approaches to drought in cassava: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okogbenin, Emmanuel; Setter, Tim L; Ferguson, Morag; Mutegi, Rose; Ceballos, Hernan; Olasanmi, Bunmi; Fregene, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cassava is an important crop in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Cassava can be produced adequately in drought conditions making it the ideal food security crop in marginal environments. Although cassava can tolerate drought stress, it can be genetically improved to enhance productivity in such environments. Drought adaptation studies in over three decades in cassava have identified relevant mechanisms which have been explored in conventional breeding. Drought is a quantitative trait and its multigenic nature makes it very challenging to effectively manipulate and combine genes in breeding for rapid genetic gain and selection process. Cassava has a long growth cycle of 12-18 months which invariably contributes to a long breeding scheme for the crop. Modern breeding using advances in genomics and improved genotyping, is facilitating the dissection and genetic analysis of complex traits including drought tolerance, thus helping to better elucidate and understand the genetic basis of such traits. A beneficial goal of new innovative breeding strategies is to shorten the breeding cycle using minimized, efficient or fast phenotyping protocols. While high throughput genotyping have been achieved, this is rarely the case for phenotyping for drought adaptation. Some of the storage root phenotyping in cassava are often done very late in the evaluation cycle making selection process very slow. This paper highlights some modified traits suitable for early-growth phase phenotyping that may be used to reduce drought phenotyping cycle in cassava. Such modified traits can significantly complement the high throughput genotyping procedures to fast track breeding of improved drought tolerant varieties. The need for metabolite profiling, improved phenomics to take advantage of next generation sequencing technologies and high throughput phenotyping are basic steps for future direction to improve genetic gain and maximize speed for drought tolerance breeding. PMID

  15. Phenotypic Approaches to Drought in Cassava: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eOkogbenin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cassava is an important crop in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Cassava can be produced adequately in drought conditions making it the ideal food security crop in marginal environments. Although cassava can tolerate drought stress, it can be genetically improved to enhance productivity in such environments. Drought adaptation studies in over three decades in cassava have identified relevant mechanisms which have been explored in conventional breeding. Drought is a quantitative trait and its multigenic nature makes it very challenging to effectively manipulate and combine genes in breeding for rapid genetic gain and selection process. Cassava has a long growth cycle of 12 - 18 months which invariably contributes to a long breeding scheme for the crop. Modern breeding using advances in genomics and improved genotyping, is facilitating the dissection and genetic analysis of complex traits including drought tolerance, thus helping to better elucidate and understand the genetic basis of such traits. A beneficial goal of new innovative breeding strategies is to shorten the breeding cycle using minimized, efficient or fast phenotyping protocols. While high throughput genotyping have been achieved, this is rarely the case for phenotyping for drought adaptation. Some of the storage root phenotyping in cassava are often done very late in the evaluation cycle making selection process very slow. This paper highlights some modified traits suitable for early-growth phase phenotyping that may be used to reduce drought phenotyping cycle in cassava. Such modified traits can significantly complement the high throughput genotyping procedures to fast track breeding of improved drought tolerant varieties. The need for metabolite profiling, improved phenomics to take advantage of next generation sequencing technologies and high throughput phenotyping are basic steps for future direction to improve genetic gain and maximize speed for drought tolerance

  16. Modified cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  17. Background independence in a background dependent renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labus, Peter; Morris, Tim R.; Slade, Zöe H.

    2016-07-01

    Within the derivative expansion of conformally reduced gravity, the modified split Ward identities are shown to be compatible with the flow equations if and only if either the anomalous dimension vanishes or the cutoff profile is chosen to have a power-law form. No solutions exist if the Ward identities are incompatible. In the compatible case, a clear reason is found for why Ward identities can still forbid the existence of fixed points; however, for any cutoff profile, a background independent (and parametrization independent) flow equation is uncovered. Finally, expanding in vertices, the combined equations are shown generically to become either overconstrained or highly redundant beyond the six-point level.

  18. Background independence in a background dependent renormalization group

    CERN Document Server

    Labus, Peter; Slade, Zoë H

    2016-01-01

    Within the derivative expansion of conformally reduced gravity, the modified split Ward identities are shown to be compatible with the flow equations if and only if either the anomalous dimension vanishes or the cutoff profile is chosen to be power law. No solutions exist if the Ward identities are incompatible. In the compatible case, a clear reason is found for why Ward identities can still forbid the existence of fixed points; however, for any cutoff profile, a background independent (and parametrisation independent) flow equation is uncovered. Finally, expanding in vertices, the combined equations are shown generically to become either over-constrained or highly redundant beyond the six-point level.

  19. The Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background

    CERN Document Server

    Beacom, John F

    2010-01-01

    The Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) is the weak glow of MeV neutrinos and antineutrinos from distant core-collapse supernovae. The DSNB has not been detected yet, but the Super-Kamiokande (SK) 2003 upper limit on the electron antineutrino flux is close to predictions, now quite precise, based on astrophysical data. If SK is modified with dissolved gadolinium to reduce detector backgrounds and increase the energy range for analysis, then it should detect the DSNB at a rate of a few events per year, providing a new probe of supernova neutrino emission and the cosmic core-collapse rate. If the DSNB is not detected, then new physics will be required. Neutrino astronomy, while uniquely powerful, has proven extremely difficult -- only the Sun and the nearby Supernova 1987A have been detected to date -- so the promise of detecting new sources soon is exciting indeed.

  20. Building Background Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  1. Genetic basis of hidden phenotypic variation revealed by increased translational readthrough in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorossadat Torabi

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic release factors 1 and 3, encoded by SUP45 and SUP35, respectively, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are required for translation termination. Recent studies have shown that, besides these two key factors, several genetic and epigenetic mechanisms modulate the efficiency of translation termination. These mechanisms, through modifying translation termination fidelity, were shown to affect various cellular processes, such as mRNA degradation, and in some cases could confer a beneficial phenotype to the cell. The most studied example of such a mechanism is [PSI+], the prion conformation of Sup35p, which can have pleiotropic effects on growth that vary among different yeast strains. However, genetic loci underlying such readthrough-dependent, background-specific phenotypes have yet to be identified. Here, we used sup35(C653R, a partial loss-of-function allele of the SUP35 previously shown to increase readthrough of stop codons and recapitulate some [PSI+]-dependent phenotypes, to study the genetic basis of phenotypes revealed by increased translational readthrough in two divergent yeast strains: BY4724 (a laboratory strain and RM11_1a (a wine strain. We first identified growth conditions in which increased readthrough of stop codons by sup35(C653R resulted in different growth responses between these two strains. We then used a recently developed linkage mapping technique, extreme QTL mapping (X-QTL, to identify readthrough-dependent loci for the observed growth differences. We further showed that variation in SKY1, an SR protein kinase, underlies a readthrough-dependent locus observed for growth on diamide and hydrogen peroxide. We found that the allelic state of SKY1 interacts with readthrough level and the genetic background to determine growth rate in these two conditions.

  2. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  3. Phenotypic Resistance to Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of antibiotic resistance is usually associated with genetic changes, either to the acquisition of resistance genes, or to mutations in elements relevant for the activity of the antibiotic. However, in some situations resistance can be achieved without any genetic alteration; this is called phenotypic resistance. Non-inherited resistance is associated to specific processes such as growth in biofilms, a stationary growth phase or persistence. These situations might occur during infection but they are not usually considered in classical susceptibility tests at the clinical microbiology laboratories. Recent work has also shown that the susceptibility to antibiotics is highly dependent on the bacterial metabolism and that global metabolic regulators can modulate this phenotype. This modulation includes situations in which bacteria can be more resistant or more susceptible to antibiotics. Understanding these processes will thus help in establishing novel therapeutic approaches based on the actual susceptibility shown by bacteria during infection, which might differ from that determined in the laboratory. In this review, we discuss different examples of phenotypic resistance and the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk between bacterial metabolism and the susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, information on strategies currently under development for diminishing the phenotypic resistance to antibiotics of bacterial pathogens is presented.

  4. A study comparing chemical peeling using modified jessner′s solution and 15% trichloroacetic acid versus 15% trichloroacetic acid in the treatment of melasma

    OpenAIRE

    Safoury Omar; Zaki Nagla; El Nabarawy Eman; Farag Eman

    2009-01-01

    Background: Melasma is a symmetric progressive hyperpigmentation of the facial skin that occurs in all races but has a predilection for darker skin phenotypes. Depigmenting agents, laser and chemical peeling as classic Jessner′s solution, modified Jessner′s solution and trichloroacetic acid have been used alone and in combination in the treatment of melasma. Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the therapeutic effect of combined 15% Trichloroacetic acid (TCA...

  5. The common bipolar phenotype in young people

    OpenAIRE

    Rock, Philippa L; Chandler, Rebecca A.; Harmer, Catherine J.; Rogers, Robert D.; Goodwin, Guy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mood elevation is common in adolescents and young adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of a bipolar diagnosis and co-morbidity in individuals identified by online screening for experience of (hypo)manic symptoms in order to better define the common bipolar phenotype in young people. Methods Survey data regarding experience of (hypo)manic symptoms and occurrence of co-morbidities were analysed for 106 students satisfying criteria for probable bipolar syndr...

  6. Covert genetic selections to optimize phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wu

    Full Text Available In many high complexity systems (cells, organisms, institutions, societies, economies, etc., it is unclear which components should be regulated to affect overall performance. To identify and prioritize molecular targets which impact cellular phenotypes, we have developed a selection procedure ("SPI"-single promoting/inhibiting target identification which monitors the abundance of ectopic cDNAs. We have used this approach to identify growth regulators. For this purpose, complex pools of S. cerevisiae cDNA transformants were established and we quantitated the evolution of the spectrum of cDNAs which was initially present. These data emphasized the importance of translation initiation and ER-Golgi traffic for growth. SPI provides functional insight into the stability of cellular phenotypes under circumstances in which established genetic approaches cannot be implemented. It provides a functional "synthetic genetic signature" for each state of the cell (i.e. genotype and environment by surveying complex genetic libraries, and does not require specialized arrays of cDNAs/shRNAs, deletion strains, direct assessment of clonal growth or even a conditional phenotype. Moreover, it establishes a hierarchy of importance of those targets which can contribute, either positively or negatively, to modify the prevailing phenotype. Extensions of these proof-of-principle experiments to other cell types should provide a novel and powerful approach to analyze multiple aspects of the basic biology of yeast and animal cells as well as clinically-relevant issues.

  7. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    This set of lectures provides an overview of the basic theory and phenomenology of the cosmic microwave background. Topics include a brief historical review; the physics of temperature and polarization fluctuations; acoustic oscillations of the primordial plasma; the space of inflationary cosmological models; current and potential constraints on these models from the microwave background; and constraints on inflation.

  8. CGRP修饰的间充质干细胞及其CGRP受体对血管平滑肌细胞增殖及表型转化的影响%Effects of CGRP and CGRP receptor modified mesenchymal stem cells on proliferation and phenotypic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石蓓; 崔璨; 龙仙萍; 陈文明; 赵然尊; 刘志江; 敖竹君

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects and mechanism of secretory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and CGRP receptor modified mesenchymal stem cells on proliferation and phenotypic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cell.Methods Firstly (Lenti-GFP-CGRP,referred to CGRP +/+)MSCs were transfected with high expression lentivirus vector of CGRP (MSCsCGRP+/+).Protein secretion in the above-mentioned MSCsCGRP+/+ supernatant was detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).And then MSCsCGRP+/+ was co-cultured with VSMCsRAMP1 +/+ and VSMCsRAMP1-/-respectively.Experimental groups were as follows:MSCs + VSMCs MSCsCGRP+/+ + VSMCs,MSCsCGRP+/+ + VSMCsRAMP1 +/+ and MSCsCGRP+/+ + VSMCs RAMP1-/-Flow cytometry was applied to detect the cycle variation of smooth muscle cells,thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide method for detecting the proliferation of smooth muscle cells and Western blot for examining the expression changes of spectrin α-SM-actin and synthetic protein OPN in each group respectively.Results After the transfection of CGRP+/+,MSCsCGRP+/+ secreted and expressed CGRP protein,the secretory volume of CGRP protein in MSCsCGRP+/+ increased significantly compared with the control group(19.530 ± 0.498 vs 3.133 ± 0.160 and 3.120 ± 0.001,P <0.05).After a 72 h co-culturing with VSMCs,the proliferation of VSMCs in MSCsCGRP+/+ + VSMCsRAMP1 +/+ group declined significantly (0.270 ± 0.263 vs 0.413 ± 0.070,P < 0.05) and the number of cells staying in G0 phase significantly increased(93.51% ±0.38% vs 84.48% ±0.31%,P <0.05),the expression of contractile phenotype protein α-SM-actin increased and intermediate phenotype OPN declined significantly as compared with MSCsCGRP+/+ + VSMCs group { (α-SM-actin 102 946 ± 3847 vs 51 759 ±635,P < 0.05),OPN (26 026 ± 2595 vs 44 201 ± 2811,P < 0.05) } ; but compared with MSCsCGRP +/+ +VSMCsRAMP1+/+ group,the proliferation of VSMCs in MSCsCGRP+/+ + VSMCsRAMP1-/-group significantly increased(0.601 ± 0

  9. Phenotypic Switching in Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Neena; Hasan, Fahmi; Fries, Bettina C.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past three decades new fungal diseases have emerged that now constitute a major threat, especially for patients with chronic diseases and/or underlying immune defi ciencies. Despite the epidemiologic data, the emergence of stable drug-resistant or hyper-virulent fungal strains in human disease has not been demonstrated as seen in emerging viral and bacterial infections. Fungi are eukaryotic microbes that capitalize on a sophisticated built-in ability to generate phenotypic variabilit...

  10. Early and sustained treatment modifies the phenotype of birdshot retinochoroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Pascal B; Papadia, Marina; Herbort, Carl P

    2014-06-01

    In this single-centre retrospective case review, we investigate the long-term follow-up of birdshot retinochoroiditis (BRC) patients, analysing the impact of early, vigorous, and prolonged treatment on the evolution of indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) signs and fundus appearance. Treatment delay was calculated for each BRC patient, and patients were classified into two groups--treatment delay of 10 months (delayed-treatment group). Fundus photographs and ICGA frames from the initial visit and from the last follow-up visit were assessed. Fundus photographs were evaluated for the presence of at least three circumpapillary, typical, rice-shaped birdshot lesions in one eye, inferior or nasal to the optic disc. ICGA pictures were evaluated for the presence of lesions (hypofluorescent dark dots, fuzziness). Differences were compared between the two groups and between the first visit and the last follow-up visit. In the early-treatment group, 5/6 patients had no characteristic BRC fundus lesions, but 7/7 patients in the delayed-treatment group displayed typical lesions. At last follow-up, 5/6 early-treatment patients showed no fundus lesions, and 6/7 delayed-treatment patients retained their fundus lesions. At presentation, all 13 patients exhibited lesions on ICGA. At last follow-up, ICGA lesions had completely disappeared in 4/6 early-treatment patients and 3/7 delayed-treatment patients. Thus, early and sufficiently dosed inflammation-suppressive treatment can prevent the appearance of typical BRC fundus lesions. It is therefore crucial to perform ICGA to detect otherwise occult stromal choroiditis in suspected BRC cases and to initiate adequate therapy immediately. PMID:24081916

  11. MeCP2 Related Studies Benefit from the Use of CD1 as Genetic Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobolli Gigli, Clementina; Scaramuzza, Linda; Gandaglia, Anna; Bellini, Elisa; Gabaglio, Marina; Parolaro, Daniela; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Bedogni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    MECP2 mutations cause a number of neurological disorders of which Rett syndrome (RTT) represents the most thoroughly analysed condition. Many Mecp2 mouse models have been generated through the years; their validity is demonstrated by the presence of a broad spectrum of phenotypes largely mimicking those manifested by RTT patients. These mouse models, between which the C57BL/6 Mecp2tm1.1Bird strain probably represents the most used, enabled to disclose much of the roles of Mecp2. However, small litters with little viability and poor maternal care hamper the maintenance of the colony, thus limiting research on such animals. For this reason, past studies often used Mecp2 mouse models on mixed genetic backgrounds, thus opening questions on whether modifier genes could be responsible for at least part of the described effects. To verify this possibility, and facilitate the maintenance of the Mecp2 colony, we transferred the Mecp2tm1.1Bird allele on the stronger CD1 background. The CD1 strain is easier to maintain and largely recapitulates the phenotypes already described in Mecp2-null mice. We believe that this mouse model will foster the research on RTT. PMID:27097329

  12. Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory for curved spacetime backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a modified version of four-dimensional electrodynamics, which has a photonic Chern-Simons-like term with spacelike background vector in the action. Light propagation in curved spacetime backgrounds is discussed using the geometrical-optics approximation. The corresponding light path is modified, which allows for new effects. In a Schwarzschild background, for example, there now exist stable bounded orbits of light rays and the two polarization modes of light rays in unbounded orbits can have different gravitational redshifts

  13. 背景音乐联合改良式拉玛择呼吸法对初产妇活跃期的影响%Effects of background music combined with modified Ramaze breathing onprimiparas during the active period of delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余小慧; 王步军; 曲双双; 陈小雷

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the effects of background music combined with modified Ramaze breathing on primiparas during the active period of delivery .Method From December,2012 to December, 2013, 100 primiparas were chosen as an experimental group and another 100 primiparas were chosen as a control group for the study .Theprimiparas of the experimental group were attended with modified Ramaze breathing of during the active period after they entered the labor ward, while the control group were attended with routine care .Pain intensity, blood pressure, heart rate and the length of the active period of the two groups were observed and recorded .Findings In the study group, the pain was found to be significantly reduced .Pressure difference and difference of heart rate were significantly lower than that in the control group . The time of the active period was shortened considerably .The difference has statistical significance .Conclusion The application of background music combined with modified Ramaze breathing has significant analgesic effect onprimiparas during the active period of delivery .It can stabilize blood pressure and heart rate and can also shorten the active period of delivery .%目的:观察100例初产妇第一产程活跃期应用背景音乐联合改良式拉玛择呼吸法的效果。方法2012年12月至2013年12月间临产的初产妇200例,随机分为研究组和常规组各100例。研究组活跃期进入待产室开始使用改良式拉玛择呼吸法,常规组活跃期进入待产室常规观察照护。观察两组疼痛强度、血压差、心率差及活跃期所需时间。结果研究组疼痛程度明显减轻,血压差和心率差显著低于常规组( P<0.05),活跃期所需时间明显缩短,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论背景音乐联合改良式拉玛择呼吸法在初产妇活跃期的应用中镇痛效果显著,可以稳定血压、心率,缩短活跃期。

  14. Cosmogenic Backgrounds to 0{\

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Auty, D J; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Belov, V; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Burenkov, A; Cao, G F; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Danilov, M; Daugherty, S J; Davis, J; Delaquis, S; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A; DeVoe, R; Didberidze, T; Dilling, J; Dolgolenko, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Feyzbakhsh, S; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hall, C; Herrin, S; Hughes, M; Jewell, M J; Johnson, A; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Krücken, R; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; Ling, J; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Njoya, O; Nelson, R; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Retière, F; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tsang, R; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Waite, A; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Wood, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zeldovich, O Ya

    2015-01-01

    As neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments become more sensitive and intrinsic radioactivity in detector materials is reduced, previously minor contributions to the background must be understood and eliminated. With this in mind, cosmogenic backgrounds have been studied with the EXO-200 experiment. Using the EXO-200 TPC, the muon flux (through a flat horizontal surface) underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been measured to be {\\Phi} = 4.07 $\\pm$ 0.14 (sys) $\\pm$ 0.03 (stat) $\\times$ $10^{-7}$cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, with a vertical intensity of $I_{v}$ = 2.97$^{+0.14}_{-0.13}$ (sys) $\\pm$ 0.02 (stat) $\\times$ $10^{-7}$cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ sr$^{-1}$. Simulations of muon-induced backgrounds identified several potential cosmogenic radionuclides, though only 137Xe is a significant background for the 136Xe 0{\

  15. On Background Independence

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns what Background Independence itself is (as opposed to some particular physical theory that is background independent). The notions presented mostly arose from a layer-by-layer analysis of the facets of the Problem of Time in Quantum Gravity. Part of this coincides with two relational postulates which are thus identified as classical precursors of two of the facets of the Problem of Time. These are furthemore tied to the forms of each of the GR Hamiltonian and momentum cons...

  16. Zambia Country Background Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampwaye, Godfrey; Jeppesen, Søren; Kragelund, Peter

    This paper provides background data and general information for the Zambia studies focusing on local food processing sub­‐sector; and the local suppliers to the mines as part of the SAFIC project (Successful African Firms and Institutional Change).......This paper provides background data and general information for the Zambia studies focusing on local food processing sub­‐sector; and the local suppliers to the mines as part of the SAFIC project (Successful African Firms and Institutional Change)....

  17. Neutrino refraction by the cosmic neutrino background

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, J S

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the dispersion relation of a neutrino test particle propagating in the cosmic neutrino background. Describing the relic neutrinos and antineutrinos from the hot big bang as a dense medium, a matter potential or refractive index is obtained. The vacuum neutrino mixing angles are unchanged, but the energy of each mass state is modified. Using a matrix in the space of neutrino species, the induced potential is decomposed into a part which produces signatures in beta-decay experiments and another part which modifies neutrino oscillations. The low temperature of the relic neutrinos makes a direct detection extremely challenging. From a different point of view, the identified refractive effects of the cosmic neutrino background constitute an ultralow background for future experimental studies of nonvanishing Lorentz violation in the neutrino sector.

  18. Neutrino refraction by the cosmic neutrino background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, J. S.; Klinkhamer, F. R.

    2016-03-01

    We have determined the dispersion relation of a neutrino test particle propagating in the cosmic neutrino background. Describing the relic neutrinos and antineutrinos from the hot big bang as a dense medium, a matter potential or refractive index is obtained. The vacuum neutrino mixing angles are unchanged, but the energy of each mass state is modified. Using a matrix in the space of neutrino species, the induced potential is decomposed into a part which produces signatures in beta-decay experiments and another part which modifies neutrino oscillations. The low temperature of the relic neutrinos makes a direct detection extremely challenging. From a different point of view, the identified refractive effects of the cosmic neutrino background constitute an ultralow background for future experimental studies of nonvanishing Lorentz violation in the neutrino sector.

  19. Cardiac sodium channel mutations: why so many phenotypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Man; Yang, Kai-Chien; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5) can induce gain or loss of channel function. Gain-of-function mutations can cause long QT syndrome type 3 and possibly atrial fibrillation, whereas loss-of-function mutations are associated with a variety of phenotypes, such as Brugada syndrome, cardiac conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, and possibly dilated cardiomyopathy. The phenotypes produced by Nav1.5 mutations vary according to the direct effect of the mutation on channel biophysics, but also with age, sex, body temperature, and between regions of the heart. This phenotypic variability makes genotype–phenotype correlations difficult. In this Perspectives article, we propose that phenotypic variability not ascribed to mutation-dependent changes in channel function might be the result of additional modifiers of channel behaviour, such as other genetic variation and alterations in transcription, RNA processing, translation, post-translational modifications, and protein degradation. Consideration of these modifiers might help to improve genotype–phenotype correlations and lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24958080

  20. Glyoxalase I drives epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition via argpyrimidine-modified Hsp70, miR-21 and SMAD signalling in human bronchial cells BEAS-2B chronically exposed to crystalline silica Min-U-Sil 5: Transformation into a neoplastic-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognelli, Cinzia; Gambelunghe, Angela; Muzi, Giacomo; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola

    2016-03-01

    Glyoxalase I (Glo1) is the main scavenging enzyme of methylglyoxal (MG), a potent precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are known to control multiple biological processes, including epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a multistep phenomenon associated with cell transformation, playing a major role in a variety of diseases, including cancer. Crystalline silica is a well-known occupational health hazard, responsible for a great number of human pulmonary diseases, such as silicosis. There is still much debate concerning the carcinogenic role of crystalline silica, mainly due to the lack of a causal demonstration between silica exposure and carcinogenesis. It has been suggested that EMT might play a role in crystalline silica-induced lung neoplastic transformation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether, and by means of which mechanism, the antiglycation defence Glo1 is involved in Min-U-Sil 5 (MS5) crystalline silica-induced EMT in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells chronically exposed, and whether this is associated with the beginning of a neoplastic-like transformation process. By using gene silencing/overexpression and scavenging/inhibitory agents, we demonstrated that MS5 induced hydrogen peroxide-mediated c-Jun-dependent Glo1 up-regulation which resulted in a decrease in the Argpyrimidine-modified Hsp70 protein level which triggered EMT in a novel mechanism involving miR-21 and SMAD signalling. The observed EMT was associated with a neoplastic-like phenotype. The results obtained provide a causal in vitro demonstration of the MS5 pro-carcinogenic transforming role and more importantly they provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in this process, thus opening new paths in research concerning the in vivo study of the carcinogenic potential of crystalline silica. PMID:26784015

  1. COPD: Definition and Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently defined as a common preventable and treatable disease that is characterized by persistent airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory response in the airways and the lung to noxious...... particles or gases. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. The evolution of this definition and the diagnostic criteria currently in use are discussed. COPD is increasingly divided in subgroups or phenotypes based on specific features and association with...

  2. Determination of background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to a method and appartus for determining the level of background radiation in a spectral region where a Raman peak characteristic of a particular substance, in particular diamond, is expected to occur. The method includes the steps of isolating the radiation in a first spectral band, and isolating the radiation in a second spectral band which overlaps the first spectral band at least partially to form an overlapping band in the vicinity of the expected Raman Peak and a least one sideband. At least one sideband value representative of the radiation present in the one or more sidebands is then obtained, and further values, representative of the radiation isolated by any one or more of the other spectral bands, such as the first and second bands, are then used to derive a background value indicative of the level of background radiation present at the position of the expected Raman peak

  3. Exploring String Theory Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, B P

    2004-01-01

    This thesis examines phenomenological and theoretical questions by exploring string theoretic backgrounds. Part I focuses on cosmology. First we propose that the induced metric along a brane moving through a curved bulk may be interpreted as the cosmology of the brane universe, providing a resolution to the apparent cosmological singularity on the brane. We then look at various decay channels of the certain meta-stable de Sitter vacua and show that there exist NS5-brane meditated decays which are much faster than decays to decompactification. Part II discusses a new class of nongeometric vacua in string theory. These backgrounds may be described locally as T2 fibrations. By enlarging the monodromy group of the fiber to include perturbative stringy duality symmetries we are able to explicitly construct nongeometric backgrounds.

  4. Unitarity and singular backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Brouzakis, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    We compute the graviton Kaluza-Klein spectrum on a gravity-dilaton background with a naked singularity for all possible boundary conditions at the singularity which are consistent with unitary evolution. We apply methods from non-relativistic quantum mechanics with singular Schr\\"{o}dinger potentials. In general the spectrum contains a tachyon, a sign of instability. Only for a particular boundary condition at the singularity the spectrum is free of tachyons. In this case the lowest-lying graviton mode is massless. We argue that this result will also hold for other backgrounds with similar geometry near the curvature singularity. We complete our study with a brief discussion on radion perturbations and Higgs mechanism on this singular background.

  5. Cosmic Tachyon Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1999-01-01

    The equilibrium statistical mechanics of a background radiation of superluminal particles is investigated, based on a vectorial wave equation for tachyons of the Proca type. The partition function, the spectral energy density, and the various thermodynamic variables of an ideal Bose gas of tachyons in an open Robertson-Walker cosmology are derived. The negative mass square in the wave equation changes the frequency scaling in the Rayleigh-Jeans law, and there are also significant changes in the low temperature regime as compared to the microwave background, in particular in the caloric and thermal equations of state.

  6. Jeans instability in classical and modified gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Arbuzova, E. V.; Dolgov, A. D.; L. Reverberi

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational instability in classical Jeans theory, General Relativity, and modified gravity is considered. The background density increase leads to a faster growth of perturbations in comparison with the standard theory. The transition to the Newtonian gauge in the case of coordinate dependent background metric functions is studied. For modified gravity a new high frequency stable solution is found.

  7. Jeans instability in classical and modified gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzova, E.V., E-mail: arbuzova@uni-dubna.ru [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Department of Higher Mathematics, University “Dubna”, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Dolgov, A.D., E-mail: dolgov@fe.infn.it [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); ITEP, Bol. Cheremushkinsaya ul., 25, 113259 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico – Edificio C, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Reverberi, L., E-mail: reverberi@fe.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico – Edificio C, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Ferrara, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico – Edificio C, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy)

    2014-12-12

    Gravitational instability in classical Jeans theory, General Relativity, and modified gravity is considered. The background density increase leads to a faster growth of perturbations in comparison with the standard theory. The transition to the Newtonian gauge in the case of coordinate dependent background metric functions is studied. For modified gravity a new high frequency stable solution is found.

  8. Jeans instability in classical and modified gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Arbuzova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational instability in classical Jeans theory, General Relativity, and modified gravity is considered. The background density increase leads to a faster growth of perturbations in comparison with the standard theory. The transition to the Newtonian gauge in the case of coordinate dependent background metric functions is studied. For modified gravity a new high frequency stable solution is found.

  9. Is oxygen a key factor in the lipodystrophy phenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonigo Pierre

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lipodystrophic syndrome (LD is a disorder resulting from selective damage of adipose tissue by antiretroviral drugs included in therapy controlling human-immunodeficiency-virus-1. In the therapy cocktail the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI contribute to the development of this syndrome. Cellular target of NRTI was identified as the mitochondrial polymerase-gamma and their toxicity described as a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion resulting in a mitochondrial cytopathy and involved in fat redistribution. No mechanisms offer explanation whatsoever for the lipo-atrophic and lipo-hypertrophic phenotype of LD. To understand the occurrence we proposed that the pO2 (oxygen partial pressure could be a key factor in the development of the LD. For the first time, we report here differential effects of NRTIs on human adipose cells depending on pO2 conditions. Results and discussion We showed that the hypoxia conditions could alter adipogenesis process by modifying expression of adipocyte makers as leptin and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARgamma and inhibiting triglyceride (TG accumulation in adipocytes. Toxicity of NRTI followed on adipose cells in culture under normoxia versus hypoxia conditions showed, differential effects of drugs on mtDNA of these cells depending on pO2 conditions. Moreover, NRTI-treated adipocytes were refractory to the inhibition of adipogenesis under hypoxia. Finally, our hypothesis that variations of pO2 could exist between adipose tissue from anatomical origins was supported by staining of the hypoxic-induced angiopoietin ANGPTL4 depended on the location of fat. Conclusion Toxicity of NRTIs have been shown to be opposite on human adipose cells depending on the oxygen availability. These data suggest that the LD phenotype may be a differential consequence of NRTI effects, depending on the metabolic status of the targeted adipose tissues and provide new insights into the

  10. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects

  11. Local microwave background radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Domingos

    2006-01-01

    An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

  12. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States); Lesko, K. T. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  13. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  14. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Aled

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a brief review of current theory and observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB. New predictions for cosmological defect theories and an overview of the inflationary theory are discussed. Recent results from various observations of the anisotropies of the microwave background are described and a summary of the proposed experiments is presented. A new analysis technique based on Bayesian statistics that can be used to reconstruct the underlying sky fluctuations is summarised. Current CMB data is used to set some preliminary constraints on the values of fundamental cosmological parameters $Omega$ and $H_circ$ using the maximum likelihood technique. In addition, secondary anisotropies due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are described.

  15. Unitarity and singular backgrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Brouzakis, Nikos; Quiros, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    We compute the graviton Kaluza-Klein spectrum on a gravity-dilaton background with a naked singularity for all possible boundary conditions at the singularity which are consistent with unitary evolution. We apply methods from non-relativistic quantum mechanics with singular Schr\\"{o}dinger potentials. In general the spectrum contains a tachyon, a sign of instability. Only for a particular boundary condition at the singularity is the spectrum free of tachyons. In this case the lowest-lying gra...

  16. Australia; Background Material

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the developments in the Australian labor market during the 1990s. In 1994, a number of new labor market programs were launched, directed especially at the long-term unemployed, and a further step was taken in the evolutionary reform of the industrial relations system. The paper reviews developments in employment, wages, and productivity in Australia that formed the background to these policy initiatives. It also examines the conduct of fiscal policy at the Commonwealth an...

  17. Sri Lanka; Background Papers

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1995-01-01

    This Background Paper on Sri Lanka provides information on the economic developments during 1992–95. Developments in the domestic and external sectors are discussed. The deficiencies of the official consumer price index that resulted in a substantial understatement of inflation performance in 1994 and alternative estimates of underlying inflation are described. The structural rigidities in the labor market that perpetuate high unemployment and limit job growth are also described. The paper ...

  18. Background, phenomenology, and motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss the background to the kinetics of adsorption and desorption after an elementary introduction to the problem of chemisorption in two limiting cases. Other topics discussed include the thermodynamics of adsorption, reaction mechanisms outside surfaces, and a case history of catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. Figures show the potential energy barrier as a function of an appropriate reaction coordinate, and bonding of carbon monoxide to platinum metal

  19. Some background about satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A.

    1986-01-01

    Four tables of planetary and satellite data are presented which list satellite discoveries, planetary parameters, satellite orbits, and satellite physical properties respectively. A scheme for classifying the satellites is provided and it is noted that most known moons fall into three general classes: regular satellites, collisional shards, and irregular satellites. Satellite processes are outlined with attention given to origins, dynamical and thermal evolution, surface processes, and composition and cratering. Background material is provided for each family of satellites.

  20. Modified Ureterosigmoidostomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To introduce an operation procedure and evaluate the coutinence diversion results of the modified ureterosigmoidostomy after radical cystectomy. Methods Fourteen cases of bladder cancer or prostate carcinoma were operated on with modified Sigma pouch from Feb, 1998 to Dec, 1999. A longitudinal incision about 25 cm on the sigmoid uall was done to form a low pressure pouch. The vertex of the new pouch was fixed to sacrum. Both ends of ureters were anastomosed side to side and to form a big nipple and inserted into the top of pouch for 2 to 3 centimeters. Results It took about sixty five minutes to create a new low pressure pouch after radical cystectomy. Early complication of was found in two cases postoperatively, and cured with temporary colonostomy. Hydronephrosis and hypokalemia in one patient were cured by percutaneous anterograde ureter dilatation with balloon and oral replacement of potassium salt. All patients displayed urinary continence. No symptomatic renal infection or hypercholoraemic acidosis occurred. Conclusion Modified ureterosigmoidostomy is a safe procedure of urinary diversion and provides a big volume, low intravesical pressure pouch. The patients are free from the troublesome urine-bag, intermittert catheterization , and upper urinary tracts are protected effectively. The quality of life is satisfied.

  1. Modified Ureterosigmoidostomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To introduce an operation procedure and evaluate the coutinence diversion results of the modified ureterosigmoidostomy after radical cystectomy. Methods Fourteen cases of bladder cancer or prostate carcinoma were operated on with modified Sigma pouch from Feb, 1998 to Dec, 1999. A longitudinal incision about 25 cm on the sigmoid uall was done to form a low pressure pouch. The vertex of the new pouch was fixed to sacrum. Both ends of ureters were anastomosed side to side and to form a big nipple and inserted into the top of pouch for 2 to 3 centimeters. Results It took about sixty five minutes to create a new low pressure pouch after radical cystectomy. Early complication of was found in two cases postoperatively, and cured with temporary colonostomy. Hydronephrosis and hypokalemia in one patient were cured by percutaneous anterograde ureter dilatation with balloon and oral replacement of potassium salt. A~ patients displayed urinary continence. No symptomatic renal infection or hypercholoraemic acidosis occurred. Conclusion Modified ureterosigmoidostomy is a safe procedure of urinary diversion and provides a big volume, low intravesical pressure pouch. The patients are free from the troublesome urine-bag, intermittert catheterization , and upper urinary tracts are protected effectively. The quality of life is satisfied.

  2. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doherty Kathleen M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the

  3. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Resistance Phenotypes and Phenotypic Highlighting Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    BĂLĂŞOIU, MARIA; BĂLĂŞOIU, A.T.; MĂNESCU, RODICA; AVRAMESCU, CARMEN; IONETE, OANA

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa genus bacteria are well known for their increased drug resistance (phenotypic ang genotypic resistance). The most important resistance mechanisms are: enzyme production, reduction of pore expression, reduction of the external membrane proteins expression, efflux systems, topoisomerase mutations. These mechanisms often accumulate and lead to multidrug ressitance strains emergence. The most frequent acquired resistance mechanisms are betalactamase-type enzyme production (ESBLs, AmpC, carbapenemases), which determine variable phenotypes of betalactamines resistance, phenotypes which are associated with aminoglycosides and quinolones resistance. The nonenzymatic drug resistance mechanisms are caused by efflux systems, pore reduction and penicillin-binding proteins (PBP) modification, which are often associated to other resistance mechanisms. Phenotypic methods used for testing these mechanisms are based on highlighting these phenotypes using Kirby Bauer antibiogram, clinical breakpoints, and “cut off” values recommended by EUCAST 2013 standard, version 3.1. PMID:25729587

  4. Backgrounded but not peripheral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmark, Henrik

    DDAs in question contribute to the socio-cultural construction of identity, i.e. that they play a rather specific role in discursive communication and socio-cultural meaning construction. On the other hand it is clear that the semantics of the DDAs in question, seen in isolation, is very abstract or...... general; furthermore, the DDAs are backgrounded in discourse. Is it reasonable to claim, rather boldly, that “the informants express their identity in the use of the directional adverb ud ‘out’ etc.”? In the course of this article, however, I suggest that the DDAs in question do contribute to the socio-cultural...

  5. The Cosmic Background Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Smoot, George; Scott, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    We review the current status of experimental data for spectral distortions and angular anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background, as well as discussing the relevant physical processes. This is one of a number of new articles in astrophysics and cosmology which will appear in the 1996 Review of Particle Properties (Phys. Rev. D. in press). Other relevant reviews include: "Big-Bang Cosmology" by K.A. Olive; "Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis" by K.A. Olive & D.N. Schramm; "The Hubble Constant" by ...

  6. Malaysia; Background Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1996-01-01

    This Background Paper on Malaysia examines developments and trends in the labor market since the mid-1980s. The paper describes the changes in the employment structure and the labor force. It reviews wages and productivity trends and their effects on unit labor cost. The paper highlights that Malaysia’s rapid growth, sustained since 1987, has had a major impact on the labor market. The paper outlines the major policy measures to address the labor constraints. It also analyzes Malaysia’s r...

  7. Background and introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; van der Voordt, Theo; Coenen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    in scope between FM and CREM is that CREM has its focus on real estate as physical and economical assets utilized by an organisation, while FM has a wider service focus. The difference in scope between FM and CREM on one side and B2B marketing on the other is that FM and CREM are related to...... chapter provides important background information to understand the following chapters in this book. Research limitations: The chapter is mainly based on the experience and knowledge of the editors. It does not include original research but provides an introductory overview of the book. Originality...

  8. Family Background and Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Matthew J.; Sol, Joeri; Van Praag, Mirjam;

    Vast amounts of money are currently being spent on policies aimed at promoting entrepreneurship. The success of such policies, however, rests in part on the assumption that individuals are not ‘born entrepreneurs’. In this paper, we assess the importance of family background and neighborhood...... effects as determinants of entrepreneurship. We start by estimating sibling correlations in entrepreneurship. We find that between 20 and 50 percent of the variance in different entrepreneurial outcomes is explained by factors that siblings share. The average is 28 percent. Allowing for differential...... entrepreneurship does play a large role, as do shared genes....

  9. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit; Clayton, John S.; Brix, Hans; Sorrell, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important. Here the primary adaptive strategy in three non-native, clonally reproducing macrophytes (Egeria densa, Elodea canadensis and Lagarosiphon major) in New Zealand freshwaters were examined and an attempt was made to link observed differences in plant morphology to local variation in habitat conditions. Methods Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity of these same populations was also quantified. Key Results For all three species, greater variation in plant characteristics was found before they were grown in standardized conditions. Moreover, field populations displayed remarkably little genetic variation and there was little interaction between habitat conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between populations may facilitate ecotypic differentiation in the future cannot be excluded. These results thus indicate that invasive clonal aquatic plants adapt to new introduced areas by phenotypic plasticity. Inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were important in controlling plant size of E. canadensis and L. major, but no other relationships between plant characteristics and habitat conditions were apparent. This implies that within-species differences in plant size can be explained

  10. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M;

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection...

  11. The Backgrounds Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  12. Integration of curated databases to identify genotype-phenotype associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianrong

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to rapidly characterize an unknown microorganism is critical in both responding to infectious disease and biodefense. To do this, we need some way of anticipating an organism's phenotype based on the molecules encoded by its genome. However, the link between molecular composition (i.e. genotype and phenotype for microbes is not obvious. While there have been several studies that address this challenge, none have yet proposed a large-scale method integrating curated biological information. Here we utilize a systematic approach to discover genotype-phenotype associations that combines phenotypic information from a biomedical informatics database, GIDEON, with the molecular information contained in National Center for Biotechnology Information's Clusters of Orthologous Groups database (NCBI COGs. Results Integrating the information in the two databases, we are able to correlate the presence or absence of a given protein in a microbe with its phenotype as measured by certain morphological characteristics or survival in a particular growth media. With a 0.8 correlation score threshold, 66% of the associations found were confirmed by the literature and at a 0.9 correlation threshold, 86% were positively verified. Conclusion Our results suggest possible phenotypic manifestations for proteins biochemically associated with sugar metabolism and electron transport. Moreover, we believe our approach can be extended to linking pathogenic phenotypes with functionally related proteins.

  13. PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaine C Keebaugh

    Full Text Available Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND is a severe X-linked neurological disorder caused by a deficiency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT. In contrast, HPRT-deficiency in the mouse does not result in the profound phenotypes such as self-injurious behavior observed in humans, and the genetic basis for this phenotypic disparity between HPRT-deficient humans and mice is unknown. To test the hypothesis that HPRT deficiency is modified by the presence/absence of phosphoribosyltransferase domain containing 1 (PRTFDC1, a paralog of HPRT that is a functional gene in humans but an inactivated pseudogene in mice, we created transgenic mice that express human PRTFDC1 in wild-type and HPRT-deficient backgrounds. Male mice expressing PRTFDC1 on either genetic background were viable and fertile. However, the presence of PRTFDC1 in the HPRT-deficient, but not wild-type mice, increased aggression as well as sensitivity to a specific amphetamine-induced stereotypy, both of which are reminiscent of the increased aggressive and self-injurious behavior exhibited by patients with LND. These results demonstrate that PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse and could therefore have important implications for unraveling the molecular etiology of LND.

  14. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-01-15

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  15. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  16. Dissecting phenotypic variation among AIS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have created genital skin fibroblast cell lines directly from three patients in a Chinese family affected by androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). All patients in the family share an identical AR Arg840Cys mutant but show different disease phenotypes. By using the cell lines, we find that the mutation has not influenced a normal androgen-binding capacity at 37 deg C but has reduced the affinity for androgens and may cause thermolability of the androgen-receptor complex. The impaired nuclear trafficking of the androgen receptor in the cell lines is highly correlated with the severity of donors' disease phenotype. The transactivity of the mutant is substantially weakened and the extent of the reduced transactivity reflects severity of the donors' disease symptom. Our data reveal that although etiology of AIS is monogenic and the mutant may alter the major biological functions of its wild allele, the function of the mutant AR can also be influenced by the different genetic backgrounds and thus explains the divergent disease phenotypes

  17. MPHASYS: a mouse phenotype analysis system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian I

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic, high-throughput studies of mouse phenotypes have been hampered by the inability to analyze individual animal data from a multitude of sources in an integrated manner. Studies generally make comparisons at the level of genotype or treatment thereby excluding associations that may be subtle or involve compound phenotypes. Additionally, the lack of integrated, standardized ontologies and methodologies for data exchange has inhibited scientific collaboration and discovery. Results Here we introduce a Mouse Phenotype Analysis System (MPHASYS, a platform for integrating data generated by studies of mouse models of human biology and disease such as aging and cancer. This computational platform is designed to provide a standardized methodology for working with animal data; a framework for data entry, analysis and sharing; and ontologies and methodologies for ensuring accurate data capture. We describe the tools that currently comprise MPHASYS, primarily ones related to mouse pathology, and outline its use in a study of individual animal-specific patterns of multiple pathology in mice harboring a specific germline mutation in the DNA repair and transcription-specific gene Xpd. Conclusion MPHASYS is a system for analyzing multiple data types from individual animals. It provides a framework for developing data analysis applications, and tools for collecting and distributing high-quality data. The software is platform independent and freely available under an open-source license 1.

  18. Algebraic aspects of the background field method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The background field method allows the evaluation of the effective action by exploiting the (background) gauge invariance, which in general yields Ward identities, i.e., linear relations among the vertex functions. In the present approach an extra gauge fixing term is introduced right at the beginning in the action and it is chosen in such a way that BRST invariance is preserved. The background effective action is considered and it is shown to satisfy both the Slavnov-Taylor (ST) identities and the Ward identities. This allows the proof of the background equivalence theorem with the standard techniques. In particular we consider a BRST doublet where the background field enters with a non-zero BRST transformation. The rationale behind the introduction of an extra gauge fixing term is that of removing the singularity of the Legendre transform of the background effective action, thus allowing the construction of the connected amplitudes generating functional Wbg. By using the relevant ST identities we show that the functional Wbg gives the same physical amplitudes as the original one we started with. Moreover we show that Wbg cannot in general be derived from a classical action by the Gell-Mann-Low formula. As a final point of the paper we show that the BRST doublet generated from the background field does not modify the anomaly of the original underlying gauge theory. The proof is algebraic and makes no use of arguments based on power-counting

  19. Discordant phenotype in siblings with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykowsky, M.J.; Veksler, K.S.; Sullivan, K.E. [Children`s Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a congenital humoral immunodeficiency caused by a defect in a B-cell-specific signaling molecule, Btk. There has been little concordance of phenotype with genotype in this disorder, and defects in Btk cause immunodeficiencies that range from mild impairment to complete inability to produce antibodies. The factors modifying the phenotype of XLA are not understood. The current study is the first description of two male siblings with identical T{sup 134}{yields}C mutations in the translation initiation ATG of Btk who have different clinical phenotypes as well as different laboratory phenotypes. The proband lacks immunoglobulins and B cells and has recurrent infections, while the elder, affected brother has normal levels of IgG and IgM and very few infections. Both have undetectable levels of Btk kinase activity in circulating mononuclear cells. Complete sequencing of Btk gene transcripts in both brothers revealed no additional mutations to account for the discordant phenotypes. This description provides unequivocal evidence that the phenotype of XLA is influenced by factors additional to the Btk gene. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Holography for Schrodinger backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Guica, Monica; Taylor, Marika; van Rees, Balt

    2010-01-01

    We discuss holography for Schrodinger solutions of both topologically massive gravity in three dimensions and massive vector theories in (d+1) dimensions. In both cases the dual field theory can be viewed as a d-dimensional conformal field theory (two dimensional in the case of TMG) deformed by certain operators that respect the Schrodinger symmetry. These operators are irrelevant from the viewpoint of the relativistic conformal group but they are exactly marginal with respect to the non-relativistic conformal group. The spectrum of linear fluctuations around the background solutions corresponds to operators that are labeled by their scaling dimension and the lightcone momentum k_v. We set up the holographic dictionary and compute 2-point functions of these operators both holographically and in field theory using conformal perturbation theory and find agreement. The counterterms needed for holographic renormalization are non-local in the v lightcone direction.

  1. Using iterative cluster merging with improved gap statistics to perform online phenotype discovery in the context of high-throughput RNAi screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Youxian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent emergence of high-throughput automated image acquisition technologies has forever changed how cell biologists collect and analyze data. Historically, the interpretation of cellular phenotypes in different experimental conditions has been dependent upon the expert opinions of well-trained biologists. Such qualitative analysis is particularly effective in detecting subtle, but important, deviations in phenotypes. However, while the rapid and continuing development of automated microscope-based technologies now facilitates the acquisition of trillions of cells in thousands of diverse experimental conditions, such as in the context of RNA interference (RNAi or small-molecule screens, the massive size of these datasets precludes human analysis. Thus, the development of automated methods which aim to identify novel and biological relevant phenotypes online is one of the major challenges in high-throughput image-based screening. Ideally, phenotype discovery methods should be designed to utilize prior/existing information and tackle three challenging tasks, i.e. restoring pre-defined biological meaningful phenotypes, differentiating novel phenotypes from known ones and clarifying novel phenotypes from each other. Arbitrarily extracted information causes biased analysis, while combining the complete existing datasets with each new image is intractable in high-throughput screens. Results Here we present the design and implementation of a novel and robust online phenotype discovery method with broad applicability that can be used in diverse experimental contexts, especially high-throughput RNAi screens. This method features phenotype modelling and iterative cluster merging using improved gap statistics. A Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM is employed to estimate the distribution of each existing phenotype, and then used as reference distribution in gap statistics. This method is broadly applicable to a number of different types of

  2. Matrix and cell phenotype differences in Dupuytren's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beuge, Marike M; Ten Dam, Evert-Jan P M; Werker, Paul M N; Bank, Ruud A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dupuytren's disease is a fibroproliferative disease of the hand and fingers, which usually manifests as two different phenotypes within the same patient. The disease first causes a nodule in the palm of the hand, while later, a cord develops, causing contracture of the fingers. RESULTS:

  3. The Cognitive and Behavioural Phenotype of Roifman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, P. J.; McCartney, D. L.; McCartney, E.; Woolf, D.; Wozencroft, D.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Roifman syndrome (OMIM 300258) is a multi-system disorder with a physical phenotype that includes B-cell immunodeficiency, intra-uterine and postnatal growth retardation, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, retinal dystrophy and characteristic facial dysmorphism. So far, six cases, all boys, have been reported in the literature. Roifman…

  4. Multidimensionality of behavioural phenotypes in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meager, Justin J; Fernö, Anders; Skjæraasen, Jon Egil; Järvi, Torbjörn; Rodewald, Petra; Sverdrup, Gisle; Winberg, Svante; Mayer, Ian

    2012-06-25

    Much of the inter-individual variation observed in animal behaviour is now attributed to the existence of behavioural phenotypes or animal personalities. Such phenotypes may be fundamental to fisheries and aquaculture, yet there have been few detailed studies of this phenomenon in exploited marine animals. We investigated the behavioural and neuroendocrine responses of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.), to situations reflecting critical ecological challenges: predator attacks and territorial challenges. Both hatchery-reared and wild fish were tested and behavioural profiles were compared with baseline conditions. We then used an objective, multivariate approach, rather than assigning individuals along one-dimensional behavioural axes, to examine whether distinct behavioural phenotypes were present. Our results indicate that two distinct behavioural phenotypes were evident in fish from each background. In hatchery-reared fish, phenotypes displayed divergent locomotor activity, sheltering, brain monoamine concentrations and responses to competitive challenges. In wild fish, phenotypes were distinguished primarily by locomotor activity, sheltering and responsiveness to predator stimuli. Hatcheries presumably represent a more stressful social environment, and social behaviour and neuroendocrine responses were important in discerning behavioural phenotypes in hatchery fish, whereas antipredator responses were important in discerning phenotypes in wild fish that have previously encountered predators. In both fish types, behavioural and physiological traits that classified individuals into phenotypes were not the same as those that were correlated across situations. These results highlight the multidimensionality of animal personalities, and that the processes that regulate one suite of behavioural traits may be very different to the processes that regulate other behaviours. PMID:22465310

  5. Phenotypic integration of brain size and head morphology in Lake Tanganyika Cichlids

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuboi, Masahito; González-Voyer, Alejandro; Kolm, N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Phenotypic integration among different anatomical parts of the head is a common phenomenon across vertebrates. Interestingly, despite centuries of research into the factors that contribute to the existing variation in brain size among vertebrates, little is known about the role of phenotypic integration in brain size diversification. Here we used geometric morphometrics on the morphologically diverse Tanganyikan cichlids to investigate phenotypic integration across key mor...

  6. Molecular complementarity between simple, universal molecules and ions limited phenotype space in the precursors of cells

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Vic; Reusch, Rosetta N.; IGARASHI, KAZUEI; Root-Bernstein, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Fundamental problems faced by the protocells and their modern descendants include how to go from one phenotypic state to another; escape from a basin of attraction in the space of phenotypes; reconcile conflicting growth and survival strategies (and thereby live on ‘the scales of equilibria’); and create a coherent, reproducible phenotype from a multitude of constituents. Presentation of the hypothesis The solutions to these problems are likely to be found with the organic and inor...

  7. Phenotypic plasticity, costs of phenotypes, and costs of plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Hilary S; Maughan, Heather; Steiner, Uli

    2008-01-01

    Why are some traits constitutive and others inducible? The term costs often appears in work addressing this issue but may be ambiguously defined. This review distinguishes two conceptually distinct types of costs: phenotypic costs and plasticity costs. Phenotypic costs are assessed from patterns of...... covariation, typically between a focal trait and a separate trait relevant to fitness. Plasticity costs, separable from phenotypic costs, are gauged by comparing the fitness of genotypes with equivalent phenotypes within two environments but differing in plasticity and fitness. Subtleties associated with both...... types of costs are illustrated by a body of work addressing predator-induced plasticity. Such subtleties, and potential interplay between the two types of costs, have also been addressed, often in studies involving genetic model organisms. In some instances, investigators have pinpointed the mechanistic...

  8. Genetical background of intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkiert-Czarnecka, Anna; Haus, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Intelligence as an ability to reason, think abstractly and adapt effectively to the environment is a subject of research in the field of psychology, neurobiology, and in the last twenty years genetics as well. Genetical testing of twins carried out from XX century indicated heritebility of intelligence, therefore confirmed an influence of genetic factor on cognitive processes. Studies on genetic background of intelligence focus on dopaminergic (DRD2, DRD4, COMT, SLC6A3, DAT1, CCKAR) and adrenergic system (ADRB2, CHRM2) genes as well as, neutrofins (BDNF) and oxidative stress genes (LTF, PRNP). Positive effect of investigated gene polymorphism was indicated by variation c.957C>T DRD2 gene (if in polymorphic site is thymine), polymorphism c.472G>A COMT gene (presence of adenine) and also gene ADRB2 c.46A->G (guanine), CHRM2 (thymine in place c.1890A>T) and BDNF (guanine in place c.472G>A) Obtained results indicate that intelligence is a feature dependent not only on genetic but also an environmental factor. PMID:27333929

  9. Biological aerosol background characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  10. Low background infrared (LBIR) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Low background infrared (LBIR) facility was originally designed to calibrate user supplied blackbody sources and to characterize low-background IR detectors and...

  11. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site

  12. Root Traits and Phenotyping Strategies for Plant Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez-Garcia, Ana; Motes, Christy M.; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Chen, Rujin; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Monteros, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Roots are crucial for nutrient and water acquisition and can be targeted to enhance plant productivity under a broad range of growing conditions. A current challenge for plant breeding is the limited ability to phenotype and select for desirable root characteristics due to their underground location. Plant breeding efforts aimed at modifying root traits can result in novel, more stress-tolerant crops and increased yield by enhancing the capacity of the plant for soil exploration and, thus, water and nutrient acquisition. Available approaches for root phenotyping in laboratory, greenhouse and field encompass simple agar plates to labor-intensive root digging (i.e., shovelomics) and soil boring methods, the construction of underground root observation stations and sophisticated computer-assisted root imaging. Here, we summarize root architectural traits relevant to crop productivity, survey root phenotyping strategies and describe their advantages, limitations and practical value for crop and forage breeding programs. PMID:27135332

  13. Root Traits and Phenotyping Strategies for Plant Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paez-Garcia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Roots are crucial for nutrient and water acquisition and can be targeted to enhance plant productivity under a broad range of growing conditions. A current challenge for plant breeding is the limited ability to phenotype and select for desirable root characteristics due to their underground location. Plant breeding efforts aimed at modifying root traits can result in novel, more stress-tolerant crops and increased yield by enhancing the capacity of the plant for soil exploration and, thus, water and nutrient acquisition. Available approaches for root phenotyping in laboratory, greenhouse and field encompass simple agar plates to labor-intensive root digging (i.e., shovelomics and soil boring methods, the construction of underground root observation stations and sophisticated computer-assisted root imaging. Here, we summarize root architectural traits relevant to crop productivity, survey root phenotyping strategies and describe their advantages, limitations and practical value for crop and forage breeding programs.

  14. Perinatal risk factors for wheezing phenotypes in the first 8 years of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caudri, D.; Savenije, O. E. M.; Smit, H. A.; Postma, D. S.; Koppelman, G. H.; Wijga, A. H.; Kerkhof, M.; Gehring, U.; Hoekstra, M. O.; Brunekreef, B.; de Jongste, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background A novel data-driven approach was used to identify wheezing phenotypes in pre-schoolchildren aged 0-8 years, in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) birth cohort. Five phenotypes were identified: never/infrequent wheeze, transient early wheeze, intermediate onset

  15. Early Learning and Adaptive Behaviour in Toddlers with Down Syndrome: Evidence for an Emerging Behavioural Phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Deborah; Hepburn, Susan; Rogers, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Background: Though the Down syndrome behavioural phenotype has been described as involving relative strengths in visuo-spatial processing and sociability, and relative weaknesses in verbal skills and motor planning, the early emergence of this phenotypic pattern of strengths and weaknesses has not yet been fully explored. Method: In this study, we…

  16. Epigenetics in heart failure phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a leading clinical and public problem posing a higher risk of morbidity and mortality in different populations. HF appears to be in both phenotypic forms: HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although both HF phenotypes can be distinguished through clinical features, co-morbidity status, prediction score, and treatment, the clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF and HFpEF are similar. In this context, investigation of various molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to the development and progression of both HF phenotypes is very important. There is emerging evidence that epigenetic regulation may have a clue in the pathogenesis of HF. This review represents current available evidence regarding the implication of epigenetic modifications in the development of different HF phenotypes and perspectives of epigenetic-based therapies of HF. PMID:27335803

  17. Capturing phenotypes for precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter N; Mungall, Christopher J; Haendel, Melissa

    2015-10-01

    Deep phenotyping followed by integrated computational analysis of genotype and phenotype is becoming ever more important for many areas of genomic diagnostics and translational research. The overwhelming majority of clinical descriptions in the medical literature are available only as natural language text, meaning that searching, analysis, and integration of medically relevant information in databases such as PubMed is challenging. The new journal Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies will require authors to select Human Phenotype Ontology terms for research papers that will be displayed alongside the manuscript, thereby providing a foundation for ontology-based indexing and searching of articles that contain descriptions of phenotypic abnormalities-an important step toward improving the ability of researchers and clinicians to get biomedical information that is critical for clinical care or translational research. PMID:27148566

  18. Finding our way through phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Deans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility.

  19. Next-generation phenotypic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchal, Scott J; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Carragher, Neil O

    2016-07-01

    Phenotypic drug discovery (PDD) strategies are defined by screening and selection of hit or lead compounds based on quantifiable phenotypic endpoints without prior knowledge of the drug target. We outline the challenges associated with traditional phenotypic screening strategies and propose solutions and new opportunities to be gained by adopting modern PDD technologies. We highlight both historical and recent examples of approved drugs and new drug candidates discovered by modern phenotypic screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of a new era of PDD underpinned by a wealth of technology advances in the areas of in vitro model development, high-content imaging and image informatics, mechanism-of-action profiling and target deconvolution. PMID:27357617

  20. Finding our way through phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Andrew R; Lewis, Suzanna E; Huala, Eva; Anzaldo, Salvatore S; Ashburner, Michael; Balhoff, James P; Blackburn, David C; Blake, Judith A; Burleigh, J Gordon; Chanet, Bruno; Cooper, Laurel D; Courtot, Mélanie; Csösz, Sándor; Cui, Hong; Dahdul, Wasila; Das, Sandip; Dececchi, T Alexander; Dettai, Agnes; Diogo, Rui; Druzinsky, Robert E; Dumontier, Michel; Franz, Nico M; Friedrich, Frank; Gkoutos, George V; Haendel, Melissa; Harmon, Luke J; Hayamizu, Terry F; He, Yongqun; Hines, Heather M; Ibrahim, Nizar; Jackson, Laura M; Jaiswal, Pankaj; James-Zorn, Christina; Köhler, Sebastian; Lecointre, Guillaume; Lapp, Hilmar; Lawrence, Carolyn J; Le Novère, Nicolas; Lundberg, John G; Macklin, James; Mast, Austin R; Midford, Peter E; Mikó, István; Mungall, Christopher J; Oellrich, Anika; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Parkinson, Helen; Ramírez, Martín J; Richter, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N; Ruttenberg, Alan; Schulz, Katja S; Segerdell, Erik; Seltmann, Katja C; Sharkey, Michael J; Smith, Aaron D; Smith, Barry; Specht, Chelsea D; Squires, R Burke; Thacker, Robert W; Thessen, Anne; Fernandez-Triana, Jose; Vihinen, Mauno; Vize, Peter D; Vogt, Lars; Wall, Christine E; Walls, Ramona L; Westerfeld, Monte; Wharton, Robert A; Wirkner, Christian S; Woolley, James B; Yoder, Matthew J; Zorn, Aaron M; Mabee, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility. PMID:25562316

  1. Spice: discovery of phenotype-determining component interplays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhengzhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A latent behavior of a biological cell is complex. Deriving the underlying simplicity, or the fundamental rules governing this behavior has been the Holy Grail of systems biology. Data-driven prediction of the system components and their component interplays that are responsible for the target system’s phenotype is a key and challenging step in this endeavor. Results The proposed approach, which we call System Phenotype-related Interplaying Components Enumerator (Spice, iteratively enumerates statistically significant system components that are hypothesized (1 to play an important role in defining the specificity of the target system’s phenotype(s; (2 to exhibit a functionally coherent behavior, namely, act in a coordinated manner to perform the phenotype-specific function; and (3 to improve the predictive skill of the system’s phenotype(s when used collectively in the ensemble of predictive models. Spice can be applied to both instance-based data and network-based data. When validated, Spice effectively identified system components related to three target phenotypes: biohydrogen production, motility, and cancer. Manual results curation agreed with the known phenotype-related system components reported in literature. Additionally, using the identified system components as discriminatory features improved the prediction accuracy by 10% on the phenotype-classification task when compared to a number of state-of-the-art methods applied to eight benchmark microarray data sets. Conclusion We formulate a problem—enumeration of phenotype-determining system component interplays—and propose an effective methodology (Spice to address this problem. Spice improved identification of cancer-related groups of genes from various microarray data sets and detected groups of genes associated with microbial biohydrogen production and motility, many of which were reported in literature. Spice also improved the predictive skill of the

  2. Latent cluster analysis of ALS phenotypes identifies prognostically differing groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeban Ganesalingam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a degenerative disease predominantly affecting motor neurons and manifesting as several different phenotypes. Whether these phenotypes correspond to different underlying disease processes is unknown. We used latent cluster analysis to identify groupings of clinical variables in an objective and unbiased way to improve phenotyping for clinical and research purposes. METHODS: Latent class cluster analysis was applied to a large database consisting of 1467 records of people with ALS, using discrete variables which can be readily determined at the first clinic appointment. The model was tested for clinical relevance by survival analysis of the phenotypic groupings using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: The best model generated five distinct phenotypic classes that strongly predicted survival (p<0.0001. Eight variables were used for the latent class analysis, but a good estimate of the classification could be obtained using just two variables: site of first symptoms (bulbar or limb and time from symptom onset to diagnosis (p<0.00001. CONCLUSION: The five phenotypic classes identified using latent cluster analysis can predict prognosis. They could be used to stratify patients recruited into clinical trials and generating more homogeneous disease groups for genetic, proteomic and risk factor research.

  3. MRPS18CP2 alleles and DEFA3 absence as putative chromosome 8p23.1 modifiers of hearing loss due to mtDNA mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischel-Ghodsian Nathan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations account for at least 5% of cases of postlingual, nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Among them, mutation A1555G is frequently found associated with aminoglycoside-induced and/or nonsyndromic hearing loss in families presenting with extremely variable clinical phenotypes. Biochemical and genetic data have suggested that nuclear background is the main factor involved in modulating the phenotypic expression of mutation A1555G. However, although a major nuclear modifying locus was located on chromosome 8p23.1 and regardless intensive screening of the region, the gene involved has not been identified. Methods With the aim to gain insights into the factors that determine the phenotypic expression of A1555G mutation, we have analysed in detail different genetic and genomic elements on 8p23.1 region (DEFA3 gene absence, CLDN23 gene and MRPS18CP2 pseudogene in a group of 213 A1555G carriers. Results Family based association studies identified a positive association for a polymorphism on MRPS18CP2 and an overrepresentation of DEFA3 gene absence in the deaf group of A1555G carriers. Conclusion Although none of the factors analysed seem to have a major contribution to the phenotype, our findings provide further evidences of the involvement of 8p23.1 region as a modifying locus for A1555G 12S rRNA gene mutation.

  4. An audit of thiopurine methyltransferase genotyping and phenotyping before intended azathioprine treatment for dermatological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, T; Bygum, A

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background. Determining thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) genotype and phenotype before azathioprine treatment predicts which patients are most likely to develop myelosuppression. Aim. To evaluate the course of azathioprine treatment in people with TPMT heterozygosity and whether this d...

  5. Epigenetic reversion of breast carcinoma phenotype is accompaniedby DNA sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandal, Tone; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Spencer, Virginia A.; Folberg,Robert; Bissell, Mina J.; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2006-07-19

    The importance of microenvironment and context in regulation of tissue-specific genes is finally well established. DNA exposure to, or sequestration from, nucleases can be used to detect differences in higher order chromatin structure in intact cells without disturbing cellular or tissue architecture. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and tumor phenotype, we utilized an established 3-D assay where normal and malignant human breast cells can be easily distinguished by the morphology of the structures they make (acinus-like vs tumor-like, respectively). We show that these phenotypes can be distinguished also by sensitivity to AluI digestion where the malignant cells are resistant to digestion relative to non-malignant cells. Reversion of the T4-2 breast cancer cells by either cAMP analogs, or a phospatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K) inhibitor not only reverted the phenotype, but also the chromatin sensitivity to AluI. By using different cAMP-analogs, we show that the cAMP-induced phenotypic reversion, polarization, and shift in DNA organization act through a cAMP-dependent-protein-kinase A-coupled signaling pathway. Importantly, inhibitory antibody to fibronectin also reverted the malignant phenotype, polarized the acini, and changed chromatin sequestration. These experiments show not only that modifying the tumor microenvironment can alter the organization of tumor cells but also that architecture of the tissues and the global chromatin organization are coupled and yet highly plastic.

  6. Refining mimicry: phenotypic variation tracks the local optimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mérot, Claire; Le Poul, Yann; Théry, Marc; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    Müllerian mimicry between chemically defended preys is a textbook example of natural selection favouring phenotypic convergence onto a shared warning signal. Studies of mimicry have concentrated on deciphering the ecological and genetic underpinnings of dramatic switches in mimicry association, producing a well-known mosaic distribution of mimicry patterns across geography. However, little is known about the accuracy of resemblance between natural comimics when the local phenotypic optimum varies. In this study, using analyses of wing shape, pattern and hue, we quantify multimodal phenotypic similarity between butterfly comimics sharing the so-called postman pattern in different localities with varying species composition. We show that subtle but consistent variation between populations of the localized species, Heliconius timareta thelxinoe, enhance resemblance to the abundant comimics which drive the mimicry in each locality. Those results suggest that rarer comimics track the changes in the phenotypic optimum caused by gradual changes in the composition of the mimicry community, providing insights into the process by which intraspecific diversity of mimetic pattern may arise. Furthermore, our results suggest a multimodal evolution of similarity, with coordinated convergence in different features of the phenotype such as wing outline, pattern and hue. Finally, multilocus genotyping allows estimating local hybridization rates between H. timareta and comimic H. melpomene in different populations, raising the hypothesis that mimicry refinement between closely related comimics may be enhanced by adaptive introgression at loci modifying the accuracy of resemblance. PMID:27003742

  7. Genetic background of hyperphenylalaninemia in Nagasaki, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateki, Sumito; Watanabe, Satoshi; Nakatomi, Akiko; Kinoshita, Eiichi; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) and related hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) are caused by a deficiency in hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The incidence of PKU in Nagasaki prefecture is higher than that in all parts of Japan (1/15 894 vs 1/120 000). To investigate the genetic background of patients with HPA in Nagasaki prefecture, mutation analysis was done in 14 patients with PKU or mild HPA. Homozygous or compound heterozygous PAH mutations were identified in all the patients. The spectrum of PAH mutations in the cohort was broad and similar to those in all parts of Japan and East Asian countries. R53H is the most common mutation in patients with mild HPA. The present results provide further support for genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with HPA. The high incidence of PKU in Nagasaki, the westernmost part of Japan, might be due to migration of people with PAH mutations from China and Korea, and geographic factors. PMID:27173423

  8. Coulomb field in a constant electromagnetic background

    CERN Document Server

    Adorno, T C; Shabad, A E

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear Maxwell equations are written up to the third-power deviations from a constant-field background, valid within any local nonlinear electrodynamics including QED with Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian. Linear electric response to imposed static finite-sized charge is found in the vacuum filled by an arbitrary combination of constant and homogeneous electric and magnetic fields. The modified Coulomb field, corrections to the total charge and to the charge density are given in terms of derivatives of the effective Lagrangian with respect to the field invariants.

  9. JEM-X background models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huovelin, J.; Maisala, S.; Schultz, J.;

    2003-01-01

    revolution 41 of INTEGRAL. Total observing time used for the analysis was 216 502 s, with the average of 25 cps of background for each of the two JEM-X telescopes. JEM-X1 showed slightly higher average background intensity than JEM-X2. The detectors were stable during the long exposures, and weak orbital...... phase dependence in the background outside radiation belts was observed. The analysis yielded an average of 5 cps for the diffuse background, and 20 cps for the instrument background. The instrument background was found highly dependent on position, both for spectral shape and intensity. Diff use...... background was enhanced in the central area of a detector, and it decreased radially towards the edge, with a clear vignetting effect for both JEM-X units. The instrument background was weakest in the central area of a detector and showed a steep increase at the very edges of both JEM-X detectors, with...

  10. Testing the Role of Genetic Background in Parallel Evolution Using the Comparative Experimental Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Vogwill, T.; Kojadinovic, M.; Furio, V.; Maclean, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Parallel evolution is the independent evolution of the same phenotype or genotype in response to the same selection pressure. There are examples of parallel molecular evolution across divergent genetic backgrounds, suggesting that genetic background may not play an important role in determining the outcome of adaptation. Here, we measure the influence of genetic background on phenotypic and molecular adaptation by combining experimental evolution with comparative analysis. We selected for res...

  11. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Soloveva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  12. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  13. Similarity-based search of model organism, disease and drug effect phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-02-19

    Background: Semantic similarity measures over phenotype ontologies have been demonstrated to provide a powerful approach for the analysis of model organism phenotypes, the discovery of animal models of human disease, novel pathways, gene functions, druggable therapeutic targets, and determination of pathogenicity. Results: We have developed PhenomeNET 2, a system that enables similarity-based searches over a large repository of phenotypes in real-time. It can be used to identify strains of model organisms that are phenotypically similar to human patients, diseases that are phenotypically similar to model organism phenotypes, or drug effect profiles that are similar to the phenotypes observed in a patient or model organism. PhenomeNET 2 is available at http://aber-owl.net/phenomenet. Conclusions: Phenotype-similarity searches can provide a powerful tool for the discovery and investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying an observed phenotypic manifestation. PhenomeNET 2 facilitates user-defined similarity searches and allows researchers to analyze their data within a large repository of human, mouse and rat phenotypes.

  14. Supergravity backgrounds and symmetry superalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Ertem, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    We consider the bosonic sectors of supergravity theories in ten and eleven dimensions which correspond to the low energy limits of string theories and M-theory. The solutions of supergravity field equations are known as supergravity backgrounds and the number of preserved supersymmetries in those backgrounds are determined by Killing spinors. We provide some examples of supergravity backgrounds which preserve different fractions of supersymmetry. An important invariant for the characterization of supergravity backgrounds is their Killing superalgebras which are constructed out of Killing vectors and Killing spinors of the background. After constructing Killing superalgebras of some special supergravity backgrounds, we discuss about the possibilities of the extensions of these superalgebras to include the higher degree hidden symmetries of the background.

  15. Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deporzio, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the modification of bolometer detectors used in particle searches to veto or otherwise reject alpha radiation background and the statistical advantages of doing so. Several techniques are presented in detail - plastic film scintillator vetoes, metallic film ionization vetoes, and scintillating bolometer vetoes. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles representative of documented detector background. Photomultipliers detect this scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Layered metallic films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased to produce a current signal veto when incident 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Modified Zinc Molybdate Bolometers are used to produce scintillation light when stimulated by alpha background. Calibration of veto signal to background energy is presented. Results are used to quantify the statistical impact of such modifications on bolometer searches.

  16. Natural variation of model mutant phenotypes in Ciona intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Sordino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study of ascidians (Chordata, Tunicata has made a considerable contribution to our understanding of the origin and evolution of basal chordates. To provide further information to support forward genetics in Ciona intestinalis, we used a combination of natural variation and neutral population genetics as an approach for the systematic identification of new mutations. In addition to the significance of developmental variation for phenotype-driven studies, this approach can encompass important implications in evolutionary and population biology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report a preliminary survey for naturally occurring mutations in three geographically interconnected populations of C. intestinalis. The influence of historical, geographical and environmental factors on the distribution of abnormal phenotypes was assessed by means of 12 microsatellites. We identified 37 possible mutant loci with stereotyped defects in embryonic development that segregate in a way typical of recessive alleles. Local populations were found to differ in genetic organization and frequency distribution of phenotypic classes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Natural genetic polymorphism of C. intestinalis constitutes a valuable source of phenotypes for studying embryonic development in ascidians. Correlating genetic structure and the occurrence of abnormal phenotypes is a crucial focus for understanding the selective forces that shape natural finite populations, and may provide insights of great importance into the evolutionary mechanisms that generate animal diversity.

  17. Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype in Adolescents Aged 15 to 18 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caridad Hernández Gutiérrez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: presence of the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype is a predictor of cardiometabolic deterioration, increased type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease. Objective: to determine the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype in adolescents aged 15 to 18 years from the Area III of Cienfuegos. Method: a case series study was conducted in a universe of 198 adolescents aged 15 to 18 years who attended a consultation created for this study at the Octavio de la Concepción y de la Pedraja University Polyclinic in Cienfuegos municipality from March to December 2013. Each patient completed a questionnaire including the following variables: age, sex, personal medical history, family medical history, weight, height, body mass index, presence of acanthosis nigricans, triglycerides and perimeter. Results: frequency of the phenotype was determined in 15.1 % of the participants with a slight predominance of the 18 age group (16.3 % and female sex (8.6 %. Twenty-one point six percent of the adolescents with a family history of obesity and 21.7 % of those with first-degree diabetic relatives presented the phenotype, being hypertriglyceridemia the most significant condition. Conclusions: a relationship between a family history of diabetes mellitus, obesity, body mass index above the 90th percentile value and presence of the phenotype was established.

  18. Leaf segmentation in plant phenotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharr, Hanno; Minervini, Massimo; French, Andrew P.; Klukas, Christian; Kramer, David M.; Liu, Xiaoming; Luengo, Imanol; Pape, Jean Michel; Polder, Gerrit; Vukadinovic, Danijela; Yin, Xi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2016-01-01

    Image-based plant phenotyping is a growing application area of computer vision in agriculture. A key task is the segmentation of all individual leaves in images. Here we focus on the most common rosette model plants, Arabidopsis and young tobacco. Although leaves do share appearance and shape cha

  19. Evaluation of Phenotypic Methods for Detection of Klebsiella Pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing K. Pneumoniae in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Azimi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the main mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems is potential of Klebsiella pneumoniae to produce K. pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC. KPC is an important type of carbapenemase, which can hydrolyze carbapenems and other beta-lactam antibiotics. Modified Hodge Test (MHT and  use  of  boronic  acid  as  a  KPC  inhibitor  are  two  types  of  phenotypic methods, which are used for detection of carbanemase-producing bacteria. Specificity of these two phenotypic tests for identification of KPC was assessed in this study.Methods:   Forty-four   K.   pneumoniae   strains   were   isolated   from  woundinfections   of   burn   patients.   All   isolates   were   identified   with   specific biochemical tests. Carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae isolates were identified by disc diffusion method and analyzed with cut off-points of CLSI 2011 guideline.   For   detection   of   KPC-producing   strains,   carbapenem-resistant isolates were examined with two different phenotypic (i.e. MHT and Boronic acid methods. Subsequently, strains with positive phenotypic methods were examined by PCR as a molecular method.Results: Twenty-eight (64% out of 44 isolates were resistant to carbapenem according  to  CLSI  breakpoints  and  16  (36%  were  susceptible.  MHT  was positive in all of carbapenem-resistant isolates but none of them have had the synergism effect between meropenem and boronic acid. Also, all isolates were negative for presence of KPC genes on gel electrophoresis. According to resultsMHT has not enough specificity for detection of KPC. 

  20. Genetic association analysis of complex diseases incorporating intermediate phenotype information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafang Li

    Full Text Available Genetic researchers often collect disease related quantitative traits in addition to disease status because they are interested in understanding the pathophysiology of disease processes. In genome-wide association (GWA studies, these quantitative phenotypes may be relevant to disease development and serve as intermediate phenotypes or they could be behavioral or other risk factors that predict disease risk. Statistical tests combining both disease status and quantitative risk factors should be more powerful than case-control studies, as the former incorporates more information about the disease. In this paper, we proposed a modified inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis method to combine disease status and quantitative intermediate phenotype information. The simulation results showed that when an intermediate phenotype was available, the inverse-variance weighted method had more power than did a case-control study of complex diseases, especially in identifying susceptibility loci having minor effects. We further applied this modified meta-analysis to a study of imputed lung cancer genotypes with smoking data in 1154 cases and 1137 matched controls. The most significant SNPs came from the CHRNA3-CHRNA5-CHRNB4 region on chromosome 15q24-25.1, which has been replicated in many other studies. Our results confirm that this CHRNA region is associated with both lung cancer development and smoking behavior. We also detected three significant SNPs--rs1800469, rs1982072, and rs2241714--in the promoter region of the TGFB1 gene on chromosome 19 (p = 1.46×10(-5, 1.18×10(-5, and 6.57×10(-6, respectively. The SNP rs1800469 is reported to be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer in cigarette smokers. The present study is the first GWA study to replicate this result. Signals in the 3q26 region were also identified in the meta-analysis. We demonstrate the intermediate phenotype can potentially enhance the power of complex

  1. Double Layered-Background Removal Filter for Detecting Small Infrared Targets in Heterogenous Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho

    2011-01-01

    Detecting small targets is essential for mitigating the sea-based Infrared search and track (IRST) problem. It is easy to detect small targets in homogeneous backgrounds such as the sky. When targets are on the border line of heterogeneous backgrounds such as the horizon in the sky and sea surface, solving the problem of detection becomes difficult. This paper presents a novel spatial filtering method, called Double Layered-Background Removal Filter (DL-BRF), for achieving high detection rates and low false alarm rates. DL-BRF consists of a Modified-Mean Subtraction Filter (M-MSF) and a consecutive Local-Directional Background Removal Filter (L-DBRF). M-MSF enhances the target signal and reduces background noise. L-DBRF removes horizontal structures, which upgrade the signal-to-clutter ratio and background suppression factor. L-DBRF used after M-MSF enhances the synergistic performance of horizontal target detection. Additionally, the adaptive Hysteresis threshold-based scheme is a suitable detection method. We validate the superior performance of the proposed method via three types of evaluation tests, including a real test scenario.

  2. Boc modifies the holoprosencephaly spectrum of Cdo mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2011-05-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE is caused by a failure to form the midline of the forebrain and/or midface. It is one of the most common human birth defects, but clinical expression is extremely variable. HPE is associated with mutations in the sonic hedgehog (SHH pathway. Mice lacking the Shh pathway regulator Cdo (also called Cdon display HPE with strain-dependent penetrance and expressivity, implicating silent modifier genes as one cause of the variability. However, the identities of potential HPE modifiers of this type are unknown. We report here that whereas mice lacking the Cdo paralog Boc do not have HPE, Cdo;Boc double mutants on a largely Cdo-resistant genetic background have lobar HPE with strong craniofacial anomalies and defects in Shh target gene expression in the developing forebrain. Boc is therefore a silent HPE modifier gene in mice. Furthermore, Cdo and Boc have specific, selective roles in Shh signaling in mammals, because Cdo;Boc double-mutant mice do not display the most severe HPE phenotype seen in Shh-null mice, nor do they have major defects in digit patterning or development of vertebrae, which are also Shh-dependent processes. This is in contrast to reported observations in Drosophila, where genetic removal of the Cdo and Boc orthologs Ihog and Boi results in a complete loss of response to the hedgehog ligand. Therefore, there is evolutionary divergence between mammals and insects in the requirement of the hedgehog pathway for Cdo/Ihog family members, with mammalian development involving additional factors and/or distinct mechanisms at this level of pathway regulation.

  3. Background subtraction theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Elgammal, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Background subtraction is a widely used concept for detection of moving objects in videos. In the last two decades there has been a lot of development in designing algorithms for background subtraction, as well as wide use of these algorithms in various important applications, such as visual surveillance, sports video analysis, motion capture, etc. Various statistical approaches have been proposed to model scene backgrounds. The concept of background subtraction also has been extended to detect objects from videos captured from moving cameras. This book reviews the concept and practice of back

  4. MicroRNAs enrichment in GWAS of complex human phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background The genotype information carried by Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) seems to have the potential to explain more of the ‘missing heritability’ of complex human phenotypes, given improved statistical approaches. Several lines of evidence support the involvement of microRNA (miRNA) and other non-coding RNA in complex human traits and diseases. We employed a novel, genetic annotation-informed enrichment method for GWAS that captures more polygenic effects than standard GWAS anal...

  5. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FV...

  6. Facial Identity Recognition in the Broader Autism Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    C Ellie Wilson; Phillipa Freeman; Jon Brock; A Mike Burton; Romina Palermo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 'broader autism phenotype' (BAP) refers to the mild expression of autistic-like traits in the relatives of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Establishing the presence of ASD traits provides insight into which traits are heritable in ASD. Here, the ability to recognise facial identity was tested in 33 parents of ASD children. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: In experiment 1, parents of ASD children completed the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT), and a questionnaire asse...

  7. Cadmium burden and the risk and phenotype of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Tony T; Wu Hsi-Chin; Pu Yeong S; Chen Yi-Chun; Lai Ming; Yang Chun Y; Sung Fung-Chang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies on the association between prostate cancer and cadmium exposure have yielded conflicting results. This study explored cadmium burden on the risk and phenotype of prostate cancer in men with no evident environmental exposure. Methods Hospital-based 261 prostate cancer cases and 267 controls with benign diseases were recruited from four hospitals in Taiwan. Demographic, dietary and lifestyle data were collected by standardized questionnaires. Blood cadmium (BCd) and ...

  8. Computational investigation of epithelial cell dynamic phenotype in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Debnath Jayanta; Mostov Keith; Park Sunwoo; Kim Sean HJ; Hunt C Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background When grown in three-dimensional (3D) cultures, epithelial cells typically form cystic organoids that recapitulate cardinal features of in vivo epithelial structures. Characterizing essential cell actions and their roles, which constitute the system's dynamic phenotype, is critical to gaining deeper insight into the cystogenesis phenomena. Methods Starting with an earlier in silico epithelial analogue (ISEA1) that validated for several Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epith...

  9. Genetic interactions and modifier genes in Hirschsprung's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam S Wallace; Richard B Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease is a congenital disorder that occurs in 1:5000 live births. It is characterised by an absence of enteric neurons along a variable region of the gastrointestinal tract. Hirschsprung's disease is classified as a multigenic disorder, because the same phenotype is associated with mutations in multiple distinct genes. Furthermore, the genetics of Hirschsprung's disease are highly complex and not strictly Mendelian. The phenotypic variability and incomplete penetrance observed in Hirschsprung's disease also suggests the involvement of modifier genes. Here, we summarise the current knowledge of the genetics underlying Hirschsprung's disease based on human and animal studies, focusing on the principal causative genes, their interactions, and the role of modifier genes.

  10. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of soil background is one of the most important activities supporting environmental restoration and waste management on the Hanford Site. Background compositions serve as the basis for identifying soil contamination, and also as a baseline in risk assessment processes used to determine soil cleanup and treatment levels. These uses of soil background require an understanding of the extent to which analytes of concern occur naturally in the soils. This report documents the results of sampling and analysis activities designed to characterize the composition of soil background at the Hanford Site, and to evaluate the feasibility for use as Sitewide background. The compositions of naturally occurring soils in the vadose Zone have been-determined for-nonradioactive inorganic and organic analytes and related physical properties. These results confirm that a Sitewide approach to the characterization of soil background is technically sound and is a viable alternative to the determination and use of numerous local or area backgrounds that yield inconsistent definitions of contamination. Sitewide soil background consists of several types of data and is appropriate for use in identifying contamination in all soils in the vadose zone on the Hanford Site. The natural concentrations of nearly every inorganic analyte extend to levels that exceed calculated health-based cleanup limits. The levels of most inorganic analytes, however, are well below these health-based limits. The highest measured background concentrations occur in three volumetrically minor soil types, the most important of which are topsoils adjacent to the Columbia River that are rich in organic carbon. No organic analyte levels above detection were found in any of the soil samples

  11. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  12. Children of ethnic minority backgrounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    2010-01-01

    Children of ethnic minority background balance their everyday life between a cultural background rooted in their ethnic origin and a daily life in day care, schools and with peers that is founded in a majority culture. This means, among other things, that they often will have access to different ...

  13. Deciphering the Galaxy Guppy phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Shaddock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal breeding hobbyists have been useful to science because they identify and isolate colorcoat mutations that geneticists can in turn use in their studies of the development and differentiation ofcolor cells. This paper discusses a very interesting color mutant, the Japanese Galaxy, tracing its creationfrom back to a self-educated genetics hobbyist, Hoskiki Tsutsui. The paper discusses a constituent genepreviously studied by Dr. Violet Phang, the snakeskin gene (the linked body and fin genes Ssb and Sst.And it discusses a gene previously unknown to science, the Schimmelpfennig Platinum gene (Sc.Through crossing experiments, the author determines that the combination of these two genes producesan intermediate phenotype, the Medusa. Incorporating the Grass (Gr, another gene unknown to sciencegene into the Medusa through a crossover produces the Galaxy phenotype. Microscope studies of thesnakeskin pattern in Galaxies and snakeskins reveals some parallels with similar studies made of theZebrafish Danio.

  14. Phenotypic variability in Meesmann's dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlers, Niels; Hjortdal, Jesper; Nielsen, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    symptoms often include blurred vision and ocular irritation. Typical cases may be entirely free of complaints. Intermittent pain episodes, such as occur in recurrent erosion syndrome, are not the rule. Genetic sequencing indicated a familial relationship with the originally described Meesmann family......'s dystrophy occurs worldwide. The largest family described is the original German one, now supplemented with a Danish branch. Despite the presence of an identical genetic defect, the clinical phenotype varies. This suggests that non-KRT12-related mechanisms are responsible for the variation.......PURPOSE: To describe the phenotypic variability in Meesmann's microcystic dystrophy of the corneal epithelium based on a review of the literature and the presentation of a Danish family. METHODS: We carried out a clinical examination of the family and genetic sequencing of DNA. RESULTS: Subjective...

  15. Phenotypic expression in mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernsen, P L; Wevers, R. A.; Gabreëls, F J; Lamers, K J; Sonnen, A E; Stekhoven, J H

    1987-01-01

    beta-glucuronidase deficiency is an extremely rare disorder which is known to have a considerable phenotypic variation. A survey of the clinical findings in 19 previously reported patients with mucopolysaccharidosis VII is presented together with the results of clinical and biochemical studies in two further patients. Because a similar clinical picture is present in a heterozygotic sister it is doubted whether all signs and symptoms can be attributed to the beta-glucuronidase deficiency. The ...

  16. [Plasticity of the cellular phenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chneiweiss, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    The tragical consequences of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs in 1945 were to lead to the discovery of hematopoietic stem cells and their phenotypic plasticity, in response to environmental factors. These concepts were much later extended to the founding cells of other tissues. In the following collection of articles, the mechanisms underlying this plasticity, at the frontiers of developmental biology and oncology, are illustrated in the case of various cell types of neural origin and of some tumours. PMID:21501574

  17. Wine Expertise Predicts Taste Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, John E.; Pickering, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    Taste phenotypes have long been studied in relation to alcohol intake, dependence, and family history, with contradictory findings. However, on balance – with appropriate caveats about populations tested, outcomes measured and psychophysical methods used – an association between variation in taste responsiveness and some alcohol behaviors is supported. Recent work suggests super-tasting (operationalized via propylthiouracil (PROP) bitterness) not only associates with heightened response but a...

  18. Statistical models for trisomic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.; Feingold, E. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Certain genetic disorders are rare in the general population but more common in individuals with specific trisomies, which suggests that the genes involved in the etiology of these disorders may be located on the trisomic chromosome. As with all aneuploid syndromes, however, a considerable degree of variation exists within each phenotype so that any given trait is present only among a subset of the trisomic population. We have previously presented a simple gene-dosage model to explain this phenotypic variation and developed a strategy to map genes for such traits. The mapping strategy does not depend on the simple model but works in theory under any model that predicts that affected individuals have an increased likelihood of disomic homozygosity at the trait locus. This paper explores the robustness of our mapping method by investigating what kinds of models give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity. We describe a number of basic statistical models for trisomic phenotypes. Some of these are logical extensions of standard models for disomic phenotypes, and some are more specific to trisomy. Where possible, we discuss genetic mechanisms applicable to each model. We investigate which models and which parameter values give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity in individuals with the trait. Finally, we determine the sample sizes required to identify the increased disomic homozygosity under each model. Most of the models we explore yield detectable increases in disomic homozygosity for some reasonable range of parameter values, usually corresponding to smaller trait frequencies. It therefore appears that our mapping method should be effective for a wide variety of moderately infrequent traits, even though the exact mode of inheritance is unlikely to be known. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Array-CGH characterization and genotype-phenotype analysis in a patient with a ring chromosome 6

    OpenAIRE

    Ciocca, Laura; Surace, Cecilia; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Roberti, Maria Cristina; Sirleto, Pietro; Lombardo, Antonietta; Russo, Serena; Brizi, Valerio; Grotta, Simona; Cini, Claudio; Angioni, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Background Ring chromosome 6 is a rare constitutional abnormality that generally occurs de novo. The related phenotype may be highly variable ranging from an almost normal phenotype to severe malformations and mental retardation. These features are mainly present when genetic material at the end of the chromosome is lost. The severity of the phenotype seems to be related to the size of the deletion. About 25 cases have been described to date, but the vast majority reports only conventional cy...

  20. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  1. Correlation between Duffy blood group phenotype and breast cancer incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiao-feng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different ethnicities have different distribution of Duffy blood group (DBG phenotypes and different breast cancer morbidity. A study in our lab demonstrated that Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC, also known as DBGP, the Duffy protein phenotype, led to the inhibition of tumorigenesis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that DBGP is correlated with breast cancer occurrence. Methods DBGP proteins were examined by indirect antiglobulin testing with anti-FYa and anti-FYb antibodies. The phenotypes were classified into four groups according to the agglutination reactions: FYa + FYb+, FYa + FYb-, FYa-FYb + and FYa-FYb-. The phenotypes and pathological diagnosis of consecutively hospitalized female patients (n = 5,022 suffering from breast cancer at the Shanghai Cancer Hospital and Henan Province Cancer Hospital were investigated. The relationships between DBGP expression with breast cancer occurrence, axillary lymph status, histological subtype, tumor size pathological grade and overall survival were analyzed. Results The incidence of breast cancer was significantly different between FYa + FYb + (29.8%, FYa + FYb- (33.2%, FYa-FYb + (45.6% and FYa-FYb- (59.1%; P = 0.001. Significant different numbers of breast cancer patients had metastases to the axillary lymph nodes in the FYa + FYb + group (25.1%, FYa + FYb- (36.9%, FYa-FYb + (41.0% and FYa-FYb- (50.0%, (P = 0.005. There was a statistical significance (p = 0.022 of the overall survival difference between patients with difference phenotypes. No significant difference was observed in cancer size (t-test, p > 0.05, histological cancer type (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05 or histological grade (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.05 between every each DBGP group. Conclusions DBGP is correlated with breast cancer incidence and axillary lymph node metastasis and overall survival. Further investigations are required to determine the underlying mechanism of Duffy blood group phenotype

  2. Prevalence Of The Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype In Iranian Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaillzadeh A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: No evidence exists regarding the prevalence of the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype in adolescents. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of this phenotype in a representative sample of Tehranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: Anthropometry and biochemical measurement were assessed in a population-based cross-sectional study of 3036 Tehranian adolescents (1413 male and 1623 female aged 10-19 years. Hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype was defined as concurrently having serum triglyceride concentration ≥110 mg/dl and waist circumference ≥90th percentile for age and sex. Overweight (≥95th percentile and at risk for overweight (≥85th-<95th percentile was defined based on the standardized percentile curves of body mass index suggested for Iranian adolescents. Results: The prevalence of the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype was 6.4% (95%CI: 5.5-7.2 among Tehranian adolescents (males: 7.3%, 5.9-8.7 and females: 5.6%, 4.4-6.7. Overweight subjects had the highest proportion of hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype than those at risk for overweight and those with normal-weight (male: 42.9 vs 2.9 and 0.0%, respectively, P<0.01; female: 32.5 vs 11.3 and 1.3%, respectively, P<0.01. Conclusion: This study provides evidence showing high prevalence of the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype in Tehranian adolescents, particularly among overweight adolescents. This finding highlights the need for effective preventive and therapeutic strategies relying on diet, physical activity and lifestyle modification.

  3. Phenotype prediction in regulated metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Centler Florian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the growing amount of biological knowledge that is incorporated into metabolic network models, their analysis has become more and more challenging. Here, we examine the capabilities of the recently introduced chemical organization theory (OT to ease this task. Considering only network stoichiometry, the theory allows the prediction of all potentially persistent species sets and therewith rigorously relates the structure of a network to its potential dynamics. By this, the phenotypes implied by a metabolic network can be predicted without the need for explicit knowledge of the detailed reaction kinetics. Results We propose an approach to deal with regulation – and especially inhibitory interactions – in chemical organization theory. One advantage of this approach is that the metabolic network and its regulation are represented in an integrated way as one reaction network. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach we examine a model by Covert and Palsson (J Biol Chem, 277(31, 2002 of the central metabolism of E. coli that incorporates the regulation of all involved genes. Our method correctly predicts the known growth phenotypes on 16 different substrates. Without specific assumptions, organization theory correctly predicts the lethality of knockout experiments in 101 out of 116 cases. Taking into account the same model specific assumptions as in the regulatory flux balance analysis (rFBA by Covert and Palsson, the same performance is achieved (106 correctly predicted cases. Two model specific assumptions had to be considered: first, we have to assume that secreted molecules do not influence the regulatory system, and second, that metabolites with increasing concentrations indicate a lethal state. Conclusion The introduced approach to model a metabolic network and its regulation in an integrated way as one reaction network makes organization analysis a universal technique to study the potential behavior of

  4. Latent TGF-β–binding protein 4 modifies muscular dystrophy in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Heydemann, Ahlke; Ceco, Ermelinda; Lim, Jackie E.; Hadhazy, Michele; Ryder, Pearl; Moran, Jennifer L; Beier, David R.; Palmer, Abraham A.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Most single-gene diseases, including muscular dystrophy, display a nonuniform phenotype. Phenotypic variability arises, in part, due to the presence of genetic modifiers that enhance or suppress the disease process. We employed an unbiased mapping approach to search for genes that modify muscular dystrophy in mice. In a genome-wide scan, we identified a single strong locus on chromosome 7 that influenced two pathological features of muscular dystrophy, muscle membrane permeability and muscle ...

  5. Genotype-phenotype correlation in 21 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome using high resolution array comparative genome hybridisation (CGH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, N. M. C.; Van Buggenhout, G.; Hannes, F.; Thienpont, B.; Sanlaville, D.; Kok, K.; Midro, A.; Andrieux, J.; Anderlid, B-M; Schoumans, J.; Hordijk, R.; Devriendt, K.; Fryns, J-P; Vermeesch, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is usually caused by terminal deletions of the short arm of chromosome 4 and is phenotypically defined by growth and mental retardation, seizures, and specific craniofacial manifestations. Large variation is observed in phenotypic expression of these fe

  6. Gene-environment and protein degradation signatures characterize genomic and phenotypic diversity in wild Caenorhabditis elegans populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, J.M.; Snoek, L.B.; Hellenberg Hubar, van C.J.; Coopman, R.; Chen, W.; Yang, Wentao; Sterken, M.G.; Schulenburg, H.; Braeckman, B.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Analyzing and understanding the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes is at the heart of genetics. Research on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been instrumental for unraveling genotype-phenotype relations, and has important implications for understanding the biology of ma

  7. Voluntary exercise attenuates LPS-induced reductions in neurogenesis and increases microglia expression of a proneurogenic phenotype in aged mice

    OpenAIRE

    Littlefield, Alyssa M.; Setti, Sharay E.; Priester, Carolina; Kohman, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Microglia can acquire various phenotypes of activation that mediate their inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. Aging causes microglia to become partially activated towards an inflammatory phenotype. As a result, aged animals display a prolonged neuroinflammatory response following an immune challenge. Currently unknown is whether this persistent neuroinflammation leads to greater reductions in hippocampal neurogenesis. Exercise has been shown to alter microglia activation in a...

  8. Annexin A6 modifies muscular dystrophy by mediating sarcolemmal repair

    OpenAIRE

    Swaggart, KA; Demonbreun, AR; Vo, AH; Swanson, KE; Kim, EY; Fahrenbach, JP; Holley-Cuthrell, J; Eskin, A; Z. Chen; Squire, K; Heydemann, A; Palmer, AA; Nelson, SF; McNally, EM

    2014-01-01

    Many monogenic disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, display phenotypic variability despite the same disease-causing mutation. To identify genetic modifiers of muscular dystrophy and its associated cardiomyopathy, we used quantitative trait locus mapping and whole genome sequencing in a mouse model. This approach uncovered a modifier locus on chromosome 11 associated with sarcolemmal membrane damage and heart mass. Whole genome and RNA sequencing identified Anxa6, encoding annexin A6...

  9. Distinct genetic regions modify specific muscle groups in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Heydemann, Ahlke; Palmer, Abraham A.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Phenotypic expression in the muscular dystrophies is variable, even with the identical mutation, providing strong evidence that genetic modifiers influence outcome. To identify genetic modifier loci, we used quantitative trait locus mapping in two differentially affected mouse strains with muscular dystrophy. Using the Sgcg model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy that lacks the dystrophin-associated protein γ-sarcoglycan, we evaluated chromosomal regions that segregated with two distinct quan...

  10. Generalized Background-Field Method

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Y J

    1997-01-01

    The graphical method discussed previously can be used to create new gauges not reachable by the path-integral formalism. By this means a new gauge is designed for more efficient two-loop QCD calculations. It is related to but simpler than the ordinary background-field gauge, in that even the triple-gluon vertices for internal lines contain only four terms, not the usual six. This reduction simplifies the calculation inspite of the necessity to include other vertices for compensation. Like the ordinary background-field gauge, this generalized background-field gauge also preserves gauge invariance of the external particles. As a check of the result and an illustration for the reduction in labour, an explicit calculation of the two-loop QCD 45% of computation compared to the ordinary background-field gauge.

  11. The Cosmic Background Radiation, 1997

    CERN Document Server

    Smoot, G F; Smoot, George; Scott, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    We summarise the current status of cosmic microwave background spectrum and anisotropy measurements, and their theoretical interpretation. This is the update of the mini-review for the 1997 web-version of the Review of Particle Properties.

  12. Geometrodynamics on a background spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, P P; Papadopoulos, Philippos; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation of the initial value problem for the Einstein equations is at the heart of obtaining interesting new solutions using numerical relativity and still very much under theoretical and applied scrutiny. We develop a specialised background geometry approach, for systems where there is non-trivial a priori knowledge about the spacetime under study. The background three-geometry and associated connection are used to express the ADM evolution equations in terms of physical non-linear deviations from that background. Expressing the equations in first order form leads naturally to a system closely linked to the Einstein-Christoffel system, introduced by Anderson and York, and sharing its hyperbolicity properties. The background metric approach can drastically alter the source structure of the equations, and we present an argument as to why this is likely to be numerically advantageous.

  13. QED_2 in Curved Backgrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Amit

    1996-01-01

    Here we discuss the two dimensional quantum electrodynamics in curved space-time, especially in the background of some black holes. We first show the existence of some new quantum mechanical solution which has interesting properties. Then for some special black holes we discuss the fermion-black hole scattering problem. The issue of confinement is intimately connected with these solutions and we also comment on this in this background. Finally, the entanglement entropy and the Hawking radiati...

  14. Backgrounds in AFP Detector Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yicong

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detectors aim to measure protons that are scattered in the ATLAS interaction point under very small angles ($90-160 \\mu rad$). The diffractive protons detected by the AFP may be accompanied by beam halo. This report presents an estimation of the beam halo backgrounds in the AFP using low pile-up data, and position distributions of the backgrounds in the AFP.

  15. The Supernova Relic Neutrino Background

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplinghat, M.; Steigman, G.; Walker, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    An upper bound to the supernova relic neutrino background from all past Type II supernovae is obtained using observations of the Universal metal enrichment history. We show that an unambiguous detection of these relic neutrinos by the Super-Kamiokande detector is unlikely. We also analyze the event rate in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (where coincident neutrons from anti-nu_e + D --> n + n + e+ might enhance background rejection), and arrive at the same conclusion. If the relic neutrino f...

  16. Background independent quantization and wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply a type of background independent 'polymer' quantization to a free scalar field in a flat spacetime. Using semiclassical states, we find an effective wave equation that is both nonlinear and Lorentz invariance violating. We solve this equation perturbatively for several cases of physical interest, and show that polymer corrections to solutions of the Klein-Gordon equation depend on the amplitude of the field. This leads to an effective dispersion relation that depends on the amplitude, frequency, and shape of the wave packet, and is hence distinct from other modified dispersion relations found in the literature. We also demonstrate that polymer effects tend to accumulate with time for plane-symmetric waveforms. We conclude by discussing the possibility of measuring deviations from the Klein-Gordon equation in particle accelerators or astrophysical observations.

  17. Knowledge-based analysis of phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoendorf, Robert

    2016-01-27

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism, and they are widely recorded in biology and medicine. To facilitate data integration, ontologies that formally describe phenotypes are being developed in several domains. I will describe a formal framework to describe phenotypes. A formalized theory of phenotypes is not only useful for domain analysis, but can also be applied to assist in the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases, and I will show how our results on the ontology of phenotypes is now applied in biomedical research.

  18. Organ system heterogeneity DB: a database for the visualization of phenotypes at the organ system level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannil, Deepthi; Vogt, Ingo; Prinz, Jeanette; Campillos, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations of mammalian organisms including diseases, drug treatments and gene perturbations in mice affect organ systems differently. Some perturbations impair relatively few organ systems while others lead to highly heterogeneous or systemic effects. Organ System Heterogeneity DB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/Organ_System_Heterogeneity/) provides information on the phenotypic effects of 4865 human diseases, 1667 drugs and 5361 genetically modified mouse models on 26 different organ systems. Disease symptoms, drug side effects and mouse phenotypes are mapped to the System Organ Class (SOC) level of the Medical Dictionary of Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). Then, the organ system heterogeneity value, a measurement of the systemic impact of a perturbation, is calculated from the relative frequency of phenotypic features across all SOCs. For perturbations of interest, the database displays the distribution of phenotypic effects across organ systems along with the heterogeneity value and the distance between organ system distributions. In this way, it allows, in an easy and comprehensible fashion, the comparison of the phenotypic organ system distributions of diseases, drugs and their corresponding genetically modified mouse models of associated disease genes and drug targets. The Organ System Heterogeneity DB is thus a platform for the visualization and comparison of organ system level phenotypic effects of drugs, diseases and genes. PMID:25313158

  19. Acetylation phenotype variation in pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi A Majeed Al-Razzuqi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have been done on the relation between acetylator status and allergic diseases. Aim: To determine any possible association between acetylating phenotype in pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD and the disease prognosis. Patients and Methods: Thirty-six pediatric patients and forty two healthy children as a control group were participated in the study. All participants received a single oral dose of dapsone of 1.54 mg/kg body weight, after an overnight fast. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, plasma concentrations of dapsone and its metabolite (monoacetyldapsone were estimated to phenotype the participants as slow and rapid acetylators according to their acetylation ratio (ratio of monoacetyldapsone to dapsone. Results: 72.2% of pediatric patients with AD showed slow acetylating status as compared to 69.4% of control individuals. Also, 73% of AD patients with slow acetylating phenotype had familial history of allergy. The severity of AD occurred only in slow acetylator patients. The eczematous lesions in slow acetylators presented mainly in the limbs, while in rapid acetylators, they were found mostly in face and neck. Conclusion: This study shows an association between the N-acetylation phenotype variation and clinical aspects of AD.

  20. Microenvironment-dependent phenotypic changes in a SCID mouse model for malignant mesothelioma

    OpenAIRE

    Eva eDarai-Ramqvist; Gustav eNilsonne; Carmen eFlores-Staino; Anders eHjerpe; Katalin eDobra

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive, therapy-resistant tumor. Mesothelioma cells may assume an epithelioid or a sarcomatoid phenotype, and presence of sarcomatoid cells predicts poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated differentiation of mesothelioma cells in a xenograft model, where mesothelioma cells of both phenotypes were induced to form tumors in SCID mice. Methods: Xenografts were established and thoroughly characterized using a comprehensive immunohistoch...

  1. The broad autism phenotype predicts child functioning in autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Christina R.; Parish-Morris, Julia; Hsin, Olivia; Bush, Jennifer C; Schultz, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Broad autism phenotype (BAP) is a milder expression of the social and communication impairments seen in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). While prior studies characterized the BAP in unaffected family members of probands with ASD, the relationship between parental BAP traits and proband symptomatology remains poorly understood. This study utilizes the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire (BAPQ) in parents and the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) in children to examine this connecti...

  2. Phenotypic, genetic, and genome-wide structure in the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Comuzzie Anthony G; Blangero John; Dyer Tom; North Kari E; Martin Lisa J; Williams Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and high blood pressure characterize the metabolic syndrome. In an effort to explore the utility of different multivariate methods of data reduction to better understand the genetic influences on the aggregation of metabolic syndrome phenotypes, we calculated phenotypic, genetic, and genome-wide LOD score correlation matrices using five traits (total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood ...

  3. Self-images in the present and future: Role of affect and the bipolar phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Di Simplicio, Martina; Holmes, Emily A; Rathbone, Clare J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bipolar Spectrum Disorder (BPSD) is associated with changes in self-related processing and affect, yet the relationship between self-image and affect in the BPSD phenotype is unclear. Methods 47 young adults were assessed for hypomanic experiences (BPSD phenotype) using the Mood Disorders Questionnaire. Current and future self-images (e.g. I am… I will be…) were generated and rated for emotional valence, stability, and (for future self-images only) certainty. The relationship betwe...

  4. Genome-wide polygenic scoring for a 14-year long-term average depression phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Glymour, M. Maria; Walter, Stefan; Liang, Liming; Koenen, Karestan C.; Tchetgen, Eric J; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Kawachi, Ichiro; Rimm, Eric; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite moderate heritability estimates for depression-related phenotypes, few robust genetic predictors have been identified. Potential explanations for this discrepancy include the use of phenotypic measures taken from a single time point, rather than integrating information over longer time periods via multiple assessments, and the possibility that genetic risk is shaped by multiple loci with small effects. Methods: We developed a 14-year long-term average depression measure ba...

  5. Genome-wide polygenic scoring for a 14-year long-term average depression phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Glymour, M. Maria; Walter, Stefan; Liang, Liming; Koenen, Karestan C.; Tchetgen, Eric J; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Kawachi, Ichiro; Rimm, Eric; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite moderate heritability estimates for depression-related phenotypes, few robust genetic predictors have been identified. Potential explanations for this discrepancy include the use of phenotypic measures taken from a single time point, rather than integrating information over longer time periods via multiple assessments, and the possibility that genetic risk is shaped by multiple loci with small effects. Methods We developed a 14-year long-term average depression measure base...

  6. Schizophrenia patients with a history of childhood trauma have a pro-inflammatory phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Dennison, Una; McKernan, Declan P.; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Increasing evidence indicates that childhood trauma is a risk factor for schizophrenia and patients with this syndrome have a pro-inflammatory phenotype. We tested the hypothesis that the pro-inflammatory phenotype in schizophrenia is associated with childhood trauma and that patients without a history of such trauma have a similar immune profile to healthy controls. Method. We recruited 40 schizophrenia patients and 40 controls, all of whom completed the Childhood Trauma ...

  7. Improvements to background level of the low background HPGe setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low background HPGe counting setup has been installed at TIFR. The detector, shielded with low activity Pb and Cu shield, has been extensively used for material screening for the TIN. TIN detector (The INdia-based TIN detector). It is proposed to use this setup for the search of rare decay processes like double beta decay (DBD) to the excited states of the daughter nuclei where T1/2 > 1018 years. To enhance the sensitivity of measurement, the background levels of the detector has been further improved by an addition of an active cosmic muon veto system in the FPGA based DAQ system

  8. Phenotyping bananas for drought resistance

    OpenAIRE

    IyyakuttyRavi

    2013-01-01

    Drought has emerged as one of the major constraints in banana production. Its effects are pronounced substantially in the tropics and sub-tropics of the world due to climate change. Bananas are quite sensitive to drought; however, genotypes with ‘B’ genome are more tolerant to abiotic stresses than those solely based on ‘A’ genome. In particular, bananas with ‘ABB’ genomes are more tolerant to drought and other abiotic stresses than other genotypes. A good phenotyping plan is a prerequisite f...

  9. Phenotyping bananas for drought resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, Iyyakkutty; Uma, Subbaraya; Vaganan, Muthu Mayil; Mustaffa, Mohamed M.

    2013-01-01

    Drought has emerged as one of the major constraints in banana production. Its effects are pronounced substantially in the tropics and sub-tropics of the world due to climate change. Bananas are quite sensitive to drought; however, genotypes with “B” genome are more tolerant to abiotic stresses than those solely based on “A” genome. In particular, bananas with “ABB” genomes are more tolerant to drought and other abiotic stresses than other genotypes. A good phenotyping plan is a prerequisite f...

  10. Hemogoblin phenotypes in Murgese horse

    OpenAIRE

    Carmela Bottiglieri; Rosario Rullo; Aldo Di Luccia; Elisa Pieragostini

    2010-01-01

    In this note we describe two new equine hemoglobin phenotypes found during a survey of the Murgese horse, a rare  Apulian native breed, among whose ancestors the Arabian surely plays an important role. To date we have analysed about  300 individual hemolysates by different chromatographic analyses (PAGIF, IPG, CMC). The results pointed out two unusu-  al patterns where the ratio of the α24Phe60Gln band to the α24Phe60Lys band was 93:7 and 70:30 rather than 60:40&nbs...

  11. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Soloveva; Michel Liuzzi; Jin Yeop Kim; Hi Chul Kim; Jin Yeong Heo; Yong-Jun Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the bio...

  12. Genetic background influences age-related decline in visual and nonvisual retinal responses, circadian rhythms, and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Gareth; Heise, Ines; Starbuck, Becky; Osborne, Tamzin; Wisby, Laura; Potter, Paul; Jackson, Ian J; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N; Nolan, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    The circadian system is entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle via retinal photoreceptors and regulates numerous aspects of physiology and behavior, including sleep. These processes are all key factors in healthy aging showing a gradual decline with age. Despite their importance, the exact mechanisms underlying this decline are yet to be fully understood. One of the most effective tools we have to understand the genetic factors underlying these processes are genetically inbred mouse strains. The most commonly used reference mouse strain is C57BL/6J, but recently, resources such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium have started producing large numbers of mouse mutant lines on a pure genetic background, C57BL/6N. Considering the substantial genetic diversity between mouse strains we expect there to be phenotypic differences, including differential effects of aging, in these and other strains. Such differences need to be characterized not only to establish how different mouse strains may model the aging process but also to understand how genetic background might modify age-related phenotypes. To ascertain the effects of aging on sleep/wake behavior, circadian rhythms, and light input and whether these effects are mouse strain-dependent, we have screened C57BL/6J, C57BL/6N, C3H-HeH, and C3H-Pde6b+ mouse strains at 5 ages throughout their life span. Our data show that sleep, circadian, and light input parameters are all disrupted by the aging process. Moreover, we have cataloged a number of strain-specific aging effects, including the rate of cataract development, decline in the pupillary light response, and changes in sleep fragmentation and the proportion of time spent asleep. PMID:25179226

  13. Genetic background influences age-related decline in visual and nonvisual retinal responses, circadian rhythms, and sleep☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Gareth; Heise, Ines; Starbuck, Becky; Osborne, Tamzin; Wisby, Laura; Potter, Paul; Jackson, Ian J.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Nolan, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian system is entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle via retinal photoreceptors and regulates numerous aspects of physiology and behavior, including sleep. These processes are all key factors in healthy aging showing a gradual decline with age. Despite their importance, the exact mechanisms underlying this decline are yet to be fully understood. One of the most effective tools we have to understand the genetic factors underlying these processes are genetically inbred mouse strains. The most commonly used reference mouse strain is C57BL/6J, but recently, resources such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium have started producing large numbers of mouse mutant lines on a pure genetic background, C57BL/6N. Considering the substantial genetic diversity between mouse strains we expect there to be phenotypic differences, including differential effects of aging, in these and other strains. Such differences need to be characterized not only to establish how different mouse strains may model the aging process but also to understand how genetic background might modify age-related phenotypes. To ascertain the effects of aging on sleep/wake behavior, circadian rhythms, and light input and whether these effects are mouse strain-dependent, we have screened C57BL/6J, C57BL/6N, C3H-HeH, and C3H-Pde6b+ mouse strains at 5 ages throughout their life span. Our data show that sleep, circadian, and light input parameters are all disrupted by the aging process. Moreover, we have cataloged a number of strain-specific aging effects, including the rate of cataract development, decline in the pupillary light response, and changes in sleep fragmentation and the proportion of time spent asleep. PMID:25179226

  14. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Du Li; Rachul Christen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching ...

  15. Mutations of the prion protein gene phenotypic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Gábor G; Trabattoni, Gianriccardo; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Ironside, James W; Knight, Richard S G; Budka, Herbert

    2002-11-01

    Prion diseases are inherited in 5-15 % of cases. They are classified according to changes in the prion protein gene ( PRNP) or conventionally according to phenotype as Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), or familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). Point mutations and insertions within PRNP form the genetic background. We report the results of a systematic analysis of over 500 case reports of patients with PRNP abnormalities. We compare clinical, neuropathological and molecular data in five groups, namely GSS, FFI, fCJD, base pair insertion (BPI), and all cases collectively. Clinical presentation overlaps between mutations, but some have characteristic features (e. g. P105L, D178N-129M, T183A). Some mutations, especially in the lack of sufficient family history, in earlier phases tend to resemble other neurodegenerative disorders like multiple system atrophy, corticobasal degeneration or familial diseases such as late-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, spastic paraparesis, frontotemporal dementia, or Alzheimer's disease. The codon 129 polymorphism has a phenotypic influence in inherited prion diseases, as in non-genetic forms, but additional factors might be considered as background for phenotypic variability. PMID:12420099

  16. A definition of background independence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a definition for background (in)/dependence in dynamical theories of the evolution of configurations that have a continuous symmetry and test this definition on particle models and on gravity. Our definition draws from Barbour's best matching framework developed for the purpose of implementing spatial and temporal relationalism. Among other interesting theories, general relativity can be derived within this framework in novel ways. We study the detailed canonical structure of a wide range of best matching theories and show that their actions must have a local gauge symmetry. When gauge theory is derived in this way, we obtain at the same time a conceptual framework for distinguishing between background-dependent and -independent theories. Gauge invariant observables satisfying Kuchar's criterion are identified and, in simple cases, explicitly computed. We propose a procedure for inserting a global background time into temporally relational theories. Interestingly, using this procedure in general relativity leads to unimodular gravity.

  17. The isotropic radio background revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Taoso, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emi...

  18. Neutron background estimates in GESA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The SIMPLE project looks for nuclear recoil events generated by rare dark matter scattering interactions. Nuclear recoils are also produced by more prevalent cosmogenic neutron interactions. While the rock overburden shields against (μ,n neutrons to below 10−8 cm−2 s−1, it itself contributes via radio-impurities. Additional shielding of these is similar, both suppressing and contributing neutrons. We report on the Monte Carlo (MCNP estimation of the on-detector neutron backgrounds for the SIMPLE experiment located in the GESA facility of the Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit, and its use in defining additional shielding for measurements which have led to a reduction in the extrinsic neutron background to ∼ 5 × 10−3 evts/kgd. The calculated event rate induced by the neutron background is ∼ 0,3 evts/kgd, with a dominant contribution from the detector container.

  19. Candidate gene resequencing to identify rare, pedigree-specific variants influencing healthy aging phenotypes in the long life family study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Druley, Todd E; Wang, Lihua; Lin, Shiow J;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Long Life Family Study (LLFS) is an international study to identify the genetic components of various healthy aging phenotypes. We hypothesized that pedigree-specific rare variants at longevity-associated genes could have a similar functional impact on healthy phenotypes. METHODS...... was significantly associated with three phenotypes (GSK3B with the Healthy Aging Index, NOTCH1 with diastolic blood pressure and TP53 with serum HDL). CONCLUSIONS: Sequencing analysis of family-based associations for age-related phenotypes can identify rare or novel variants....

  20. Generative electronic background music system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurowski, Lukasz [Faculty of Computer Science, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Zolnierska Street 49, Szczecin, PL (Poland)

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  1. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  2. Background music and cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Leslie A; Polzella, Donald J; Elvers, Greg C

    2010-06-01

    The present experiment employed standardized test batteries to assess the effects of fast-tempo music on cognitive performance among 56 male and female university students. A linguistic processing task and a spatial processing task were selected from the Criterion Task Set developed to assess verbal and nonverbal performance. Ten excerpts from Mozart's music matched for tempo were selected. Background music increased the speed of spatial processing and the accuracy of linguistic processing. The findings suggest that background music can have predictable effects on cognitive performance. PMID:20865993

  3. Exotic branes and nongeometric backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jan; Shigemori, Masaki

    2010-06-25

    When string or M theory is compactified to lower dimensions, the U-duality symmetry predicts so-called exotic branes whose higher-dimensional origin cannot be explained by the standard string or M-theory branes. We argue that exotic branes can be understood in higher dimensions as nongeometric backgrounds or U folds, and that they are important for the physics of systems which originally contain no exotic charges, since the supertube effect generically produces such exotic charges. We discuss the implications of exotic backgrounds for black hole microstate (non-)geometries. PMID:20867363

  4. Generative electronic background music system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions

  5. Locating a modifier gene of Ovum mutant through crosses between DDK and C57BL/6J inbred strains in mice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JING TAN; GEN DI SONG; JIA SHENG SONG; SHI HAO REN; CHUN LI LI; ZHEN YU ZHENG; WEI DONG ZHAO

    2016-06-01

    A striking infertile phenotype has been discovered in the DDK strain of mouse. The DDK females are usually infertile when crossed with males of other inbred strains, whereas DDK males exhibit normal fertility in reciprocal crosses. This phenomenon is caused by mutation in the ovum (Om) locus on chromosome 11 and known as the DDK syndrome. Previously, some research groups reported that the embryonic mortality deviated from the semilethal rate in backcrosses between heterozygous (Om/+) females and males of other strains. This embryonic mortality exhibited an aggravated trend with increasing background genes of other strains. These results indicated that some modifier genes of Om were present in other strains. In the present study, a population of N 2(Om/+) females from the backcrosses between C57BL/6J (B6) and F1(B6♀×DDK♂) was used to map potential modifier genes of Om. Quantitative trait locus showed that a major locus, namely Amom1 (aggravate modifier gene of Om 1), was located at the middle part of chromosome 9 in mice. The Amom1 could increase the expressivity of Om gene, thereby aggravating embryonic lethality when heterozygous (Om/+)females mated with males of B6 strain. Further, the 1.5 LOD-drop analysis indicated that the confidence interval was between 37.54 and 44.46 cM,∼6.92 cM. Amom1 is the first modifier gene of Om in the B6 background.

  6. Carbapenem resistance and phenotypic detection of carbapenemases in clinical isolates of acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomty Mahajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-Ab reported worldwide has become one of the most difficult nosocomially acquired Gram-negative pathogens to control and treat. The clinical utility of carbapenems is under threat with the emergence of acquired carbapenemases, particularly Ambler class B metallo-lactamases (MBL. Because of the global increase in the occurrence and dissemination of MBLs, early detection is critical. This study was undertaken to detect resistance to carbapenems in clinical isolates of A. baumannii from hospitalized patients by both disk-diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC methods and to assess the rate of carbapenemase and MBL production among the isolates. Materials and Methods : A. baumannii were identified from various clinical samples and antibiotic susceptibility profile was determined by the standard disk-diffusion method. Meropenem-resistant strains were tested further by agar dilution MIC for meropenem. Resistant isolates were screened for carbapenemase production by the modified Hodge test and positive isolates were further checked for metallo-β-lacatmase production by the EDTA disk synergy test. Results : 42 isolates (31.81% showed resistance to meropenem by the disk diffusion method. 47.6% were carbapenemase positive by the modified Hodge test and 19% were MBL producers phenotypically by the EDTA disc synergy test (EDS. These meropenem-resistant isolates were resistant to most of the other antibiotics tested. These 42 isolates were recovered mostly from patients admitted to intensive care units. Four isolates of the A. baumannii complex were pan drug resistant and showed resistance to even tigecycline and polymyxin B. Conclusion : Carbapenem resistance has been increasingly reported, necessitating their detection. This study reports simple, carbapenemase, and MBL detection method that can be easily incorporated into the daily routine of a clinical laboratory.

  7. Examining the relation between the serotonin transporter 5-HTTPLR genotype x trauma exposure interaction on a contemporary phenotypic model of posttraumatic stress symptomatology: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Galea, Sandro; Southwick, Steven M.; Gelernter, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the specificity of the interaction of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR genotype x trauma exposure in relation to contemporary structural models of PTSD symptomatology, which suggest that 4- or 5-factor models provide a better representation of this phenotypic expression of this disorder. Methods One hundred forty-nine respondents of a representative sample of adults affected by Hurricane Ike were interviewed 2 to 5 months after this 2008 disaster. Results After adjustment for age, sex, and ancestral proportion scores, the interaction of 5-HTTPLR genotype x trauma exposure was significantly associated with both severity (β=.40, p.13). Limitations The small sample size and employment of self-report measures may limit generalizability of these findings. Conclusions Results of this pilot study suggest that the low-expression variant of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism modifies risk for PTSD, but that this effect may be specific to anxious arousal and re-experiencing symptoms. PMID:23183127

  8. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Garza, J G; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J.F.; Christensen, F.E.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Decker, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; García, J.A.; Giomataris, I.; Hill, R.M.; Iguaz, F.J.; Irastorza, I.G.; Jakobsen, A.C.; Jourde, D.; Mirallas, H.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M.J.; Ruz, J.; Tomás, A.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10$^{-6}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10$^{-7}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as ...

  9. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garza, J G; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.;

    2014-01-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micr...

  10. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using 48Ca in CaF2 crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper

  11. Virus infection suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Bedhomme

    Full Text Available Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus. Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana--potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked.

  12. Virus infection suppresses Nicotiana benthamiana adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedhomme, Stéphanie; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-01-01

    Competition and parasitism are two important selective forces that shape life-histories, migration rates and population dynamics. Recently, it has been shown in various pathosystems that parasites can modify intraspecific competition, thus generating an indirect cost of parasitism. Here, we investigated if this phenomenon was present in a plant-potyvirus system using two viruses of different virulence (Tobacco etch virus and Turnip mosaic virus). Moreover, we asked if parasitism interacted with the shade avoidance syndrome, the plant-specific phenotypic plasticity in response to intraspecific competition. Our results indicate that the modification of intraspecific competition by parasitism is not present in the Nicotiana benthamiana--potyvirus system and suggests that this phenomenon is not universal but depends on the peculiarities of each pathosystem. However, whereas the healthy N. benthamiana presented a clear shade avoidance syndrome, this phenotypic plasticity totally disappeared when the plants were infected with TEV and TuMV, very likely resulting in a fitness loss and being another form of indirect cost of parasitism. This result suggests that the suppression or the alteration of adaptive phenotypic plasticity might be a component of virulence that is often overlooked. PMID:21359142

  13. A quantitative neural network approach to understanding aging phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Jessica A; Rapp, Peter R

    2014-05-01

    Basic research on neurocognitive aging has traditionally adopted a reductionist approach in the search for the basis of cognitive preservation versus decline. However, increasing evidence suggests that a network level understanding of the brain can provide additional novel insight into the structural and functional organization from which complex behavior and dysfunction emerge. Using graph theory as a mathematical framework to characterize neural networks, recent data suggest that alterations in structural and functional networks may contribute to individual differences in cognitive phenotypes in advanced aging. This paper reviews literature that defines network changes in healthy and pathological aging phenotypes, while highlighting the substantial overlap in key features and patterns observed across aging phenotypes. Consistent with current efforts in this area, here we outline one analytic strategy that attempts to quantify graph theory metrics more precisely, with the goal of improving diagnostic sensitivity and predictive accuracy for differential trajectories in neurocognitive aging. Ultimately, such an approach may yield useful measures for gauging the efficacy of potential preventative interventions and disease modifying treatments early in the course of aging. PMID:24548925

  14. Phenotype microarray profiling of the antibacterial activity of red cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafidh RR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional food can be a potent source of wide array of biocomonents with antimicrobial activity. We investigated the antibacterial activity of red cabbage (RC extract on Gram negative and positive ATCC strains. Most intersting, we, for the first time, explored and analysed the complete phenotypic profile of RC-treated bacteria using Omnilog Phenotype Microarray. Results: This study revealed that the phenotype microarray (PM screen was a valuable tool in the search for compounds and their antibacterial mechanisms that can inhibit bacterial growth by affecting certain metabolic pathways. It was shown that RC exerted remarkable antibacterial effect on S. aureus and E. coli bacteria, and PM showed a wide range phenotypic profile of the exerted RC antibacterial activity. RC targeted the peptide, carbon, nutriontional assembly, and sulfur metbolic pathways altogether. The peptidoglycan synthesis pathway was inferred to be targeted by RC extract at a metabolic point different from other available cell wall-targeting drugs; these could be hot targets for the discovery of new therapy for many problematic microbes.Conclusions: Taken together, the phenotype microarray for functional food and medicinal plants can be a very useful tool for profiling their antimicrobial activity. Moreover, extracts of functional food can exert antibacterial activity by hitting a wide range of metabolic pathways, at the same time leading to very difficult condition for bacteria to rapidly develop resistance. Therefore, using functional foods or medicinal plants as such, or as extracts, can be superior on mono-targeting antibiotics if the optimal concentrations and conditions of these functional foods were sought.

  15. Broad phenotypic spectrum in familial adenomatous polyposis; from early onset and severe phenotypes to late onset of attenuated polyposis with the first manifestation at age 72

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Ericsson, Mats; Johannsson, Oskar; Rambech, Eva; Mangell, Peter

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is typically characterized by multiple colonic polyps and frequent extracolonic features. Whereas the number of colonic polyps has been linked to the APC gene mutation, possible genotype-phenotype correlations largely remain to be defined ...

  16. Hemogoblin phenotypes in Murgese horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Bottiglieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note we describe two new equine hemoglobin phenotypes found during a survey of the Murgese horse, a rare  Apulian native breed, among whose ancestors the Arabian surely plays an important role. To date we have analysed about  300 individual hemolysates by different chromatographic analyses (PAGIF, IPG, CMC. The results pointed out two unusu-  al patterns where the ratio of the α24Phe60Gln band to the α24Phe60Lys band was 93:7 and 70:30 rather than 60:40  which would have been expected of BII homozygote. Given that the three horses exhibiting the unusual patterns shared  a common ancestor and that none of the possible combinations of the known haplotypes can account for 7-8%  α24Phe60Lys, reasonably a triplicated arrangement has to be postulated. 

  17. Clinical Asthma Phenotypes and Therapeutic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Zedan, M.; Attia, G.; Zedan, M. M.; Osman, A; Abo-Elkheir, N.; Maysara, N.; Barakat, T.; Gamil, N.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that means not all asthmatics respond to the same treatment. We hypothesize an approach to characterize asthma phenotypes based on symptomatology (shortness of breath (SOB), cough, and wheezy phenotypes) in correlation with airway inflammatory biomarkers and FEV1. We aimed to detect whether those clinical phenotypes have an impact on the response to asthma medications. Two hundred three asthmatic children were allocated randomly to receive either montelukast ...

  18. Phenotype Information Retrieval for Existing GWAS Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Alipanah, Neda; Lin, Ko-Wei; Venkatesh, Vinay; Farzaneh, Seena; Kim, Hyeon-eui

    2013-01-01

    The database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) is archiving the results of different Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). dbGaP has a multitude of phenotype variables, but they are not harmonized across studies. We proposed a method to standardize phenotype variables by classifying similar variables based on semantic distances. We first extracted variables description, enriched them using domain knowledge, and computed the distances among them. We used clustering techniques to classify t...

  19. Phenotypes and Survival of Hatchling Lizards

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Daniel Augustus

    2001-01-01

    The phenotypes of hatchling reptiles are influenced by the environmental conditions that embryos experience during incubation, by yolk invested into the egg, and by the genetic contributions of the parents. Phenotypic traits are influenced by these factors in ways that potentially affect the fitness of hatchlings. The physical conditions that embryos experience within the nest affects development, hatching success, and hatchling phenotypes. Thus, the nest site that a female selects can inf...

  20. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  1. Stealths on Anisotropic Holographic Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Juárez-Aubry, María Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in exploring the existence of stealth configurations on anisotropic backgrounds playing a prominent role in the non-relativistic version of the gauge/gravity correspondence. By stealth configuration, we mean a nontrivial scalar field nonminimally coupled to gravity whose energy-momentum tensor evaluated on the anisotropic background vanishes identically. In the case of a Lifshitz spacetime with a nontrivial dynamical exponent z, we spotlight the role played by the anisotropy to establish the holographic character of the stealth configurations, i.e. the scalar field is shown to only depend on the radial holographic direction. This configuration which turns out to be massless and without integration constants is possible for a unique value of the nonminimal coupling parameter. Then, using a simple conformal argument, we map this configuration into a stealth solution defined on the so-called hyperscaling violation metric which is conformally related to the Lifshitz spacetime. Thi...

  2. Background paper on aquaculture research

    OpenAIRE

    Wenblad, Axel; Jokumsen, Alfred; Eskelinen, Unto; Torrissen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Board of MISTRA established in 2012 a Working Group (WG) on Aquaculture to provide the Board with background information for its upcoming decision on whether the foundation should invest in aquaculture research. The WG included Senior Advisor Axel Wenblad, Sweden (Chairman), Professor Ole Torrissen, Norway, Senior Advisory Scientist Unto Eskelinen, Finland and Senior Advisory Scientist Alfred Jokumsen, Denmark. The WG performed an investigation of the Swedish aquaculture sector including ...

  3. Background radioactivity in environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a literature search to identify information on concentrations of 'background' radioactivity in foodstuffs and other commonly available environmental materials. The review has concentrated on naturally occurring radioactivity in foods and on UK data, although results from other countries have also been considered where appropriate. The data are compared with established definitions of a 'radioactive' substance and radionuclides which do not appear to be adequately covered in the literature are noted. (author)

  4. Stochastic background of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    D'Araújo, J C N; Aguiar, O D

    2000-01-01

    A continuous stochastic background of gravitational waves (GWs) for burst sources is produced if the mean time interval between the occurrence of bursts is smaller than the average time duration of a single burst at the emission, i.e., the so called duty cycle must be greater than one. To evaluate the background of GWs produced by an ensemble of sources, during their formation, for example, one needs to know the average energy flux emitted during the formation of a single object and the formation rate of such objects as well. In many cases the energy flux emitted during an event of production of GWs is not known in detail, only characteristic values for the dimensionless amplitude and frequencies are known. Here we present a shortcut to calculate stochastic backgrounds of GWs produced from cosmological sources. For this approach it is not necessary to know in detail the energy flux emitted at each frequency. Knowing the characteristic values for the ``lumped'' dimensionless amplitude and frequency we show tha...

  5. Robust suppression of background reflections in PIV images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong background reflections in PIV images are known to bias velocity estimates and their concomitant statistical ensembles. Many methods have been developed to eliminate background reflections, with the common premise of generating a reference background intensity map that is then subtracted from each individual PIV image prior to interrogation. This reference background intensity map can be generated in several ways, including acquiring a background image without particles, calculating the average or minimum intensity map based on an ensemble of PIV images, generating a reference intensity map for each individual PIV realization by means of various local sliding filters or considering the second frame of any PIV realization as its reference intensity map. Motivated by the need to suppress background reflections in a PIV study of flow over highly irregular surface roughness that generated significant diffuse background reflections from the complex topography, the efficacy of these methods was studied. It was found that all failed to adequately suppress such reflections, rendering the resulting velocity fields biased. A local-median normalization algorithm was developed to further suppress background reflections and this note reports the performance of this modified algorithm compared to those previously reported in the literature. (technical design note)

  6. The influence of different helminth infection phenotypes on immune responses against HIV in co-infected adults in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabaso Musawenkosi LH

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The convergent distribution of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and helminth infections has led to the suggestion that infection with helminths exacerbates the HIV epidemic in developing countries. In South Africa, it is estimated that 57% of the population lives in poverty and carries the highest burden of both HIV and helmith infections, however, the disease interactions are under-researched. Methods We employed both coproscopy and Ascaris lumbricoides-specific serum IgE to increase diagnostic sensitivity and to distinguish between different helminth infection phenotypes and their effects on immune responses in HIV co-infected individuals. Coproscopy was done by formol ether and Kato Katz methods. HIV positive and negative adults were stratified according to the presence or absence of A. lumbricoides and/or Trichuris trichuria eggs with or without elevated Ascaris IgE. Lymphocyte subsets were phenotyped by flow cytometry. Viral loads, serum total IgE and eosinophils were also analysed. Lymphocyte activation markers (CCR5, HLA-DR, CD25, CD38 and CD71 were determined. Non parametric statistics were used to describe differences in the variables between the subgroups. Results Helminth prevalence ranged between 40%-60%. Four distinct subgroups of were identified, and this included egg positive/high Ascaris-specific IgE (egg+IgEhi, egg positive/low IgE (egg+IgElo, egg negative/high IgE (egg-IgEhi and egg negative/low IgE (egg-IgElo individuals. The egg+IgEhi subgroup displayed lymphocytopenia, eosinophilia, (low CD4+ counts in HIV- group, high viral load (in HIV+ group, and an activated lymphocyte profile. High Ascaris IgE subgroups (egg+IgEhi and egg-IgEhi had eosinophilia, highest viral loads, and lower CD4+ counts in the HIV- group. Egg excretion and low IgE (egg+IgElo status demonstrated a modified Th2 immune profile with a relatively competent response to HIV. Conclusions People with both helminth egg excretion and high

  7. Simulation of PEP-II Accelerator Backgrounds Using TURTLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present studies of accelerator-induced backgrounds in the BaBar detector at the SLAC B-Factory, carried out using LPTURTLE, a modified version of the DECAY TURTLE simulation package. Lost-particle backgrounds in PEP-II are dominated by a combination of beam-gas bremsstrahlung, beam-gas Coulomb scattering, radiative- Bhabha events and beam-beam blow-up. The radiation damage and detector occupancy caused by the associated electromagnetic shower debris can limit the usable luminosity. In order to understand and mitigate such backgrounds, we have performed a full programme of beam gas and luminosity-background simulations, that include the effects of the detector solenoidal field, detailed modeling of limiting apertures in both collider rings, and optimization of the betatron collimation scheme in the presence of large transverse tails

  8. Simulation of PEP-II Accelerator Backgrounds Using TURTLE

    CERN Document Server

    Barlow, Roger J; Kozanecki, Witold; Majewski, Stephanie; Roudeau, Patrick; Stocchi, Achille

    2005-01-01

    We present studies of accelerator-induced backgrounds in the BaBar detector at the SLAC B-Factory, carried out using a modified version ofthe DECAY TURTLE simulation package. Lost-particle backgrounds in PEP-II are dominated by a combination of beam-gas bremstrahlung, beam-gas Coulomb scattering, radiative-Bhabha events and beam-beam blow-up. The radiation damage and detector occupancy caused by the associated electromagnetic shower debris can limit the usable luminosity. In order to understand and mitigate such backgrounds, we have performed a full programme of beam-gas and luminosity-background simulations, that include the effects of the detector solenoidal field, detailed modelling of limiting apertures in both collider rings, and optimization of the betatron collimation scheme in the presence of large transverse tails.

  9. A Turner syndrome neurocognitive phenotype maps to Xp22.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Frederick F

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Turner syndrome (TS is associated with a neurocognitive phenotype that includes selective nonverbal deficits, e.g., impaired visual-spatial abilities. We previously reported evidence that this phenotype results from haploinsufficiency of one or more genes on distal Xp. This inference was based on genotype/phenotype comparisons of individual girls and women with partial Xp deletions, with the neurocognitive phenotype considered a dichotomous trait. We sought to confirm our findings in a large cohort (n = 47 of adult women with partial deletions of Xp or Xq, enriched for subjects with distal Xp deletions. Methods Subjects were recruited from North American genetics and endocrinology clinics. Phenotype assessment included measures of stature, ovarian function, and detailed neurocognitive testing. The neurocognitive phenotype was measured as a quantitative trait, the Turner Syndrome Cognitive Summary (TSCS score, derived from discriminant function analysis. Genetic analysis included karyotyping, X inactivation studies, fluorescent in situ hybridization, microsatellite marker genotyping, and array comparative genomic hybridization. Results We report statistical evidence that deletion of Xp22.3, an interval containing 31 annotated genes, is sufficient to cause the neurocognitive phenotype described by the TSCS score. Two other cardinal TS features, ovarian failure and short stature, as well as X chromosome inactivation pattern and subject's age, were unrelated to the TSCS score. Conclusion Detailed mapping suggests that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in Xp22.3, the distal 8.3 megabases (Mb of the X chromosome, is responsible for a TS neurocognitive phenotype. This interval includes the 2.6 Mb Xp-Yp pseudoautosomal region (PAR1. Haploinsufficiency of the short stature gene SHOX in PAR1 probably does not cause this TS neurocognitive phenotype. Two genes proximal to PAR1 within the 8.3 Mb critical region, STS and NLGN4X, are

  10. Phenotypic resistance of resistant strains of HIV type-1 subtype B in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jue; WANG Zhe; WU Hao; LI Jing-yun; LU Jun-feng; DONG Hua-huang; BAO Zuo-yi; LIU Si-yang; LI Han-ping; ZHUANG Dao-min; LIU Yong-jian; LI Hong

    2006-01-01

    Background This study was aim to explore the characteristics of phenotypic resistance of resistant strains of HIV type-1 (HIV-1) subtype B and to compare the concordance between the phenotypic resistance and genotypic resistance. Methods The genotypic resistance assay for the HIV-1 clinical isolates was performed. One isolate without resistance mutation was chosen as a drug-sensitive reference strain and seven subtype B isolates with resistance mutations were phenotypically tested. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) between resistant and sensitive viruses were compared. The resistance extent was determined by the folds of the increased IC50. The concordance between the phenotypic resistance and genotypic resistance was also analyzed.Results IC50 of resistant isolates were 0.0006-0.1300 μmol/L for zidovudine (AZT), 0.0016-0.0390 μmol/L for lamivudine (3TC), 0.0104-0.4234 μmol/L for nevirapine (NVP), and 0.0163-0.1142 μmol/L for indinavir (IDV), respectively. Genotypic and phenotypic resistance assays indicated that the resistant strains were intermediately and highly resistant to nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors and non-nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The phenotypic assay was consistent with the genotypic assay. For measuring the potential resistance, the genotypic assay was more sensitive than the phenotypic. In evaluating the resistance to protease inhibitors, these two assays were discrepant.Conclusions Both the phenotypic and genotypic assays indicate that the resistant viruses exist in HIV-infected patients in China who have received treatment. Phenotypic and genotypic assays have high concordance, and the genotypic assay could replace the phenotypic assay to predict the HIV-1 resistance.

  11. Phenotypic robustness can increase phenotypic variability after non-genetic perturbations in gene regulatory circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa-Soto, C.; Martin, O. C.; Wagner, A

    2010-01-01

    Non-genetic perturbations, such as environmental change or developmental noise, can induce novel phenotypes. If an induced phenotype confers a fitness advantage, selection may promote its genetic stabilization. Non-genetic perturbations can thus initiate evolutionary innovation. Genetic variation that is not usually phenotypically visible may play an important role in this process. Populations under stabilizing selection on a phenotype that is robust to mutations can accumulate such variation...

  12. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H.V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G.C.M.; Brown, D.L.; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.; Helbig, I.; Hurst, J.A.; Jahn, J.; Jackson, L.G.; Kelly, A.M.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Mansour, S.; Martin, C.L.; Moss, C.; Mumford, A.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Park, S.M.; Riggs, E.R.; Scott, R.H.; Sisodiya, S.; Vooren, S. van der; Wapner, R.J.; Wilkie, A.O.; Wright, C.F.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Leeuw, N. de; Vries, B. de; Washingthon, N.L.; Smith, C.L.; Westerfield, M.; Schofield, P.; Ruef, B.J.; Gkoutos, G.V.; Haendel, M.; Smedley, D.; Lewis, S.E.; Robinson, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have d

  13. [Toothache with a neuropathic background].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatchaturian, V; de Wijer, A; Kalaykova, S I; Steenks, M H

    2015-03-01

    A 48-year old woman in good general health was referred to the orofacial pain clinic in a centre for special dentistry with a toothache in the premolar region of the left maxillary quadrant. The complaints had existed for 15 years and various dental treatments, including endodontic treatments, apical surgery, extraction and splint therapy, had not helped to alleviate the complaints. As a result of the fact that anti-epileptic drugs were able to reduce the pain it was concluded that this 'toothache' satisfied the criteria of an atypical odontalgia: 'toothache' with a neuropathic background. PMID:26181392

  14. Breast cancer - background and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summary is to provide the reader with a brief overview of the key concepts relating to epidemiology and etiology; clinical presentation and patterns of spread; Canadian guidelines for management; prognosis; and current Canadian screening recommendations in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. This information will enable the reader to have the appropriate background knowledge before delving into the subsequent articles in this special CJMRT breast cancer edition. A variety of references have been provided for readers who are interested in more than a skeleton version of the current literature. (author)

  15. The Cognitive Phenotype of Spina Bifida Meningomyelocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Maureen; Barnes, Marcia A.

    2010-01-01

    A cognitive phenotype is a product of both assets and deficits that specifies what individuals with spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM) can and cannot do and why they can or cannot do it. In this article, we review the cognitive phenotype of SBM and describe the processing assets and deficits that cut within and across content domains, sensory…

  16. Distribution of phenotypes among Bacillus thuringiensis strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extensive collection of Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from around the world were phenotypically profiled using standard biochemical tests. Six phenotypic traits occurred in 20-86% of the isolates and were useful in distinguishing isolates: production of urease (U; 20.5% of isolates), hydrolysis...

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic data integration and exploration through a web-service architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellazzi Riccardo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Linking genotypic and phenotypic information is one of the greatest challenges of current genetics research. The definition of an Information Technology infrastructure to support this kind of studies, and in particular studies aimed at the analysis of complex traits, which require the definition of multifaceted phenotypes and the integration genotypic information to discover the most prevalent diseases, is a paradigmatic goal of Biomedical Informatics. This paper describes the use of Information Technology methods and tools to develop a system for the management, inspection and integration of phenotypic and genotypic data. Results We present the design and architecture of the Phenotype Miner, a software system able to flexibly manage phenotypic information, and its extended functionalities to retrieve genotype information from external repositories and to relate it to phenotypic data. For this purpose we developed a module to allow customized data upload by the user and a SOAP-based communications layer to retrieve data from existing biomedical knowledge management tools. In this paper we also demonstrate the system functionality by an example application of the system in which we analyze two related genomic datasets. Conclusion In this paper we show how a comprehensive, integrated and automated workbench for genotype and phenotype integration can facilitate and improve the hypothesis generation process underlying modern genetic studies.

  18. Diamondoid-modified DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yan; Tkachenko, Boryslav A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Marx, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We prepared novel C5-modified triphosphates and phosphoramidites with a diamondoid functionally linked to the nucleobase. Using primer extension experiments with different length templates we investigated whether the modified triphosphates were enzymatically incorporated into DNA and whether they were further extended. We found that all three modified nucleotides can be incorporated into DNA using a single-nucleotide incorporation experiment, but only partially using two templates that demand...

  19. Colour and pattern change against visually heterogeneous backgrounds in the tree frog Hyla japonica

    OpenAIRE

    Changku Kang; Ye Eun Kim; Yikweon Jang

    2016-01-01

    Colour change in animals can be adaptive phenotypic plasticity in heterogeneous environments. Camouflage through background colour matching has been considered a primary force that drives the evolution of colour changing ability. However, the mechanism to which animals change their colour and patterns under visually heterogeneous backgrounds (i.e. consisting of more than one colour) has only been identified in limited taxa. Here, we investigated the colour change process of the Japanese tree ...

  20. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  1. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  2. Immunopathogenic Background of Pars Planitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przeździecka-Dołyk, Joanna; Węgrzyn, Agnieszka; Turno-Kręcicka, Anna; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Pars planitis is defined as an intermediate uveitis of unknown background of systemic disease with characteristic formations such as vitreous snowballs, snowbanks and changes in peripheral retina. The incidence of pars planitis varies 2.4-15.4 % of the uveitis patients. The pathogenesis of the disease is to be determined in future. Clinical and histopathological findings suggest an autoimmune etiology, most likely as a reaction to endogenous antigen of unknown source, with T cells predominant in both vitreous and pars plana infiltrations. T cells subsets play an important role as a memory-effector peripheral cell. Snowbanks are formed as an effect of post inflammatory glial proliferation of fibrous astrocytes. There is also a genetic predisposition for pars planitis by human leukocyte antigen and several other genes. A coexistence of multiple sclerosis and optic neuritis has been described in numerous studies. Epiretinal membrane, cataract, cystoid macular edema, retinal detachment, retinal vasculitis, neovascularization, vitreous peripheral traction, peripheral hole formation, vitreous hemorrhage, disc edema are common complications observed in pars planitis. There is a need to expand the knowledge of the pathogenic and immunologic background of the pars planitis to create an accurate pharmacological treatment. PMID:26438050

  3. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  4. HDACs and the senescent phenotype of WI-38 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noonan Emily J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal cells possess a limited proliferative life span after which they enter a state of irreversible growth arrest. This process, known as replicative senescence, is accompanied by changes in gene expression that give rise to a variety of senescence-associated phenotypes. It has been suggested that these gene expression changes result in part from alterations in the histone acetylation machinery. Here we examine the influence of HDAC inhibitors on the expression of senescent markers in pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells. Results Pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells were treated with the HDAC inhibitors butyrate or trichostatin A (TSA. Following HDAC inhibitor treatment, pre-senescent cells increased p21WAF1 and β-galactosidase expression, assumed a flattened senescence-associated morphology, and maintained a lower level of proteasome activity. These alterations also occurred during normal replicative senescence of WI-38 cells, but were not accentuated further by HDAC inhibitors. We also found that HDAC1 levels decline during normal replicative senescence. Conclusion Our findings indicate that HDACs impact numerous phenotypic changes associated with cellular senescence. Reduced HDAC1 expression levels in senescent cells may be an important event in mediating the transition to a senescent phenotype.

  5. Trisomic and allelic differences influence phenotypic variability during development of Down syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitz, Samantha L; Roper, Randall J

    2011-12-01

    Individuals with full or partial Trisomy 21 (Ts21) present with clinical features collectively referred to as Down syndrome (DS), although DS phenotypes vary in incidence and severity between individuals. Differing genetic and phenotypic content in individuals with DS as well as mouse models of DS facilitate the understanding of the correlation between specific genes and phenotypes associated with Ts21. The Ts1Rhr mouse model is trisomic for 33 genes (the "Down syndrome critical region" or DSCR) hypothesized to be responsible for many clinical DS features, including craniofacial dysmorphology with a small mandible. Experiments with Ts1Rhr mice showed that the DSCR was not sufficient to cause all DS phenotypes by identifying uncharacteristic craniofacial abnormalities not found in individuals with DS or other DS mouse models. We hypothesized that the origins of the larger, dysmorphic mandible observed in adult Ts1Rhr mice develop from larger embryonic craniofacial precursors. Because of phenotypic variability seen in subsequent studies with Ts1Rhr mice, we also hypothesized that genetic background differences would alter Ts1Rhr developmental phenotypes. Using Ts1Rhr offspring from two genetic backgrounds, we found differences in mandibular precursor volume as well as total embryonic volume and postnatal body size of Ts1Rhr and nontrisomic littermates. Additionally, we observed increased relative expression of Dyrk1a and differential expression of Ets2 on the basis of the genetic background in the Ts1Rhr mandibular precursor. Our results suggest that trisomic gene content and allelic differences in trisomic or nontrisomic genes influence variability in gene expression and developmental phenotypes associated with DS. PMID:21926299

  6. The superhealing MRL background improves muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydemann Ahlke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice from the MRL or “superhealing” strain have enhanced repair after acute injury to the skin, cornea, and heart. We now tested an admixture of the MRL genome and found that it altered the course of muscle pathology and cardiac function in a chronic disease model of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg, a dystrophin-associated protein, develop muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy similar to their human counterparts with limb girdle muscular dystrophy. With disruption of the dystrophin complex, the muscle plasma membrane becomes leaky and muscles develop increased fibrosis. Methods MRL/MpJ mice were bred with Sgcg mice, and cardiac function was measured. Muscles were assessed for fibrosis and membrane leak using measurements of hydroxyproline and Evans blue dye. Quantitative trait locus mapping was conducted using single nucleotide polymorphisms distinct between the two parental strains. Results Introduction of the MRL genome reduced fibrosis but did not alter membrane leak in skeletal muscle of the Sgcg model. The MRL genome was also associated with improved cardiac function with reversal of depressed fractional shortening and the left ventricular ejection fraction. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of genetic modifiers and found that a region on chromosome 2 was associated with cardiac, diaphragm muscle and abdominal muscle fibrosis. Conclusions These data are consistent with a model where the MRL genome acts in a dominant manner to suppress fibrosis in this chronic disease setting of heart and muscle disease.

  7. Fried frailty phenotype assessment components as applied to geriatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieniek J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Joanna Bieniek, Krzysztof Wilczynski, Jan Szewieczek Department of Geriatrics, School of Health Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland Background: Management of geriatric patients would be simplified if a universally accepted definition of frailty for clinical use was defined. Among definitions of frailty, Fried frailty phenotype criteria constitute a common reference frame for many geriatric studies. However, this reference frame has been tested primarily in elderly patients presenting with relatively good health status. Objective: The aim of this article was to assess the usefulness and limitations of Fried frailty phenotype criteria in geriatric inpatients, characterized by comorbidity and functional impairments, and to estimate the frailty phenotype prevalence in this group. Patients and methods: Five hundred consecutive patients of the university hospital subacute geriatric ward, aged 79.0±8.4 years (67% women and 33% men, participated in this cross-sectional study. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and Fried frailty phenotype component evaluation were performed in all patients. Results: Multimorbidity (6.0±2.8 diseases characterized our study group, with a wide range of clinical conditions and functional states (Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living 72.2±28.2 and Mini-Mental State Examination 23.6±7.1 scores. All five Fried frailty components were assessed in 65% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI] =60.8–69.2 (diagnostic group. One or more components were not feasible to be assessed in 35% of the remaining patients (nondiagnostic group because of lack of past patient’s body mass control and/or cognitive or physical impairment. Patients from the nondiagnostic group, as compared to patients from the diagnostic group, presented with more advanced age, higher prevalence of dementia, lower prevalence of hypertension, lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, Mini

  8. Cosmic background radiation: a hagiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramo, Luis Raul [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    Full text. Cosmology advanced tremendously since Gamow and his students predicted the cosmic microwave background radiation, and since Penzias and Wilson observed it for the first time. The observations of the CMBR point to a Universe which is beautiful in its simplicity: the amazing richness of structures can be explained by a minimalistic set of well-known physical laws, a reasonable amount of free parameters, and 'natural' initial conditions which realize the idea of maximum entropy. We will revise the latest observations and show how the CMBR is presently allowing the study of the 'fine structure' of cosmological phenomena. We will also discuss the possibility of a detection of rotational modes (B-modes) in the polarization of the CMBR, that may reveal which processes (inflation ?) acted in the very early universe to endow it with these beautiful and simple properties. (author)

  9. Cosmic background radiation: a hagiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Cosmology advanced tremendously since Gamow and his students predicted the cosmic microwave background radiation, and since Penzias and Wilson observed it for the first time. The observations of the CMBR point to a Universe which is beautiful in its simplicity: the amazing richness of structures can be explained by a minimalistic set of well-known physical laws, a reasonable amount of free parameters, and 'natural' initial conditions which realize the idea of maximum entropy. We will revise the latest observations and show how the CMBR is presently allowing the study of the 'fine structure' of cosmological phenomena. We will also discuss the possibility of a detection of rotational modes (B-modes) in the polarization of the CMBR, that may reveal which processes (inflation ?) acted in the very early universe to endow it with these beautiful and simple properties. (author)

  10. Low background aspects of GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in 76Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio-impurities coming from the liquid argon, the stainless steel cryostat and the front-end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from 222Rn. The main source of 222Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio-pure components for front-end electronics resulted in the development of a pre-amplifier with a total activity of less than 1 mBq 228Th.

  11. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs

  12. Polarization of Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Buzzelli, Alessandro; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; Vittorio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present an extension of the ROMA map-making code for data analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background polarization, with particular attention given to the inflationary polarization B-modes. The new algorithm takes into account a possible cross-correlated noise component among the different detectors of a CMB experiment. We tested the code on the observational data of the BOOMERanG (2003) experiment and we show that we are provided with a better estimate of the power spectra, in particular the error bars of the BB spectrum are smaller up to 20% for low multipoles. We point out the general validity of the new method. A possible future application is the LSPE balloon experiment, devoted to the observation of polarization at large angular scales.

  13. The Cosmic Background Imager 2

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Angela C; Allison, James R; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bond, J Richard; Bronfman, Leonardo; Bustos, Ricardo; Davis, Richard J; Dickinson, Clive; Leech, Jamie; Mason, Brian S; Myers, Steven T; Pearson, Timothy J; Readhead, Anthony C S; Reeves, Rodrigo; Shepherd, Martin C; Sievers, Jonathan L

    2011-01-01

    We describe an upgrade to the Cosmic Background Imager instrument to increase its surface brightness sensitivity at small angular scales. The upgrade consisted of replacing the thirteen 0.9-m antennas with 1.4-m antennas incorporating a novel combination of design features, which provided excellent sidelobe and spillover performance for low manufacturing cost. Off-the-shelf spun primaries were used, and the secondary mirrors were oversized and shaped relative to a standard Cassegrain in order to provide an optimum compromise between aperture efficiency and low spillover lobes. Low-order distortions in the primary mirrors were compensated for by custom machining of the secondary mirrors. The secondaries were supported on a transparent dielectric foam cone to minimize scattering. The antennas were tested in the complete instrument, and the beam shape and spillover noise contributions were as expected. We demonstrate the performance of the telescope and the inter-calibration with the previous system using observ...

  14. Gauging the cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We provide a new derivation of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and find an exact expression that can be readily expanded perturbatively. Close attention is paid to gauge issues, with the motivation to examine the effect of super-Hubble modes on the CMB. We calculate a transfer function that encodes the behavior of the dipole, and examine its long-wavelength behavior. We show that contributions to the dipole from adiabatic super-Hubble modes are strongly suppressed, even in the presence of a cosmological constant, contrary to claims in the literature. We also introduce a naturally defined CMB monopole, which exhibits closely analogous long-wavelength behavior. We discuss the geometrical origin of this super-Hubble suppression, pointing out that it is a simple reflection of adiabaticity, and hence argue that it will occur regardless of the matter content.

  15. Background paper on aquaculture research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenblad, Axel; Jokumsen, Alfred; Eskelinen, Unto;

    Torrissen, Norway, Senior Advisory Scientist Unto Eskelinen, Finland and Senior Advisory Scientist Alfred Jokumsen, Denmark. The WG performed an investigation of the Swedish aquaculture sector including interviews with a range of stakeholders within aquaculture research, farming organisations, authorities......The Board of MISTRA established in 2012 a Working Group (WG) on Aquaculture to provide the Board with background information for its upcoming decision on whether the foundation should invest in aquaculture research. The WG included Senior Advisor Axel Wenblad, Sweden (Chairman), Professor Ole...... tonnes of crayfish altogether corresponding to a total value of SEK 328 million in 2011. Further about 1,000 tonnes of fish and crustaceans were produced for restocking as well as about 3 million fry of salmon and trout were released into rivers. Swedish aquaculture research was overall assessed...

  16. The scientific background to decorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific background to chelation therapy is reviewed. A review of the animal studies which have demonstrated that in animals treated with DTPA either a reduction in bone tumour incidence from internally deposited 239Pu and 241Am, or a significant increase in survival time may occur, suggests that it is reasonable to assume that could also occur in humans. The biokinetics and bioinorganic chemistry of cobalt, caesium, thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium after their entry into the systemic circulation are reviewed briefly. These reviews discuss the general biokinetic behaviour of each element in adult humans with special reference to those aspects of their bioinorganic chemistry that either underlie existing approaches to decorporation therapy, or which might be exploitable for new types of treatment. (author)

  17. Recognizing foreground-background interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey; Szu, Harold

    2010-04-01

    Can the background affect a foreground target in distant, low-quality imagery? If it does, it might occur in our mind, or perhaps it may represent a snapshot of our early vision. An affirmative answer, one way or another, may affect our current understanding of this phenomena and potentially for related applications. How can we be sure about this in the psycho-physical sense? We begin with the physiology of our brain's homeostasis, of which an isothermal equilibrium is characterized by the minimum of Helmholtz isothermal Free Energy: A = U - T0S >= 0, where T0 = 37°C, the Boltzmann Entropy S = KB1n(W), and U is the unknown internal energy to be computed.

  18. Analysis of cell cycle-related proteins in gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers based on mucin phenotypes: a novel hypothesis of early gastric carcinogenesis based on mucin phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsushita Hiroo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities of cell cycle regulators are common features in human cancers, and several of these factors are associated with the early development of gastric cancers. However, recent studies have shown that gastric cancer tumorigenesis was characterized by mucin expression. Thus, expression patterns of cell cycle-related proteins were investigated in the early phase of differentiated-type gastric cancers to ascertain any mechanistic relationships with mucin phenotypes. Methods Immunostaining for Cyclins D1, A, E, and p21, p27, p53 and β-catenin was used to examine impairments of the cell cycle in 190 gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers. Mucin phenotypes were determined by the expressions of MUC5AC, MUC6, MUC2 and CD10. A Ki-67 positive rate (PR was also examined. Results Overexpressions of p53, cyclin D1 and cyclin A were significantly more frequent in a gastric phenotype than an intestinal phenotype. Cyclin A was overexpressed in a mixed phenotype compared with an intestinal phenotype, while p27 overexpression was more frequent in an intestinal phenotype than in a mixed phenotype. Reduction of p21 was a common feature of the gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers examined. Conclusions Our results suggest that the levels of some cell cycle regulators appear to be associated with mucin phenotypes of early gastric differentiated-type cancers.

  19. The other side of phenotypic plasticity: a developmental system that generates an invariant phenotype despite environmental variation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Christian Braendle; Marie-Anne Félix

    2009-10-01

    Understanding how the environment impacts development is of central interest in developmental and evolutionary biology. On the one hand, we would like to understand how the environment induces phenotypic changes (the study of phenotypic plasticity). On the other hand, we may ask how a development system maintains a stable and precise phenotypic output despite the presence of environmental variation. We study such developmental robustness to environmental variation using vulval cell fate patterning in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a study system. Here we review both mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of these studies, focusing on recently obtained experimental results. First, we present evidence indicating that vulval formation is under stabilizing selection. Second, we discusss quantitative data on the precision and variability in the output of the vulval developmental system in different environments and different genetic backgrounds. Third, we illustrate how environmental and genetic variation modulate the cellular and molecular processes underlying the formation of the vulva. Fourth, we discuss the evolutionary significance of environmental sensitivity of this developmental system.

  20. Multi-dimensional discovery of biomarker and phenotype complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Kun

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the rapid growth of translational research and personalized healthcare paradigms, the ability to relate and reason upon networks of bio-molecular and phenotypic variables at various levels of granularity in order to diagnose, stage and plan treatments for disease states is highly desirable. Numerous techniques exist that can be used to develop networks of co-expressed or otherwise related genes and clinical features. Such techniques can also be used to create formalized knowledge collections based upon the information incumbent to ontologies and domain literature. However, reports of integrative approaches that bridge such networks to create systems-level models of disease or wellness are notably lacking in the contemporary literature. Results In response to the preceding gap in knowledge and practice, we report upon a prototypical series of experiments that utilize multi-modal approaches to network induction. These experiments are intended to elicit meaningful and significant biomarker-phenotype complexes spanning multiple levels of granularity. This work has been performed in the experimental context of a large-scale clinical and basic science data repository maintained by the National Cancer Institute (NCI funded Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research Consortium. Conclusions Our results indicate that it is computationally tractable to link orthogonal networks of genes, clinical features, and conceptual knowledge to create multi-dimensional models of interrelated biomarkers and phenotypes. Further, our results indicate that such systems-level models contain interrelated bio-molecular and clinical markers capable of supporting hypothesis discovery and testing. Based on such findings, we propose a conceptual model intended to inform the cross-linkage of the results of such methods. This model has as its aim the identification of novel and knowledge-anchored biomarker-phenotype complexes.

  1. Modulation of Lupus Phenotype by Adiponectin Deficiency in Autoimmune Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Jennifer; Menn-Josephy, Hanni; Laskow, Bari; Takemura, Yukihiro; Aprahamian, Tamar

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived cytokine with anti-inflammatory properties. Paradoxically, circulating adiponectin levels are increased in a number of inflammatory diseases. Thus, we sought to define the role of adiponectin deficiency in mouse models of autoimmunity. Adiponectin-deficient mice on a C57BL/6 background do not develop an autoimmune phenotype. Autoimmunity was also not observed in adiponectin-deficient mice generated on the permissive MRL background. However, adiponectin defi...

  2. DBA/2J genetic background exacerbates spontaneous lethal seizures but lessens amyloid deposition in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet M Jackson

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is characterized by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and neuronal dysfunction. Early onset AD (EOAD is commonly caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP or genes involved in the processing of APP including the presenilins (e.g. PSEN1 or PSEN2. In general, mouse models relevant to EOAD recapitulate amyloidosis, show only limited amounts of NFTs and neuronal cell dysfunction and low but significant levels of seizure susceptibility. To investigate the effect of genetic background on these phenotypes, we generated APPswe and PSEN1de9 transgenic mice on the seizure prone inbred strain background, DBA/2J. Previous studies show that the DBA/2J genetic background modifies plaque deposition in the presence of mutant APP but the impact of PSEN1de9 has not been tested. Our study shows that DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice are significantly more prone to premature lethality, likely to due to lethal seizures, compared to B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice-70% of DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice die between 2-3 months of age. Of the DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice that survived to 6 months of age, plaque deposition was greatly reduced compared to age-matched B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice. The reduction in plaque deposition appears to be independent of microglia numbers, reactive astrocytosis and complement C5 activity.

  3. PHENOTYPIC TRAITS IN ZAGORJE TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Janječić

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of turkeys in the region of Hrvatsko zagorje began in second half of 16th century, when there was a little influence of other turkey breeds from other region. Recently, interest for protection and preservation of autochthonous poultry breeds in Croatia is growing and in that sense this investigation was set to determine the phenotypic traits of Zagorje turkey. One hundred 10-month old turkeys (5 males and 20 females of four strains (bronze, black, grey and pale were measured, while egg production data were collected by a poll among the breeders. Average body weight of bronze, black, grey and pale strain males were 7.08, 6.88, 6.10 and 6.09 kg, respectively, while in females the average values were 4.02, 4.07, 3.63, and 3.68 kg. Generally, according to body measures of male birds, other than body weight, of all of the strains of Zagorje turkey, the black one is the biggest, as it had the highest values for body length, length of sternum, length of drumstick, length of shank, depth of chest and head measures. At the same time, the bronze strain had the highest value for carcass width. Body measures mentioned previously were not so different in females. Number of reared chicks was lowest in the pale strain. From the body measures assessed it is possible to conclude that Zagorje turkeys are rather uniform within the strain but differences in most of the breed traits are present between the strains, especially in males of bronze and black strain, when compared to gray and pale strain.

  4. Oncogenic driver genes and the inflammatory microenvironment dictate liver tumor phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matter, Matthias S; Marquardt, Jens U; Andersen, Jesper B;

    2016-01-01

    The majority of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develops in the background of chronic liver inflammation caused by viral hepatitis and alcoholic or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. However, the impact of different types of chronic inflammatory microenvironments on the phenotypes of tumors generated by...

  5. Measurement Equivalence of the Autism Symptom Phenotype in Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duku, Eric; Szatmari, Peter; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Georgiades, Stelios; Thompson, Ann; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Paterson, Andrew D.; Bennett, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) is a gold standard assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) symptoms and behaviours. A key underlying assumption of studies using the ADI-R is that it measures the same phenotypic constructs across different populations (i.e. males/females, younger/older, verbal/nonverbal). The…

  6. Oppositional Defiant Disorder as a Clinical Phenotype in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2008-01-01

    To examine the validity of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) as a clinical phenotype distinct from attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), parents and teachers completed a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale and a background questionnaire for 608 children (ages 3-12 years) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The ASD sample was separated…

  7. The Behavioural Phenotype of Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Behaviour problems and a preference for adult contact are reported to be prominent in the phenotype of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this study we examined the relationship between social interactions and self-injurious and aggressive/disruptive behaviour in Smith-Magenis syndrome to explore potential operant reinforcement of problem…

  8. A genome-wide association study for blood lipid phenotypes in the Framingham Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Background: Blood lipid levels including low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) are highly heritable. Genome-wide association is a promising approach to map genetic loci related to these heritable phenotypes. Metho...

  9. Investigating Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Factor Mixture Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiades, Stelios; Szatmari, Peter; Boyle, Michael; Hanna, Steven; Duku, Eric; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bryson, Susan; Fombonne, Eric; Volden, Joanne; Mirenda, Pat; Smith, Isabel; Roberts, Wendy; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Waddell, Charlotte; Bennett, Teresa; Thompson, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by notable phenotypic heterogeneity, which is often viewed as an obstacle to the study of its etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. On the basis of empirical evidence, instead of three binary categories, the upcoming edition of the DSM 5 will use two dimensions--social…

  10. Visual Orienting in the Early Broader Autism Phenotype: Disengagement and Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabbagh, Mayada; Volein, Agnes; Holmboe, Karla; Tucker, Leslie; Csibra, Gergely; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Bolton, Patrick; Charman, Tony; Baird, Gillian; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent studies of infant siblings of children diagnosed with autism have allowed for a prospective approach to examine the emergence of symptoms and revealed behavioral differences in the broader autism phenotype within the early years. In the current study we focused on a set of functions associated with visual attention, previously…

  11. Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Pruszewicz, Antoni; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Czerniejewska, Hanna; Jackowska, Joanna; Jarmuż, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 6 Final Diagnosis: Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Otolaryngology Objective: Congenital defects Background: Communication process disorders are very frequent in rare cases of chromosomal aberrations (deletions, insertions, and trisomies) such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Turner syndrome, Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), or...

  12. Elevated Antisaccade Error Rate as an Intermediate Phenotype for Psychosis Across Diagnostic Categories

    OpenAIRE

    Reilly, James L.; Frankovich, Kyle; Hill, Scot; Gershon, Elliot S.; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Tamminga, Carol A.; John A. Sweeney

    2013-01-01

    Background: Elevated antisaccade error rate, reflecting problems with inhibitory behavioral control, is a promising intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. Here, we consider whether it marks liability across psychotic disorders via common or different neurophysiological mechanisms and whether it represents a neurocognitive risk indicator apart from the generalized cognitive deficit. Methods: Schizophrenia (n = 267), schizoaffective (n = 150), and psychotic bipolar (n = 202) probands, their ...

  13. The phenotypic spectrum of organic acidurias and urea cycle disorders. Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kölker, Stefan; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Burlina, Alberto B;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The disease course and long-term outcome of patients with organic acidurias (OAD) and urea cycle disorders (UCD) are incompletely understood. AIMS: To evaluate the complex clinical phenotype of OAD and UCD patients at different ages. RESULTS: Acquired microcephaly and movement disorders...

  14. Accelerating cosmology in modified gravity with scalar field

    OpenAIRE

    Shaido, Yulia A.; Sugamoto, Akio

    2004-01-01

    The modified gravity with 1/R term (R being scalar curvature) and the Einstein-Hilbert term is studied by incorporating the phantom scalar field. A number of cosmological solutions are derived in the presence of the phantom field in the perfect fluid background. It is shown the current inflation obtained in the modified gravity is affected by the existence the phantom field.

  15. Efficient α, β-motif finder for identification of phenotype-related functional modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Matthew C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial communities in their natural environments exhibit phenotypes that can directly cause particular diseases, convert biomass or wastewater to energy, or degrade various environmental contaminants. Understanding how these communities realize specific phenotypic traits (e.g., carbon fixation, hydrogen production is critical for addressing health, bioremediation, or bioenergy problems. Results In this paper, we describe a graph-theoretical method for in silico prediction of the cellular subsystems that are related to the expression of a target phenotype. The proposed (α, β-motif finder approach allows for identification of these phenotype-related subsystems that, in addition to metabolic subsystems, could include their regulators, sensors, transporters, and even uncharacterized proteins. By comparing dozens of genome-scale networks of functionally associated proteins, our method efficiently identifies those statistically significant functional modules that are in at least α networks of phenotype-expressing organisms but appear in no more than β networks of organisms that do not exhibit the target phenotype. It has been shown via various experiments that the enumerated modules are indeed related to phenotype-expression when tested with different target phenotypes like hydrogen production, motility, aerobic respiration, and acid-tolerance. Conclusion Thus, we have proposed a methodology that can identify potential statistically significant phenotype-related functional modules. The functional module is modeled as an (α, β-clique, where α and β are two criteria introduced in this work. We also propose a novel network model, called the two-typed, divided network. The new network model and the criteria make the problem tractable even while very large networks are being compared. The code can be downloaded from http://www.freescience.org/cs/ABClique/

  16. Gaussianity of LISA's confusion backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    different time scales, so no single background source closely resembles any search template. We also briefly discuss other types of LISA searches where the non-Gaussianity of LISA's confusion backgrounds could perhaps have a much greater impact on search reliability and efficacy

  17. Nonderivative modified gravity: a classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the theories of gravity modified by a generic nonderivative potential built from the metric, under the minimal requirement of unbroken spatial rotations. Using the canonical analysis, we classify the potentials V according to the number of degrees of freedom (DoF) that propagate at the nonperturbative level. We then compare the nonperturbative results with the perturbative DoF propagating around Minkowski and FRW backgrounds. A generic V implies 6 propagating DoF at the non-perturbative level, with a ghost on Minkowski background. There exist potentials which propagate 5 DoF, as already studied in previous works. Here, no V with unbroken rotational invariance admitting 4 DoF is found. Theories with 3 DoF turn out to be strongly coupled on Minkowski background. Finally, potentials with only the 2 DoF of a massive graviton exist. Their effect on cosmology is simply equivalent to a cosmological constant. Potentials with 2 or 5 DoF and explicit time dependence appear to be a further viable possibility

  18. Nonderivative Modified Gravity: a Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Comelli, Denis; Pilo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the theories of gravity modified by a generic nonderivative potential built from the metric, under the minimal requirement of unbroken spatial rotations. Using the canonical analysis, we classify the potentials $V$ according to the number of degrees of freedom (DoF) that propagate at the nonperturbative level. We then compare the nonperturbative results with the perturbative DoF propagating around Minkowski and FRW backgrounds. A generic $V$ implies 6 propagating DoF at the non-perturbative level, with a ghost on Minkowski background. There exist potentials which propagate 5 DoF, as already studied in previous works. Here, no $V$ with unbroken rotational invariance admitting 4 DoF is found. Theories with 3 DoF turn out to be strongly coupled on Minkowski background. Finally, potentials with only the 2 DoF of a massive graviton exist. Their effect on cosmology is simply equivalent to a cosmological constant. Potentials with 2 or 5 DoF and explicit time dependence appear to be a further viable possib...

  19. The Cosmic Background Radiation, 1995

    CERN Document Server

    Smoot, G F

    1995-01-01

    Observations of the Cosmic Microwave background have provided many of the most powerful constraints we have on cosmology and events in the early universe. The spectrum and isotropy of CBR have long been a pillar of Big Bang models. The discovery of low levels on anisotropy has provided new information and tools for our understanding of the early universe. Further observations promise to enhance greatly our knowledge of processes in the early universe and cosmological parameters. We can anticipate rapid advance in this field up to and through the year 2000 which will dramatically focus our efforts in cosmology during the next millenium. This paper outlines the primary science likely to be discovered and defined by a vigorous airborne and ground-based program which should be strongly supported. If successfully excuted, we an anticipate a measurement of the CBR anisotropy spectrum to within a factor of two of the confidence level unavoidably set by cosmic variance. Even so, observations of the CBR are the best a...

  20. Natural background radiation in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Airborne Gamma Ray survey has been accomplished for Jordan since 1979. A complete report has been submitted to the Natural Resources Authority along with field and processed data ''digital and analogue''. Natural radioelements concentration is not provided with this report. From the corrected count rate data for each natural radioelement, Concentrations and exposure rates at the ground level were calculated. Contoured maps, showing the exposure rates and the dose rates were created. Both maps reflect the surface geology of Jordan, where the Phosphate areas are very well delineated by high-level contours. In southeastern Jordan the Ordovician sandstone, which contain high percentage of Th (around 2000 ppm in some places) and a moderate percentage of U (about 300 ppm), also show high gamma radiation exposures compared with the surrounding areas. Comparing the values of the exposure rates given in (μR/h) to those obtained from other countries such as United States, Canada, Germany, etc. Jordan shows higher background radiation which reach two folds and even more than those in these countries. More detailed studies should be performed in order to evaluate the radiological risk limits on people who are living in areas of high radiation such that the area of the phosphatic belt which covers a vast area of Jordan high Plateau. (author)

  1. Annual research review: Reaction time variability in ADHD and autism spectrum disorders: measurement and mechanisms of a proposed trans-diagnostic phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Karalunas; H.M. Geurts; K. Konrad; S. Bender; J.T. Nigg

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intraindividual variability in reaction time (RT) has received extensive discussion as an indicator of cognitive performance, a putative intermediate phenotype of many clinical disorders, and a possible trans-diagnostic phenotype that may elucidate shared risk factors for mechanisms of p

  2. Phenotypic profiles of Armenian grape cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroutiounian Rouben

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conservation and sustainable use of grapevine biodiversity in Armenia is particularly important due to the large number of traditional local varieties. Being partially different from European grapevine gene pool, the material of Armenian local cultivars significantly contributes to the understanding of the genetic variation and is valuable source for target selection. During last years many Armenian grapevine cultivars have been already described and their genotypes determined, but some local varieties and wild accessions remain unidentified and their phenotypic characteristics overlooked. The comprehensive analysis of phenotypes is essential for research, including genetic association studies, cultivar evaluation and selection. The goal of our research was the phenotyping on the base of reproductive, carpological and analytical characteristics of 80 Armenian aboriginal and new grape cultivars. Description of phenotypic profiles is important step towards identification and conservation of genetic resources of Armenian grapes. In future, these data can be applied for breeding of improved grape varieties targeted to fresh consumption and wine production.

  3. Mining skeletal phenotype descriptions from scientific literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Groza

    Full Text Available Phenotype descriptions are important for our understanding of genetics, as they enable the computation and analysis of a varied range of issues related to the genetic and developmental bases of correlated characters. The literature contains a wealth of such phenotype descriptions, usually reported as free-text entries, similar to typical clinical summaries. In this paper, we focus on creating and making available an annotated corpus of skeletal phenotype descriptions. In addition, we present and evaluate a hybrid Machine Learning approach for mining phenotype descriptions from free text. Our hybrid approach uses an ensemble of four classifiers and experiments with several aggregation techniques. The best scoring technique achieves an F-1 score of 71.52%, which is close to the state-of-the-art in other domains, where training data exists in abundance. Finally, we discuss the influence of the features chosen for the model on the overall performance of the method.

  4. Holographic modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Setare, M R

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study cosmological application of holographic dark energy density in the modified gravity framework. We employ the holographic model of dark energy to obtain the equation of state for the holographic energy density in spatially flat universe. Our calculation show, taking $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0.73$ for the present time, it is possible to have $w_{\\rm \\Lambda}$ crossing -1. This implies that one can generate phantom-like equation of state from a holographic dark energy model in flat universe in the modified gravity cosmology framework. Also we develop a reconstruction scheme for the modified gravity with $f(R)$ action.

  5. Scientific background of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the proposed project is the development of radioimmunometric assay(s) for the determination of free and total PSA in serum samples from normal and pathological individuals (BPH, PCa). This will be achieved by: A. Selection of appropriate antibody pairs (capture and labelled antibody) for determination of total PSA (free and complex) and for determination of free PSA. From bibliography we have already spotted some antibody pairs. B. Radiolabelling of antibodies. Several labelling and purification procedures will be followed in order to obtain the required analytical sensitivity and dynamic range of the assays. Special attention will be given to the affinity constant as well as to the stability of the radiolabelled molecules. C. Development of protocols for immobilisation of capture antibodies. We will use several solid support formats (plastic tubes, beads and magnetizable particles). Direct adsorption or covalent binding will be used. Immunoadsorption through immobilised second antibody will be also tested in order to decrease the preparation cost of the solid phase reagents. D. Preparation of standards of suitable purity levels. We will test different PSA-free matrices (Bovine serum, buffer solutions etc.) in order to select the most appropriate among them in terms of low background determination and low reagents cost. E. Optimisation of the immunoassays conditions for the free PSA and total PSA (e.g. assay buffers, incubation time, temperature, one or two step procedure, washings). F. Optimisation and standardisation of assay protocols for kit production. G. Production of kits for distribution in clinical laboratories in Greece for comparison with commercial kits. H. Evaluation of the developed assays in real clinical conditions using well characterised human serum samples. This will be performed in co-operation with the Hellenic Society for Tumor Markers, and other anticancer institutions and hospital clinicians of long standing relation

  6. Phenotypic modifications in ovarian cancer stem cells following Paclitaxel treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Despite initial responsiveness, 80% of EOC patients recur and present with chemoresistant and a more aggressive disease. This suggests an underlying biology that results in a modified recurrent disease, which is distinct from the primary tumor. Unfortunately, the management of recurrent EOC is similar to primary disease and does not parallel the molecular changes that may have occurred during the process of rebuilding the tumor. We describe the characterization of unique in vitro and in vivo ovarian cancer models to study the process of recurrence. The in vitro model consists of GFP+/CD44+/MyD88+ EOC stem cells and mCherry+/CD44−/MyD88− EOC cells. The in vivo model consists of mCherry+/CD44+/MyD88+ EOC cells injected intraperitoneally. Animals received four doses of Paclitaxel and response to treatment was monitored by in vivo imaging. Phenotype of primary and recurrent disease was characterized by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot analysis. Using the in vivo and in vitro models, we confirmed that chemotherapy enriched for CD44+/MyD88+ EOC stem cells. However, we observed that the surviving CD44+/MyD88+ EOC stem cells acquire a more aggressive phenotype characterized by chemoresistance and migratory potential. Our results highlight the mechanisms that may explain the phenotypic heterogeneity of recurrent EOC and emphasize the significant plasticity of ovarian cancer stem cells. The significance of our findings is the possibility of developing new venues to target the surviving CD44+/MyD88+ EOC stem cells as part of maintenance therapy and therefore preventing recurrence and metastasis, which are the main causes of mortality in patients with ovarian cancer

  7. Optimizing the phenotyping of rodent ASD models: Enrichment analysis of mouse and human neurobiological phenotypes associated with high-risk autism genes identifies morphological, electrophysiological, neurological, and behavioral features.

    OpenAIRE

    Buxbaum Joseph D; Betancur Catalina; Bozdagi Ozlem; Dorr Nate P; Elder Gregory A; Hof Patrick R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is interest in defining mouse neurobiological phenotypes useful for studying autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in both forward and reverse genetic approaches. A recurrent focus has been on high-order behavioral analyses, including learning and memory paradigms and social paradigms. However, well-studied mouse models, including for example Fmr1 knockout mice, do not show dramatic deficits in such high-order phenotypes, raising a question as to what constitutes useful ph...

  8. A study comparing chemical peeling using modified jessner′s solution and 15% trichloroacetic acid versus 15% trichloroacetic acid in the treatment of melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoury Omar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melasma is a symmetric progressive hyperpigmentation of the facial skin that occurs in all races but has a predilection for darker skin phenotypes. Depigmenting agents, laser and chemical peeling as classic Jessner′s solution, modified Jessner′s solution and trichloroacetic acid have been used alone and in combination in the treatment of melasma. Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the therapeutic effect of combined 15% Trichloroacetic acid (TCA and modified Jessner′s solution with 15% TCA on melasma. Materials and Methods: Twenty married females with melasma (epidermal type, with a mean age of 38.25 years, were included in this study. All were of skin type III or IV. Fifteen percent TCA was applied to the whole face, with the exception of the left malar area to which combined TCA 15% and modified Jessner′s solution was applied. Results: Our results revealed statistically highly significant difference between MASI Score (Melasma Area and Severity Index between the right malar area and the left malar area. Conclusion: Modified Jessner′s solution proved to be useful as an adjuvant treatment with TCA in the treatment of melasma, improving the results and minimizing postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.

  9. GEE for GWAS using Longitudinal Phenotype Data

    OpenAIRE

    Sitlani, Colleen M.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Avery, Christy L; Noordam, Raymond; Stricker, Bruno H. C.; Whitsel, Eric A.; Psaty, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Many longitudinal cohort studies have both genome-wide measures of genetic variation and repeated measures of phenotypes and environmental exposures. Genome-wide association study analyses have typically used only cross-sectional data to evaluate quantitative phenotypes and binary traits. Incorporation of repeated measures may increase power to detect associations, but also requires specialized analysis methods. Here we discuss one such method – generalized estimating equations...

  10. Next Generation Sequencing Demands Next Generation Phenotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Hennekam, Raoul CM; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2012-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is the most powerful diagnostic tool since the roentgenogram. NGS will facilitate diagnosis on a massive scale –allowing interrogation of all genes in a single assay. It has been suggested that NGS will decrease the need for phenotyping in general, and medical geneticists in particular. We argue that NGS will shift focus and approach of phenotyping. We predict that NGS performed for diagnostic purposes will yield variants in several genes, and consequences of ...

  11. Phenotyping of robustness and milk quality

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, D. P.; Mcparland, S.; Bastin, Catherine; Wall, E.; Gengler, Nicolas; Soyeurt, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    A phenotype describes the outcome of the interacting development between the genotype of an individual and its specific environment throughout life. Animal breeding currently exploits large data sets of phenotypic and pedigree information to estimate the genetic merit of animals. Here we describe rapid, low-cost phenomic tools for dairy cattle. We give particular emphasis to infrared spectroscopy of milk because the necessary spectral data are already routinely available on milk samples from ...

  12. Phenotypic spandrel: absolute discrimination and ligand antagonism

    OpenAIRE

    François, Paul; Johnson, Kyle A.; Saunders, Laura N.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the general problem of absolute discrimination between categories of ligands irrespective of their concentration. An instance of this problem is immune discrimination between self and not-self. We connect this problem to biochemical adaptation, and establish that ligand antagonism - the ability of sub threshold ligands to negatively impact response - is a necessary consequence of absolute discrimination.Thus antagonism constitutes a "phenotypic spandrel": a phenotype existing as a...

  13. Important discoveries from analysing bacterial phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Bochner, Barry R.; Giovannetti, Luciana; Viti, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The ability to test hundreds to thousands of cellular phenotypes in a single experiment has opened up new avenues of investigation and exploration and led to important discoveries in very diverse applications of microbiological research and development. The information provided by global phenotyping is complementary to, and often more easily interpretable than information provided by global molecular analytical methods such as gene chips and proteomics. This report summarizes advances present...

  14. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan; Cucchiara, Salvatore; Sladek, Malgorzata; Murphy, M Stephen; Escher, Johanna C; Pærregaard, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping of...... atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  15. Recurrent duplications of 17q12 associated with variable phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Elyse; Douglas, Andrew; Kjaegaard, Susanne; Callewaert, Bert; Vanlander, Arnaud; Janssens, Sandra; Yuen, Amy Lawson; Skinner, Cindy; Failla, Pinella; Alberti, Antonino; Avola, Emanuela; Fichera, Marco; Kibaek, Maria; Digilio, Maria C; Hannibal, Mark C; den Hollander, Nicolette S; Bizzarri, Veronica; Renieri, Alessandra; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Piazzolla, Serena; van Oudenhove, Elke; Romano, Corrado; Schwartz, Charles; Eichler, Evan E; Slavotinek, Anne; Escobar, Luis; Rajan, Diana; Crolla, John; Carter, Nigel; Hodge, Jennelle C; Mefford, Heather C

    2015-12-01

    The ability to identify the clinical nature of the recurrent duplication of chromosome 17q12 has been limited by its rarity and the diverse range of phenotypes associated with this genomic change. In order to further define the clinical features of affected patients, detailed clinical information was collected in the largest series to date (30 patients and 2 of their siblings) through a multi-institutional collaborative effort. The majority of patients presented with developmental delays varying from mild to severe. Though dysmorphic features were commonly reported, patients do not have consistent and recognizable features. Cardiac, ophthalmologic, growth, behavioral, and other abnormalities were each present in a subset of patients. The newly associated features potentially resulting from 17q12 duplication include height and weight above the 95th percentile, cataracts, microphthalmia, coloboma, astigmatism, tracheomalacia, cutaneous mosaicism, pectus excavatum, scoliosis, hypermobility, hypospadias, diverticulum of Kommerell, pyloric stenosis, and pseudohypoparathryoidism. The majority of duplications were inherited with some carrier parents reporting learning disabilities or microcephaly. We identified additional, potentially contributory copy number changes in a subset of patients, including one patient each with 16p11.2 deletion and 15q13.3 deletion. Our data further define and expand the clinical spectrum associated with duplications of 17q12 and provide support for the role of genomic modifiers contributing to phenotypic variability. PMID:26420380

  16. Phenotypic Evolution With and Beyond Genome Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, M-A

    2016-01-01

    DNA does not make phenotypes on its own. In this volume entitled "Genes and Phenotypic Evolution," the present review draws the attention on the process of phenotype construction-including development of multicellular organisms-and the multiple interactions and feedbacks between DNA, organism, and environment at various levels and timescales in the evolutionary process. First, during the construction of an individual's phenotype, DNA is recruited as a template for building blocks within the cellular context and may in addition be involved in dynamical feedback loops that depend on the environmental and organismal context. Second, in the production of phenotypic variation among individuals, stochastic, environmental, genetic, and parental sources of variation act jointly. While in controlled laboratory settings, various genetic and environmental factors can be tested one at a time or in various combinations, they cannot be separated in natural populations because the environment is not controlled and the genotype can rarely be replicated. Third, along generations, genotype and environment each have specific properties concerning the origin of their variation, the hereditary transmission of this variation, and the evolutionary feedbacks. Natural selection acts as a feedback from phenotype and environment to genotype. This review integrates recent results and concrete examples that illustrate these three points. Although some themes are shared with recent calls and claims to a new conceptual framework in evolutionary biology, the viewpoint presented here only means to add flesh to the standard evolutionary synthesis. PMID:27282029

  17. Advanced phenotyping and phenotype data analysis for the study of plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Md Matiur; Chen, Dijun; Gillani, Zeeshan; Klukas, Christian; Chen, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increase in the consumption of food, feed, fuel and to meet global food security needs for the rapidly growing human population, there is a necessity to breed high yielding crops that can adapt to the future climate changes, particularly in developing countries. To solve these global challenges, novel approaches are required to identify quantitative phenotypes and to explain the genetic basis of agriculturally important traits. These advances will facilitate the screening of germplasm with high performance characteristics in resource-limited environments. Recently, plant phenomics has offered and integrated a suite of new technologies, and we are on a path to improve the description of complex plant phenotypes. High-throughput phenotyping platforms have also been developed that capture phenotype data from plants in a non-destructive manner. In this review, we discuss recent developments of high-throughput plant phenotyping infrastructure including imaging techniques and corresponding principles for phenotype data analysis. PMID:26322060

  18. Computer aided data acquisition tool for high-throughput phenotyping of plant populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basha Pinjari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The data generated during a course of a biological experiment/study can be sometimes be massive and its management becomes quite critical for the success of the investigation undertaken. The accumulation and analysis of such large datasets often becomes tedious for biologists and lab technicians. Most of the current phenotype data acquisition management systems do not cater to the specialized needs of large-scale data analysis. The successful application of genomic tools/strategies to introduce desired traits in plants requires extensive and precise phenotyping of plant populations or gene bank material, thus necessitating an efficient data acquisition system. Results Here we describe newly developed software "PHENOME" for high-throughput phenotyping, which allows researchers to accumulate, categorize, and manage large volume of phenotypic data. In this study, a large number of individual tomato plants were phenotyped with the "PHENOME" application using a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA with built-in barcode scanner in concert with customized database specific for handling large populations. Conclusion The phenotyping of large population of plants both in the laboratory and in the field is very efficiently managed using PDA. The data is transferred to a specialized database(s where it can be further analyzed and catalogued. The "PHENOME" aids collection and analysis of data obtained in large-scale mutagenesis, assessing quantitative trait loci (QTLs, raising mapping population, sampling of several individuals in one or more ecological niches etc.

  19. Cluster analysis in severe emphysema subjects using phenotype and genotype data: an exploratory investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Fernando J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies have demonstrated associations between genetic markers and COPD, but results have been inconsistent. One reason may be heterogeneity in disease definition. Unsupervised learning approaches may assist in understanding disease heterogeneity. Methods We selected 31 phenotypic variables and 12 SNPs from five candidate genes in 308 subjects in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT Genetics Ancillary Study cohort. We used factor analysis to select a subset of phenotypic variables, and then used cluster analysis to identify subtypes of severe emphysema. We examined the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of each cluster. Results We identified six factors accounting for 75% of the shared variability among our initial phenotypic variables. We selected four phenotypic variables from these factors for cluster analysis: 1 post-bronchodilator FEV1 percent predicted, 2 percent bronchodilator responsiveness, and quantitative CT measurements of 3 apical emphysema and 4 airway wall thickness. K-means cluster analysis revealed four clusters, though separation between clusters was modest: 1 emphysema predominant, 2 bronchodilator responsive, with higher FEV1; 3 discordant, with a lower FEV1 despite less severe emphysema and lower airway wall thickness, and 4 airway predominant. Of the genotypes examined, membership in cluster 1 (emphysema-predominant was associated with TGFB1 SNP rs1800470. Conclusions Cluster analysis may identify meaningful disease subtypes and/or groups of related phenotypic variables even in a highly selected group of severe emphysema subjects, and may be useful for genetic association studies.

  20. Modified quaternion Newton methods

    OpenAIRE

    Falcão, M. I.; Miranda, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the quaternion Newton method for computing roots of a class of quaternion valued functions and propose modified algorithms for finding multiple roots of simple polynomials. We illustrate the performance of these new methods by presenting several numerical experiments.

  1. Modified Desert Cooler (MDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHANDRAKANT B. KOTHARE,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available “Modified Desert Cooler (MDC” as the name suggest that it is the modification of the conventional cooler. It is the Air Conditioner cum refrigerator for people who cannot afford costly equipments like air conditioner, refrigerator and other such appliances. It cools the air more than the conventional Desert cooler. The modified desert cooler is developed for providing better cooling effect than conventional desert cooler. It also provides cold-pure water for drinking purpose comparatively at low cost than Refrigerator with the help of modifies Matka attached with it. It also decreased moisture content of the air coming through desert cooler upto someextent. The MDC consists of a desert cooler with storage box, two concentric simple small size earthen pot known as modify Matka, a purifier, humidity controller and connecting tubes or pipes. Storage box provided in the desert cooler can be used to store regular food items, vegetables, fruits etc.

  2. iTAP: integrated transcriptomics and phenotype database for stress response of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Sundararaman, Niveda; Ash, Christine; Guo, Weihua; Button, Rebecca; Singh, Jugroop; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Organisms are subject to various stress conditions, which affect both the organism’s gene expression and phenotype. It is critical to understand microbial responses to stress conditions and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. To this end, it is necessary to build a database that collects transcriptomics and phenotypic data of microbes growing under various stress factors for in-depth systems biology analysis....

  3. The prevalence of metabolic disorders in various phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome: a community based study in Southwest of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Rashidi, Homeira; Bahri Khomami, Mahnaz; Tohidi, Maryam; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy, associated with metabolic abnormalities. Metabolic features of various phenotypes of this syndrome are still debatable. The aim of present study hence was to evaluate the metabolic and hormonal features of PCOS phenotypes in comparison to a group of healthy control. Methods A total of 646 reproductive-aged women were randomly selected using the stratified, multistage probability cluster sampling method. The subjects were ...

  4. High level of molecular and phenotypic biodiversity in Jatropha curcas from Central America compared to Africa, Asia and South America

    OpenAIRE

    Montes Osorio, Luis; Torres Salvador, Andres; Jongschaap, Raymond Elmar; Azurdia Perez, Cesar; Berduo Sandoval, Julio; Trindade, Luisa; Visser, Richard Gerardus; van Loo, Eibertus

    2014-01-01

    Background The main bottleneck to elevate jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) from a wild species to a profitable biodiesel crop is the low genetic and phenotypic variation found in different regions of the world, hampering efficient plant breeding for productivity traits. In this study, 182 accessions from Asia (91), Africa (35), South America (9) and Central America (47) were evaluated at genetic and phenotypic level to find genetic variation and important traits for oilseed production. Results G...

  5. Phenotypic plasticity in the range-margin population of the lycaenid butterfly Zizeeria maha

    OpenAIRE

    Otaki Joji M; Hiyama Atsuki; Iwata Masaki; Kudo Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Many butterfly species have been experiencing the northward range expansion and physiological adaptation, probably due to climate warming. Here, we document an extraordinary field case of a species of lycaenid butterfly, Zizeeria maha, for which plastic phenotypes of wing color-patterns were revealed at the population level in the course of range expansion. Furthermore, we examined whether this outbreak of phenotypic changes was able to be reproduced in a laboratory. Resul...

  6. Disease profile and differential diagnosis of hereditary transthyretin-related amyloidosis with exclusively cardiac phenotype: An Italian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Rapezzi, Claudio; Quarta, Candida Cristina; Obici, Laura; Perfetto, Federico; Longhi, Simone; Salvi, Fabrizio; Biagini, Elena; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Grigioni, Francesco; Leone, Ornella; Cappelli, Francesco; Palladini, Giovanni; Rimessi, Paola; Ferlini, Alessandra; Arpesella, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Hereditary transthyretin (TTR)-related amyloidosis (ATTR) is mainly considered a neurologic disease. We assessed the phenotypic and genotypic spectra of ATTR in a Caucasian area and evaluated the prevalence, genetic background, and disease profile of cases with an exclusively cardiac phenotype, highlighting possible hints for the differential diagnosis with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA). METHODS AND RESULTS: In this Italian multicentr...

  7. In vitro analysis of the invasive phenotype of SUM 149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmawardhane Suranganie F; Wall Kristin M; Hoffmeyer Michaela R

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of locally invasive breast cancer known. However, very little information is available on the cellular mechanisms responsible for manifestation of the IBC phenotype. To understand the unique phenotype of IBC, we compared the motile and adhesive interactions of an IBC cell line, SUM 149, to the non-IBC cell line SUM 102. Results Our results demonstrate that both IBC and non-IBC cell lines exhibit similar adhesive prop...

  8. Type I collagen inhibits differentiation and promotes a stem cell-like phenotype in human colorectal carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkland, S. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Human colorectal cancer is caused by mutations and is thought to be maintained by a population of cancer stem cells. Further phenotypic changes occurring at the invasive edge suggest that colon cancer cells are also regulated by their microenvironment. Type I collagen, a promoter of the malignant phenotype in pancreatic carcinoma cells, is highly expressed at the invasive front of human colorectal cancer. Methods: This study investigates the role of type I collagen in specifying t...

  9. A Dysmorphometric Analysis to Investigate Facial Phenotypic Signatures as a Foundation for Non-invasive Monitoring of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kung, Stefanie; Walters, Mark; Claes, Peter; Goldblatt, Jack; Le Souef, Peter; Baynam, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Background: Some lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), including Muccopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPSI), are associated with characteristic facies. Methods such as three-dimensional (3D) facial scanning and geometric morphometric techniques can potentially generate detailed objective descriptions of these facial phenotypes. This approach can facilitate discriminating the inherent overlap in facial phenotypes within these disease spectra, and the non-invasive monitoring of disease progression and ...

  10. Autistic Disorder in Patients with Williams-Beuren Syndrome: A Reconsideration of the Williams-Beuren Syndrome Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Tordjman, Sylvie; Anderson, George M; Botbol, Michel; Toutain, Annick; Sarda, Pierre; Carlier, Michèle; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Baumann, Clarisse; Cohen, David; Lagneaux, Céline; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Verloes, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a rare developmental disorder caused by deletion of contiguous genes at 7q11.23, has been characterized by strengths in socialization (overfriendliness) and communication (excessive talkativeness). WBS has been often considered as the polar opposite behavioral phenotype to autism. Our objective was to better understand the range of phenotypic expression in WBS and the relationship between WBS and autistic disorder. Methodology The study was conducted...

  11. “Rolled-upness”: phenotyping leaf rolling in cereals using computer vision and functional data analysis approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Sirault, X. R. R.; Condon, A. G.; Wood, J. T.; Farquhar, G. D.; Rebetzke, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The flag leaf of a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plant rolls up into a cylinder in response to drought conditions and then unrolls when leaf water relations improve. This is a desirable trait for extending leaf area duration and improving grain size particularly under drought. But how do we quantify this phenotype so that different varieties of wheat or different treatments can be compared objectively since this phenotype can easily be confounded with inter-genotypic differences in ...

  12. Morphogenesis of an extended phenotype: four-dimensional ant nest architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Minter, Nicholas J.; Franks, Nigel R.; Robson Brown, Katharine A.

    2011-01-01

    Animals produce a variety of structures to modify their environments adaptively. Such structures represent extended phenotypes whose development is rarely studied. To begin to rectify this, we used micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and time-series experiments to obtain the first high-resolution dataset on the four-dimensional growth of ant nests. We show that extrinsic features within the environment, such as the presence of planes between layers of sediment, influence the architecture ...

  13. Genetically regulated epigenetic transcriptional activation of retrotransposon insertion confers mouse dactylaplasia phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Hiroki; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Toda, Tatsushi

    2007-01-01

    Dactylaplasia, characterized by missing central digital rays, is an inherited mouse limb malformation that depends on two genetic loci. The first locus, Dac, is an insertional mutation around the dactylin gene that is inherited as a semidominant trait. The second locus is an unlinked modifier, mdac/Mdac, that is polymorphic among inbred strains. Mdac dominantly suppresses the dactylaplasia phenotype in mice carrying Dac. However, little is known about either locus or the nature of their inter...

  14. Organ system heterogeneity DB: a database for the visualization of phenotypes at the organ system level

    OpenAIRE

    Mannil, Deepthi; Vogt, Ingo; Prinz, Jeanette; Campillos, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Perturbations of mammalian organisms including diseases, drug treatments and gene perturbations in mice affect organ systems differently. Some perturbations impair relatively few organ systems while others lead to highly heterogeneous or systemic effects. Organ System Heterogeneity DB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/Organ_System_Heterogeneity/) provides information on the phenotypic effects of 4865 human diseases, 1667 drugs and 5361 genetically modified mouse models on 26 different organ ...

  15. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium: past and future perspectives on mouse phenotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Steve D M Brown; Moore, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the function of all mammalian genes remains a major challenge for the biomedical science community in the 21st century. The goal of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) over the next 10 years is to undertake broad-based phenotyping of 20,000 mouse genes, providing an unprecedented insight into mammalian gene function. This short article explores the drivers for large-scale mouse phenotyping and provides an overview of the aims and processes involved in IMPC mouse ...

  16. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H. V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G C M; Brown, D L; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; Fitzpatrick, D R; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with sev...

  17. Genetically Modified Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Claro Llaguno

    2001-01-01

    Recent reports have brought to public attention concerns about Bt corn and genetically modified organisms (GMO) in general. The timing, it seems, is most appropriate considering two related developments early this year: the final approval of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety in Montreal on January 29, 2001, and the OECD Edinburgh Conference on GM food safety last February 28- March 1, 2001. The protocol makes clear that GMOs include all living modified organisms (LMO) defined as "any living...

  18. Modified gravity without dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, R H

    2006-01-01

    On an empirical level, the most successful alternative to dark matter in bound gravitational systems is the modified Newtonian dynamics, or MOND, proposed by Milgrom. Here I discuss the attempts to formulate MOND as a modification of General Relativity. I begin with a summary of the phenomenological successes of MOND and then discuss the various covariant theories that have been proposed as a basis for the idea. I show why these proposals have led inevitably to a multi-field theory. I describe in some detail TeVeS, the tensor-vector-scalar theory proposed by Bekenstein, and discuss its successes and shortcomings. This lecture is primarily pedagogical and directed to those with some, but not a deep, background in General Relativity

  19. Minimal parameterizations for modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Ali Narimani Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The increasing precision of cosmological data provides us with an opportunity to test general relativity (GR) on the largest accessible scales. Parameterizing modified gravity models facilitates the systematic testing of the predictions of GR, and gives a framework for detecting possible deviations from it. Several different parameterizations have already been suggested, some linked to classifications of theories, and others more empirically motivated. Here we describe a particular new approach which casts modifications to gravity through two free functions of time and scale, which are directly linked to the field equations, but also easy to confront with observational data. We compare our approach with other existing methods of parameterizing modied gravity, specifically the parameterized post-Friedmann approach and the older method using the parameter set $\\{\\mu,\\gamma\\}$. We explain the connection between our parameters and the physics that is most important for generating cosmic microwave background aniso...

  20. Increased entropy of signal transduction in the cancer metastasis phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teschendorff Andrew E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The statistical study of biological networks has led to important novel biological insights, such as the presence of hubs and hierarchical modularity. There is also a growing interest in studying the statistical properties of networks in the context of cancer genomics. However, relatively little is known as to what network features differ between the cancer and normal cell physiologies, or between different cancer cell phenotypes. Results Based on the observation that frequent genomic alterations underlie a more aggressive cancer phenotype, we asked if such an effect could be detectable as an increase in the randomness of local gene expression patterns. Using a breast cancer gene expression data set and a model network of protein interactions we derive constrained weighted networks defined by a stochastic information flux matrix reflecting expression correlations between interacting proteins. Based on this stochastic matrix we propose and compute an entropy measure that quantifies the degree of randomness in the local pattern of information flux around single genes. By comparing the local entropies in the non-metastatic versus metastatic breast cancer networks, we here show that breast cancers that metastasize are characterised by a small yet significant increase in the degree of randomness of local expression patterns. We validate this result in three additional breast cancer expression data sets and demonstrate that local entropy better characterises the metastatic phenotype than other non-entropy based measures. We show that increases in entropy can be used to identify genes and signalling pathways implicated in breast cancer metastasis and provide examples of de-novo discoveries of gene modules with known roles in apoptosis, immune-mediated tumour suppression, cell-cycle and tumour invasion. Importantly, we also identify a novel gene module within the insulin growth factor signalling pathway, alteration of which may

  1. The modified Hodge test is a useful tool for ruling out klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula Cury; Denise Andreazzi; Márcia Maffucci; Hélio Hehl Caiaffa-Junior; Flávia Rossi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Enterobacteriaceae bacteria harboring Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase are a serious worldwide threat. The molecular identification of these pathogens is not routine in Brazilian hospitals, and a rapid phenotypic screening test is desirable. This study aims to evaluate the modified Hodge test as a phenotypic screening test for Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase. METHOD: From April 2009 to July 2011, all Enterobacteriaceae bacteria that were not susceptible to ertapenem accordin...

  2. The proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole improves the skeletal phenotype in dystrophin deficient mdx mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpana Sali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, loss of the membrane stabilizing protein dystrophin results in myofiber damage. Microinjury to dystrophic myofibers also causes secondary imbalances in sarcolemmic ion permeability and resting membrane potential, which modifies excitation-contraction coupling and increases proinflammatory/apoptotic signaling cascades. Although glucocorticoids remain the standard of care for the treatment of DMD, there is a need to investigate the efficacy of other pharmacological agents targeting the involvement of imbalances in ion flux on dystrophic pathology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a preclinical trial to investigate the effects of lansoprazole (LANZO administration, a proton pump inhibitor, on the dystrophic muscle phenotype in dystrophin deficient (mdx mice. Eight to ten week-old female mice were assigned to one of four treatment groups (n = 12 per group: (1 vehicle control; (2 5 mg/kg/day LANZO; (3 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone; and (4 combined treatment of 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone (PRED and 5 mg/kg/day LANZO. Treatment was administered orally 5 d/wk for 3 months. At the end of the study, behavioral (Digiscan and functional outcomes (grip strength and Rotarod were assessed prior to sacrifice. After sacrifice, body, tissue and organ masses, muscle histology, in vitro muscle force, and creatine kinase levels were measured. Mice in the combined treatment groups displayed significant reductions in the number of degenerating muscle fibers and number of inflammatory foci per muscle field relative to vehicle control. Additionally, mice in the combined treatment group displayed less of a decline in normalized forelimb and hindlimb grip strength and declines in in vitro EDL force after repeated eccentric contractions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together our findings suggest that combined treatment of LANZO and prednisolone attenuates some components of dystrophic pathology in mdx mice. Our findings

  3. The multi-systemic nature of diabetes mellitus: Genotype or phenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Wilfred Ewing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article discusses factors which materially influence the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diabetes mellitus but which may be overlooked by the prevailing biomedical paradigm. That cognition can be mathematically linked to the function of the autonomic nervous system and physiological systems casts new light upon the mechanisms responsible for homeostasis and origins of disease. In particular, it highlights the limitations of the reductionist biomedical approach which considers mainly the biochemistry of single pathologies rather than considering the neural mechanisms which regulate the function of physiological systems, and inherent visceral organs; and which are subsequently manifest as biochemistries of varying degrees of complexity and severity. As a consequence, histopathological tests are fraught with inherent limitations and many categories of drugs are significantly ineffective. Aims: Such limitations may be explained if disease (in particular diabetes mellitus has multiple origins, is multi-systemic in nature and, depending upon the characteristics of each pathology, is influenced by genotype and/or phenotype. Results:This article highlights the influence of factors which are not yet considered re. the aetiology of diabetes mellitus e.g. the influence of light and sensory input upon the stability of the autonomic nervous system; the influence of raised plasma viscosity upon rates of reaction; the influence of viruses and/or of modified live viruses given in vaccinations; systemic instability, in particular the adverse influence of drinks and lack of exercise upon the body′s prevailing pH and its subsequent influence upon levels of magnesium and other essential trace elements. Conclusions: This application of the top-down systems biology approach may provide a plausible and inclusive explanation for the nature and occurrence of diabetes mellitus.

  4. Highly efficient transduction of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells without phenotypic and functional maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plumas Joel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene modified dendritic cells (DC are able to modulate DC functions and induce therapeutic immunity or tolerance in an antigen-specific manner. Among the different DC subsets, plasmacytoid DC (pDC are well known for their ability to recognize and respond to a variety of viruses by secreting high levels of type I interferon. Methods We analyzed here, the transduction efficiency of a pDC cell line, GEN2.2, and of pDC derived from CD34+ progenitors, using lentiviral vectors (LV pseudotyped with different envelope glycoproteins such as the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope (VSVG, the gibbon ape leukaemia virus envelope (GaLV or the feline endogenous virus envelope (RD114. At the same time, we evaluated transgene expression (E-GFP reporter gene under the control of different promoters. Results We found that efficient gene transfer into pDC can be achieved with VSVG-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV under the control of phoshoglycerate kinase (PGK and elongation factor-1 (EF1α promoters (28% to 90% of E-GFP+ cells, respectively in the absence of phenotypic and functional maturation. Surprisingly, promoters (desmin or synthetic C5–12 described as muscle-specific and which drive gene expression in single strand AAV vectors in gene therapy protocols were very highly active in pDC using VSVG-LV. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that LV vectors can serve to design pDC-based vaccines in humans, and they are also useful in vitro to evaluate the immunogenicity of the vector preparations, and the specificity and safety of given promoters used in gene therapy protocols.

  5. Characterization of Rett Syndrome-like phenotypes in Mecp2-knockout rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yang; Zhong, Weiwei; Cui, Ningren; Johnson, Christopher M.; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disease caused by the disruption of the MECP2 gene. Several mouse models of RTT have been developed with Mecp2 disruptions. Although the mouse models are widely used in RTT research, results obtained need to be validated in other species. Therefore, we performed these studies to characterize phenotypes of a novel Mecp2 −/Y rat model and compared them with the Mecp2 tm1.1Bird mouse model of RTT. Methods RTT-like phenotypes were systematica...

  6. A Systematic Review of Phenotypic Features Associated With Cardiac Troponin I Mutations in Hereditary Cardiomyopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jens; Hey, Thomas; Lambrecht, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic investigations have established that mutations in proteins of the contractile unit of the myocardium, known as the sarcomere, may be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). It has become clinical...... in relation to phenotypic features reported to be associated with mutations in cardiac troponin I (cTnI; TNNI3), which is a recognized sarcomeric disease gene in all 3 cardiomyopathies. RESULTS: The results of this review did not identify specific genotype-phenotype relations in HCM or DCM, and c...

  7. Volatile organic compounds as non-invasive markers for plant phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederbacher, B; Winkler, J B; Schnitzler, J P

    2015-09-01

    Plants emit a great variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can actively participate in plant growth and protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. VOC emissions are strongly dependent on environmental conditions; the greatest ambiguity is whether or not the predicted change in climate will influence and modify plant-pest interactions that are mediated by VOCs. The constitutive and induced emission patterns between plant genotypes, species, and taxa are highly variable and can be used as pheno(chemo)typic markers to distinguish between different origins and provenances. In recent years significant progress has been made in molecular and genetic plant breeding. However, there is actually a lack of knowledge in functionally linking genotypes and phenotypes, particularly in analyses of plant-environment interactions. Plant phenotyping, the assessment of complex plant traits such as growth, development, tolerance, resistance, etc., has become a major bottleneck, and quantitative information on genotype-environment relationships is the key to addressing major future challenges. With increasing demand to support and accelerate progress in breeding for novel traits, the plant research community faces the need to measure accurately increasingly large numbers of plants and plant traits. In this review article, we focus on the promising outlook of VOC phenotyping as a fast and non-invasive measure of phenotypic dynamics. The basic principle is to define plant phenotypes according to their disease resistance and stress tolerance, which in turn will help in improving the performance and yield of economically relevant plants. PMID:25969554

  8. Comparison of TaqMan® Array Card and MYCOTB™ with conventional phenotypic susceptibility testing in MDR-TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foongladda, S.; Banu, S.; Pholwat, S.; Gratz, J.; O-Thong, S.; Nakkerd, N.; Chinli, R.; Ferdous, S. S.; Rahman, S. M. M.; Rahman, A.; Ahmed, S.; Heysell, S.; Sariko, M.; Kibiki, G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND: Although phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) is endorsed as the standard for second-line drug testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is slow and laborious. METHODS: We evaluated the accuracy of two faster, easier methodologies that provide results for multiple drugs: a genotypic TaqMan® Array Card (TAC) and the Sensititre® MYCOTB™ plate. Both methods were tested at three central laboratories in Bangladesh, Tanzania, and Thailand with 212 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) isolates and compared with the laboratories' phenotypic method in use. RESULTS: The overall accuracy for ethambutol, streptomycin, amikacin, kanamycin, ofloxacin, and moxifloxacin vs. the phenotypic standard was 87% for TAC (range 70–99) and 88% for the MYCOTB plate (range 76–98). To adjudicate discordances, we re-defined the standard as the consensus of the three methods, against which the TAC and MYCOTB plate yielded 94–95% accuracy, while the phenotypic result yielded 93%. Some isolates with genotypic mutations and high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were phenotypically susceptible, and some isolates without mutations and low MIC were phenotypically resistant, questioning the phenotypic standard. CONCLUSIONS: In our view, the TAC, the MYCOTB plate, and the conventional phenotypic method have similar performance for second-line drugs; however, the former methods offer speed, throughput, and quantitative DST information. PMID:27393547

  9. Involvement of the modifier gene of a human Mendelian disorder in a negative selection process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jéru

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of modifier genes and characterization of their effects represent major challenges in human genetics. SAA1 is one of the few modifiers identified in humans: this gene influences the risk of renal amyloidosis (RA in patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, a Mendelian autoinflammatory disorder associated with mutations in MEFV. Indeed, the SAA1 alpha homozygous genotype and the p.Met694Val homozygous genotype at the MEFV locus are two main risk factors for RA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HERE, WE INVESTIGATED ARMENIAN FMF PATIENTS AND CONTROLS FROM TWO NEIGHBORING COUNTRIES: Armenia, where RA is frequent (24%, and Karabakh, where RA is rare (2.5%. Sequencing of MEFV revealed similar frequencies of p.Met694Val homozygotes in the two groups of patients. However, a major deficit of SAA1 alpha homozygotes was found among Karabakhian patients (4% as compared to Armenian patients (24% (p = 5.10(-5. Most importantly, we observed deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE in the two groups of patients, and unexpectedly, in opposite directions, whereas, in the two control populations, genotype distributions at this locus were similar and complied with (HWE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The excess of SAA1alpha homozygotes among Armenian patients could be explained by the recruitment of patients with severe phenotypes. In contrast, a population-based study revealed that the deficit of alpha/alpha among Karabakhian patients would result from a negative selection against carriers of this genotype. This study, which provides new insights into the role of SAA1 in the pathophysiology of FMF, represents the first example of deviations from HWE and selection involving the modifier gene of a Mendelian disorder.

  10. Meta-analysis of melanin-concentrating hormone signaling-deficient mice on behavioral and metabolic phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenkichi Takase

    Full Text Available The demand for meta-analyses in basic biomedical research has been increasing because the phenotyping of genetically modified mice does not always produce consistent results. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH has been reported to be involved in a variety of behaviors that include feeding, body-weight regulation, anxiety, sleep, and reward behavior. However, the reported behavioral and metabolic characteristics of MCH signaling-deficient mice, such as MCH-deficient mice and MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1-deficient mice, are not consistent with each other. In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis of the published data related to MCH-deficient and MCHR1-deficient mice to obtain robust conclusions about the role of MCH signaling. Overall, the meta-analysis revealed that the deletion of MCH signaling enhanced wakefulness, locomotor activity, aggression, and male sexual behavior and that MCH signaling deficiency suppressed non-REM sleep, anxiety, responses to novelty, startle responses, and conditioned place preferences. In contrast to the acute orexigenic effect of MCH, MCH signaling deficiency significantly increased food intake. Overall, the meta-analysis also revealed that the deletion of MCH signaling suppressed the body weight, fat mass, and plasma leptin, while MCH signaling deficiency increased the body temperature, oxygen consumption, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure. The lean phenotype of the MCH signaling-deficient mice was also confirmed in separate meta-analyses that were specific to sex and background strain (i.e., C57BL/6 and 129Sv. MCH signaling deficiency caused a weak anxiolytic effect as assessed with the elevated plus maze and the open field test but also caused a weak anxiogenic effect as assessed with the emergence test. MCH signaling-deficient mice also exhibited increased plasma corticosterone under non-stressed conditions, which suggests enhanced activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. To the best of our

  11. Deriving modified rankin scores from medical records

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, T J; Ray, G.; Atula, S.; Walters, M.R.; Dawson, J.; Lees, K R

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Modified Rankin score (mRS) is traditionally graded using a face-to-face or telephone interview. Certain stroke assessment scales can be derived from a review of a patient’s case-record alone. We hypothesized that mRS could be successfully derived from the narrative within patient case-records. Methods: Sequential patients attending our cerebrovascular outpatient clinic were included. Two independent, blinded clinicians, trained in mRS, assessed case-records to der...

  12. Image segmentation by background extraction refinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Arturo A.; Mitchell, O. Robert

    1990-01-01

    An image segmentation method refining background extraction in two phases is presented. In the first phase, the method detects homogeneous-background blocks and estimates the local background to be extracted throughout the image. A block is classified homogeneous if its left and right standard deviations are small. The second phase of the method refines background extraction in nonhomogeneous blocks by recomputing the shoulder thresholds. Rules that predict the final background extraction are derived by observing the behavior of successive background statistical measurements in the regions under the presence of dark and/or bright object pixels. Good results are shown for a number of outdoor scenes.

  13. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  14. Genotypic and Phenotypic Analysis of Fasciola Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SN Mosavinasab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: To identify the fasciolid species by morphometric and molecular methods in Zanjan, north­west of Iran. "nMethods: Adult Fasciola worms (n=584 were obtained from cattle and sheep in Zanjan slaughterhouse in 2007. Living flukes were washed, then worms' images were taken by 3CCD camera and finally apical zone of each worm was obtained. Morphometric values such as body length, body width, body area, body pe­rimeter and the distance between ventral sucker and posterior end of body were obtained using Auto­CAD image analysis software. Total gDNA was extracted from individual flukes by modified phenol-chloroform method. PCR amplification of ITS2 fragment was performed the isolated DNA samples and the amplicons were consequently subjected to RFLP assay and nucleotide sequencing to distinguish be­tween fasciolid species. "nResults: Mean of morphometric values in flukes from sheep was greater than those of cattle. Accordingly, the identified species included 31% F. hepatica-like, 7% F. gigantica-like and 62% intermediate forms. How­ever, ITS2 fragment of 535 amplified specimens, showed no variation at the species-specific nucleo­tide sites 230, 340 and 341. The amplified fragment composed of partial 5.8S sequence (62bp, the com­plete ITS2 sequence (361bp and partial 28S sequence (34bp. The nucleotide contents of ITS2 region were 69 A, 116 T, 81 C and 95 G and the average G+C content was approximately 49%. Comparing of ITS2 sequences with the BLAST GenBank database, also confirmed that all specimens were F. hepatica. "nConclusion: A simple and rapid PCR-RFLP assay can be used for distinguishing between these species.

  15. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: Are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit;

    2010-01-01

    . Methods: Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity of...

  16. Kinetics of spontaneous baryogenesis in non-stationary background

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzova, Elena; Novikov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Generation of the cosmological baryon asymmetry in frameworks of spontaneous baryogenesis is studied in detail. It is shown that the relation between baryonic chemical potential and the time derivative of the (pseudo)Goldstone field essentially depends upon the representation chosen for the fermionic fields with non-zero baryonic number (quarks). Kinetic equation is modified and numerically solved in equilibrium for the case of time dependent external background or finite integration time to be applicable to the case when energy conservation law is formally violated.

  17. Phenotypic and genetic consequences of protein damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Krisko

    Full Text Available Although the genome contains all the information necessary for maintenance and perpetuation of life, it is the proteome that repairs, duplicates and expresses the genome and actually performs most cellular functions. Here we reveal strong phenotypes of physiological oxidative proteome damage at the functional and genomic levels. Genome-wide mutations rates and biosynthetic capacity were monitored in real time, in single Escherichia coli cells with identical levels of reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage, but with different levels of irreversible oxidative proteome damage (carbonylation. Increased protein carbonylation correlates with a mutator phenotype, whereas reducing it below wild type level produces an anti-mutator phenotype identifying proteome damage as the leading cause of spontaneous mutations. Proteome oxidation elevates also UV-light induced mutagenesis and impairs cellular biosynthesis. In conclusion, protein damage reduces the efficacy and precision of vital cellular processes resulting in high mutation rates and functional degeneracy akin to cellular aging.

  18. Regulatory mechanisms link phenotypic plasticity to evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J

    2016-01-01

    Organisms have a remarkable capacity to respond to environmental change. They can either respond directly, by means of phenotypic plasticity, or they can slowly adapt through evolution. Yet, how phenotypic plasticity links to evolutionary adaptability is largely unknown. Current studies of plasticity tend to adopt a phenomenological reaction norm (RN) approach, which neglects the mechanisms underlying plasticity. Focusing on a concrete question - the optimal timing of bacterial sporulation - we here also consider a mechanistic approach, the evolution of a gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying plasticity. Using individual-based simulations, we compare the RN and GRN approach and find a number of striking differences. Most importantly, the GRN model results in a much higher diversity of responsive strategies than the RN model. We show that each of the evolved strategies is pre-adapted to a unique set of unseen environmental conditions. The regulatory mechanisms that control plasticity therefore critically link phenotypic plasticity to the adaptive potential of biological populations. PMID:27087393

  19. Constraints on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murren, Courtney J; Auld, Josh R.; Callahan, Hilary S;

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is ubiquitous and generally regarded as a key mechanism for enabling organisms to survive in the face of environmental change. Because no organism is infinitely or ideally plastic, theory suggests that there must be limits (for example, the lack of ability to produce an...... optimal trait) to the evolution of phenotypic plasticity, or that plasticity may have inherent significant costs. Yet numerous experimental studies have not detected widespread costs. Explicitly differentiating plasticity costs from phenotype costs, we re-evaluate fundamental questions of the limits to...... the evolution of plasticity and of generalists vs specialists. We advocate for the view that relaxed selection and variable selection intensities are likely more important constraints to the evolution of plasticity than the costs of plasticity. Some forms of plasticity, such as learning, may be...

  20. Delineating the GRIN1 phenotypic spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Johannes R; Geider, Kirsten; Helbig, Katherine L; Heyne, Henrike O; Schütz, Hannah; Hentschel, Julia; Courage, Carolina; Depienne, Christel; Nava, Caroline; Heron, Delphine; Møller, Rikke S; Hjalgrim, Helle; Lal, Dennis; Neubauer, Bernd A; Nürnberg, Peter; Thiele, Holger; Kurlemann, Gerhard; Arnold, Georgianne L; Bhambhani, Vikas; Bartholdi, Deborah; Pedurupillay, Christeen Ramane J; Misceo, Doriana; Frengen, Eirik; Strømme, Petter; Dlugos, Dennis J; Doherty, Emily S; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A; Hoffer, Mariette J V; Goldstein, Amy; Rajan, Deepa S; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ramsey, Keri; Belnap, Newell; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Richholt, Ryan; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Sá, Joaquim; Mendonça, Carla; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Hardies, Katia; De Jonghe, Peter; De Meirleir, Linda; Milh, Mathieu; Badens, Catherine; Lebrun, Marine; Busa, Tiffany; Francannet, Christine; Piton, Amélie; Riesch, Erik; Biskup, Saskia; Vogt, Heinrich; Dorn, Thomas; Helbig, Ingo; Michaud, Jacques L; Laube, Bodo; Syrbe, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the phenotypic spectrum caused by mutations in GRIN1 encoding the NMDA receptor subunit GluN1 and to investigate their underlying functional pathophysiology. METHODS: We collected molecular and clinical data from several diagnostic and research cohorts. Functional conseque......OBJECTIVE: To determine the phenotypic spectrum caused by mutations in GRIN1 encoding the NMDA receptor subunit GluN1 and to investigate their underlying functional pathophysiology. METHODS: We collected molecular and clinical data from several diagnostic and research cohorts. Functional...... impairment as well as oculomotor and movement disorders being discriminating phenotypic features. Loss of NMDA receptor function appears to be the underlying disease mechanism. The identification of both heterozygous and homozygous mutations blurs the borders of dominant and recessive inheritance of GRIN1...

  1. Rational elicitation of cold-sensitive phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Chetana; Majhi, Sandipan; Mondal, Kajari; Bhattacharjee, Antara; VijayRaghavan, K; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-05-01

    Cold-sensitive phenotypes have helped us understand macromolecular assembly and biological phenomena, yet few attempts have been made to understand the basis of cold sensitivity or to elicit it by design. We report a method for rational design of cold-sensitive phenotypes. The method involves generation of partial loss-of-function mutants, at either buried or functional sites, coupled with selective overexpression strategies. The only essential input is amino acid sequence, although available structural information can be used as well. The method has been used to elicit cold-sensitive mutants of a variety of proteins, both monomeric and dimeric, and in multiple organisms, namely Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Drosophila melanogaster This simple, yet effective technique of inducing cold sensitivity eliminates the need for complex mutations and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for eliciting cold-sensitive phenotypes. PMID:27091994

  2. Accoustic background of BN-600 steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the results of accoustic background for BN-600 steam generator in nominal operating conditions are presented. The 1-200 kHz accoustic background of evaporator and reheater modules are given

  3. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process......This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic variations within a single bacteriophage species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulakov Leonid

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although horizontal gene transfer plays a pivotal role in bacteriophage evolution, many lytic phage genomes are clearly shaped by vertical evolution. We investigated the influence of minor genomic deletions and insertions on various phage-related phenotypic and serological properties. Findings We collected ten different isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage ϕKMV. All sequenced genomes (42-43 kb, long direct terminal repeats are nearly identical, which intuitively implied strongly similar infections cycles. However, their latent periods vary between 21 and 28 minutes and they are able to lyse between 5 and 58% of a collection of 107 clinical P. aeruginosa strains. We also noted that phages with identical tail structures displayed profound differences in host spectra. Moreover, point mutations in tail and spike proteins were sufficient to evade neutralization by two phage-specific antisera, isolated from rabbits. Conclusion Although all analyzed phages are 83-97% identical at the genome level, they display a surprisingly large variation in various phenotypic properties. The small overlap in host spectrum and their ability to readily escape immune defences against a nearly identical phage are promising elements for the application of these phages in phage therapy.

  5. Background subtraction using probabilistic event weights

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yadi; Liu, Beijiang; Shen, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ziping

    2014-01-01

    Background treatment is crucial to extract physics from precision experiments. In this paper, we introduce a novel method to assign each event a signal probability. This could then be used to weight the event's contribution to the likelihood during fitting. To illustrate the effect of this method, we test it with MC samples. The consistence between the constructed background and the background from MC truth shows that the background subtraction method with probabilistic event weights is feasi...

  6. Radiative emission of neutrino pair free of quantum electrodynamic backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme of quantum electrodynamic (QED) background-free radiative emission of a neutrino pair (RENP) is proposed in order to achieve precision determination of neutrino properties so far not accessible. The important point for the background rejection is the fact that the dispersion relation between the wave vector along the propagating direction in the wave guide (and in a photonic-crystal-type fiber) and the frequency is modified by a discretized non-vanishing effective mass. This effective mass acts as a cutoff of allowed frequencies, and one may select the RENP photon energy region free of all macro-coherently amplified QED processes by choosing the cutoff larger than the mass of neutrinos

  7. Pharmacogenetics of antipsychotic-induced movement disorders as a resource for better understanding Parkinson's disease modifier genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior eGreenbaum

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic-induced movement disorders are major side effects of antipsychotic drugs among schizophrenia patients, and include antipsychotic-induced parkinsonism (AIP and tardive dyskinesia (TD. Substantial pharmacogenetic work has been done in this field, and several susceptibility variants have been suggested. In this paper, the genetics of antipsychotic-induced movement disorders is considered in a broader context. We hypothesize that genetic variants that are risk factors for AIP and TD may provide insights into the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD. Since loss of dopaminergic stimulation (albeit pharmacological in AIP and degenerative in PD is shared by the two clinical entities, genes associated with susceptibility to AIP may be modifier genes that influence clinical expression of PD sub-phenotypes, such as age at onset, disease severity or rate of progression. This is due to their possible functional influence on compensatory mechanisms for striatal dopamine loss. Better compensatory potential might be beneficial at the early and later stages of the PD course. AIP vulnerability variants may also be related to latent impairment in the nigrostriatal pathway, affecting its functionality, and leading to subclinical dopaminergic deficits in the striatum. Susceptibility of PD patients to early development of L-dopa induced dyskinesia (LID, is an additional relevant sub-phenotype. LID may share a common genetic background with TD, with which it shares clinical features. Genetic risk variants may predispose to both phenotypes, exerting a pleiotropic effect. According to this hypothesis, elucidating the genetics of antipsychotic-induced movement disorders may advance our understanding of multiple aspects of PD and it clinical course, rendering this a potentially rewarding field of study.

  8. Beam-Generated Detector Backgrounds at CESR

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Stuart; Cinabro, David

    2000-01-01

    The CESR/CLEO Phase II interaction region is described. The operational experience with beam-generated detector backgrounds is reviewed. The status of our understanding of beam-generated detector backgrounds at CESR is described and comparisons of background measurements with simulation predictions are presented.

  9. On high energy scattering inside gravitational backgrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Nastase, Horatiu

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the high energy scattering inside gravitational backgrounds using 't Hooft's formalism. The scattering is equivalent to geodesic shifts accross Aichelburg-Sexl waves inside the gravitational backgrounds. We find solutions for A-S waves inside various backgrounds and analyze them.

  10. Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy using secondary modifiers of the dystrophic phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Abmayr, Simone

    2005-01-01

    The absence of dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy causes sarcolemmal instability and renders muscle fibers susceptible to contraction-induced injury. Muscle repair mechanisms cannot compensate for progressive muscle degeneration, leading to a gradual replacement of muscle with adipose and connective tissue. Viral vectors have been successfully used to deliver dystrophin cDNA to dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, leading to a partial functional and morphological recovery of dystrophic mus...

  11. Infant rat infection modifies phenotypic properties of an invasive nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    OpenAIRE

    Tsao, David; Nelson, Kevin L.; Kim, Daniel; Smith, Arnold L.

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing the virulence trait of a specific bacterium in an animal model is often performed prior to the use of the strain for ex vivo human studies, such as reactivity with complement and antibody, or with phagocytic cells. For example, in S. penumoniae mouse passage is used to enhance capsule production. While investigating an unusual serum-resistant unencapsulated H. influenzae (R2866), we found that animal passage yielded an isolate (R3392) which had decreased resistance to human serum, b...

  12. Phenotypic and functional markers for 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)-modified regulatory dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A W; Holmstrøm, K; Jensen, S S; Fuchs, D; Rasmussen, S; Kvistborg, P; Claesson, M H; Zocca, M-B

    2009-01-01

    The clinical use of dendritic cells (DCs) to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance has been hampered by the lack of a widely acknowledged method for generating human regulatory DCs but even more so by the non-existence of reliable markers. Thus, we set out to find reliable markers that can be...

  13. Significance of Lewis Phenotyping Using Saliva and Gastric Tissue: Comparison with the Lewis Phenotype Inferred from Lewis and Secretor Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ji Hong

    2014-01-01

    , and le59 alleles was 74.6%, 21.3%, 3.1%, and 1.0%, respectively, among 418 alleles. The saliva Lewis phenotype was completely consistent with the Lewis phenotype inferred from Lewis and Secretor genotypes, but that of gastric mucosa could not be predicted from genotypes. Lewis phenotyping using erythrocytes is only adequate for transfusion needs. Saliva testing for the Lewis phenotype is a more reliable method for determining the peripheral Lewis phenotype of an individual and the gastric Lewis phenotype must be used for the study on the association between Helicobacter pylori and the Lewis phenotype.

  14. Modifiable Combining Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Paul; Shafer, Glenn; Shenoy, Prakash P.

    2013-01-01

    Modifiable combining functions are a synthesis of two common approaches to combining evidence. They offer many of the advantages of these approaches and avoid some disadvantages. Because they facilitate the acquisition, representation, explanation, and modification of knowledge about combinations of evidence, they are proposed as a tool for knowledge engineers who build systems that reason under uncertainty, not as a normative theory of evidence.

  15. SOME STRANGE FINDINGS: NON - INTERPRETABLE PATTERNS IN MODIFIED HODGE TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayashree

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Many clinically relevant species of Gram - negative bacilli are often resistant to β - lactam antibiotics even to c arbapenems. According to CLS I guideline 2013, Carbapenemase producers are screened by zone size <21mm to Meropenem or Etrapenem and phenotypically confirmed by Modified Hodge test. The test of Hodge et al was modified by substituting Escherichia coli for penicillin - susceptible Staphy lococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and 10 - μg Imipenem disk for a 10 - U Penicillin disk. While looking for the Carbapenemase producing strains, some astonishing, unexplainable facts were revealed in this study. Meropenem - resistant test strains were screened (zone d iameter in Modified Kirby - Bauer technique<21mm & for phenotypic confirmation of Carbapenemase production, modified Hodge test was performed. Thereafter the test strains were examined for production of Metallo β Lactamase using Imipenem (10μg disk and com bination of Imipenem and EDTA, followed by test for Bacteriocin production. Two Acinetobacter and one Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were found to produce a Star like outward distortion. They did not produce Metallo β lactamase. Moreover, screening test fo r bacteriocin production was also found to be negative. The strains resistant to Carbapenem antibiotics but nonproducers of metallo β lactamase and/or Bacteriocins, have left behind a head twister for us

  16. An expanded model of HIV cell entry phenotype based on multi-parameter single-cell data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozek Katarzyna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 into the host cell involves interactions between the viral envelope glycoproteins (Env and the cellular receptor CD4 as well as a coreceptor molecule (most importantly CCR5 or CXCR4. Viral preference for a specific coreceptor (tropism is in particular determined by the third variable loop (V3 of the Env glycoprotein gp120. The approval and use of a coreceptor antagonist for antiretroviral therapy make detailed understanding of tropism and its accurate prediction from patient derived virus isolates essential. The aim of the present study is the development of an extended description of the HIV entry phenotype reflecting its co-dependence on several key determinants as the basis for a more accurate prediction of HIV-1 entry phenotype from genotypic data. Results Here, we established a new protocol of quantitation and computational analysis of the dependence of HIV entry efficiency on receptor and coreceptor cell surface levels as well as viral V3 loop sequence and the presence of two prototypic coreceptor antagonists in varying concentrations. Based on data collected at the single-cell level, we constructed regression models of the HIV-1 entry phenotype integrating the measured determinants. We developed a multivariate phenotype descriptor, termed phenotype vector, which facilitates a more detailed characterization of HIV entry phenotypes than currently used binary tropism classifications. For some of the tested virus variants, the multivariant phenotype vector revealed substantial divergences from existing tropism predictions. We also developed methods for computational prediction of the entry phenotypes based on the V3 sequence and performed an extrapolating calculation of the effectiveness of this computational procedure. Conclusions Our study of the HIV cell entry phenotype and the novel multivariate representation developed here contributes to a more detailed

  17. The expanding phenotypic spectra of kidney diseases: insights from genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokman, Marijn F; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Giles, Rachel H; Schaefer, Franz; Knoers, Nine V A M; van Eerde, Albertien M

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has led to the identification of previously unrecognized phenotypes associated with classic kidney disease genes. In addition to improving diagnostics for genetically heterogeneous diseases and enabling a faster rate of gene discovery, NGS has enabled an expansion and redefinition of nephrogenetic disease categories. Findings from these studies raise the question of whether disease diagnoses should be made on clinical grounds, on genetic evidence or a combination thereof. Here, we discuss the major kidney disease-associated genes and gene categories for which NGS has expanded the phenotypic spectrum. For example, COL4A3-5 genes, which are classically associated with Alport syndrome, are now understood to also be involved in the aetiology of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. DGKE, which is associated with nephrotic syndrome, is also mutated in patients with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. We examine how a shared genetic background between diverse clinical phenotypes can provide insight into the function of genes and novel links with essential pathophysiological mechanisms. In addition, we consider genetic and epigenetic factors that contribute to the observed phenotypic heterogeneity of kidney diseases and discuss the challenges in the interpretation of genetic data. Finally, we discuss the implications of the expanding phenotypic spectra associated with kidney disease genes for clinical practice, genetic counselling and personalized care, and present our recommendations for the use of NGS-based tests in routine nephrology practice. PMID:27374918

  18. phenosim - A software to simulate phenotypes for testing in genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawenda Inka

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a great interest in understanding the genetic architecture of complex traits in natural populations. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS are becoming routine in human, animal and plant genetics to understand the connection between naturally occurring genotypic and phenotypic variation. Coalescent simulations are commonly used in population genetics to simulate genotypes under different parameters and demographic models. Results Here, we present phenosim, a software to add a phenotype to genotypes generated in time-efficient coalescent simulations. Both qualitative and quantitative phenotypes can be generated and it is possible to partition phenotypic variation between additive effects and epistatic interactions between causal variants. The output formats of phenosim are directly usable as input for different GWAS tools. The applicability of phenosim is shown by simulating a genome-wide association study in Arabidopsis thaliana. Conclusions By using the coalescent approach to generate genotypes and phenosim to add phenotypes, the data sets can be used to assess the influence of various factors such as demography, genetic architecture or selection on the statistical power of association methods to detect causal genetic variants under a wide variety of population genetic scenarios. phenosim is freely available from the authors' website http://evoplant.uni-hohenheim.de

  19. phenosim - A software to simulate phenotypes for testing in genome-wide association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a great interest in understanding the genetic architecture of complex traits in natural populations. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are becoming routine in human, animal and plant genetics to understand the connection between naturally occurring genotypic and phenotypic variation. Coalescent simulations are commonly used in population genetics to simulate genotypes under different parameters and demographic models. Results Here, we present phenosim, a software to add a phenotype to genotypes generated in time-efficient coalescent simulations. Both qualitative and quantitative phenotypes can be generated and it is possible to partition phenotypic variation between additive effects and epistatic interactions between causal variants. The output formats of phenosim are directly usable as input for different GWAS tools. The applicability of phenosim is shown by simulating a genome-wide association study in Arabidopsis thaliana. Conclusions By using the coalescent approach to generate genotypes and phenosim to add phenotypes, the data sets can be used to assess the influence of various factors such as demography, genetic architecture or selection on the statistical power of association methods to detect causal genetic variants under a wide variety of population genetic scenarios. phenosim is freely available from the authors' website http://evoplant.uni-hohenheim.de PMID:21714868

  20. Phenotype as Agent for Epigenetic Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2016-01-01

    The conventional understanding of phenotype is as a derivative of descent with modification through Darwinian random mutation and natural selection. Recent research has revealed Lamarckian inheritance as a major transgenerational mechanism for environmental action on genomes whose extent is determined, in significant part, by germ line cells during meiosis and subsequent stages of embryological development. In consequence, the role of phenotype can productively be reconsidered. The possibility that phenotype is directed towards the effective acquisition of epigenetic marks in consistent reciprocation with the environment during the life cycle of an organism is explored. It is proposed that phenotype is an active agent in niche construction for the active acquisition of epigenetic marks as a dominant evolutionary mechanism rather than a consequence of Darwinian selection towards reproductive success. The reproductive phase of the life cycle can then be appraised as a robust framework in which epigenetic inheritance is entrained to affect growth and development in continued reciprocal responsiveness to environmental stresses. Furthermore, as first principles of physiology determine the limits of epigenetic inheritance, a coherent justification can thereby be provided for the obligate return of all multicellular eukaryotes to the unicellular state. PMID:27399791

  1. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  2. Cognitive Phenotype of Velocardiofacial Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furniss, Frederick; Biswas, Asit B.; Gumber, Rohit; Singh, Niraj

    2011-01-01

    The behavioural phenotype of velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), one of the most common human multiple anomaly syndromes, includes developmental disabilities, frequently including intellectual disability (ID) and high risk of diagnosis of psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. VCFS may offer a model of the relationship between ID and risk of…

  3. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biessels, G J; Bril, V; Calcutt, N A;

    2014-01-01

    NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy. The...

  4. Genetical metabolomics: closing in on phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keurentjes, J.J.B.

    2009-01-01

    One of the long-standing goals in plant biology has been to link genotypic variation to natural variation in plant development and adaptive traits. From recent studies it has become clear that a complex interacting network is underlying phenotypic diversity. A major role in this regulatory mechanism

  5. Advances in Phenotyping of Functional Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    In plants, functional traits are morphological, biochemical, physiological, structural, phenological, or behavioral characteristics that are expressed in phenotypes of individual plants,that are relevant to the plant’s role in the ecosystem or its agronomic performance. By themselves, functional tra...

  6. Phenotyping for Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benhilda Masuka; Jose Luis Araus; Biswanath Das; Kai Sonder; Jill E. Cairns

    2012-01-01

    The ability to quickly develop germplasm having tolerance to several complex polygenic inherited abiotic and biotic stresses combined is critical to the resilience of cropping systems in the face of climate change.Molecular breeding offers the tools to accelerate cereal breeding; however,suitable phenotyping protocols are essential to ensure that the much-anticipated benefits of molecular breeding can be realized.To facilitate the full potential of molecular tools,greater emphasis needs to be given to reducing the within-experimental site variability,application of stress and characterization of the environment and appropriate phenotyping tools.Yield is a function of many processes throughout the plant cycle,and thus integrative traits that encompass crop performance over time or organization level (i.e.canopy level) will provide a better alternative to instantaneous measurements which provide only a snapshot of a given plant process.Many new phenotyping tools based on remote sensing are now available including non-destructive measurements of growth-related parameters based on spectral reflectance and infrared thermometry to estimate plant water status.Here we describe key field phenotyping protocols for maize with emphasis on tolerance to drought and low nitrogen.

  7. Behavioural Phenotypes in Disability Research: Historical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodey, C. F.

    2006-01-01

    Western medicine has a long history of accounting for behaviour by reducing the body to ultimate explanatory entities. In pre-modern medicine these were invisible "animal spirits" circulating the body. In modern medicine, they are "genes". Both raise questions. The psychological phenotype is defined by human consensus, varying according to time…

  8. Lubiprostone ameliorates the cystic fibrosis mouse intestinal phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Lisle Robert C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene that impair the function of CFTR, a cAMP-regulated anion channel. In the small intestine loss of CFTR function creates a dehydrated, acidic luminal environment which is believed to cause an accumulation of mucus, a phenotype characteristic of CF. CF mice have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, an altered innate immune response, and impaired intestinal transit. We investigated whether lubiprostone, which can activate the CLC2 Cl- channel, would improve the intestinal phenotype in CF mice. Methods Cftrtm1UNC (CF and wildtype (WT littermate mice on the C57BL/6J background were used. Lubiprostone (10 μg/kg-day was administered by gavage for two weeks. Mucus accumulation was estimated from crypt lumen widths in periodic acid-Schiff base, Alcian blue stained sections. Luminal bacterial load was measured by qPCR for the bacterial 16S gene. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in fasted mice were assessed using gavaged rhodamine dextran. Gene expression was evaluated by Affymetrix Mouse430 2.0 microarray and qRT-PCR. Results Crypt width in control CF mice was 700% that of WT mice (P P = 0.001. Lubiprostone increased bacterial load in WT mice to 490% of WT control levels (P = 0.008. Conversely, lubiprostone decreased bacterial overgrowth in CF mice by 60% (P = 0.005. Lubiprostone increased gastric emptying at 20 min postgavage in both WT (P P P = 0.024 but not in CF mice (P = 0.377. Among other innate immune markers, expression of mast cell genes was elevated 4-to 40-fold in the CF intestine as compared to WT, and lubiprostone treatment of CF mice decreased expression to WT control levels. Conclusions These results indicate that lubiprostone has some benefits for the CF intestinal phenotype, especially on bacterial overgrowth and the innate immune response. The unexpected observation of increased mucus accumulation in the crypts of lubiprostone-treated CF mice

  9. Phenotypic extremes in rare variant study designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Gina M; Rader, Daniel J; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    Currently, next-generation sequencing studies aim to identify rare and low-frequency variation that may contribute to disease. For a given effect size, as the allele frequency decreases, the power to detect genes or variants of interest also decreases. Although many methods have been proposed for the analysis of such data, study design and analytic issues still persist in data interpretation. In this study we present sequencing data for ABCA1 that has known rare variants associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). We contrast empirical findings from two study designs: a phenotypic extreme sample and a population-based random sample. We found differing strengths of association with HDL-C across the two study designs (P=0.0006 with n=701 phenotypic extremes vs P=0.03 with n=1600 randomly sampled individuals). To explore this apparent difference in evidence for association, we performed a simulation study focused on the impact of phenotypic selection on power. We demonstrate that the power gain for an extreme phenotypic selection study design is much greater in rare variant studies than for studies of common variants. Our study confirms that studying phenotypic extremes is critical in rare variant studies because it boosts power in two ways: the typical increases from extreme sampling and increasing the proportion of relevant functional variants ascertained and thereby tested for association. Furthermore, we show that when combining statistical evidence through meta-analysis from an extreme-selected sample and a second separate population-based random sample, power is lower when a traditional sample size weighting is used compared with weighting by the noncentrality parameter. PMID:26350511

  10. Association between the Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype, Prediabetes, and Diabetes Mellitus in Rural Chinese Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective was to evaluate the association of the hypertriglyceridemic waist (HTGW phenotype with prediabetes and diabetes (DM in rural Chinese population. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 11,579 adults (5361 men and 6218 women aged 35 years or older were recruited from rural areas of China. Anthropometric measurements, laboratory examinations and self-reported information were collected by trained personnel. The HTGW phenotype was defined as elevated triglycerides and elevated waist circumference. We used logistic regression analysis to evaluate the associations of interest. Results: Adults with the HTGW phenotype had a significantly higher prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes than those without the HTGW phenotype. Compared with the normal waist-normal triglycerides (NWNT group, those in the HTGW group had a higher adjusted odds ratio of diabetes (OR: 2.10; 95% CI: 1.62–2.73. The association for diabetes was stronger for men (OR: 2.27; 95% CI: 1.52–3.40 than for women (OR: 1.86; 95% CI: 1.32–2.63. However, multivariate analysis indicated that the HTGW phenotype was not associated with prediabetes. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the HTGW phenotype was associated with diabetes in a large rural Chinese population, and suggested this phenotype as a simple screening tool to identify adults with cardiometabolic conditions.

  11. A single point-mutation within the melanophilin gene causes the lavender plumage colour dilution phenotype in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tixier-Boichard Michèle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lavender phenotype in the chicken causes the dilution of both black (eumelanin and red/brown (phaeomelanin pigments. Defects in three genes involved in intracellular melanosomal transport, previously described in mammals, give rise to similar diluted pigmentation phenotypes as those seen in lavender chickens. Results We have used a candidate-gene approach based on an expectation of homology with mammals to isolate a gene involved in pigmentation in chicken. Comparative sequence analysis of candidate genes in the chicken identified a strong association between a mutation in the MLPH gene and the diluted pigmentation phenotype. This mutation results in the amino acid change R35W, at a site also associated with similar phenotypes in mice, humans and cats. Conclusion This is the first time that an avian species with a mutation in the MLPH gene has been reported.

  12. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry. PMID:26906932

  13. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with tip-modified propellers and the methods which, over a period of two decades, have been applied to develop such propellers. The development is driven by the urge to increase the efficiency of propellers and can be seen as analogous to fitting end plates and winglets to aircraft...... wings. The literature on four different designs is reviewed: the end-plate propeller; the two-sided, shifted end-plate propeller; the tip-fin propeller; and the bladelet propeller. The conclusion is that it is indeed possible to design tip-modified propellers that, relative to an optimum conventional...... propeller, have efficiency increases of a reasonable magnitude in both open-water and behind-ship conditions....

  14. Extragalactic Background Light: Measurements and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light (EBL) intensity from gamma-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in the wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centered at 1 microns, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar system. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving Gamma-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 microns established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the path for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimeter observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy for...

  15. Environmental background assessment: basic principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background assessment is crucial in setting remediation and management goals, in identifying contamination trends and in providing screening tools for the selection of contaminants of concern. Legal requirements and guideline documents place great emphasis onto the establishment of background levels. This contribution discusses background estimates for metals and organics in relation to bioavailability and to its potential impact onto living systems. Methods for defining background in Environmental Risk Assessment are provided by the US EPA and by the Dutch Added Risk Approach. Cited case studies, taken from projects carried out in Italy and abroad, show that practical approaches vary significantly. A standardised database of soil, sediment and water background levels for different contaminants, as well as a more comprehensive guideline of background assessment, are urgently needed

  16. Perturbative Double Field Theory on General Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Hohm, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    We develop the perturbation theory of double field theory around arbitrary solutions of its field equations. The exact gauge transformations are written in a manifestly background covariant way and contain at most quadratic terms in the field fluctuations. We expand the generalized curvature scalar to cubic order in fluctuations and thereby determine the cubic action in a manifestly background covariant form. As a first application we specialize this theory to group manifold backgrounds, such as $SU(2) \\simeq S^3$ with $H$-flux. In the full string theory this corresponds to a WZW background CFT. Starting from closed string field theory, the cubic action around such backgrounds has been computed before by Blumenhagen, Hassler and L\\"ust. We establish precise agreement with the cubic action derived from double field theory. This result confirms that double field theory is applicable to arbitrary curved background solutions, disproving assertions in the literature to the contrary.

  17. CMB with the background primordial magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Dai G

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the background primordial magnetic field (PMF) on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The sound speed of the tightly coupled photon-baryon fluid is increased by the background PMF. The increased sound speed causes the odd peaks of the CMB temperature fluctuations to be suppressed and the CMB peak positions to be shifted to a larger scale. The background PMF causes a stronger decaying potential and increases the amplitude of the CMB. These two effects of the background PMF on a smaller scale cancel out, and the overall effects of the background PMF are the suppression of the CMB around the first peak and the shifting of peaks to a large scale. We also discuss obtaining information about the PMF generation mechanisms, and we examine the nonlinear evolution of the PMF by the constraint on the maximum scale for the PMF distributions. Finally, we discuss degeneracies between the PMF parameters and the standard cosmological parameters.

  18. Modified entropic gravity revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tower

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by Verlinde's idea, some modified versions of entropic gravity have appeared in the literature. Extending them in a unified formalism, we derive the generalized gravitational equations accordingly. From gravitational equations, the energy-momentum conservation law and cosmological equations are investigated. The covariant conservation law of energy-momentum tensor severely constrains viable modifications of entropic gravity. A discrepancy arises when two independent methods are appli...

  19. Endemic species have highly integrated phenotypes, environmental distributions and phenotype-environment relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermant, M.; Prinzing, A.; Vernon, P.; Convey, P.; Hennion, F.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: Abiotic environmental gradients; endemism level; functional biogeography; island biogeography; Kerguelen Islands; life-history traits; multi-species comparison; phenotypic integration; range size; sub-Antarctic Abstract Aim: Why are some species geographically restricted? Ecological explan

  20. Health-related phenotypes and longevity in Danish twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Culminskaya, Irina V;

    2009-01-01

    Aging studies can be facilitated by refocusing from longevity phenotypes to their proxies (intermediate phenotypes). Robust selection of the intermediate phenotypes requires data on such phenotypes and life span measured in the same individuals, which is not always the case in aging studies. A...... promising approach is to select intermediate phenotypes using information on longevity measured in related individuals. We evaluated feasibility of this approach focusing on 32 geriatric diseases as potential intermediate phenotypes of longevity assessed in the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins. Our...

  1. Genetically Modified Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claro Llaguno

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have brought to public attention concerns about Bt corn and genetically modified organisms (GMO in general. The timing, it seems, is most appropriate considering two related developments early this year: the final approval of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety in Montreal on January 29, 2001, and the OECD Edinburgh Conference on GM food safety last February 28- March 1, 2001. The protocol makes clear that GMOs include all living modified organisms (LMO defined as "any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology". This includes seeds, live fish, and other organisms intentionally obtained for release to the environment. It would seem that the common understanding about GMOs as referring to farm-to-table products is perforce expanded to embrace genetically modified farm animals and aquatic resources. Being a trade agreement, the Montreal accord primarily deals with the safety issues related to the transboundary movement of LMOs around the globe. The OECD conference on the other hand, called for an international body "to address all sides of the GM debate" in response to the public outcry, particularly in Western Europe, regarding the risks the new products pose to human health and the environment. Some points of contention, which remain unresolved, include issues such as whether countries should be allowed to develop their own GM food based on their needs, and whether a global moratorium on GMOs and mandatory labeling should be enforced worldwide.

  2. Modified entropic force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration gD. It is found the Debye acceleration is gD=10-15 N kg-1. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10-4 N kg-1 which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10-10 N kg-1 felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  3. Modified Supersymmetric Dark Sectors

    CERN Document Server

    Redino, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    SUSY models with a modified dark sector require constraints to be reinterpreted, which may allow for scenarios with low tuning. A modified dark sector can also change the phenomenology greatly. The addition of the QCD axion to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) solves the strong CP problem and also modifies the dark sector with new dark matter candidates. While SUSY axion phenomenology is usually restricted to searches for the axion itself or searches for the ordinary SUSY particles, this work focuses on scenarios where the axion's superpartner, the axino may be detectable at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the decays of neutralinos displaced from the primary vertex. In particular this work focuses on the KSVZ axino. The decay length of neutralinos in this scenario easily fits the ATLAS detector for SUSY spectra expected to be testable at the 14 TeV LHC. This signature of displaced decays to axinos is compared to other well motivated scenarios containing a long lived neutralino which decays i...

  4. Improving foreground detection for adaptive background segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Huerta, Iván; Rowe, Daniel; Gonzàlez, Jordi; Villanueva, Juan J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper tries to manage with the nonincorporation of erroneous foreground objects to the background model, and the incorporation of those detected objects which cease their movement. These newly motionless foreground objects should be handled in security domains such as video surveillance. This paper uses an adaptive background modelling algorithm for moving object detection. Those detected objects which present no motion are identified and added into the background model, so that they wil...

  5. On Cultural Background Knowledge in English Reading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏琴; 郭成

    2009-01-01

    Reading comprehension is undoubtedly one of the most important abilities for English learners. This paper firstly makes a brief introduction to the reading theory and cultural background knowledge. Then using schema theory and typical examples, the paper demons~ates the role of cultural background knowledge in reading comprehension. The application of cultural background knowledge inreading practice is proposed as the keys to the improvement of reading comprehension ability.

  6. PENGARUH BACKGROUND MAHASISWA TERHADAP KINERJA AKADEMIK

    OpenAIRE

    Trianasari Angkawijaya; Yenny Sugiarti

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The Effect of Students’ Background on Academic Performance. This study examines the effect of background variables on the academic performance of accounting students in a private university in Surabaya. The background variables under study included previous academic performance, prior knowledge on accounting, sex, motivation, preparedness, and expectations. The results show that previous academic performance, motivation, and expectations have positive and significant effects on the ...

  7. Backgrounds for tagging Bs events at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final state Ds+l+anti νl+... occurring in Z0-decay is analyzed, and backgrounds to the decay chain (i) Z0→Bs+..., (ii) Bs→Ds+l+anti νl+... are estimated. A resonance description is used to model the dominant source of background, and a numerical study yields estimates for the background-to-signal ratio of several per cent as input parameters are varied. (orig.)

  8. Gauge theories with non-trivial backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Binosi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We review our most recent results in formulating gauge theories in the presence of a background field on the basis of symmetry arguments only. In particular we show how one can gain full control over the dependence on the background field of the effective action, and how the so-called background field method emerges naturally from the requirement of invariance under the BRST and antiBRST symmetries.

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI phenotypes-genotypes and antibody response to galsulfase

    OpenAIRE

    Brands, Marion M; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; Kroos, Marian A.; Nobel, Willemieke; Ruijter, George J.; Özkan, Lale; Plug, Iris; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Halley, Dicky J; van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J.

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome; MPS VI) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder in which deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase (arylsulfatase B; ARSB) leads to the storage of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in connective tissue. The genotype-phenotype correlation has been addressed in several publications but the picture is not complete. Since 2007, enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with MPS VI in ...

  10. Novel Meta-Analysis-Derived Type 2 Diabetes Risk Loci Do Not Determine Prediabetic Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Staiger, Harald; Machicao, Fausto; Kantartzis, Konstantinos; Schäfer, Silke A.; Kirchhoff, Kerstin; Guthoff, Martina; Silbernagel, Günther; Stefan, Norbert; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association (GWA) studies identified a series of novel type 2 diabetes risk loci. Most of them were subsequently demonstrated to affect insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells. Very recently, a meta-analysis of GWA data revealed nine additional risk loci with still undefined roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Using our thoroughly phenotyped cohort of subjects at an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, we assessed the association of the nine latest genetic vari...

  11. The Heritability of Hedonic Capacity and Perceived Stress: A Twin Study Evaluation of Candidate Depressive Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan, Ryan; Pizzagalli, Diego

    2008-01-01

    Background. Anhedonia and stress sensitivity have been identified as promising depressive phenotypes. Research suggests that stress-induced anhedonia is a possible mechanism underlying the association between stress and depression. The present proof-of-concept study assessed whether hedonic capacity and stress perception are heritable and whether their genetic and environmental contributions are shared. Method. Twenty monozygotic (MZ) and 15 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs completed a probabilistic...

  12. Magnifying Endoscopy with Narrow Band Imaging of Early Gastric Cancer: Correlation with Histopathology and Mucin Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ok, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Park, Do Youn; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Jeon, Hye Kyung; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Song, Geun Am

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging (ME-NBI) is a useful modality for the detailed visualization of microsurface (MS) and microvascular (MV) structures in the gastrointestinal tract. This study aimed to determine whether the MS and MV patterns in ME-NBI differ according to the histologic type, invasion depth, and mucin phenotype of early gastric cancers (EGCs). Methods The MS and MV patterns of 160 lesions in 160 patients with EGC who underwent ME-NBI before endoscop...

  13. Analysis of multiple phenotypes in genome-wide genetic mapping studies

    OpenAIRE

    Suo, C.; Toulopoulou, T; Bramon, E.; Walshe, M; Picchioni, M.; Murray, R.; Ott, J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complex traits may be defined by a range of different criteria. It would result in a loss of information to perform analyses simply on the basis of a final clinical dichotomized affected / unaffected variable. RESULTS: We assess the performance of four alternative approaches for the analysis of multiple phenotypes in genetic association studies. We describe the four methods in detail and discuss their relative theoretical merits and disadvantages. Using simulation we demonstrate t...

  14. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Lina, Taslima T.; Khajanchi, Bijay K.; Azmi, Ishrat J.; Mohammad Aminul Islam; Belal Mahmood; Mahmuda Akter; Atanu Banik; Rumana Alim; Armando Navarro; Gabriel Perez; Alejandro Cravioto; Talukder, Kaisar A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resistance to cephalosporins in Enterobacteriaceae is mainly due to the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Little is known about ESBL-producing bacteria in Bangladesh. Therefore, the study presents results of phenotypic and molecular characterization of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from hospitals in Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 339 E. coli isolated from patients with urinary tract and wound infections attending three different medical hospitals in urban a...

  15. SparSNP: Fast and memory-efficient analysis of all SNPs for phenotype prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham Gad; Kowalczyk Adam; Zobel Justin; Inouye Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A central goal of genomics is to predict phenotypic variation from genetic variation. Fitting predictive models to genome-wide and whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) profiles allows us to estimate the predictive power of the SNPs and potentially develop diagnostic models for disease. However, many current datasets cannot be analysed with standard tools due to their large size. Results We introduce SparSNP, a tool for fitting lasso linear models for massive S...

  16. Gelam honey potentiates ex vivo corneal keratocytes proliferation with desirable phenotype expression

    OpenAIRE

    Yusof, Alia Md; Abd Ghafar, Norzana; Kamarudin, Taty Anna; Hui, Chua Kien; Yusof, Yasmin Anum Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Gelam honey on corneal keratocytes proliferative capacity and phenotypic characterization via MTT assay, gene expression and immunocytochemistry. Methods Corneal keratocytes from New Zealand white rabbits were cultured in basal medium (BM) and serum enriched medium (BMS). Serial dilutions of Gelam honey (GH) were added to both media and cells were cultured until passage 1. MTT assay was performed on corneal keratocytes in both media to as...

  17. Phenotypes of severe asthma among children and adolescents in Brazil: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Wenderson Clay Correia de; Lasmar, Laura Maria de Lima Belizário Facury; Ricci, Cristiane de Abreu Tonelli; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Álvaro A Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Background The morbidity associated with severe uncontrolled asthma is disproportionately higher in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries. The aim of this study was to describe the phenotypic characteristics of difficult-to-treat severe asthma and treatment-resistant severe asthma in a sample of children and adolescents in Brazil. Methods This was a prospective study, conducted between 2010 and 2014, following 61 patients (6–18 years of age) who had been diagnosed wit...

  18. Hair Analysis for Determination of Isoniazid Concentrations and Acetylator Phenotype during Antituberculous Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Eisenhut; Detlef Thieme; Dagmar Schmid; Sybille Fieseler; Hans Sachs

    2012-01-01

    Background. Analysis of isoniazid (INH) uptake has been based on measurement of plasma concentrations providing a short-term and potentially biased view. Objectives. To establish hair analysis as a tool to measure long-term uptake of INH and to assess whether acetylator phenotype in hair reflects N-acetyltransferase-2 (NAT2) genotype. Design and Methods. INH and acetyl-INH concentrations in hair were determined in patients on INH treatment for M. tuberculosis infection using high pressure liq...

  19. Dysfunctional breathing phenotype in adults with asthma - incidence and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Agache, Ioana; Ciobanu, Cristina; Paul, Gabriela; ROGOZEA, LILIANA

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal breathing patterns may cause characteristic symptoms and impair quality of life. In a cross-sectional survey 29% of adults treated for asthma in primary care had symptoms suggestive of dysfunctional breathing (DB), more likely to be female and younger, with no differences for severity of asthma. No clear risk factors were demonstrated for DB in asthma, nor the impact of asthma medication was evaluated. The objective of this study was to describe the DB phenotype in adults ...

  20. Dysfunctional breathing phenotype in adults with asthma - incidence and risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Agache Ioana; Ciobanu Cristina; Paul Gabriela; Rogozea Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Abnormal breathing patterns may cause characteristic symptoms and impair quality of life. In a cross-sectional survey 29% of adults treated for asthma in primary care had symptoms suggestive of dysfunctional breathing (DB), more likely to be female and younger, with no differences for severity of asthma. No clear risk factors were demonstrated for DB in asthma, nor the impact of asthma medication was evaluated. The objective of this study was to describe the DB phenotype i...

  1. Karyotype alteration generates the neoplastic phenotypes of SV40-infected human and rodent cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bloomfield, Mathew; Duesberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite over 50 years of research, it remains unclear how the DNA tumor viruses SV40 and Polyoma cause cancers. Prevailing theories hold that virus-coded Tumor (T)-antigens cause cancer by inactivating cellular tumor suppressor genes. But these theories don’t explain four characteristics of viral carcinogenesis: (1) less than one in 10,000 infected cells become cancer cells, (2) cancers have complex individual phenotypes and transcriptomes, (3) recurrent tumors without viral DNA an...

  2. Bridging the gap between gene expression and metabolic phenotype via kinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the close association between gene expression and metabolism, experimental evidence shows that gene expression levels alone cannot predict metabolic phenotypes, indicating a knowledge gap in our understanding of how these processes are connected. Here, we present a method that integrates transcriptome, fluxome, and metabolome data using kinetic models to create a mechanistic link between gene expression and metabolism. Results We developed a modeling framework to construct ...

  3. Phenotypic detection of broad-spectrum beta-lactamases in microbiological practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sedlakova, Miroslava Htoutou; Hanulik, Vojtech; Chroma, Magdalena; Hricova, Kristyna; Kolar, Milan; Latal, Tomas; Schaumann, Reiner; Rodloff, Arne C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Enterobacteriaceae producing ESBL and AmpC enzymes can be associated with failure of antibiotic therapy and related morbidity and mortality. Their routine detection in microbiology laboratories is still a problem. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of selected phenotypic methods. Material/Methods A total of 106 strains of the Enterobacteriaceae family were tested, in which molecular biology methods confirmed the presence of genes encoding ESBL or AmpC. In ...

  4. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of Chikungunya Virus of Different Genotypes from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Sam, I-Ching; Loong, Shih-Keng; Michael, Jasmine Chandramathi; Chua, Chong-Long; Wan Sulaiman, Wan Yusoff; Vythilingam, Indra; Chan, Shie-Yien; Chiam, Chun-Wei; Yeong, Yze-Shiuan; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Chan, Yoke-Fun

    2012-01-01

    Background Mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has recently re-emerged globally. The epidemic East/Central/South African (ECSA) strains have spread for the first time to Asia, which previously only had endemic Asian strains. In Malaysia, the ECSA strain caused an extensive nationwide outbreak in 2008, while the Asian strains only caused limited outbreaks prior to this. To gain insight into these observed epidemiological differences, we compared genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of...

  5. 24-hour central blood pressure and intermediate cardiovascular phenotypes in untreated subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Bednarek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Piotr; Olszanecka, Agnieszka; Windak, Adam; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently, 24-hour monitoring of central systolic blood pressure (SBP) has become available. However, the relation between end-organ damage and the 24-hour central SBP profile and variability has not so far been analyzed. Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the relation between 24-hour central SBP, 24-hour central SBP profile as well as central SBP short-term variability and parameters of cardiac and vascular intermediate phenotypes. Methods: The study ...

  6. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Tanya C. Burch; Rhim, Johng S.; Julius O Nyalwidhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells) and RC77T/E (malignant cells) were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mit...

  7. Modified stethoscope for auscultation of temporomandibular joint sounds

    OpenAIRE

    Dagar, Sanjiv Rajender Singh; Turakiya, Viral; Pakhan, Ashok J; Jaggi, Nitin; Kalra, Amit; Vaidya, Vidya

    2014-01-01

    Background: Purpose of this study was to modify the stethoscope which can auscultate the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds more precisely than conventional stethoscope, and fabrication of stethoscope compatible software which analyses the auscultated sound and gives documentary evidence of that analysis in the form of graph. Materials & Methods: The conventional stethoscope was modified by attaching a custom made soundscope with a recording device which can be place...

  8. Color gradient background oriented schlieren imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, Frank Austin; Hargather, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Background oriented schlieren (BOS) imaging is a method of visualizing refractive disturbances through the comparison of digital images. By comparing images with and without a refractive disturbance visualizations can be achieved via a range of image processing methods. Traditionally, backgrounds consist of random distributions of high contrast speckle patterns. To image a refractive disturbance, a digital image correlation algorithm is used to identify the location and magnitude of apparent pixel shifts in the background pattern. Here a novel method of using color gradient backgrounds is explored as an alternative. The gradient background eliminates the need to perform an image correlation between the two digital images, as simple image subtraction can be used to identify the location, magnitude, and direction of the image distortions. This allows for quicker processing. Two-dimensional gradient backgrounds using multiple colors are shown. The gradient backgrounds are demonstrated to provide quantitative data limited only by the camera's pixel resolution, whereas speckle backgrounds limit resolution to the size of the random pattern features and image correlation window size. Additional results include the use of a computer screen as a background.

  9. Thermal inflation and the gravitational wave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the impact of thermal inflation—a short, secondary period of inflation that can arise in supersymmetric scenarios—on the stochastic gravitational wave background. We show that while the primordial inflationary gravitational wave background is essentially unchanged at cosmic microwave background scales, it is massively diluted at solar system scales and would be unobservable by a Big Bang Observer (BBO) style experiment. Conversely, bubble collisions at the end of thermal inflation can generate a new stochastic background. We calculate the likely properties of the bubbles created during this phase transition, and show that the expected amplitude and frequency of this signal would fall within the BBO range

  10. Why your practice must do background checks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupko, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Hiring qualified staff is critical for a medical practice. As many physicians have discovered, taking applicants' resumes on faith can be a mistake. Background company searches show that one in three applicants provide false, inaccurate, misleading, or incomplete information. Fake degrees, false licenses and certifications, and criminal histories are a few of the problems that a proper background check can reveal. This article describes further why background checks are essential, how to incorporate a background check into your hiring process, and some of the legalities involved in the process. PMID:17494489

  11. PIAS1 Regulates Mutant Huntingtin Accumulation and Huntington's Disease-Associated Phenotypes In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochaba, Joseph; Monteys, Alex Mas; O'Rourke, Jacqueline G; Reidling, Jack C; Steffan, Joan S; Davidson, Beverly L; Thompson, Leslie M

    2016-05-01

    The disruption of protein quality control networks is central to pathology in Huntington's disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The aberrant accumulation of insoluble high-molecular-weight protein complexes containing the Huntingtin (HTT) protein and SUMOylated protein corresponds to disease manifestation. We previously identified an HTT-selective E3 SUMO ligase, PIAS1, that regulates HTT accumulation and SUMO modification in cells. Here we investigated whether PIAS1 modulation in neurons alters HD-associated phenotypes in vivo. Instrastriatal injection of a PIAS1-directed miRNA significantly improved behavioral phenotypes in rapidly progressing mutant HTT (mHTT) fragment R6/2 mice. PIAS1 reduction prevented the accumulation of mHTT and SUMO- and ubiquitin-modified proteins, increased synaptophysin levels, and normalized key inflammatory markers. In contrast, PIAS1 overexpression exacerbated mHTT-associated phenotypes and aberrant protein accumulation. These results confirm the association between aberrant accumulation of expanded polyglutamine-dependent insoluble protein species and pathogenesis, and they link phenotypic benefit to reduction of these species through PIAS1 modulation. PMID:27146268

  12. Phenotypical Expression of Maize Seedlings from Lines with the “Tallos Gemelos” Trait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Lorena Meraz-Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Colegio de Postgraduados in Mexico, we have generated lines of maize (Zea mays L. with the particularity that from a seed two or more stalks emerge and develop normally, calling that character “tallos gemelos.” This trait possibly modifies the proportions of the constituent tissues of the seed and could increase the nutritional and nutraceutical quality of the grain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the germination percentage and quantify and describe the types of phenotypic expression of seedling with twin stalks in the lines. 100 seeds of each of the 26 S5 lines tested were used. At 15 days after planting in a greenhouse, the seedlings were classified based on their morphology. The results showed that, on average, the lines had 81.3% of emergence and 51% of twin stalks. Eight types of phenotypic expression in seedlings were identified and described with the character “tallos gemelos”; Type II showed the highest proportion (59.5%. The phenotypical expressions identified in seedlings with the “tallos gemelos” trait are evidence of epigenetic mechanisms, since they present one of the features of epimutants, which is that they are reversible, that is; they can return to the original phenotype, in the present circumstance to normal plants (single stalk.

  13. Not in their genes: Phenotypic flexibility, behavioural traditions and cultural evolution in wild bonnet macaques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anindya Sinha

    2005-02-01

    Phenotypic flexibility, or the within-genotype, context-dependent, variation in behaviour expressed by single reproductively mature individuals during their lifetimes, often impart a selective advantage to organisms and profoundly influence their survival and reproduction. Another phenomenon apparently not under direct genetic control is behavioural inheritance whereby higher animals are able to acquire information from the behaviour of others by social learning, and, through their own modified behaviour, transmit such information between individuals and across generations. Behavioural information transfer of this nature thus represents another form of inheritance that operates in many animals in tandem with the more basic genetic system. This paper examines the impact that phenotypic flexibility, behavioural inheritance and socially transmitted cultural traditions may have in shaping the structure and dynamics of a primate society – that of the bonnet macaque (Macaca radiata), a primate species endemic to peninsular India. Three principal issues are considered: the role of phenotypic flexibility in shaping social behaviour, the occurrence of individual behavioural traits leading to the establishment of social traditions, and the appearance of cultural evolution amidst such social traditions. Although more prolonged observations are required, these initial findings suggest that phenotypic plasticity, behavioural inheritance and cultural traditions may be much more widespread among primates than have previously been assumed but may have escaped attention due to a preoccupation with genetic inheritance in zoological thinking.

  14. Belief propagation in genotype-phenotype networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharil, Janhavi; May, Paul; Gaile, Daniel P; Blair, Rachael Hageman

    2016-03-01

    Graphical models have proven to be a valuable tool for connecting genotypes and phenotypes. Structural learning of phenotype-genotype networks has received considerable attention in the post-genome era. In recent years, a dozen different methods have emerged for network inference, which leverage natural variation that arises in certain genetic populations. The structure of the network itself can be used to form hypotheses based on the inferred direct and indirect network relationships, but represents a premature endpoint to the graphical analyses. In this work, we extend this endpoint. We examine the unexplored problem of perturbing a given network structure, and quantifying the system-wide effects on the network in a node-wise manner. The perturbation is achieved through the setting of values of phenotype node(s), which may reflect an inhibition or activation, and propagating this information through the entire network. We leverage belief propagation methods in Conditional Gaussian Bayesian Networks (CG-BNs), in order to absorb and propagate phenotypic evidence through the network. We show that the modeling assumptions adopted for genotype-phenotype networks represent an important sub-class of CG-BNs, which possess properties that ensure exact inference in the propagation scheme. The system-wide effects of the perturbation are quantified in a node-wise manner through the comparison of perturbed and unperturbed marginal distributions using a symmetric Kullback-Leibler divergence. Applications to kidney and skin cancer expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data from different mus musculus populations are presented. System-wide effects in the network were predicted and visualized across a spectrum of evidence. Sub-pathways and regions of the network responded in concert, suggesting co-regulation and coordination throughout the network in response to phenotypic changes. We demonstrate how these predicted system-wide effects can be examined in connection with

  15. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C. M.; Brown, Danielle L.; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R.; Eppig, Janan T.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A.; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G.; Kelly, Anne M.; Ledbetter, David H.; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L.; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Vooren, Steven Van; Wapner, Ronald J.; Wilkie, Andrew O. M.; Wright, Caroline F.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Washingthon, Nicole L.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Robinson, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online. PMID:24217912

  16. Modeling Lost-Particle Accelerator Backgrounds in PEP-II Using LPTURTLE

    CERN Document Server

    Fieguth, Theodore; Kozanecki, Witold

    2005-01-01

    Background studies during the design, construction, commissioning, operation and improvement of BaBar and PEP-II have been greatly influenced by results from a program referred to as LPTURTLE (Lost Particle TURTLE a modified version of Decay TURTLE) which was originally conceived for the purpose of studying gas background for SLC. This venerable program is still in use today. We describe its use, capabilities and improvements and refer to current results now being applied to BaBar.

  17. Molecules in the mirror: how SERS backgrounds arise from the quantum method of images

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Harris, Nadine; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The Raman coupling of light to molecular vibrations is strongly modified when they are placed near a plasmonic metal surface, with the appearance of a strong broad continuum background in addition to the normal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) peaks. Using a quantum method of images approach, we produce a simple but quantitative explanation of the inevitable presence of the background, due to the resistive damping of the image molecule. This model thus suggests new strategies for enha...

  18. Luminosity distance for Born–Infeld electromagnetic waves propagating in a cosmological magnetic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born–Infeld electromagnetic waves interacting with a static magnetic background in an expanding universe are studied. The non-linear character of Born–Infeld electrodynamics modifies the relation between the energy flux and the distance to the source, which gains a new dependence on the redshift that is governed by the background field. We compute the luminosity distance as a function of the redshift and compare with Maxwellian curves for supernovae type Ia

  19. X-ray Rietveld analysis with a physically based background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of known equations for calculating X-ray diffraction intensities from a given number of unit cells of a crystal phase in polycrystalline material, as due to: (i) Bragg reflections; (ii) average diffuse scattering caused by thermal plus first-kind disorder; and (iii) incoherent scattering, a relationship has been found that ties, in the Rietveld analysis, the Bragg scale factor to a scale factor for 'disorder' as well as incoherent scattering. Instead of fitting the background with a polynomial function, it becomes possible to describe the background by physically based equations. Air scattering is included in the background simulation. By this means, the refinement can be carried out with fewer parameters (six fewer than when a fifth-order polynomial is used). The DBWS-9006PC computer program written by Sakthivel and Young [(1990), Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA] has been modified to follow this approach and it has been used to refine the crystal structures of the cubic form of Y2O3 and of α-Al2O3. Peak asymmetry has been described by a function based on an exponential approximation. The results from refinements using polynomial physically based background function are, in terms of final structural parameters and reliability indices, very close to each other and in agreement with results reported in the literature. The reconstruction and optimization of the background scattering by means of physically based equations helps the implementation in the Rietveld code of other possible specific diffuse scattering contributions, such as that due to an amorphous phase. (orig.)

  20. Developmental thermal plasticity of prey modifies the impact of predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, Frank; Grigaltchik, Veronica S

    2015-05-01

    Environmental conditions during embryonic development can influence the mean expression of phenotypes as well as phenotypic responses to environmental change later in life. The resulting phenotypes may be better matched to their environment and more resilient to environmental change, including human-induced climate change. However, whether plasticity does improve success in an ecological context is unresolved. In a microcosm experiment, we show that developmental plasticity in embryos of the frog Limnodynastes peronii is beneficial by increasing survivorship of tadpoles in the presence of predators when egg incubation (15 or 25°C) and tadpole acclimation temperature in microcosms (15 or 25°C) coincided at 15°C. Tadpoles that survived predation were smaller, and had faster burst swimming speeds than those kept in no-predator control conditions, but only at high (25°C) egg incubation or subsequent microcosm temperatures. Metabolic rates were determined by a three-way interaction between incubation and microcosm temperatures and predation; maximal glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolic capacities (enzyme activities) were lower in survivors from predation compared with controls, particularly when eggs were incubated at 25°C. We show that thermal conditions experienced during early development are ecologically relevant by modulating survivorship from predation. Importantly, developmental thermal plasticity also impacts population phenotypes indirectly by modifying species interactions and the selection pressure imposed by predation. PMID:25767143

  1. The behavioral phenotype of FMR1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Lia; Kaufmann, Walter E

    2010-11-15

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the behavioral phenotype of FMR1 mutations, including fragile X syndrome (FXS) in order to better understand the clinical involvement of individuals affected by mutations in this gene. FXS is associated with a wide range of intellectual and behavioral problems, some relatively mild and others quite severe. FXS is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and one of the most prevalent genetic causes of autism spectrum disorder. Learning difficulties, attentional problems, anxiety, aggressive behavior, stereotypies, and mood disorders are also frequent in FXS. Recent studies of children and adults have identified associations between FMR1 premutation and many of the same disorders. We examine the neurobehavioral phenotypes of FXS and FMR1 premutation as they manifest across the lifespan of the individual. PMID:20981777

  2. Diagnosis, assessment, and phenotyping of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Halpin, David M; O'Donnell, Denis E;

    2016-01-01

    COPD is now widely recognized as a complex heterogeneous syndrome, having both pulmonary and extrapulmonary features. In clinical practice, the diagnosis of COPD is based on the presence of chronic airflow limitation, as assessed by post-bronchodilator spirometry. The severity of the airflow...... limitation, as measured by percent predicted FEV1, provides important information to the physician to enable optimization of management. However, in order to accurately assess the complexity of COPD, there need to be other measures made beyond FEV1. At present, there is a lack of reliable and simple blood...... biomarkers to confirm and further assess the diagnosis of COPD. However, it is possible to identify patients who display different phenotypic characteristics of COPD that relate to clinically relevant outcomes. Currently, validated phenotypes of COPD include alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and "frequent...

  3. Evolution of environmental cues for phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevin, Luis-Miguel; Lande, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypically plastic characters may respond to multiple variables in their environment, but the evolutionary consequences of this phenomenon have rarely been addressed theoretically. We model the evolution of linear reaction norms in response to several correlated environmental variables, in a population undergoing stationary environmental fluctuations. At evolutionary equilibrium, the linear combination of environmental variables that acts as a developmental cue for the plastic trait is the multivariate best linear predictor of changes in the optimum. However, the reaction norm with respect to any single environmental variable may exhibit nonintuitive patterns. Apparently maladaptive, or hyperadaptive plasticity can evolve with respect to single environmental variables, and costs of plasticity may increase, rather than reduce, plasticity in response to some variables. We also find conditions for the evolution of an indirect environmental indicator that affects expression of a plastic phenotype, despite not influencing natural selection on it. PMID:26292649

  4. Supermembrane actions for Gaiotto-Maldacena backgrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanski, B.

    2013-01-01

    We write down the supermembrane actions for M-theory backgrounds dual to general N=2 four-dimensional superconformal field theories. The actions are given to all orders in fermions and are in a particular κ -gauge. When an extra U(1) isometry is present, our actions reduce to κ -gauge fixed Green–Schwarz actions for the corresponding Type IIA backgrounds.

  5. 45 CFR 650.16 - Background rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Background rights. The Foundation will acquire rights to a research performer's pre-existing technology only... of the Bayh-Dole Act (35 U.S.C. 202(f)) as implemented by 37 CFR 401.12). ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Background rights. 650.16 Section 650.16...

  6. 32 CFR 770.54 - Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 770.54 Section 770.54 National... Hampshire § 770.54 Background. (a) Portsmouth Naval Shipyard maintains and operates facilities “to provide... assigned; to perform manufacturing, research, development, and test work, as assigned; and to...

  7. 47 CFR 215.1 - Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Background. 215.1 Section 215.1... POINT FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE (EMP) INFORMATION § 215.1 Background. (a) The nuclear electromagnetic... available protective measures, and in order to avoid duplication of research efforts, it is desirable...

  8. The impact of CYP2D6-predicted phenotype on tamoxifen treatment outcome in patients with metastatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Lammers (Laureen); R.H.J. Matthijsen (Ron); T. van Gelder (Teun); M.J. Bijl (Monique); A.J.M. de Graan (Anne-Joy); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.A. van Fessem (Marianne); P.M.J.J. Berns (Els); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); R.H.N. van Schaik (Ron)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract BACKGROUND: Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) has a crucial role in the metabolic conversion of tamoxifen into the active metabolite endoxifen. In this cohort study, the effect of CYP2D6-predicted phenotype, defined as the combined effect of CYP2D6 genetic variation and concomitant

  9. HIV-Specific ADCC Improves After Antiretroviral Therapy and Correlates With Normalization of the NK Cell Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne S; Hartling, Hans J; Tingstedt, Jeanette L;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Natural killer (NK) cell phenotype and function have recently gained much attention as playing crucial roles in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We investigated NK cell function, as measured by ADCC, in HIV-1-positive individuals before and 6 months after highly active...

  10. Sleep Duration and Breast Cancer Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Khawaja; Santosh Rao; Li Li; Thompson, Cheryl L.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that short sleep is associated with an increased risk of cancer; however, little has been done to study the role of sleep on tumor characteristics. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between sleep duration and tumor phenotype in 972 breast cancer patients. Sleep duration was inversely associated with tumor grade (univariate P = 0.032), particularly in postmenopausal women (univariate P = 0.018). This association did not reach statistical significance after...

  11. Prions, protein homeostasis, and phenotypic diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Halfmann, Randal; Alberti, Simon; Lindquist, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Prions are fascinating but often misunderstood protein aggregation phenomena. The traditional association of the mammalian prion protein with disease has overshadowed a potentially more interesting attribute of prions: their ability to create protein-based molecular memories. In fungi, prions alter the relationship between genotype and phenotype in a heritable way that diversifies clonal populations. Recent findings in yeast indicate that prions might be much more common than previously real...

  12. Lewis phenotype, secretor status, and coeliac disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickey, W; Wylie, J D; Collins, J S; Porter, K G; Watson, R G; McLoughlin, J C

    1994-01-01

    Patients who cannot secrete ABO and Lewis blood group antigens into body fluids, an ability controlled by a single gene on chromosome 19, are known to be at increased risk of certain autoimmune diseases associated with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) markers. This study investigated the possibility of an association with coeliac disease using red cell Lewis (Le) blood group phenotype to infer secretor status. Among 73 patients with coeliac disease who had Le a or b antigen, 48% were non-secreto...

  13. Connectomic intermediate phenotypes for psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eFornito

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are phenotypically heterogeneous entities with a complex genetic basis. To mitigate this complexity, many investigators study so-called intermediate phenotypes that putatively provide a more direct index of the physiological effects of candidate genetic risk variants than overt psychiatric syndromes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a particularly popular technique for measuring such phenotypes because it allows interrogation of diverse aspects of brain structure and function in vivo. Much of this work however, has focused on relatively simple measures that quantify variations in the physiology or tissue integrity of specific brain regions in isolation, contradicting an emerging consensus that most major psychiatric disorders do not arise from isolated dysfunction in one or a few brain regions, but rather from disturbed interactions within and between distributed neural circuits; i.e., they are disorders of brain connectivity. The recent proliferation of new MRI techniques for comprehensively mapping the entire connectivity architecture of the brain, termed the human connectome, has provided a rich repertoire of tools for understanding how genetic variants implicated in mental disorder impact distinct neural circuits. In this article, we review research using these connectomic techniques to understand how genetic variation influences the connectivity and topology of human brain networks. We highlight recent evidence from twin and imaging genetics studies suggesting that the penetrance of candidate risk variants for mental illness, such as those in SLC6A4, MAOA, ZNF804A and APOE, may be higher for intermediate phenotypes characterised at the level of distributed neural systems than at the level of spatially localised brain regions. The findings indicate that imaging connectomics provides a powerful framework for understanding how genetic risk for psychiatric disease is expressed through altered structure and function of

  14. Color change, phenotypic plasticity, and camouflage

    OpenAIRE

    Martin eStevens

    2016-01-01

    The ability to change appearance over a range of timescales is widespread in nature, existing in many invertebrate and vertebrate groups. This can include color change occurring in seconds, minutes, and hours, to longer term changes associated with phenotypic plasticity and development. A major function is for camouflage against predators because color change and plasticity enables animals to match their surroundings and potentially reduce the risk of predation. Recently, we published finding...

  15. Covert Genetic Selections to Optimize Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Di; Townsley, Elizabeth; Tartakoff, Alan Michael

    2007-01-01

    In many high complexity systems (cells, organisms, institutions, societies, economies, etc.), it is unclear which components should be regulated to affect overall performance. To identify and prioritize molecular targets which impact cellular phenotypes, we have developed a selection procedure (“SPI”–single promoting/inhibiting target identification) which monitors the abundance of ectopic cDNAs. We have used this approach to identify growth regulators. For this purpose, complex pools of S. c...

  16. Phenotypic impact of genomic structural variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Symmons, Orsolya; Spitz, François;

    2013-01-01

    Genomic structural variants have long been implicated in phenotypic diversity and human disease, but dissecting the mechanisms by which they exert their functional impact has proven elusive. Recently however, developments in high-throughput DNA sequencing and chromosomal engineering technology have...... delineating disease-causing elements that are affected by structural variants, and we discuss future directions for research on the functional consequences of structural variants....

  17. Mutator phenotypes due to DNA replication infidelity

    OpenAIRE

    Arana, Mercedes E.; Kunkel, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the fidelity of DNA replication performed by eukaryotic DNA polymerases involved in replicating the nuclear genome. DNA replication fidelity can vary widely depending on the DNA polymerase, the composition of the error, the flanking sequence, the presence of DNA damage and the ability to correct errors. As a consequence, defects in processes that determine DNA replication fidelity can confer strong mutator phenotypes whose specificity can help determine the molecular na...

  18. Innate lymphocyte cells in asthma phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Ozyigit, Leyla Pur; MORITA, Hideaki; Akdis, Mubeccel

    2015-01-01

    T helper type 2 (TH2) cells were previously thought to be the main initiating effector cell type in asthma; however, exaggerated TH2 cell activities alone were insufficient to explain all aspects of asthma. Asthma is a heterogeneous syndrome comprising different phenotypes that are characterized by their different clinical features, treatment responses, and inflammation patterns. The most-studied subgroups of asthma include TH2-associated early-onset allergic asthma, late-onset persistent eos...

  19. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Hardavella, Georgia; George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer ...

  20. Phenotype development in TgHD minipigs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ellederová, Zdeňka; Vidinská, Daniela; Mačáková, Monika; Kučerová, S.; Bohuslavová, Božena; Sedláčková, M.; Lišková, Irena; Valeková, Ivona; Baxa, Monika; Ardan, Taras; Juhás, Štefan; Motlík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 11-11. ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. 08.11.2015-10.11.2015, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : phenotype * minipig model of Huntington´s disease * reproductive failure Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology