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Sample records for background clinical considerations

  1. Antipsychotic drug treatment for patients with schizophrenia: theoretical background, clinical considerations and patients preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Ernst; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2009-01-01

      The cornerstone in treatment of psychosis is antipsychotic drugs. Treatment options have increased over the years; newer antipsychotic drugs with a proposed efficacy regarding negative and cognitive symptoms, but also a shift in side-effects from neurological side-effects to metabolic side......-effects have arisen as the new challenge. The basis of successful pharmacological treatment is a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of action, the desired effects and side-effects of antipsychotic drugs, a good relationship with the patient and a thorough monitoring of the patient before and during...... treatment. The clinically relevant aspects of antipsychotic drug treatment are reviewed; mechanism of antipsychotic drug action, clinical considerations in treatment, switching antipsychotic drugs, polypharmacy, safety and patient preference.  ...

  2. Glioblastoma: background, standard treatment paradigms, and supportive care considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellor, Susan V; Pagano-Young, Teri Ann; Avgeropoulos, Nicholas G

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a brain tumor condition marked by rapid neurological and clinical demise, resulting in disproportionate disability for those affected. Caring for this group of patients is complex, intense, multidisciplinary in nature, and fraught with the need for expensive treatments, surveillance imaging, physician follow-up, and rehabilitative, psychological, and social support interventions. Few of these patients return to the workforce for any meaningful time frame, and because of the enormity of the financial burden that patients, their caregivers, and society face, utilization reviews become the focus of ethical scrutiny. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  3. Local anesthesia in dentistry - Clinical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Sharmraaj Subramaniam; Prasanna Neelakantan

    2013-01-01

    Local anaesthesia is commonly employed prior to most dental procedures. It is imperative to understand the mechanisms by which local anaesthetics work, so that their efficacy can be improved for painless dental care. Local anaesthesia also has major clinical implications in that it can precipitate emergencies in patients with an underlying systemic disease. It is imperative that a dentist have a thorough knowledge of the considerations one must take when administering local anaesthesia in pat...

  4. [CLINICAL BACKGROUND ANALYSIS ABOUT TRANSURETHRAL ELECTROCOAGULATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsui, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Yazawa, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Morita, Shinya; Shinoda, Kazunobu; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Shinojima, Toshiaki; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2015-10-01

    Transurethral electrocoagulation (TUC) is a rare event but occurs in a constant manner with various causes or disorders and reduces patient quality of life. So far there have been no reports focusing on the details of TUC. We focused on the clinical background and related causes in cases of TUC in our institution. We identified 76 cases (65 patients) who underwent TUC at Keio University Hospital between April 2001 and March 2011. We focused on patient background, especially with respect to the primary disease, treatment modality, use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant agent, timing of TUC, type of electrosurgical device, and the incidence of transfusion. The primary disease for TUC included bladder tumor (BT) in 31 cases, benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) in 13, prostate cancer (PCa) in 13, idiopathic bladder bleeding in 4, periarteritis nodosa in 3, uterine cervical cancer in 3, and others in 9. TUC after transurethral resection (TUR) was found in 38 cases, including transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) in 26 of 31 BT cases and transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) in 12 of 13 BPH cases. After TURBT, TUC was performed before removal of a urethral catheter in 7 cases, and after removal of a urethral catheter in 19 cases. With regard to TUC associated with TURP, the average estimated prostate volume in TUC cases before removal of the urethral catheter was 66.2 ml, which was significantly larger than that in TUC cases after removal of the urethral catheter (46.1 ml, p = 0.045). TUC after the radiation therapy was observed in 21 cases, and the average time from the radiation therapy to TUC was 3.4 years (7 months-10 years). TUC was caused by multiple causes or disorders, and 75% of our TUC was associated with BT, BPH or PCa. TUC associated with TURBT frequently occurred within 1 week after TURBT but was still observed after 1 month following the operation. All TUC associated with TURP occurred within 3 weeks after operation. The average period from

  5. Marfan Syndrome: Clinical, Surgical, and Anesthetic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, José M; Silvay, George; Castillo, Javier G

    2014-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder, with primary involvement of the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. This autosomal heritable disease is mainly attributable to a defect in the FBN1 gene. Clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome has been based on the Ghent criteria since 1996. In 2010, these criteria were updated, and the revised guidelines place more emphasis on aortic root dilation, ectopia lentis, and FBN1 mutation testing in the diagnostic assessment of Marfan syndrome. Among its many different clinical manifestations, cardiovascular involvement deserves special consideration, owing to its impact on prognosis. Recent molecular, surgical, and clinical research has yielded profound new insights into the pathological mechanisms that ultimately lead to tissue degradation and weakening of the aortic wall, which has led to exciting new treatment strategies. Furthermore, with the increasing life expectancy of patients with Marfan syndrome, there has been a subtle shift in the spectrum of medical problems. Consequently, this article focuses on recent advances to highlight their potential impact on future concepts of patient care from a clinical, surgical, and anesthetic perspective. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Combining offshore wind energy and large-scale mussel farming: background & technical, ecological and economic considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerveld, S.; Rockmann, C.; Scholl, M.M.; Bartelings, H.; Burg, van den S.W.K.; Jak, R.G.; Jansen, H.M.; Klijnstra, J.; Leopold, M.F.; Poelman, M.; Smith, S.R.; Stavenuiter, J.; Veenstra, F.A.; Veltman, C.; Westra, C.

    2014-01-01

    This Blauwdruk project report presents background and technical, ecological and economic considerations of the potential combination of offshore wind energy production and large-scale mussel farming in offshore areas in the North Sea. The main objective of the Blauwdruk project was to study the

  7. Clinical consideration of thrombocytopenia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ratna Laksmiastuti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediatric patient with the history of bleeding disorder as thrombocytopenia is considered as a clinical case in dentistry. The patient with platelet count below normal has potential risk of bleeding disorders. The situation would be more dangerous if the dentist could not identify the problem. Purpose: The aim of this review is to describe how a dentist must understand the step and management that should be performed in pediatric patient with history of bleeding disorder due to thrombocytopenia. Reviews: Bleeding disorders might be the result of thrombocytopenia, a condition that alter the ability of blood vessels, platelet and coagulation factors in normal hemostatic system. Thrombocytopenia is defined as a platelet count of less than normal (150.000/mm3–400.000/mm3. Etiology, risk factor and preventive method of thrombocytophenia are still unknown. Conclusion: It is concluded that special attention is needed for pediatric patient with thrombocytopenia. A dentist should understand well about this disorder on how to take the history, to do clinical examination, to establish the diagnosis and to decide treatment plan as well as to consult to related collongues.Latar belakang: Penderita anak-anak dengan riwayat gangguan perdarahan yang ditandai dengan adanya trombositopenia merupakan masalah klinis yang ditemukan dalam bidang kedokteran gigi. Beberapa perawatan di bidang kedokteran gigi beresiko menimbulkan terjadinya perdarahan. Keadaan akan berbahaya bila dokter gigi tidak dapat mengidentifikasi masalah. Tujuan: Artikel ini menunjukkan pentingnya seorang dokter gigi memahami dan mengetahui langkah dan tindakan apa yang harus dilakukan, bila suatu saat menghadapi penderita anak-anak dengan riwayat gangguan perdarahan akibat trombositopenia. Review: Gangguan perdarahan adalah suatu kondisi terjadinya penurunan kemampuan dari pembuluh darah, platelet, dan faktor pembekuan pada fungsi normal hemostasis. Trombositopenia adalah jumlah

  8. Legal Considerations in Clinical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursu, Samuel C.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of legal issues in dental clinical decision making looks at the nature and elements of applicable law, especially malpractice, locus of responsibility, and standards of care. Greater use of formal decision analysis in clinical dentistry and better research on diagnosis and treatment are recommended, particularly in light of increasing…

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy – Clinical and Electrophysiological Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae; Prasad, Kalpana; Lloyd, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a primer on the pathophysiology and clinical evaluation of peripheral neuropathy for the radiologist. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) has utility in the diagnosis of many focal peripheral nerve lesions. When combined with history, examination, electrophysiology, and laboratory data, future advancements in high-field MRN may play an increasingly important role in the evaluation of patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24210312

  10. Clinical efficiency, image quality and dosimetric considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arreola, M. [Director of Clinical Radiological Physics, Shands Hospital at the University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Three decades have passed since the first clinical use of the famous EMI Computed Axial Tomography (Cat) scanner. At the time, the prospects for clinical success of this innovative idea were not very good. Time, however, has proven otherwise as what is now simply known as Computed tomography (CT) has been boosted in each one of these decades for different reasons. In the 1970s, technological progress augmented by the realization of the importance of tomographic imaging got everything started; in the 1980s, the boom in health care demand in the US solidified its position and in the 1990s the technological explosion in computers and the imperative need to lower costs in the health care industry have prompted the most dramatic changes in the wy CT is utilized in the year 2000. Thus, different motivations have led the way of progress in CT at various times, and in spite of amazing developments in other crucial imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging, CT maintains its rightful place as the premiere imaging modality in the modern radiology department. This work covers the basic principles of tomographic image reconstruction, and how axial CT scanners progressed historically in the first two decades. Developments in X-ray tubes, and detection systems are highlighted, as well as the impact of clinical efficiency, image quality and patient doses. The basic construction of translate-rotate (1st and 2nd generation), rotate-rotate (3rd generation) and detector ring (4th generation) scanners are described. The so-called 5th generation scanner, the electron beam scanner, is also described, with its clinical and technical advantages and its inherent financial and maintenance disadvantages, which brought the advent of spiral and multi-slice scanners. These most recent developments in CT technology have opened a new era in the clinical use of CT; and although image quality has reached an expected

  11. Clinical efficiency, image quality and dosimetric considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arreola, M.

    2000-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the first clinical use of the famous EMI Computed Axial Tomography (Cat) scanner. At the time, the prospects for clinical success of this innovative idea were not very good. Time, however, has proven otherwise as what is now simply known as Computed tomography (CT) has been boosted in each one of these decades for different reasons. In the 1970s, technological progress augmented by the realization of the importance of tomographic imaging got everything started; in the 1980s, the boom in health care demand in the US solidified its position and in the 1990s the technological explosion in computers and the imperative need to lower costs in the health care industry have prompted the most dramatic changes in the wy CT is utilized in the year 2000. Thus, different motivations have led the way of progress in CT at various times, and in spite of amazing developments in other crucial imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging, CT maintains its rightful place as the premiere imaging modality in the modern radiology department. This work covers the basic principles of tomographic image reconstruction, and how axial CT scanners progressed historically in the first two decades. Developments in X-ray tubes, and detection systems are highlighted, as well as the impact of clinical efficiency, image quality and patient doses. The basic construction of translate-rotate (1st and 2nd generation, rotate-rotate (3rd generation) and detector ring (4th generation) scanners are described. The so-called 5th generation scanner, the electron beam scanner, is also described, with its clinical and technical advantages and its inherent financial and maintenance disadvantages, which brought the advent of spiral and multi-slice scanners. These most recent developments in CT technology have opened a new era in the clinical use of CT; and although image quality has reached an expected

  12. Smallpox: clinical highlights and considerations for vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox virus has gained considerable attention as a potential bioterrorism agent. Recommendations for smallpox (vaccinia vaccination presume a low risk for use of smallpox as a terrorist biological agent and vaccination is currently recommended for selected groups of individuals such as health care workers, public health authorities, and emergency/rescue workers, among others. Information about adverse reactions to the smallpox vaccine is based upon studies completed during the 1950s and 1960s. The prevalence of various diseases has changed over the last four decades and new disease entities have been described during this period. The smallpox vaccination may be contra-indicated in many of these conditions. This has made pre-screening of potential vaccines necessary. It is believed that at present, the risks of vaccine-associated complications far outweigh the potential benefits of vaccination in the general population.

  13. Acetabular fractures: anatomic and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David A; Menn, Kirsten; Baumgaertner, Michael; Haims, Andrew H

    2013-09-01

    Classifying acetabular fractures can be an intimidating topic. However, it is helpful to remember that there are only three basic types of acetabular fractures: column fractures, transverse fractures, and wall fractures. Within this framework, acetabular fractures are classified into two broad categories: elementary or associated fractures. We will review the osseous anatomy of the pelvis and provide systematic approaches for reviewing both radiographs and CT scans to effectively evaluate the acetabulum. Although acetabular fracture classification may seem intimidating, the descriptions and distinctions discussed and shown in this article hopefully make the topic simpler to understand. Approach the task by recalling that there are only three basic types of acetabular fractures: column fractures (coronally oriented on CT images), transverse fractures (sagittally oriented on CT images), and wall fractures (obliquely oriented on CT images). We have provided systematic approaches for reviewing both conventional radiographs and CT scans to effectively assess the acetabulum. The clinical implications of the different fracture patterns have also been reviewed because it is critically important to include pertinent information for our clinical colleagues to provide the most efficient and timely clinical care.

  14. Rectal drug administration: clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A G; Moolenaar, F; de Leede, L G; Breimer, D D

    1982-01-01

    The human rectum represents a body cavity in which drugs can be easily introduced and retained and from which absorption is well possible. There are important therapeutic reasons why it is sometimes preferable to give a drug rectally rather than orally, e.g. in cases of nausea and vomiting. Drawbacks of rectal drug administration include the interruption of absorption by defaecation and lack of patient acceptability. The mechanism of drug absorption from the rectum is probably no different to that in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract, despite the fact that the physiological circumstances (e.g. pH, fluid content) differ substantially, Absorption from aqueous and alcoholic solutions may occur very rapidly, which has proved to be of considerable therapeutic value in the rapid suppression of acute convulsive attacks by diazepam (e.g. in children), but absorption from suppositories is generally slower and very much dependent on the nature of the suppository base, the use of surfactants or other additives, particle size of the active ingredient, etc. There is some evidence that hepatic first-pass elimination of high clearance drugs is partially avoided after rectal administration, e.g. lignocaine. This can be explained by the rectal venous blood supply: the upper part is connected with the portal system, whereas the lower part is directly connected with the systemic circulation. Plasma concentration data following rectal administration of representatives of several classes of drugs are reviewed: anticonvulsants, non-narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, hypnosedatives and anaesthetics, strong analgesics, theophylline and derivatives, corticosteroids, antibacterial agents, thiazinamium, promethazine, hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide, streptokinase, progesterone, ergotamine tartrate and levodopa. Only limited number of cases has it been adequately shown that the rectal route of administration gives plasma concentrations which are comparable to

  15. Disordered gambling: etiology, trajectory, and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Howard J; Martin, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Gambling-related research has advanced rapidly during the past 20 years. As a result of expanding interest in pathological gambling (PG), stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, regulators, and policy makers) have a better understanding of excessive gambling, including its etiology (e.g., neurobiological/neurogenetic, psychological, and sociological factors) and trajectory (e.g., initiation, course, and adaptation to gambling exposure). In this article, we examine these advances in PG-related research and then consider some of the clinical implications of these advances. We consider criteria changes for PG recently proposed by the DSM-V Impulse Control Work Group for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). We also review how clinicians can more accurately and efficiently diagnose clients seeking help for gambling-related problems by utilizing brief screens. Finally, we consider the importance of future research that can identify behavioral markers for PG. We suggest that identifying these markers will allow clinicians to make earlier diagnoses, recommend targeted treatments, and advance secondary prevention efforts. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved

  16. Clinical consideration of fungal paranasal sinusitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuni, Tsuyoshi; Asakura, Koji; Homma, Tomo; Kawaguchi, Ryuichi; Ishikawa, Tadataka; Yamazaki, Norikazu; Himi, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    Fungal paranasal sinusitis is included in the differential diagnosis of unilateral paranasal lesion. Recently the incidence of fungal paranasal sinusitis has been increasing. We reviewed 24 patients (9 males and 15 females) with fungal paranasal sinusitis treated at Muroran City Hospital between January 2001 and May 2006, and clinical presentation and CT findings with those of 56 patients (36 males and 20 females) with chronic unilateral sinusitis. Fungal sinusitis patients ranged in age from 45 to 87, and the average age was 65.9 years old. In contrast, the age of chronic sinusitis patients ranged from 24 to 83, and the average age was 54.4 years old. The chief complaint of both fungal sinusitis and chronic sinusitis included rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction and post nasal discharge. CT exam was performed in all patients. In 23 cases of paranasal fungal sinusitis and 54 cases of chronic sinusitis the findings involved the maxillary sinus. The most common observation (69.6%) was bone density within the affected sinus in fungal sinusitis. However, only 2 cases of chronic sinusitis (3.9%) showed calcification. All cases of fungal sinusitis were diagnosed by pathological examinations. Most cases were proved to be aspergillus, while only one case was mucor. We treated all cases surgically, 18 cases underwent Caldwell-Luc's procedure and 5 cases underwent endoscopic sinus surgery under local anesthesia. (author)

  17. Practical Considerations for Clinical PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Samuel; Viets, Zachary; Fowler, Kathryn; Gore, Lael; Thomas, John V; McNamara, Michelle; McConathy, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Clinical PET/MR imaging is currently performed at a number of centers around the world as part of routine standard of care. This article focuses on issues and considerations for a clinical PET/MR imaging program, focusing on routine standard-of-care studies. Although local factors influence how clinical PET/MR imaging is implemented, the approaches and considerations described here intend to apply to most clinical programs. PET/MR imaging provides many more options than PET/computed tomography with diagnostic advantages for certain clinical applications but with added complexity. A recurring theme is matching the PET/MR imaging protocol to the clinical application to balance diagnostic accuracy with efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Considerations for Clinical Neuropsychological Evaluation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Susan C; Rush, Beth K

    2017-11-01

    The clinical neuropsychologist has the opportunity to be uniquely involved in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We review the current literature that defines cognitive and behavioral symptoms in ALS, including current knowledge of the neuropathological and genetic underpinning for these symptoms. There are unique considerations for clinical neuropsychological evaluation and clinical research in ALS and we highlight these in this review. Specifically, we shed light on special factors that contribute to our understanding of cognitive and behavioral impairment in ALS, including co-morbid symptoms, differential diagnosis, and considerations for longitudinal tracking of phenotypes. We discuss the rationale for proposing a specific approach to such as cognitive screening, test selection, response modality consideration, and test-retest intervals. With this didactic overview, the clinical neuropsychologist has the potential to learn more about the heterogeneous presentation of motor and neuropsychological symptoms in ALS. Furthermore, the reader has the opportunity to understand what it takes to develop a valid assessment approach particularly when the phenotype of ALS remains undefined in some regards. This clinical practice review sets the stage for the clinical neuropsychologist to further contribute to our clinical and scientific understanding of ALS and cognition. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Influence of Task Difficulty and Background Music on Working Memory Activity: Developmental Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniel, Shlomo; Aram, Dorit

    1998-01-01

    A study of 300 children in kindergarten, grade 2, and grade 6 found that background music improved visual discrimination task performance at the youngest and middle ages and had no effect on the oldest participants. On a square identification task, background music had no influence on easy and difficult tasks but lowered performance on…

  20. Clinical and financial considerations for implementing an ICU telemedicine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruklitis, Robert J; Tracy, Joseph A; McCambridge, Matthew M

    2014-06-01

    As the population in the United States increases and ages, the need to provide high-quality, safe, and cost-effective care to the most critically ill patients will be of great importance. With the projected shortage of intensivists, innovative changes to improve efficiency and increase productivity will be necessary. Telemedicine programs in the ICUs (tele-ICUs) are a successful strategy to improve intensivist access to critically ill patients. Although significant capital and maintenance costs are associated with tele-ICUs, these costs can be offset by indirect financial benefits, such as decreased length of stay. To achieve the positive clinical outcomes desired, tele-ICUs must be carefully designed and implemented. In this article, we discuss the clinical benefits of tele-ICUs. We review the financial considerations, including direct and indirect reimbursement and development and maintenance costs. Finally, we review design and implementation considerations for tele-ICUs.

  1. Emollient treatment of atopic dermatitis: latest evidence and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Lun Hon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To review current classes of emollients in the market, their clinical efficacy in atopic dermatitis (AD and considerations for choice of an emollient. Methods: PubMed Clinical Queries under Clinical Study Categories (with Category limited to Therapy and Scope limited to Narrow and Systematic Reviews were used as the search engine. Keywords of ‘emollient or moisturizer’ and ‘atopic dermatitis’ were used. Overview of findings: Using the keywords of ‘emollient’ and ‘atopic dermatitis’, there were 105 and 36 hits under Clinical Study Categories (with Category limited to Therapy and Scope limited to Narrow and Systematic Reviews, respectively. Plant-derived products, animal products and special ingredients were discussed. Selected proprietary products were tabulated. Conclusions: A number of proprietary emollients have undergone trials with clinical data available on PubMed-indexed journals. Most moisturizers showed some beneficial effects, but there was generally no evidence that one moisturizer is superior to another. Choosing an appropriate emollient for AD patients would improve acceptability and adherence for emollient treatment. Physician’s recommendation is the primary consideration for patients when selecting a moisturizer/ emollient; therefore, doctors should provide evidence-based information about these emollients.

  2. Signal and background considerations for the MRSt on the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wink, C. W., E-mail: cwink@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Bionta, R.; Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRSt) has been conceptually designed for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility. Using the MRSt, the goals are to measure the time-evolution of the spectrum with a time resolution of ∼20-ps and absolute accuracy better than 5%. To meet these goals, a detailed understanding and optimization of the signal and background characteristics are required. Through ion-optics, MCNP simulations, and detector-response calculations, it is demonstrated that the goals and a signal-to background >5–10 for the down-scattered neutron measurement are met if the background, consisting of ambient neutrons and gammas, at the MRSt is reduced 50–100 times.

  3. Signal and background considerations for the MRSt on the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, C W; Frenje, J A; Hilsabeck, T J; Bionta, R; Khater, H Y; Gatu Johnson, M; Kilkenny, J D; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRSt) has been conceptually designed for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility. Using the MRSt, the goals are to measure the time-evolution of the spectrum with a time resolution of ∼20-ps and absolute accuracy better than 5%. To meet these goals, a detailed understanding and optimization of the signal and background characteristics are required. Through ion-optics, MCNP simulations, and detector-response calculations, it is demonstrated that the goals and a signal-to background >5-10 for the down-scattered neutron measurement are met if the background, consisting of ambient neutrons and gammas, at the MRSt is reduced 50-100 times.

  4. Clinical and practical considerations in the pharmacologic management of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpy, Michael J; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Despite published treatment recommendations and the availability of approved and off-label pharmacologic therapies for narcolepsy, the clinical management of this incurable, chronic neurologic disorder remains challenging. While treatment is generally symptomatically driven, decisions regarding which drug(s) to use need to take into account a variety of factors that may affect adherence, efficacy, and tolerability. Type 1 narcolepsy (predominantly excessive daytime sleepiness with cataplexy) or type 2 narcolepsy (excessive daytime sleepiness without cataplexy) may drive treatment decisions, with consideration given either to a single drug that targets multiple symptoms or to multiple drugs that each treat a specific symptom. Other drug-related characteristics that affect drug choice are dosing regimens, tolerability, and potential drug-drug interactions. Additionally, the patient should be an active participant in treatment decisions, and the main symptomatic complaints, treatment goals, psychosocial setting, and use of lifestyle substances (ie, alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and cannabis) need to be discussed with respect to treatment decisions. Although there is a lack of narcolepsy-specific instruments for monitoring therapeutic effects, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness (eg, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test) can be used to provide guidance on whether treatment goals are being met. These considerations are discussed with the objective of providing clinically relevant recommendations for making treatment decisions that can enhance the effective management of patients with narcolepsy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Innovative Prenatal Testing: Clinical Applications and Ethical Considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Shio-Jean; Chen, Chih-Ling; Huang, Tzu-Jung

    2017-10-01

    The biomedical technology related to prenatal screen/diagnosis has developed rapidly in recent decades. Many prenatal genetic examinations are now available to assist pregnant women to better understand the status and development of their fetus. Moreover, many commercial advertisements for innovative prenatal examinations are now shown in the media. Cell-free DNA Screening (cfDNA screening), a non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) procedure, is a safe and high accuracy test that may be done at an earlier gestational age to screen for fetal aneuploidy. The following questions should be considered when applying cfDNA screening in clinical practice: 1. what is cfDNA screening, 2. who are its potential users, and 3. what ethical and policy considerations are associated with this examination? This article provides relevant information, clinical practice guidelines, and ethical / policy considerations related to cfDNA screening. Discussing cases involving different clinical situations helps promote understanding of cfDNA screening and maternal-care quality.

  6. A consideration of Raman scattering in the estimation of the background in low energy TXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, M.; Shoji, T.; Yamada, T.; Wilson, R.

    2000-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the background in a TXRF spectrum is necessary for trace analysis. The tailing of large peaks in the spectrum is the main source of the background. Sum and escape peaks are also part of the background caused from an SSD detector. Estimation and subtraction of these peaks from the spectrum have been successful with sophisticated software. Raman scattering is another possible phenomenon that will give rise to a background peak in the spectrum. This paper explores this Raman phenomenon. We used the W-Mα line for the low energy TXRF experiments. The W-Mα is effective for exciting aluminum, magnesium and sodium atoms. The energy of the W-Mα line, 1.78 keV, is above and near the absorption edges of these elements and yet below the absorption edge of silicon, 1.84 keV. To obtain a monochromatic W-Mα line, we used a monochromator consisting of a total reflection mirror of silicon and a crystal of RAP(001). The reflectivity of this monochromator is smaller than that of a monochromator consisting of synthesized multilayers but the energy resolution is superior. We measured the spectra from a blank silicon wafer and a silicon wafer covered with a titanium layer. A peak caused by the elastic scattering of the incident W-Mα line is the main peak that appeared at 1.78 keV in each spectrum. There is another peak at 1.65 keV in the spectrum from the blank wafer. The ratio of the intensity of this peak to that of the main peak increases with the glancing angle. The peak at 1.65 keV does not appear in the spectrum taken from a silicon wafer covered with a titanium layer. There are no characteristic x-rays which have this same energy. Also, Compton scattering cannot account for a peak at that energy. We calculated energies of diffracted x-rays by the silicon crystal assuming that x-rays having a continuous spectrum are included in the incident x-rays. However, there are no diffracted x-rays which have an energy in this range. The binding energy of

  7. Ethical considerations in clinical training, care and research in psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D

    2011-04-01

    Psychopharmacology is a powerful tool in psychiatry; however, it is one that demands responsibility in order to deal with the ethical complexities that accompany advances in the field. It is important that questions are asked and that ethical mindfulness and sensitivity are developed along with clinical skills. In order to cultivate and deepen ethical awareness and subsequently solve issues in optimal fashion, investment should be made in the development of an ethical decision-making process as well as in education in the ethics of psychopharmacology to trainees in the field at all stages of their educational development. A clear approach to identifying ethical problems, engaging various ethical concepts in considering solutions and then applying these principles in problem resolution is demanded. An openness in identifying and exploring issues has become crucial to the future development and maturation of psychopharmacologists, both research and clinical. Consideration must be given to the social implications of psychopharmacological practice, with the best interests of patients always paramount. From both a research and clinical perspective, psychopharmacology has to be practised with fairness, sensitivity and ethical relevance to all. While ethical issues related to psychopharmacological practice are varied and plentiful, this review focuses on advances in technology and biological sciences, personal integrity, special populations, and education and training.

  8. Clinical considerations in restorative dentistry - A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Tumkur Shivakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between periodontal health and the restoration of teeth is intimate and inseparable. Human teeth are designed in such a way that the individual tooth contributes significantly to their own support as well as collectively the teeth in the arch. Decay on the proximal surfaces occurs mainly due to the faulty interrelationship between the contact area, marginal ridge, the embrasures and the gingiva. An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure an adequate form, function, aesthetics and comfort of the dentition. For long-term survival of restoration, both functionally and esthetically, certain biological considerations are very critical to preserve the health of the periodontium and thus must be given due importance in clinical practice. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainly remains regarding specific concept such as biologic width and its maintainces.

  9. Acute abdomen. Clinical background and demands on imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeb, C.; Jauch, K.W.; Reiser, M.; Graser, A.

    2010-01-01

    The term ''acute abdomen'' does not describe a specific disease entity but is more a critical clinical state which incorporates very heterogeneous clinical presentations. The prognosis of any disease depends on the time frame from the onset of symptoms to the initiation of a specific therapy. For this reason there are special expectations by clinicians regarding the diagnostic assessment provided by radiology which is expected to deliver an immediate diagnosis supporting further therapeutic decisions. Along with the patient's clinical history, physical examination and blood tests, radiological diagnostics are essential for enabling a specific treatment. From a surgical point of view the radiologist is expected to help in differentiating between cases with indications for emergency surgery and cases eligible for elective surgery or conservative treatment. (orig.) [de

  10. The clinical and radiologic consideration of osteosarcoma of the jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Kim, Ki Duck; Park, Chang Seo

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the proper diagnosis and to establish the treatment plan of the osteosarcoma in the jaws through the clinical, radiological, and histopathologic considerations. The authors compared and analyzed t he clinicoradiologic features of the six cases of osteosarcoma, diagnosed at the dental college hospital in Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, during the period from 1975 to 1995. The obtained results were as follows; 1. Osteosarcoma occurred in the mean age, 26.2 years, ranged from 14 to 35 years, and equally in men and women. 2. The swelling was the most common frequent presenting complaints. Other reported symptoms included pain, parasthesia of the lower lip or the lesion. 3. The average interval was seen 3.5 months before the patient had been seen by a doctor. 4. The frequency of the lesions was equally in the maxilla, 3 cases and mandible, 3 cases. 5. Radiologically, osteoblastic osteosarcoma which is seen in the 3 cases was the most frequent histologic type. Chondroblastic osteosarcoma were seen in the 2 cases. there was no correlation between the radiologic appearance and histopathologic type.

  11. Flowable Resin Composites: A Systematic Review and Clinical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about flowable composite materials. Most literature mentions conventional composite materials at large, giving minimal emphasis to flowables in particular. This paper briefly gives an in depth insight to the multiple facets of this versatile material. Aim To exclusively review the most salient features of flowable composite materials in comparison to conventional composites and to give clinicians a detailed understanding of the advantages, drawbacks, indications and contraindications based on composition and physical/mechanical properties. Methodology Data Sources: A thorough literature search from the year 1996 up to January 2015 was done on PubMed Central, The Cochrane Library, Science Direct, Wiley Online Library, and Google Scholar. Grey literature (pending patents, technical reports etc.) was also screened. The search terms used were “dental flowable resin composites”. Search Strategy After omitting the duplicates/repetitions, a total of 491 full text articles were assessed. As including all articles were out of the scope of this paper. Only relevant articles that fulfilled the reviewer’s objectives {mentioning indications, contraindications, applications, assessment of physical/mechanical/biological properties (in vitro/ in vivo /ex vivo)} were considered. A total of 92 full text articles were selected. Conclusion Flowable composites exhibit a variable composition and consequently variable mechanical/ physical properties. Clinicians must be aware of this aspect to make a proper material selection based on specific properties and indications of each material relevant to a particular clinical situation. PMID:26266238

  12. Practical and clinical considerations in Cobalt-60 tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt-60 (Co-60 based radiation therapy continues to play a significant role in not only developing countries, where access to radiation therapy is extremely limited, but also in industrialized countries. Howver, technology has to be developed to accommodate modern techniques, in-clud-ing image guided and adaptive radiation therapy (IGART. In this paper we describe some of the practical and clinical considerations for Co-60 based tomotherapy by comparing Co-60 and 6 MV linac-based tomotherapy plans for a head and neck (HandN cancer and a prostate cancer case. The tomotherapy IMRT plans were obtained by modeling a MIMiC binary multi-leaf collimator attached to a Theratron-780c Co-60 unit and a 6 MV linear accelerator (CL2100EX. The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC code was used for the modeling of the treatment units with the MIMiC collimator and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code was used for beamlet dose data. An in-house inverse treatment planning program was then used to generate optimized tomotherapy dose distributions for the H and N and prostate cases. The dose distributions, cumulative dose area histograms (DAHs and dose difference maps were used to evaluate and compare Co-60 and 6 MV based tomotherapy plans. A quantitative analysis of the dose distributions and dose-volume histograms shows that both Co-60 and 6 MV plans achieve the plan objectives for the targets (CTV and nodes and OARs (spinal cord in HandN case, and rectum in prostate case.

  13. Clinical and Diagnostic Features of Bronchial Asthma in Children on the Background of Latent Food Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Levytskyi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on clinical and paraclinical examination of 112 children with bronchial asthma, there were studied the features of its course against the background of food allergy. It was found that only a set of clinical and paraclinical signs is the most important for the diagnosis of bronchial asthma in children on the background of latent food allergy.

  14. [Basic considerations during outsourcing of clinical data management services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tong; Liu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    With worldwide improvements in the regulations of international and domestic clinical trial conductions, the quality of clinical trials and trial data management are receiving a great deal of attention. To ensure the quality of clinical trials, maintain business flexibilities and effectively utilize internal and external resources, the outsourcing model is used in the management of clinical data in operation of pharmaceutical companies. The essential criteria of a successful outsourcing mode in clinical trial are selection of qualified contract research organizations (CRO); establishment of appropriate outsourcing model, and generation of effective quality control systems to ensure the authenticity, integrity and accuracy of the clinical trial data.

  15. Research design considerations for chronic pain prevention clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2015-01-01

    Although certain risk factors can identify individuals who are most likely to develop chronic pain, few interventions to prevent chronic pain have been identified. To facilitate the identification of preventive interventions, an IMMPACT meeting was convened to discuss research design considerations...

  16. Incorporating consideration of health impacts into land use development approval processes: Development of a Health Background Study Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloughney, Brent W; Bursey, Gayle E; Neumann, Jana; Leeming, Daniel H; Gutmann, Christine E; Sivanand, Bhavna; Mowat, David L

    2014-09-12

    This project involved development of a Health Background Study (HBS) Framework to support consideration of health impacts within municipalities' approval process for land use development. Peel Public Health and Toronto Public Health led the project with the participation of planners, urban designers, engineers, public health staff and development industry representatives. Historical growth in the Region of Peel and suburban Toronto has resulted in extensive low-density development, creating car-dependent communities with disconnected streets and segregated land uses. The inclusion of an HBS in developers' applications to municipalities is one approach by which health-related expectations for the built environment can be established within the approval process. Development of the HBS Framework used the six core elements of the built environment with the strongest evidence for impact on health and was informed by analysis of the provincial and local policy contexts, practices of other municipalities and stakeholder interviews. The Framework's contents were refined according to feedback from multidisciplinary stakeholder workshops. The HBS Framework identifies minimum standards for built environment core elements that developers need to address in their applications. The Framework was created to be simple and instructive with applicability to a range of development locations and scales, and to various stages of the development approval process. Peel Public Health is leading several initiatives to support the use of the HBS as a part of the development application process. The HBS Framework is a tool that public health and planning can use to support the consideration of health impacts within municipalities' land use development processes.

  17. Physician to investigator: clinical practice to clinical research--ethical, operational, and financial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Physicians who participate in clinical research studies gain benefits for themselves, their practice, and their patients. Historically, private practice physicians have chosen to defer to their counterparts in academic medicine when it comes to contributing to scientific advancement through clinical studies. A growing number of private practice physicians are now taking a serious second look and deciding that there are unique benefits for both the practice and the patient. Physicians who decide to participate in clinical research should give serious consideration to the time and resources that are required to meet both federal regulations and industry standards. In addition, ethical and scientific principles for assuring the protection of human research subjects must be a paramount commitment.

  18. MO-B-BRB-01: 3D Dosimetry in the Clinic: Background and Motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, L.

    2016-01-01

    Full three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry using volumetric chemical dosimeters probed by 3D imaging systems has long been a promising technique for the radiation therapy clinic, since it provides a unique methodology for dose measurements in the volume irradiated using complex conformal delivery techniques such as IMRT and VMAT. To date true 3D dosimetry is still not widely practiced in the community; it has been confined to centres of specialized expertise especially for quality assurance or commissioning roles where other dosimetry techniques are difficult to implement. The potential for improved clinical applicability has been advanced considerably in the last decade by the development of improved 3D dosimeters (e.g., radiochromic plastics, radiochromic gel dosimeters and normoxic polymer gel systems) and by improved readout protocols using optical computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. In this session, established users of some current 3D chemical dosimeters will briefly review the current status of 3D dosimetry, describe several dosimeters and their appropriate imaging for dose readout, present workflow procedures required for good dosimetry, and analyze some limitations for applications in select settings. We will review the application of 3D dosimetry to various clinical situations describing how 3D approaches can complement other dose delivery validation approaches already available in the clinic. The applications presented will be selected to inform attendees of the unique features provided by full 3D techniques. Learning Objectives: L. John Schreiner: Background and Motivation Understand recent developments enabling clinically practical 3D dosimetry, Appreciate 3D dosimetry workflow and dosimetry procedures, and Observe select examples from the clinic. Sofie Ceberg: Application to dynamic radiotherapy Observe full dosimetry under dynamic radiotherapy during respiratory motion, and Understand how the measurement of high resolution dose data in an

  19. MO-B-BRB-01: 3D Dosimetry in the Clinic: Background and Motivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, L. [Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Full three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry using volumetric chemical dosimeters probed by 3D imaging systems has long been a promising technique for the radiation therapy clinic, since it provides a unique methodology for dose measurements in the volume irradiated using complex conformal delivery techniques such as IMRT and VMAT. To date true 3D dosimetry is still not widely practiced in the community; it has been confined to centres of specialized expertise especially for quality assurance or commissioning roles where other dosimetry techniques are difficult to implement. The potential for improved clinical applicability has been advanced considerably in the last decade by the development of improved 3D dosimeters (e.g., radiochromic plastics, radiochromic gel dosimeters and normoxic polymer gel systems) and by improved readout protocols using optical computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. In this session, established users of some current 3D chemical dosimeters will briefly review the current status of 3D dosimetry, describe several dosimeters and their appropriate imaging for dose readout, present workflow procedures required for good dosimetry, and analyze some limitations for applications in select settings. We will review the application of 3D dosimetry to various clinical situations describing how 3D approaches can complement other dose delivery validation approaches already available in the clinic. The applications presented will be selected to inform attendees of the unique features provided by full 3D techniques. Learning Objectives: L. John Schreiner: Background and Motivation Understand recent developments enabling clinically practical 3D dosimetry, Appreciate 3D dosimetry workflow and dosimetry procedures, and Observe select examples from the clinic. Sofie Ceberg: Application to dynamic radiotherapy Observe full dosimetry under dynamic radiotherapy during respiratory motion, and Understand how the measurement of high resolution dose data in an

  20. Clinical Considerations in the Assessment of Adolescent Chemical Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ken

    1990-01-01

    Discusses relevant research findings of clinical assessment of adolescent chemical dependency so that service providers can better address these concerns. Three major issues are discussed: the definition of adolescent chemical dependency, clinical domains of assessment (chemical use problem severity, precipitating and perpetuating risk factors,…

  1. Distance Supervision in Rehabilitation Counseling: Ethical and Clinical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily M.; Schultz, Jared C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of technology-mediated distance supervision is a rapidly growing area in rehabilitation counseling and other fields. Distance supervision has both tremendous potential and notable challenges to address, including questions of ethics and evidence. Purpose: This article examines both the ethical and nonethical principles that…

  2. Diagnostic Consideration for Sinonasal Wegener's Granulomatosis Clinically Mistaken for Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Cristina; Emmanuele, Carmela; Tranchina, Maria Grazia; Ippolito, Massimo; Cosentino, Sebastiano; Saita, Vincenzo; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Wegener's granulomatosis clinically mistaken for carcinoma in a 21-year-old girl presenting with an ulcerated mass of the nasopharynx associated with enlarged laterocervical nodes. The lesion was clinically suspected as malignant on the basis of clinical and radiological findings (namely, computed tomography scan and positron emission tomography). However, multiple biopsies were not conclusive for malignancy showing histological change suggestive of Wegener's granulomatosis. A serum determination of cANCA supported the diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis. Clinical findings and image studies suggested an erroneous diagnosis of malignancy whereas a definitive diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis was achieved only after repeated biopsies thus leading to a correct therapeutic approach. The Wegener granulomatosis must be added to the list of the differential diagnoses of the masses of the nasopharynx associated with or without enlarged laterocervical nodes. PMID:24106630

  3. Clinical considerations of Monte Carlo for electron radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faddegon, Bruce; Balogh, Judith; Mackenzie, Robert; Scora, Daryl

    1998-01-01

    Technical requirements for Monte Carlo based electron radiotherapy treatment planning are outlined. The targeted overall accuracy for estimate of the delivered dose is the least restrictive of 5% in dose, 5 mm in isodose position. A system based on EGS4 and capable of achieving this accuracy is described. Experience gained in system design and commissioning is summarized. The key obstacle to widespread clinical use of Monte Carlo is lack of clinically acceptable measurement based methodology for accurate commissioning

  4. Clinical trials in "emerging markets": regulatory considerations and other factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Romi; Wang, Ouhong

    2013-11-01

    Clinical studies are being placed in emerging markets as part of global drug development programs to access large pool of eligible patients and to benefit from a cost effective structure. However, over the last few years, the definition of "emerging markets" is being revisited, especially from a regulatory perspective. For purposes of this article, countries outside US, EU and the traditional "western countries" are discussed. Multiple factors are considered for placement of clinical studies such as adherence to Good Clinical Practice (GCP), medical infrastructure & standard of care, number of eligible patients, etc. This article also discusses other quantitative factors such as country's GDP, patent applications, healthcare expenditure, healthcare infrastructure, corruption, innovation, etc. These different factors and indexes are correlated to the number of clinical studies ongoing in the "emerging markets". R&D, healthcare expenditure, technology infrastructure, transparency, and level of innovation, show a significant correlation with the number of clinical trials being conducted in these countries. This is the first analysis of its kind to evaluate and correlate the various other factors to the number of clinical studies in a country. © 2013.

  5. Ethical considerations in industry-sponsored multiregional clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibia, Ekopimo; Binkowitz, Bruce; Saillot, Jean-Louis; Talerico, Steven; Koerner, Chin; Ferreira, Irene; Agarwal, Anupam; Metz, Craig; Maman, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    During the last several decades, the scientific and ethics communities have addressed important ethical issues in medical research, resulting in the elaboration and adoption of concepts, guidelines, and codes. Ethical issues in the conduct of Multiregional Clinical Trials have attracted significant attention mainly in the last two decades. With the globalization of clinical research and the rapid expansion to countries with a limited tradition of biomedical research, sponsors must proactively address local ethical issues, the adequacy of oversight as well as the applicability and validity of data, and scientific conclusions drawn from diverse patient populations. This paper highlights some core ethical principles and milestones in medical research, and, from an industry perspective, it discusses ethical issues that the clinical trial team may face when conducting Multiregional Clinical Trials (MRCT, clinical trials conducted at sites located across multiple geographic regions of the world). This paper further highlights the areas of consensus and controversies and proposes points to consider. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Endo-perio lesions: Diagnosis and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Nina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interrelationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has aroused confusion, queries and controversy. Differentiating between periodontal and endodontic problems can be difficult. A symptomatic tooth may have pain of periodontal and/or pulpal origin. The nature of that pain is often the first clue in determining the etiology of such a problem. Radiographic and clinical evaluation can help clarify the nature of the problem. In some cases, the influence of pulpal pathology may create periodontal involvement. In others, periodontal pathology may create pulpal pathology. This review article discusses the various clinical aspects to be considered for accurately diagnosing and treating endo-perio lesions.

  7. Prescription and Cost Consideration at a Diabetic Clinic in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    SUMMARY. Diabetes mellitus is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The high cost of treatment is a major concern to both physicians and patients. This study assessed pattern and cost of drugs prescribed at a diabetic clinic, and identified the commonest reasons militating against adherence to therapy.The study ...

  8. Enamel microabrasion: An overview of clinical and scientific considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Sundfeld-Neto, Daniel; Aguiar, Flavio Henrique Baggio; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-01-01

    Superficial stains and irregularities of the enamel are generally what prompt patients to seek dental intervention to improve their smile. These stains or defects may be due to hypoplasia, amelogenesis imperfecta, mineralized white spots, or fluorosis, for which enamel microabrasion is primarily indicated. Enamel microabrasion involves the use of acidic and abrasive agents, such as with 37% phosphoric acid and pumice or 6% hydrochloric acid and silica, applied to the altered enamel surface with mechanical pressure from a rubber cup coupled to a rotatory mandrel of a low-rotation micromotor. If necessary, this treatment can be safely combined with bleaching for better esthetic results. Recent studies show that microabrasion is a conservative treatment when the enamel wear is minimal and clinically imperceptible. The most important factor contributing to the success of enamel microabrasion is the depth of the defect, as deeper, opaque stains, such as those resulting from hypoplasia, cannot be resolved with microabrasion, and require a restorative approach. Surface enamel alterations that result from microabrasion, such as roughness and microhardness, are easily restored by saliva. Clinical studies support the efficacy and longevity of this safe and minimally invasive treatment. The present article presents the clinical and scientific aspects concerning the microabrasion technique, and discusses the indications for and effects of the treatment, including recent works describing microscopic and clinical evaluations. PMID:25610848

  9. Clinical neuropsychiatric considerations regarding nonsubstance or behavioral addictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Marc N.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past several decades, non-substance-use behaviors like gambling, gaming, and sex have received greater consideration as possible foci of addictions. In this article, I will review the recent history and current status of non-substance or behavioral addictions. A main focus will involve gambling and gambling disorder, given that the latter is currently the sole non-substance addictive disorder described in the main text of the current (fifth) edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Internet gaming disorder, currently in the DSM-5 section addressing conditions that may need additional research, will also be considered, as will the concept of Internet addiction. Compulsive sexual behaviors (including problematic pornography use) will be considered, particularly with respect to how behavioral addictions may be considered in the forthcoming 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). PMID:29302225

  10. The forearm complex: anatomy, biomechanics and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaStayo, Paul C; Lee, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The forearm complex is comprised of the proximal radioulnar joint, middle radioulnar joint/interosseous membrane, and the distal radioulnar joint. These three areas function in a coordinated manner to rotate the hand in space and allow performance of functional tasks. If a structure or structures in one of these three areas is disrupted, this can adversely affect the function at any of the other two remaining areas. Surgical intervention focuses on restoring anatomical alignment to preserve the function of the forearm complex. Rehabilitation is guided by the relationships between the three areas of the forearm complex and the awareness of clinical signs, symptoms, and complications. The purposes of this paper are to 1) describe the anatomy and biomechanical function of the forearm complex and 2) discuss clinical correlates pertaining to select forearm injuries (excluding peripheral nerve injuries) that may affect forearm function.

  11. Sleep Health Issues for Children with FASD: Clinical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Jan, James E.; Asante, Kwadwo O.; Conry, Julianne L.; Fast, Diane K.; Bax, Martin C. O.; Ipsiroglu, Osman S.; Bredberg, Elizabeth; Loock, Christine A.; Wasdell, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the combined clinical experience of a multidisciplinary group of professionals on the sleep disturbances of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) focusing on sleep hygiene interventions. Such practical and comprehensive information is not available in the literature. Severe, persistent sleep difficulties are frequently associated with this condition but few health professionals are familiar with both FASD and sleep disorders. The sleep promotion techniqu...

  12. IT and security considerations for online clinical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patricia A H

    2010-03-01

    E-health and the national electronic medical record are on our doorstep. As an integral part of the healthcare system, dentistry needs to get on board with this national initiative. How prepared is the dental profession for this? How can a culture of online clinical records be promoted and what protocols and infrastructure exist for this to occur? The lack of government restriction means that dentistry should be taking full advantage of what is possible. The benefits and barriers to adoption of online records will be presented to provide a frame of reference for the next major shift in electronic communication.

  13. Oligometastatic prostate cancer: definitions, clinical outcomes, and treatment considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosoian, Jeffrey J.; Gorin, Michael A.; Ross, Ashley E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2018-01-01

    The oligometastatic state has been proposed as an intermediate stage of cancer spread between localized disease and widespread metastases. With improvements in diagnostic modalities such as functional imaging, oligometastatic prostate cancer is being diagnosed with greater frequency than ever before. Furthermore, the paradigm for treatment of advanced prostate cancers is shifting toward a more aggressive approach. Many questions surround the understanding of the process and consequences of oligometastasis, meaning that the contemporary literature offers a wide variety of definitions of oligometastatic prostate cancer. Until genomic data exist to provide a biological component to the definition of oligometastatic disease, a clinical diagnosis made on the basis of up to five extrapelvic lesions is reasonable for use. Retrospective studies suggest that interventions such as radical prostatectomy and local or metastasis-directed radiotherapy can be performed in the metastatic setting with minimal risk of toxic effects. These therapies seem to decrease the need for subsequent palliative interventions, but insufficient data are available to draw reliable conclusions regarding their effect on survival. Thus, a protocol for clinicians to manage the patient presenting with oligometastatic prostate cancer would be a useful clinical tool. PMID:27725639

  14. A new paradigm for HIV care: ethical and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noring, S; Dubler, N N; Birkhead, G; Agins, B

    2001-05-01

    Although dramatic advances in clinical treatment have greatly improved the lives of many people with HIV/AIDS, many other patients do not have information about or access to these treatments because of health care providers' presumptive judgments about patients' ability to adhere to medical regimens. The authors contend that with sufficient support and education most patients, even those with difficult social and medical problems, can be helped to initiate and maintain HIV treatment in accordance with current clinical standards. This commentary delineates a new paradigm for HIV care in which patients and providers collaborate on individualized plans to establish patients' readiness for treatment, ensure maintenance of treatment, and make use of the social services necessary to accomplish these goals. Providers have an ethical responsibility to do everything possible to see that patients who might benefit from new HIV treatments have a fair opportunity to do so, and health systems have a responsibility to facilitate this process. Substantial progress toward meeting these responsibilities can be made within the current health care environment.

  15. Sleep Health Issues for Children with FASD: Clinical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the combined clinical experience of a multidisciplinary group of professionals on the sleep disturbances of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD focusing on sleep hygiene interventions. Such practical and comprehensive information is not available in the literature. Severe, persistent sleep difficulties are frequently associated with this condition but few health professionals are familiar with both FASD and sleep disorders. The sleep promotion techniques used for typical children are less suitable for children with FASD who need individually designed interventions. The types, causes, and adverse effects of sleep disorders, the modification of environment, scheduling and preparation for sleep, and sleep health for their caregivers are discussed. It is our hope that parents and also researchers, who are interested in the sleep disorders of children with FASD, will benefit from this presentation and that this discussion will stimulate much needed evidence-based research.

  16. Sleep Health Issues for Children with FASD: Clinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, James E; Asante, Kwadwo O; Conry, Julianne L; Fast, Diane K; Bax, Martin C O; Ipsiroglu, Osman S; Bredberg, Elizabeth; Loock, Christine A; Wasdell, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the combined clinical experience of a multidisciplinary group of professionals on the sleep disturbances of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) focusing on sleep hygiene interventions. Such practical and comprehensive information is not available in the literature. Severe, persistent sleep difficulties are frequently associated with this condition but few health professionals are familiar with both FASD and sleep disorders. The sleep promotion techniques used for typical children are less suitable for children with FASD who need individually designed interventions. The types, causes, and adverse effects of sleep disorders, the modification of environment, scheduling and preparation for sleep, and sleep health for their caregivers are discussed. It is our hope that parents and also researchers, who are interested in the sleep disorders of children with FASD, will benefit from this presentation and that this discussion will stimulate much needed evidence-based research.

  17. Design considerations of a real-time clinical confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Barry R.

    1991-06-01

    A real-time clinical confocal light microscope provides the ophthalmologist with a new tool for the observation of the cornea and the ocular lens. In addition, the ciliary body, the iris, and the sclera can be observed. The real-time light microscopic images have high contrast and resolution. The transverse resolution is about one half micron and the range resolution is one micron. The following observations were made with visible light: corneal epithelial cells, wing cells, basal cells, Bowman's membrane, nerve fibers, basal lamina, fibroblast nuclei, Descemet's membrane, endothelial cells. Observation of the in situ ocular lens showed lens capsule, lens epithelium, lens fibrils, the interior of lens fibrils. The applications of the confocal microscope include: eye banking, laser refractive surgery, observation of wound healing, observation of the iris, the sciera, the ciliary body, the ocular lens, and the intraocular lens. Digital image processing can produce three-dimensional reconstructions of the cornea and the ocular lens.

  18. The myeloproliferative neoplasms, unclassifiable: clinical and pathological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianelli, Umberto; Cattaneo, Daniele; Bossi, Anna; Cortinovis, Ivan; Boiocchi, Leonardo; Liu, Yen-Chun; Augello, Claudia; Bonometti, Arturo; Fiori, Stefano; Orofino, Nicola; Guidotti, Francesca; Orazi, Attilio; Iurlo, Alessandra

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigate in detail the morphological, clinical and molecular features of 71 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms, unclassifiable. We performed a meticulous morphological analysis and found that most of the cases displayed a hypercellular bone marrow (70%) with normal erythropoiesis without left-shifting (59%), increased granulopoiesis with left-shifting (73%) and increased megakaryocytes with loose clustering (96%). Megakaryocytes displayed frequent giant forms with hyperlobulated or bulbous nuclei and/or other maturation defects. Interestingly, more than half of the cases displayed severe bone marrow fibrosis (59%). Median values of hemoglobin level and white blood cells count were all within the normal range; in contrast, median platelets count and lactate dehydrogenase were increased. Little less than half of the patients (44%) showed splenomegaly. JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 72% of all patients. Among the JAK2-negative cases, MPLW515L mutation was found in 17% and CALR mutations in 67% of the investigated cases, respectively. Finally, by multiple correspondence analysis of the morphological profiles, we found that all but four of the cases could be grouped in three morphological clusters with some features similar to those of the classic BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Analysis of the clinical parameters in these three clusters revealed discrepancies with the morphological profile in about 55% of the patients. In conclusion, we found that the category of myeloproliferative neoplasm, unclassifiable is heterogeneous but identification of different subgroups is possible and should be recommended for a better management of these patients.

  19. Telemetric intra-cranial pressure monitoring: clinical and financial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, James M; Pringle, Catherine J; Raffalli-Ebezant, Helen; Pathmanaban, Omar; Ramirez, Roberto; Kamaly-Asl, Ian D

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement is an important diagnostic tool in Neurosurgery. Until relatively recently, conventional monitoring has required that subjects be admitted to a hospital bed and the device is only able to be left in-situ for limited periods of time. We have evaluated a Telemetric ICP monitoring system that has been proven, by several other groups worldwide, to permit rapid, repeated and prolonged ICP measurement, in multiple environments. In our unit, 4 patients have been implanted to-date, between the ages of 4 and 16, manifesting a wide range of complex neurosurgical conditions. The sensors have been left in-situ for between 460 and 632 days. There have been no clinical complications and the system has been universally well tolerated. Clinical events, costs and patient experience were all assessed prior to and following implantation. Overall, there was a significant reduction in associated admissions (44.3%), imaging requirements (72.5%) and costs (50.0%). Subjective feedback from both the patients (where possible) and their families was overwhelmingly positive, partly due to (a) the system's ease of use, (b) its ability to reduce the number of admissions/tests required and (c) the facility for rapid measurement of ICP that permitted on-the-spot reassurance of concerns. Additionally, the ability to monitor ICP at home and/or whilst ambulant, has provided measurements that were hitherto inaccessible to our team, facilitating all the potential benefits that analysis of such information would provide. Indeed, we have seen the resultant management in each case has been completely altered by the availability of this data, reaffirming that the importance of being able to obtain it should not be underestimated. The combination of both this and the ability to markedly improve patient experience, along with generating significant cost-savings, lead the authors to suggest that the implantation of this system should be strongly considered in selected

  20. Clinical considerations for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madoc-Jones, H.; Wazer, D.E.; Zamenhof, R.G.; Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The radiotherapeutic management of primary brain tumors and metastatic melanoma in brain has had disappointing clinical results for many years. Although neutron capture therapy was tried in the US in the 1950s and 1960s, the results were not as hoped. However, with the newly developed capability to measure boron concentrations in blood and tissue both quickly and accurately, and with the advent of epithermal neutron beams obviating the need for scalp and skull reflection, it should not be possible to mount such a clinical trial of NCT again and avoid serious complications. As a prerequisite, it will be important to demonstrate the differential uptake of boron compound in brain tumor as compared with normal brain and its blood supply. If this can be done, then a trial of boron neutron capture therapy for brain tumors should be feasible. Because boronated phenylalanine has been demonstrated to be preferentially taken up by melanoma cells through the biosynthetic pathway for melanin, there is special interest in a trial of boron neutron capture therapy for metastatic melanoma in brain. Again, the use of an epithermal beam would make this a practical possibility. However, because any epithermal (or thermal) beam must contain a certain contaminating level of gamma rays, and because even a pure neutron beam cases gamma rays to be generated when it interacts with tissue, they think that it is essential to deliver treatments with an epithermal beam for boron neutron capture therapy in fractions in order to minimize the late-effects of low-LET gamma rays in the normal tissue

  1. Mindfulness Meditation for Fibromyalgia: Mechanistic and Clinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Neal, Adrienne L; Zeidan, Fadel

    2017-09-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread pain and a spectrum of psychological comorbidities, rendering treatment difficult and often a financial burden. Fibromyalgia is a complicated chronic pain condition that requires a multimodal therapeutic approach to optimize treatment efficacy. Thus, it has been postulated that mind-body techniques may prove fruitful in treating fibromyalgia. Mindfulness meditation, a behavioral technique premised on non-reactive sensory awareness, attenuates pain and improves mental health outcomes. However, the impact of mindfulness meditation on fibromyalgia-related outcomes has not been comprehensively characterized. The present review delineates the existing evidence supporting the effectiveness and hypothesized mechanisms of mindfulness meditation in treating fibromyalgia-related outcomes. Mindfulness-based interventions premised on cultivating acceptance, non-attachment, and social engagement may be most effective in decreasing fibromyalgia-related pain and psychological symptoms. Mindfulness-based therapies may alleviate fibromyalgia-related outcomes through multiple neural, psychological, and physiological processes. Mindfulness meditation may provide an effective complementary treatment approach for fibromyalgia patients, especially when combined with other reliable techniques (exercise; cognitive behavioral therapy). However, characterizing the specific analgesic mechanisms supporting mindfulness meditation is a critical step to fostering the clinical validity of this technique. Identification of the specific analgesic mechanisms supporting mindfulness-based pain relief could be utilized to better design behavioral interventions to specifically target fibromyalgia-related outcomes.

  2. Clinical utility of metabolic syndrome severity scores: considerations for practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeBoer MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mark D DeBoer,1,2 Matthew J Gurka2 11Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, 2Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: The metabolic syndrome (MetS is marked by abnormalities in central obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and high fasting glucose and appears to be produced by underlying processes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and adipocyte dysfunction. MetS has traditionally been classified based on dichotomous criteria that deny that MetS-related risk likely exists as a spectrum. Continuous MetS scores provide a way to track MetS-related risk over time. We generated MetS severity scores that are sex- and race/ethnicity-specific, acknowledging that the way MetS is manifested may be different by sex and racial/ethnic subgroup. These scores are correlated with long-term risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Clinical use of scores like these provide a potential opportunity to identify patients at highest risk, motivate patients toward lifestyle change, and follow treatment progress over time. Keywords: metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, risk prediction

  3. Trichomonas vaginalis origins, molecular pathobiology and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Robert P; Sherrard, Jackie

    2015-02-01

    To integrate a selection of the most recent data on Trichomonas vaginalis origins, molecular cell biology and T. vaginalis interactions with the urogenital tract microbiota with trichomoniasis symptoms and clinical management. Transcriptomics and proteomics datasets are accumulating, facilitating the identification and prioritization of key target genes to study T. vaginalis pathobiology. Proteins involved in host sensing and cytoskeletal plasticity during T. vaginalis amoeboid transformation were identified. T. vaginalis was shown to secrete exosomes and a macrophage migration inhibitory factor-like protein that both influence host-parasite interactions. T. vaginalis co-infections with Mycoplasma species and viruses were shown to modulate the inflammatory responses, whereas T. vaginalis interactions with various Lactobacillus species inhibit parasite interactions with human cells. T. vaginalis infections were also shown to be associated with bacterial vaginosis. A broader range of health sequelae is also becoming apparent. Diagnostics for both women and men based on the molecular approaches are being refined, in particular for men. New developments in the molecular and cellular basis of T. vaginalis pathobiology combined with data on the urogenital tract microbiota and immunology have enriched our knowledge on human-microbe interactions that will contribute to increasing our capacity to prevent and treat T. vaginalis and other sexually transmitted infections.

  4. Human factors consideration in clinical applications of virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C H; Griffin, M J

    1997-01-01

    Virtual reality environments have many potential applications in medicine, including surgical training, tele-operated robotic surgery, assessment and rehabilitation of behavioural and neurological disorders and diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation of physical disabilities. Although there is much potential for the use of immersive virtual reality environments in clinical applications, there are problems which could limit their ultimate usability. Some users have experienced side-effects during and after exposure to virtual reality environments. The symptoms include ocular problems, disorientation and balance disturbances, and nausea. Susceptibility to side-effects can be affected by age, ethnicity, experience, gender and physical fitness, as well as the characteristics of the display, the virtual environment and the tasks. The characteristics of the virtual reality system have also been shown to affect the ability of users to perform tasks in a virtual environment. Many of these effects can be attributed to delays between the sampling of head and limb positions and the presentation of an appropriate image on the display. The introduction of patients to virtual reality environments, for assessment, therapy or rehabilitation, raises particular safety and ethical issues. Patients exposed to virtual reality environments for assessment and rehabilitation may have disabilities which increase their susceptibility to certain side-effects. Special precautions therefore need to be taken to ensure the safety and effectiveness of such virtual reality applications. These precautions include minimisation of possible side-effects at the design stage. Factors are identified which are likely to affect the incidence of side-effects during and after exposures, and which need to be understood in order to minimise undesirable consequences. There is also a need for the establishment of protocols for monitoring and controlling exposures of patients to virtual reality environments. Issues

  5. Clinical Considerations of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Monogenic Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokun Hu

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore factors contribute to the success of PGD cycles for monogenic diseases.During a 3-year period (January 2009 to December 2012, 184 consecutive ICSI-PGD cycles for monogenic diseases reaching the ovum pick-up and fresh embryo-transfer stage performed at the Reproductive Medicine Center of The First Affiliated Hospital Of Sun Yat-sen University were evaluated.ICSI was performed on 2206 metaphase II oocytes, and normal fertilization and cleavage rates were 83.4% (1840/2206 and 96.2% (1770/1840, respectively. In the present study, 60.5% (181/299 of day 3 good-quality embryos developed into good-quality embryos on day 4 after biopsy. Collectively, 42.9% clinical pregnancy rate (79/184 and 28.5% implantation rate (111/389 were presented. In the adjusted linear regression model, the only two significant factors affecting the number of genetically unaffected embryos were the number of biopsied embryos (coefficient: 0.390, 95%CI 0.317-0.463, P = 0.000 and basal FSH level (coefficient: 0.198, 95%CI 0.031-0.365, P = 0.021. In the adjusted binary logistic regression model, the only two significant factors affecting pregnancy outcome were the number of genetically available transferable embryos after PGD (adjusted OR 1.345, 95% CI 1.148-1.575, P = 0.000 and number of oocyte retrieved (adjusted OR 0.934, 95% CI 0.877-0.994, P = 0.031.There should be at least four biopsied embryos to obtain at least one unaffected embryos in a PGD system for patients with single gene disorder and under the condition of basal FSH level smaller than 8.0mmol/L. Moreover, if only a low number (< 4 of biopsied embryos are available on day 3, the chance of unaffected embryos for transfer was small, with poor outcome.

  6. The thoracolumbar fascia: anatomy, function and clinical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, F H; Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Danneels, L; Schleip, R

    2012-01-01

    In this overview, new and existent material on the organization and composition of the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) will be evaluated in respect to its anatomy, innervation biomechanics and clinical relevance. The integration of the passive connective tissues of the TLF and active muscular structures surrounding this structure are discussed, and the relevance of their mutual interactions in relation to low back and pelvic pain reviewed. The TLF is a girdling structure consisting of several aponeurotic and fascial layers that separates the paraspinal muscles from the muscles of the posterior abdominal wall. The superficial lamina of the posterior layer of the TLF (PLF) is dominated by the aponeuroses of the latissimus dorsi and the serratus posterior inferior. The deeper lamina of the PLF forms an encapsulating retinacular sheath around the paraspinal muscles. The middle layer of the TLF (MLF) appears to derive from an intermuscular septum that developmentally separates the epaxial from the hypaxial musculature. This septum forms during the fifth and sixth weeks of gestation. The paraspinal retinacular sheath (PRS) is in a key position to act as a ‘hydraulic amplifier’, assisting the paraspinal muscles in supporting the lumbosacral spine. This sheath forms a lumbar interfascial triangle (LIFT) with the MLF and PLF. Along the lateral border of the PRS, a raphe forms where the sheath meets the aponeurosis of the transversus abdominis. This lateral raphe is a thickened complex of dense connective tissue marked by the presence of the LIFT, and represents the junction of the hypaxial myofascial compartment (the abdominal muscles) with the paraspinal sheath of the epaxial muscles. The lateral raphe is in a position to distribute tension from the surrounding hypaxial and extremity muscles into the layers of the TLF. At the base of the lumbar spine all of the layers of the TLF fuse together into a thick composite that attaches firmly to the posterior superior iliac spine

  7. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application.

  8. Clinically speaking: A communication skills program for students from non-English speaking backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Caroline San; Rogan, Fran; Kilstoff, Kathleen; Brown, Di

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports on the design, delivery and evaluation of an innovative oral communication skills program for first year students in a Bachelor of Nursing degree at an Australian university. This program was introduced in 2004 to meet the needs of first year undergraduate students from non-English speaking backgrounds who had experienced difficulties with spoken English while on clinical placement. The program consisted of early identification of students in need of communication development, a series of classes incorporated into the degree program to address students' needs, followed by a clinical placement block. This paper describes the structure of the program, discusses some of the major problems encountered by students in the clinical setting and presents some of the teaching strategies used to address these problems. Evaluations of the program suggest that students' communication skills and confidence improved, resulting in a more positive clinical experience for the majority of students.

  9. Comparison of two interpolative background subtraction methods using phantom and clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, A.S.; Sampson, W.F.D.

    1989-01-01

    Two interpolative background subtraction methods used in scintigraphy are tested using both phantom and clinical data. Cauchy integral subtraction was found to be relatively free of artefacts but required more computing time than bilinear interpolation. Both methods may be used with reasonable confidence for the quantification of relative measurements such as left ventricular ejection fraction and myocardial perfusion index but should be avoided if at all possible in the quantification of absolute measurements such as glomerular filtration rate. (author)

  10. Clinical trial considerations on male contraception and collection of pregnancy information from female partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banholzer Maria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little guidance regarding the risk of exposure of pregnant women/ women of childbearing potential to genotoxic or teratogenic compounds via vaginal dose delivered through seminal fluid during sexual intercourse. Method We summarize current thinking and provide clinical trial considerations for a consistent approach to contraception for males exposed to genotoxic and/or teratogenic compounds or to compounds of unknown teratogenicity, and for collection of pregnancy data from their female partners. Results Where toxicity testing demonstrates genotoxic potential, condom use is required during exposure and for 5 terminal plasma half-lives plus 74 days (one human spermatogenesis cycle to avoid conception. For non-genotoxic small molecules and immunoglobulins with unknown teratogenic potential or without a no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL from embryo-fetal development (EFD studies and no minimal anticipated biological effect level (MABEL, condom use is recommended for males with pregnant partner/female partner of childbearing potential. For teratogenic small molecules with estimated seminal fluid concentration and a margin between projected maternal area under the curve (AUC and NOAEL AUC from EFD studies of ≥300 (≥100 for immunoglobulins or in the absence of a NOAEL with a margin between MABEL plasma concentration and maternal Cmax of ≥300 (≥10 for immunoglobulins, condom use is not required. However, condom use is required for margins below the thresholds previously indicated. For small molecules with available seminal fluid concentrations, condom use is required if margins are Pregnancy data should be proactively collected if pregnancy occurs during the condom use period required for males exposed to first-in-class molecules or to molecules with a target/class shown to be teratogenic, embryotoxic or fetotoxic in human or preclinical experiments. Conclusion These recommendations, based on a precaution

  11. Counselors' Role in Preventing Abuse of Older Adults: Clinical, Ethical, and Legal Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Julia M.; McBride, Rebecca G.

    2010-01-01

    Mistreatment of older adults is commonplace. These individuals are subjected to abuse, financial exploitation, and neglect. The authors present an overview of the literature concerning mistreatment, with an emphasis on clinical, ethical, and legal considerations. Methods are proposed for prevention, including counselor education, advocacy, and…

  12. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials......, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay...... sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable...

  13. Cost consideration in the clinical guidance documents of physician specialty societies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer A T; Pearson, Steven D

    2013-06-24

    Despite increasing concerns regarding the cost of health care, the consideration of costs in the development of clinical guidance documents by physician specialty societies has received little analysis. To evaluate the approach to consideration of cost in publicly available clinical guidance documents and methodological statements produced between 2008 and 2012 by the 30 largest US physician specialty societies. Qualitative document review. Whether costs are considered in clinical guidance development, mechanism of cost consideration, and the way that cost issues were used in support of specific clinical practice recommendations. Methodological statements for clinical guidance documents indicated that 17 of 30 physician societies (57%) explicitly integrated costs, 4 (13%) implicitly considered costs, 3 (10%) intentionally excluded costs, and 6 (20%) made no mention. Of the 17 societies that explicitly integrated costs, 9 (53%) consistently used a formal system in which the strength of recommendation was influenced in part by costs, whereas 8 (47%) were inconsistent in their approach or failed to mention the exact mechanism for considering costs. Among the 138 specific recommendations in these guidance documents that included cost as part of the rationale, the most common form of recommendation (50 [36%]) encouraged the use of a specific medical service because of equal effectiveness and lower cost. Slightly more than half of the largest US physician societies explicitly consider costs in developing their clinical guidance documents; among these, approximately half use an explicit mechanism for integrating costs into the strength of recommendations. Many societies remain vague in their approach. Physician specialty societies should demonstrate greater transparency and rigor in their approach to cost consideration in documents meant to influence care decisions.

  14. Ethical, Legal, and Clinical Considerations when Disclosing a High-Risk Syndrome for Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Vijay A; Dean, Derek J; Mittal, Jyoti; Saks, Elyn R

    2015-10-01

    There are complex considerations when planning to disclose an attenuated psychosis syndrome (APS) diagnosis. In this review, we evaluate ethical, legal, and clinical perspectives as well as caveats related to full, non- and partial disclosure strategies, discuss societal implications, and provide clinical suggestions. Each of the disclosure strategies is associated with benefits as well as costs/considerations. Full disclosure promotes autonomy, allows for the clearest psychoeducation about additional risk factors, helps to clarify and/or correct previous diagnoses/treatments, facilitates early intervention and bolsters communication between providers but there are important considerations involving heritability, comorbidity, culture, and stigma. Non-disclosure advances nonmaleficence by limiting stigma and stress (which may inadvertently exacerbate the condition), and confusion (related to the rapidly evolving diagnosis) in a sensitive developmental period but is complicated by varying patient preferences and the possibility that, as new treatments without adverse effects become available, the risk with false positives no longer justifies the accompanying loss of autonomy. Partial disclosure balances ethical considerations by focusing on symptoms instead of labels, but evidence that laypersons may interpret this information as a pseudo-diagnosis and that symptoms alone also contribute to stigma limits the efficacy of this approach. In addition, there are notable societal considerations relating to disclosure involving conservatorship, the reach of insurance companies, and discrimination. We advocate a hybrid approach to disclosure and recommend future research aimed at understanding the effects of stigma on clinical course and a renewed focus on those help-seeking cases that do not transition but remain clinically relevant. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Ethical and social significance of microdose clinical trial. Background of guidance draw-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Chieko

    2008-01-01

    Microdose clinical trial (MCT) aims to elucidate only the mass balance (pharmacokinetics, PK) in human of a new drug candidate compound before the first Phase I trial and is going to be approved by the authority MHLW in Japan. In MCT, the compound is administered in human in an extremely small amount (microdose) that is unexpected to exert its pharmacological effect ( 14 C) labeled compound is administered, LC/MS/MS with non-isotopic compound and positron emission tomography (PET) with compound labeled by positron emitter like 11 C, 13 N, etc. Under promotions by support and demand of related scientific societies and corporations in Japan as well as by ICH agreement, MHLW has defined MCT as one of clinical trials linked with GMP standard of drug candidate for clinical trials, with concept for assessment of internal radiation exposure, and with consistency with handling of radioisotopes, because of ethical consideration for volunteers to be enrolled. MCT can expectedly improve the cost- and time-effectiveness of new drug development, which ultimately leads to earlier supply of superior medicines. (R.T.)

  16. Important considerations for designing and reporting epidemiologic and clinical studies in dental traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Lars; Andreasen, Jens O

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest important considerations for epidemiologic and clinical studies in the field of dental traumatology. The article is based on the authors' experiences from research in this field and editorial board work for the scientific journal Dental Traumatology. Examples are given of issues where development is important. The importance of planning ahead of the study and consulting with experts in other fields is emphasized. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Important considerations for designing and reporting epidemiologic and clinical studies in dental traumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lars; Andreasen, Jens O

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest important considerations for epidemiologic and clinical studies in the field of dental traumatology. The article is based on the authors' experiences from research in this field and editorial board work for the scientific journal Dental Traumatology....... Examples are given of issues where development is important. The importance of planning ahead of the study and consulting with experts in other fields is emphasized....

  18. Clinical implementation of x-ray phase-contrast imaging: Theoretical foundations and design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xizeng; Liu Hong

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical foundation and design considerations of a clinical feasible x-ray phase contrast imaging technique were presented in this paper. Different from the analysis of imaging phase object with weak absorption in literature, we proposed a new formalism for in-line phase-contrast imaging to analyze the effects of four clinically important factors on the phase contrast. These are the body parts attenuation, the spatial coherence of spherical waves from a finite-size focal spot, and polychromatic x-ray and radiation doses to patients for clinical applications. The theory presented in this paper can be applied widely in diagnostic x-ray imaging procedures. As an example, computer simulations were conducted and optimal design parameters were derived for clinical mammography. The results of phantom experiments were also presented which validated the theoretical analysis and computer simulations

  19. Research design considerations for chronic pain prevention clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C; Farrar, John T; Fillingim, Roger B; Gilron, Ian; Markman, John D; Oaklander, Anne Louise; Polydefkis, Michael J; Raja, Srinivasa N; Robinson, James P; Woolf, Clifford J; Ziegler, Dan; Ashburn, Michael A; Burke, Laurie B; Cowan, Penney; George, Steven Z; Goli, Veeraindar; Graff, Ole X; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Katz, Joel; Kehlet, Henrik; Kitt, Rachel A; Kopecky, Ernest A; Malamut, Richard; McDermott, Michael P; Palmer, Pamela; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Steigerwald, Ilona; Tobias, Jeffrey; Walco, Gary A

    2015-07-01

    Although certain risk factors can identify individuals who are most likely to develop chronic pain, few interventions to prevent chronic pain have been identified. To facilitate the identification of preventive interventions, an IMMPACT meeting was convened to discuss research design considerations for clinical trials investigating the prevention of chronic pain. We present general design considerations for prevention trials in populations that are at relatively high risk for developing chronic pain. Specific design considerations included subject identification, timing and duration of treatment, outcomes, timing of assessment, and adjusting for risk factors in the analyses. We provide a detailed examination of 4 models of chronic pain prevention (ie, chronic postsurgical pain, postherpetic neuralgia, chronic low back pain, and painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy). The issues discussed can, in many instances, be extrapolated to other chronic pain conditions. These examples were selected because they are representative models of primary and secondary prevention, reflect persistent pain resulting from multiple insults (ie, surgery, viral infection, injury, and toxic or noxious element exposure), and are chronically painful conditions that are treated with a range of interventions. Improvements in the design of chronic pain prevention trials could improve assay sensitivity and thus accelerate the identification of efficacious interventions. Such interventions would have the potential to reduce the prevalence of chronic pain in the population. Additionally, standardization of outcomes in prevention clinical trials will facilitate meta-analyses and systematic reviews and improve detection of preventive strategies emerging from clinical trials.

  20. Ethical considerations in clinical research on herbal medicine for prevention of cardiovascular disease in the ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonrungsesomboon, Nut; Karbwang, Juntra

    2016-10-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the ageing is a major public health problem worldwide. The nature of most CVD is subclinical with pathological processes that can span over years. Use of preventive measures could be an appropriate approach to prevailing over CVD in the ageing, and herbal medicine is one of the promising preventive approaches and is currently of interest among medical societies. In the evidence-based era, herbal medicine is, however, often underestimated and approached with skepticism, mainly due to the paucity of scientific evidence. Properly designed clinical trials on herbal medicine for prevention of CVD in a geriatric population are thus of importance and of clinical value. To review ethical issues and discuss considerations when such research is proposed. Four ethical issues, including the scientific validity of research, risk-benefit assessments, subject selection and vulnerability, and informed consent, are structured and extensively discussed in this article. Ethical core considerations of prevention research of CVD on herbal medicine involve particular attention on the scientific validity of research, risk-benefit assessments, subject selection and vulnerability, and informed consent. These issues and considerations are keys, although they must be adapted to an individual research setting in which a clinical study is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical outcomes, not clinical utility, should be the major consideration for saxagliptin with or without metformin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doggrell SA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sheila A DoggrellDepartment of Pharmacology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, AustraliaA recent review by Panagoulias and Doupis, published in Patient Preference and Adherence, concerned the saxagliptin/metformin fixed combination (SAXA/MET FDC, and was titled "Clinical utility in the treatment of type 2 diabetes with the saxagliptin/metformin fixed combination."1 This review concluded that "The SAXA/MET FDC is a patient-friendly, dosage-flexible, and hypoglycemia-safe regimen with very few adverse events and a neutral or even favorable effect on body weight. It achieves significant glycosylated hemoglobin A1c reduction helping the patient to achieve his/her individual glycemic goals."1View original paper by Panagoulias and Doupis.

  2. Case studies on clinical evaluation of biosimilar monoclonal antibody: scientific considerations for regulatory approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, Alex; Knezevic, Ivana; Joung, Jeewon; Kang, Hye-Na

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide considerations based on comprehensive case studies important for regulatory evaluation of monoclonal antibodies as similar biotherapeutic products (SBPs) with a special emphasis on clinical aspects. Scientific principles from WHO Guidelines on SBPs were used as a basis for the exercise. Working groups consisted of regulators, manufacturers and academia. The following topics were discussed by the working groups: clinical criteria for biosimilarity, extrapolation approach and the overall regulatory decision making process. In order to determine typical pitfalls in the design of a SBP clinical programme and evaluate the gap of knowledge, amongst different industry and regulatory stakeholders on the appraisal of the data arising from SBP clinical studies, we have presented two fictional but realistic clinical case studies. The first case consists of the fictional development programme for an infliximab SBP candidate. The second case describes clinical studies proposed for a fictional rituximab SBP candidate. In the first scenario a highly similar quality profile has been taken forward into clinical studies whereas there was an important residual difference in functional attributes for the rituximab SBP candidate. These case studies were presented at the WHO implementation workshop for the WHO guidelines on evaluation of similar biotherapeutic products held in Seoul, Republic of Korea, in May 2014. The goal was to illustrate the interpretation of the clinical data arising from studies with SBP candidates and elicit knowledge gaps in clinical assessment. This paper reflects the outcome of the exercise and discussions held in Seoul and offers an analysis of the case studies as a learning opportunity on clinical development and evaluation of SBPs. Copyright © 2014 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Proton therapy for head and neck cancer: Rationale, potential indications, practical considerations, and current clinical evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Su, Zhong; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng

    2011-01-01

    There is a strong rationale for potential benefits from proton therapy (PT) for selected cancers of the head and neck because of the opportunity to improve the therapeutic ratio by improving radiation dose distributions and because of the significant differences in radiation dose distribution achievable with x-ray-based radiation therapy (RT) and PT. Comparisons of dose distributions between x-ray-based and PT plans in selected cases show specific benefits in dose distribution likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. However, the use of PT in head and neck cancers requires special considerations in the simulation and treatment planning process, and currently available PT technology may not permit realization of the maximum potential benefits of PT. To date, few clinical data are available, but early clinical experiences in sinonasal tumors in particular suggest significant improvements in both disease control and radiation-related toxicity

  4. Proton therapy for head and neck cancer: Rationale, potential indications, practical considerations, and current clinical evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Su, Zhong; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng (Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville, Florida (United States)), e-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu

    2011-08-15

    There is a strong rationale for potential benefits from proton therapy (PT) for selected cancers of the head and neck because of the opportunity to improve the therapeutic ratio by improving radiation dose distributions and because of the significant differences in radiation dose distribution achievable with x-ray-based radiation therapy (RT) and PT. Comparisons of dose distributions between x-ray-based and PT plans in selected cases show specific benefits in dose distribution likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. However, the use of PT in head and neck cancers requires special considerations in the simulation and treatment planning process, and currently available PT technology may not permit realization of the maximum potential benefits of PT. To date, few clinical data are available, but early clinical experiences in sinonasal tumors in particular suggest significant improvements in both disease control and radiation-related toxicity

  5. Circulating Tumor Cell Analysis: Technical and Statistical Considerations for Application to the Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L. Allan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid cancers are a leading cause of death worldwide, primarily due to the failure of effective clinical detection and treatment of metastatic disease in distant sites. There is growing evidence that the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in the blood of cancer patients may be an important indicator of the potential for metastatic disease and poor prognosis. Technological advances have now facilitated the enumeration and characterization of CTCs using methods such as PCR, flow cytometry, image-based immunologic approaches, immunomagnetic techniques, and microchip technology. However, the rare nature of these cells requires that very sensitive and robust detection/enumeration methods be developed and validated in order to implement CTC analysis for widespread use in the clinic. This review will focus on the important technical and statistical considerations that must be taken into account when designing and implementing CTC assays, as well as the subsequent interpretation of these results for the purposes of clinical decision making.

  6. Considerations for use of dental photography and electronic media in dental education and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieber, Jane C; Nelson, Travis; Huebner, Colleen E

    2015-04-01

    Photography and electronic media are indispensable tools for dental education and clinical practice. Although previous research has focused on privacy issues and general strategies to protect patient privacy when sharing clinical photographs for educational purposes, there are no published recommendations for developing a functional, privacy-compliant institutional framework for the capture, storage, transfer, and use of clinical photographs and other electronic media. The aims of this study were to research patient rights relating to electronic media and propose a framework for the use of patient media in education and clinical care. After a review of the relevant literature and consultation with the University of Washington's director of privacy and compliance and assistant attorney general, the researchers developed a privacy-compliant framework to ensure appropriate capture, storage, transfer, and use of clinical photography and electronic media. A four-part framework was created to guide the use of patient media that reflects considerations of patient autonomy and privacy, informed consent, capture and storage of media, and its transfer, use, and display. The best practices proposed for capture, storage, transfer, and use of clinical photographs and electronic media adhere to the health care code of ethics (based on patient autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, and veracity), which is most effectively upheld by a practical framework designed to protect patients and limit institutional liability. Educators have the opportunity and duty to convey these principles to students who will become the next generation of dentists, researchers, and educators.

  7. Initial clinical evaluation of PET-based ion beam therapy monitoring under consideration of organ motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia

    2016-02-01

    Intrafractional organ motion imposes considerable challenges to scanned ion beam therapy and demands for a thorough verification of the applied treatment. At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), the scanned ion beam delivery is verified by means of postirradiation positron-emission-tomography (PET) imaging. This work presents a first clinical evaluation of PET-based treatment monitoring in ion beam therapy under consideration of target motion. Three patients with mobile liver lesions underwent scanned carbon ion irradiation at HIT and postirradiation PET/CT (x-ray-computed-tomography) imaging with a commercial scanner. Respiratory motion was recorded during irradiation and subsequent image acquisition. This enabled a time-resolved (4D) calculation of the expected irradiation-induced activity pattern and, for one patient where an additional 4D CT was acquired at the PET/CT scanner after treatment, a motion-compensated PET image reconstruction. For the other patients, PET data were reconstructed statically. To verify the treatment, calculated prediction and reconstructed measurement were compared with a focus on the ion beam range. Results in the current three patients suggest that for motion amplitudes in the order of 2 mm there is no benefit from incorporating respiratory motion information into PET-based treatment monitoring. For a target motion in the order of 10 mm, motion-related effects become more severe and a time-resolved modeling of the expected activity distribution can lead to an improved data interpretation if a sufficient number of true coincidences is detected. Benefits from motion-compensated PET image reconstruction could not be shown conclusively at the current stage. The feasibility of clinical PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion has been shown for the first time. Improvements in noise-robust 4D PET image reconstruction are deemed necessary to enhance the clinical potential.

  8. Initial clinical evaluation of PET-based ion beam therapy monitoring under consideration of organ motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Richter, Daniel; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Intrafractional organ motion imposes considerable challenges to scanned ion beam therapy and demands for a thorough verification of the applied treatment. At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), the scanned ion beam delivery is verified by means of postirradiation positron-emission-tomography (PET) imaging. This work presents a first clinical evaluation of PET-based treatment monitoring in ion beam therapy under consideration of target motion. Methods: Three patients with mobile liver lesions underwent scanned carbon ion irradiation at HIT and postirradiation PET/CT (x-ray-computed-tomography) imaging with a commercial scanner. Respiratory motion was recorded during irradiation and subsequent image acquisition. This enabled a time-resolved (4D) calculation of the expected irradiation-induced activity pattern and, for one patient where an additional 4D CT was acquired at the PET/CT scanner after treatment, a motion-compensated PET image reconstruction. For the other patients, PET data were reconstructed statically. To verify the treatment, calculated prediction and reconstructed measurement were compared with a focus on the ion beam range. Results: Results in the current three patients suggest that for motion amplitudes in the order of 2 mm there is no benefit from incorporating respiratory motion information into PET-based treatment monitoring. For a target motion in the order of 10 mm, motion-related effects become more severe and a time-resolved modeling of the expected activity distribution can lead to an improved data interpretation if a sufficient number of true coincidences is detected. Benefits from motion-compensated PET image reconstruction could not be shown conclusively at the current stage. Conclusions: The feasibility of clinical PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion has been shown for the first time. Improvements in noise-robust 4D PET image reconstruction are deemed necessary to enhance the

  9. Surgical Procedures and Clinical Considerations for Impacted Canines: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Torkzaban

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Impaction of canine teeth is a clinical problem whose treatment usually requires an interdisciplinary approach. After the maxillary third molar, the maxillary canine is the second-most commonly impacted tooth, with an incidence of 1% - 2.5%. Maxillary canines are more common in females than males. This study reviews the surgical treatments and orthodontic considerations for impacted canines exposure reported in previous studies. The clinician should be aware of variations in the surgical management of labially and palatally impacted canines, as well as the most common methods of canine in orthodontic application, and the implications of canine extraction. The different factors that affect these decisions are discussed.

  10. [What are Considerations for Clinical Investigation of New Drugs and Treatment Techniques for Major Depressive Disorders?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder treatments remain unsatisfactory, and the development of novel antidepressants is continuing. Therefore, not only the establishment of therapeutic strategies to accumulate evidence on existing therapies, but also the development of novel therapies is required in order to improve the medical standards. In principle, parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are necessary to assess new compounds for the treatment of major depressive disorders from a scientific perspective. To provide unambiguous evidence of antidepressant activity, well-controlled studies with adequate designs must show efficacy with a statistically significant effect on a clinically meaningful endpoint. For this purpose, it is important to examine all aspects of factors that adversely affect the efficacy and safety assessment in the planning stage of clinical trials and reduce these factors. There are several specific characteristics of clinical trials for neuropsychiatric disorders. Some typical features are as follows: 1) a high and variable response, 2) impact on the effect of the baseline severity of disorders, 3) high dropout rates, 4) biases related to subjective measures of clinical symptoms. In this paper, considerations for the planning and performing of clinical trials for major depressive disorders will be discussed based on these features.

  11. Children with language problems in a speech and hearing clinic : Background variables and extent of language problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keegstra, A.L.; Knijff, W.A.; Post, W.J.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, S.M.

    Objective: Analysis of a clinical population referred for language analysis in terms of background variables and extent of language problems. Design: Descriptive study. Materials and methods: Children referred to a speech and hearing clinic because of assumed language problems were analyzed with

  12. Myocardial Contrast Agents – Safety Considerations and Clinical Efficacy in Stress Echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Anca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Transthoracic echocardiographic examination is known to be a safe, non-invasive and reproducible method, used in every day clinical practice to obtain important information about cardiac structure and function. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of studies have highlighted the considerable technically difficultly in producing diagnostic images due to a poor acoustic window and more than 33% of patients undergoing stress echocardiography have suboptimal echocardiographic images. All these limitations have led to the use of contrast agents to improve the quality of standard ultrasound examination to provide a better delineation of left ventricle endocardial borders or to obtain information that cannot be achieved by using standard echocardiography, such as assessing myocardial microcirculation and therefore perfusion. This paper sought to review the clinical efficacy and safety of ultrasound contrast agents focusing on stress echocardiography.

  13. TU-A-201-02: Treatment Site-Specific Considerations for Clinical IGRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesooriya, K. [University of Virginia Health Systems (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Recent years have seen a widespread proliferation of available in-room image guidance systems for radiation therapy target localization with many centers having multiple in-room options. In this session, available imaging systems for in-room IGRT will be reviewed highlighting the main differences in workflow efficiency, targeting accuracy and image quality as it relates to target visualization. Decision-making strategies for integrating these tools into clinical image guidance protocols that are tailored to specific disease sites like H&N, lung, pelvis, and spine SBRT will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Major system characteristics of a wide range of available in-room imaging systems for IGRT. Advantages / disadvantages of different systems for site-specific IGRT considerations. Concepts of targeting accuracy and time efficiency in designing clinical imaging protocols.

  14. Intimacy and Sexuality in Institutionalized Dementia Care: Clinical-Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Lieslot; Anckaert, Luc; Gastmans, Chris

    2017-03-01

    Intimacy and sexuality expressed by nursing home residents with dementia remains an ethically sensitive issue for care facilities, nursing staff and family members. Dealing with residents' sexual longings and behaviour is extremely difficult, putting a burden on the caregivers as well as on the residents themselves and their relatives. The parties in question often do not know how to react when residents express themselves sexually. The overall aim of this article is to provide a number of clinical-ethical considerations addressing the following question: 'How can expressions of intimacy and sexuality by residents with dementia be dealt with in an ethically responsible way?' The considerations formulated are based on two cornerstones: (1) the current literature on older peoples' experiences regarding intimacy and sexuality after the onset of dementia, and (2) an anthropological-ethical framework addressing four fundamental pillars of human existence namely the decentred self, human embodiment, being-in-the-world and being-with-others. The resulting considerations are oriented toward the individual sphere, the partnership sphere, and the institutional sphere. The continuous interaction between these spheres leads to orientations that both empower the residents in question and respect the complex network of relationships that surrounds them.

  15. Mechanistic background and clinical applications of indocyanine green fluorescence imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, Takeaki; Masuda, Koichi; Urano, Yasuteru; Kawaguchi, Yoshikuni; Satou, Shouichi; Kaneko, Junichi; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Shibahara, Junji; Fukayama, Masashi; Tsuji, Shingo; Midorikawa, Yutaka; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-02-01

    Although clinical applications of intraoperative fluorescence imaging of liver cancer using indocyanine green (ICG) have begun, the mechanistic background of ICG accumulation in the cancerous tissues remains unclear. In 170 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the liver surfaces and resected specimens were intraoperatively examined by using a near-infrared fluorescence imaging system after preoperative administration of ICG (0.5 mg/kg i.v.). Microscopic examinations, gene expression profile analysis, and immunohistochemical staining were performed for HCCs, which showed ICG fluorescence in the cancerous tissues (cancerous-type fluorescence), and HCCs showed fluorescence only in the surrounding non-cancerous liver parenchyma (rim-type fluorescence). ICG fluorescence imaging enabled identification of 273 of 276 (99%) HCCs in the resected specimens. HCCs showed that cancerous-type fluorescence was associated with higher cancer cell differentiation as compared with rim-type HCCs (P Fluorescence microscopy identified the presence of ICG in the canalicular side of the cancer cell cytoplasm, and pseudoglands of the HCCs showed a cancerous-type fluorescence pattern. The ratio of the gene and protein expression levels in the cancerous to non-cancerous tissues for Na(+)/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 8 (OATP8), which are associated with portal uptake of ICG by hepatocytes that tended to be higher in the HCCs that showed cancerous-type fluorescence than in those that showed rim-type fluorescence. Preserved portal uptake of ICG in differentiated HCC cells by NTCP and OATP8 with concomitant biliary excretion disorders causes accumulation of ICG in the cancerous tissues after preoperative intravenous administration. This enables highly sensitive identification of HCC by intraoperative ICG fluorescence imaging.

  16. Ozone exposure and pulmonary effects in panel and human clinical studies: Considerations for design and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Annette C

    2018-04-01

    A wealth of literature exists regarding the pulmonary effects of ozone, a photochemical pollutant produced by the reaction of nitrogen oxide and volatile organic precursors in the presence of sunlight. This paper focuses on epidemiological panel studies and human clinical studies of ozone exposure, and discusses issues specific to this pollutant that may influence study design and interpretation as well as other, broader considerations relevant to ozone-health research. The issues are discussed using examples drawn from the wider literature. The recent panel and clinical literature is also reviewed. Health outcomes considered include lung function, symptoms, and pulmonary inflammation. Issues discussed include adversity, reversibility, adaptation, variability in ozone exposure metric used and health outcomes evaluated, co-pollutants in panel studies, influence of temperature in panel studies, and multiple comparisons. Improvements in and standardization of panel study approaches are recommended to facilitate comparisons between studies as well as meta-analyses. Additional clinical studies at or near the current National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 70 ppb are recommended, as are clinical studies in sensitive subpopulations such as asthmatics. The pulmonary health impacts of ozone exposure have been well documented using both epidemiological and chamber study designs. However, there are a number of specific methodological and related issues that should be considered when interpreting the results of these studies and planning additional research, including the standardization of exposure and health metrics to facilitate comparisons among studies.

  17. MO-E-BRC-00: Online Adaptive Radiotherapy - Considerations for Practical Clinical Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  18. MO-E-BRC-00: Online Adaptive Radiotherapy - Considerations for Practical Clinical Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  19. Eating dysfunction associated with oromandibular dystonia: clinical characteristics and treatment considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer Carlos

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In oromandibular dystonia (OMD abnormal repetitive contractions of masticatory, facial, and lingual muscles as well as the presence of orobuccolingual (OBL dyskinesias may interfere with the appropriate performance of tasks such as chewing and swallowing leading to significant dysphagia and weight loss. We present here the clinical characteristics and treatment variables of a series of patients that developed an OMD-associated eating dysfunction. Methods We present a series of patients diagnosed and followed-up at the Movement Disorders Clinic of the Department of Neurology of University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine over a 10-year period. Patients were treated with botulinum toxin injections according to standard methods. Results Five out of 32 (15.6% OMD patients experienced symptoms of eating dysfunction associated with OMD. Significant weight loss was reported in 3/5 patients (ranged for 13–15 lbs. Two patients regained the lost weight after treatment and one was lost to follow-up. Tetrabenazine in combination with other antidystonic medication and/or botulinum toxin injections provided substantial benefit to the patients with dysphagia caused by OMD. Conclusion Dystonic eating dysfunction may occasionally complicate OMD leading to weight loss. Its adequate characterization at the time of history taking and clinical examination should be part of outcome measurements of the anti-dystonic treatment in clinical practice.

  20. Pediatric obesity pharmacotherapy: current state of the field, review of the literature and clinical trial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A S; Fox, C K; Rudser, K D; Gross, A C; Ryder, J R

    2016-07-01

    Despite the increasing number of medications recently approved to treat obesity among adults, few agents have been formally evaluated in children or adolescents for this indication. Moreover, there is a paucity of guidance in the literature addressing best practices with regard to pediatric obesity pharmacotherapy clinical trial design, and only general recommendations have been offered by regulatory agencies on this topic. The purposes of this article are to (1) offer a background of the current state of the field of pediatric obesity medicine, (2) provide a brief review of the literature summarizing pediatric obesity pharmacotherapy clinical trials, and (3) highlight and discuss some of the unique aspects that should be considered when designing and conducting high-quality clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of obesity medications in children and adolescents. Suggestions are offered in the areas of target population and eligibility criteria, clinical trial end-point selection, trial duration, implementation of lifestyle modification therapy and recruitment and retention of participants. Efforts should be made to design and conduct trials appropriately to ensure that high-quality evidence is generated on the safety and efficacy of various medications used to treat pediatric obesity.

  1. Clinical development and regulatory points for consideration for second-generation live attenuated dengue vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannice, Kirsten S; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Barrett, Alan D T; Carrijo, Kalinka; Cavaleri, Marco; de Silva, Aravinda; Durbin, Anna P; Endy, Tim; Harris, Eva; Innis, Bruce L; Katzelnick, Leah C; Smith, Peter G; Sun, Wellington; Thomas, Stephen J; Hombach, Joachim

    2018-03-07

    Licensing and decisions on public health use of a vaccine rely on a robust clinical development program that permits a risk-benefit assessment of the product in the target population. Studies undertaken early in clinical development, as well as well-designed pivotal trials, allow for this robust characterization. In 2012, WHO published guidelines on the quality, safety and efficacy of live attenuated dengue tetravalent vaccines. Subsequently, efficacy and longer-term follow-up data have become available from two Phase 3 trials of a dengue vaccine, conducted in parallel, and the vaccine was licensed in December 2015. The findings and interpretation of the results from these trials released both before and after licensure have highlighted key complexities for tetravalent dengue vaccines, including concerns vaccination could increase the incidence of dengue disease in certain subpopulations. This report summarizes clinical and regulatory points for consideration that may guide vaccine developers on some aspects of trial design and facilitate regulatory review to enable broader public health recommendations for second-generation dengue vaccines. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. First branchial cleft anomaly: clinical insight into its relevance in otolaryngology with pediatric considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maithani, Tripti; Pandey, Apporva; Dey, Debraj; Bhardwaj, Aparna; Singh, V P

    2014-01-01

    First branchial cleft anomalies (FBCA) represent a small subset of congenital malformations in neck. Prime objective of this study is to share our experience with FBCA, emphasize its relevance in otolaryngology and deal with its pediatric perspective. Embryology, pathologic anatomy and varied spectra of clinical presentations of FBCA are discussed. Along with this we have illustrated three different cases; all of them were of pediatric age group and were misdiagnosed by their treating specialists elsewhere. In this article we have also laid special emphasis on its pediatric considerations. FBCA are mostly misdiagnosed due to their unfamiliar clinical signs and symptoms. Swellings may masquerade as other neck masses. Majority of patients give a history of previous incision and drainage. While dealing with pediatric patients the important factors to be kept in mind are the age of child, superficial course of facial nerve, any associated agenesis of parotid gland. Alteration in surgical technique may be required in children. A thorough medical examination with high index of clinical suspicion should be kept in mind while dealing with such anomalies. Owing to their complex presentation and close relation with facial nerve they are challenging lesions for surgeons.

  3. [Atosiban treatment for preterm labor--financial considerations and savings by implementing clinical guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Eran; Mansur, Nariman; Ambar, Irit; Hod, Moshe

    2011-06-01

    Preterm delivery is a significant cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Pregnant women, with symptoms and signs consistent with preterm labor, can be treated with various tocolytic drugs. Atosiban is one of many drugs indicated to arrest imminent preterm labor. Various studies show that the efficacy of atosiban is similar to other tocolytic drugs. The main advantage of atosiban is a relativeLy low incidence of adverse maternal reactions. Its considerable shortcoming is the financial cost, compared to other available drugs. In view of its cost, we have decided to implement a strict protocol to direct the use of atosiban, with the intent to reduce costs, without hampering quality of care. The protocol was implemented from July 2009, and it outlines the medical and procedural terms to use atosiban. We compared similar time periods before and after implementation of the protocol. The outcomes compared included: treatment success, rates of preterm deliveries and financial costs. Within the timeframe that the protocol was implemented, we have been able to demonstrate a 40% reduction in atosiban related costs, compared to a parallel period, when the clinical guidelines were not implemented. This translates into savings of about NIS 40,000 (New Israeli Shekel) (approximately $10,000). This was achieved without an increase in the rate of preterm deliveries. Implementing and enforcing a simple protocol of supervision on the use of atosiban enables a considerable reduction of financial costs related to atosiban, without hampering medical care.

  4. Patient attributes warranting consideration in clinical practice guidelines, health workforce planning and policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segal Leonie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order for clinical practice guidelines (CPGs to meet their broad objective of enhancing the quality of care and supporting improved patient outcomes, they must address the needs of diverse patient populations. We set out to explore the patient attributes that are likely to demand a unique approach to the management of chronic disease, and which are crucial if evidence or services planning is to reflect clinic populations. These were incorporated into a new conceptual framework; using diabetes mellitus as an exemplar. Methods The patient attributes that informed the framework were identified from CPGs, the diabetes literature, an expert academic panel, and two cross-disciplinary panels; and agreed upon using a modified nominal group technique. Results Full consensus was reached on twenty-four attributes. These factors fell into one of three themes: (1 type/stage of disease, (2 morbid events, and (3 factors impacting on capacity to self-care. These three themes were incorporated in a convenient way in the workforce evidence-based (WEB model. Conclusions While biomedical factors are frequently recognised in published clinical practice guidelines, little attention is given to attributes influencing a person's capacity to self-care. Paying explicit attention to predictable threats to effective self-care in clinical practice guidelines, by drawing on the WEB model, may assist in refinements that would address observed disparities in health outcomes across socio-economic groups. The WEB model also provides a framework to inform clinical training, and health services and workforce planning and research; including the assessment of healthcare needs, and the allocation of healthcare resources.

  5. Clinical utility and patient consideration in the use of lenalidomide for multiple myeloma in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jing Wang, Hongfeng Guo, Xin Zhou Department of Hematology, Wuxi People’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multiple myeloma (MM is an incurable hematologic malignancy caused by the autonomous growth of malignant plasma cells. In the last decade, the introduction of novel targeted agents such as thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide has dramatically improved the clinical outcome of MM patients in both the frontline and recurrent settings. Lenalidomide is a synthetic derivative of thalidomide, which has been shown to significantly improve overall survival, time to progression, and overall response rates in patients with MM. The China Food and Drug Administration approved the use of lenalidomide in patients with MM in 2013. In a Phase II trial, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone was associated with a high response rate and acceptable safety profile in heavily pretreated Chinese patients with relapsed/refractory MM, including those with renal impairment and IgD subtype. However, lenalidomide will remain as a second-line antimyeloma drug in the near future because of its high price and the policy of health insurance reimbursement in People’s Republic of China. In this review, we summarize the clinical utility and patient considerations in the use of lenalidomide for MM in Chinese patients. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to investigate the better quality, longer duration, and more clinically meaningful outcomes of lenalidomide in the treatment of MM in Chinese patients. Keywords: lenalidomide, multiple myeloma, clinical efficacy, Chinese patients

  6. Connecting Gaucher and Parkinson Disease: Considerations for Clinical and Research Genetic Counseling Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Lola; Schulze, Jeanine

    2017-12-01

    There are multiple autosomal recessive disorders in which carriers may be at risk for other diseases. This observation calls into question the previous understanding that carriers of autosomal recessive disorders escape clinical consequences. We also know that childhood genetic conditions may have adult disease counterparts (Zimran et al., The Israel Medical Association Journal: IMAJ, 16(11), 723-724, 2014). Individuals who have Gaucher disease and carriers of the disorder are at increased risk for a seemingly unrelated and complex neurological condition, Parkinson disease. Parkinson disease is, in part, caused by the same mutations in the GBA gene that lead to Gaucher disease, and the two conditions are thought to have shared pathophysiology. Briefly reviewed are how these two diseases historically became linked, where their paths cross, potential problems and considerations in disclosure of the link, and current guidelines and research in this area. Genetic counseling experience with a large Parkinson disease cohort is used as a starting point to question the state of clinical and nonclinical practice in disclosing this unusual connection We conclude that more research and discussion are needed to inform practice regarding the crossroads of Gaucher and Parkinson disease.

  7. Biofluid infrared spectro-diagnostics: pre-analytical considerations for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovergne, L; Bouzy, P; Untereiner, V; Garnotel, R; Baker, M J; Thiéfin, G; Sockalingum, G D

    2016-06-23

    Several proof-of-concept studies on the vibrational spectroscopy of biofluids have demonstrated that the methodology has promising potential as a clinical diagnostic tool. However, these studies also show that there is a lack of a standardised protocol in sample handling and preparation prior to spectroscopic analysis. One of the most important sources of analytical errors is the pre-analytical phase. For the technique to be translated into clinics, it is clear that a very strict protocol needs to be established for such biological samples. This study focuses on some of the aspects of the pre-analytical phase in the development of the high-throughput Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of some of the most common biofluids such as serum, plasma and bile. Pre-analytical considerations that can impact either the samples (solvents, anti-coagulants, freeze-thaw cycles…) and/or spectroscopic analysis (sample preparation such as drying, deposit methods, volumes, substrates, operators dependence…) and consequently the quality and the reproducibility of spectral data will be discussed in this report.

  8. Acceleration of cardiovascular MRI using parallel imaging: basic principles, practical considerations, clinical applications and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niendorf, T.; Sodickson, D.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CVMR) imaging has proven to be of clinical value for non-invasive diagnostic imaging of cardiovascular diseases. CVMR requires rapid imaging; however, the speed of conventional MRI is fundamentally limited due to its sequential approach to image acquisition, in which data points are collected one after the other in the presence of sequentially-applied magnetic field gradients and radiofrequency coils to acquire multiple data points simultaneously, and thereby to increase imaging speed and efficiency beyond the limits of purely gradient-based approaches. The resulting improvements in imaging speed can be used in various ways, including shortening long examinations, improving spatial resolution and anatomic coverage, improving temporal resolution, enhancing image quality, overcoming physiological constraints, detecting and correcting for physiologic motion, and streamlining work flow. Examples of these strategies will be provided in this review, after some of the fundamentals of parallel imaging methods now in use for cardiovascular MRI are outlined. The emphasis will rest upon basic principles and clinical state-of-the art cardiovascular MRI applications. In addition, practical aspects such as signal-to-noise ratio considerations, tailored parallel imaging protocols and potential artifacts will be discussed, and current trends and future directions will be explored. (orig.)

  9. Financial remuneration for clinical and behavioral research participation: ethical and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Borenstein, Amy R

    2009-04-01

    Although the practice of providing payment to clinical research participants has been ongoing for more than a century, it remains an ethically controversial topic among members of the research community. The aims of this commentary are to summarize ethical and practical considerations regarding financial remuneration of research participants and to make recommendations for researchers contemplating this practice. A PubMed search was conducted to explore the ethical implications surrounding financial remuneration and review the body of empiric data on this topic. Financial remuneration is perceived to be ethically acceptable by many researchers and research participants and can be helpful in the recruitment process. It is recommended that when investigators are contemplating whether to offer payment to research participants, they should consider the nature of the study and the potential benefits and risks to the participants, institutional or organizational guidelines, and cultural and societal norms specific to the population being studied. Financial remuneration has the ability to serve as a sign of appreciation for the contributions of research participants and a way to facilitate clinical and behavioral research.

  10. Background Complex angiographic lesions and clinic presentation in unstable angina. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLuberas, R.; Mallo, D.; Pouso, J.; Artucio, C.; Korytnicki; Argon, L.; Besada, E.; Tavella, N.

    2002-01-01

    Background Complex angiography lesions and intracoronary thrombus have been identified in unstable angina.Braunwalds categorization has been accepted in the last years.Identifying severe clinical classes class III (angina at rest during the last 48 hours), class C (angina postinfarction) and class c (angina with maximum therapeutic). The main objective of this study was to determine independent associations of Braunwalds classes III, C and c: complex lesions, intracoronary thrombus, total occlusion and distal flux TIMI<3 of the responsible vessel. The secondary objectives were to analyze the angiographic features of the lesion and the responsible vessel. Aprospective study of 300 patients with diagnosed unstable angina, clustered according to Braunwalds clinis classification was done. The angiographic evaluation was performed identifying the responsible lesion and the presence of the complex lesion, intracoronary thrombus, total occlusion and distal flux TIMI<3 of the responsible vessel. A univariate analysis and a multivariate model of binary logistic regression were used. In the 300 patient population, 22 patients with normal coronaries(7.3%) were identified. The responsible lesion was identified in 243 out of the remaining 278 patients (87,4%). Class III was significantly associated with the complex lesion (OR=2.74, IC95%=1,27-5,9) and intracoronary thrombus (OR=2,82 IC95=1,2-6,6). Class C was significantly associated with intracoronary thrombus (OR=3.9),IC95%=1.53-10,0).Class III was and independent predictor for the presence of the complex lesion(OR=1.98, IC 95%=1,01-3,87) and intracoronary thrombus (OR=2,47 IC95%=1,14-5,37). Class C was and independent predictor for the complex lesion (OR=5,05,IC95%=2.25-11,3), infracoronary thrombus (OR=8,04, IC 95%=3,49-18,0), total occlusion (OR=6,49, IC95%=2,67-15,7) and distal flux TIMI<3(OR=3,96,IC 95%=1,87-8,4) There was no significant association between classes III, C and c and the responsible vessel, localization of

  11. Bipolar disorder and complementary medicine: current evidence, safety issues, and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; Lake, James; Hoenders, Rogier

    2011-10-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating syndrome that is often undiagnosed and undertreated. Population surveys show that persons with BD often self-medicate with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or integrative therapies in spite of limited research evidence supporting their use. To date, no review has focused specifically on nonconventional treatments of BD. The study objectives were to present a review of nonconventional (complementary and integrative) interventions examined in clinical trials on BD, and to offer provisional guidelines for the judicious integrative use of CAM in the management of BD. PubMed, CINAHL,(®) Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for human clinical trials in English during mid-2010 using Bipolar Disorder and CAM therapy and CAM medicine search terms. Effect sizes (Cohen's d) were also calculated where data were available. Several positive high-quality studies on nutrients in combination with conventional mood stabilizers and antipsychotic medications in BD depression were identified, while branched-chain amino acids and magnesium were effective (small studies) in attenuating mania in BD. In the treatment of bipolar depression, evidence was mixed regarding omega-3, while isolated studies provide provisional support for a multinutrient formula, n-acetylcysteine, and l-tryptophan. In one study, acupuncture was found to have favorable but nonsignificant effects on mania and depression outcomes. Current evidence supports the integrative treatment of BD using combinations of mood stabilizers and select nutrients. Other CAM or integrative modalities used to treat BD have not been adequately explored to date; however, some early findings are promising. Select CAM and integrative interventions add to established conventional treatment of BD and may be considered when formulating a treatment plan. It is hoped that the safety issues and clinical considerations addressed in this article may encourage the practice

  12. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 1, Pathological Background and Clinical Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Fei; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Sánchez, Francisco M.

    2016-01-01

    Pathological features of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) dictate various responses to prostatic artery embolization (PAE). Typically, BPH originates in the transition zone and periurethral region, where should be considered the primary target area in PAE procedures. Given that histological heterogeneity of components in hyperplasia nodules, epithelial or stromal, identifying the more responsive nodules to PAE will have clinical implications. Since some lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with BPH are usually related to bladder outlet obstruction-induced changes in bladder function rather than to outflow obstruction directly, proper selection of candidate patients prior to PAE is of great clinical importance. BPH is a typical chronic progressive condition, suggesting PAE could aim not only to relieve LUTS but also to delay or prevent the clinical progression. Awareness of the pathological background of BPH is essential for interventional radiologists to improve clinical outcomes and develop new treatment strategies in clinical practice of PAE

  13. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 1, Pathological Background and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Sánchez, Francisco M

    2016-01-01

    Pathological features of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) dictate various responses to prostatic artery embolization (PAE). Typically, BPH originates in the transition zone and periurethral region, where should be considered the primary target area in PAE procedures. Given that histological heterogeneity of components in hyperplasia nodules, epithelial or stromal, identifying the more responsive nodules to PAE will have clinical implications. Since some lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with BPH are usually related to bladder outlet obstruction-induced changes in bladder function rather than to outflow obstruction directly, proper selection of candidate patients prior to PAE is of great clinical importance. BPH is a typical chronic progressive condition, suggesting PAE could aim not only to relieve LUTS but also to delay or prevent the clinical progression. Awareness of the pathological background of BPH is essential for interventional radiologists to improve clinical outcomes and develop new treatment strategies in clinical practice of PAE.

  14. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Part 1, Pathological Background and Clinical Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Fei, E-mail: feisun@ccmijesususon.com; Crisóstomo, Verónica, E-mail: crisosto@ccmijesususon.com; Báez-Díaz, Claudia, E-mail: cbaez@ccmijesususon.com; Sánchez, Francisco M., E-mail: msanchez@ccmijesususon.com [Jesús Usón Minimally Invasive Surgery Centre (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Pathological features of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) dictate various responses to prostatic artery embolization (PAE). Typically, BPH originates in the transition zone and periurethral region, where should be considered the primary target area in PAE procedures. Given that histological heterogeneity of components in hyperplasia nodules, epithelial or stromal, identifying the more responsive nodules to PAE will have clinical implications. Since some lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with BPH are usually related to bladder outlet obstruction-induced changes in bladder function rather than to outflow obstruction directly, proper selection of candidate patients prior to PAE is of great clinical importance. BPH is a typical chronic progressive condition, suggesting PAE could aim not only to relieve LUTS but also to delay or prevent the clinical progression. Awareness of the pathological background of BPH is essential for interventional radiologists to improve clinical outcomes and develop new treatment strategies in clinical practice of PAE.

  15. The clinical and radiologic consideration of cementifying and ossifying fibroma of the jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Eun Young; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the proper diagnosis and to establish the treatment plan of cementifying and ossifying fibroma in the jaws through the clinical, radiological, and histopathologic considerations. The authors compared and analyzed the clinicoradiologic features of the thirteen cases of cementifying and ossifying fibroma, diagnosed at the Dental college hospital in Yonsei university, Seoul, Korea, during the period from 1980 to 1995. The obtained results were as follows : 1. Cementifying and ossifying fibroma occurred in the mean age, 44 years, ranged from 29 to 65 years and the male to female ratio was approximately 1:5. 2. Swelling was the most common frequent presenting complaints. Other reported symptoms included pain, tooth mobility and symptom. 3. The frequency of the lesions was twelve cases in the mandible and one case in the maxilla. And eleven of thirteen cases were distributed on the premolar and molar region. 4. Radiologically, eight of thirteen cases were well defined lesions, five cases were relatively well defined lesions. And nine of thirteen cases were mixed lesions, three cases were radiopaque lesions, and only one case was purely radiolucent lesion. 5. Histologically, seven of thirteen cases were classified ossifying fibroma, four cases were cemento-ossifying fibroma, and two cases were cementifying fibroma.

  16. Medical specialty considerations by medical students early in their clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissman Charles

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specialty selection by medical students determines the future composition of the physician workforce. Selection of career specialties begins in earnest during the clinical rotations with exposure to the clinical and intellectual environments of various specialties. Career specialty selection is followed by choosing a residency program. This is the period where insight into the decision process might help healthcare leaders ascertain whether, when, and how to intervene and attempt to influence students' decisions. The criteria students consider important in selecting a specialty and a residency program during the early phases of their clinical rotations were examined. Methods Questionnaires distributed to fifth-year medical students at two Israeli medical schools. Results 229 of 275 (83% questionnaires were returned. 80% of the students had considered specialties; 62% considered one specialty, 25% two, the remainder 3-5 specialties. Students took a long-range view; 55% considered working conditions after residency more important than those during residency, another 42% considered both equally important. More than two-thirds wanted an interesting and challenging bedside specialty affording control over lifestyle and providing a reasonable relationship between salary and lifestyle. Men were more interested in well-remunerated procedure-oriented specialties that allowed for private practice. Most students rated as important selecting a challenging and interesting residency program characterized by good relationships between staff members, with positive treatment by the institution, and that provided much teaching. More women wanted short residencies with few on-calls and limited hours. More men rated as important residencies affording much responsibility for making clinical decisions and providing research opportunities. More than 50% of the students considered it important that their residency be in a leading department, and in

  17. The Myth of the Nuclear Family: Historical Background and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoka, Azubike Felix

    1979-01-01

    Research reviewed indicates that the concept of the nuclear family is inadequate and misleading for an understanding of family dynamics or a guide for therapeutic intervention. Nonetheless, clinical practitioners and psychological theorists foster the nuclear myth. A new approach to the study of human relationships is needed. (Author/GC)

  18. Using Digital Technologies in Clinical HIV Research: Real-World Applications and Considerations for Future Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriesen, Jessica; Bull, Sheana; Dietrich, Janan; Haberer, Jessica E; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Voronin, Yegor; Wall, Kristin M; Whalen, Christopher; Priddy, Frances

    2017-07-31

    Digital technologies, especially if used in novel ways, provide a number of potential advantages to clinical research in trials related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and may greatly facilitate operations as well as data collection and analysis. These technologies may even allow answering questions that are not answerable with older technologies. However, they come with a variety of potential concerns for both the participants and the trial sponsors. The exact challenges and means for alleviation depend on the technology and on the population in which it is deployed, and the rapidly changing landscape of digital technologies presents a challenge for creating future-proof guidelines for technology application. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize some common themes that are frequently encountered by researchers in this context and highlight those that should be carefully considered before making a decision to include these technologies in their research. In April 2016, the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise surveyed the field for research groups with recent experience in novel applications of digital technologies in HIV clinical research and convened these groups for a 1-day meeting. Real-world uses of various technologies were presented and discussed by 46 attendees, most of whom were researchers involved in the design and conduct of clinical trials of biomedical HIV prevention and treatment approaches. After the meeting, a small group of organizers reviewed the presentations and feedback obtained during the meeting and categorized various lessons-learned to identify common themes. A group of 9 experts developed a draft summary of the findings that was circulated via email to all 46 attendees for review. Taking into account the feedback received, the group finalized the considerations that are presented here. Meeting presenters and attendees discussed the many successful applications of digital

  19. Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis: Background, laboratory features, and acute clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Comelli, Ivan; Benatti, Mario; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Bassi, Antonella; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a relatively rare condition, but its clinical consequences are frequently dramatic in terms of both morbidity and mortality. Although no consensus has been reached so far about the precise definition of this condition, the term rhabdomyolysis describes a rapid breakdown of striated, or skeletal, muscle. It is hence characterized by the rupture and necrosis of muscle fibers, resulting in release of cell degradation products and intracellular elements within the bloodstream and extracellular space. Notably, the percentage of patients with rhabdomyolysis who develop acute kidney injury, the most dramatic consequence, varies from 13% to over 50% according to both the cause and the clinical and organizational setting where they are diagnosed. Despite direct muscle injury (i.e., traumatic rhabdomyolysis) remains the most common cause, additional causes, frequently overlapping, include hypoxic, physical, chemical or biological factors. The conventional triad of symptoms includes muscle pain, weakness and dark urine. The laboratory diagnosis is essentially based on the measurement of biomarkers of muscle injury, being creatine kinase (CK) the biochemical "gold standard" for diagnosis, and myoglobin the "gold standard" for prognostication, especially in patients with non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis. The essential clinical management in the emergency department is based on a targeted intervention to manage the underlying cause, combined with infusion of fluids and eventually sodium bicarbonate. We will present and discuss in this article the pathophysiological and clinical features of non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis, focusing specifically on Emergency Department (ED) management. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Background on Establishing a Working Group to Create Home Clinical Cases for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Taketo

    2017-01-01

    In Japan there are concerns that there will be a surge in social insurance costs such as medical and nursing care expenses as a result of the baby boom generation reaching the late stages of old age (75 years old and beyond) around 2025 ("The 2025 Problem"). In 2012, the "Outline on Social Insurance and Tax Reform" was approved by the Japanese cabinet and government, including "construction of regional comprehensive care". To promote participation in home medical care by pharmacists, this article presents the roles demanded of pharmacists in regional comprehensive care from the standpoint of physicians, and the discussion of case studies bridging the gap from knowledge learned in lectures to practical applications. In the field of medical education, "The 2023 Problem", regarding standards of education on a global level, caused medical schools across Japan to scramble for curriculum reform, specifically in the demand for increased time spent in clinical training and the expansion of community-based medical education. The current state of community-based medical education will be reviewed. In light of these developments, "the working group to create home clinical cases for education" was developed by clinical pharmacists in the field and university faculty members at Daiichi University of Pharmacy.

  1. Considerations for automated machine learning in clinical metabolic profiling: Altered homocysteine plasma concentration associated with metformin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlenko, Alena; Moore, Jason H; Orzechowski, Patryk; Olson, Randal S; Cairns, Junmei; Caraballo, Pedro J; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Wang, Liewei; Breitenstein, Matthew K

    2018-01-01

    With the maturation of metabolomics science and proliferation of biobanks, clinical metabolic profiling is an increasingly opportunistic frontier for advancing translational clinical research. Automated Machine Learning (AutoML) approaches provide exciting opportunity to guide feature selection in agnostic metabolic profiling endeavors, where potentially thousands of independent data points must be evaluated. In previous research, AutoML using high-dimensional data of varying types has been demonstrably robust, outperforming traditional approaches. However, considerations for application in clinical metabolic profiling remain to be evaluated. Particularly, regarding the robustness of AutoML to identify and adjust for common clinical confounders. In this study, we present a focused case study regarding AutoML considerations for using the Tree-Based Optimization Tool (TPOT) in metabolic profiling of exposure to metformin in a biobank cohort. First, we propose a tandem rank-accuracy measure to guide agnostic feature selection and corresponding threshold determination in clinical metabolic profiling endeavors. Second, while AutoML, using default parameters, demonstrated potential to lack sensitivity to low-effect confounding clinical covariates, we demonstrated residual training and adjustment of metabolite features as an easily applicable approach to ensure AutoML adjustment for potential confounding characteristics. Finally, we present increased homocysteine with long-term exposure to metformin as a potentially novel, non-replicated metabolite association suggested by TPOT; an association not identified in parallel clinical metabolic profiling endeavors. While warranting independent replication, our tandem rank-accuracy measure suggests homocysteine to be the metabolite feature with largest effect, and corresponding priority for further translational clinical research. Residual training and adjustment for a potential confounding effect by BMI only slightly modified

  2. WE-D-207-01: Background and Clinical Implementation of a Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberle, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, Lung Cancer is responsible for more cancer deaths than the next four cancers combined. In addition, the 5 year survival rate for lung cancer patients has not improved over the past 40 to 50 years. To combat this deadly disease, in 2002 the National Cancer Institute launched a very large Randomized Control Trial called the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). This trial would randomize subjects who had substantial risk of lung cancer (due to age and smoking history) into either a Chest X-ray arm or a low dose CT arm. In November 2010, the National Cancer Institute announced that the NLST had demonstrated 20% fewer lung cancer deaths among those who were screened with low-dose CT than with chest X-ray. In December 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended the use of Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT and a little over a year later (Feb. 2015), CMS announced that Medicare would also cover Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT. Thus private and public insurers are required to provide Lung Cancer Screening programs using CT to the appropriate population(s). The purpose of this Symposium is to inform medical physicists and prepare them to support the implementation of Lung Screening programs. This Symposium will focus on the clinical aspects of lung cancer screening, requirements of a screening registry for systematically capturing and tracking screening patients and results (such as required Medicare data elements) as well as the role of the medical physicist in screening programs, including the development of low dose CT screening protocols. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical basis and clinical components of a lung cancer screening program, including eligibility criteria and other requirements. To understand the data collection requirements, workflow, and informatics infrastructure needed to support the tracking and reporting components of a screening program. To understand the role of the medical physicist in

  3. The Managed Ventricular pacing versus VVI 40 Pacing (MVP) Trial: clinical background, rationale, design, and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Michael O; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Miller, Elaine Hogan; Sherfesee, Lou; Sheldon, Todd; Whellan, David

    2006-12-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduce mortality among appropriately selected patients who have had or are at risk for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Right ventricular apical (RVA) pacing has been implicated in worsening heart failure and death. The optimal pacemaker mode for bradycardia support while minimizing unnecessary and potentially harmful RVA pacing has not been determined. The Managed Ventricular pacing vs. VVI 40 Pacing Trial (MVP) is a prospective, multicenter, randomized, single-blind, parallel, controlled clinical trial designed to establish whether atrial-based dual-chamber managed ventricular pacing mode (MVP) is equivalent or superior to back-up only ventricular pacing (VVI 40) among patients with standard indications for ICD therapy and no indication for bradycardia pacing. The MVP Trial is designed with 80% power to detect a 10% reduction in the primary endpoint of new or worsening heart failure or all-cause mortality in the MVP-treated group. Approximately 1,000 patients at 80 centers in the United States, Canada, Western Europe, and Israel will be randomized to MVP or VVI 40 pacing after successful implantation of a dual-chamber ICD. Heart failure therapies will be optimized in accordance with evidence-based guidelines. Prespecified secondary endpoints will include ventricular arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, new indication for bradycardia pacing, health-related quality of life, and cost effectiveness. Enrollment began in October 2004 and concluded in April 2006. The study will be terminated upon recommendation of the Data Monitoring Committee or when the last patient enrolled and surviving has reached a minimum 2 years of follow-up. The MVP Trial will meet the clinical need for carefully designed prospective studies to define the benefits of atrial-based dual-chamber minimal ventricular pacing versus single-chamber ventricular pacing in conventional ICD patients.

  4. Clinical MR mammography. Impact of hormonal status on background enhancement and diagnostic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltzer, Pascal Andreas Thomas; Dietzel, M.; Burmeister, H.; Pfleiderer, S.O.; Kaiser, W.A.; Vag, T.; Gajda, M.; Camara, O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Hormonal stimulation can induce background enhancement (BE) in MR mammography (MRM). This fact has been assumed to decrease the accuracy of MRM. Consequently, this report investigates: 1. The prevalence of BE in postmenopausal vs. premenopausal women in correlation to hormonal cycle phase (CP). 2. The impact of hormonal status (HS) and BE on diagnostic accuracy. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients over 22 months with complete HS information (week of CP or postmenopausal) were included in this prospective investigation. Exclusion criteria were any hormonal therapy, hysterectomy as well as cancer proven by biopsy. The standard of reference was histopathology. All MRM scans were acquired using the same protocol (1.5 T, dynamic T 1w GRE after 0.1 mmol/kg bw Gd-DTPA i. v.). Two radiologists rated all examinations in consensus according to BI-RADS. BE was defined as: 0 = missing, 1 = moderate, 2 = distinct. Results: 224 patients (150 postmenopausal, 74 premenopausal, 45 in the second week of CP) were included in this study (83 benign and 141 malignant findings). BE was more frequent in premenopausal women (p = 0.006), but did not differ between CP (p = 0.460). Neither HS nor BE had a significant impact on the diagnostic parameters of MRM (p ≥ 0.375). However, regarding BE, the relative number of false positive (FP) findings was highest (5 / 10; 50 %) in the distinct BE group. Regarding HS, 17 % more FP findings were observed in premenopausal women examined outside the second week of CP. Conclusion: In premenopausal women, HS leads to increased BE of breast tissue, independent of CP. Distinct BE and less pronounced, non-optimal CP may lead to an increased number of false positive findings. (orig.)

  5. Clinical MR mammography. Impact of hormonal status on background enhancement and diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltzer, Pascal Andreas Thomas; Dietzel, M.; Burmeister, H.; Pfleiderer, S.O.; Kaiser, W.A. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Vag, T. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Gajda, M. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Pathology; Camara, O. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Clinic of Gynaecology

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Hormonal stimulation can induce background enhancement (BE) in MR mammography (MRM). This fact has been assumed to decrease the accuracy of MRM. Consequently, this report investigates: 1. The prevalence of BE in postmenopausal vs. premenopausal women in correlation to hormonal cycle phase (CP). 2. The impact of hormonal status (HS) and BE on diagnostic accuracy. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients over 22 months with complete HS information (week of CP or postmenopausal) were included in this prospective investigation. Exclusion criteria were any hormonal therapy, hysterectomy as well as cancer proven by biopsy. The standard of reference was histopathology. All MRM scans were acquired using the same protocol (1.5 T, dynamic T 1w GRE after 0.1 mmol/kg bw Gd-DTPA i. v.). Two radiologists rated all examinations in consensus according to BI-RADS. BE was defined as: 0 = missing, 1 = moderate, 2 = distinct. Results: 224 patients (150 postmenopausal, 74 premenopausal, 45 in the second week of CP) were included in this study (83 benign and 141 malignant findings). BE was more frequent in premenopausal women (p = 0.006), but did not differ between CP (p = 0.460). Neither HS nor BE had a significant impact on the diagnostic parameters of MRM (p {>=} 0.375). However, regarding BE, the relative number of false positive (FP) findings was highest (5 / 10; 50 %) in the distinct BE group. Regarding HS, 17 % more FP findings were observed in premenopausal women examined outside the second week of CP. Conclusion: In premenopausal women, HS leads to increased BE of breast tissue, independent of CP. Distinct BE and less pronounced, non-optimal CP may lead to an increased number of false positive findings. (orig.)

  6. Health Equity Considerations for Developing and Reporting Patient-reported Outcomes in Clinical Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkovic, Jennifer; Barton, Jennifer L; Flurey, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    , and (6) consideration of statistical power of subgroup analyses for outcome reporting. CONCLUSION: There is a need to (1) conduct a systematic review to assess how equity and population characteristics have been considered in PROM development and whether these differences influence the ranking...

  7. Advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants in sleep centers and clinics: a survey of current roles and educational background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Loretta; Cartwright, Ann; Collop, Nancy; Freedman, Neil; McLeod, Don; Weaver, Terri E; Rogers, Ann E

    2014-05-15

    To survey Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) and Physician Assistant (PA) utilization, roles and educational background within the field of sleep medicine. Electronic surveys distributed to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) member centers and APRNs and PAs working within sleep centers and clinics. Approximately 40% of responding AASM sleep centers reported utilizing APRNs or PAs in predominantly clinical roles. Of the APRNs and PAs surveyed, 95% reported responsibilities in sleep disordered breathing and more than 50% in insomnia and movement disorders. Most APRNs and PAs were prepared at the graduate level (89%), with sleep-specific education primarily through "on the job" training (86%). All APRNs surveyed were Nurse Practitioners (NPs), with approximately double the number of NPs compared to PAs. APRNs and PAs were reported in sleep centers at proportions similar to national estimates of NPs and PAs in physicians' offices. They report predominantly clinical roles, involving common sleep disorders. Given current predictions that the outpatient healthcare structure will change and the number of APRNs and PAs will increase, understanding the role and utilization of these professionals is necessary to plan for the future care of patients with sleep disorders. Surveyed APRNs and PAs reported a significant deficiency in formal and standardized sleep-specific education. Efforts to provide formal and standardized educational opportunities for APRNs and PAs that focus on their clinical roles within sleep centers could help fill a current educational gap.

  8. The Effects of Music Intervention on Background Pain and Anxiety in Burn Patients: Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Haghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of music on the background pain, anxiety, and relaxation levels in burn patients. In this pretest-posttest randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 hospitalized burn patients were selected through convenience sampling. Subjects randomly assigned to music and control groups. Data related to demographic and clinical characteristics, analgesics, and physiologic measures were collected by researcher-made tools. Visual analog scale was used to determine pain, anxiety, and relaxation levels before and after the intervention in 3 consecutive days. Patients' preferred music was offered once a day for 3 days. The control group only received routine care. Data were analyzed using SPSS-PC (V. 20.0). According to paired t-test, there were significant differences between mean scores of pain (P < .001), anxiety (P < .001), and relaxation (P < .001) levels before and after intervention in music group. Independent t-test indicated a significant difference between the mean scores of changes in pain, anxiety, and relaxation levels before and after intervention in music and control groups (P < .001). No differences were detected in the mean scores of physiologic measures between groups before and after music intervention. Music is an inexpensive, appropriate, and safe intervention for applying to burn patients with background pain and anxiety at rest. To produce more effective comfort for patients, it is necessary to compare different types and time lengths of music intervention to find the best approach.

  9. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendler, Rabbi Moshe D.; Loike, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The transition of new biotechnologies into clinical trials is a critical step in approving a new drug or therapy in health care. Ethically recruiting appropriate volunteers for these clinical trials can be a challenging task for both the pharmaceutical companies and the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy. The halachic perspective encourages individuals to volunteer for such clinical trials under the ethical principles of beneficence and social responsibility, when animal studies have shown that health risks are minimal. PMID:26241230

  10. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbi Moshe D. Tendler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transition of new biotechnologies into clinical trials is a critical step in approving a new drug or therapy in health care. Ethically recruiting appropriate volunteers for these clinical trials can be a challenging task for both the pharmaceutical companies and the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy. The halachic perspective encourages individuals to volunteer for such clinical trials under the ethical principles of beneficence and social responsibility, when animal studies have shown that health risks are minimal.

  11. Body weight considerations in the B6C3F1 mouse and the use of dietary control to standardize background tumor incidence in chronic bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leakey, Julian E.A.; Seng, John E.; Allaben, William T.

    2003-01-01

    In B6C3F 1 mice, the rate of body growth influences susceptibility to liver neoplasia and large variations in body weight can complicate the interpretation of bioassay data. The relationship between body weight and liver tumor incidence was calculated for historical control populations of male and female ad libitum-fed mice (approx. 2750 and 2300 animals, respectively) and in populations of male and female mice which had been subjected to forced body weight reduction due to either dietary restriction or exposure to noncarcinogenic chemicals (approx. 1600 and 1700, respectively). Resulting tumor risk data were then used to construct idealized weight curves for male and female B6C3F 1 mice; these curves predict a terminal background liver tumor incidence of 15-20%. Use of dietary control to manipulate body growth of male B6C3F 1 mice to fit the idealized weight curve was evaluated in a 2-year bioassay of chloral hydrate. Cohorts of mice were successfully maintained at weights approximating their idealized target weights throughout the study. These mice exhibited less body weight variation than their ad libitum-fed counterparts (e.g., standard deviations of body weight were 1.4 and 3.4 g for respective control groups at 36 weeks). Historical control body weight and tumor risk data from the two male mouse populations were utilized to predict background liver tumor rates for each experimental group of the chloral hydrate study. The predicted background tumor rates closely matched the observed rates for both the dietary controlled and ad libitum-fed chloral hydrate control groups when each mouse was evaluated according to either its weekly food consumption or its weekly change in body weight

  12. Theoretical and practical considerations for teaching diagnostic electronic-nose technologies to clinical laboratory technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of new electronic technologies and instruments, utilized to perform many current clinical operations in the biomedical field, is changing the way medical health care is delivered to patients. The majority of test results from laboratory analyses, performed with these analytical instruments often prior to clinical examinations, are frequently used...

  13. Safety and effectiveness considerations for clinical studies of visual prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ethan D.

    2007-03-01

    With the advent of new designs of visual prostheses for the blind, FDA is faced with developing guidance for evaluating their engineering, safety and patient performance. Visual prostheses are considered significant risk medical devices, and their use in human clinical trials must be approved by FDA under an investigation device exemption (IDE). This paper contains a series of test topics and design issues that sponsors should consider in order to assess the safety and efficacy of their device. The IDE application includes a series of pre-clinical and clinical data sections. The pre-clinical section documents laboratory, animal and bench top performance tests of visual prostheses safety and reliability to support a human clinical trial. The materials used in constructing the implant should be biocompatible, sterile, corrosion resistant, and able to withstand any forces exerted on it during normal patient use. The clinical data section is composed of items related to patient-related evaluation of device performance. This section documents the implantation procedure, trial design, statistical analysis and how visual performance is assessed. Similar to cochlear implants, a visual prosthesis is expected to last in the body for many years, and good pre-clinical and clinical testing will help ensure its safety, durability and effectiveness.

  14. Assessment of consent models as an ethical consideration in the conduct of prehospital ambulance randomised controlled clinical trials: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Armstrong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to understand the main ethical considerations when conducting clinical trials in the prehospital ambulance based setting. Methods A systematic review of the literature on randomised controlled trials in ambulance settings was undertaken. A search of eight databases identified published studies involving recruitment of ambulance service users. Four independent authors undertook abstract and full-text reviews to determine eligibility and extract relevant data. The data extraction concentrated on ethical considerations, with any discussion of ethics being included for further analysis. The resultant data were combined to form a narrative synthesis. Results In all, 56 papers were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Issues relating to consent were the most significant theme identified. Type of consent differed depending on the condition or intervention being studied. The country in which the research took place did not appear to influence the type of consent, apart from the USA where exception from consent appeared to be most commonly used. A wide range of terms were used to describe consent. Conclusions Consent was the main ethical consideration in published ambulance based research. A range of consent models were used ranging from informed consent to exception from consent (waiver of consent. Many studies cited international guidelines as informing their choice of consent model but diverse and sometimes confused terms were used to describe these models. This suggests that standardisation of consent models and the terminology used to describe them is warranted.

  15. Considerations in the development of circulating tumor cell technology for clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkinson David R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript summarizes current thinking on the value and promise of evolving circulating tumor cell (CTC technologies for cancer patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy, as well as accelerating oncologic drug development. Moving forward requires the application of the classic steps in biomarker development–analytical and clinical validation and clinical qualification for specific contexts of use. To that end, this review describes methods for interactive comparisons of proprietary new technologies, clinical trial designs, a clinical validation qualification strategy, and an approach for effectively carrying out this work through a public-private partnership that includes test developers, drug developers, clinical trialists, the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA and the US National Cancer Institute (NCI.

  16. Caesarean section in a patient with varicella: Anaesthesia considerations and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini M Dave

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A primigravida with chicken pox was posted for an emergency caesarean section. General anaesthesia was administered. Key issues in anaesthesia management and the clinical implications are discussed.

  17. 78 FR 66941 - Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices; Guidance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    .... 66, rm. 2110, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301- 796-5750. For devices regulated by CBER: Stephen... the best clinical and statistical practices for investigational medical device studies. A medical...

  18. Diagnostic Consideration for Sinonasal Wegener’s Granulomatosis Clinically Mistaken for Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina La Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Wegener’s granulomatosis clinically mistaken for carcinoma in a 21-year-old girl presenting with an ulcerated mass of the nasopharynx associated with enlarged laterocervical nodes. The lesion was clinically suspected as malignant on the basis of clinical and radiological findings (namely, computed tomography scan and positron emission tomography. However, multiple biopsies were not conclusive for malignancy showing histological change suggestive of Wegener’s granulomatosis. A serum determination of cANCA supported the diagnosis of Wegener’s granulomatosis. Clinical findings and image studies suggested an erroneous diagnosis of malignancy whereas a definitive diagnosis of Wegener’s granulomatosis was achieved only after repeated biopsies thus leading to a correct therapeutic approach. The Wegener granulomatosis must be added to the list of the differential diagnoses of the masses of the nasopharynx associated with or without enlarged laterocervical nodes.

  19. Social media for physiotherapy clinics: considerations in creating a Facebook page

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Osman; Claydon, L.S.; Ribeiro, D.C.; Arumugam, A.; Higgs, C.; Baxter, G.D.

    2013-01-01

    Social media websites play a prominent role in modern society, and the most popular of these websites is Facebook. Increasingly, physiotherapy clinics have begun to utilize Facebook in order to create pages to publicize their services. There are many factors to consider in the planning, implementing, and maintenance of Facebook pages for physiotherapy clinics, including ethical and privacy issues. The primary purpose of creating a page must be clearly defined, with dedicated clinicians given ...

  20. Neck Rhabdoid Tumors: Clinical Features and Consideration of Autologous Stem Cell Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Adam D; Capitini, Christian M; Salamat, Shahriar M; DeSantes, Kenneth; Bradley, Kristin A; Kennedy, Tabassum; Dehner, Louis P; Patel, Neha J

    2018-01-01

    Extrarenal malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRT) have a poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. Adding high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue (HDC-ASCR) as consolidative therapy for MRT is controversial. We describe 2 patients, age 13 years and 19 months, with unresectable neck MRT. After chemotherapy and radiotherapy, both underwent HDC-ASCR and remain in remission over 4 years later. We reviewed all published cases of neck MRT, and found poorer outcomes and more variable age of presentation and time to progression than MRT at other sites. Neck MRT may represent a higher-risk subset of MRT, and addition of HDC-ASCR merits consideration.

  1. Social economical and psychological considerations in conveying potential radiation risks from high level natural background radiation to the residents of Ramsar, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Ghiassi-nejad, M.

    2003-01-01

    X-rays and radioactivity were discovered more than 100 years ago but the need for protection against very low doses of ionizing radiation and especially different levels of natural radiation is still among the most controversial matters in radiobiology and radiation protection. According to formal reports, some areas in Ramsar, a city in northern Iran, are the inhabited areas with the highest levels of natural radiation studied so far. A population of about 2000 is exposed to average annual radiation levels of 10.2 mGy y''-1 and the highest recorded external gamma dose rates are about 130 mGy y''-1. We have previously shown that in high background radiation areas (HBRAs), cultured human lymphocytes of the inhabitants whose cumulative radiation doses were as much as 170 times more than those of a control area when subjected to 1.5 Gy challenge dose,were significantly more radioresistant compared to the residents of the control area (Mortazavi et al. 2002a,b, Mortazavi and Karam 2002, Ghiassi-Najed et al. 2002). The people who live in these areas are usually unaware of the high levels of natural radiation in their environment. Studies performed on the residents of these areas have indicated that the effective dose of the inhabitants, in some cases, is much higher than the dose limits for occupational irradiation. Considering recent policies of ICRP regarding suggesting dose limits for exposure to natural sources of ionizing including radon, it seems that the inhabitants should become familiar with the possible risks of the exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. They should also realize that studies performed over the past years have indicated no detrimental effect. On the other hand, according to ICRP suggestions and considering the experiences in other countries, especially evacuation of the residents of contaminated areas after Chernobyl accident, setting any radiation protection regulation for the inhabitants without considering social, economic and

  2. Training-Based Interventions in Motor Rehabilitation after Stroke: Theoretical and Clinical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Sterr

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic neuroscience research on brain plasticity, motor learning and recovery has stimulated new concepts in neurological rehabilitation. Combined with the development of set methodological standards in clinical outcome research, these findings have led to a double-paradigm shift in motor rehabilitation: (a the move towards evidence-based procedures for the assessment of clinical outcome & the employment of disablement models to anchor outcome parameters, and (b the introduction of practice-based concepts that are derived from testable models that specify treatment mechanisms. In this context, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIT has played a catalytic role in taking motor rehabilitation forward into the scientific arena. As a theoretically founded and hypothesis-driven intervention, CIT research focuses on two main issues. The first issue is the assessment of long-term clinical benefits in an increasing range of patient groups, and the second issue is the investigation of neuronal and behavioural treatment mechanisms and their interactive contribution to treatment success. These studies are mainly conducted in the research environment and will eventually lead to increased treatment benefits for patients in standard health care. However, gradual but presumably more immediate benefits for patients may be achieved by introducing and testing derivates of the CIT concept that are more compatible with current clinical practice. Here, we summarize the theoretical and empirical issues related to the translation of research-based CIT work into the clinical context of standard health care.

  3. Clinical translation of handheld optical coherence tomography: practical considerations and recent advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy, Guillermo L.; Won, Jungeun; Spillman, Darold R.; Dsouza, Roshan; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-12-01

    Since the inception of optical coherence tomography (OCT), advancements in imaging system design and handheld probes have allowed for numerous advancements in disease diagnostics and characterization of the structural and optical properties of tissue. OCT system developers continue to reduce form factor and cost, while improving imaging performance (speed, resolution, etc.) and flexibility for applicability in a broad range of fields, and nearly every clinical specialty. An extensive array of components to construct customized systems has also become available, with a range of commercial entities that produce high-quality products, from single components to full systems, for clinical and research use. Many advancements in the development of these miniaturized and portable systems can be linked back to a specific challenge in academic research, or a clinical need in medicine or surgery. Handheld OCT systems are discussed and explored for various applications. Handheld systems are discussed in terms of their relative level of portability and form factor, with mention of the supporting technologies and surrounding ecosystem that bolstered their development. Additional insight from our efforts to implement systems in several clinical environments is provided. The trend toward well-designed, efficient, and compact handheld systems paves the way for more widespread adoption of OCT into point-of-care or point-of-procedure applications in both clinical and commercial settings.

  4. Commentary: considerations for using the 'Trials within Cohorts' design in a clinical trial of an investigational medicinal product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibby, Anna C; Torgerson, David J; Leach, Samantha; Lewis-White, Helen; Maskell, Nick A

    2018-01-08

    The 'trials within cohorts' (TwiC) design is a pragmatic approach to randomised trials in which trial participants are randomly selected from an existing cohort. The design has multiple potential benefits, including the option of conducting multiple trials within the same cohort. To date, the TwiC design methodology been used in numerous clinical settings but has never been applied to a clinical trial of an investigational medicinal product (CTIMP). We have recently secured the necessary approvals to undertake the first CTIMP using the TwiC design. In this paper, we describe some of the considerations and modifications required to ensure such a trial is compliant with Good Clinical Practice and international clinical trials regulations. We advocate using a two-stage consent process and using the consent stages to explicitly differentiate between trial participants and cohort participants who are providing control data. This distinction ensured compliance but had consequences with respect to costings, recruitment and the trial assessment schedule. We have demonstrated that it is possible to secure ethical and regulatory approval for a CTIMP TwiC. By including certain considerations at the trial design stage, we believe this pragmatic and efficient methodology could be utilised in other CTIMPs in future.

  5. Endocrine therapy for breast cancer prevention in high-risk women: clinical and economic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Amy G; Younis, Tallal

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of breast cancer highlights the need for primary prevention strategies that demonstrate both favorable clinical benefit/risk profile and good value for money. Endocrine therapy with selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs) or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) has been associated with a favorable clinical benefit/risk profile in the prevention of breast cancer in women at high risk of developing the disease. The available endocrine therapy strategies differ in terms of their relative reductions of breast cancer risk, potential side effects, and upfront drug acquisition costs, among others. This review highlights the clinical trials of SERMs and AIs for the primary prevention of breast cancer, and the cost-effectiveness /cost-utility studies that have examined their "value for money" in various health care jurisdictions.

  6. Developing students' time management skills in clinical settings: practical considerations for busy nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan

    2011-06-01

    In clinical settings, nursing staff often find themselves responsible for students who have varying time management skills. Nurses need to respond sensitively and appropriately, and to teach nursing students how to prioritize and better allocate time. This is important not only for developing students' clinical skills but also for shaping their perceptions about the quality of the placement and their willingness to consider it as a potential work specialty. In this column, some simple, practical strategies that nurses can use to assist students with improving their time management skills are identified. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. A multidisciplinary audit of clinical coding accuracy in otolaryngology: financial, managerial and clinical governance considerations under payment-by-results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouraei, S A R; O'Hanlon, S; Butler, C R; Hadovsky, A; Donald, E; Benjamin, E; Sandhu, G S

    2009-02-01

    To audit the accuracy of otolaryngology clinical coding and identify ways of improving it. Prospective multidisciplinary audit, using the 'national standard clinical coding audit' methodology supplemented by 'double-reading and arbitration'. Teaching-hospital otolaryngology and clinical coding departments. Otolaryngology inpatient and day-surgery cases. Concordance between initial coding performed by a coder (first cycle) and final coding by a clinician-coder multidisciplinary team (MDT; second cycle) for primary and secondary diagnoses and procedures, and Health Resource Groupings (HRG) assignment. 1250 randomly-selected cases were studied. Coding errors occurred in 24.1% of cases (301/1250). The clinician-coder MDT reassigned 48 primary diagnoses and 186 primary procedures and identified a further 209 initially-missed secondary diagnoses and procedures. In 203 cases, patient's initial HRG changed. Incorrect coding caused an average revenue loss of 174.90 pounds per patient (14.7%) of which 60% of the total income variance was due to miscoding of a eight highly-complex head and neck cancer cases. The 'HRG drift' created the appearance of disproportionate resource utilisation when treating 'simple' cases. At our institution the total cost of maintaining a clinician-coder MDT was 4.8 times lower than the income regained through the double-reading process. This large audit of otolaryngology practice identifies a large degree of error in coding on discharge. This leads to significant loss of departmental revenue, and given that the same data is used for benchmarking and for making decisions about resource allocation, it distorts the picture of clinical practice. These can be rectified through implementing a cost-effective clinician-coder double-reading multidisciplinary team as part of a data-assurance clinical governance framework which we recommend should be established in hospitals.

  8. Catching moving targets: cancer stem cell hierarchies, therapy-resistance & considerations for clinical intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gasch, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    It is widely believed that targeting the tumour-initiating cancer stem cell (CSC) component of malignancy has great therapeutic potential, particularly in therapy-resistant disease. However, despite concerted efforts, CSC-targeting strategies have not been efficiently translated to the clinic. This is partly due to our incomplete understanding of the mechanisms underlying CSC therapy-resistance. In particular, the relationship between therapy-resistance and the organisation of CSCs as Stem-Progenitor-Differentiated cell hierarchies has not been widely studied. In this review we argue that modern clinical strategies should appreciate that the CSC hierarchy is a dynamic target that contains sensitive and resistant components and expresses a collection of therapy-resisting mechanisms. We propose that the CSC hierarchy at primary presentation changes in response to clinical intervention, resulting in a recurrent malignancy that should be targeted differently. As such, addressing the hierarchical organisation of CSCs into our bench-side theory should expedite translation of CSC-targeting to bed-side practice. In conclusion, we discuss strategies through which we can catch these moving clinical targets to specifically compromise therapy-resistant disease.

  9. Beyond research: a primer for considerations on using viral metagenomics in the field and clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Richard J; Draper, Jenny L; Nielsen, Fiona G G; Dutilh, Bas E

    2015-01-01

    Powered by recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies, metagenomics has already unveiled vast microbial biodiversity in a range of environments, and is increasingly being applied in clinics for difficult-to-diagnose cases. It can be tempting to suggest that metagenomics could be used

  10. Ruby laser for treatment of tattoos: technical considerations affecting clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Robert E.

    1990-06-01

    Recent clinical research on the use of ruby lasers for the treatment of tattoos and FIlk approval of a commercial system have renewed interest in this device. In this paper the principles of Q-switched ruby laser operation are reviewed, and potential sources of error in the estimation of delivered fluence are discussed.

  11. Radiation safety considerations and compliance within equine veterinary clinics: Results of an Australian survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surjan, Y.; Ostwald, P.; Milross, C.; Warren-Forward, H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine current knowledge and the level of compliance of radiation safety principles in equine veterinary clinics within Australia. Method: Surveys were sent to equine veterinary surgeons working in Australia. The survey was delivered both online and in hardcopy format; it comprised 49 questions, 15 of these directly related to radiation safety. The participants were asked about their current and previous use of radiation-producing equipment. Information regarding their level of knowledge and application of radiation safety principles and practice standards was collected and analysed. Results: The use of radiation-producing equipment was evident in 94% of responding clinics (a combination of X-ray, CT and/or Nuclear Medicine Cameras). Of those with radiation-producing equipment, 94% indicated that they hold a radiation licence, 78% had never completed a certified radiation safety course and 19% of participants did not use a personal radiation monitor. In 14% of cases, radiation safety manuals or protocols were not available within clinics. Conclusions: The study has shown that knowledge and application of guidelines as provided by the Code of Practice for Radiation Protection in Veterinary Medicine (2009) is poorly adhered to. The importance of compliance with regulatory requirements is pivotal in minimising occupational exposure to ionising radiation in veterinary medicine, thus there is a need for increased education and training in the area. - Highlights: • Application of the Code of Practice for Veterinary Medicine is poorly adhered to. • Majority of veterinary clinics had not completed certified radiation safety course. • One-fifth of participants did not use personal radiation monitoring. • Increased education and training in area of radiation safety and protection required to generate compliance in clinics

  12. Clinical background and its relation to results of percutaneous needle biopsy of suspected bone metastasis under guidance with CT fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Jun; Koyama, Yoshinori; Morita, Hideo; Takahashi, Ayako; Nakajima, Takahito; Yagi, Akiko; Arai, Kiyokazu; Shinozaki, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Hideomi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical background of needle biopsy of suspected bone metastasis under guidance with CT fluoroscopy. During a 3-year period (from April 2000 to March 2003), 103 needle biopsies on 101 lesions of 90 patients were performed for pathological evaluation of suspected bone metastasis. The clinical course of these patients prior to biopsy and its relation to the biopsy results were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty-two patients (69% of total cases) were referred for biopsy from orthopedic surgeons, and 51 of these patients consulted orthopedic surgeons on the initial presentation. Malignancy was pathologically proved in 47 (76%) of the 62 orthopedic patients, and in 19 (68%) of the 28 patients referred from other clinicians. Thirteen (21%) of the orthopedic patients had a history of malignancy, while 22 (78%) of the non-orthopedic patients were cancer patients. Metastasis was pathologically proved in 23 (66%) of the 35 patients with a history of malignancy, while malignancy was pathologically proved in 43 (78%) of the 55 patients without known malignancy. Diagnostic accuracy of the needle bone biopsy was 96%, and its complication rate was 0.7%. In the era of CT fluoroscopy, needle biopsy for suspected bone metastasis was most frequently requested for the patients who consulted orthopedic surgeons for the occurrence of local bone pain as the initial symptom of unknown malignancy. Frequency of malignancy proved by the biopsy in those patients was as high as that in the cancer patients referred from other clinicians. (author)

  13. Survey of young patients with polio and a foreign background at a Swedish post-polio outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werhagen, Lars; Borg, Kristian

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, polio survivors aged under 60 years are non-native Swedes which pose new aspects and challenges to a post-polio outpatient clinic. To analyze the medical data, walking aids, occupational, and family situation in non-native polio survivors aged less than 60 years at a Swedish post-polio outpatient clinic. Retrospective data analysis. Data were retrieved from medical records at the post-polio outpatient clinic. Actual age, age at acute polio infection, walking capacity, pain, concomitant diseases, working and family situation, and ethnical origin were analyzed. Data are presented in numbers and percentage. 153 patients were included. Mean age was 45 (17-60) years, and mean age at acute polio infection was 2 (0-12) years. Paresis of the lower extremities was the most common disability. 10 % were wheelchair dependent. Pain occurred in 70 % with a mean intensity of 55 measured with the visual analog scale. Hypertension was the most common concomitant disease. Half of the polio survivors were working at least part time, and roughly half were singles. Data were comparable with data earlier published in Swedish native polio survivors. Non-native polio survivors aged under 60 years showed similarities in age at acute polio infection, paresis, prevalence, and intensity of pain when compared with native Swedish polio survivors. They were, however, younger, and were less often working and married/cohabitants than native Swedish polio survivors. The results of this study underline the importance of social and vocational rehabilitation tailoring rehabilitation suitable for polio survivors with a foreign background.

  14. The clinical meaning of oxaluria in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with comorbid chronic pyelonephritis on the background of urolithiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Khukhlina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study clinical peculiarities of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with comorbid chronic pyelonephritis on the background of urolithiasis with oxaluria. Materials and methods. 60 patients were included into the study and divided into 3 groups. Study groups: I-st group - 18 patients with isolated course of chronic pyelonephritis (CP and urolithiasis (U of oxalic and mixed genesis, II-nd group - 19 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, study group III - 23 patients with COPD, CP and U of oxalic genesis. Additional control group consisted of 20 practically healthy individuals (PHI of corresponding age and gender. Laboratory and clinical examination of the patients was conducted. Spectrophotometry with polarization of biologic material was performed. Statistical analysis was done in Primer of Biostatistics, Origin 8.0. Results. Systemic inflammation in patients with COPD and comorbid CP with oxaluria form the syndrome of mutual burdening. This fact was proved by inverse correlation between oxalate salts in sputum (15,5±1,0 mg/24h and reduction of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 in group III. This result was in 2,1 lower than in PHI (r = -0,53,р<0,05. Conclusions. Taking into account data of the anamnesis, patients with COPD, comorbid CP and urolithiasis with oxaluria, had more severe course of COPD than patients with isolated COPD. This can be explained by the oxalic acid crystals deposition in bronchial wall. Stated above clinical characteristics are the features of respiratory oxalosis that needs special treatment.

  15. Dissecting aneurysms of posterior communicating artery itself: anatomical, diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Kizilkilic, Osman; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci

    2013-09-01

    Posterior communicating artery (PCoA) itself is an unusual location for intracranial aneurysms in that isolated dissections or dissecting aneurysms are extremely rare. In the way of correct diagnosis of dissecting aneurysms of PCoA itself, a proper understanding of (1) the anatomy of the PCoA and its perforator branches, (2) some particular diagnostic features, and (3) related clinical aspects is of significant importance. Although there are no established treatment strategies for this particular type of aneurysms, the endovascular approach might be considered as a plausible one. In this paper, our scope was to report five cases with dissecting aneurysm of the PCoA itself and to discuss this rare vascular pathology from anatomical, diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutical perspectives.

  16. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING WARFARIN DOSE TITRATION IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION DEPENDING ON CLINICAL FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Artanova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the relations of clinical characteristics and individual warfarin dose titration in patients with atrial fibrillation. Material and methods. Period of warfarin dose titration was analyzed in 68 patients with atrial fibrillation due to ischemic heart disease. Adjusted warfarin dose in milligram, duration of dose titration in days and maximal international normalized ratio (INR were taken into account. Sex, age, history of myocardial infarction and stroke, concomitant diseases, amiodarone therapy were considered among clinical characteristics. Results. Adjusted warfarin dose was significantly higher in obesity , and it was lower in case of experienced myocardial infarction. The INR highest levels and maximal amplitudes of its fluctuations were observed in patients with thyroid gland nodes and smokers. Period of warfarin dose titration was longer in patients treated with amiodarone. Conclusion. Warfarin dose titration in patients with atrial fibrillation depends on the presence of myocardial infarction, obesity , thyroid nodular changes, smoking and amiodarone treatment.

  17. Phrenic Nerve Palsy and Regional Anesthesia for Shoulder Surgery: Anatomical, Physiologic, and Clinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Boghdadly, Kariem; Chin, Ki Jinn; Chan, Vincent W S

    2017-07-01

    Regional anesthesia has an established role in providing perioperative analgesia for shoulder surgery. However, phrenic nerve palsy is a significant complication that potentially limits the use of regional anesthesia, particularly in high-risk patients. The authors describe the anatomical, physiologic, and clinical principles relevant to phrenic nerve palsy in this context. They also present a comprehensive review of the strategies for reducing phrenic nerve palsy and its clinical impact while ensuring adequate analgesia for shoulder surgery. The most important of these include limiting local anesthetic dose and injection volume and performing the injection further away from the C5-C6 nerve roots. Targeting peripheral nerves supplying the shoulder, such as the suprascapular and axillary nerves, may be an effective alternative to brachial plexus blockade in selected patients. The optimal regional anesthetic approach in shoulder surgery should be tailored to individual patients based on comorbidities, type of surgery, and the principles described in this article.

  18. Clinical and morphological considerations in one case with cervical cancer and right ureterohydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghib Para, Cristina Georgiana; Sferdian, Mircea Florin; Daşcău, Voicu; Păiuşan, Lucian; Ioiart, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 34-year-old female with cervical cancer and right ureterohydronephrosis. She was admitted to the Urology Clinic of the Emergency County Hospital of Arad, Romania, on November 11, 2015, after previously being diagnosed with stage IIIA cervical cancer in December 2014 and undergoing radio and chemotherapy and laparotomy for staging. At the moment of hospital admission, the patient suffered from fever and right lumbar pain, she was also diagnosed with grade IV right ureterohydronephrosis. The patient was operated at the Urology Clinic of Arad; the intervention involved a total hysterectomy with bilateral adnexectomy and a right obturatory necrectomy of the necrotic lymph nodes. However, the evolution was favorable. The purpose was to increase the patient's survival rate and increase the quality of her life by also applying one palliative method including a urethral stent. As a result, the patient's life was extended.

  19. Clinical photography in dermatology: ethical and medico-legal considerations in the age of digital and smartphone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunde, Lauren; McMeniman, Erin; Parker, Malcolm

    2013-08-01

    Clinical photography has long been an important aspect in the management of dermatological pathology and has many applications in contemporary dermatology practice. With the continuous evolution of digital and smartphone technology, clinicians must maintain ethical and medico-legal standards. This article reviews how dermatology trainees are utilising this technology in their clinical practice and what procedures they follow when taking photos of patients. We review the ethical and legal considerations of clinical photography in dermatology and present a hypothetical medico-legal scenario. Dermatology registrars were surveyed on their use of personal smartphones and digital equipment for photographing patients in their clinical practice. Numerous medico-legal providers were approached to provide medico-legal advice about a hypothetical scenario. We found that the use of these technologies is prevalent among dermatology registrars and all respondents reported regular use. Clinicians should routinely obtain and document adequate patient consent in relation to clinical photography, utilise strict privacy settings on smartphones and other digital devices and ensure that the images are stored on these devices for minimal periods. Express consent documentation in the clinical file puts the clinician in a more defensible position if a complaint is made to the medical board or privacy commissioner. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  20. Practical considerations in clinical strategy to support the development of injectable drug-device combination products for biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Easton, Rachael

    2018-01-01

    The development of an injectable drug-device combination (DDC) product for biologics is an intricate and evolving process that requires substantial investments of time and money. Consequently, the commercial dosage form(s) or presentation(s) are often not ready when pivotal trials commence, and it is common to have drug product changes (manufacturing process or presentation) during clinical development. A scientifically sound and robust bridging strategy is required in order to introduce these changes into the clinic safely. There is currently no single developmental paradigm, but a risk-based hierarchical approach has been well accepted. The rigor required of a bridging package depends on the level of risk associated with the changes. Clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic comparability or outcome studies are only required when important changes occur at a late stage. Moreover, an injectable DDC needs to be user-centric, and usability assessment in real-world clinical settings may be required to support the approval of a DDC. In this review, we discuss the common issues during the manufacturing process and presentation development of an injectable DDC and practical considerations in establishing a clinical strategy to address these issues, including key elements of clinical studies. We also analyze the current practice in the industry and review relevant and status of regulatory guidance in the DDC field.

  1. Practical considerations in clinical strategy to support the development of injectable drug-device combination products for biologics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Rachael

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of an injectable drug-device combination (DDC) product for biologics is an intricate and evolving process that requires substantial investments of time and money. Consequently, the commercial dosage form(s) or presentation(s) are often not ready when pivotal trials commence, and it is common to have drug product changes (manufacturing process or presentation) during clinical development. A scientifically sound and robust bridging strategy is required in order to introduce these changes into the clinic safely. There is currently no single developmental paradigm, but a risk-based hierarchical approach has been well accepted. The rigor required of a bridging package depends on the level of risk associated with the changes. Clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic comparability or outcome studies are only required when important changes occur at a late stage. Moreover, an injectable DDC needs to be user-centric, and usability assessment in real-world clinical settings may be required to support the approval of a DDC. In this review, we discuss the common issues during the manufacturing process and presentation development of an injectable DDC and practical considerations in establishing a clinical strategy to address these issues, including key elements of clinical studies. We also analyze the current practice in the industry and review relevant and status of regulatory guidance in the DDC field. PMID:29035675

  2. Invited review: study design considerations for clinical research in veterinary radiology and radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Peter V; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    High quality clinical research is essential for advancing knowledge in the areas of veterinary radiology and radiation oncology. Types of clinical research studies may include experimental studies, method-comparison studies, and patient-based studies. Experimental studies explore issues relative to pathophysiology, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. Method-comparison studies evaluate agreement between techniques or between observers. Patient-based studies investigate naturally acquired disease and focus on questions asked in clinical practice that relate to individuals or populations (e.g., risk, accuracy, or prognosis). Careful preplanning and study design are essential in order to achieve valid results. A key point to planning studies is ensuring that the design is tailored to the study objectives. Good design includes a comprehensive literature review, asking suitable questions, selecting the proper sample population, collecting the appropriate data, performing the correct statistical analyses, and drawing conclusions supported by the available evidence. Most study designs are classified by whether they are experimental or observational, longitudinal or cross-sectional, and prospective or retrospective. Additional features (e.g., controlled, randomized, or blinded) may be described that address bias. Two related challenging aspects of study design are defining an important research question and selecting an appropriate sample population. The sample population should represent the target population as much as possible. Furthermore, when comparing groups, it is important that the groups are as alike to each other as possible except for the variables of interest. Medical images are well suited for clinical research because imaging signs are categorical or numerical variables that might be predictors or outcomes of diseases or treatments. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  3. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING WARFARIN DOSE TITRATION IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION DEPENDING ON CLINICAL FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    E. L. Artanova; E. V. Saleeva; I. M. Sokolov; Y. G. Shvarts

    2011-01-01

    Aim. To study the relations of clinical characteristics and individual warfarin dose titration in patients with atrial fibrillation. Material and methods. Period of warfarin dose titration was analyzed in 68 patients with atrial fibrillation due to ischemic heart disease. Adjusted warfarin dose in milligram, duration of dose titration in days and maximal international normalized ratio (INR) were taken into account. Sex, age, history of myocardial infarction and stroke, concomitant diseases, a...

  4. Beyond research: a primer for considerations on using viral metagenomics in the field and clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Richard J.; Draper, Jenny L.; Nielsen, Fiona G. G.; Dutilh, Bas E.

    2015-01-01

    Powered by recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies, metagenomics has already unveiled vast microbial biodiversity in a range of environments, and is increasingly being applied in clinics for difficult-to-diagnose cases. It can be tempting to suggest that metagenomics could be used as a “universal test” for all pathogens without the need to conduct lengthy serial testing using specific assays. While this is an exciting prospect, there are issues that need to be addressed bef...

  5. Magnet-Retained Two-Mini-Implant Overdenture: Clinical and Mechanical Consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Ishida

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-implant overdentures have become the accepted treatment for restoring mandibular edentulism. The dimensions of regular implants sometimes limit their use, such as in the case of narrow ridges. Mini-implants with reduced diameters (less than 3.0 mm enable insertion into narrow ridges. A magnet-retained two-mini-implant overdenture system was developed and is described in this paper. Additionally, we describe a clinical mandibular procedure using the system and evaluate its biomechanical performance.

  6. Health and safety in clinical laboratories in developing countries: safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejilemele, A A; Ojule, A C

    2004-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are potentially hazardous work areas. Health and safety in clinical laboratories is becoming an increasingly important subject as a result of the emergence of highly infectious diseases such as hepatitis and HIV. This is even more so in developing countries where health and safety have traditionally been regarded as low priority issues, considering the more important health problems confronting the health authorities in these countries. We conducted a literature search using the medical subheadings titles on the INTERNET over a period of twenty years and summarized our findings. This article identifies hazards in the laboratories and highlights measures to make the laboratory a safer work place. It also emphasizes the mandatory obligations of employers and employees towards the attainment of acceptable safety standards in clinical laboratories in Third World countries in the face of the current HIV/AIDS epidemic in many of these developing countries especially in the sub-Saharan Africa while accommodating the increasing work load in these laboratories. Both the employer and the employee have major roles to play in the maintenance of a safe working environment. This can be achieved if measures discussed are incorporated into everyday laboratory practice.

  7. Clinical and economic considerations of antiobesity treatment: a review of orlistat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armineh Zohrabian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Armineh ZohrabianDivision of Adult and Community Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: The objective of this study was to review the current knowledge about the use of orlistat from clinical and economic perspectives, and to assess this drug’s public health impact. Weight reduction by current antiobesity drugs, compared to placebo, is at most around 5 kg. Orlistat, the most studied antiobesity drug, is associated with the least-severe adverse effects, but compared with other drugs in its class it also delivers the most modest weight loss versus placebo (less than 3 kg. Orlistat appears to have a favorable risk/benefit profile, and cost-effectiveness ratios seem to be within a range that is generally considered acceptable. In the short-term, orlistat is related to reduced diabetes incidence and to slightly improved blood pressure and lipid profiles. Long-term clinical effects have been largely unstudied, however, and this study did not find reports that considered mortality as an endpoint. Given a very low continuation with orlistat treatment in the population and very modest and, apparently, only short-term clinical effects, orlistat is not likely to have a significant impact on the population health. Public health approaches of improving environmental and social factors to foster healthier food choices and increase physical activity remain essential for addressing the obesity epidemic.Keywords: obesity, orlistat, weight loss, cost-effectiveness

  8. The Sino-American belt study: nickel and cobalt exposure, epidemiology, and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Carsten; Li, Lin-Feng; Xiang, Hailian; Hamann, Kylin; Maibach, Howard; Taylor, James S; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    Nickel and cobalt are common causes of metal allergy. The objective of this study was to investigate nickel and cobalt exposure in belt buckles by testing 701 belts purchased in China and the United States and to consider the prevalence of nickel allergy and its relevance among Chinese patients. Seven hundred one belt buckles purchased in China and the United States were tested for nickel and cobalt release. Six hundred thirty-one Chinese patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis were patch tested and interviewed to determine clinical relevance of results. The Chinese and American literature was reviewed to investigate trends in nickel prevalence over the past decades. Sixty percent (n = 219) of belts purchased in China (n = 365) released nickel, and 0.5% (n = 2) released cobalt; 55.7% (n = 187) in the United States (n = 336) released nickel, and 0.9% (n = 3) released cobalt. Belt dermatitis was a significant clinical finding in 34.8% of Chinese nickel-allergic patients. Literature review suggests increasing nickel allergy prevalence in the United States and China. Metallic belt buckles are an important source of nickel exposure to consumers. Belts from lowest socioeconomic vendors were more likely to release nickel. Belts with silver color and dark metallic color were more likely to release nickel and cobalt, respectively. Clinical findings show belt dermatitis in China to be a problem.

  9. Ethical Considerations for the Participation of Children of Minor Parents in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mary A; Crawley, Francis P; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Neubauer, David; Dubin, Gary; Poplazarova, Tatjana; Begg, Norman; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2018-06-01

    Children of minor parents are under-represented in clinical trials. This is largely because of the ethical, legal, and regulatory complexities in the enrolment, consent, and appropriate access of children of minor parents to clinical research. Using a case-based approach, we examine appropriate access of children of minor parents in an international vaccine trial. We first consider the scientific justification for inclusion of children of minor parents in a vaccine trial. Laws and regulations governing consent generally do not address the issue of minor parents. In their absence, local community and cultural contexts may influence consent processes. Rights of the minor parent include dignity in their role as a parent and respect for their decision-making capacity in that role. Rights of the child include the right to have decisions made in their best interest and the right to the highest attainable standard of health. Children of minor parents may have vulnerabilities related to the age of their parent, such as increased rates of poverty, that have implications for consent. Neuroscience research suggests that, by age 12-14 years, minors have adult-level capacity to make research decisions in situations with low emotion and low distraction. We conclude with a set of recommendations based on these findings to facilitate appropriate access and equity related to the participation of children of minor parents in clinical research.

  10. Ethical and clinical practice considerations for genetic counselors related to direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Christopher H; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2006-11-15

    Several companies utilize direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising for genetic tests and some, but not all, bypass clinician involvement by offering DTC purchase of the tests. This article examines how DTC marketing strategies may affect genetic counselors, using available cardiovascular disease susceptibility tests as an illustration. The interpretation of these tests is complex and includes consideration of clinical validity and utility, and the further complications of gene-environment interactions and pleiotropy. Although it is unclear to what extent genetic counselors will encounter clients who have been exposed to DTC marketing strategies, these strategies may influence genetic counseling interactions if they produce directed interest in specific tests and unrealistic expectations for the tests' capacity to predict disease. Often, a client's concern about risk for cardiovascular diseases is best addressed by established clinical tests and a family history assessment. Ethical dilemmas may arise for genetic counselors who consider whether to accept clients who request test interpretation or to order DTC-advertised tests that require a clinician's authorization. Genetic counselors' obligations to care for clients extend to interpreting DTC tests, although this obligation may be fulfilled by referral or consultation with specialists. Genetic counselors do not have an obligation to order DTC-advertised tests that have minimal clinical validity and utility at a client's request. This can be a justified restriction on autonomy based on consideration of risks to the client, the costs, and the implications for society. Published 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. [Design considerations for clinical data management in an integrated remote medical system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautu, E; Bautu, A; Ciorap, R; Pomazan, V M; Petcu, L C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a proposal for the design of a telemedicine system. The system (called SIMPA) will be used for noninvasive monitoring of some vital parameters of patients with chronic diseases. The telemedicine system contains a fixed unit and some mobile units. The mobile unit contains various sensors used to gather data about vital biosignals, a transceiver and a medical processor. On the fixed unit side, the host transceiver must be compatible with the mobile transceiver. On the server side, an application analyzes and processes the data and further stores it in dedicated databases. The database support for the telemedicine application is ensured by open source technologies and already available communication infrastructures (GSM networks). The requirements for the application were thoroughly analyzed and the Entity-Relationship diagram of the system was designed and translated into relational model. SIMPA will be implemented using only free and open source technologies, which will ensure a low cost and improved extensibility and portability. We presented some design considerations for a low-cost telemedicine system. The system will help optimize medical decisions and will increase the quality of the medical act and lower the cost, to the ultimate benefit of the patient.

  12. Implementing PGD/PGD-A in IVF clinics: considerations for the best laboratory approach and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capalbo, Antonio; Romanelli, Valeria; Cimadomo, Danilo; Girardi, Laura; Stoppa, Marta; Dovere, Lisa; Dell'Edera, Domenico; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-10-01

    For an IVF clinic that wishes to implement preimplantation genetic diagnosis for monogenic diseases (PGD) and for aneuploidy testing (PGD-A), a global improvement is required through all the steps of an IVF treatment and patient care. At present, CCS (Comprehensive Chromosome Screening)-based trophectoderm (TE) biopsy has been demonstrated as a safe, accurate and reproducible approach to conduct PGD-A and possibly also PGD from the same biopsy. Key challenges in PGD/PGD-A implementation cover genetic and reproductive counselling, selection of the most efficient approach for blastocyst biopsy as well as of the best performing molecular technique to conduct CCS and monogenic disease analysis. Three different approaches for TE biopsy can be compared. However, among them, the application of TE biopsy approaches, entailing the zona opening when the expanded blastocyst stage is reached, represent the only biopsy methods suited with a totally undisturbed embryo culture strategy (time lapse-based incubation in a single media). Moreover, contemporary CCS technologies show a different spectrum of capabilities and limits that potentially impact the clinical outcomes, the management and the applicability of the PGD-A itself. In general, CCS approaches that avoid the use of whole genome amplification (WGA) can provide higher reliability of results with lower costs and turnaround time of analysis. The future perspectives are focused on the scrupulous and rigorous clinical validations of novel CCS methods based on targeted approaches that avoid the use of WGA, such as targeted next-generation sequencing technology, to further improve the throughput of analysis and the overall cost-effectiveness of PGD/PGD-A.

  13. A study of biceps brachii muscle: Anatomical considerations and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishaly Kishore Bharambe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Biceps brachii muscle (BBm is a very variable muscle, the variations being associated with a variety of clinical conditions. This study delves on anatomical variations in this muscle, possible phylogenic causes for their frequency and their clinical importance. Aims: The aim was to study anatomy of bicep brachii muscle, its variations and their clinical importance. Subjects and Methods: A total of 60 upper limbs preserved in 10% formalin were dissected meticulously to study anatomical details of the BBm. Results: The incidence of variation in anatomy of BBm was 15%, with incidence being 11.6% and 3.3% among male and female cadavers studied, respectively. Variation was unilateral in 10% and bilateral in 3.3%. The incidence of third head was 13.3% out of which 3.3% took origin from the capsule of the shoulder joint, 8.3% from humerus, and 1.6% from brachialis muscle. Incidence of extra bellies of insertion was found to be 1.6%. A 3.3% incidence was observed in the nerve supply. Conclusions: Variations in BBm are a reflection of its late development in human phylum. The extra bellies can cause neurovascular compression, change the kinematics at the elbow joint and be misinterpreted as tears of muscle on magnetic resonance imaging. They should be watched for in the shoulder as well as elbow joint surgeries. The authors suggest that the extra bellies of BBm instead of being labeled as third, fourth or fifth heads, can be classified as those of origin and insertion and bellies of origin be referred to clearly as capsular, humeral or brachial heads.

  14. Biosimilars 101: considerations for U.S. oncologists in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, Luis H; Frost, Craig P; Abella, Esteban; Morrow, Phuong K; Whittaker, Sadie

    2014-01-01

    Biosimilars of biologics used for cancer treatment and supportive care are expected to enter the U.S. market soon. Biosimilars will be highly similar to their reference products, but unlike generic drugs, not identical. Differences between a biosimilar and its reference product may arise because of the complexity of biologics, and differences in the cell lines and processes used during manufacturing. Biosimilars will be approved in the United States through a regulatory pathway based on comparative analytical and clinical studies for their characterization and demonstration of no clinically meaningful differences from their reference products. Unlike generics, initial approval may not include interchangeability, as additional evidence may be required before a biosimilar could be approved as interchangeable with its reference product; interchangeable designation could allow pharmacy-level substitution without prescriber intervention. In some cases, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may extrapolate an indication that has not been formally investigated for the biosimilar but that is approved for the reference product. Robust safety monitoring of all biologics is important to track and accurately attribute adverse events, particularly because their inherent complexity and manufacturing differences make them susceptible to structural changes that can affect safety (e.g., immunogenicity). Accuracy of postapproval safety reports will partly depend on the biosimilar naming approach. Potential cost savings should be evaluated in the context of differences in manufacturers' patient-assistance programs, copayments, and institutional costs. A manufacturer's ability to ensure reliable supply of high-quality biosimilars should also be considered. Broad understanding of these issues is critical for oncologists preparing for their use in clinical practice

  15. Clinical considerations in the management of inflammatory periodontal diseases in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanilla, Leyvee; Molinari, Gail

    2009-01-01

    Periodontal diseases and conditions, as defined by The 1999 International Workshop for Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions presented some significant paradigm shifts based on evidence that the transition from plaque-associated reversible gingival diseases to periodontitis can occur in children and adolescents with characteristics which were previously thought to be typical of adult periodontitis. The purposes of this paper are to present the periodontal diseases and conditions described in the 1999 workshop sponsored by the American Academy of Periodontology, review the risk factors for the development of periodontal diseases in the pediatric and adolescent populations, and present appropriate clinical periodontal assessment and management for these age groups.

  16. The development of a gender identity psychosocial clinic: treatment issues, logistical considerations, interdisciplinary cooperation, and future initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Scott F; Spack, Norman P

    2011-10-01

    Few interdisciplinary treatment programs that tend to the needs of youth with gender nonconforming behaviors, expressions, and identities exist in academic medical centers with formal residency training programs. Despite this, the literature provides evidence that these youth have higher rates of poor psychosocial adjustment and suicide attempts. This article explores the logistical considerations involved in developing a specialized interdisciplinary service to these gender minority youth in accordance with the existing treatment guidelines.Demographic data will be presented and treatment issues will be explored. The impact that a specialized interdisciplinary treatment program has on clinical expansion, research development, education and training, and community outreach initiatives is discussed.

  17. The Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Consideration of the Clinical and Radiologic Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Yensei (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    To determine whether the significant relationship exists between radiographic appearance, whether it is unilocular or multilocular, and its corresponding clinical and histologic features by examining the odontogenic keratocyst clinically, radiologically and histologically. This study was conducted on 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst from the files of Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years 1982 through 1995. The mean age of patients was 30.5 years in the unilocular group and 35.5 years in the multilocular group. The male to female ratio was 1:1.06 in the unilocular group and 1:1.75 in the multilocular group. The chief complaint was swelling in both groups (unilocular 35.1%, multilocular 54.5%). In the occurrence site, the border of the lesion, the displacement and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant difference between the unilocular group and multilocular group, but in the border type, there was statistically significant difference (x{sup 2}-test, p<0.05). Two recurred cases were observed among 11 cases of odontogenic keratocyst. One was unilocular case and the other was multilocular case.

  18. The Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Consideration of the Clinical and Radiologic Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether the significant relationship exists between radiographic appearance, whether it is unilocular or multilocular, and its corresponding clinical and histologic features by examining the odontogenic keratocyst clinically, radiologically and histologically. This study was conducted on 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst from the files of Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years 1982 through 1995. The mean age of patients was 30.5 years in the unilocular group and 35.5 years in the multilocular group. The male to female ratio was 1:1.06 in the unilocular group and 1:1.75 in the multilocular group. The chief complaint was swelling in both groups (unilocular 35.1%, multilocular 54.5%). In the occurrence site, the border of the lesion, the displacement and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant difference between the unilocular group and multilocular group, but in the border type, there was statistically significant difference (x 2 -test, p<0.05). Two recurred cases were observed among 11 cases of odontogenic keratocyst. One was unilocular case and the other was multilocular case.

  19. Research design considerations for clinical studies of abuse-deterrent opioid analgesics: IMMPACT recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Dennis C.; O’Connor, Alec B.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Chaudhry, Amina; Katz, Nathaniel P.; Adams, Edgar H.; Brownstein, John S.; Comer, Sandra D.; Dart, Richard; Dasgupta, Nabarun; Denisco, Richard A.; Klein, Michael; Leiderman, Deborah B.; Lubran, Robert; Rappaport, Bob A.; Zacny, James P.; Ahdieh, Harry; Burke, Laurie B.; Cowan, Penney; Jacobs, Petra; Malamut, Richard; Markman, John; Michna, Edward; Palmer, Pamela; Peirce-Sandner, Sarah; Potter, Jennifer S.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Rauschkolb, Christine; Roland, Carl L.; Webster, Lynn R.; Weiss, Roger D.; Wolf, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are essential to the management of pain in many patients, but they also are associated with potential risks for abuse, overdose, and diversion. A number of efforts have been devoted to the development of abuse-deterrent formulations of opioids to reduce these risks. This article summarizes a consensus meeting that was organized to propose recommendations for the types of clinical studies that can be used to assess the abuse deterrence of different opioid formulations. Due to the many types of individuals who may be exposed to opioids, an opioid formulation will need to be studied in several populations using various study designs in order to determine its abuse-deterrent capabilities. It is recommended that the research conducted to evaluate abuse deterrence should include studies assessing: (1) abuse liability; (2) the likelihood that opioid abusers will find methods to circumvent the deterrent properties of the formulation; (3) measures of misuse and abuse in randomized clinical trials involving pain patients with both low risk and high risk of abuse; and (4) post-marketing epidemiological studies. PMID:22770841

  20. Current quality assurance concepts and considerations for quality control of in-clinic biochemistry testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Sally; Harr, K E; Rishniw, Mark; Pion, Paul

    2013-01-15

    Quality assurance is an implied concept inherent in every consumer's purchase of a product or service. In laboratory testing, quality assurance encompasses preanalytic (sampling, transport, and handling prior to testing), analytic (measurement), and postanalytic (reporting and interpretation) factors. Quality-assurance programs require that procedures are in place to detect errors in all 3 components and that the procedures are characterized by both documentation and correction of errors. There are regulatory bodies that provide mandatory standards for and regulation of human medical laboratories. No such regulations exist for veterinary laboratory testing. The American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards Committee was formed in 1996 in response to concerns of ASVCP members about quality assurance and quality control in laboratories performing veterinary testing. Guidelines for veterinary laboratory testing have been developed by the ASVCP. The purpose of this report was to provide an overview of selected quality-assurance concepts and to provide recommendations for quality control for in-clinic biochemistry testing in general veterinary practice.

  1. Endoscopic endonasal anatomy of superior orbital fissure and orbital apex regions: critical considerations for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallan, Iacopo; Castelnuovo, Paolo; de Notaris, Matteo; Sellari-Franceschini, Stefano; Lenzi, Riccardo; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Battaglia, Paolo; Prats-Galino, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    The superior orbital fissure is a critical three-dimensional space connecting the middle cranial fossa and the orbit. From an endoscopic viewpoint, only the medial aspect has a clinical significance. It presents a critical relationship with the lateral sellar compartment, the pterygopalatine fossa and the middle cranial fossa. The connective tissue layers and neural and vascular structures of this region are described. The role of Muller's muscle is confirmed, and the utility of the maxillary and optic strut is outlined. Muller's muscle extends for the whole length of the inferior orbital fissure, passes over the maxillary strut and enters the superior orbital fissure, representing a critical surgical landmark. Dividing the tendon between the medial and inferior rectus muscle allows the identification of the main trunk of the oculomotor nerve, and a little laterally, it is usually possible to visualize the first part of the ophthalmic artery. Based on a better knowledge of anatomy, we trust that this area could be readily addressed in clinical situations requiring an extended approach in proximity of the orbital apex.

  2. Key feasibility considerations when conducting vaccine clinical trials in Asia–Pacific countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansang EZ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Elvira Zenaida Lansang,1 Kenneth Tan,2 Saumya Nayak,1 Ken J Lee,1 Karen Wai1 1Feasibility and Site Identification – Asia, Quintiles East Asia Pte Ltd, Singapore; 2National University of Singapore, Singapore Introduction: Conducting clinical trial feasibility is an important first step in initiating a clinical trial. A robust feasibility process ensures that a realistic capability assessment is made before conducting a trial. A retrospective analysis of vaccine clinical trials was performed to understand changes which could affect feasibility recommendations. Methods: Feasibilities conducted by Quintiles between January 2011 and August 2012 were reviewed. Vaccine studies only involving Asia–Pacific countries were selected, and common study parameters were identified. Information from Quintiles’ database was retrieved to examine changes in parameters over time. Results: A total of six vaccine studies were identified within the 1.7-year period. Two studies were excluded because they did not contain feasibility information or had involved sites that were sponsor selected. Four studies were analyzed. Three cases required healthy volunteers, while one case involved a specific patient population. Age requirement and seasonality of disease mainly influenced recommendations for Study 1. Sponsor’s marketing strategy influenced the recommendations for Study 2. Study 3 showed the effect of a country’s immunization program and reimbursement of vaccines on a study’s success. In contrast to the other studies, Study 4 demonstrated the impact of eligibility criteria in recruitment recommendations for a vaccine trial requiring specific patient pools. Conclusion: Feasibility recommendations for vaccine trials are largely based on (1 eligibility criteria; (2 cultural beliefs; (3 country’s past recruitment performance; (4 use of advertising; (5 site’s access to subject populations; (6 cooperation with local health professionals and government; (7

  3. Primary melanoma lung purposely clinico pathologic considerations of a clinical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, R.; Roldán, G.; Sosa, A.; Mañana, G.; Rodríguez, A.; Panuncio, A.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: There are few reports of primary malignant melanomas (M M) of visceral organs, general case of metastatic cutaneous and ocular M M regression suffering go unnoticed or diagnosis. Cases of lung primary melanomas (MPP) that meet the clinico pathologic to be considered as such criteria constitute about 0.01% lung tumors and are published as individual case analysis is impossible series of patients. These criteria are under constant review, constituting a field permanent controversial.Materials and method: A case review of the clinical literature on the most relevant of MPP clinico pathological aspects is performed. Case: This is a patient (Pt), 58 years old, smoker, who consults for elements progressive intracranial hypertension installation without other symptoms to note. the Computed tomography (CT) of the skull shows an expansive process only right temporal. Radiography and CT of the chest then show a right parahiliar single nodule without liver involvement without mediastinal symphadenopathy. Flexible bronchoscopy and bronchial brushing are negative. With the proposition that it is a bearer of a lung carcinoma with second only symptomatic brain macroscopically complete resection is performed head injury. The pathology reports that metastasis is a M M. Is discarded the presence of other injuries, especially to skin and eye. Receive brain radiotherapy and a right lower lobectomy whose analysis confirms that this is a M M is performed and that no there are other lesions in the resected lobe. Analyzed the cost / benefit profile indication treatment (t to) with systemic disease in the absence of other obvious injuries continues regular clinical exams. Remained asymptomatic for 5 months relapsing to brain level no new lesions in the lungs. The p te refuses to receive palliative systemic t to reaching, to the presentation of this work, a survival of 11 months. Discussion: Within the clinical criteria that state that is an MPP, the absence of a history of

  4. Lifestyle measures in the management of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: clinical and pathophysiological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J H-E; Kang, J Y

    2015-03-01

    Several lifestyle and dietary factors are commonly cited as risk factors for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and modification of these factors has been advocated as first-line measures for the management of GORD. We performed a systematic review of the literature from 2005 to the present relating to the effect of these factors and their modification on GORD symptoms, physiological parameters of reflux as well as endoscopic appearances. Conflicting results existed for the association between smoking, alcohol and various dietary factors in the development of GORD. These equivocal findings are partly due to methodology problems. There is recent good evidence that weight reduction and smoking cessation are beneficial in reducing GORD symptoms. Clinical and physiological studies also suggest that some physical measures as well as modification of meal size and timing can also be beneficial. However, there is limited evidence for the role of avoiding alcohol and certain dietary ingredients including carbonated drinks, caffeine, fat, spicy foods, chocolate and mint.

  5. Self-regulation method: psychological, physiological and clinical considerations. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemi, A; Tomita, S; Kuroda, M; Hayashida, Y; Ikemi, Y

    1986-01-01

    Body-oriented therapies as relaxation training and certain forms of meditation are gaining popularity in the treatment and prevention of psychosomatic disorders. In this paper, a new method of self-control called self-regulation method (SRM), derived from autogenic training and Zen meditation, is presented. The technique of SRM is introduced. Secondly, physiological studies on SRM using skin temperature, galvanic skin response, and cortical evoked potentials are presented. Thirdly, the results of psychological tests conducted on SRM are presented. These psycho-physiological studies suggest that SRM may elicit a state of 'relaxed alertness'. Fourthly, clinical applications of SRM are discussed, and 3 cases are presented. Finally, SRM is discussed in relation to the psychology and physiology of 'relaxed alertness'.

  6. Benign bone-forming lesions: osteoma, osteoid osteoma, and osteoblastoma; Clinical, imaging, pathologic, and differential considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, A. (Depts. of Radiology and Orthopedic Surgery, California Univ., Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States) Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States))

    1993-10-01

    The benign bone lesions - osteoma, osteoid osteoma, and osteoblastoma - are characterized as bone-forming because tumor cells produce osteoid or mature bone. Osteoma is a slow-growing lesion most commonly seen in the paranasal sinuses and in the calvaria. When it occurs in the long bones, it is invariably juxtacortical and may need to be differentiated from, among others, parosteal osteosarcoma, sessile osteochondroma, and a matured juxtacortical focus of myositis ossificans. Osteoid osteoma and osteoblastoma appear histologically very similar. Their clinical presentations and distribution in the skeleton, however, are distinct: osteoid osteoma is usually accompanied by nocturnal pain promptly relieved by salicylates; osteoblastoma arises predominantly in the axial skeleton, spinal lesions constituting one-third of reported cases. This review focuses on the application of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and evaluation of these lesions. Their histopathology also is discussed, and their treatment briefly outlined. (orig.)

  7. "HUMAN AURICULAR MYIASIS CAUSED BY LUCILIA SERICATA: CLINICAL AND PARASITOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yaghoobi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is the invasion of body tissues of humans and animals by the larvae of the Diptera or two-winged flies. There are only sporadic reports in the literature concerning human ear myiasis. A 62-year-old bedridden woman in an intensive care unit was examined because of her intense swollen and erythematous right ear. Physical examination revealed 80 live larvae (maggots in the posterior part of right outer ear and external auditory canal. Entomological studies of the third instar larvae revealed it’s identity as Lucilia sericata. The entomological aspects, clinical and epidemiological characteristics are evaluated. In particular, we underline the rarity of myiasis because of both etiological agent and the anatomical site.

  8. Invasive Pleomorphic Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast: Pathologic, Clinical, and Therapeutic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baimani, Khalid; Bazzarelli, Amy; Clemons, Mark; Robertson, Susan J; Addison, Christina; Arnaout, Angel

    2015-12-01

    Pleomorphic lobular carcinoma is an uncommon form of breast cancer and a subtype of invasive lobular carcinoma. It has unique histopathologic features that translate to a more aggressive phenotype with an associated poor prognosis. Unlike classical invasive lobular carcinoma, it can lose estrogen and progesterone receptor expression and demonstrate HER-2/neu amplification. It remains to be determined, however, whether the pleomorphic histology independently predicts a worse outcome or whether other known associated negative prognostic factors such as larger tumor size, increased metastatic disease, and associated worse molecular subtypes commonly present in pleomorphic carcinoma account for the poor prognosis. Here we present an updated review of the unique pathologic and clinical features of pleomorphic lobular carcinoma needed to guide management for women with this subtype of cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quagmires for clinical psychology and executive coaching? Ethical considerations and practice challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Judith Ann

    2016-04-01

    As the coaching field burgeons, both the mental health and coaching professionals, and their respective professions, face a myriad of potential quagmires, especially if the unique challenges encountered are ignored. After a short introduction and presentation on ethics and morals related to executive coaching and clinical therapy, a discussion follows on the lengthy and intimate relationship between executive coaching and psychology. Next are definitions and comparisons and 6 areas that are potential quagmires. This includes roles, skill sets/core competencies, education/training, licensing/credentialing-certification, governing bodies and confidentiality, and fees/reimbursement. Each section includes a discussion and several questions to highlight potentially problematic areas, practice challenges, and/or ethical issues, followed with brief responses. This paper concludes with the inquiry, "Where do we go from here?" (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Adrenal Disorders and the Paediatric Brain: Pathophysiological Considerations and Clinical Implications

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    Vincenzo Salpietro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by

  11. Visual Representation of Body Shape in African-American and European American Women: Clinical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice L. Capers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Body mass index (BMI has been used widely among clinicians to assess obesity in their patients due to its ease and availability. However, BMI has some diagnostic limitations and other measures related to health risks; in particular, body shape may be of greater relevance to health outcomes. Objective The objective of this study was to illustrate the importance of body shape assessments above and beyond BMI and its relationship to health risk among a sample of African-American and European American women. Methods African-American and European American women aged 19–78 years ( n = 552 in Birmingham, Alabama, were recruited and stratified by menopausal status (ie, pre- or postmenopausal. Pictorial body shapes were derived from digital photographs, while body fat distribution defined by android-gynoid ratio (AGR and body composition were obtained from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Images of BMI and age-matched women illustrate variability in fat distribution. Among both menopausal status groups, more than 50% of women had a pear body shape (AGR < 1. An apple body shape was associated with higher odds of having diabetes (unadjusted odds ratio [OR]: 4.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9–9.3, hypertension (unadjusted OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 2.0–4.7, and high cholesterol (unadjusted OR: 3.0, 95% CI: 1.8–5.1. Conclusion Use of visual cues alongside traditional methods of weight status assessment may help to facilitate weight management conversations between physicians and female patients. However, next steps should include the validation of visual assessments of body shape in women for use by physicians.

  12. Non-fatal suicide attempt by intentional stab wound: Clinical management, psychiatric assessment, and multidisciplinary considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Badger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suicide by means of self-inflicted stab wounds is relatively uncommon and little is known about this population and their management. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of adult trauma patients admitted to our Level-1 trauma center between January 2005 and October 2009 for management of non-fatal, self-inflicted stab wounds. Results: Fifty-eight patients were evaluated with self-inflicted stab wounds. Four patients died due to their injuries (mortality, 7%. Of the non-fatal stab wounds, 78% were male ranging in age from 19-82 (mean: 45 years. The most common injury sites were the abdomen (46%, neck (33%, and chest (20%. In terms of operative interventions, 56% of abdominal operations were therapeutic, whereas 100% of neck and chest operations were therapeutic. When assessing for suicidal ideation, 44 patients (81% admitted to suicidal intentions whereas 10 patients (19% described "accidental" circumstances. Following psychiatric evaluation, 8 of the 10 patients with "accidental injuries" were found to be suicidal. Overall, 54 patients (98% met criteria for a formal psychiatric diagnosis with 48 patients (89% necessitating inpatient or outpatient psychiatric assistance at discharge. Conclusions: Compared to previous reports of stab wounds among trauma patients, patients with self- inflicted stab wounds may have a higher incidence of operative interventions and significant injuries depending on the stab location. When circumstances surrounding a self-inflicted stabbing are suspicious, additional interviews by psychiatric care providers may uncover a suicidal basis to the event. Given the increased incidence of psychiatric illness in this population, it is imperative to approach the suicidal patient in a multidisciplinary fashion.

  13. Analysis of the clinical backgrounds of patients who developed respiratory acidosis under high-flow oxygen therapy during emergency transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Naoki; Yamano, Yasuhiko; Ishikawa, Genta; Tomishima, Yutaka; Jinta, Torahiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    High-flow oxygen is often administered to patients during emergency transport and can sometimes cause respiratory acidosis with disturbed consciousness, thereby necessitating mechanical ventilation. Although oxygen titration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients during emergency transport reduces mortality rates, the clinical risk factors for respiratory acidosis in emergency settings are not fully understood. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical backgrounds of patients who developed respiratory acidosis during pre-hospital transport. This was a retrospective study of patients who arrived at our hospital by emergency transport in 2010 who received high-flow oxygen while in transit. Respiratory acidosis was defined by the following arterial blood gas readings: pH, ≤7.35; PaCO 2 , ≥45 mmHg; and HCO 3 - , ≥24 mmol/L. The risk factors were identified using multivariable logistic regression analysis. In 765 study patients, 66 patients showed respiratory acidosis. The following risk factors for respiratory acidosis were identified: age, ≥65 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-2.8); transportation time, ≥10 min (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7); three digits on the Japan Coma Scale (OR 3.1; 95% CI, 1.7-5.8); percutaneous oxygen saturation, ≤90% (OR 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8-3.0); tuberculosis (OR 4.5; 95% CI, 1.4-15.1); asthma (OR 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6-5.3); pneumonia (OR 1.5; 95% CI, 0.7-3.1); and lung cancer (OR 3.9; 95% CI, 1.5-10.1). These underlying diseases as risk factors included both comorbid diseases and past medical conditions. The factors identified may contribute to the development of respiratory acidosis. Further studies on preventing respiratory acidosis will improve the quality of emergency medical care.

  14. Lincosamide resistance is less frequent in Denmark in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from first-time canine superficial pyoderma compared with skin isolates from clinical samples with unknown clinical background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Rikke; Boysen, Lene; Berg, June; Guardabassi, Luca; Damborg, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance may be overestimated in bacterial isolates from clinical samples because veterinarians often submit samples in cases of treatment failure or recurrent cases, which are more frequently associated with resistant strains. To assess to what extent the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from first-time superficial pyoderma differs from canine skin isolates from clinical samples with unknown clinical background. Two study groups were enrolled in Denmark between March 2012 and October 2013: 57 dogs with first-time superficial pyoderma and no prior antimicrobial treatment (Group A); and 289 different dogs for which skin specimens were submitted for culture during the study (Group B). One S. pseudintermedius isolate from each dog was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by broth microdilution. Resistance levels in the two groups were compared by Fisher's exact test. Clindamycin resistance was less frequent in Group A (14%) than in Group B (27%) (P = 0.02). Similar trends were observed for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (1.8 versus 4.8%), chloramphenicol (8.8 versus 14.5%), enrofloxacin (1.8 versus 3.5%), oxacillin (1.8 versus 4.8%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (3.5 versus 5.9%). Oxacillin resistance was significantly associated with resistance to six of seven non-β-lactams. The prevalence of lincosamide resistance is markedly influenced by patients' clinical and antimicrobial treatment history. To limit selection of multidrug-resistant bacteria, lincosamides are appropriate empirical choices for treatment of first-time superficial pyoderma even though resistance is not infrequent. Culture and susceptibility testing are, however, recommended for all pyoderma patients. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  15. FDA drug safety communications: a narrative review and clinical considerations for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Zachary A; Vande Griend, Joseph P; Linnebur, Sunny A

    2012-08-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has new regulatory authorities intended to enhance drug safety monitoring in the postmarketing period. This has resulted in an increase in communication from the FDA in recent years about the safety profile of certain drugs. It is important to stay abreast of the current literature on drug risks to effectively communicate these risks to patients, other health care providers, and the general public. To summarize 4 new FDA drug safety communications by describing the evidence supporting the risks and the clinical implications for older adults. The FDA Web site was reviewed for new drug safety communications from May 2011 to April 2012 that would be relevant to older adults. Approved labeling for each drug or class was obtained from the manufacturer, and PubMed was searched for primary literature that supported the drug safety concern. FDA drug safety communications for 4 drugs were chosen because of the potential clinical importance in older adults. A warning for citalopram was made because of potential problems with QT prolongation in patients taking less than 40 mg per day. The evidence suggests minor changes in QT interval. Given the flat dose-response curve in treating depression with citalopram, the new 20-mg/d maximum dose in older adults is sensible. Another warning was made for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection. A dose-response relationship was found for this drug risk. With C. difficile infections on the rise in older adults, along with other safety risks of PPI therapy, PPIs should only be used in older adults indicated for therapy for the shortest duration possible. In addition, a warning about dabigatran was made. There is strong evidence from a large clinical trial, as well as case reports, of increased bleeding risk in older adults taking dabigatran, especially in older adults with decreased renal function. This medication should be used with caution in older

  16. Non-clinical models: validation, study design and statistical consideration in safety pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugsley, M K; Towart, R; Authier, S; Gallacher, D J; Curtis, M J

    2010-01-01

    The current issue of the Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods (JPTM) focuses exclusively on safety pharmacology methods. This is the 7th year the Journal has published on this topic. Methods and models that specifically relate to methods relating to the assessment of the safety profile of a new chemical entity (NCE) prior to first in human (FIH) studies are described. Since the Journal started publishing on this topic there has been a major effort by safety pharmacologists, toxicologists and regulatory scientists within Industry (both large and small Pharma as well as Biotechnology companies) and also from Contract Research Organizations (CRO) to publish the surgical details of the non-clinical methods utilized but also provide important details related to standard and non-standard (or integrated) study models and designs. These details from core battery and secondary (or ancillary) drug safety assessment methods used in drug development programs have been the focus of these special issues and have been an attempt to provide validation of methods. Similarly, the safety pharmacology issues of the Journal provide the most relevant forum for scientists to present novel and modified methods with direct applicability to determination of drug safety-directly to the safety pharmacology scientific community. The content of the manuscripts in this issue includes the introduction of additional important surgical methods, novel data capture and data analysis methods, improved study design and effects of positive control compounds with known activity in the model. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Type III B dens invaginatus: Diagnostic and clinical considerations using 128-slice computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Muppa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic therapy is successful only when thorough knowledge of root canal morphology is understood. Dens invaginatus is malformation of teeth resulting from invagination of tooth before biological mineralization occurs. It is clinically significant with an early pulpal involvement and chronic periapical lesion, which are often associated with this anomaly. The present case report describes a 13-year-old female patient who reported to our institution with complaint of pain and swelling in the right maxillary region. Intraoral examination revealed Ellis Type II fracture of right maxillary central incisor and normal appearing right maxillary lateral incisor. On radiographic examination right maxillary, lateral incisor roots are morphologically altered with an immature apex and a large periradicular lesion. Conventional radiographs help in the assessment of complex root morphology, but certain limitations pertaining to detail of complexity needs for the use of more advance imaging modalities. Complex anatomic variations can best be diagnosed with the use of computed tomography (CT. A combined endodontic and surgical treatment was performed followed by postobturation CT images which were reviewed as axial slices and in volume rendering multiplanar reconstruction. The scope of using spiral CT in the endodontic diagnosis and treatments is increasing as it provides better resolution than other methods.

  18. Clinical nutrition counselling service in the veterinary hospital: retrospective analysis of equine patients and nutritional considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnano, D; Bergero, D; Valle, E

    2017-06-01

    Nutrition plays a very important role in the healthy and in the ill horse. Although research in this field clearly shows that incorrect nutritional practices may lead to severe pathologies, inappropriate feeding plans often continue to be used. A clinical nutrition counselling (CNC) service could thus be of great use to both horse owners and veterinarians. The aim of this study was to provide information on equine patients referred to the CNC service of the University of Turin and to provide standard dietary protocols as used in our Veterinary Teaching Hospital for the most common nutrition-related pathologies. The data were obtained by retrospective analysis of the nutritional records of referred equine patients. The data collected included information about anamnesis, nutritional assessment, current diet, referring person and follow-up of each patient. Sixty-one horses were included in the study. The majority were adult males. The most common breeds were the Italian Saddle Horse and the Friesian Horse. Old horses (>19 years) had a statistically lower BCS than brood mares or other adult horses (p equine gastric ulcer syndrome. All horses received first-cut meadow hay; 85% also ate concentrates. Young horses (equine population. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Case report of a pustular dermatitis outbreak in sheep: Clinical and food safety considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Roccaro

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this report is to describe an outbreak of pustular dermatitis in a flock of about 200 sheep, its clinical evolution and food safety implications. The onset of the symptoms was sudden and the lesions spread very quickly from ewe to ewe, so that in about 3 days almost all of the lactating sheep were stricken. Pustules from 5 different animals, six milk samples, two cheese samples, teat cup samples from the milking machine and farmer’s hands were analysed. A pure culture of Staphylococcus aureus, producing staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE C, was isolated from pustules. Milk and cheese showed a contamination by coagulase positive staphylococci <15 and 30 colony forming units respectively and the absence of SE. Farmer’s hands and teat cups samples resulted negative for coagulase positive staphylococci. Therapy with daily topical medicaments was prescribed and a prophylactic intervention was suggested by the administration of an autovaccine. The low level of milk and cheese contamination and the absence of SE in cheese supported the decision to not advise the farmer to recall cheese produced with milk from affected animals.

  20. Submitted for your consideration: potential advantages of a novel clinical trial design and initial patient reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Shane Loop

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In many circumstances, individuals do not respond identically to the same treatment. This phenomenon, which is called treatment response heterogeneity (TRH, appears to be present in treatments for many conditions, including obesity. Estimating the total amount of TRH, predicting an individual’s response, and identifying the mediators of TRH are of interest to biomedical researchers. Clinical investigators and physicians commonly postulate that some of these mediators could be genetic. Current designs can estimate TRH as a function of specific, measurable observed factors; however, they cannot estimate the total amount of TRH, nor provide reliable estimates of individual persons’ responses. We propose a new repeated randomizations design (RRD, which can be conceived as a generalization of the Balaam design, that would allow estimates of that variability and facilitate estimation of the total amount of TRH, prediction of an individual’s response, and identification of the mediators of TRH. In a pilot study, we asked 118 subjects entering a weight loss trial for their opinion of the RRD, and they stated a preference for the RRD over the conventional 2-arm parallel groups design. Research is needed as to how the RRD will work in practice and its relative statistical properties, and we invite dialogue about it.

  1. [Clinical and therapeutical considerations regarding the diagnosis and treatment in meconial disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetay, C; Ciobanu, O; Zavate, A; Ciucă, M; Malos, A; Marin-Diu, B

    2010-01-01

    The meconium disease represents a problem of great impact over the vital prognosis of the newborn, the mortality of this disease being rated in various studies between 30 and 50%. The meconial disease that reunites the meconial ileus and the meconial peritonitis is often associated with cystic fibrosis a disease of general impact over the entire organism increasing the gravity and influencing the vital prognosis of these patients. The authors' purpose is to evaluate the results obtained after the treatment of the meconial disease in the Pediatric Surgery Clinic of the Emergency Hospital of Craiova over a period of 10 years. The study has been made on a number of 16 cases of meconial ileus, plug and peritonitis analising the difficulty of the diagnostic process, the preoperative care as well as the possibilities of surgical treatment. The surgical treatment is composed of multiple procedures including simple suture of the bowel defect and segmentary bowel resections with primary anastomosis and/or secondary anastomosis after ileostoma. The mortality on the studied cases was of 37.5% despite recent progresses achieved in postoperative care of these type of patients.

  2. Donor Selection for Allogenic Hemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Clinical and Ethical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Riezzo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is an established treatment for many diseases. Stem cells may be obtained from different sources: mobilized peripheral blood stem cells, bone marrow, and umbilical cord blood. The progress in transplantation procedures, the establishment of experienced transplant centres, and the creation of unrelated adult donor registries and cord blood banks gave those without an human leucocyte antigen- (HLA- identical sibling donor the opportunity to find a donor and cord blood units worldwide. HSCT imposes operative cautions so that the entire donation/transplantation procedure is safe for both donors and recipients; it carries with it significant clinical, moral, and ethical concerns, mostly when donors are minors. The following points have been stressed: the donation should be excluded when excessive risks for the donor are reasonable, donors must receive an accurate information regarding eventual adverse events and health burden for the donors themselves, a valid consent is required, and the recipient’s risks must be outweighed by the expected benefits. The issue of conflict of interest, when the same physician has the responsibility for both donor selection and recipient care, is highlighted as well as the need of an adequate insurance protection for all the parties involved.

  3. The clinical and radiological consideration of calcifying odontogenic cyst of the jaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hae Rym; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-15

    Nine cases presented with a calcifying odontogenic cyst to the Dental Hospital of the College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, from January 1987 to September June, 1996, Clinical or histopathological findings were observed according to each radiologic criteria. The results obtained are as follows:1. The male to female ratio was 2 : 1 with a mean age of 25 years. 2. The radiographic appearances of nine caes were well-defined radiolucent lesions in which eight cases were shown until ocular lesions and only one lesion was seen multilocular lesion. 3. Radiologically, three of nine cases were pure radiolucent lesion and others, six cases were radiolucent contained a variable amount of radiopaque material. 4. Histologically, two cases were classified simple cyst, five were cyst associated odontoma, two were neoplastic type. 5. Histological findings according to the radiological classification, two of three radiolucent lesions were simple cys ts; another was a cyst associated with odontoma. While, four of six radiologic mixed lesions turned out to be a cyst associated with odontoma, two was the neoplastic type.

  4. [Stalking: clinical and criminological considerations through the results of a research contribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomilla, Antonella; D'Argenio, Alberto; Mastronardi, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Among the extensive results supplied by the psychiatric literature on the subject of stalking, few studies focus on the analysis of persecutory behaviors carried out against mental health professionals, who also identified as one of the most affected sample of victims. Particularly, for studies conducted in this way, further examination requires differentiation according to gender type into the social and personal characteristics of the authors' behavior patterns displayed towards the victims. Aim. To obtaine results by an epidemiological survey conducted in public and private psychiatric care structures in the city of Rome, to assess the incidence of the phenomenon as well as gender differences in behavior patterns practised out by the author for the two sample considered. Methods. Administration of a questionnaire to a sample make up by psychiatrists working in out-patient services for the Departments of Mental Health (ASL) of Rome and to a sample of psychiatrists who practise their professional activity in the private sector. Results. Regarding the incidence of the phenomenon, an increased presence has been found in private mental health care settings in comparison to the public service; regarding to the distribution of the phenomenon according to the sexual identity of the authors among the two samples analyzed, a statistical prevalence of female authors has been found in the sample of private sector. Discussion. The health's professionals, so much liable of victimization, are poorly formed on the phenomenon. So it's urgent to operate with integrated approaches (informative trainings; strengthening of administrative and clinical policies of the profession; multidimensional assessment).

  5. Expression of DNA repair genes in ovarian cancer samples: biological and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzinelli, M; Mariani, P; Cattaneo, D; Fossati, R; Fruscio, R; Corso, S; Ricci, F; Broggini, M; Damia, G

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate retrospectively the mRNA expression of genes involved in different DNA repair pathways implicated in processing platinum-induced damage in 171 chemotherapy-naïve ovarian tumours and correlate the expression of the different genes with clinical parameters. The expression of genes involved in DNA repair pathways (PARP1, ERCC1, XPA, XPF, XPG, BRCA1, FANCA, FANCC, FANCD2, FANCF and PolEta), and in DNA damage transduction (Chk1 and Claspin) was measured by RT-PCR in 13 stage I borderline and 77 stage I and 88 III ovarian carcinomas. ERCC1, XPA, XPF and XPG genes were significantly less expressed in stage III than in stage I carcinoma; BRCA1, FANCA, FANCC, FANCD2 gene expressions were low in borderline tumours, higher in stage I carcinomas and lower in stage III samples. High levels of ERCC1, XPA, FANCC, XPG and PolEta correlated with an increase in Overall Survival (OS) and Progression Free Survival (PFS), whilst high BRCA1 levels were associated with PFS on univariate analysis. With multivariate analyses no genes retained an association when adjusted by stage, grade and residual tumour. A tendency towards a better PFS was observed in patients with the highest level of ERCC1 and BRCA1 after platinum-based therapy than those given both platinum and taxol. The expression of DNA repair genes differed in borderline stage I, stage I and stage III ovarian carcinomas. The role of DNA repair genes in predicting the response in ovarian cancer patients seems far from being established. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Study on clinical Considerations caused by inevitably Extended SSD for Electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Woo; Kim, Jeong Man

    1996-01-01

    We are often faced with the clinical situations that is inevitably extended SSD for electron beam therapy due to anatomical restriction or applicator structure. But there are some difficulties in accurately predicting output and properties. In electron beam treatment , unlike photon beam the decrease in output for extended SSD does not follow inverse-square law accurately because of a loss of side scatter equilibrium, which is particularly significant for small cone size and low energies. The purpose of our study is to analyze the output in changing with the energy, cone size, air gap beyond the standard SSD and to compare inverse-square law factor derived from calculated effective SSD, mominal SSD with measured output factor. In addition, we have analyzed the change of PDD for several cones with different SSDs which range from 100 cm to 120 cm with 5 cm step and with different energies(6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, 16 MeV, 20 MeV). In accordance with our study, an extended SSD produces a significant change in beam output, negligible change in depth dose which range from 100 cm to 120 cm SSDs. In order to deliver the more accurate dose to the neoplastic tissue, first of all we recommend inverse-square law using the table of effective SSDs with cone sizes and energies respectively or simply to create a table of extended SSD air gap correction factor. The second we need to have an insight into some change of dose distribution including PPD, penumbra caused by extended SSD for electron beam therapy.

  7. Will Regulatory and Financial Considerations Dampen Innovation in the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Peter H; Miller, Melissa B

    2016-02-02

    Over a million prosthetic joints are placed in patients in the United States annually. Of those that fail, 25% will be due to infection, with an estimated cost approaching 1 billion dollars. Despite the clinical and economic importance of these infections, the techniques for their detection are relatively insensitive. An innovative method for detecting these infections by using blood culture bottles (BCB) to culture specimens of periprosthetic tissue (PPT) was described in a recent article [T. N. Peel, et al., mBio 7(1):e01776-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01776-15]. There are two potential stumbling blocks to the widespread implementation of this innovation. First, the FDA judges such an application of BCB as an "off-label use" and as such, a laboratory-developed test (LDT). LDTs are coming under greater scrutiny by the FDA and may require extensive, costly validation studies in laboratories that adopt this methodology. Second, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services has established a Hospital Acquired Condition Reduction Act under which institutions performing in the lowest quartile forfeit 1% of their Medicare reimbursement. Hospital-acquired infections are an important component of this quality metric. Although prosthetic joint infection (PJI) rates are not currently a hospital quality metric, given their cost and increasing frequency, it is reasonable to expect that they may become one. Will those with financial oversight allow an innovative technique that will require an expensive validation and may put the institution at risk for loss of CMS reimbursement? Copyright © 2016 Gilligan and Miller.

  8. Bringing stability to the COPD patient: clinical and pharmacological considerations for frequent exacerbators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Swati

    2017-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are critical events associated with accelerated loss of lung function, increased morbidity, and excess mortality. AECOPD are heterogeneous in nature and this may directly impact clinical decision making, specifically in patients with frequent exacerbations. A “frequent exacerbator” is a sub-phenotype of COPD that is defined as an individual who experiences ≥2 moderate to severe exacerbations per year. This distinct subgroup has higher mortality and account for more than half of COPD-related hospitalizations annually. Thus, it is imperative to identify individuals at risk for frequent exacerbations and choose optimal strategies to minimize risk for these events. New paradigms for utilizing combination inhalers and the introduction of novel oral compounds provide expanded treatment options to reduce the risk and frequency of exacerbations. The goals of managing frequent exacerbators or patients at risk for AECOPD are: 1) maximizing bronchodilation, 2) reducing inflammation, and 3) targeting specific molecular pathways implicated in COPD and AECOPD pathogenesis. Novel inhaler therapies include combination long acting muscarinic agents (LAMA) plus long acting beta agonists (LABA) show promising results compared to monotherapy or LABA inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) combination in reducing exacerbation risk among individuals at risk for exacerbations and among frequent exacerbators. Likewise, oral medications including macrolides and phosphodiesterase (PDE4) inhibitors reduce the risk for AECOPD in select groups of individuals at high risk for exacerbation. Future direction in COPD management is based on identification of various subtypes or “endotypes” and targeting therapies based on their pathophysiology. This review aims to describe the impact of AECOPD, challenges posed by frequent exacerbators, and explores the rationale for different pharmacologic approaches to preventing AECOPD in these

  9. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Subcentimeter Lung Tumors: Clinical, Dosimetric, and Image Guidance Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Use of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for subcentimeter lung tumors is controversial. We report our outcomes for tumors with diameter ≤1 cm and their visibility on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and retrospectively evaluate the planned dose using a deterministic dose calculation algorithm (Acuros XB [AXB]). Methods and Materials: We identified subcentimeter tumors from our institutional SABR database. Tumor size was remeasured on an artifact-free phase of the planning 4-dimensional (4D)-CT. Clinical plan doses were generated using either a pencil beam convolution or an anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA). All AAA plans were recalculated using AXB, and differences among D95 and mean dose for internal target volume (ITV) and planning target volume (PTV) on the average intensity CT dataset, as well as for gross tumor volume (GTV) on the end respiratory phases were reported. For all AAA patients, CBCT scans acquired during each treatment fraction were evaluated for target visibility. Progression-free and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Thirty-five patients with 37 subcentimeter tumors were eligible for analysis. For the 22 AAA plans recalculated using AXB, Mean D95 ± SD values were 2.2 ± 4.4% (ITV) and 2.5 ± 4.8% (PTV) lower using AXB; whereas mean doses were 2.9 ± 4.9% (ITV) and 3.7 ± 5.1% (PTV) lower. Calculated AXB doses were significantly lower in one patient (difference in mean ITV and PTV doses, as well as in mean ITV and PTV D95 ranged from 22%-24%). However, the end respiratory phase GTV received at least 95% of the prescription dose. Review of 92 CBCT scans from all AAA patients revealed that the tumor was visualized in 82 images, and its position could be inferred in other images. The 2-year local progression-free survival was 100%. Conclusions: Patients with subcentimeter lung tumors are good candidates for SABR, given the dosimetry, ability to localize

  10. Analysis of the clinical backgrounds of patients who developed respiratory acidosis under high‐flow oxygen therapy during emergency transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Hirokazu; Yamano, Yasuhiko; Ishikawa, Genta; Tomishima, Yutaka; Jinta, Torahiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2015-01-01

    Aim High‐flow oxygen is often administered to patients during emergency transport and can sometimes cause respiratory acidosis with disturbed consciousness, thereby necessitating mechanical ventilation. Although oxygen titration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients during emergency transport reduces mortality rates, the clinical risk factors for respiratory acidosis in emergency settings are not fully understood. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical backgrounds of patients who developed respiratory acidosis during pre‐hospital transport. Methods This was a retrospective study of patients who arrived at our hospital by emergency transport in 2010 who received high‐flow oxygen while in transit. Respiratory acidosis was defined by the following arterial blood gas readings: pH, ≤7.35; PaCO 2, ≥45 mmHg; and HCO 3 −, ≥24 mmol/L. The risk factors were identified using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results In 765 study patients, 66 patients showed respiratory acidosis. The following risk factors for respiratory acidosis were identified: age, ≥65 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7–2.8); transportation time, ≥10 min (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1–3.7); three digits on the Japan Coma Scale (OR 3.1; 95% CI, 1.7–5.8); percutaneous oxygen saturation, ≤90% (OR 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8–3.0); tuberculosis (OR 4.5; 95% CI, 1.4–15.1); asthma (OR 1.8; 95% CI, 0.6–5.3); pneumonia (OR 1.5; 95% CI, 0.7–3.1); and lung cancer (OR 3.9; 95% CI, 1.5–10.1). These underlying diseases as risk factors included both comorbid diseases and past medical conditions. Conclusions The factors identified may contribute to the development of respiratory acidosis. Further studies on preventing respiratory acidosis will improve the quality of emergency medical care. PMID:29123744

  11. 'You find yourself.' Perceptions of nursing students from non-English speaking backgrounds of the effect of an intensive language support program on their oral clinical communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Fran; San Miguel, Caroline; Brown, Di; Kilstoff, Kathleen

    2006-10-01

    Nurses of ethnically diverse backgrounds are essential in providing multicultural populations in western societies with culturally and linguistically competent health care. However, many nurses from non-English speaking backgrounds (NESB) are at high risk of failure in university programs particularly during clinical placements. Few studies investigate the clinical experiences of students from NESB and strategies to support their learning. This study describes perceptions of fifteen undergraduate nursing students from NESB about their first clinical placement in an Australian university program and the effect of a language support program on their oral clinical communication skills. Three categories arose: *Wanting to belong but feeling excluded; *Wanting to learn how to...; and *You find yourself. While many students find clinical placement challenging, it appeared difficult for students in this study as language and cultural adjustments required some modification of their usual ways of thinking and communicating, often without coping strategies available to other students.

  12. Identifying design considerations for a shared decision aid for use at the point of outpatient clinical care: An ethnographic study at an inner city clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Negin; Perez Figueroa, Rafael E; Uhler, Lauren M; Chiou, Erin; Perchonok, Jennifer E; Montague, Enid

    2013-03-06

    Computerized decision aids could facilitate shared decision-making at the point of outpatient clinical care. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a computerized shared decision aid would be feasible to implement in an inner-city clinic by evaluating the current practices in shared decision-making, clinicians' use of computers, patient and clinicians' attitudes and beliefs toward computerized decision aids, and the influence of time on shared decision-making. Qualitative data analysis of observations and semi-structured interviews with patients and clinicians at an inner-city outpatient clinic. The findings provided an exploratory look at the prevalence of shared decision-making and attitudes about health information technology and decision aids. A prominent barrier to clinicians engaging in shared decision-making was a lack of perceived patient understanding of medical information. Some patients preferred their clinicians make recommendations for them rather than engage in formal shared decision-making. Health information technology was an integral part of the clinic visit and welcomed by most clinicians and patients. Some patients expressed the desire to engage with health information technology such as viewing their medical information on the computer screen with their clinicians. All participants were receptive to the idea of a decision aid integrated within the clinic visit although some clinicians were concerned about the accuracy of prognostic estimates for complex medical problems. We identified several important considerations for the design and implementation of a computerized decision aid including opportunities to: bridge clinician-patient communication about medical information while taking into account individual patients' decision-making preferences, complement expert clinician judgment with prognostic estimates, take advantage of patient waiting times, and make tasks involved during the clinic visit more efficient. These findings

  13. ECAT ART - a continuously rotating PET camera: performance characteristics, initial clinical studies, and installation considerations in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.L.; Young, H.; Bloomfield, P.M.; Meikle, S.R.; Glass, D.; Myers, M.J.; Spinks, T.J.; Watson, C.C.; Luk, P.; Peters, A.M.; Jones, T.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in image reconstruction techniques have permitted the development of a commercial, rotating, partial ring, fully 3D scanner, the ECAT ART. The system has less than one-half the number of bismuth germanate detectors compared with a full ring scanner with the equivalent field of view, resulting in reduced capital cost. The performance characteristics, implications for installation in a nuclear medicine department, and clinical utility of the scanner are presented in this report. The sensitivity (20 cm diameter x 20 cm long cylindrical phantom, no scatter correction) is 11400 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 . This compares with 5800 and 40500 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 in 2D and 3D respectively for the equivalent full ring scanner (ECAT EXACT). With an energy window of 350-650 keV the maximum noise equivalent count (NEC) rate was 27 kcps at a radioactivity concentration of ∝15 kBq .ml -1 in the cylinder. Spatial resolution is ∝6 mm full width at half maximum on axis degrading to just under 8 mm at a distance of 20 cm off axis. Installation and use within the nuclear medicine department does not appreciably increase background levels of radiation on gamma cameras in adjacent rooms and the dose rate to an operator in the same room is 2 μSv .h -1 for a typical fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) study with an initial injected activity of 370 MBq. The scanner has been used for clinical imaging with 18 F-FDG for neurological and oncological applications. Its novel use for imaging iron-52 transferrin for localising erythropoietic activity demonstrates its sensitivity and resolution advantages over a conventional dual-headed gamma camera. The ECAT ART provides a viable alternative to conventional full ring PET scanners without compromising the performance required for clinical PET imaging. (orig.). With 9 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Anti-VEGF strategies - from antibodies to tyrosine kinase inhibitors: background and clinical development in human cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Korpanty, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Tumour angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels supporting tumour growth and metastasis) is a result of complex interactions between the tumour and the surrounding microenvironment. Targeting tumours with anti-angiogenic therapy remains an exciting area of preclinical and clinical studies. Although many significant advances have been achieved and the clinical use of anti-angiogenic drugs is now well recognized in many solid malignancies, these therapies fall short of their anticipated clinical benefits and leave many unanswered questions like exact mechanism of action, patients\\' selection and monitoring response to anti-angiogenic drugs. Tumour angiogenesis is controlled by complex signaling cascades and ongoing research into molecular mechanisms of tumour angiogenesis not only helps to understand its basic mechanisms but hopefully will identify new therapeutic targets. In 2012, both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors remain the two major clinically useful therapeutic options that interfere with tumour angiogenesis in many solid malignancies.

  15. Illness Perception and Clinical Treatment Experiences in Patients with M. Maroteaux-Lamy (Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI) and a Turkish Migration Background in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Hansjörg; Leissner, Linn; Bosanska, Lenka; Lampe, Christina; Plöckinger, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by a mutation of the gene for arylsulfatase B (ASB). Of the thirty-one patients registered in Germany, almost fifty percent have a Turkish migration background. MPS VI is treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which is time-consuming and expensive. Methods This interdisciplinary study explored the illness perceptions and clinical treatment experiences among ten MPS VI patients with a Turkish migration background in two centers for metabolic diseases (Berlin and Mainz, Germany). The clinical treatment situation was observed and semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients and health care personnel, in addition to participatory observation in four patients' everyday environments in Berlin. The data from the interviews, patient records, and personal field notes were encoded, cross-related, and analyzed. Results Patients' acknowledgement of the disease and coping strategies are influenced predominantly by the perception of their individual health status and the handling of the disease within their family. Patients' willingness to cooperate with treatment strategies is further modified by their knowledge of the disease and the relationships with their health care providers. In this analysis, cultural factors turned out to be marginally relevant. Conclusion As with other chronic and debilitating diseases, effective treatment strategies have to reach beyond delivering medication. Health care providers need to strengthen the support for patients with a migration background. In this regard, they should respect the patients' cultural and social background and their personal perception of the disease and the therapy. Yet structural and social aspects (clinical setting, family and educational background) may be more crucial here than “cultural barriers.” PMID:23826140

  16. Acute abdomen. Clinical background and demands on imaging; Akutes Abdomen. Klinische Begriffsbestimmung und Anforderungen an die Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graeb, C.; Jauch, K.W. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Chirurgie, Muenchen (Germany); Reiser, M.; Graser, A. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The term ''acute abdomen'' does not describe a specific disease entity but is more a critical clinical state which incorporates very heterogeneous clinical presentations. The prognosis of any disease depends on the time frame from the onset of symptoms to the initiation of a specific therapy. For this reason there are special expectations by clinicians regarding the diagnostic assessment provided by radiology which is expected to deliver an immediate diagnosis supporting further therapeutic decisions. Along with the patient's clinical history, physical examination and blood tests, radiological diagnostics are essential for enabling a specific treatment. From a surgical point of view the radiologist is expected to help in differentiating between cases with indications for emergency surgery and cases eligible for elective surgery or conservative treatment. (orig.) [German] Der Begriff ''akutes Abdomen'' stellt keine eigenstaendige Erkrankung dar, sondern beschreibt einen kritischen klinischen Zustand, unter dessen Oberbegriff sich die unterschiedlichsten Krankheitsbilder subsumieren lassen. Das Zeitintervall zwischen dem Auftreten der ersten Symptome bis zur Einleitung einer gezielten Therapie ist fuer die Prognose der Patienten der entscheidende Faktor. Aus diesem Grund bestehen besondere Anforderungen an die bildgebende Diagnostik, die dazu beitragen soll, innerhalb kuerzester Zeit eine moeglichst genaue Diagnose zu stellen. Neben Anamnese, klinischer Untersuchung und Labordiagnostik stellt die radiologische Untersuchung einen wesentlichen Baustein vor der Therapieeinleitung dar. Aus chirurgischer Sicht muessen Krankheitsbilder, die eine sofortige Notfalloperation erforderlich machen, von Erkrankungen differenziert werden, die eine elektive Chirurgie oder ein konservatives Vorgehen indizieren. (orig.)

  17. Quality and clinical supply considerations of Paediatric Investigation Plans for IV preparations-A case study with the FP7 CloSed project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Sara M; Orlu Gul, Mine; Winslade, Jackie; Baarslag, Manuel A; Neubert, Antje; Tuleu, Catherine

    2016-09-25

    A Paediatric Investigation Plan (PIP) is a development plan that aims to ensure that sufficient data are obtained through studies in paediatrics to support the generation of marketing authorisation of medicines for children. This paper highlights some practical considerations and challenges with respect to PIP submissions and paediatric clinical trials during the pharmaceutical development phase, using the FP7-funded Clonidine for Sedation of Paediatric Patients in the Intensive Care Unit (CloSed) project as a case study. Examples discussed include challenges and considerations regarding formulation development, blinding and randomisation, product labelling and shipment and clinical trial requirements versus requirements for marketing authorisation. A significant quantity of information is required for PIP submissions and it is hoped that future applicants may benefit from an insight into some critical considerations and challenges faced in the CloSed project. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY ASPECTS OF CHRONIC HEPATITIS B ON THE BACKGROUND OF REFRACTORY ANEMIA OF INFLAMMATION IN CHILDREN OF UZBEKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. I. Inoyatova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 75 children with chronic hepatitis B (ChHB with a refractory variant of anemia of inflammation (AV course were examined, the pathogenetic manifestation of which was the development of iron overload syndrome (IOS. It was revealed that against the background of an increase in the severity of the IOS, the incidence of progressive forms of the disease with persistent prevalence of asthenovegetative, hemorrhagic syndromes and severe hepatosplenomegaly increased. At the same time, the leading biochemical syndromes were the presence of cytolysis with prolonged hyperfermentemia, endotoxemia and mesenchymal inflammatory syndrome. A directly proportional dependence of the hepcidin-25 peptide level on the degree of expression of the IOS, the higher the presentation of the IOS, the higher the level of suppression of peptide expression in hepatocytes. Diagnostically significant tests of severe forms of IOS in ChHB in children are the presence of hemosiderin in the urine and an increase in the level of sIL-6R in the serum.  

  19. Background Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Saraiva, Sofia

    This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders.......This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders....

  20. Some clinical and laboratory parameters of hemorrhagic fever with renal failure syndrome against the background correction of hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Syrtlanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to curry out correction of hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal failure syndrome (HFRS and evaluate some clinical and laboratory parameters. The results of examining 91 men patients with HFRS at the age of 18 till 50 years old are presented. The vitamin complex «Angiovit» was used for hyperhomocysteinemia correction. The correction of hyperhomocysteinemia using the vitamin complex in all the three considered forms (mid, severs, complicated there are statistically significant decreases of homocysteine, the duration of oliguric stage and the concentration of creatinine in oliguric and diuretic stages in patients with HFRS compared with the group of patients having the generally basically therapy.

  1. Background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of background radiation, whether natural or caused by man's activities, are discussed. The known biological effects of radiation in causing cancers or genetic mutations are explained. The statement that there is a threshold below which there is no risk is examined critically. (U.K.)

  2. Drug-related disorders and the criminal and clinical background of the prison population of São Paulo State, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Mendes dos Santos

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between drug (DAD and alcohol (AAD abuse and dependency and criminal and clinical background by gender of prisoners in São Paulo, Brazil. METHOD: Cross-sectional study, random sample stratified by administrative district, from which prisons and prisoners were selected via random, multistage sampling. Psychiatric diagnoses were made with the CIDI 2.1. Lifetime prevalence and 95% CI were calculated and adjusted via analysis of complex samples. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was carried out with four categories of dependent variables: presence AAD; presence DAD; presence of another mental disorder; no mental disorders. For female alcohol and drug abuse and dependency (ADAD were combined into a single category. RESULTS: The sample was composed by 1809 interviewed prisoners (1192 men and 617 women. Prevalence of DAD and AAD was 25.2% and 15.6%, respectively, among female prisoners, and 26.5% and 18.5% among males. Male prisoners with DAD were more likely to have a criminal record as an adolescent (OR 2.17, to be a repeat offender (OR 2.85, and to have committed a property crime (OR 2.18. Prisoners with AAD were repeat offenders (OR 2.18. Among female prisoners, ADAD was associated with repeat offenses (OR 3.39, a criminal record as an adolescent (OR 9.24, a clinical or infectious condition (OR 5.09, another health problem (OR 3.04, and violent crime (OR 2.5. CONCLUSION: The study confirmed an association between drug-use disorders and the criminal and clinical background in the study population. Prisoners with such disorders were more likely to be repeat offenders and to have a criminal record as adolescents. Among female prisoners disorders were also associated with violent crime and health problems, while among males they were associated with property crime. These patterns in clinical and criminal backgrounds illustrate the need for social rehabilitation programs and specific medical treatment for

  3. Translational Radiomics: Defining the Strategy Pipeline and Considerations for Application-Part 2: From Clinical Implementation to Enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Faiq; Franc, Benjamin; Allen, Erastus; Sala, Evis; Awan, Omer; Hendrata, Kenneth; Halabi, Safwan; Mohiuddin, Sohaib; Malik, Sana; Hadley, Dexter; Shrestha, Rasu

    2018-03-01

    Enterprise imaging has channeled various technological innovations to the field of clinical radiology, ranging from advanced imaging equipment and postacquisition iterative reconstruction tools to image analysis and computer-aided detection tools. More recently, the advancement in the field of quantitative image analysis coupled with machine learning-based data analytics, classification, and integration has ushered in the era of radiomics, a paradigm shift that holds tremendous potential in clinical decision support as well as drug discovery. However, there are important issues to consider to incorporate radiomics into a clinically applicable system and a commercially viable solution. In this two-part series, we offer insights into the development of the translational pipeline for radiomics from methodology to clinical implementation (Part 1) and from that point to enterprise development (Part 2). In Part 2 of this two-part series, we study the components of the strategy pipeline, from clinical implementation to building enterprise solutions. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Quantifying the additional clinical benefit of new medicines: little - considerable - significant - 6 remarks from a biometrician's point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vach, Werner

    2014-11-01

    According to the German Pharmaceutical Market Reorganisation Act [Arzneimittelmarktneuordnungsgesetz (AMNOG)] of 22.12.2010, the benefit assessment of a new drug should include an evaluation of the "degree of additional benefit". A corresponding regulation of the German Ministry of Health states that the quantification of the degree of additional benefit should be made in the terms "major additional benefit", "considerable additional benefit" and "little additional benefit". In September 2011 the IQWiG undertook and explained in appendix A of the dossier evaluation of Ticagrelor an "operationalisation of the extent of additional benefit according to AM-NutzenV". Therein a distinction was made between the target categories "survival time (mortality)", "serious (or, respectively, severe) symptoms", "quality of life", and "not serious (or, respectively, not severe) symptoms". In the operationalisation of the IQWiG, the categorisation of the additional benefit with regard to mortality was addressed by definition of threshold values for the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval for the relative risk (RR). The statutory regulations and the operationalisation of the IQWiG will have direct long-term effects on the provision of medical care since they have a say as to which drugs are to be available at which prices. By introduction of terms such as "major additional benefit", "considerable additional benefit" or "desired effects" and linking them to statistical parameters and algorithms, they also open a series of further fundamental questions as to if and how we should handle these terms in the future and what consequences are inherent to the use of statistical criteria in their "definition". In the present article 6 of the questions that arise in this context are discussed: Can a "considerable additional benefit" be defined with statistical methods? Can a classification of the additional benefit on the basis of an estimated RR be reliable? What are the fundamental

  5. 78 FR 69690 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Considerations for the Design of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... (referred to collectively as CGT products) with recommendations to assist in designing early-phase clinical... Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. Submit written requests for single copies of the draft... 20852-1448. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist the office in processing your request. The...

  6. 78 FR 39736 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Considerations for the Design of Early-Phase Clinical Trials of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... collectively as CGT products) with recommendations to assist in designing early-phase clinical trials of CGT...-addressed adhesive label to assist the office in processing your requests. The draft guidance may also be...-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER...

  7. Duplication of complete dentures using general-purpose handheld optical scanner and 3-dimensional printer: Introduction and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Kosuke; Matsuda, Takashi; Goto, Takaharu; Ishida, Yuichi; Ito, Teruaki; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    To introduce a new clinical procedure for fabricating duplicates of complete dentures by bite pressure impression using digital technology, and to discuss its clinical significance. The denture is placed on a rotary table and the 3-dimensional form of the denture is digitized using a general-purpose handheld optical scanner. The duplicate denture is made of polylactic acid by a 3-dimensional printer using the 3-dimensional data. This procedure has the advantages of wasting less material, employing less human power, decreasing treatment time at the chair side, lowering the rates of contamination, and being readily fabricated at the time of the treatment visit. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Aspects, Imaging Features, and Considerations on Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis Risk in a Pediatric Patient with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Wildson Gurgel Costa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is a rare hereditary condition caused by changes in collagen metabolism. It is classified into four types according to clinical, genetic, and radiological criteria. Clinically, bone fragility, short stature, blue sclerae, and locomotion difficulties may be observed in this disease. OI is often associated to severe dental problems, such as dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI and malocclusions. Radiographically, affected teeth may have crowns with bulbous appearance, accentuated constriction in the cementoenamel junction, narrowed roots, large root canals due to defective dentin formation, and taurodontism (enlarged pulp chambers. There is no definitive cure, but bisphosphonate therapy is reported to improve bone quality; however, there is a potential risk of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. In this study we report a case of OI in a male pediatric patient with no family history of OI who was receiving ongoing treatment with intravenous perfusion of bisphosphonate and who required dental surgery. In addition, we discussed the clinical and imaging findings and briefly reviewed the literature.

  9. Practical considerations on the introduction of sacubitril/valsartan in clinical practice: Current evidence and early experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Bistola, Vassiliki; Karavidas, Apostolos; Parissis, John

    2016-11-15

    The combination of neprilysin inhibitor sacubitril with the angiotensin II receptor 1 blocker valsartan is the first agent from the angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitors (ARNI) class authorized for clinical use in heart failure (HF) patients with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Sacubitril/valsartan resulted in 20% reduction in the incidence rate of death or HF hospitalization compared to enalapril in symptomatic HFrEF patients in the seminal PARADIGM-HF trial. As a result, the recently updated European and American HF guidelines granted this agent a class IB indication for the treatment of ambulatory/chronic symptomatic HFrEF patients. However, translating the positive results of trials into true clinical benefit is often challenging. This is particularly true in the case of sacubitril/valsartan, as HF is a heterogeneous syndrome including many severely ill patients who are prone to decompensation, while this new agent comes to replace a cornerstone of current evidence-based HF therapy. In the present paper, we address a number of practical issues regarding the introduction of sacubitril/valsartan and propose an algorithm based on available evidence and early clinical experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stem cell-based treatments against stroke: observations from human proof-of-concept studies and considerations regarding clinical applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Roland Doeppner

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke remains a heavy burden for industrialized countries. The only causal therapy is the recanalization of occluded vessels via thrombolysis, which due to a narrow time window still can be offered only to a minority of patients. Since the majority of patients continues to exhibit neurological deficits even following successful thrombolysis, restorative therapies are urgently needed that promote brain remodeling and repair once stroke injury has occurred. Due to their unique properties of action, stem cell-based strategies gained increasing interest during recent years. Using various stroke models in both rodents and primates, the transplantation of stem cells, namely of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs or neural progenitor cells (NPCs, has been shown to promote neurological recovery most likely via indirect bystander actions. In view of promising observations, clinical proof-of-concept studies are currently under way, in which effects of stem and precursor cells are evaluated in human stroke patients. In this review we summarize already published studies, which due to the broad experience in other medical contexts mostly employed bone marrow-derived MSCs by means of intravenous transplantation. With the overall number of clinical trials limited in number, only a fraction of these studies used non-treated control groups, and only single studies were adequately blinded. Despite these limitations, first promising results justify the need for more elaborate clinical trials in order to make stem cell transplantation a success for stroke treatment in the future.

  11. What, why, and when we image: considerations for diagnostic imaging and clinical research in the Children's Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaman, Gregory H.

    2009-01-01

    Success in improving treatment outcomes in childhood cancer has been achieved almost exclusively through multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical and applied research over several decades. While biologically rational as well as empirical approaches have led to combination chemotherapy and multimodality approaches to therapy, which have given rise to evidence-based practice standards, similar scientific rigor has not always been as evidently applied to modalities utilized to assess initial disease burden and, more important, response to investigational approaches to therapy. As the empirical approach to therapeutic advances has likely maximized its benefit, future progress will require translation of biologic discovery most notably from the areas of genomics and proteomics. Hence, attempts to improve efficacy of therapy will require a parallel effort to minimize collateral damage of future therapeutic approaches, and such a parallel approach will mandate the continued dependence on advances in diagnostic imaging for improvements in staging methodologies to best define risk groups for risk-adjusted therapy. In addition, anatomic and functional assessment of response and surveillance for disease recurrence will require improved understanding of the biology as well as natural history of individual diseases, which one hopes will better inform investigators in designing trials. Clinical and research expertise is urgently needed in the selection of specific imaging studies and frequencies that best assess a response as well as to define disease-free intervals. Despite limited resources to develop sufficient infrastructure, emphasis on enabling early assessment of new technology to minimize risks associated with treatment advances and with those critical diagnostic and staging procedures must continue to be a focus of pediatric cancer clinical research. (orig.)

  12. Clinical social work practice and technology: personal, practical, regulatory, and ethical considerations for the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombo, Eileen A; Kays, Lisa; Weller, Katelyn

    2014-10-01

    The world that social work exists in is no longer defined by traditional physical settings and boundaries, such as schools, agencies, or even offices. With the advent of the Internet and digital communications, social work now exists in a far more complex reality, with clients and social workers engaging across multiple platforms, and sometimes even unintentionally and without one another's awareness. The implications of this can be ethical, practical, regulatory, and personal. This article explores these areas of concern and suggests strategies professionals can use to navigate these complex issues related to technology and clinical practice.

  13. Metastatic Breast Cancer With ESR1 Mutation: Clinical Management Considerations From the Molecular and Precision Medicine (MAP) Tumor Board at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardia, Aditya; Iafrate, John A; Sundaresan, Tilak; Younger, Jerry; Nardi, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    : The last decade in oncology has witnessed impressive response rates with targeted therapies, largely because of collaborative efforts at understanding tumor biology and careful patient selection based on molecular fingerprinting of the tumor. Consequently, there has been a push toward routine molecular genotyping of tumors, and large precision medicine-based clinical trials have been launched to match therapy to the molecular alteration seen in a tumor. However, selecting the "right drug" for an individual patient in clinic is a complex decision-making process, including analytical interpretation of the report, consideration of the importance of the molecular alteration in driving growth of the tumor, tumor heterogeneity, the availability of a matched targeted therapy, efficacy and toxicity considerations of the targeted therapy (compared with standard therapy), and reimbursement issues. In this article, we review the key considerations involved in clinical decision making while reviewing a molecular genotyping report. We present the case of a 67-year-old postmenopausal female with metastatic estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, whose tumor progressed on multiple endocrine therapies. Molecular genotyping of the metastatic lesion revealed the presence of an ESR1 mutation (encoding p.Tyr537Asn), which was absent in the primary tumor. The same ESR1 mutation was also detected in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) extracted from her blood. The general approach for interpretation of genotyping results, the clinical significance of the specific mutation in the particular cancer, potential strategies to target the pathway, and implications for clinical practice are reviewed in this article. ER+ breast tumors are known to undergo genomic evolution during treatment with the acquisition of new mutations that confer resistance to treatment.ESR1 mutations in the ligand-binding domain of ER can lead to a ligand-independent, constitutively active form of ER and mediate

  14. A review of clinical and technical considerations for fixed and removable implant prostheses in the edentulous mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzmann, Nicola Ursula; Marinello, Carlo Paolo

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to review some of the technical treatment options for implant prostheses restoring the edentulous mandible, mainly based on the Brånemark system. Clinical and technical aspects are discussed for the three established concepts: (1) implant-supported fixed prosthesis, (2) removable implant-supported overdenture, and (3) combined implant-retained and soft tissue-supported overdenture prosthesis. The framework of an implant-supported fixed screw-retained prosthesis can be processed in gold, Co-Cr alloy, or titanium with casting, laser-welding, or milling techniques. To improve the stability and retention of a conventional complete denture, one to four implants are indicated, and unsplinted (single attachments) or splinted designs (bar systems) can be applied. The design of the overdenture prosthesis must be carefully planned according to the requirements to ensure adequate stability and optimal form, contour, and esthetics, and the patient's best comfort. A large variety of different treatment modalities exist for both the fixed and removable mandibular implant prosthesis. Clinical and technical aspects should be considered at the beginning of the treatment to: (1) select the optimal implant position, (2) establish an adequate number of functional units, (3) select the appropriate retainers, and (4) apply the best technique for framework processing and veneering.

  15. Clinical utility and patient considerations in the use of the sitagliptin-metformin combination in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Q

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Du, Yan-Jun Wang, Sheng Yang, Ping HanDepartment of Endocrinology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM continues to increase each year. However, the efficacy of glucose-lowering therapies remains unsatisfactory. Moreover, the clinical characteristics and manifestations of DM in Chinese patients are different from those in Western patients. Thus, it is imperative to develop an optimal treatment protocol for lowering blood glucose levels in Chinese patients with DM. Sitagliptin has been used in People’s Republic of China, and sitagliptin and metformin combination therapy may not alter their individual pharmacokinetics. To date, several clinical trials undertaken to investigate the efficacy of sitagliptin and metformin combination therapy have revealed that it effectively controlled glycated hemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose, and postprandial plasma glucose levels to a greater extent than sitagliptin or metformin alone. In addition, the combined therapy was well tolerated and induced few side effects, which were largely mild. Furthermore, the combined therapy was easy to administer, and the patients receiving this therapy showed good compliance. Therefore, for Chinese patients with type 2 DM, sitagliptin and metformin combination therapy is preferred.Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, sitagliptin, metformin

  16. Bone scintigraphy in bone stress. A technical consideration and correlation of the findings to clinical symptoms especially to the pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuusela, T.; Vorne, M.; Vahatalo, S.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to find out a reliable scintigraphic method to investigate different fatigue phenomena in bone and to correlate the scintigraphic findings to the development of clinical symptoms. The gamma-imaging after the injection of bone seeking tracers is recommended to be performed after a period of 1-3 hours. The experiments indicate that in active bone tissue, might it be a healing fracture or a remodeling bone, the tracer uptake still increases after 1-3 hours. The delayed gamma-imaging can therefore be useful, especially if it is important to investigate faint physiological changes in bone tissue. It seems, that the capacity of emission energy in the diagnosis of bone affections is superior to the radiology because of its excellent histo-functional resolution especially in detecting and localizing bone affections

  17. Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus directly from clinical samples: methods, effectiveness and cost considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stürenburg, Enno

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates is a serious public health problem whose ever-increasing rate is commensurate with the pressure it is exerting on the healthcare system. At present, more than 20% of clinical S. aureus isolates in German hospitals are methicillin resistant. Strategies from low-prevalence countries show that this development is not necessarily inevitable. In the Scandinavian countries and the Netherlands, thanks to a rigorous prevention programme, MRSA prevalence has been kept at an acceptably low level (<1–3%. Central to these ‘search and destroy’ control strategies is an admission screening using several MRSA swabs taken from mucocutaneous colonisation sites of high-risk patients (‘MRSA surveillance’. It has also been reported that the speed with which MRSA carriage is detected has an important role to play, as it is a key component of any effective strategy to prevent the pathogen from spreading. Since MRSA culturing involves a 2–3 day delay before the final results are available, rapid detection techniques (commonly referred to as ‘MRSA rapid tests’ using PCR methods and, most recently, rapid culturing methods have been developed. The implementation of rapid tests reduces the time of detection of MRSA carriers from 48–72 to 2–5 h. Clinical evaluation data have shown that MRSA can thus be detected with very high sensitivity. Specificity however is sometimes impaired due to false-positive PCR signals occurring in mixed flora specimens. In order to rule out any false-positive PCR results, a culture screen must always be carried out simultaneously.The data provide preliminary evidence that a PCR assay can reduce nosocomial MRSA transmission in high-risk patients or high-risk areas, whereas an approach that screens all patients admitted to the hospital is probably not effective. Information concerning the cost-effectiveness of rapid MRSA tests is still sparse and thus the issue remains

  18. Management of infections in critically ill returning travellers in the intensive care unit—II: clinical syndromes and special considerations in immunocompromised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Rello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This position paper is the second ESCMID Consensus Document on this subject and aims to provide intensivists, infectious disease specialists, and emergency physicians with a standardized approach to the management of serious travel-related infections in the intensive care unit (ICU or the emergency department. This document is a cooperative effort between members of two European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID study groups and was coordinated by Hakan Leblebicioglu and Jordi Rello for ESGITM (ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Travellers and Migrants and ESGCIP (ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Critically Ill Patients, respectively. A relevant expert on the subject of each section prepared the first draft which was then edited and approved by additional members from both ESCMID study groups. This article summarizes considerations regarding clinical syndromes requiring ICU admission in travellers, covering immunocompromised patients.

  19. Assessment of consent models as an ethical consideration in the conduct of prehospital ambulance randomised controlled clinical trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Stephanie; Langlois, Adele; Laparidou, Despina; Dixon, Mark; Appleton, Jason P; Bath, Philip M; Snooks, Helen; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2017-09-16

    We sought to understand the main ethical considerations when conducting clinical trials in the prehospital ambulance based setting. A systematic review of the literature on randomised controlled trials in ambulance settings was undertaken. A search of eight databases identified published studies involving recruitment of ambulance service users. Four independent authors undertook abstract and full-text reviews to determine eligibility and extract relevant data. The data extraction concentrated on ethical considerations, with any discussion of ethics being included for further analysis. The resultant data were combined to form a narrative synthesis. In all, 56 papers were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Issues relating to consent were the most significant theme identified. Type of consent differed depending on the condition or intervention being studied. The country in which the research took place did not appear to influence the type of consent, apart from the USA where exception from consent appeared to be most commonly used. A wide range of terms were used to describe consent. Consent was the main ethical consideration in published ambulance based research. A range of consent models were used ranging from informed consent to exception from consent (waiver of consent). Many studies cited international guidelines as informing their choice of consent model but diverse and sometimes confused terms were used to describe these models. This suggests that standardisation of consent models and the terminology used to describe them is warranted.

  20. Durable efficacy of enfuvirtide over 48 weeks in heavily treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients in the T-20 versus optimized background regimen only 1 and 2 clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, Mark; Arastéh, Keikawus; Clotet, Bonaventura; Cooper, David A.; Henry, Keith; Katlama, Christine; Lalezari, Jacob P.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Montaner, Julio S. G.; O'Hearn, Mary; Piliero, Peter J.; Reynes, Jacques; Trottier, Benoit; Walmsley, Sharon L.; Cohen, Calvin; Eron, Joseph J.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Lange, Joep; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Buss, Neil E.; Donatacci, Lucille; Wat, Cynthia; Smiley, Lynn; Wilkinson, Martin; Valentine, Adeline; Guimaraes, Denise; DeMasi, Ralph; Chung, Jain; Salgo, Miklos P.

    2005-01-01

    The T-20 Versus Optimized Background Regimen Only (TORO) 1 and TORO 2 clinical trials are open-label, controlled, parallel-group, phase 3 studies comparing enfuvirtide plus an optimized background (OB) of antiretrovirals (n = 661) with OB alone (n = 334) in treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected

  1. Scatter radiation intensities around a clinical digital breast tomosynthesis unit and the impact on radiation shielding considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kai, E-mail: kyang11@mgh.harvard.edu; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To measure the scattered radiation intensity around a clinical digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) unit and to provide updated data for radiation shielding design for DBT systems with tungsten-anode x-ray tubes. Methods: The continuous distribution of scattered x-rays from a clinical DBT system (Hologic Selenia Dimensions) was measured within an angular range of 0°–180° using a linear-array x-ray detector (X-Scan 0.8f3-512, Detection Technology, Inc., Finland), which was calibrated for the x-ray spectrum range of the DBT unit. The effects of x-ray field size, phantom size, and x-ray kVp/filter combination were investigated. Following a previously developed methodology by Simpkin, scatter fraction was determined for the DBT system as a function of angle around the phantom center. Detailed calculations of the scatter intensity from a DBT system were demonstrated using the measured scatter fraction data. Results: For the 30 and 35 kVp acquisition, the scatter-to-primary-ratio and scatter fraction data closely matched with data previously measured by Simpkin. However, the measured data from this study demonstrated the nonisotropic distribution of the scattered radiation around a DBT system, with two strong peaks around 25° and 160°. The majority scatter radiation (>70%) originated from the imaging detector assembly, instead of the phantom. With a workload from a previous survey performed at MGH, the scatter air kerma at 1 m from the phantom center for wall/door is 1.76 × 10{sup −2} mGy patient{sup −1}, for floor is 1.64 × 10{sup −1} mGy patient{sup −1}, and for ceiling is 3.66 × 10{sup −2} mGy patient{sup −1}. Conclusions: Comparing to previously measured data for mammographic systems, the scatter air kerma from Holgoic DBT is at least two times higher. The main reasons include the harder primary beam with higher workload (measured with total mAs/week), added tomosynthesis acquisition, and strong small angle forward scattering. Due to the

  2. Immunization in pregnancy clinical research in low- and middle-income countries - Study design, regulatory and safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Sonali; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Jones, Christine E; Muñoz, Flor M; Honrado, Angel; Bauwens, Jorgen; Sobanjo-Ter Meulen, Ajoke; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2017-12-04

    Immunization of pregnant women is a promising public health strategy to reduce morbidity and mortality among both the mothers and their infants. Establishing safety and efficacy of vaccines generally uses a hybrid design between a conventional interventional study and an observational study that requires enrolling thousands of study participants to detect an unknown number of uncommon events. Historically, enrollment of pregnant women in clinical research studies encountered many barriers based on risk aversion, lack of knowledge, and regulatory ambiguity. Conducting research enrolling pregnant women in low- and middle-income countries can have additional factors to address such as limited availability of baseline epidemiologic data on disease burden and maternal and neonatal outcomes during and after pregnancy; challenges in recruiting and retaining pregnant women in research studies, variability in applying and interpreting assessment methods, and variability in locally acceptable and available infrastructure. Some measures to address these challenges include adjustment of study design, tailoring recruitment, consent process, retention strategies, operational and logistical processes, and the use of definitions and data collection methods that will align with efforts globally. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Measurement error, time lag, unmeasured confounding: Considerations for longitudinal estimation of the effect of a mediator in randomised clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, K A; Chalder, T; White, P D; Sharpe, M; Pickles, A

    2018-06-01

    Clinical trials are expensive and time-consuming and so should also be used to study how treatments work, allowing for the evaluation of theoretical treatment models and refinement and improvement of treatments. These treatment processes can be studied using mediation analysis. Randomised treatment makes some of the assumptions of mediation models plausible, but the mediator-outcome relationship could remain subject to bias. In addition, mediation is assumed to be a temporally ordered longitudinal process, but estimation in most mediation studies to date has been cross-sectional and unable to explore this assumption. This study used longitudinal structural equation modelling of mediator and outcome measurements from the PACE trial of rehabilitative treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome (ISRCTN 54285094) to address these issues. In particular, autoregressive and simplex models were used to study measurement error in the mediator, different time lags in the mediator-outcome relationship, unmeasured confounding of the mediator and outcome, and the assumption of a constant mediator-outcome relationship over time. Results showed that allowing for measurement error and unmeasured confounding were important. Contemporaneous rather than lagged mediator-outcome effects were more consistent with the data, possibly due to the wide spacing of measurements. Assuming a constant mediator-outcome relationship over time increased precision.

  4. CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGIC CONSIDERATIONS OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN HARBOR SEALS (PHOCA VITULINA) AT A MARINE MAMMAL REHABILITATION CENTER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chelsea E; Haulena, Martin; Zabek, Erin; Habing, Gregory; Raverty, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Between 1998 and 2008, 15 cases of segmental to diffuse hemorrhagic to necrohemorrhagic enterocolitis were diagnosed in neonatal and weaned juvenile harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) presented from the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre for rehabilitation. Based on a combination of gross pathology, histopathology, bacterial isolation, and toxin testing, Clostridium difficile enterocolitis was diagnosed. Most pups were anorexic or inappetant and died acutely with few other premonitory signs. Due to ongoing clinical concerns and possible emergence of this pathogen at the facility, efforts to better characterize the disease and understand the epidemiology of C. difficile was initiated in 95 harbor seal pups presented for rehabilitation in a single stranding season. Fecal samples were collected on admission, following completion of antibiotic treatment, and also prerelease or postmortem. All samples were collected fresh and submitted either directly or stored frozen. Fecal samples were inoculated into selective media for culture and screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) for C. difficile toxins A, B, or both. Results of the 95 seals in the study were as follows: on hospital admit 72 seals were sampled, 10 were culture positive, 12 were ELISA positive; following antibiotic therapy 46 seals were sampled noting three culture positive and nine ELISA positive; prior to release 58 seals were sampled noting zero culture positive and one ELISA positive; and on postmortem exam seven seals were sampled noting zero culture positive and two ELISA positive. Clostridium difficile was not deemed to be the cause of death in any of the animals. Although the exact mechanism of disease is unknown, this study suggests that C. difficile infection is not a significant cause of mortality and may be part of the normal flora in harbor seals undergoing rehabilitation. Morbidity and mortality from this bacterium can likely be minimized by judicious use of antibiotics

  5. Evaluation Considerations for Secondary Uses of Clinical Data: Principles for an Evidence-based Approach to Policy and Implementation of Secondary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P J; Rigby, M; Ammenwerth, E; McNair, J Brender; Georgiou, A; Hyppönen, H; de Keizer, N; Magrabi, F; Nykänen, P; Gude, W T; Hackl, W

    2017-08-01

    Objectives: To set the scientific context and then suggest principles for an evidence-based approach to secondary uses of clinical data, covering both evaluation of the secondary uses of data and evaluation of health systems and services based upon secondary uses of data. Method: Working Group review of selected literature and policy approaches. Results: We present important considerations in the evaluation of secondary uses of clinical data from the angles of governance and trust, theory, semantics, and policy. We make the case for a multi-level and multi-factorial approach to the evaluation of secondary uses of clinical data and describe a methodological framework for best practice. We emphasise the importance of evaluating the governance of secondary uses of health data in maintaining trust, which is essential for such uses. We also offer examples of the re-use of routine health data to demonstrate how it can support evaluation of clinical performance and optimize health IT system design. Conclusions: Great expectations are resting upon "Big Data" and innovative analytics. However, to build and maintain public trust, improve data reliability, and assure the validity of analytic inferences, there must be independent and transparent evaluation. A mature and evidence-based approach needs not merely data science, but must be guided by the broader concerns of applied health informatics. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.

  6. A systematic review assessing non-pharmacological conservative treatment studies for people with non-inflammatory multi-joint pain: clinical outcomes and research design considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, C; Smith, T O; Drew, B; Raja, R; Kingsbury, S R; Conaghan, Philip G

    2018-03-01

    To systematically review the evidence to determine the clinical outcomes and the important methodological quality features of interventional studies on adults with non-inflammatory multi-joint pain (MJP). Systematic search of published and unpublished literature using the databases: AMED, CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, psycINFO, SPORTDiscus, PEDro, OpenGrey, the EU Clinical Trials Register, World Health Organization International Clinical Trial Registry Platform, ClinicalTrials.gov and the ISRCTN registry (search: inception to 19th October 2017). All papers reporting the clinical outcomes of non-pharmacological interventions for people with non-inflammatory MJP were included. Studies were critically appraised using the Downs and Black Critical Appraisal and the TIDieR reporting checklists. Data were analysed using a Best Evidence Synthesis approach. From 3824 citations, four papers satisfied the eligibility criteria. Three studies reported outcomes from multidisciplinary rehabilitation programmes and one study reported the findings of a spa therapy intervention. All interventions significantly improved pain, function and quality of life in the short-term. There was limited reporting of measures for absenteeism, presenteeism and psychosocial outcomes. The evidence was 'weak', and due to a lack of controlled trials, there is limited evidence to ascertain treatment effectiveness. Design consideration for future trials surround improved reporting of participant characteristics, interventions and the standardisation of core outcome measures. There is insufficient high-quality trial data to determine the effectiveness of treatments for non-inflammatory MJP. Given the significant health burden which this condition presents on both individuals and wider society, developing and testing interventions and accurately reporting these, should be a research priority. Registration PROSPERO (CRD42013005888).

  7. [A survey carried out among Italian physicians regarding non-required clinical examinations, treatments and procedures in the current clinical practice: results and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernero, Sandra; Giustetto, Guido

    2017-01-01

    A survey addressed to all Italian physicians regarding how they behave when a patient asks them to prescribe non-required clinical examinations, treatments and procedures has been carried out for the first time. The survey - realized during the last months of the year 2015 thanks to the collaboration between Slow Medicine and the National Federation of Associations of Doctors, Surgeons and Dentists - is based on a questionnaire given to the America physicians by the ABIM Foundation in 2014. The Italian survey results cannot be compared with the American ones because different approaches were used. 4,263 physicians started to fill in the questionnaire and 3,688 completed it. The results suggest that the physicians that answered the questions are highly aware of the over-usage of diagnostic tests and treatments, and among the main reasons they cite the need of safety and then the fear of legal consequences. Most of the physicians who answered the questions believe to be responsible for giving patients accurate information in order to avoid non-required practices, and that the physician is the right person with the most suitable role to face the problem. Among the most important and useful tools to reduce the prescription of non-required examinations and treatments, physicians indicate the possibility to have much more time available to discuss the different options with their patients, to arrange the evidence-based information material for the patients, and to explain the reform on the physician's responsibility (recently approved as law). Therefore, it stands out the opportunity to apply provisions aimed at providing the patients with more accurate information and at improving the relationship between the physician and the patient by ensuring on the one hand more availability of dedicated time and on the other hand the training of the physicians on scientific topics as well as on topics concerning communication and shared decisions. The communication can be

  8. Thoracic lateral extracavitary corpectomy for anterior column reconstruction with expandable and static titanium cages: clinical outcomes and surgical considerations in a consecutive case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Christopher M; Bass, David I; Gary, Matthew F; Howard, Brian M; Refai, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Many surgical interventions have emerged as effective means of restoring mechanical stability of the anterior column of the spine. The lateral extracavitary approach (LECA) allows for broad visualization and circumferential reconstruction of the spinal column. However, early reports demonstrated significant complication rates, protracted operative times, and prolonged hospitalizations. More recent reports have highlighted concerns for subsidence, particularly with expandable cages. Our work seeks to describe a single-surgeon consecutive series of patients undergoing LECA for thoracic corpectomy. Specifically, the objective was to explore the surgical considerations, clinical and radiographic outcomes, and complication profile of this approach. A retrospective study examined data from 17 consecutive patients in whom single or multi-level corpectomy was performed via a LECA by a single surgeon. Vertebral body replacement was achieved with either a static or expandable titanium cage. The Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) was utilized to assess patient functional status before and after surgery. Radiographic outcomes, particularly footplate-to-body ratio and subsidence, were assessed on CT imaging at 6 weeks after surgery and at follow-up of at least 6 months. The majority of patients had post-operative KPS scores consistent with functional independence (≥70, 12/17 patients, 71%). Fourteen patients had improved or maintained function by last follow-up. In both groups, all patients had a favorable footplate-to-body ratio, and rates of subsidence were similar at both time points. Notably, the overall complication rate (24%) was significantly lower than that published in the literature, and no patient suffered a pneumothorax that required placement of a thoracostomy tube. The LECA approach for anterior column reconstruction with static or expandable cages is an important surgical consideration with favorable surgical parameters and complication rates. Further, use of

  9. On transcending the impasse of respiratory motion correction applications in routine clinical imaging - a consideration of a fully automated data driven motion control framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, Adam L; Schleyer, Paul J; Büther, Florian; Walter, Martin A; Schäfers, Klaus P; Koo, Phillip J

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly used for the detection, characterization, and follow-up of tumors located in the thorax. However, patient respiratory motion presents a unique limitation that hinders the application of high-resolution PET technology for this type of imaging. Efforts to transcend this limitation have been underway for more than a decade, yet PET remains for practical considerations a modality vulnerable to motion-induced image degradation. Respiratory motion control is not employed in routine clinical operations. In this article, we take an opportunity to highlight some of the recent advancements in data-driven motion control strategies and how they may form an underpinning for what we are presenting as a fully automated data-driven motion control framework. This framework represents an alternative direction for future endeavors in motion control and can conceptually connect individual focused studies with a strategy for addressing big picture challenges and goals. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2197-7364-1-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  10. A global survey of clinicians' awareness, accessibility, utilization of e-continuous education, and quality of clinical blood use: policy considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2017-07-01

    . Three research questions were answered, while seven null hypotheses were tested at 0.05 level of significance. Descriptive statistical tools (frequency counts and percentage were used to analyze demographic backgrounds; inferential statistics – Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (PPMCC and analysis of variance (ANOVA were used to analyze hypotheses.Results: Quality of clinical blood use was positively and significantly correlated with the level of awareness (r=0.137; p=0.03; df=262 and accessibility (r=0.184; p=0.01; df=262 to e-continuous learning among clinicians/nurses. There was a significant difference in the levels of awareness (F[3,260]=53.942, p=0.01, accessibility (F[3,260]=38.582, p=0.01, and utilization (F[3,260]=24.858, p=0.01 of continuous e-learning and education among clinicians/nurses based on HDI grouping, particularly between very high and low HDI. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the levels of accessibility (F[6,257]=6.444, p=0.01 and utilization (F[6,257]=13.704, p=0.01 of continuous e-learning and education among clinicians based on clinical specialty/department and a significant difference in the quality of clinical blood use based on clinical specialty/department (F[6,257]=9.677, p=0.01.Conclusion and recommendations: The higher the HDI level the better is the awareness, accessibility, and utilization of continuous education, both through e-learning and conventional in teaching curricula. This has an immediate impact on the quality of clinical care and in particular on supportive hemotherapy and the development of patient blood management systems. Keywords: continuous E-learning and education programs, awareness, accessibility, utilization, blood prescribing clinicians/nurses, Human Development Index, quality management, clinical blood use, patient blood management

  11. Genetic testing in asymptomatic minors: background considerations towards ESHG Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borry, Pascal; Evers-Kiebooms, Gerry; Cornel, Martina C

    2009-01-01

    Although various guidelines and position papers have discussed, in the past, the ethical aspects of genetic testing in asymptomatic minors, the European Society of Human Genetics had not earlier endorsed any set of guidelines exclusively focused on this issue. This paper has served as a backgroun...

  12. Design considerations in a clinical trial of a cognitive behavioural intervention for the management of low back pain in primary care: Back Skills Training Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Frances E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain (LBP is a major public health problem. Risk factors for the development and persistence of LBP include physical and psychological factors. However, most research activity has focused on physical solutions including manipulation, exercise training and activity promotion. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial will establish the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a group programme, based on cognitive behavioural principles, for the management of sub-acute and chronic LBP in primary care. Our primary outcomes are disease specific measures of pain and function. Secondary outcomes include back beliefs, generic health related quality of life and resource use. All outcomes are measured over 12 months. Participants randomised to the intervention arm are invited to attend up to six weekly sessions each of 90 minutes; each group has 6–8 participants. A parallel qualitative study will aid the evaluation of the intervention. Discussion In this paper we describe the rationale and design of a randomised evaluation of a group based cognitive behavioural intervention for low back pain.

  13. Clinical Features and Genetic Background of the Periodic Fever Syndrome with Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenitis: A Single Center Longitudinal Study of 81 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daša Perko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PFAPA syndrome is the most common autoinflammatory disorder in childhood with unknown etiology. The aim of our study was clinical evaluation of PFAPA patients from a single tertiary care center and to determine whether variations of AIM2, MEFV, NLRP3, and MVK genes are involved in PFAPA pathogenesis. Clinical and laboratory data of consecutive patients with PFAPA syndrome followed up at the University Children’s Hospital, Ljubljana, were collected from 2008 to 2014. All four genes were PCR amplified and directly sequenced. Eighty-one patients fulfilled criteria for PFAPA syndrome, 50 (63% boys and 31 (37% girls, with mean age at disease onset of 2.1 ± 1.5 years. Adenitis, pharyngitis, and aphthae were present in 94%, 98%, and 56%, respectively. Family history of recurrent fevers in childhood was positive in 78%. Nineteen variants were found in 17/62 (27% patients, 4 different variants in NLRP3 gene in 13 patients, and 6 different variants in MEFV gene in 5 patients, and 2 patients had 2 different variants. No variants of clinical significance were found in MVK and AIM2 genes. Our data suggest that PFAPA could be the result of multiple low-penetrant variants in different genes in combination with epigenetic and environmental factors leading to uniform clinical picture.

  14. Two to five repeated measurements per patient reduced the required sample size considerably in a randomized clinical trial for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smedslund Geir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient reported outcomes are accepted as important outcome measures in rheumatology. The fluctuating symptoms in patients with rheumatic diseases have serious implications for sample size in clinical trials. We estimated the effects of measuring the outcome 1-5 times on the sample size required in a two-armed trial. Findings In a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effects of a mindfulness-based group intervention for patients with inflammatory arthritis (n=71, the outcome variables Numerical Rating Scales (NRS (pain, fatigue, disease activity, self-care ability, and emotional wellbeing and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20 were measured five times before and after the intervention. For each variable we calculated the necessary sample sizes for obtaining 80% power (α=.05 for one up to five measurements. Two, three, and four measures reduced the required sample sizes by 15%, 21%, and 24%, respectively. With three (and five measures, the required sample size per group was reduced from 56 to 39 (32 for the GHQ-20, from 71 to 60 (55 for pain, 96 to 71 (73 for fatigue, 57 to 51 (48 for disease activity, 59 to 44 (45 for self-care, and 47 to 37 (33 for emotional wellbeing. Conclusions Measuring the outcomes five times rather than once reduced the necessary sample size by an average of 27%. When planning a study, researchers should carefully compare the advantages and disadvantages of increasing sample size versus employing three to five repeated measurements in order to obtain the required statistical power.

  15. PECULIARITIES OF THE CLINICAL COURSE OF NON-ALCOHOLIC STEATOHEPATITIS AGAINST THE BACKGROUND OF THE CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE OF THE I-III STAGE WITH SECONDARY ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hukhlina, O; Antoniv, A; Dudka, I; Dudka, T; Mandryk, O

    2017-09-01

    The article addresses the theoretical generalization of the clinical study of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis peculiarities in comorbidity with obesity and chronic kidney disease of the І-ІІІ stage, characterized by higher frequency and intensity of clinical and biochemical syndromes, the manifestation of which is likely to increase the occurrence of secondary arterial hypertension (portal hypertension syndromes, cholestasis, mesenchymal inflammation). Comorbid course of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with chronic kidney disease is characterized by higher degree of liver steatosis compared to the patients with only non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (p<0.05), and a higher diagnostic threshold of the hepatorenal index values, which correlates with the Steato-test index (p<0.001) with strong interdependence.

  16. [Clinical usefulness of the combined empirical therapy with flomoxef and fosfomycin for intractable respiratory tract infections. With a background of increasing MRSA incidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, K; Kudoh, S; Hayashi, I; Shishido, H; Fukuchi, Y; Suzuki, H; Oritsu, M; Nakada, K; Sano, Y; Goto, H

    1994-10-01

    We conducted a multicenter trial to determine the clinical usefulness of the combined therapy with flomoxef (FMOX) and fosfomycin (FOM) (FF therapy) as an empirical therapy in the treatment of intractable respiratory tract infections, because FF therapy has clinically been proved to be very useful for the treatment of severe infections including MRSA infections. The overall efficacy rate of FF therapy was 69.2%. The efficacy rate for "pneumonia/lung abscess," which occupy the largest portions of respiratory tract infections, was 70.0%, showing a statistically significant difference from the efficacy rate for FMOX alone (56.7%) found in a previous study (P = 0.09 by chi-squared test). Although MRSA was eradicated in only 3 cases (37.5%) including superinfection cases, of 8 patients, from whom MRSA had been isolated as causative organisms, none of our patients were superinfected with MRSA. Thus it has been concluded that FF therapy is clinically very useful when used as an empirical therapy in the treatment of respiratory tract infections.

  17. Managed ventricular pacing vs. conventional dual-chamber pacing for elective replacements: the PreFER MVP study: clinical background, rationale, and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Aurelio; Botto, Gianluca; Erdogan, Ali; Kozak, Milan; Lercher, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Piot, Olivier; Ricci, Renato; Weiss, Christian; Becker, Daniel; Wetzels, Gwenn; De Roy, Luc

    2008-03-01

    Several clinical studies have shown that, in patients with intact atrioventricular (AV) conduction, unnecessary chronic right ventricular (RV) pacing can be detrimental. The managed ventricular pacing (MVP) algorithm is designed to give preference to spontaneous AV conduction, thus minimizing RV pacing. The clinical outcomes of MVP are being studied in several ongoing trials in patients undergoing a first device implantation, but it is unknown to what extent MVP is beneficial in patients with a history of ventricular pacing. The purpose of the Prefer for Elective Replacement MVP (PreFER MVP) study is to assess the superiority of the MVP algorithm to conventional pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator programming in terms of freedom from hospitalization for cardiovascular causes in a population of patients exposed to long periods of ventricular pacing. PreFER MVP is a prospective, 1:1 parallel, randomized (MVP ON/MVP OFF), single-blinded multi-centre trial. The study population consists of patients with more than 40% ventricular pacing documented with their previous device. Approximately, 600 patients will be randomized and followed for at least 24 months. The primary endpoint comprises cardiovascular hospitalization. The PreFER MVP trial is the first large prospective randomized clinical trial evaluating the effect of MVP in patients with a history of RV pacing.

  18. Cyclotrons for clinical and biomedical research with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to present some background material on cyclotrons and other particle accelerators particularly with a view toward the considerations behind acquiring and installing such a machine for purely clinical and/or biomedical research use

  19. Ethnic Background and Genetic Variation in the Evaluation of Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Lijun; Su, Li; Ring, Brian Z.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in ...

  20. Background sources at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Important sources of background for PEP experiments are studied. Background particles originate from high-energy electrons and positrons which have been lost from stable orbits, γ-rays emitted by the primary beams through bremsstrahlung in the residual gas, and synchrotron radiation x-rays. The effect of these processes on the beam lifetime are calculated and estimates of background rates at the interaction region are given. Recommendations for the PEP design, aimed at minimizing background are presented. 7 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Cosmic Microwave Background Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmic Microwave Background Timeline 1934 : Richard Tolman shows that blackbody radiation in an will have a blackbody cosmic microwave background with temperature about 5 K 1955: Tigran Shmaonov anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, this strongly supports the big bang model with gravitational

  2. Functional and clinical evaluation of renal injury in patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer: Low dose and comorbidity considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Ibrahimov

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Functional renal impairment without any clinical signs or symptoms can be observed in low doses after radiotherapy. Careful treatment planning and a detailed evaluation of the functional renal capacity before treatment may help to reduce late renal toxicity.

  3. Consideration of a new definition of clinically relevant myocardial infarction after coronary revascularization: an expert consensus document from the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Issam D; Klein, Lloyd W; Shah, Binita; Mehran, Roxana; Mack, Michael J; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Reilly, John P; Zoghbi, Gilbert; Holper, Elizabeth; Stone, Gregg W

    2014-01-01

    Numerous definitions have been proposed for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI) after coronary revascularization. The universal definition for MI designates post procedural biomarker thresholds for defining percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-related MI (type 4a) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)-related MI (type 5) which are of uncertain prognostic importance. In addition, for both MI types cTn is recommended as the biomarker of choice, the prognostic significance of which is less well validated than CK-MB. Widespread adoption of a MI definition not clearly linked to subsequent adverse events such as mortality or heart failure may have serious consequences for the appropriate assessment of devices and therapies, may affect clinical care pathways, and may result in misinterpretation of physician competence. Rather than employing an MI definition sensitive for small degrees of myonecrosis (the occurrence of which, based on contemporary large-scale studies, are unlikely to have important clinical consequences), it is instead recommended that a threshold level of biomarker elevation which has been strongly linked to subsequent adverse events in clinical studies be used to define a "clinically relevant MI." The present document introduces a new definition for "clinically relevant MI" after coronary revascularization (PCI or CABG) which is applicable for use in clinical trials, patient care, and quality outcomes assessment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Spinal cord stimulation: Background and clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    a number of contacts capable of delivering a weak electrical current to the spinal cord, evoking a feeling of peripheral paresthesia. With correct indication and if implanted by an experienced implanter, success rates generally are in the range of about 50–75%. Common indications include complex regional...

  5. Regulatory Considerations for the Clinical and Research Use of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): review and recommendations from an expert panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregni, F; Nitsche, MA; Loo, C.K.; Brunoni, AR; Marangolo, P; Leite, J; Carvalho, S; Bolognini, N; Caumo, W; Paik, NJ; Simis, M; Ueda, K; Ekhitari, H; Luu, P; Tucker, DM; Tyler, WJ; Brunelin, J; Datta, A; Juan, CH; Venkatasubramanian, G; Boggio, PS; Bikson, M

    2014-01-01

    The field of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) has experienced significant growth in the past 15 years. One of the tES techniques leading this increased interest is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Significant research efforts have been devoted to determining the clinical potential of tDCS in humans. Despite the promising results obtained with tDCS in basic and clinical neuroscience, further progress has been impeded by a lack of clarity on international regulatory pathways. We therefore convened a group of research and clinician experts on tDCS to review the research and clinical use of tDCS. In this report, we review the regulatory status of tDCS, and we summarize the results according to research, off-label and compassionate use of tDCS in the following countries: Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, India, Iran, Italy, Portugal, South Korea, Taiwan and United States. Research use, off label treatment and compassionate use of tDCS are employed in most of the countries reviewed in this study. It is critical that a global or local effort is organized to pursue definite evidence to either approve and regulate or restrict the use of tDCS in clinical practice on the basis of adequate randomized controlled treatment trials. PMID:25983531

  6. Medical Care in a Free Clinic: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Patient Experience, Incentives, and Barriers to Optimal Medical Care with Consideration of a Facility Fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birs, Antoinette; Liu, Xinwei; Nash, Bee; Sullivan, Sara; Garris, Stephanie; Hardy, Marvin; Lee, Michael; Simms-Cendan, Judith; Pasarica, Magdalena

    2016-02-19

    Free and charitable clinics are important contributors to the health of the United States population. Recently, funding for these clinics has been declining, and it is, therefore, useful to identify what qualities patients value the most in clinics in an effort to allocate funding wisely. In order to identify targets and incentives for improvement of patients' health, we performed a comprehensive analysis of patients' experience at a free clinic by analyzing a patient survey (N=94). The survey also assessed patient opinions of a small facility fee, which could be used to offset the decrease in funds. Interestingly, our patients believed it is appropriate to be charged a facility fee (78%) because it increases involvement in their care (r = 0.69, p fee. Barriers include affordable housing, transportation, medication, and accessible information. In order to improve medical care in the uninsured population, our study suggested that we need to: 1) offer continuity of medical care; 2) offer affordable preventive health screenings; 3) support affordable transportation, housing, and medications; and 4) consider including a facility fee.

  7. Determination of Eligibility in Related Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Donors: Ethical and Clinical Considerations. Recommendations from a Working Group of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitan, Menachem; van Walraven, Suzanna M; Worel, Nina; Ball, Lynne M; Styczynski, Jan; Torrabadella, Marta; Witt, Volker; Shaw, Bronwen E; Seber, Adriana; Yabe, Hiromasa; Greinix, Hildegard T; Peters, Christina; Gluckman, Eliane; Rocha, Vanderson; Halter, Joerg; Pulsipher, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Related donors for hematopoietic cell (HC) transplantation are a growing population in recent years because of expanding indications for allogeneic transplantation. The safety and welfare of the donor are major concerns for the transplantation community, especially for related sibling donors of young recipients who are children and, thus, not able to fully consent. Because donation of HC does not improve the donor's own physical health and carries a risk of side effects, careful assessment of medical risks specific to the individual donor, as well as consideration of ethical and legal aspects associated with donation from a child, must be considered. In addition, donor centers must balance the needs of both the donor and the recipient, understanding the inherent conflict parents may have as they can be overly focused on the very sick child receiving a transplant, rather than on the relatively less significant health or emotional problems that a sibling donor may have, which could impact risk with donation. Likewise, consideration must be made regarding the nature of the relationship of the sibling donor to the recipient and also aspects of performing research on pediatric HC donors. In this article, as members of the Donor Issues Committee of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, we review key ethical concerns associated with pediatric donation and then give recommendations for screening potential child donors with underlying health conditions. These recommendations are aimed at protecting the physical and emotional well-being of childhood donors and arise out of the Third International Conference on Health and Safety of Donors sponsored by the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular allergy diagnostics using IgE singleplex determinations: methodological and practical considerations for use in clinical routine: Part 18 of the Series Molecular Allergology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Jakob, Thilo

    Allergen molecules (synonyms: single allergens, allergen components) open up new horizons for the targeted allergen-specific diagnostics of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in singleplex determination. The following rationales support the targeted use of allergen molecules and, more importantly, improve test properties: (1) increased test sensitivity ("analytical sensitivity"), particularly when important allergens are under-represented or lacking in the extract; (2) improved test selectivity (analytical specificity), particularly when the selected IgE repertoire against an allergen yields additional information on: (a) potential risk, (b) possible cross-reactivity, or (c) primary (species-specific) sensitization. However, the appropriate indication for the use of single allergens can only be established on a case-by-case basis (depending on the clinical context and previous history) and in an allergen-specific manner (depending on the allergen source and the single allergens available), rather than in a standardized way. Numerous investigations on suspected food allergy, insect venom allergy, or sensitization to respiratory allergens have meanwhile demonstrated the successful use of defined molecules for allergen-specific singleplex IgE diagnosis. Specific IgE to single allergens is limited in its suitability to predict the clinical relevance of sensitivity on an individual basis. In food allergies, one can at best identify the relative risk of a clinical reaction on the basis of an IgE profile, but no absolutely reliable prediction on (future) tolerance can be made. Ultimately, the clinical relevance of all IgE findings depends on the presence of corresponding symptoms and can only be assessed on an individual basis (previous history, symptom log, and provocation testing with the relevant allergen source where appropriate). Thus, also in molecular allergology, the treating physician and not the test result should determine the clinical relevance of diagnostic findings

  9. Use of the i2b2 research query tool to conduct a matched case-control clinical research study: advantages, disadvantages and methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emilie K; Broder-Fingert, Sarabeth; Tanpowpong, Pornthep; Bickel, Jonathan; Lightdale, Jenifer R; Nelson, Caleb P

    2014-01-30

    A major aim of the i2b2 (informatics for integrating biology and the bedside) clinical data informatics framework aims to create an efficient structure within which patients can be identified for clinical and translational research projects.Our objective was to describe the respective roles of the i2b2 research query tool and the electronic medical record (EMR) in conducting a case-controlled clinical study at our institution. We analyzed the process of using i2b2 and the EMR together to generate a complete research database for a case-control study that sought to examine risk factors for kidney stones among gastrostomy tube (G-tube) fed children. Our final case cohort consisted of 41/177 (23%) of potential cases initially identified by i2b2, who were matched with 80/486 (17%) of potential controls. Cases were 10 times more likely to be excluded for inaccurate coding regarding stones vs. inaccurate coding regarding G-tubes. A majority (67%) of cases were excluded due to not meeting clinical inclusion criteria, whereas a majority of control exclusions (72%) occurred due to inadequate clinical data necessary for study completion. Full dataset assembly required complementary information from i2b2 and the EMR. i2b2 was critical as a query analysis tool for patient identification in our case-control study. Patient identification via procedural coding appeared more accurate compared with diagnosis coding. Completion of our investigation required iterative interplay of i2b2 and the EMR to assemble the study cohort.

  10. Examinations with computerized cranial axial tomography carried out on patients with epileptic seizures, taking into consideration the EEG and the clinical picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiser, R.

    1982-01-01

    204 patients suffering from epileptic seizures were examined with the help of computerized cranial X-ray tomography; the results were compared with anamnestic, clinical, and EEC-findings. In good agreement with results published in literature, in 54% of the patients pathologic CT's such as tumours, attack scars, changes in ventricles and arachnoid spaces etc. were found. A pathological CT is very likely to appear in male patients who are 30 or even 50 years of age, having partial attacks with elementary symptoms, focal diagnosis in the EEG and a neurological unilateral finding. Especially noteworthy is the tumour detecting rate achieved by CT and the fact that in nearly 5% of the cases CT detected a cerebral lesion which has not been suspected, neither clinically nor in the EEG (4 tumours). This shows clearly that CT represents a heighly valuable diagnostic help, especially for patients with epileptic seizures. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Optimal background matching camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalis, Constantine; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E; Gibson, David P; Cuthill, Innes C

    2017-07-12

    Background matching is the most familiar and widespread camouflage strategy: avoiding detection by having a similar colour and pattern to the background. Optimizing background matching is straightforward in a homogeneous environment, or when the habitat has very distinct sub-types and there is divergent selection leading to polymorphism. However, most backgrounds have continuous variation in colour and texture, so what is the best solution? Not all samples of the background are likely to be equally inconspicuous, and laboratory experiments on birds and humans support this view. Theory suggests that the most probable background sample (in the statistical sense), at the size of the prey, would, on average, be the most cryptic. We present an analysis, based on realistic assumptions about low-level vision, that estimates the distribution of background colours and visual textures, and predicts the best camouflage. We present data from a field experiment that tests and supports our predictions, using artificial moth-like targets under bird predation. Additionally, we present analogous data for humans, under tightly controlled viewing conditions, searching for targets on a computer screen. These data show that, in the absence of predator learning, the best single camouflage pattern for heterogeneous backgrounds is the most probable sample. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Clinical and programmatic considerations in the treatment of MDR-TB in children: a series of 16 patients from Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, J S; Joseph, J K; Rich, M L; Shin, S S; Furin, J J; Seung, K J; Sloutsky, A; Socci, A R; Vanderwarker, C; Vasquez, L; Palacios, E; Guerra, D; Viru, F A; Farmer, P; Del Castillo, H E

    2003-07-01

    Since 2000, the directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) strategy has been expanded in several countries to include treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). This strategy is known as DOTS-Plus. Tuberculosis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality for children throughout the developing world. Children may also be infected with MDR-TB, yet most developing countries do not specifically address pediatric MDR-TB. To present the intermediate outcomes of the first 16 children enrolled in the Peruvian DOTS-Plus program and to demonstrate the tolerability of second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. Three children completed therapy and are cured, one child had bacteriologic and clinical failure after 12 months of therapy and died of respiratory insufficiency, and 12 have intermediate outcomes demonstrating favorable clinical, bacteriologic, and radiographic evidence of improvement after 9-19 months of therapy. Of the 16 pediatric DOTS-Plus patients, 15 have tolerated therapy well and have had favorable clinical evolution. However, the diagnosis of pediatric MDR-TB is often extremely delayed due to reliance on the adult case definition and should be changed to prevent progressive, chronic illness in such children. Programmatic changes could facilitate earlier diagnosis and treatment of pediatric MDR-TB in Peru and in other DOTS-Plus programs.

  13. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma presenting as an intradural spinal mass: report of a rare clinical presentation with an emphasis on differential diagnostic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Rao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare soft tissue neoplasm that occurs predominantly in the soft tissues of the lower extremities. Herein we present a case of a 29 year old male who presented with bilateral femoral numbness believed to be the result of prior injury to his back. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the T4-T5 epidural space compressing the spinal cord. Laminectomy was performed and the lesion removed piecemeal. The pathology specimen consisted of multiple fragments of dura involved by a myxoid neoplasm with a nodular growth pattern. The tumor cells were arranged in anastomosing cords and strands. Individual tumor cells were small, of uniform size and shape, with small hyperchromatic nuclei and scant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical stains were performed which showed the tumor cells were diffusely positive for vimentin and focally positive for EMA, S-100 protein and cytokeratin, whereas they were negative for CD34 and CD99. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies showed a clonal population of cells with re-arrangement of the EWSR1 locus, confirming the histologic impression of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. This is the first report of a case of an extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma arising from the dura, confirmed to have rearrangement of the EWSR1 gene by FISH. There have only been two other cases of dural based extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma reported prior to our case. We also briefly review the published literature and discuss differential diagnostic considerations for this rare tumor.

  14. Treatment Considerations for the Cardiometabolic Signs of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Review of the Literature Since the 2013 Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Errol L; Trent, Maria E

    2016-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by an excess in androgen levels, ovarian dysfunction, and polycystic ovarian morphology but is also associated with metabolic dysfunction and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. To our knowledge, there are few therapeutic recommendations for these cardiometabolic risk factors and little evidence of their long-term clinical relevance to cardiovascular health. To determine metabolic and/or cardiovascular outcomes in polycystic ovary syndrome treatment literature since the publication of the most recent Endocrine Society clinical practice guidelines in 2013. We searched PubMed using a string of variations of polycystic ovary syndrome, therapy/treatment, and adolescence, and we included English-language original research articles published while the 2013 clinical practice guidelines were disseminated (ie, articles published from January 1, 2011, to June 1, 2015). Articles that appeared relevant based on a review of titles and abstracts were read in full to determine relevancy. References from relevant articles were reviewed for additional studies. Four topic areas emerged: (1) lifestyle modification, (2) metformin vs placebo or estrogen-progestin oral contraceptives, (3) insulin-sensitizing agents, and (4) estrogen-progestin formulations. Most studies assessed the role of metformin as a monotherapy or dual therapy supplement and found significant benefit when including metformin in polycystic ovary syndrome treatment regimens. Studies showed improvements in cardiometabolic risk factors and, in several, androgen excess and cutaneous and menstrual symptoms. Studies were limited by sample size (range, 22-171), few adolescent participants, and short-term outcomes. Findings show potential for metformin and estrogen-progestin dual therapy but warrant longitudinal studies examining outcomes from adolescence through middle age to determine the effect on long-term cardiovascular health.

  15. What, why, and when we image: considerations for diagnostic imaging and clinical research in the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaman, Gregory H. [The George Washington University, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Hematology Oncology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Success in improving treatment outcomes in childhood cancer has been achieved almost exclusively through multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical and applied research over several decades. While biologically rational as well as empirical approaches have led to combination chemotherapy and multimodality approaches to therapy, which have given rise to evidence-based practice standards, similar scientific rigor has not always been as evidently applied to modalities utilized to assess initial disease burden and, more important, response to investigational approaches to therapy. As the empirical approach to therapeutic advances has likely maximized its benefit, future progress will require translation of biologic discovery most notably from the areas of genomics and proteomics. Hence, attempts to improve efficacy of therapy will require a parallel effort to minimize collateral damage of future therapeutic approaches, and such a parallel approach will mandate the continued dependence on advances in diagnostic imaging for improvements in staging methodologies to best define risk groups for risk-adjusted therapy. In addition, anatomic and functional assessment of response and surveillance for disease recurrence will require improved understanding of the biology as well as natural history of individual diseases, which one hopes will better inform investigators in designing trials. Clinical and research expertise is urgently needed in the selection of specific imaging studies and frequencies that best assess a response as well as to define disease-free intervals. Despite limited resources to develop sufficient infrastructure, emphasis on enabling early assessment of new technology to minimize risks associated with treatment advances and with those critical diagnostic and staging procedures must continue to be a focus of pediatric cancer clinical research. (orig.)

  16. Experimental poisoning of goats by Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa in Argentina: a clinic and pathological correlation with special consideration on the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvio E. Ríos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa, aguapei or mandiyura, is responsible for lysosomal storage in goats. The shrub contains several alkaloids, mainly swansonine which inhibits lysosomal α-mannosidase and Golgi mannosidase II. Poisoning occurs by inhibition of these hydrolases. There is neuronal vacuolation, endocrine dysfunction, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal injury, and immune disorders. Clinical signs and pathology of the experimental poisoning of goats by Ipomoea carnea in Argentina are here described. Five goats received fresh leaves and stems of Ipomoea. At the beginning, the goats did not consume the plant, but later, it was preferred over any other forage. High dose induced rapid intoxication, whereas with low doses, the course of the toxicosis was more protracted. The goats were euthanized when they were recumbent. Cerebrum, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, pons and colliculi, were routinely processed for histology. In nine days, the following clinical signs developed: abnormal fascies, dilated nostrils and abnormal postures of the head, cephalic tremors and nystagmus, difficulty in standing. Subsequently, the goats had a tendency to fall, always to the left, with spastic convulsions. There was lack in coordination of voluntary movements due to Purkinje and deep nuclei neurons damage. The cochlear reflex originated hyperreflexia, abnormal posture, head movements and tremors. The withdrawal reflex produced flexor muscles hypersensitivity at the four legs, later depression and stupor. Abnormal responses to sounds were related to collicular lesions. Thalamic damage altered the withdrawal reflex, showing incomplete reaction. The observed cervical hair bristling was attributed to a thalamic regulated nociceptive response. Depression may be associated with agonists of lysergic acid contained in Ipomoea. These clinical signs were correlated with lesions in different parts of the CNS.

  17. Randomised controlled pragmatic clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of a discharge follow-up phone call on 30-day hospital readmissions: balancing pragmatic and explanatory design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiadom, Maame Yaa A B; Domenico, Henry; Byrne, Daniel; Hasselblad, Michele Marie; Gatto, Cheryl L; Kripalani, Sunil; Choma, Neesha; Tucker, Sarah; Wang, Li; Bhatia, Monisha C; Morrison, Johnston; Harrell, Frank E; Hartert, Tina; Bernard, Gordon

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Hospital readmissions within 30 days are a healthcare quality problem associated with increased costs and poor health outcomes. Identifying interventions to improve patients’ successful transition from inpatient to outpatient care is a continued challenge. Methods and analysis This is a single-centre pragmatic randomised and controlled clinical trial examining the effectiveness of a discharge follow-up phone call to reduce 30-day inpatient readmissions. Our primary endpoint is inpatient readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge censored for death analysed with an intention-to-treat approach. Secondary endpoints included observation status readmission within 30 days, time to readmission, all-cause emergency department revisits within 30 days, patient satisfaction (measured as mean Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores) and 30-day mortality. Exploratory endpoints include the need for assistance with discharge plan implementation among those randomised to the intervention arm and reached by the study nurse, and the number of call attempts to achieve successful intervention delivery. Consistent with the Learning Healthcare System model for clinical research, timeliness is a critical quality for studies to most effectively inform hospital clinical practice. We are challenged to apply pragmatic design elements in order to maintain a high-quality practicable study providing timely results. This type of prospective pragmatic trial empowers the advancement of hospital-wide evidence-based practice directly affecting patients. Ethics and dissemination Study results will inform the structure, objective and function of future iterations of the hospital’s discharge follow-up phone call programme and be submitted for publication in the literature. Trial registration number NCT03050918; Pre-results. PMID:29444787

  18. The clinical trajectory of emerging bipolar disorder among the high-risk offspring of bipolar parents: current understanding and future considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, A; Vandeleur, C; Heffer, N; Preisig, M

    2017-11-22

    Relatively little is known about the onset of bipolar disorder, yet the early illness course is already associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, characterizing the bipolar illness trajectory is key to risk prediction and early intervention advancement. In this narrative review, we discuss key findings from prospective longitudinal studies of the high-risk offspring of bipolar parents and related meta-analyses that inform us about the clinical trajectory of emerging bipolar disorder. Challenges such as phenotypic and etiologic heterogeneity and the non-specificity of early symptoms and syndromes are highlighted. Implications of the findings for both research and clinical practice are discussed. Bipolar disorder in young people at familial risk does not typically onset with a hypomanic or manic episode. Rather the first activated episode is often preceded by years of impairing psychopathological states that vary over development and across emerging bipolar subtype. Taking heterogeneity into account and adopting a more comprehensive approach to diagnosis seems necessary to advance earlier identification and our understanding of the onset of bipolar disorder.

  19. Two dimensional echocardiography in mitral, aortic and tricuspid valve prolapse - The clinical problem, cardiac nuclear imaging considerations and a proposed standard for diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganroth, J.; Jones, R.H.; Chen, C.C.; Naito, M.; Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pa.; Duke University, Medical Center, Durham, N.C.)

    1980-01-01

    The mitral valve prolapse syndrome may present with a variety of clinical manifestations and has proved to be a common cause of nonspecific cardiac symptoms in clinical practice. Primary and secondary forms must be distinguished. Myxomatous degeneration appears to be the common denominator of the primary form. The diagnostic standard of this form has not previously been defined because the detection of mitral leaflet tissue in the left atrium (prolapse) on physical examination or angiography is nonspecific. M mode echocardiography has greatly enhanced the recognition of this syndrome but has not proved to be the best diagnostic standard because of its limited view of mitral valve motion. The advent of two-dimensional echocardiography has provided the potential means for specific identification of the mitral leaflet motion in systole and can be considered the diagnostic standard for this syndrome. Primary myxomatous degeneration with leaflet prolapse is not localized to the mitral valve. Two-dimensional echocardiography has detected in preliminary studies tricuspid valve prolapse in up to 50% and aortic valve prolapse in about 20% of patients with idiopathic mitral valve prolapse

  20. New developments in oral contraception: clinical utility of estradiol valerate/dienogest (Natazia® for contraception and for treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding: patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson AL

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anita L NelsonObstetrics and Gynecology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Harbor UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California, USAAbstract: Natazia® is a new oral contraceptive with estradiol valerate and dienogest in a unique multiphasic formulation that includes a shortened hormone-free interval. This new formulation has been approved for both contraception and also as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding in women who desire to use oral contraceptives as their method of birth control. It is marketed in the US as Natazia® and elsewhere as Qlaira®. This article will review the properties of each of the major new features of this pill: estradiol used in place of ethinyl estradiol, dienogest as the progestin, and the unique dosing pattern of this product. It will also summarize the results of the pivotal clinical trials of contraceptive effectiveness, bleeding patterns, safety and tolerability. The lessons learned from the clinical trials about the effectiveness of this formulation in the treatment of excessive menstrual bleeding will be summarized. Also, results of trials comparing this new pill to other popular formulations for "menstrually-related" symptoms and for potential female sexual dysfunction related to use of oral contraceptives will be presented. This review will suggest how all this information might be used to counsel women about how to use this pill most successfully.Keywords: oral contraceptives, estradiol valerate, dienogest, heavy menstrual bleeding, menorrhagia, dynamic dosing

  1. Improving the Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy, a Difficult but Essential Task for a Successful HIV Treatment—Clinical Points of View and Practical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona A. Iacob

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV infection is responsible for one the most devastating human pandemics. The advent of antiretroviral therapy has changed the course of the pandemic and saved millions of lives. Complex therapeutic regimens have been introduced since 1996 and have contributed to the transformation of HIV infection into a treatable chronic diseases. New types of potent antiretrovirals and their combinations, including “once daily” treatment, have simplified the regimens and diminished side effects. Nevertheless the adherence to antiretroviral therapy remains unsatisfactory and varies between 27 and 80% across different population in various studies, compared with the required level of 95%. The lack of adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a multi-factorial and dynamic process which raises considerable difficulties for long-term follow-up. Current solutions to this problem are complex. These should be applied by a multidisciplinary team and should take into account key features related to both the individual and social factors as well as to the population to whom it belongs (children, teenagers, elderly, marginalized population like drug users, incarcerated patients, sex workers, etc.. Importantly, adherence should continue to be monitored even in patients known to be compliant. In case of subsequent failure the team should identify the reasons for non-adherence and apply the appropriate methods. Where usual methods have no chance of success, a coordinated package of services also known as “harm reduction” can be offered in order to reduce the risks of transmission. The current article analyses the concept of adherence to antiretroviral therapy, the shortcomings of this medication and the methods that can be applied in practice to increase adherence. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of groups at high risk for HIV infection that currently represent the spearhead with which the HIV pandemic is spreading.

  2. [Strategic considerations on the design and choice of animal models for non-clinical investigations of cell-based medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jörg; Schulz, Ronny M; Sanzenbacher, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    For the development of medicinal products animal models are still indispensable to demonstrate efficacy and safety prior to first use in humans. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP), which include cell-based medicinal products (CBMP), differ in their pharmacology and toxicology compared to conventional pharmaceuticals, and thus, require an adapted regime for non-clinical development. Developers are, therefore, challenged to develop particular individual concepts and to reconcile these with regulatory agencies. Guidelines issued by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other sources can provide direction.The published approaches for non-clinical testing of efficacy document that homologous animal models where the therapeutic effect is investigated in a disease-relevant animal model utilizing cells derived from the same species are commonly used. The challenge is that the selected model should reflect the human disease in all critical features and that the cells should be comparable to the investigated human medicinal product in terms of quality and biological activity. This is not achievable in all cases. In these cases, alternative methods may provide supplemental information. To demonstrate the scientific proof-of-concept (PoC), small animal models such as mice or rats are preferred. During the subsequent product development phase, large animal models (i.e. sheep, minipigs, dogs) must be considered, as they may better reflect the anatomical or physiological situation in humans. In addition to efficacy, those models may also be suitable to prove some safety aspects of ATMP (e.g. regarding dose finding, local tolerance, or undesired interactions and effects of the administered cells in the target tissue). In contrast, for evaluation of the two prominent endpoints for characterizing the safety of ATMP (i.e. biodistribution, tumorigenicity) heterologous small animal models, especially immunodeficient mouse strains

  3. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The 20-ft horn-reflector antenna at Bell Laboratories is discussed in detail with emphasis on the 7.35 cm radiometer. The circumstances leading to the detection of the cosmic microwave background radiation are explored

  4. Zambia Country Background Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampwaye, Godfrey; Jeppesen, Søren; Kragelund, Peter

    This paper provides background data and general information for the Zambia studies focusing on local food processing sub­‐sector; and the local suppliers to the mines as part of the SAFIC project (Successful African Firms and Institutional Change).......This paper provides background data and general information for the Zambia studies focusing on local food processing sub­‐sector; and the local suppliers to the mines as part of the SAFIC project (Successful African Firms and Institutional Change)....

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Motor Status in Parkinson’s Disease Using Wearable Devices: From Methodological Considerations to Problems in Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Suzuki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term and objective monitoring is necessary for full assessment of the condition of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. Recent advances in biotechnology have seen the development of various types of wearable (body-worn sensor systems. By using accelerometers and gyroscopes, these devices can quantify motor abnormalities, including decreased activity and gait disturbances, as well as nonmotor signs, such as sleep disturbances and autonomic dysfunctions in PD. This review discusses methodological problems inherent in wearable devices. Until now, analysis of the mean values of motion-induced signals on a particular day has been widely applied in the clinical management of PD patients. On the other hand, the reliability of these devices to detect various events, such as freezing of gait and dyskinesia, has been less than satisfactory. Quantification of disease-specific changes rather than nonspecific changes is necessary.

  6. Cortical thickness in de novo patients with Parkinson disease and mild cognitive impairment with consideration of clinical phenotype and motor laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danti, S; Toschi, N; Diciotti, S; Tessa, C; Poletti, M; Del Dotto, P; Lucetti, C

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with motor and non-motor symptoms, including cognitive deficits. Several magnetic resonance imaging approaches have been applied to investigate brain atrophy in PD. The aim of this study was to detect early structural cortical and subcortical changes in de novo PD whilst distinguishing cognitive status, clinical phenotype and motor laterality. Eighteen de novo PD with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), 18 de novo PD without MCI (PD-NC) and 18 healthy control subjects were evaluated. In the PD-MCI group, nine were tremor dominant and nine were postural instability gait disorder (PIGD) phenotype; 11 had right-sided symptom dominance and seven had left-sided symptom dominance. FreeSurfer was used to measure cortical thickness/folding, subcortical structures and to study group differences as well as the association with clinical and neuropsychological data. Parkinson's disease with MCI showed regional thinning in the right frontal, right middle temporal areas and left insula compared to PD-NC. A reduction of the volume of the left and right thalamus and left hippocampus was found in PD-MCI compared to PD-NC. PD-MCI PIGD showed regional thinning in the right inferior parietal area compared to healthy controls. A decreased volume of the left thalamus was reported in PD-MCI with right-sided symptom dominance compared to PD-NC and PD-MCI with left-sided symptom dominance. When MCI was present, PD patients showed a fronto-temporo-parietal pattern of cortical thinning. This cortical pattern does not appear to be influenced by motor laterality, although one-sided symptom dominance may contribute to volumetric reduction of specific subcortical structures. © 2015 EAN.

  7. Considerações sobre as significações da psicologia clínica na contemporaneidade Considerations on the meanings of clinical psychology in our times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Dutra

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo considera a evolução de significados e conceitos da Psicologia Clínica e suas implicações para as ações do psicólogo dessa área. Para isso baseia-se no pensamento fenomenológico e nas idéias de alguns estudiosos da psicologia, na tentativa de melhor compreender as mudanças ocorridas nos saberes e fazeres do psicólogo clínico. A análise empreendida confirma a importância do compromisso social do psicólogo na sua prática e sugere que a postura clínica repousa não só na formação teórico-técnica, mas, sobretudo, na ética da escuta do não-dito e do interditado.The aim of this article is to discuss the evolution of the meanings and concepts of Clinical Psychology and its implication for the psychologists in this area. The discussion is based on the concepts of the phenomenological approach and the ideas of authors in Psychology and leads to a better understanding of the changes that have taken place on psychological knowledge and practices. Such analysis points to the relevance of social commitment from the clinical psychologist and suggests that the accomplishment of his work lies not only on a proper theoretical and technical knowledge, but above all on an ethical attitude regarding the listening of what is unsaid and censored.

  8. Practical considerations for effective microendoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Thanassis; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; Daykhovsky, Leon; Gershman, Alex; Segalowitz, Jacob; Reznik, G.; Beeder, Clain; Chandra, Mudjianto; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on the application of angioscopic technology to the endoscopy of previously inaccessible body cavities. Necessary instruments including endoscopes, light sources, cameras, video recorders, monitors, and other accessories are described. Practical considerations for effective instrumentation are discussed. An overview of our clinical microendoscopic applications in more than 630 patients is presented.

  9. Case Report: Diagnosis of hypogeusia after oral exposure to commercial cleaning agent and considerations for clinical taste testing [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 not approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Jetté

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Few reports in the literature document acute taste disturbance following exposure to toxic chemicals. We describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with primary complaint of tongue numbness and persistent problems with taste 1.5 years following oral exposure to a commercial cleaning agent. A test of olfaction revealed normosmia for age and gender. Lingual tactile two-point discrimination testing showed reduced somatosensation. Taste threshold testing using a 3-drop method demonstrated severe hypogeusia, though the patient was able to discriminate tastants at lower concentrations with a whole mouth swish and spit test. We conclude that clinical evaluation of dysgeusia can be performed using a number of previously published testing methods, however, determining causative factors may be confounded by duration since exposure, lack of knowledge of baseline taste function, and medications. Although many testing options exist, basic taste testing can be performed with minimal expertise or specialized equipment, depending on the patient history and goals of evaluation.

  10. The Spanish Society of Neurology's official clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy. Special considerations in epilepsy: comorbidities, women of childbearing age, and elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri Llerda, J A; Suller Marti, A; de la Peña Mayor, P; Martínez Ferri, M; Poza Aldea, J J; Gomez Alonso, J; Mercadé Cerdá, J M

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of some population groups (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly) may limit epilepsy management. Antiepileptic treatment in these patients may require adjustments. We searched articles in Pubmed, clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy, and recommendations by the most relevant medical societies regarding epilepsy in special situations (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly). Evidence and recommendations are classified according to the prognostic criteria of Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine (2001) and the European Federation of Neurological Societies (2004) for therapeutic interventions. Epilepsy treatment in special cases of comorbidities must be selected properly to improve efficacy with the fewest side effects. Adjusting antiepileptic medication and/or hormone therapy is necessary for proper seizure management in catamenial epilepsy. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AED) during pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects and may affect fetal growth and/or cognitive development. Postpartum breastfeeding is recommended, with monitoring for adverse effects if sedative AEDs are used. Finally, the elderly are prone to epilepsy, and diagnostic and treatment characteristics in this group differ from those of other age groups. Although therapeutic limitations may be more frequent in older patients due to comorbidities, they usually respond better to lower doses of AEDs than do other age groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Dosimetric considerations and early clinical experience of accelerated partial breast irradiation using multi-lumen applicators in the setting of breast augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtari, Mani; Pino, Ramiro; Scarboro, Sarah B.; Bass, Barbara L.; Miltenburg, Darlene M.; Butler, E. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an accepted treatment option in breast-conserving therapy for early stage breast cancer. However, data regarding outcomes of patients treated with multi-lumen catheter systems who have existing breast implants is limited. The purpose of this study was to report treatment parameters, outcomes, and possible dosimetric correlation with cosmetic outcome for this population of patients at our institution. Material and methods We report the treatment and outcome of seven consecutive patients with existing breast implants and early stage breast cancer who were treated between 2009 and 2013 using APBI following lumpectomy. All patients were treated twice per day for five days to a total dose of 34 Gy using a high-dose-rate 192Ir source. Cosmetic outcomes were evaluated using the Harvard breast cosmesis scale, and late toxicities were reported using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late radiation morbidity schema. Results After a mean follow-up of 32 months, all patients have remained cancer free. Six out of seven patients had an excellent or good cosmetic outcome. There were no grade 3 or 4 late toxicities. The average total breast implant volume was 279.3 cc, received an average mean dose of 12.1 Gy, and a maximum dose of 234.1 Gy. The average percentage of breast implant volume receiving 50%, 75%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose was 15.6%, 7.03%, 4.6%, 1.58%, and 0.46%, respectively. Absolute volume of breast implants receiving more than 50% of prescribed dose correlated with worse cosmetic outcomes. Conclusions Accelerated partial breast irradiation using a multi-lumen applicator in patients with existing breast implants can safely be performed with promising early clinical results. The presence of the implant did not compromise the ability to achieve dosimetric criteria; however, dose to the implant and the irradiated implant volume may be related with worse cosmetic outcomes. PMID:26816499

  12. Diagnosis of osteoporosis in rural Arctic Greenland: a clinical case using plain chest radiography for secondary prevention and consideration of tools for primary prevention in remote areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Inuuteq; Schæbel, Louise K; Albertsen, Nadja; Sørensen, Vibeke N; Andersen, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a frequent disease in many populations. The hallmark is fragility fractures, which are harbingers of future fractures, disability, mortality and cost on society. The occurrence increases with age, low vitamin D level and smoking. Smoking rates are high, vitamin D is low and life expectancy is rising steeply in Greenland, as is the need for focus on osteoporosis. We report a case that uses a simple and readily available tool to diagnose osteoporosis at the hospital in Sisimiut, a town of 5000 inhabitants on the west coast of Greenland. A 51-year-old Inuit woman was seen due to lower back pain. No trauma could be recalled. Laboratory results showed a low vitamin D level and normal S-calcium, S-phosphate, S-parathyroid hormone, S-thyrotropin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, S-creatinine and hemoglobin. The lateral chest radiograph demonstrated a reduction of anterior height of the seventh and ninth thoracic vertebral bodies of 50% and 40% respectively. Chest radiographs are frequently done in the towns along the vast coastline of Greenland, the world's largest island. They are transferred to the hospital in the capital city Nuuk using existing tele-technology, and specialist evaluations are given in electronic records available at the coastal hospitals. Effective therapies for osteoporosis are available and the identification of vertebral fractures that merit treatment may prevent future fractures, morbidity and mortality. Fragility fractures are frequent in old age and the steep rise in life expectancy and in the number of old people in Greenland emphasize the need for a focus on management of osteoporosis. Geography provides a diagnostic challenge to rural and remote areas that can be overcome by the use of lateral chest radiographs as it relies on facilities readily available. Clinical risk assessment tools with high specificity may support further osteoporosis risk prediction in remote Arctic societies.

  13. Executive Summary - Historical background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    matter physics experiments at the High Flux Reactor of The Laue Langevin Institute and the ISIS spallation source at Rutherford-Appleton. Recently, we very actively entered the ICARUS neutrino collaboration and were invited to the PIERRE AUGER collaboration which will search for the highest energies in the Universe. Having close ties with CERN we are very actively engaged in CROSS-GRID, a large computer network project. To better understand the historical background of the INP development, it is necessary to add a few comments on financing of science in Poland. During the 70's and the 80's, research was financed through the so-called Central Research Projects for Science and Technical Development. The advantage of this system was that state-allocated research funds were divided only by a few representatives of the scientific community, which allowed realistic allocation of money to a small number of projects. After 1989 we were able to purchase commercially available equipment, which led to the closure of our large and very experienced electronic workshop. We also considerably reduced our well equipped mechanical shop. During the 90's the reduced state financing of science was accompanied by a newly established Committee of Scientific Research which led to the creation of a system of small research projects. This precluded the development of more ambitious research projects and led to the dispersion of equipment among many smaller laboratories and universities. A large research establishment, such as our Institute, could not develop properly under such conditions. In all, between 1989 and 2004 we reduced our personnel from about 800 to 470 and our infrastructure became seriously undercapitalised. However, with energetic search for research funds, from European rather than national research programs, we hope to improve and modernize our laboratories and their infrastructure in the coming years

  14. The natural radiation background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggleby, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The components of the natural background radiation and their variations are described. Cosmic radiation is a major contributor to the external dose to the human body whilst naturally-occurring radionuclides of primordial and cosmogenic origin contribute to both the external and internal doses, with the primordial radionuclides being the major contributor in both cases. Man has continually modified the radiation dose to which he has been subjected. The two traditional methods of measuring background radiation, ionisation chamber measurements and scintillation counting, are looked at and the prospect of using thermoluminescent dosimetry is considered

  15. Effects of background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, E.G.; Stewart, A.M.; Gilman, E.A.; Kneale, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to measure the relationship between exposure to different levels of background gamma radiation in different parts of the country, and different Relative Risks for leukaemias and cancers in children. The investigation is linked to an earlier analysis of the effects of prenatal medical x-rays upon leukaemia and cancer risk; the prior hypothesis on which the background-study was based, is derived from the earlier results. In a third analysis, the authors attempted to measure varying potency of medical x-rays delivered at different stages of gestation and the results supply a link between the other two estimates. (author)

  16. The cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent limits on spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are reviewed. The various backgrounds are described, and the theoretical implications are assessed. Constraints on inflationary cosmology dominated by cold dark matter (CDM) and on open cosmological models dominated by baryonic dark matter (BDM), with, respectively, primordial random phase scale-invariant curvature fluctuations or non-gaussian isocurvature fluctuations are described. More exotic theories are addressed, and I conclude with the 'bottom line': what theories expect experimentalists to be measuring within the next two to three years without having to abandon their most cherished theorists. (orig.)

  17. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  18. Thermal background noise limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  19. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects

  20. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Aled

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a brief review of current theory and observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB. New predictions for cosmological defect theories and an overview of the inflationary theory are discussed. Recent results from various observations of the anisotropies of the microwave background are described and a summary of the proposed experiments is presented. A new analysis technique based on Bayesian statistics that can be used to reconstruct the underlying sky fluctuations is summarised. Current CMB data is used to set some preliminary constraints on the values of fundamental cosmological parameters $Omega$ and $H_circ$ using the maximum likelihood technique. In addition, secondary anisotropies due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are described.

  1. Clinical considerations for regenerative endodontic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Todd M

    2012-07-01

    The management of a tooth with incomplete root maturation and a necrotic pulp is an endodontic and a restorative challenge. Apexification procedures alone leave the tooth in a weakened state and at risk for reinfection. Regenerative endodontic procedures potentially offer advantages, including the possibility of hard tissue deposition and continued root development. Case studies have reported regeneration of human pulplike tissues in vivo, but there is no protocol that reliably regenerates pulplike tissue. This article summarizes historical, current, and future regenerative treatment approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Vitreoretinal outpatient surgery: clinical and financial considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creuzot-Garcher, C; Aubé, H; Candé, F; Dupont, G; Guillaubey, A; Malvitte, L; Arnavielle, S; Bron, A

    2008-11-01

    Vitreoretinal surgery has benefited from great advances opening the opportunity for outpatient management. We report on the 6-month experience of outpatient surgery for vitreoretinal diseases. From November 2007 to April 2008, 270 patients benefited from a vitreoretinal surgery, with 173 retinal detachments, 63 epiretinal membranes, and 34 other procedures. Only 8.5% (n=23) of the patients had to stay at the hospital one or two nights. The main reasons were the distance from the hospital and surgery on a single-eye patient. The questionnaire given after the surgery showed that almost all the patients were satisfied with the outpatient setting. In contrast, the financial results showed a loss of income of around 400,000 euros due to the low level of payment of outpatient surgery in France by the national health insurance system. Vitreoretinal surgery can be achieved in outpatient surgery with an improvement in the information given to the patients and the overall organization of the hospitalization. However, the current income provided with vitreoretinal outpatient surgery is highly disadvantageous in France, preventing this method from being generalized.

  3. Safety considerations in the clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Jong, R.

    1985-01-01

    Safe, everyday use of /sup 195m/Hg→/sup 195m/Au generators requires strict adherence to a handling protocol to ensure a minimal radiation risk to the patient. This protocol involves preparatory washings of the generator, as well as frequent washings between patient administrations. The design of the generator makes massive breakthrough of parent isotope extremely improbable. Because the possibility of quality control on individual administered doses is not feasible, a check on parent-isotope leakage must be performed very regularly

  4. Family Background and Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, Matthew J.; Sol, Joeri; Van Praag, Mirjam

    Vast amounts of money are currently being spent on policies aimed at promoting entrepreneurship. The success of such policies, however, rests in part on the assumption that individuals are not ‘born entrepreneurs’. In this paper, we assess the importance of family background and neighborhood...... effects as determinants of entrepreneurship. We start by estimating sibling correlations in entrepreneurship. We find that between 20 and 50 percent of the variance in different entrepreneurial outcomes is explained by factors that siblings share. The average is 28 percent. Allowing for differential...... entrepreneurship does play a large role, as do shared genes....

  5. Malaysia; Background Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1996-01-01

    This Background Paper on Malaysia examines developments and trends in the labor market since the mid-1980s. The paper describes the changes in the employment structure and the labor force. It reviews wages and productivity trends and their effects on unit labor cost. The paper highlights that Malaysia’s rapid growth, sustained since 1987, has had a major impact on the labor market. The paper outlines the major policy measures to address the labor constraints. It also analyzes Malaysia’s recen...

  6. Background simulation for the GENIUS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponkratenko, O.A.; Tretyak, V.I.; Zdesenko, Yu.G.

    1999-01-01

    The background simulations for the GENIUS experiment were performed with the help of GEANT 3.21 package and event generator DECAY 4.Contributions from the cosmogenic activity produced in the Ge detectors and from its radioactive impurities as well as from contamination of the liquid nitrogen and other materials were calculated.External gamma and neutron background were taking into consideration also.The results of calculations evidently show feasibility of the GENIUS project,which can substantially promote development of modern astroparticle physics

  7. Backgrounded but not peripheral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmark, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    .e. the schema enters into apparently contradictory constructions of the informants’ local home-base and, possibly, of their identity (cf. Hovmark, 2010). Second, I discuss the status and role of the specific linguistic category in question, i.e. the directional adverbs. On the one hand we claim that the DDAs......In this paper I pay a closer look at the use of the CENTRE-PERIPHERY schema in context. I address two specific issues: first, I show how the CENTRE-PERIPHERY schema, encoded in the DDAs, enters into discourses that conceptualize and characterize a local community as both CENTRE and PERIPHERY, i......; furthermore, the DDAs are backgrounded in discourse. Is it reasonable to claim, rather boldly, that “the informants express their identity in the use of the directional adverb ud ‘out’ etc.”? In the course of this article, however, I suggest that the DDAs in question do contribute to the socio...

  8. OCRWM Backgrounder, January 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) assigns to the US Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing a system to safely and economically transport spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from various storage sites to geologic repositories or other facilities that constitute elements of the waste management program. This transportation system will evolve from technologies and capabilities already developed. Shipments of spent fuel to a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility could begin as early as 1996 if Congress authorizes its construction. Shipments of spent fuel to a geologic repository are scheduled to begin in 1998. The backgrounder provides an overview of DOE's cask development program. Transportation casks are a major element in the DOE nuclear waste transportation system because they are the primary protection against any potential radiation exposure to the public and transportation workers in the event an accident occurs

  9. Monitored background radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruel, C.

    1988-01-01

    A monitored background radiometer is described comprising: a thermally conductive housing; low conductivity support means mounted on the housing; a sensing plate mounted on the low conductivity support means and spaced from the housing so as to be thermally insulated from the housing and having an outwardly facing first surface; the sensing plate being disposed relative to the housing to receive direct electromagnetic radiation from sources exterior to the radiometer upon the first surface only; means for controllably heating the sensing plate; first temperature sensitive means to measure the temperature of the housing; and second temperature sensitive means to measure the temperature of the sensing plate, so that the heat flux at the sensing plate may be determined from the temperatures of the housing and sensing plate after calibration of the radiometer by measuring the temperatures of the housing and sensing plate while controllably heating the sensing plate

  10. Background dose subtraction in personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picazo, T.; Llorca, N.; Alabau, J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed to consider the mode of the frequency distribution of the low dose dosemeters from each clinic that uses X rays as the background environmental dose that should be subtracted from the personnel dosimetry to evaluate the doses due to practice. The problems and advantages of this indirect method to estimate the environmental background dose are discussed. The results for 60 towns are presented. (author)

  11. Low background infrared (LBIR) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Low background infrared (LBIR) facility was originally designed to calibrate user supplied blackbody sources and to characterize low-background IR detectors and...

  12. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site

  13. Note on bouncing backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haro, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2018-05-01

    The theory of inflation is one of the fundamental and revolutionary developments of modern cosmology that became able to explain many issues of the early Universe in the context of the standard cosmological model (SCM). However, the initial singularity of the Universe, where physics is indefinite, is still obscure in the combined SCM +inflation scenario. An alternative to SCM +inflation without the initial singularity is thus always welcome, and bouncing cosmology is an attempt at that. The current work is thus motivated to investigate the bouncing solutions in modified gravity theories when the background universe is described by the spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry. We show that the simplest way to obtain the bouncing cosmologies in such spacetime is to consider some kind of Lagrangian whose gravitational sector depends only on the square of the Hubble parameter of the FLRW universe. For these modified Lagrangians, the corresponding Friedmann equation, a constraint in the dynamics of the Universe, depicts a curve in the phase space (H ,ρ ), where H is the Hubble parameter and ρ is the energy density of the Universe. As a consequence, a bouncing cosmology is obtained when this curve is closed and crosses the axis H =0 at least twice, and whose simplest particular example is the ellipse depicting the well-known holonomy corrected Friedmann equation in loop quantum cosmology (LQC). Sometimes, a crucial point in such theories is the appearance of the Ostrogradski instability at the perturbative level; however, fortunately enough, in the present work, as long as the linear level of perturbations is concerned, this instability does not appear, although it may appear at the higher order of perturbations.

  14. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline

  15. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline.

  16. Axis I diagnoses and transition to psychosis in clinical high-risk patients EPOS project: Prospective follow-up of 245 clinical high-risk outpatients in four countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salokangas, Raimo K. R.; Ruhrmann, Stephan; von Reventlow, Heinrich Graf; Heinimaa, Markus; Svirskis, Tanja; From, Tiina; Luutonen, Sinikka; Juckel, Georg; Linszen, Don; Dingemans, Peter; Birchwood, Max; Patterson, Paul; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Picke, Heinz; Neumann, Meike; Brockhaus-Dumke, Anke; Pukrop, Ralf; Huttunen, Jukka; Laine, Tiina; Ilonen, Tuula; Ristkari, Terja; Hietala, Jarmo; Becker, Hiske; Nieman, Dorien; Skeate, Amanda; Gudlowski, Yehonala; Ozgürdal, Seza; Witthaus, Henning; French, Paul; Stevens, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Background: In selected samples, a considerable number of patients at clinical high risk of psychosis (CHR) are found to meet criteria for co-morbid clinical psychiatric disorders. It is not known how clinical diagnoses correspond to or even predict transitions to psychosis (TTP). Our aim was to

  17. Responsible innovation in human germline gene editing: Background document to the recommendations of ESHG and ESHRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wert, Guido; Heindryckx, Björn; Pennings, Guido; Clarke, Angus; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula; van El, Carla G; Forzano, Francesca; Goddijn, Mariëtte; Howard, Heidi C; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Dondorp, Wybo; Tarlatzis, Basil C; Cornel, Martina C

    2018-04-01

    Technological developments in gene editing raise high expectations for clinical applications, including editing of the germline. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) together developed a Background document and Recommendations to inform and stimulate ongoing societal debates. This document provides the background to the Recommendations. Germline gene editing is currently not allowed in many countries. This makes clinical applications in these countries impossible now, even if germline gene editing would become safe and effective. What were the arguments behind this legislation, and are they still convincing? If a technique could help to avoid serious genetic disorders, in a safe and effective way, would this be a reason to reconsider earlier standpoints? This Background document summarizes the scientific developments and expectations regarding germline gene editing, legal regulations at the European level, and ethics for three different settings (basic research, preclinical research and clinical applications). In ethical terms, we argue that the deontological objections (e.g., gene editing goes against nature) do not seem convincing while consequentialist objections (e.g., safety for the children thus conceived and following generations) require research, not all of which is allowed in the current legal situation in European countries. Development of this Background document and Recommendations reflects the responsibility to help society understand and debate the full range of possible implications of the new technologies, and to contribute to regulations that are adapted to the dynamics of the field while taking account of ethical considerations and societal concerns.

  18. Scientific background of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christofidis, I.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of the proposed project is the development of radioimmunometric assay(s) for the determination of free and total PSA in serum samples from normal and pathological individuals (BPH, PCa). This will be achieved by: A. Selection of appropriate antibody pairs (capture and labelled antibody) for determination of total PSA (free and complex) and for determination of free PSA. From bibliography we have already spotted some antibody pairs. B. Radiolabelling of antibodies. Several labelling and purification procedures will be followed in order to obtain the required analytical sensitivity and dynamic range of the assays. Special attention will be given to the affinity constant as well as to the stability of the radiolabelled molecules. C. Development of protocols for immobilisation of capture antibodies. We will use several solid support formats (plastic tubes, beads and magnetizable particles). Direct adsorption or covalent binding will be used. Immunoadsorption through immobilised second antibody will be also tested in order to decrease the preparation cost of the solid phase reagents. D. Preparation of standards of suitable purity levels. We will test different PSA-free matrices (Bovine serum, buffer solutions etc.) in order to select the most appropriate among them in terms of low background determination and low reagents cost. E. Optimisation of the immunoassays conditions for the free PSA and total PSA (e.g. assay buffers, incubation time, temperature, one or two step procedure, washings). F. Optimisation and standardisation of assay protocols for kit production. G. Production of kits for distribution in clinical laboratories in Greece for comparison with commercial kits. H. Evaluation of the developed assays in real clinical conditions using well characterised human serum samples. This will be performed in co-operation with the Hellenic Society for Tumor Markers, and other anticancer institutions and hospital clinicians of long standing relation

  19. Background noise levels in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Gjestland, Truls

    2008-01-01

    - This report gives a brief overview of typical background noise levels in Europe, and suggests a procedure for the prediction of background noise levels based on population density. A proposal for the production of background noise maps for Europe is included.

  20. Backgrounder

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Center for Mountain Ecosystem Studies, Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, China: $1,526,000 to inform effective water governance in the Asian highlands of China, Nepal, and Pakistan. • Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment (ATREE), India: $1,499,300 for research on ...

  1. BACKGROUNDER

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    demographic trends, socio-economic development pathways, and strong ... knowledge and experience, and encourage innovation. ... choices, and will work with stakeholders in government, business, civil society, and regional economic.

  2. Backgrounder

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    Safe and Inclusive Cities: ... improving urban environments and public spaces might have on reducing the city's high ... violence against women among urban youth of working class neighbourhoods of Islamabad, Rawalpindi, and Karachi,.

  3. BACKGROUNDER

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    CARIAA's research agenda addresses gaps and priorities highlighted in the ... Research focuses on climate risk, institutional and regulatory frameworks, markets, and ... The researchers will identify relevant drivers and trends and use develop ...

  4. BACKGROUNDER

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    achieving long‐term food security in Africa, with a focus on post‐harvest loss, ... nutrion and health, and the socio‐economic factors that affect food supply ... Water use. Agricultural producvity in sub‐Saharan Africa is the lowest in the world.

  5. Lyme Disease: Emergency Department Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegren, Nathan D; Kraus, Chadd K

    2017-06-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is the most common vector-borne illness in North America. Reported cases of LD have increased from approximately 10,000 cases annually in 1991 to >25,000 cases in 2014. Greater recognition, enhanced surveillance, and public education have contributed to the increased prevalence, as have geographic expansion and the number of infected ticks. Cases are reported primarily in the Northeastern United States, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, with children having the highest incidence of LD among all age groups. The increased incidence and prevalence of LD in the United States makes it increasingly more common for patients to present to the emergency department (ED) for tick bites and LD-related chief complaints, such as the characteristic erythema migrans skin manifestation. We sought to review the etiology of LD, describe its clinical presentations and sequela, and provide a practical classification and approach to ED management of patients with LD-related presentations. In this review, ED considerations for LD are presented and clinical presentations and management of the disease at different stages is discussed. Delayed sequelae that have significant morbidity, including Lyme carditis and Lyme neuroborreliosis, are discussed. Diagnostic tests and management are described in detail. The increasing prevalence and growing geographic reach of Lyme disease makes it critically important for emergency physicians to consider the diagnosis in patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of LD and to initiate appropriate treatment to minimize the potential of delayed sequelae. Special consideration should be made for the epidemiology of LD and a high clinical suspicion should be present for patients in endemic areas or with known exposures to ticks. Emergency physicians can play a critical role in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of LD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Some of the structural and functional features of the autonomic nervous system and diagnosis in clinical practice in the treatment and rehabilitation of patients from diverse backgrounds with vegetative violations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Samosyuk

    2015-03-01

    educational-methodical manual "some structural and functional features of the autonomic nervous system and their Diagnostics in clinical and resort practice in the treatment and rehabilitation of patients from diverse backgrounds with vegetative violations" are known and new data on the operation of the autonomic nervous system. In particular, describes the effect of the left and right hemispheres of the brain, function of the insula sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system. The manual briefly describes the enteric nervous system, with its powerful vegetative-trophic and immuno-corrective function. An important place in the manual is the modern samples and tests to determine the functional of the autonomic nervous system, which together with the study of variational pulsometry parameters may serve as an objective criterion of the autonomic nervous system. The manual also provides autonomic disorders in different parts of the autonomic nervous system. Manual is intended for a wide range of doctors-clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with neurological and therapeutic profile, etc.

  7. Entrepreneurship: Some Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Martinho

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work it is presented some considerations about entrepreneurship. Most of these questions are linked with Portuguese context. Portugal has some particularities, namely because the asymmetries between the littoral and the interior. This situation carried out some problems that complicate and prevent the appearance of new innovated business. In a situation of crisis like that we have today this context can become a really problem to solve some questions.

  8. Fusion facility siting considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussell, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. A critically important consideration in this regard is site selection. The purpose of this paper is to examine major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion

  9. Uncertain Portfolio Selection with Background Risk and Liquidity Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses an uncertain portfolio selection problem with consideration of background risk and asset liquidity. In addition, the transaction costs are also considered. The security returns, background asset return, and asset liquidity are estimated by experienced experts instead of historical data. Regarding them as uncertain variables, a mean-risk model with background risk, liquidity, and transaction costs is proposed for portfolio selection and the crisp forms of the model are provided when security returns obey different uncertainty distributions. Moreover, for better understanding of the impact of background risk and liquidity on portfolio selection, some important theorems are proved. Finally, numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the modeling idea.

  10. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  11. Background current of radioisotope manometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vydrik, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The technique for calculating the main component of the background current of radioisotopic monometers, current from direct collision of ionizing particles and a collector, is described. The reasons for appearance of background photoelectron current are clarified. The most effective way of eliminating background current components is collector protection from the source by a screen made of material with a high gamma-quanta absorption coefficient, such as lead, for example

  12. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water reflected (i.e., surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established. When evaluating arrays, it has become more common for analysts to use calculations to demonstrate the safety of the array configuration. In performing these calculations, the analyst has considerable freedom concerning the assumptions made for modeling the reflection of the array. Considerations are given for the physical layout of the array with little or no discussion (or demonstration) of what conditions are bounded by the assumed reflection conditions. For example, an array may be generically evaluated by placing it in a corner of a room in which the opposing walls are far away. Typically, it is believed that complete flooding of the room is incredible, so the array is evaluated for various levels of water mist interspersed among array containers. This paper discusses some assumptions that are made regarding storage array reflection

  13. Background subtraction theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Elgammal, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Background subtraction is a widely used concept for detection of moving objects in videos. In the last two decades there has been a lot of development in designing algorithms for background subtraction, as well as wide use of these algorithms in various important applications, such as visual surveillance, sports video analysis, motion capture, etc. Various statistical approaches have been proposed to model scene backgrounds. The concept of background subtraction also has been extended to detect objects from videos captured from moving cameras. This book reviews the concept and practice of back

  14. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The determination of soil background is one of the most important activities supporting environmental restoration and waste management on the Hanford Site. Background compositions serve as the basis for identifying soil contamination, and also as a baseline in risk assessment processes used to determine soil cleanup and treatment levels. These uses of soil background require an understanding of the extent to which analytes of concern occur naturally in the soils. This report documents the results of sampling and analysis activities designed to characterize the composition of soil background at the Hanford Site, and to evaluate the feasibility for use as Sitewide background. The compositions of naturally occurring soils in the vadose Zone have been-determined for-nonradioactive inorganic and organic analytes and related physical properties. These results confirm that a Sitewide approach to the characterization of soil background is technically sound and is a viable alternative to the determination and use of numerous local or area backgrounds that yield inconsistent definitions of contamination. Sitewide soil background consists of several types of data and is appropriate for use in identifying contamination in all soils in the vadose zone on the Hanford Site. The natural concentrations of nearly every inorganic analyte extend to levels that exceed calculated health-based cleanup limits. The levels of most inorganic analytes, however, are well below these health-based limits. The highest measured background concentrations occur in three volumetrically minor soil types, the most important of which are topsoils adjacent to the Columbia River that are rich in organic carbon. No organic analyte levels above detection were found in any of the soil samples

  15. Backgrounds and characteristics of arsonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labree, W.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Marle, H.J.C. van; Rassin, E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more insight in the backgrounds and characteristics of arsonists. For this, the psychiatric, psychological, personal, and criminal backgrounds of all arsonists (n = 25), sentenced to forced treatment in the maximum security forensic hospital “De Kijvelanden”, were

  16. Measurement of natural background neutron

    CERN Document Server

    Li Jain, Ping; Tang Jin Hua; Tang, E S; Xie Yan Fong

    1982-01-01

    A high sensitive neutron monitor is described. It has an approximate counting rate of 20 cpm for natural background neutrons. The pulse amplitude resolution, sensitivity and direction dependence of the monitor were determined. This monitor has been used for natural background measurement in Beijing area. The yearly average dose is given and compared with the results of KEK and CERN.

  17. Part 8. Deployment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, K.D.; Chang, Y.I.; Daly, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report addresses considerations of fast breeder reactor development and deployment from a national perspective. Nations vary greatly in their expertise and interest relative to nuclear power, and hence a single set of steps to be taken by a nation in decision-making on breeder development and deployment cannot be presented. The approach taken in this report is to present discussions on key factors influencing the breeder development and deployment decisions, especially in non-breeder nations, by drawing upon historical perspectives of the Light Water Reactor for comparison

  18. Geophysical considerations of geothermics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, M

    1967-01-01

    The development and utilization of geothermal energy is described from the standpoint of geophysics. The internal temperature of the Earth and the history and composition of magmas are described. Methods of exploration such as gravity, magnetic, thermal and electrical surveys are discussed, as are geochemical and infrared photogrammetric techniques. Examples are provided of how these techniques have been used in Italy and at the Matsukawa geothermal field in Japan. Drilling considerations such as muds, casings and cementing materials are discussed. Solutions are proposed for problems of environmental pollution and plant expansion.

  19. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water-reflected (i.e. surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established

  20. Aluminum as a source of background in low background experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majorovits, B., E-mail: bela@mppmu.mpg.de [MPI fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [MPI fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Laubenstein, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, S.S.17/bis, km 18 plus 910, I-67100 Assergi (Italy); Volynets, O. [MPI fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)

    2011-08-11

    Neutrinoless double beta decay would be a key to understanding the nature of neutrino masses. The next generation of High Purity Germanium experiments will have to be operated with a background rate of better than 10{sup -5} counts/(kg y keV) in the region of interest around the Q-value of the decay. Therefore, so far irrelevant sources of background have to be considered. The metalization of the surface of germanium detectors is in general done with aluminum. The background from the decays of {sup 22}Na, {sup 26}Al, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Th introduced by this metalization is discussed. It is shown that only a special selection of aluminum can keep these background contributions acceptable.

  1. JEM-X background models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huovelin, J.; Maisala, S.; Schultz, J.

    2003-01-01

    Background and determination of its components for the JEM-X X-ray telescope on INTEGRAL are discussed. A part of the first background observations by JEM-X are analysed and results are compared to predictions. The observations are based on extensive imaging of background near the Crab Nebula...... on revolution 41 of INTEGRAL. Total observing time used for the analysis was 216 502 s, with the average of 25 cps of background for each of the two JEM-X telescopes. JEM-X1 showed slightly higher average background intensity than JEM-X2. The detectors were stable during the long exposures, and weak orbital...... background was enhanced in the central area of a detector, and it decreased radially towards the edge, with a clear vignetting effect for both JEM-X units. The instrument background was weakest in the central area of a detector and showed a steep increase at the very edges of both JEM-X detectors...

  2. Writing about Clients: Ethical Considerations and Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Len; Pies, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Today, the decision to prepare clinical case material for publication is a decision that cannot be taken lightly. The decision involves reviewing ethical considerations and choosing among various options to safeguard client privacy. Such options include seeking the client's permission, disguising case material, and developing composite case…

  3. Effect of background music on auditory-verbal memory performance

    OpenAIRE

    Sona Matloubi; Ali Mohammadzadeh; Zahra Jafari; Alireza Akbarzade Baghban

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Music exists in all cultures; many scientists are seeking to understand how music effects cognitive development such as comprehension, memory, and reading skills. More recently, a considerable number of neuroscience studies on music have been developed. This study aimed to investigate the effects of null and positive background music in comparison with silence on auditory-verbal memory performance.Methods: Forty young adults (male and female) with normal hearing, aged betw...

  4. Stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggiore, M.

    2001-01-01

    We review the motivations for the search for stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves and we compare the experimental sensitivities that can be reached in the near future with the existing bounds and with the theoretical predictions. (author)

  5. Berkeley Low Background Counting Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Sensitive low background assay detectors and sample analysis are available for non-destructive direct gamma-ray assay of samples. Neutron activation analysis is also...

  6. Spectral characterization of natural backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Max

    2017-10-01

    As the distribution and use of hyperspectral sensors is constantly increasing, the exploitation of spectral features is a threat for camouflaged objects. To improve camouflage materials at first the spectral behavior of backgrounds has to be known to adjust and optimize the spectral reflectance of camouflage materials. In an international effort, the NATO CSO working group SCI-295 "Development of Methods for Measurements and Evaluation of Natural Background EO Signatures" is developing a method how this characterization of backgrounds has to be done. It is obvious that the spectral characterization of a background will be quite an effort. To compare and exchange data internationally the measurements will have to be done in a similar way. To test and further improve this method an international field trial has been performed in Storkow, Germany. In the following we present first impressions and lessons learned from this field campaign and describe the data that has been measured.

  7. Cosmic microwave background, where next?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based, balloon-borne and space-based experiments will observe the Cosmic Microwave Background in greater details to address open questions about the origin and the evolution of the Universe. In particular, detailed observations the polarization pattern of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation have the potential to directly probe physics at the GUT scale and illuminate aspects of the physics of the very early Universe.

  8. Looking for Cosmic Neutrino Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki eYanagisawa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of neutrino oscillation in atmospheric neutrinos by the Super-Kamiokande experiment in 1998, study of neutrinos has been one of exciting fields in high-energy physics. All the mixing angles were measured. Quests for 1 measurements of the remaining parameters, the lightest neutrino mass, the CP violating phase(s, and the sign of mass splitting between the mass eigenstates m3 and m1, and 2 better measurements to determine whether the mixing angle theta23 is less than pi/4, are in progress in a well-controlled manner. Determining the nature of neutrinos, whether they are Dirac or Majorana particles is also in progress with continuous improvement. On the other hand, although the ideas of detecting cosmic neutrino background have been discussed since 1960s, there has not been a serious concerted effort to achieve this goal. One of the reasons is that it is extremely difficult to detect such low energy neutrinos from the Big Bang. While there has been tremendous accumulation of information on Cosmic Microwave Background since its discovery in 1965, there is no direct evidence for Cosmic Neutrino Background. The importance of detecting Cosmic Neutrino Background is that, although detailed studies of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and Cosmic Microwave Background give information of the early Universe at ~a few minutes old and ~300 k years old, respectively, observation of Cosmic Neutrino Background allows us to study the early Universe at $sim$ 1 sec old. This article reviews progress made in the past 50 years on detection methods of Cosmic Neutrino Background.

  9. Environmental considerations and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Methods used to control the radiological impact of the nuclear fuel cycle are described. This control is exercised through the application of a series of federal laws and regulations that are used as the basis for licensing nuclear facilities. The control is exercised more directly by the use of radwaste treatment equipment at the nuclear facilities to limit the release of radioactive materials. Federal laws and regulations are summarized and their applications in licensing actions are discussed. Radiological doses from materials released from licensed facilities are compared with doses from natural background. A series of cost/benefit engineering surveys are being made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radwaste systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from model fuel cycle facilities and to determine the benefits in terms of reduction in dose commitment to individuals and populations in surrounding areas

  10. Biomarkers of PTSD: military applications and considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Lehrner; Rachel Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although there are no established biomarkers for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as yet, biological investigations of PTSD have made progress identifying the pathophysiology of PTSD. Given the biological and clinical complexity of PTSD, it is increasingly unlikely that a single biomarker of disease will be identified. Rather, investigations will more likely identify different biomarkers that indicate the presence of clinically significant PTSD symptoms, associate with risk fo...

  11. A review of clinical guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines are increasingly used in patient management but few clinicians are familiar with their origin or appropriate application. METHODS: A Medline search using the terms \\'clinical guidelines\\' and \\'practice guidelines\\' was conducted. Additional references were sourced by manual searching from the bibliographies of articles located. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Clinical guidelines originated in the USA in the early 1980s, initially as a cost containment exercise. Significant improvements in the process and outcomes of care have been demonstrated following their introduction, although the extent of improvement varies considerably. The principles for the development of guidelines are well established but many published guidelines fall short of these basic quality criteria. Guidelines are only one aspect of improving quality and should be used within a wider framework of promoting clinical effectiveness. Understanding their limitations as well as their potential benefits should enable clinicians to have a clearer view of their place in everyday practice.

  12. Epigenetic considerations in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenzie R. Gavery

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics has attracted considerable attention with respect to its potential value in many areas of agricultural production, particularly under conditions where the environment can be manipulated or natural variation exists. Here we introduce key concepts and definitions of epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNA, review the current understanding of epigenetics in both fish and shellfish, and propose key areas of aquaculture where epigenetics could be applied. The first key area is environmental manipulation, where the intention is to induce an ‘epigenetic memory’ either within or between generations to produce a desired phenotype. The second key area is epigenetic selection, which, alone or combined with genetic selection, may increase the reliability of producing animals with desired phenotypes. Based on aspects of life history and husbandry practices in aquaculture species, the application of epigenetic knowledge could significantly affect the productivity and sustainability of aquaculture practices. Conversely, clarifying the role of epigenetic mechanisms in aquaculture species may upend traditional assumptions about selection practices. Ultimately, there are still many unanswered questions regarding how epigenetic mechanisms might be leveraged in aquaculture.

  13. Pneumonia in patients on the background of blood cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertseva T.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Problematic issues of etiologic diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia are being studied actively. At the same time specific features of pneumonia in patients with severe immune defects, against blood cancer including are studied insufficiently. By the result of microbiological examinations of 149 patients with pneumonia on the background of blood cancer, who have undergone treatment in hematological center of CE “Dnipropetrovsk local multi-field clinical hospital №4” in 2010-2012, bacterial causative agents were determined in 59,7% of accidents, among which gram-negative microorganisms made up 69,7%, gram-positive – 30,3%. In 63% of accidents the asso¬ciations of causative agents were determined: the combination of fungal flora made up 58, 4% bacterial associations – 25, 8%. Invasive methods of research have demonstrated a considerably bigger informativeness in determination of possible etiological diagnosis of pneumonia. In determination of causative agent in fluid of brochoalveolar lavage the part of positive results made up 77,4% against 30,3% in examination of sputum.

  14. Neutron background estimates in GESA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The SIMPLE project looks for nuclear recoil events generated by rare dark matter scattering interactions. Nuclear recoils are also produced by more prevalent cosmogenic neutron interactions. While the rock overburden shields against (μ,n neutrons to below 10−8 cm−2 s−1, it itself contributes via radio-impurities. Additional shielding of these is similar, both suppressing and contributing neutrons. We report on the Monte Carlo (MCNP estimation of the on-detector neutron backgrounds for the SIMPLE experiment located in the GESA facility of the Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit, and its use in defining additional shielding for measurements which have led to a reduction in the extrinsic neutron background to ∼ 5 × 10−3 evts/kgd. The calculated event rate induced by the neutron background is ∼ 0,3 evts/kgd, with a dominant contribution from the detector container.

  15. LOFT gamma densitometer background fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimesey, R.A.; McCracken, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    Background gamma-ray fluxes were calculated at the location of the γ densitometers without integral shielding at both the hot-leg and cold-leg primary piping locations. The principal sources for background radiation at the γ densitometers are 16 N activity from the primary piping H 2 O and γ radiation from reactor internal sources. The background radiation was calculated by the point-kernel codes QAD-BSA and QAD-P5A. Reasonable assumptions were required to convert the response functions calculated by point-kernel procedures into the gamma-ray spectrum from reactor internal sources. A brief summary of point-kernel equations and theory is included

  16. A definition of background independence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryb, Sean

    2010-01-01

    We propose a definition for background (in)/dependence in dynamical theories of the evolution of configurations that have a continuous symmetry and test this definition on particle models and on gravity. Our definition draws from Barbour's best matching framework developed for the purpose of implementing spatial and temporal relationalism. Among other interesting theories, general relativity can be derived within this framework in novel ways. We study the detailed canonical structure of a wide range of best matching theories and show that their actions must have a local gauge symmetry. When gauge theory is derived in this way, we obtain at the same time a conceptual framework for distinguishing between background-dependent and -independent theories. Gauge invariant observables satisfying Kuchar's criterion are identified and, in simple cases, explicitly computed. We propose a procedure for inserting a global background time into temporally relational theories. Interestingly, using this procedure in general relativity leads to unimodular gravity.

  17. Generative electronic background music system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurowski, Lukasz [Faculty of Computer Science, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Zolnierska Street 49, Szczecin, PL (Poland)

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  18. Background metric in supergravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneya, T.

    1978-01-01

    In supergravity theories, we investigate the conformal anomaly of the path-integral determinant and the problem of fermion zero modes in the presence of a nontrivial background metric. Except in SO(3) -invariant supergravity, there are nonvanishing conformal anomalies. As a consequence, amplitudes around the nontrivial background metric contain unpredictable arbitrariness. The fermion zero modes which are explicitly constructed for the Euclidean Schwarzschild metric are interpreted as an indication of the supersymmetric multiplet structure of a black hole. The degree of degeneracy of a black hole is 2/sup 4n/ in SO(n) supergravity

  19. Background music and cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Leslie A; Polzella, Donald J; Elvers, Greg C

    2010-06-01

    The present experiment employed standardized test batteries to assess the effects of fast-tempo music on cognitive performance among 56 male and female university students. A linguistic processing task and a spatial processing task were selected from the Criterion Task Set developed to assess verbal and nonverbal performance. Ten excerpts from Mozart's music matched for tempo were selected. Background music increased the speed of spatial processing and the accuracy of linguistic processing. The findings suggest that background music can have predictable effects on cognitive performance.

  20. Children of ethnic minority backgrounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv

    2010-01-01

    media products and toys just as they will have knowledge of different media texts, play genres, rhymes etc. This has consequences for their ability to access social settings, for instance in play. New research in this field will focus on how children themselves make sense of this balancing of cultures......Children of ethnic minority background balance their everyday life between a cultural background rooted in their ethnic origin and a daily life in day care, schools and with peers that is founded in a majority culture. This means, among other things, that they often will have access to different...

  1. Generative electronic background music system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions

  2. Status and low background considerations for the CRESST dark matter search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, M.; Zerle, L.; Proebst, F.; Rulofs, A.; Schanda, U.; Seidel, W.; Absmaier, C.; Booth, N.E.; Bucci, C.; Cooper, S.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Ferger, P.; Forster, G.; Gabutti, A.; Hoess, C.; Hoehne, J.; Igalson, J.; Kellner, E.; Koch, M.; Loidl, M.; Meier, O.; Nucciotti, A.; Nagel, U.; Putte, M.J.J. v.d.; Salmon, G.L.; Sisti, M.; Stodolsky, L.; Stolovich, A.

    1996-01-01

    We are preparing the CRESST experiment to search for dark matter WIMPs using cryogenic detectors with superconducting phase transition thermometers. In the first stage we plan to use four 250 g sapphire detectors with thresholds of 0.5 keV and resolutions of 0.2 keV at 1 keV. This will provide sensitivity to WIMP masses below 10 GeV, and is thus complementary to other dark matter searches. (orig.)

  3. Practical considerations on frenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldoveanu, Lucia; Badea, Florin Ciprian; Odor, Alin A.

    2014-01-01

    Besides surgically classical frenectomy, modern dentistry currently allows its approach by dental laser. Materials and Method: We proposed clinical observation of the results obtained by frenectomy with/without frenoplasty made by laser Er,Cr:YSGG 2780 nm. Results: The patients reported no pain, bleeding, swelling or major discomfort during the postoperative control of the following day. In terms of psycho-emotional reactions, both patients well behave well, the calm being given by no pain, bleeding, suture or edema. Discussions: The accuracy of this method, as well as the use of additional means of healing, allow satisfactory results both for patient and physician. Working parameters depend on the type of laser that is used, in our case Biolase Waterlase MD Turbo, regularly used in Toldimed Clinic in Constanta. Conclusions: Our study reveals that the possibilities regarding the surgical modeling of the lower lip frenulum are higher due to laser than the classical surgical approach. Moreover, a major role in the prevention of relapse by inappropriate healing is represented by the approach of frenectomy accompanied by frenuloplasty.

  4. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garza, J G; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.

    2014-01-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micr...

  5. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  6. Educational Choice. A Background Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality Education for Minorities Network, Washington, DC.

    This paper addresses school choice, one proposal to address parental involvement concerns, focusing on historical background, definitions, rationale for advocating choice, implementation strategies, and implications for minorities and low-income families. In the past, transfer payment programs such as tuition tax credits and vouchers were…

  7. Kerr metric in cosmological background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, P C [Gujarat Univ., Ahmedabad (India). Dept. of Mathematics

    1977-06-01

    A metric satisfying Einstein's equation is given which in the vicinity of the source reduces to the well-known Kerr metric and which at large distances reduces to the Robertson-Walker metric of a nomogeneous cosmological model. The radius of the event horizon of the Kerr black hole in the cosmological background is found out.

  8. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Garza, J.G.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J.F.; Christensen, F.E.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Decker, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; García, J.A.; Giomataris, I.; Hill, R.M.; Iguaz, F.J.; Irastorza, I.G.; Jakobsen, A.C.; Jourde, D.; Mirallas, H.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M.J.; Ruz, J.; Tomás, A.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J.K.

    2015-11-16

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10$^{-6}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10$^{-7}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as ...

  9. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; Battle, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Kawada, M.; Keating, B.; Lee, D.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) to search for signatures of first-light galaxy emission in the extragalactic background. The first generation of stars produce characteristic signatures in the near-infrared extragalactic background, including a redshifted Ly-cutoff feature and a characteristic fluctuation power spectrum, that may be detectable with a specialized instrument. CIBER consists of two wide-field cameras to measure the fluctuation power spectrum, and a low-resolution and a narrow-band spectrometer to measure the absolute background. The cameras will search for fluctuations on angular scales from 7 arcseconds to 2 degrees, where the first-light galaxy spatial power spectrum peaks. The cameras have the necessary combination of sensitivity, wide field of view, spatial resolution, and multiple bands to make a definitive measurement. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by Spitzer arise from first-light galaxies. The cameras observe in a single wide field of view, eliminating systematic errors associated with mosaicing. Two bands are chosen to maximize the first-light signal contrast, at 1.6 um near the expected spectral maximum, and at 1.0 um; the combination is a powerful discriminant against fluctuations arising from local sources. We will observe regions of the sky surveyed by Spitzer and Akari. The low-resolution spectrometer will search for the redshifted Lyman cutoff feature in the 0.7 - 1.8 um spectral region. The narrow-band spectrometer will measure the absolute Zodiacal brightness using the scattered 854.2 nm Ca II Fraunhofer line. The spectrometers will test if reports of a diffuse extragalactic background in the 1 - 2 um band continues into the optical, or is caused by an under estimation of the Zodiacal foreground. We report performance of the assembled and tested instrument as we prepare for a first sounding rocket flight in early 2009. CIBER is funded by the NASA/APRA sub-orbital program.

  10. Ultrasonic imaging: safety considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Haar, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Modern ultrasound imaging for diagnostic purposes has a wide range of applications. It is used in obstetrics to monitor the progress of pregnancy, in oncology to visualize tumours and their response to treatment, and, in cardiology, contrast-enhanced studies are used to investigate heart function and physiology. An increasing use of diagnostic ultrasound is to provide the first photograph for baby's album—in the form of a souvenir or keepsake scan that might be taken as part of a routine investigation, or during a visit to an independent high-street ‘boutique’. It is therefore important to ensure that any benefit accrued from these applications outweighs any accompanying risk, and to evaluate the existing ultrasound bio-effect and epidemiology literature with this in mind. This review considers the existing laboratory and epidemiological evidence about the safety of diagnostic ultrasound and puts it in the context of current clinical usage. PMID:22866238

  11. Ultrasonic imaging: safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Haar, Gail

    2011-08-06

    Modern ultrasound imaging for diagnostic purposes has a wide range of applications. It is used in obstetrics to monitor the progress of pregnancy, in oncology to visualize tumours and their response to treatment, and, in cardiology, contrast-enhanced studies are used to investigate heart function and physiology. An increasing use of diagnostic ultrasound is to provide the first photograph for baby's album-in the form of a souvenir or keepsake scan that might be taken as part of a routine investigation, or during a visit to an independent high-street 'boutique'. It is therefore important to ensure that any benefit accrued from these applications outweighs any accompanying risk, and to evaluate the existing ultrasound bio-effect and epidemiology literature with this in mind. This review considers the existing laboratory and epidemiological evidence about the safety of diagnostic ultrasound and puts it in the context of current clinical usage.

  12. Ethical considerations of therapeutic hypnosis and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzrodt, Christine M

    2013-04-01

    Historically, therapeutic hypnosis has been met with skepticism within some fields, although acceptance has expanded in recent decades. Development and application of ethical standards and principles has contributed to increased acceptance of hypnosis with children. The Ethics Code of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2002) and the Code of Conduct of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH, 2000) serve as guides to ethical considerations when treating children. From a developmental and practical perspective, children have limited decision-making capacities, therefore special attention should be paid to their rights and welfare. Important ethical considerations relevant to children and hypnosis have emerged, including competence, supervision, informed consent, confidentiality, and boundaries. Considerations are reviewed from a normal and abnormal child development perspective.

  13. Open bosonic string in background electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterenko, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The classical and quantum dynamics of an open string propagating in the D-dimensional space-time in the presence of a background electromagnetic field is investigated. An important point in this consideration is the use of the generalized light-like gauge. There are considered the strings of two types; the neutral strings with charges at their ends obeying the condition q 1 +q 2 =0 and the charged strings having a net charge q 1 +q 2 ≠ 0. The consistency of theory demands that the background electric field does not exceed its critical value. The distance between the mass levels of the neutral open string decreases (1-e 2 ) times in comparison with the free string, where e is the dimensionless strength of the electric field. The magnetic field does not affect this distance. It is shown that at a classical level the squared mass of the neutral open string has a tachyonic contribution due to the motion of the string as a whole in transverse directions. The tachyonic term disappears if one considers, instead of M 2 , the string energy in a special reference frame where the projection of the total canonical momentum of the string onto the electric field vanishes. The contributions due to zero point fluctuations to the energy spectrum of the neutral string and to the Virasoro operators in the theory of charged string are found

  14. Insights into the background of autonomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjo, Sérgio; Geraldes, Vera; Oliveira, Mário; Rocha, Isabel

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the physiology underlying the autonomic nervous system is pivotal for understanding autonomic dysfunction in clinical practice. Autonomic dysfunction may result from primary modifications of the autonomic nervous system or be secondary to a wide range of diseases that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Together with a detailed history and physical examination, laboratory assessment of autonomic function is essential for the analysis of various clinical conditions and the establishment of effective, personalized and precise therapeutic schemes. This review summarizes the main aspects of autonomic medicine that constitute the background of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [The psychosocial background of sterile patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusch, H H; Urdl, W; Walcher, W

    1989-01-01

    The psychosocial background of 300 childless couples from the Infertility Clinic of the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Graz, was evaluated by means of a questionnaire and statistical analysis of data from their files. Points of special interest were problems such as interactions of the couple, motivations for the desire of children, psychosomatics, andrological investigation within the gynecological department, sexual habits and motivation and compliance concerning investigations and treatment. 72% of the questionnaires were returned. 50% of the sterile couples preferred to attend the infertility clinic together. 26% felt restrictions in their sexual behaviour due to the unrealized desire of children, 48% expected improvements in their partnership if they could have children. Compliance of male partners concerning the regular intake of prescribed medicaments was 83%, 63% accepted to stop smoking in cases of pathospermia.

  16. Hypochondriasis: considerations for ICD-11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile A. van den Heuvel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO is currently revisiting the ICD. In the 10th version of the ICD, approved in 1990, hypochondriacal symptoms are described in the context of both the primary condition hypochondriacal disorder and as secondary symptoms within a range of other mental disorders. Expansion of the research base since 1990 makes a critical evaluation and revision of both the definition and classification of hypochondriacal disorder timely. This article addresses the considerations reviewed by members of the WHO ICD-11 Working Group on the Classification of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders in their proposal for the description and classification of hypochondriasis. The proposed revision emphasizes the phenomenological overlap with both anxiety disorders (e.g., fear, hypervigilance to bodily symptoms, and avoidance and obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (e.g., preoccupation and repetitive behaviors and the distinction from the somatoform disorders (presence of somatic symptom is not a critical characteristic. This revision aims to improve clinical utility by enabling better recognition and treatment of patients with hypochondriasis within the broad range of global health care settings.

  17. Background radioactivity in environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, P.R.; O'Hara, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a literature search to identify information on concentrations of 'background' radioactivity in foodstuffs and other commonly available environmental materials. The review has concentrated on naturally occurring radioactivity in foods and on UK data, although results from other countries have also been considered where appropriate. The data are compared with established definitions of a 'radioactive' substance and radionuclides which do not appear to be adequately covered in the literature are noted. (author)

  18. Background paper on aquaculture research

    OpenAIRE

    Wenblad, Axel; Jokumsen, Alfred; Eskelinen, Unto; Torrissen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Board of MISTRA established in 2012 a Working Group (WG) on Aquaculture to provide the Board with background information for its upcoming decision on whether the foundation should invest in aquaculture research. The WG included Senior Advisor Axel Wenblad, Sweden (Chairman), Professor Ole Torrissen, Norway, Senior Advisory Scientist Unto Eskelinen, Finland and Senior Advisory Scientist Alfred Jokumsen, Denmark. The WG performed an investigation of the Swedish aquaculture sector including ...

  19. The isotropic radio background revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Università di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I–10125 Torino (Italy); Lineros, Roberto A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular – CSIC/U. Valencia, Parc Científic, calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, E-46980 Paterna (Spain); Taoso, Marco, E-mail: fornengo@to.infn.it, E-mail: rlineros@ific.uv.es, E-mail: regis@to.infn.it, E-mail: taoso@cea.fr [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cédex (France)

    2014-04-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission is reasonable, extragalactic sources well below the current experimental threshold seem to account for the majority of the brightness of the extragalactic radio sky.

  20. The isotropic radio background revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Lineros, Roberto A.; Taoso, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission is reasonable, extragalactic sources well below the current experimental threshold seem to account for the majority of the brightness of the extragalactic radio sky

  1. Backgrounds and characteristics of arsonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labree, Wim; Nijman, Henk; van Marle, Hjalmar; Rassin, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more insight in the backgrounds and characteristics of arsonists. For this, the psychiatric, psychological, personal, and criminal backgrounds of all arsonists (n=25), sentenced to forced treatment in the maximum security forensic hospital "De Kijvelanden", were compared to the characteristics of a control group of patients (n=50), incarcerated at the same institution for other severe crimes. Apart from DSM-IV Axis I and Axis II disorders, family backgrounds, level of education, treatment history, intelligence (WAIS scores), and PCL-R scores were included in the comparisons. Furthermore, the apparent motives for the arson offences were explored. It was found that arsonists had more often received psychiatric treatment, prior to committing their index offence, and had a history of severe alcohol abuse more often in comparison to the controls. The arsonists turned out to be less likely to suffer from a major psychotic disorder. Both groups did not differ significantly on the other variables, among which the PCL-R total scores and factor scores. Exploratory analyses however, did suggest that arsonists may differentiate from non-arsonists on three items of the PCL-R, namely impulsivity (higher scores), superficial charm (lower scores), and juvenile delinquency (lower scores). Although the number of arsonists with a major psychotic disorder was relatively low (28%), delusional thinking of some form was judged to play a role in causing arson crimes in about half of the cases (52%).

  2. Cardiac disorders with psychosomatic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Bielejewska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychosomatic disorders can be described as psychosocial-derived organic disorders. The influence of depression, sleep disorders, quality of life, addictions, work environment, family situation, and stress on atrial fibrillation, palpitations, syncope, chest pain, coronary heart disease, and heart failure has been analysed in this paper. The correlation between psychosomatic disorders and the cardiovascular system has been shown. It allows us to conclude that an attending physician, while taking medical history of cardiac patients, should take into consideration factors that may have a negative impact on their mental health, which can be risk factors in the development or aggravation of an already present cardiovascular disease.

  3. Technical note - Considerations for MR imaging of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Routine clinical veterinary use of MR scanning is becoming more common. This article addresses the major technical considerations for radiographers performing MR examinations on small animals and provides practical advice for scanning techniques.

  4. Family Background and Educational Choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    enrollments, especially for females. Not only did the educational opportunities for individuals with disadvantaged backgrounds improve absolutely, but their relative position also improved. A similarly dramatic increase in attendance at university for the period 1985-2005 was found for these cohorts when......We examine the participation in secondary and tertiary education of five cohorts of Danish males and females who were aged twenty starting in 1982 and ending in 2002. We find that the large expansion of secondary education in this period was characterized by a phenomenal increase in gymnasium...

  5. Background radiation map of Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angsuwathana, P.; Chotikanatis, P.

    1997-01-01

    The radioelement concentration in the natural environment as well as the radiation exposure to man in day-to-day life is now the most interesting topic. The natural radiation is frequently referred as a standard for comparing additional sources of man-made radiation such as atomic weapon fallout, nuclear power generation, radioactive waste disposal, etc. The Department of Mineral Resources commenced a five-year project of nationwide airborne geophysical survey by awarding to Kenting Earth Sciences International Limited in 1984. The original purpose of survey was to support mineral exploration and geological mapping. Subsequently, the data quantity has been proved to be suitable for natural radiation information. In 1993 the Department of Mineral Resources, with the assistance of IAEA, published a Background Radiation Map of Thailand at the scale of 1:1,000,000 from the existing airborne radiometric digital data. The production of Background Radiation Map of Thailand is the result of data compilation and correction procedure developed over the Canadian Shield. This end product will be used as a base map in environmental application not only for Thailand but also Southeast Asia region. (author)

  6. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  7. Optical polarization: background and camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škerlind, Christina; Hallberg, Tomas; Eriksson, Johan; Kariis, Hans; Bergström, David

    2017-10-01

    Polarimetric imaging sensors in the electro-optical region, already military and commercially available in both the visual and infrared, show enhanced capabilities for advanced target detection and recognition. The capabilities arise due to the ability to discriminate between man-made and natural background surfaces using the polarization information of light. In the development of materials for signature management in the visible and infrared wavelength regions, different criteria need to be met to fulfil the requirements for a good camouflage against modern sensors. In conventional camouflage design, the aimed design of the surface properties of an object is to spectrally match or adapt it to a background and thereby minimizing the contrast given by a specific threat sensor. Examples will be shown from measurements of some relevant materials and how they in different ways affect the polarimetric signature. Dimensioning properties relevant in an optical camouflage from a polarimetric perspective, such as degree of polarization, the viewing or incident angle, and amount of diffuse reflection, mainly in the infrared region, will be discussed.

  8. The Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. L.

    1994-12-01

    The properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation provide unique constraints on the history and evolution of the universe. The first detection of anisotropy of the microwave radiation was reported by the COBE Team in 1992, based on the first year of flight data. The latest analyses of the first two years of COBE data are reviewed in this talk, including the amplitude of the microwave anisotropy as a function of angular scale and the statistical nature of the fluctuations. The two-year results are generally consistent with the earlier first year results, but the additional data allow for a better determination of the key cosmological parameters. In this talk the COBE results are compared with other observational anisotropy results and directions for future cosmic microwave anisotropy observations will be discussed. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). Scientific guidance is provided by the COBE Science Working Group.

  9. Advanced LBB methodology and considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P.

    1997-01-01

    LBB applications have existed in many industries and more recently have been applied in the nuclear industry under limited circumstances. Research over the past 10 years has evolved the technology so that more advanced consideration of LBB can now be given. Some of the advanced considerations for nuclear plants subjected to seismic loading evaluations are summarized in this paper

  10. Revealed preference with limited consideration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demuynck, T.; Seel, C.

    2014-01-01

    We derive revealed preference tests for models where individuals use consideration sets to simplify their consumption problem. Our basic test provides necessary and sufficient conditions for consistency of observed choices with the existence of consideration set restrictions. The same conditions can

  11. Ethical Considerations in Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Examines ethical considerations involved in the transfer of appropriate information technology to less developed countries. Approaches to technology are considered; two philosophical frameworks for studying ethical considerations are discussed, i.e., the Kantian approach and the utilitarian perspective by John Stuart Mill; and integration of the…

  12. Advanced LBB methodology and considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.; Rahman, S.; Scott, P. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    LBB applications have existed in many industries and more recently have been applied in the nuclear industry under limited circumstances. Research over the past 10 years has evolved the technology so that more advanced consideration of LBB can now be given. Some of the advanced considerations for nuclear plants subjected to seismic loading evaluations are summarized in this paper.

  13. Gamma background irradiation. Standards and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miloslavov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The systematic deviation of the results of measuring the power of air dose absorbed from the natural gamma background radiation in Bulgaria is inadmissibly large and variable. This in turn augments the dispersion of results as well as the mean value relative to worldwide data, to an implausible level, hardly attributable to the variegated geographical relief of the country. Thus in practice local anthropogenic increases hardly lend themselves to detection and demonstration. In the Radiation Protection Standards (RPS-92) in effect in Bulgaria, and in other documents concerning the same radiation factors as well, the maximum allowable limits for the population as a whole are clearly specified on the basis of worldwide expertise along this line. As a rule these limits are being exceeded by the actually measured values, and for this reason the cited documents contain a clause stipulating that these limits do not refer to the natural radiation background and therefore the latter may be virtually ignored. Thus the basic risk factor for the population goes beyond control at levels commensurable with the officially established limits, its twofold increase inclusive. The maximum allowable limit becomes undefinable. Bearing in mind the fact that in compliance with the cited RPS-92 elimination of the technogenic ionizing radiation sources incorporated in the environment prior to 1992 is 'freezed', it is evident that exposure of the population to anthropogenic radiation becomes legally allowable in a much wider range than the one specified by world legislators. One may anticipate radiation induced health noxae for the population directly or by anthropogenic radiation stress on biocenosis. A relatively large part of the population is susceptible to the effect of low radiation doses. Presumably this contingent will augment as a result of eventual fluctuations. The casual relationship which is difficult to establish should be given due consideration in the analysis of the causes

  14. Low background aspects of GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simgen, Hardy

    2011-01-01

    The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in 76 Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio-impurities coming from the liquid argon, the stainless steel cryostat and the front-end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from 222 Rn. The main source of 222 Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio-pure components for front-end electronics resulted in the development of a pre-amplifier with a total activity of less than 1 mBq 228 Th.

  15. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The history is described of the discovery of microwave radiation of the cosmic background using the 20-foot horn antenna at the Bell Laboratories back in 1965. Ruby masers with travelling wave were used, featuring the lowest noise in the world. The measurement proceeded on 7 cm. In measuring microwave radiation from the regions outside the Milky Way continuous noise was discovered whose temperature exceeded the calculated contributions of the individual detection system elements by 3 K. A comparison with the theory showed that relict radiation from the Big Bang period was the source of the noise. The discovery was verified by measurements on the 20.1 cm wavelength and by other authors' measurements on 0.5 mm to 74 cm, and by optical measurements of the interstellar molecule spectrum. (Ha)

  16. Polarization of Cosmic Microwave Background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzzelli, A; Cabella, P; De Gasperis, G; Vittorio, N

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present an extension of the ROMA map-making code for data analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background polarization, with particular attention given to the inflationary polarization B-modes. The new algorithm takes into account a possible cross- correlated noise component among the different detectors of a CMB experiment. We tested the code on the observational data of the BOOMERanG (2003) experiment and we show that we are provided with a better estimate of the power spectra, in particular the error bars of the BB spectrum are smaller up to 20% for low multipoles. We point out the general validity of the new method. A possible future application is the LSPE balloon experiment, devoted to the observation of polarization at large angular scales. (paper)

  17. A Modified Translaminar Osseous Channel-Assisted Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy for Highly Migrated and Sequestrated Disc Herniations of the Upper Lumbar: Clinical Outcomes, Surgical Indications, and Technical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective is to describe a safe and effective percutaneous endoscopic approach for removal of highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations of the upper lumbar spine and to report the results, surgical indications, and technical considerations of the new technique. Eleven patients who had highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations in the upper lumbar were included in this study. A retrospective study was performed for all patients after translaminar osseous channel-assisted PELD was performed. Radiologic findings were investigated, and pre-and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS assessments for back and leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI evaluations were performed. Surgical outcomes were evaluated under modified MacNab criteria. All of the patients were followed for more than 1 year. The preoperative and postoperative radiologic findings revealed that the decompression of the herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP was complete. After surgery, the mean VAS scores for back and leg pain immediately improved from 8.64 (range, 7–10 and 8.00 (range, 6–10 to 2.91 (range, 2–4 and 2.27 (range, 1–3, respectively. The mean preoperative ODI was 65.58 (range, 52.2–86, which decreased to 7.51 (range, 1.8–18 at the 12-month postoperative follow-up. The MacNab scores at the final follow-up included nine excellent, one good, and one fair. The modified translaminar osseous channel-assisted PELD could be a safe and effective option for the treatment of highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations of the upper lumbar.

  18. A Clinical Study of Phenomenology and Comorbidity of Paediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pavan Kumar; T., Sivakumar; Agarwal, Vivek; Sitholey, Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considerable controversy exists regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, and comorbidities especially with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), in paediatric Bipolar Disorder (BPD). Aims and objectives: To describe phenomenology and comorbidities of paediatric BPD. Method: 78 Subjects (6-16 years) attending child and…

  19. Closing the Gap between Research Evidence and Clinical Practice: Jordanian Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Research Utilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khalaileh, Murad; Al Qadire, Mohammad; Musa, Ahmad S.; Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A.; Al Qudah, Hani; Alhabahbeh, Atalla

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nursing profession is a combination of theory and practical skill, and nurses are required to generate and develop knowledge through implementing research into clinical practice. Considerable number of barriers could hind implementing research findings into practice. Barriers to research utilisation are not identified in the…

  20. Does a Rater's Professional Background Influence Communication Skills Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemiou, Elpida; Hecker, Kent G; Adams, Cindy L; Coe, Jason B

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing pressure in veterinary education to teach and assess communication skills, with the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) being the most common assessment method. Previous research reveals that raters are a large source of variance in OSCEs. This study focused on examining the effect of raters' professional background as a source of variance when assessing students' communication skills. Twenty-three raters were categorized according to their professional background: clinical sciences (n=11), basic sciences (n=4), clinical communication (n=5), or hospital administrator/clinical skills technicians (n=3). Raters from each professional background were assigned to the same station and assessed the same students during two four-station OSCEs. Students were in year 2 of their pre-clinical program. Repeated-measures ANOVA results showed that OSCE scores awarded by the rater groups differed significantly: (F(matched_station_1) [2,91]=6.97, p=.002), (F(matched_station_2) [3,90]=13.95, p=.001), (F(matched_station_3) [3,90]=8.76, p=.001), and ((Fmatched_station_4) [2,91]=30.60, p=.001). A significant time effect between the two OSCEs was calculated for matched stations 1, 2, and 4, indicating improved student performances. Raters with a clinical communication skills background assigned scores that were significantly lower compared to the other rater groups. Analysis of written feedback provided by the clinical sciences raters showed that they were influenced by the students' clinical knowledge of the case and that they did not rely solely on the communication checklist items. This study shows that it is important to consider rater background both in recruitment and training programs for communication skills' assessment.

  1. Plenoptic background oriented schlieren imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemkowsky, Jenna N; Fahringer, Timothy W; Clifford, Christopher J; Thurow, Brian S; Bathel, Brett F

    2017-01-01

    The combination of the background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique with the unique imaging capabilities of a plenoptic camera, termed plenoptic BOS, is introduced as a new addition to the family of schlieren techniques. Compared to conventional single camera BOS, plenoptic BOS is capable of sampling multiple lines-of-sight simultaneously. Displacements from each line-of-sight are collectively used to build a four-dimensional displacement field, which is a vector function structured similarly to the original light field captured in a raw plenoptic image. The displacement field is used to render focused BOS images, which qualitatively are narrow depth of field slices of the density gradient field. Unlike focused schlieren methods that require manually changing the focal plane during data collection, plenoptic BOS synthetically changes the focal plane position during post-processing, such that all focal planes are captured in a single snapshot. Through two different experiments, this work demonstrates that plenoptic BOS is capable of isolating narrow depth of field features, qualitatively inferring depth, and quantitatively estimating the location of disturbances in 3D space. Such results motivate future work to transition this single-camera technique towards quantitative reconstructions of 3D density fields. (paper)

  2. Concerning background from calorimeter ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digiacomo, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    Any detector system viewing a port or slit in a calorimeter wall will see, in addition to the primary particles of interest, a background of charged and neutral particles and photons generated by scattering from the port walls and by leakage from incompletely contained primary particle showers in the calorimeter near the port. The signal to noise ratio attainable outside the port is a complex function of the primary source spectrum, the calorimeter and port design and, of course, the nature and acceptance of the detector system that views the port. Rather than making general statements about the overall suitability (or lack thereof) of calorimeter ports, we offer here a specific example based on the external spectrometer and slit of the NA34 experiment. This combination of slit and spectrometer is designed for fixed-target work, so that the primary particle momentum spectrum contains higher momentum particles than expected in a heavy ion colliding beam environment. The results are, nevertheless, quite relevant for the collider case

  3. Natural background radiation in Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, M.N.S.

    1997-01-01

    An Airborne Gamma Ray survey has been accomplished for Jordan since 1979. A complete report has been submitted to the Natural Resources Authority along with field and processed data ''digital and analogue''. Natural radioelements concentration is not provided with this report. From the corrected count rate data for each natural radioelement, Concentrations and exposure rates at the ground level were calculated. Contoured maps, showing the exposure rates and the dose rates were created. Both maps reflect the surface geology of Jordan, where the Phosphate areas are very well delineated by high-level contours. In southeastern Jordan the Ordovician sandstone, which contain high percentage of Th (around 2000 ppm in some places) and a moderate percentage of U (about 300 ppm), also show high gamma radiation exposures compared with the surrounding areas. Comparing the values of the exposure rates given in (μR/h) to those obtained from other countries such as United States, Canada, Germany, etc. Jordan shows higher background radiation which reach two folds and even more than those in these countries. More detailed studies should be performed in order to evaluate the radiological risk limits on people who are living in areas of high radiation such that the area of the phosphatic belt which covers a vast area of Jordan high Plateau. (author)

  4. Natural background radiation in Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daoud, M N.S. [National Resources Authority, Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman (Jordan)

    1997-11-01

    An Airborne Gamma Ray survey has been accomplished for Jordan since 1979. A complete report has been submitted to the Natural Resources Authority along with field and processed data ``digital and analogue``. Natural radioelements concentration is not provided with this report. From the corrected count rate data for each natural radioelement, Concentrations and exposure rates at the ground level were calculated. Contoured maps, showing the exposure rates and the dose rates were created. Both maps reflect the surface geology of Jordan, where the Phosphate areas are very well delineated by high-level contours. In southeastern Jordan the Ordovician sandstone, which contain high percentage of Th (around 2000 ppm in some places) and a moderate percentage of U (about 300 ppm), also show high gamma radiation exposures compared with the surrounding areas. Comparing the values of the exposure rates given in ({mu}R/h) to those obtained from other countries such as United States, Canada, Germany, etc. Jordan shows higher background radiation which reach two folds and even more than those in these countries. More detailed studies should be performed in order to evaluate the radiological risk limits on people who are living in areas of high radiation such that the area of the phosphatic belt which covers a vast area of Jordan high Plateau. (author). 8 refs, 10 figs, 7 tabs.

  5. Design Considerations | Efficient Windows Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foundry Foundry New Construction Windows Window Selection Tool Selection Process Design Guidance Installation Replacement Windows Window Selection Tool Assessing Options Selection Process Design Guidance Installation Understanding Windows Benefits Design Considerations Measuring Performance Performance Standards

  6. State/Federal Regulatory Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains presentations from the Brown to Green: Make the Connection to Renewable Energy workshop held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during December 10-11, 2008, regarding State/Federal Regulatory Considerations.

  7. Ethnic Background and Genetic Variation in the Evaluation of Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lijun; Su, Li; Ring, Brian Z.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in 68 studies across six different cancer types, comparing association results between ethnic groups and examining linkage disequilibrium between risk alleles and nearby genetic loci. We find that the relevance of ethnic background depends on the question. If asked whether the association of variants with disease risk is conserved across ethnic boundaries, we find that the answer is yes, the majority of markers show insignificant variability in association with cancer risk across ethnic groups. However if the question is whether a significant association between a variant and cancer risk is likely to reproduce, the answer is no, most markers do not validate in an ethnic group other than the discovery cohort’s ancestry. This lack of reproducibility is not attributable to studies being inadequately populated due to low allele frequency in other ethnic groups. Instead, differences in local genomic structure between ethnic groups are associated with the strength of association with cancer risk and therefore confound interpretation of the implied physiologic association tracked by the disease allele. This suggest that a biological association for cancer risk alleles may be broadly consistent across ethnic boundaries, but reproduction of a clinical study in another ethnic group is uncommon, in part due to confounding genomic architecture. As clinical studies are increasingly performed globally this has important implications for how cancer risk stratifiers should be studied and

  8. Ethnic background and genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lijun; Su, Li; Ring, Brian Z

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in 68 studies across six different cancer types, comparing association results between ethnic groups and examining linkage disequilibrium between risk alleles and nearby genetic loci. We find that the relevance of ethnic background depends on the question. If asked whether the association of variants with disease risk is conserved across ethnic boundaries, we find that the answer is yes, the majority of markers show insignificant variability in association with cancer risk across ethnic groups. However if the question is whether a significant association between a variant and cancer risk is likely to reproduce, the answer is no, most markers do not validate in an ethnic group other than the discovery cohort's ancestry. This lack of reproducibility is not attributable to studies being inadequately populated due to low allele frequency in other ethnic groups. Instead, differences in local genomic structure between ethnic groups are associated with the strength of association with cancer risk and therefore confound interpretation of the implied physiologic association tracked by the disease allele. This suggest that a biological association for cancer risk alleles may be broadly consistent across ethnic boundaries, but reproduction of a clinical study in another ethnic group is uncommon, in part due to confounding genomic architecture. As clinical studies are increasingly performed globally this has important implications for how cancer risk stratifiers should be studied and employed.

  9. Ethnic background and genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Jing

    Full Text Available The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in 68 studies across six different cancer types, comparing association results between ethnic groups and examining linkage disequilibrium between risk alleles and nearby genetic loci. We find that the relevance of ethnic background depends on the question. If asked whether the association of variants with disease risk is conserved across ethnic boundaries, we find that the answer is yes, the majority of markers show insignificant variability in association with cancer risk across ethnic groups. However if the question is whether a significant association between a variant and cancer risk is likely to reproduce, the answer is no, most markers do not validate in an ethnic group other than the discovery cohort's ancestry. This lack of reproducibility is not attributable to studies being inadequately populated due to low allele frequency in other ethnic groups. Instead, differences in local genomic structure between ethnic groups are associated with the strength of association with cancer risk and therefore confound interpretation of the implied physiologic association tracked by the disease allele. This suggest that a biological association for cancer risk alleles may be broadly consistent across ethnic boundaries, but reproduction of a clinical study in another ethnic group is uncommon, in part due to confounding genomic architecture. As clinical studies are increasingly performed globally this has important implications for how cancer risk stratifiers should be

  10. Hipnose, dor e subjetividade: considerações teóricas e clínicas Hipnosis, dolor y subjetividad: consideraciones teóricas y clínicas Hypnosis, pain and subjectivity: theoretical and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício da Silva Neubern

    2009-06-01

    subjetividad y sujeto en el ámbito de las complejas relaciones entre dolor e hipnosis dentro del contexto clínico.The present article aims to propose a qualitative and clinical approach to the comprehension of the relationship between hypnosis and pain, taking as a reference the notion of subjectivity. Having a criticism of the statistical methodologies as a starting-point, three other points are discussed in that sense. Firstly, the pain is conceived as a subjective process, organized in terms of configurations, senses, emotions and meanings that are built in the actions of the subject in his or her respective social insertion sceneries. Secondly, the relationship between hypnosis and pain is emphasized, giving a highlight to the intersubjective processes that exist in the communication and relationship between therapist and subject. The third point accentuates the importance of the singularity that should range the comprehension of pain, as well as the construction of hypnotic interventions. The article is concluded by emphasizing the relevance of subjectivity and subject notions in what regards the complex relationships between pain and hypnosis in the clinical context.

  11. A Review of Acoustic Consideration in Public and Multifunctional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been shown that acoustics in buildings depend mainly on the type and use of the buildings, therefore acoustic criteria and design parameters in public and multifunctional buildings should be such that it takes into consideration the room reverberation time, background noise and sound isolation to enhance speech ...

  12. Surgical Considerations in the Management of Tumours of the Nose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Tumours of the nose and paranasal sinuses in sub-Saharan Africa are generally characterised by late presentation posing management challenges to the otorhinolaryngologists in the sub-region. OBJECTIVES: To appraise surgical considerations in the management of tumours of the nose and paranasal ...

  13. Hypothyroidism in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Qari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease that was seen in the clinical practice especially for family physicians. Methods: This review article covered the important practical clinical issues for managing overt hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism during pregnancy. Conclusions: The clinical issues were addressed by clinical scenario followed by questions and stressed on the important clinical points.

  14. Biomarkers of PTSD: military applications and considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Lehrner

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no established biomarkers for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD as yet, biological investigations of PTSD have made progress identifying the pathophysiology of PTSD. Given the biological and clinical complexity of PTSD, it is increasingly unlikely that a single biomarker of disease will be identified. Rather, investigations will more likely identify different biomarkers that indicate the presence of clinically significant PTSD symptoms, associate with risk for PTSD following trauma exposure, and predict or identify recovery. While there has been much interest in PTSD biomarkers, there has been less discussion of their potential clinical applications, and of the social, legal, and ethical implications of such biomarkers. Objective: This article will discuss possible applications of PTSD biomarkers, including the social, legal, and ethical implications of such biomarkers, with an emphasis on military applications. Method: Literature on applications of PTSD biomarkers and on potential ethical and legal implications will be reviewed. Results: Biologically informed research findings hold promise for prevention, assessment, treatment planning, and the development of prophylactic and treatment interventions. As with any biological indicator of disorder, there are potentially positive and negative clinical, social, legal, and ethical consequences of using such biomarkers. Conclusions: Potential clinical applications of PTSD biomarkers hold promise for clinicians, patients, and employers. The search for biomarkers of PTSD should occur in tandem with an interdisciplinary discussion regarding the potential implications of applying biological findings in clinical and employment settings.

  15. Neutron therapy: The historical background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, H.; Landberg, T.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron therapy was first introduced by Stone et al. in 1938, i.e. more than 10 years earlier than electron beam therapy and only 6 years after the discovery of neutrons. In spite of the impressive accomplishment in generating an adequate therapy beam, time was also found for careful radiobiological studies of neutron beams. However, it was not considered that for a certain early reaction the late effects were much greater with neutrons than with X-rays. The severe late sequelae in proportion to the few good results motivated the closure of this therapy. Neutron therapy was again introduced in Hammersmith hospital at the end of the 1960's. The major reason seems to have been to overcome the oxygen effect. Encouraging results were reported. It was argued that the very favourable statistics on local tumour control were obtained at the expense of more frequent and more severe complications. A clinical trial in Edinburgh seemed to indicate this, but it was not proved in the end as the two trials differed regarding fractionation. Today about 16000 patients have been treated with neutrons. The neutron beams now used differ significantly, both regarding dose distributions and microdosimetrical properties, from those utilized earlier. The advantage of neutrons is still, however, controversial. There are indications that neutron treatment may be favourable for some tumours. A careful cost-benefit study ought to be performed before the creation of a neutron therapy centre in Sweden as the group of patients suitable for neutrons is limited, and there may be new possibilities for improvement of photon and electron treatment with much smaller resources. (orig.)

  16. Transplanting the Body: Preliminary Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lantz Fleming

    2017-11-01

    A dissociated area of medical research warrants bioethical consideration: a proposed transplantation of a donor's entire body, except head, to a patient with a fatal degenerative disease. The seeming improbability of such an operation can only underscore the need for thorough bioethical assessment: Not assessing a case of such potential ethical import, by showing neglect instead of facing the issue, can only compound the ethical predicament, perhaps eroding public trust in ethical medicine. This article discusses the historical background of full-body transplantation, documents the seriousness of its current pursuit, and builds an argument for why prima facie this type of transplant is bioethically distinct. Certainly, this examination can only be preliminary, indicating what should be a wide and vigorous discussion among practitioners and ethicists. It concludes with practical suggestions for how the medical and bioethics community may proceed with ethical assessment.

  17. Design considerations for mechanical snubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.; Summers, G.D.

    1980-03-01

    The use of mechanical snubbers to restrain piping during an earthquake event is becoming more common in design of nuclear power plants. The design considerations and qualification procedures for mechanical snubbers used on the Fast Flux Test Facility will be presented. Design precautions and requirements for both normal operation and seismic operation are necessary. Effects of environmental vibration (nonseismic) induced through the piping by pump shaft imbalance and fluid flow oscillations will be addressed. Also, the snubber dynamic characteristics of interest to design and snubber design application considerations will be discussed

  18. Background radiation and childhood cancer mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakka, Masatoshi

    1979-01-01

    Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancer estimated an ''extra'' cancer risk of 572 per million man-rad of juvenile cancer deaths under 10 years of age. In Hiroshima and Nagasaki 36.9 juvenile cancers were expected out of 64,490 man-rad of exposed mothers. Observed cancer was, however, only one. The discrepancy was explained partly by possible overlapping of confidence intervals of two samples and partly by excessive doses received by exposed fetuses in Japan. If A-bomb radiation sterilized preleukemic cells induced in fetuses, it must also killed those cells in irradiated adults. Leukemogenic efficiency in adults, about 2.10 -5 per rad, is not different either in A-bomb survivors or in irradiated patients. We examined a dose-effect relationship in childhood cancer mortality (0 - 4 yrs) in Miyagi Prefecture Japan. Ninety two cancers were detected out of 1,214,157 children from 1968 to 1975. They were allocated to 8 districts with different background levels. Population at risk was calculated every year for every district. About 4 deaths occurred every 10,000 man-rad, which is comparable with 572 per million man-rad in Oxford Survey. One out of one thousand infants died from severe malformation in every year when they received 9.8 rad in embryonic stage, the doubling dose is estimated as 20 rad. Clinical and biological significance of the statistical data must be examined in future. Fetal death decreased significantly from 110/1,000 in 1962 to 55/1,000 in 1975. Background radiation plays no role in fetal death in Miyagi Prefecture. (author)

  19. The colorful brain: Visualization of EEG background patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a method to transform routine clinical EEG recordings to an alternative visual domain. The method is intended to support the classic visual interpretation of the EEG background pattern and to facilitate communication about relevant EEG characteristics. In addition, it provides

  20. The temporal resolution factor with and without background noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreschler, W. A.; Leeuw, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the measurement of the temporal resolution factor (TRF). The major merits of this measurement are that it is simple enough to be used clinically and that the results are, within certain limits, independent of presentation level. Addition of a continuous background noise has

  1. Nuclear energy applications - ethical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, K.

    1980-01-01

    Following an Austrian referendum in 1978 which showed a small majority against operation of nuclear power stations, the economic penalties involved by this decision are qualitatively discussed, with emphasis on reduced standards of living. Religious considerations are examined and the difficulty of obtaining informed public opinion is stressed. Alternative sources of energy, including nuclear fusion, are briefly referred to. (G.M.E.)

  2. LABORATORY DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR SAFETY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Safety Council, Chicago, IL. Campus Safety Association.

    THIS SET OF CONSIDERATIONS HAS BEEN PREPARED TO PROVIDE PERSONS WORKING ON THE DESIGN OF NEW OR REMODELED LABORATORY FACILITIES WITH A SUITABLE REFERENCE GUIDE TO DESIGN SAFETY. THERE IS NO DISTINCTION BETWEEN TYPES OF LABORATORY AND THE EMPHASIS IS ON GIVING GUIDES AND ALTERNATIVES RATHER THAN DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS. AREAS COVERED INCLUDE--(1)…

  3. General B factory design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    We describe the general considerations that go into the design of an asymmetric B factory collider. Justification is given for the typical parameters of such a facility, and the physics and technology challenges that arise from these parameter choices are discussed. Cost and schedule issues for a B factory are discussed briefly. A summary of existing proposals is presented, noting their similarities and differences

  4. Clinical and imaging considerations in primary immunodeficiency disorders: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Eveline Y. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Pediatrics, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ehrlich, Lauren [Yale School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States); Handly, Brian [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Frush, Donald P. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Buckley, Rebecca H. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University School of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Primary immunodeficiencies are a group of genetically determined disorders with diverse presentations. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical and brief description of a select number of these diseases and to discuss the important role the radiologist can have in making an early diagnosis and in detecting and following disease complications. The role of diagnostic imaging and informed performance and interpretation are vital in the diagnosis, surveillance and management of all primary immunodeficiency disorders. (orig.)

  5. Cardiovascular impact in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis: Clinical management considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirakarnjanakorn, Srisakul; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Francis, Gary S; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-04-01

    Patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis develop both structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities. Despite improvement of dialysis technology, cardiovascular mortality of this population remains high. The pathophysiological mechanisms of these changes are complex and not well understood. It has been postulated that several non-traditional, uremic-related risk factors, especially the long-term uremic state, which may affect the cardiovascular system. There are many cardiovascular changes that occur in chronic kidney disease including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fibrosis, microvascular disease, accelerated atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. These structural and functional changes in patients receiving chronic dialysis make them more susceptible to myocardial ischemia. Hemodialysis itself may adversely affect the cardiovascular system due to non-physiologic fluid removal, leading to hemodynamic instability and initiation of systemic inflammation. In the past decade there has been growing awareness that pathophysiological mechanisms cause cardiovascular dysfunction in patients on chronic dialysis, and there are now pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies that may improve the poor quality of life and high mortality rate that these patients experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical Considerations Related to the Behavioral Manifestations of Child Maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sege, Robert D; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    Children who have suffered early abuse or neglect may later present with significant health and behavior problems that may persist long after the abusive or neglectful environment has been remediated. Neurobiological research suggests that early maltreatment may result in an altered psychological and physiologic response to stressful stimuli, a response that deleteriously affects the child's subsequent development. Pediatricians can assist caregivers by helping them recognize the abused or neglected child's emotional and behavioral responses associated with child maltreatment and guide them in the use of positive parenting strategies, referring the children and families to evidence-based therapeutic treatment and mobilizing available community resources. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Sexual Objectification of Women: Clinical Implications and Training Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Dawn M.; Carr, Erika R.; Moffitt, Lauren B.

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the implications of theory and empirical research on the sexual objectification of women. Drawing largely from the American Psychological Association's 2007 "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Girls and Women," the 2007 "Report of the American Psychological Association's Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls,"…

  8. Early Onset Bipolar Disorder: Clinical and Research Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Gabrielle A.

    2005-01-01

    This article examined some of the reasons for confusion and controversy surrounding the frequency of diagnosis of bipolar disorder, especially in prepubertal children. Four case vignettes are used to articulate questions surrounding manifestations of euphoria and grandiosity, informant variance, diagnostic implications of medication-induced…

  9. Variability of clinical features in attacks of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Goadsby, Peter J; Charles, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    . CONCLUSION: These findings are consistent with variable involvement of different brain regions during a migraine attack. The variable occurrence of nausea, and phonophobia in conjunction with photophobia, both defining features of migraine, may be an important consideration in designing clinical studies......BACKGROUND: There is significant variability in the clinical presentation of migraine, both among patients, and between attacks in an individual patient. We examined clinical features of migraine with aura in a large group of patients enrolled in a clinical trial, and compared retrospective...... a detailed retrospective description of the clinical features of their attacks of migraine. During the trial, clinical symptoms in migraine attacks starting with aura were recorded prospectively in 861 attacks. RESULTS: Retrospectively reported visual aura symptoms were variable and often overlapping...

  10. Large population center and core melt accident considerations in siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarinopoulos, L.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of providing suitable demographic siting criteria in the presence of a very large population center in an otherwise sparsely populated region is addressed. Simple calculations were performed making maximum use of pretabulated results of studies where core melt accidents are considered. These show that taking into consideration the air flow patterns in the region can lower the expected population doses from core melt accidents more effectively than distance alone. Expected doses are compared to the annual background radiation dose. A simple siting criterion combining geographical considerations with the probability of a release reaching the large population center is proposed

  11. Treatment of Deaf Clients: Ethical Considerations for Professionals in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, Cassandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Providing therapy to deaf clients raises important ethical considerations for psychologists related to competence; multiple relationships and boundary issues; confidentiality; assessment, diagnosis, and evaluation; and communication and using interpreters. In evaluating and addressing these, psychologists must consider the APA’s Ethics Code and other relevant issues (e.g., ADA) necessary to provide ethical treatment. The current article provides background, ethical considerations, principles and standards relevant to the treatment of deaf clients, and recommendations to support psychologists, training programs, and the field. Psychologists have the responsibility to guarantee that the benefits of mental health treatment are fairly and justly provided to this traditionally underserved population. PMID:27917030

  12. Canonical quantization of spinning relativistic particle in external backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, S.P. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Gitman, D.M. [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2000-07-01

    Full text follows: We revise the problem of the quantization of spinning relativistic particle pseudoclassical model, using a modified consistent canonical scheme. It allows one not only to include arbitrary electromagnetic and gravitational backgrounds in the consideration but to get in course of the quantization a consistent relativistic quantum mechanics, which reproduces literally the behavior of the one-particle sector of quantized spinor field. In particular, in a physical sector of the Hilbert space a complete positive spectrum of energies of relativistic particles and antiparticles is reproduced. Requirement to maintain all classical symmetries under the coordinate transformations and under U(1) transformations allows one to realize operator algebra without any ambiguities. (author)

  13. Planets as background noise sources in free space optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J.

    1986-01-01

    Background noise generated by planets is the dominant noise source in most deep space direct detection optical communications systems. Earlier approximate analyses of this problem are based on simplified blackbody calculations and can yield results that may be inaccurate by up to an order of magnitude. Various other factors that need to be taken into consideration, such as the phase angle and the actual spectral dependence of the planet albedo, in order to obtain a more accurate estimate of the noise magnitude are examined.

  14. Background based Gaussian mixture model lesion segmentation in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffientini, Chiara Dolores, E-mail: chiaradolores.soffientini@polimi.it; Baselli, Giuseppe [DEIB, Department of Electronics, Information, and Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milan 20133 (Italy); De Bernardi, Elisabetta [Department of Medicine and Surgery, Tecnomed Foundation, University of Milano—Bicocca, Monza 20900 (Italy); Zito, Felicia; Castellani, Massimo [Nuclear Medicine Department, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, via Francesco Sforza 35, Milan 20122 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Quantitative {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is limited by the uncertainty in lesion delineation due to poor SNR, low resolution, and partial volume effects, subsequently impacting oncological assessment, treatment planning, and follow-up. The present work develops and validates a segmentation algorithm based on statistical clustering. The introduction of constraints based on background features and contiguity priors is expected to improve robustness vs clinical image characteristics such as lesion dimension, noise, and contrast level. Methods: An eight-class Gaussian mixture model (GMM) clustering algorithm was modified by constraining the mean and variance parameters of four background classes according to the previous analysis of a lesion-free background volume of interest (background modeling). Hence, expectation maximization operated only on the four classes dedicated to lesion detection. To favor the segmentation of connected objects, a further variant was introduced by inserting priors relevant to the classification of neighbors. The algorithm was applied to simulated datasets and acquired phantom data. Feasibility and robustness toward initialization were assessed on a clinical dataset manually contoured by two expert clinicians. Comparisons were performed with respect to a standard eight-class GMM algorithm and to four different state-of-the-art methods in terms of volume error (VE), Dice index, classification error (CE), and Hausdorff distance (HD). Results: The proposed GMM segmentation with background modeling outperformed standard GMM and all the other tested methods. Medians of accuracy indexes were VE <3%, Dice >0.88, CE <0.25, and HD <1.2 in simulations; VE <23%, Dice >0.74, CE <0.43, and HD <1.77 in phantom data. Robustness toward image statistic changes (±15%) was shown by the low index changes: <26% for VE, <17% for Dice, and <15% for CE. Finally, robustness toward the user-dependent volume initialization was

  15. Health effects in residents of regions with high background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Possible health problems created by high natural levels of background radiation are hard to detect, partly because the health problems involved would exist to some degree irrespective of radiation exposure, partly because other factors affect the incidence of such problems, and partly because the differences between normal background radiation levels and radiation levels found in most high-radiation areas are not extreme. Nevertheless, the need to know about such health effects is evident, and so various studies conducted over the past 30 years have sought to determine whether those effects exist and what they are. Overall, however, the fragmentary and uncertain nature of many of these findings makes it hard to draw firm conclusions about the health risks involved or the desirability of countermeasures. So despite considerable efforts and some progress over the past three decades, the need for a clear quantitative assessment of the consequences is as great as ever

  16. Method and equipment for γ background compensation in neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, M.; Marik, P.

    1986-01-01

    The compensation of background gamma radiation in neutron spectrometry is based on the measurement of the total energy spectrum of all protons and electrons, and of the energy spectrum of those protons and neutrons which are in coincidence with the discriminating signal derived from the integral of the counting rate distribution by pulse shape. The benefits of the method consist in the possibility of using standard single-parameter apparatus, in considerably smaller demands on the memory capacity and the possibility of a substantially finer division of the spectrum and more accurate compensation of the background than has been the case with methods used so far. A practical application is shown in a block diagram. (J.B.)

  17. Fluctuations from cosmic strings and the microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenberger, R.H.; Turok, N.

    1986-01-01

    The spectrum of energy-density perturbations and anisotropies in the microwave background radiation are calculated in models with cosmic strings. The computations are based on a mathematical model of the network of cosmic strings as a combination of a random walk of infinite strings and a distribution of string loops. The energy-density distribution is scale invariant at Hubble radius crossing, but the k dependence of the spectrum is nontrivial and not equal to the result for adiabatic linear perturbations. The anisotropies in the microwave background radiation are smaller than the observational upper bounds on all angular scales for a value μGapprox.2 x 10 -6 obtained from independent astrophysical considerations. We include both the effects due to gravitational lensing from long strings and from local gravitational perturbations due to loops (the Sachs-Wolfe effect)

  18. Hanford Site background: Evaluation of existing soil radionuclide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This report is an evaluation of the existing data on radiological background for soils in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The primary purpose of this report is to assess the adequacy of the existing data to serve as a radiological background baseline for use in environmental restoration and remediation activities at the Hanford Site. The soil background data compiled and evaluated in this report were collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Washington State Department of Health (DOH) radiation surveillance programs in southeastern Washington. These two programs provide the largest well-documented, quantitative data sets available to evaluate background conditions at the Hanford Site. The data quality objectives (DQOs) considered in this evaluation include the amount of data, number of sampling localities, spatial coverage, number and types of radionuclides reported, frequency of reporting, documentation and traceability of sampling and laboratory methods used, and comparability between sets of data. Although other data on soil radionuclide abundances around the Hanford Site exist, they are generally limited in scope and lack the DQOs necessary for consideration with the PNL and DOH data sets. Collectively, these two sources provide data on the activities of 25 radionuclides and four other parameters (gross alpha, gross beta, total uranium, and total thorium). These measurements were made on samples from the upper 2.5 cm of soil at over 70 localities within the region

  19. Biological evolution: Some genetic considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Mohammad Saad Zaghloul

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of biological evolution has long been accepted as a palatable theory aiming at explaining how life began and how creatures diverged so widely along the life span of the earth. Meticulous analysis and criticism of the different postulations of this concept, however, reveals that evolution is an illogic concept based on theoretical hypotheses that can never be tested. Creation, on the other hand, represents the other side of the coin, and up till now debates confronting ...

  20. Commercial considerations in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbridge, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a field with immense promise. Using the example of an early tissue-engineered skin implant, Dermagraft, factors involved in the successful commercial development of devices of this type are explored. Tissue engineering has to strike a balance between tissue culture, which is a resource-intensive activity, and business considerations that are concerned with minimizing cost and maximizing customer convenience. Bioreactor design takes place in a highly regulated environment, so factors to be incorporated into the concept include not only tissue culture considerations but also matters related to asepsis, scaleup, automation and ease of use by the final customer. Dermagraft is an allogeneic tissue. Stasis preservation, in this case cryopreservation, is essential in allogeneic tissue engineering, allowing sterility testing, inventory control and, in the case of Dermagraft, a cellular stress that may be important for hormesis following implantation. Although the use of allogeneic cells provides advantages in manufacturing under suitable conditions, it raises the spectre of immunological rejection. Such rejection has not been experienced with Dermagraft. Possible reasons for this and the vision of further application of allogeneic tissues are important considerations in future tissue-engineered cellular devices. This review illustrates approaches that indicate some of the criteria that may provide a basis for further developments. Marketing is a further requirement for success, which entails understanding of the mechanism of action of the procedure, and is illustrated for Dermagraft. The success of a tissue-engineered product is dependent on many interacting operations, some discussed here, each of which must be performed simultaneously and well.

  1. Senior academic physicians and retirement considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Arthur J; Greenberg, Henry; Dwyer, Edward M; Klein, Helmut; Ryan, Daniel; Francis, Charles; Marcus, Frank; Eberly, Shirley; Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Gillespie, John; Goldstein, Robert; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Oakes, David; Thomsen, Poul Erik Bloch; Zareba, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of academic senior physicians are approaching their potential retirement in good health with accumulated clinical and research experience that can be a valuable asset to an academic institution. Considering the need to let the next generation ascend to leadership roles, when and how should a medical career be brought to a close? We explore the roles for academic medical faculty as they move into their senior years and approach various retirement options. The individual and institutional considerations require a frank dialogue among the interested parties to optimize the benefits while minimizing the risks for both. In the United States there is no fixed age for retirement as there is in Europe, but European physicians are initiating changes. What is certain is that careful planning, innovative thinking, and the incorporation of new patterns of medical practice are all part of this complex transition and timing of senior academic physicians into retirement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Considerations Regarding Students’ Social Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana Cenar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper entitled “Considerations Regarding Students’ Social Protection” addresses the main forms of support offered to students and their families, divided in relation to the aim pursued, which may be relate to stimulating students’ performance and discipline, material and financial support (social assistance, supplementing family income. For these components there were taken into account: the circumstances in which it acquires to status of beneficiary, evolutionary dimensions in terms of beneficiary numbers, the amounts awarded, the need to ensure the complementarities with the informal side of social protection.

  3. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented

  4. Simulation of Experimental Background using FLUKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, Sayed

    1999-05-11

    In November 1997, Experiment T423 began acquiring data with the intentions of understanding the energy spectra of high-energy neutrons generated in the interaction of electrons with lead. The following describes a series of FLUKA simulations studying (1) particle yields in the absence of all background; (2) the background caused from scattering in the room; (3) the effects of the thick lead shielding which surrounded the detector; (4) the sources of neutron background created in this lead shielding; and (5) the ratio of the total background to the ideal yield. In each case, particular attention is paid to the neutron yield.

  5. Modeling the Thermal Signature of Natural Backgrounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gamborg, Marius

    2002-01-01

    Two measuring stations have been established the purpose being to collect comprehensive databases of thermal signatures of background elements in addition to the prevailing meteorological conditions...

  6. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing—pitfalls and recommendations for managing variants of uncertain clinical significance

    OpenAIRE

    Eccles, D. M.; Mitchell, G.; Monteiro, A. N. A.; Schmutzler, R.; Couch, F. J.; Spurdle, A. B.; Gómez-García, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundIncreasing use of BRCA1/2 testing for tailoring cancer treatment and extension of testing to tumour tissue for somatic mutation is moving BRCA1/2 mutation screening from a primarily prevention arena delivered by specialist genetic services into mainstream oncology practice. A considerable number of gene tests will identify rare variants where clinical significance cannot be inferred from sequence information alone. The proportion of Variants of Uncertain clinical Significance (VUS) ...

  7. Orthodontic treatment considerations in Down syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sianiwati Goenharto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Down syndrome is an easily recognized congenital disease anomaly, a common autosomal chromosomal anomaly with high prevalence of malocclusion. Orthodontic treatment demand should be high but it seems difficult to be done because of specific condition of disability. Purpose: The purpose of this literature review was to discribe the orthodontic problems found in Down syndrome patients and several consideration that shoud be done to treat them. Reviews: Many studies report the high prevalence of malocclusion among people with Down syndrome. There is a greater frequency of clas III relationship, crossbite, crowding and also open bite. Several problems might appear in the treatment because of dental, medical, mental, and behavioural factor. Conclusion: It is concluded that orthodonic treatment can be performed in Down syndrome patient, although several difficulties may appear. Good consideration in mental, behavior, medical and also dental condition will influence whether the treatment will success or not. Special care and facilities will support the orthodontic treatment.Latar belakang: Sindroma Down adalah suatu kelainan congenital yang mudah dikenali, merupakan kelaian kromosom autosomal yang cukup banyak terjadi, dengan prevalensi maloklusi cukup tinggi. Seharusnya permintaan akan perawatan ortodonti juga tinggi meskipun tampaknya sulit dilakukan karena adanya kondisi ketidakmampuan/cacat yang spesifik. Tujuan: Tujuan studi pustaka ini adalah untuk menggambarkan problem perawatan ortodonti pada penderita sindroma Down dan pertimbangan apa yang sebaiknya diambil untuk mengatasi masalah tersebut. Tinjauan pustaka: Banyak penelitian melaporkan tentang prevalensi maloklusi yang tinggi pada penderita sindroma Down. Maloklusi yang sering dijumpai adalah relasi klas III, gigitan silang, berdesakan dan juga gigitan terbuka. Problem dapat terjadi saat perawatan ortodonti karena adanya faktor dental, medis, mental dan tingkah laku penderita

  8. 28 CFR 51.34 - Expedited consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited consideration. 51.34 Section 51... consideration. (a) When a submitting authority is required under State law or local ordinance or otherwise finds... the submission be given expedited consideration. The submission should explain why such consideration...

  9. 46 CFR 114.550 - Special consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special consideration. 114.550 Section 114.550 Shipping... consideration. In applying the provisions of this subchapter, the OCMI may give special consideration to... vessel operates must approve any special consideration granted to the vessel. ...

  10. A statistical background noise correction sensitive to the steadiness of background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Charles H

    2016-10-01

    A statistical background noise correction is developed for removing background noise contributions from measured source levels, producing a background noise-corrected source level. Like the standard background noise corrections of ISO 3741, ISO 3744, ISO 3745, and ISO 11201, the statistical background correction increases as the background level approaches the measured source level, decreasing the background noise-corrected source level. Unlike the standard corrections, the statistical background correction increases with steadiness of the background and is excluded from use when background fluctuation could be responsible for measured differences between the source and background noise levels. The statistical background noise correction has several advantages over the standard correction: (1) enveloping the true source with known confidence, (2) assuring physical source descriptions when measuring sources in fluctuating backgrounds, (3) reducing background corrected source descriptions by 1 to 8 dB for sources in steady backgrounds, and (4) providing a means to replace standardized background correction caps that incentivize against high precision grade methods.

  11. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site.

  12. 41 CFR 128-1.8001 - Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 128-1.8001 Section 128-1.8001 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 1-INTRODUCTION 1.80-Seismic Safety Program § 128-1.8001 Background. The...

  13. Introduction to the background field method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, L.F.; Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA

    1982-01-01

    The background field approach to calculations in gauge field theories is presented. Conventional functional techniques are reviewed and the background field method is introduced. Feynman rules and renormalization are discussed and, as an example, the Yang-Mills β function is computed. (author)

  14. 12 CFR 408.1 - Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Background. 408.1 Section 408.1 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES PROCEDURES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 408.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 U.S.C...

  15. Observing a Gravitational Wave Background With Lisa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tinto, M; Armstrong, J; Estabrook, F

    2000-01-01

    .... Comparison of the conventional Michelson interferometer observable with the fully-symmetric Sagnac data-type allows unambiguous discrimination between a gravitational wave background and instrumental noise. The method presented here can be used to detect a confusion-limited gravitational wave background.

  16. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 23.2 Section 23.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is... potential threats to the privacy of individuals to whom such data relates, policy guidelines for Federally...

  17. 16 CFR 1404.2 - Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Background. 1404.2 Section 1404.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS CELLULOSE INSULATION § 1404.2 Background. Based on available fire incident information, engineering analysis of the probable...

  18. Beam-gas Background Observations at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00214737; The ATLAS collaboration; Alici, Andrea; Lazic, Dragoslav-Laza; Alemany Fernandez, Reyes; Alessio, Federico; Bregliozzi, Giuseppe; Burkhardt, Helmut; Corti, Gloria; Guthoff, Moritz; Manousos, Athanasios; Sjoebaek, Kyrre; D'Auria, Saverio

    2017-01-01

    Observations of beam-induced background at LHC during 2015 and 2016 are presented in this paper. The four LHC experiments use the non-colliding bunches present in the physics-filling pattern of the accelerator to trigger on beam-gas interactions. During luminosity production the LHC experiments record the beam-gas interactions using dedicated background monitors. These data are sent to the LHC control system and are used to monitor the background levels at the experiments during accelerator operation. This is a very important measurement, since poor beam-induced background conditions can seriously affect the performance of the detectors. A summary of the evolution of the background levels during 2015 and 2016 is given in these proceedings.

  19. PENGARUH BACKGROUND MAHASISWA TERHADAP KINERJA AKADEMIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trianasari Angkawijaya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The Effect of Students’ Background on Academic Performance. This study examines the effect of background variables on the academic performance of accounting students in a private university in Surabaya. The background variables under study included previous academic performance, prior knowledge on accounting, sex, motivation, preparedness, and expectations. The results show that previous academic performance, motivation, and expectations have positive and significant effects on the students’ overall academic performance in accounting, while preparedness affects only the students’ performance in management accounting. In contrast, prior knowledge on accounting and sex do not give significant impacts to the students’ overall academic performance.These findings indicate the importance of previous aca­demic performance as well as motivation and expectations as background variables in current academic performance. Keywords: students’ background, academic performance, accounting Abstrak: Pengaruh Background Mahasiswa terhadap Kinerja Akademik. Penelitian ini mengkaji pengaruh variabel background terhadap kinerja akademik mahasiswa akuntansi di Universitas Surabaya. Lima variabel background utama dipergunakan, yaitu kinerja akademik sebelumnya, pengetahuan akun­tansi sebelumnya, jenis kelamin, motivasi, kesiapan, dan ekspektasi. Hipotesis diuji menggunakan model regresi linier berganda OLS dan Robust Standar Error. Hasil penelitian memerlihatkan bahwa kinerja akademik sebelumnya, motivasi, dan ekspektasi memiliki pengaruh positif signifikan terhadap kinerja akademik keseluruhan, sementara kesiapan memberikan pengaruh positif hanya pada kinerja akademik akuntansi manajemen. Sebaliknya, pengetahuan akuntansi sebelumnya dan jenis kelamin tidak memberi­kan pengaruh signifikan terhadap kinerja akademik keseluruhan. Temuan ini mengindikasikan bahwa kinerja akademik sebelumnya beserta motivasi dan ekspektasi adalah variabel background

  20. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cogmed Working Memory Training in School-Age Children with ADHD: A Replication in a Diverse Sample Using a Control Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, A.; Bedard, A. C.; Marks, D. J.; Feirsen, N.; Uderman, J. Z.; Chimiklis, A.; Rajwan, E.; Cornwell, M.; Anderson, L.; Zwilling, A.; Ramon, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cogmed Working Memory Training (CWMT) has received considerable attention as a promising intervention for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children. At the same time, methodological weaknesses in previous clinical trials call into question reported efficacy of CWMT. In particular, lack of equivalence…

  1. Definition of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage as an Outcome Event in Clinical Trials and Observational Studies Proposal of a Multidisciplinary Research Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.; Vermeulen, Marinus; van Gijn, Jan; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Wijdicks, Eelco F.; Muizelaar, J. Paul; Mendelow, A. David; Juvela, Seppo; Yonas, Howard; Terbrugge, Karel G.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Diringer, Michael N.; Broderick, Joseph P.; Dreier, Jens P.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose-In clinical trials and observational studies there is considerable inconsistency in the use of definitions to describe delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A major cause for this inconsistency is the combining of radiographic evidence of

  2. Precise muon drift tube detectors for high background rate conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engl, Albert

    2011-08-04

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS-experiment at the Large Hadron Collider consists of drift tube chambers, which provide the precise measurement of trajectories of traversing muons. In order to determine the momentum of the muons with high precision, the measurement of the position of the muon in a single tube has to be more accurate than {sigma}{<=}100 {mu}m. The large cross section of proton-proton-collisions and the high luminosity of the accelerator cause relevant background of neutrons and {gamma}s in the muon spectrometer. During the next decade a luminosity upgrade to 5.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned, which will increase the background counting rates considerably. In this context this work deals with the further development of the existing drift chamber technology to provide the required accuracy of the position measurement under high background conditions. Two approaches of improving the drift tube chambers are described: - In regions of moderate background rates a faster and more linear drift gas can provide precise position measurement without changing the existing hardware. - At very high background rates drift tube chambers consisting of tubes with a diameter of 15 mm are a valuable candidate to substitute the CSC muon chambers. The single tube resolution of the gas mixture Ar:CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} in the ratio of 96:3:1 Vol %, which is more linear and faster as the currently used drift gas Ar:CO{sub 2} in the ratio of 97:3 Vol %, was determined at the Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility at Garching and at high {gamma}-background counting rates at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The alternative gas mixture shows similar resolution without background. At high background counting rates it shows better resolution as the standard gas. To analyse the data the various parts of the setup have to be aligned precisely to each other. The change to an alternative gas mixture allows the use of the existing hardware. The second approach are drift tubes

  3. KIDNEY TRANSPLANT URODYNAMICS: NEUROPHYSIOLOGIC CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Berdichevskiy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing data from the literature and the results of own clinical the authors suggest the presence of its own physiological rhythmogenesis motility of the urinary system to ensure its functional viability after denervation in the process of donor kidney recоvery and its transplantation to the recipient. 

  4. Shaft and tunnel sealing considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Shukla, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Much of the emphasis of previous repository sealing research has been placed on plugging small diameter boreholes. It is increasingly evident that equal emphasis should now be given to shafts and tunnels which constitute more significant pathways between a repository and the biosphere. The paper discusses differences in requirements for sealing shafts and tunnels as compared with boreholes and the implications for seal design. Consideration is given to a design approach for shaft and tunnel seals based on a multiple component design concept, taking into account the requirements for retrievability of the waste. A work plan is developed for the future studies required to advance shaft and tunnel sealing technology to a level comparable with the existing technology for borehole sealing

  5. Sodium concrete reaction - Structural considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferskakis, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the sodium concrete reaction phenomenon, with emphasis on structural considerations, is presented. Available test results for limestone, basalt, and magnetite concrete with various test article configurations are reviewed. Generally, tests indicate reaction is self limiting before all sodium is used. Uncertainties, however, concerning the mechanism for penetration of sodium into concrete have resulted in different theories about a reaction model. Structural behavior may be significant in the progression of the reaction due to thermal-structuralchemical interactions involving tensile cracking, compressive crushing, or general deterioration of concrete and the exposure of fresh concrete surfaces to react with sodium. Structural behavior of test articles and potential factors that could enhance the progression of the reaction are discussed

  6. Biosimilars: Considerations for Oncology Nurses
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizgirda, Vida; Jacobs, Ira

    2017-04-01

    Biosimilars are developed to be highly similar to and treat the same conditions as licensed biologics. As they are approved and their use becomes more widespread, oncology nurses should be aware of their development and unique considerations. This article reviews properties of biosimilars; their regulation and approval process; the ways in which their quality, safety, and efficacy are evaluated; their postmarketing safety monitoring; and their significance to oncology nurses and oncology nursing.
. A search of PubMed and regulatory agency websites was conducted for references related to the development and use of biosimilars in oncology. 
. Because biologics are large, structurally complex molecules, biosimilars cannot be considered generic equivalents to licensed biologic products. Consequently, regulatory approval for biosimilars is different from approval for small-molecule generics. Oncology nurses are in a unique position to educate themselves, other clinicians, and patients and their families about biosimilars to ensure accurate understanding, as well as optimal and safe use, of biosimilars.

  7. Considerations for the transportation of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    In our society today the transportation of radioactive materials, and most particularly spent reactor fuel, is surrounded by considerable emotion and a wealth of information, good and bad. The transportation of these materials is viewed as unique and distinct from the transportation of other hazardous materials and as a particularly vulnerable component of the nuclear power activities of this nation. Added to this is the concept, widely held, that almost everyone is an expert on the transportation of radioactive materials. One significant contribution to this level of emotion is the notion that all roads (rail and highway), on which these goods will be transported, somehow traverse everyone's backyard. The issue of the transportation of spent fuel has thus become a political battleground. Perhaps this should not be surprising since it has all of the right characteristics for such politicization in that it is pervasive, emotional, and visible. In order that those involved in the discussion of this activity might be able to reach some rational conclusions, this paper offers some background information which might be useful to a broad range of individuals in developing their own perspectives. The intent is to address the safety of transporting spent fuel from a technical standpoint without the emotional content which is frequently a part of this argument

  8. String pair production in non homogeneous backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolognesi, S. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi” University of Pisa, and INFN - Sezione di Pisa,Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Rabinovici, E. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem,91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Tallarita, G. [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales,Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Santiago 7941169 (Chile)

    2016-04-28

    We consider string pair production in non homogeneous electric backgrounds. We study several particular configurations which can be addressed with the Euclidean world-sheet instanton technique, the analogue of the world-line instanton for particles. In the first case the string is suspended between two D-branes in flat space-time, in the second case the string lives in AdS and terminates on one D-brane (this realizes the holographic Schwinger effect). In some regions of parameter space the result is well approximated by the known analytical formulas, either the particle pair production in non-homogeneous background or the string pair production in homogeneous background. In other cases we see effects which are intrinsically stringy and related to the non-homogeneity of the background. The pair production is enhanced already for particles in time dependent electric field backgrounds. The string nature enhances this even further. For spacial varying electrical background fields the string pair production is less suppressed than the rate of particle pair production. We discuss in some detail how the critical field is affected by the non-homogeneity, for both time and space dependent electric field backgrouds. We also comment on what could be an interesting new prediction for the small field limit. The third case we consider is pair production in holographic confining backgrounds with homogeneous and non-homogeneous fields.

  9. String pair production in non homogeneous backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolognesi, S.; Rabinovici, E.; Tallarita, G.

    2016-01-01

    We consider string pair production in non homogeneous electric backgrounds. We study several particular configurations which can be addressed with the Euclidean world-sheet instanton technique, the analogue of the world-line instanton for particles. In the first case the string is suspended between two D-branes in flat space-time, in the second case the string lives in AdS and terminates on one D-brane (this realizes the holographic Schwinger effect). In some regions of parameter space the result is well approximated by the known analytical formulas, either the particle pair production in non-homogeneous background or the string pair production in homogeneous background. In other cases we see effects which are intrinsically stringy and related to the non-homogeneity of the background. The pair production is enhanced already for particles in time dependent electric field backgrounds. The string nature enhances this even further. For spacial varying electrical background fields the string pair production is less suppressed than the rate of particle pair production. We discuss in some detail how the critical field is affected by the non-homogeneity, for both time and space dependent electric field backgrouds. We also comment on what could be an interesting new prediction for the small field limit. The third case we consider is pair production in holographic confining backgrounds with homogeneous and non-homogeneous fields.

  10. Slavnov-Taylor constraints for nontrivial backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binosi, D.; Quadri, A.

    2011-01-01

    We devise an algebraic procedure for the evaluation of Green's functions in SU(N) Yang-Mills theory in the presence of a nontrivial background field. In the ghost-free sector the dependence of the vertex functional on the background is shown to be uniquely determined by the Slavnov-Taylor identities in terms of a certain 1-PI correlator of the covariant derivatives of the ghost and the antighost fields. At nonvanishing background this amplitude is shown to encode the quantum deformations to the tree-level background-quantum splitting. The approach only relies on the functional identities of the model (Slavnov-Taylor identities, b-equation, antighost equation) and thus it is valid beyond perturbation theory, and, in particular, in a lattice implementation of the background field method. As an example of the formalism we analyze the ghost two-point function and the Kugo-Ojima function in an instanton background in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory, quantized in the background Landau gauge.

  11. Sources of the Radio Background Considered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Stawarz, L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-22

    We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

  12. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB.

  13. Do instantons like a colorful background?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gies, H.; Pawlowski, J.M.; Wetterich, C. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Jaeckel, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    We investigate chiral symmetry breaking and color symmetry breaking in QCD. The effective potential of the corresponding scalar condensates is discussed in the presence of non-perturbative contributions from the semiclassical one-instanton sector. We concentrate on a color singlet scalar background which can describe chiral condensation, as well as a color cotet scalar background which can generate mass for the gluons. Whereas a non-vanishing singlet chiral field is favored by the instantons, we have found no indication for a preference of color octet backgrounds. (orig.)

  14. Environmental compliance considerations for the management of cultural resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.A.; Whitfield, S.; McGinnis, K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines three key considerations underlying the programmatic management of cultural resources that may be affected by a large federal project. These considerations are statutory background and the compliance process, cultural resource compliance tasks, and quality assurance. The first consideration addresses the legal requirements and steps that must be met and taken for federal agencies to fulfill their cultural resource compliance responsibilities. The second consideration focuses on the tasks that must be performed by technical specialists to facilitate related federal and state compliance actions. The third consideration ensures that compliance requirements are being properly fulfilled. In the technical literature and compliance planning, archaeological and historic sites and Native American cultural resources are grouped under the general heading of cultural resources. Also included under this heading are the traditions and resources of Folk societies. Cultural resources encompass both material and nonmaterial aspects of our cultural heritage and include buildings, structures, objects, sites, districts, archaeological resources, places of religious importance, and unique, distinctive, or unusual lifeways. For compliance purposes, it is useful to treat these resources within four roughly chronological culture-historical periods: prehistoric, ethnohistoric, historic, and contemporary. 6 refs., 6 tabs

  15. Effect of background music on auditory-verbal memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Matloubi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Music exists in all cultures; many scientists are seeking to understand how music effects cognitive development such as comprehension, memory, and reading skills. More recently, a considerable number of neuroscience studies on music have been developed. This study aimed to investigate the effects of null and positive background music in comparison with silence on auditory-verbal memory performance.Methods: Forty young adults (male and female with normal hearing, aged between 18 and 26, participated in this comparative-analysis study. An auditory and speech evaluation was conducted in order to investigate the effects of background music on working memory. Subsequently, the Rey auditory-verbal learning test was performed for three conditions: silence, positive, and null music.Results: The mean score of the Rey auditory-verbal learning test in silence condition was higher than the positive music condition (p=0.003 and the null music condition (p=0.01. The tests results did not reveal any gender differences.Conclusion: It seems that the presence of competitive music (positive and null music and the orientation of auditory attention have negative effects on the performance of verbal working memory. It is possibly owing to the intervention of music with verbal information processing in the brain.

  16. CERN-derived analysis of lunar radiation backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Svoboda, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The Moon produces radiation which background-limits scientific experiments there. Early analyses of these backgrounds have either failed to take into consideration the effect of charm in particle physics (because they pre-dated its discovery), or have used branching ratios which are no longer strictly valid (due to new accelerator data). We are presently investigating an analytical program for deriving muon and neutrino spectra generated by the Moon, converting an existing CERN computer program known as GEANT which does the same for the Earth. In so doing, this will (1) determine an accurate prompt neutrino spectrum produced by the lunar surface; (2) determine the lunar subsurface particle flux; (3) determine the consequence of charm production physics upon the lunar background radiation environment; and (4) provide an analytical tool for the NASA astrophysics community with which to begin an assessment of the Moon as a scientific laboratory versus its particle radiation environment. This will be done on a recurring basis with the latest experimental results of the particle data groups at Earth-based high-energy accelerators, in particular with the latest branching ratios for charmed meson decay. This will be accomplished for the first time as a full 3-dimensional simulation.

  17. Space Tourism: Orbital Debris Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, N.; Shajiee, S.; Moghani, T.; Bahrami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Space activities after a phase of research and development, political competition and national prestige have entered an era of real commercialization. Remote sensing, earth observation, and communication are among the areas in which this growing industry is facing competition and declining government money. A project like International Space Station, which draws from public money, has not only opened a window of real multinational cooperation, but also changed space travel from a mere fantasy into a real world activity. Besides research activities for sending man to moon and Mars and other outer planets, space travel has attracted a considerable attention in recent years in the form of space tourism. Four countries from space fairing nations are actively involved in the development of space tourism. Even, nations which are either in early stages of space technology development or just beginning their space activities, have high ambitions in this area. This is worth noting considering their limited resources. At present, trips to space are available, but limited and expensive. To move beyond this point to generally available trips to orbit and week long stays in LEO, in orbital hotels, some of the required basic transportations, living requirements, and technological developments required for long stay in orbit are already underway. For tourism to develop to a real everyday business, not only the price has to come down to meaningful levels, but also safety considerations should be fully developed to attract travelers' trust. A serious hazard to space activities in general and space tourism in particular is space debris in earth orbit. Orbiting debris are man-made objects left over by space operations, hazardous to space missions. Since the higher density of debris population occurs in low earth orbit, which is also the same orbit of interest to space tourism, a careful attention should be paid to the effect of debris on tourism activities. In this study, after a

  18. On the microwave background spectrum and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.

    1982-01-01

    We show that the combined measurement of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) intensity and noise can provide direct information on the temperature and the emissivity of the source responsible for the CBR. (orig.)

  19. Quantum background independence in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witten, E.

    1994-01-01

    Not only in physical string theories, but also in some highly simplified situations, background independence has been difficult to understand. It is argued that the ''holomorphic anomaly'' of Bershadsky, Cecotti, Ooguri and Vafa gives a fundamental explanation of some of the problems. Moreover, their anomaly equation can be interpreted in terms of a rather peculiar quantum version of background independence: in systems afflicted by the anomaly, background independence does not hold order by order in perturbation theory, but the exact partition function as a function of the coupling constants has a background independent interpretation as a state in an auxiliary quantum Hilbert space. The significance of this auxiliary space is otherwise unknown. (author). 23 refs

  20. Background-cross-section-dependent subgroup parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toshihisa

    2003-01-01

    A new set of subgroup parameters was derived that can reproduce the self-shielded cross section against a wide range of background cross sections. The subgroup parameters are expressed with a rational equation which numerator and denominator are expressed as the expansion series of background cross section, so that the background cross section dependence is exactly taken into account in the parameters. The advantage of the new subgroup parameters is that they can reproduce the self-shielded effect not only by group basis but also by subgroup basis. Then an adaptive method is also proposed which uses fitting procedure to evaluate the background-cross-section-dependence of the parameters. One of the simple fitting formula was able to reproduce the self-shielded subgroup cross section by less than 1% error from the precise evaluation. (author)

  1. REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST For Background ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    sbickram

    2012-07-10

    Jul 10, 2012 ... the applicant's qualifications and ability to undertake the hot spot background study. ... any interviews, presentations and subsequent proposals, are the sole ... The program will focus on increasing the resilience of the most ...

  2. Background music: effects on attention performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yi-Nuo; Huang, Rong-Hwa; Chiang, Hsin-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that noise may affect worker attention. However, some background music in the work environment can increase worker satisfaction and productivity. This study compared how music with, and without, lyrics affects human attention. One hundred and two participants, aged 20-24 years, were recruited into this study. Fifty-six males and 46 females participated in this study. Background music with, and without lyrics, was tested for effects on listener concentration in attention testing using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) study. The comparison results revealed that background music with lyrics had significant negative effects on concentration and attention. The findings suggest that, if background music is played in the work environment, music without lyrics is preferable because songs with lyrics are likely to reduce worker attention and performance.

  3. History and background of the project

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jauhari, P.; Nair, R.R.

    The history of oceanography, the discovery of manganese nodules and the background of the developments in nodule research and mining is given The first nodules were collected in 1981 on board the research vessel R V Gaveshani Following the success...

  4. 47 CFR 215.1 - Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... POINT FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE (EMP) INFORMATION § 215.1 Background. (a) The nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is part of the complex environment produced by nuclear explosions. It consists of transient...

  5. 32 CFR 770.49 - Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Washington § 770.49 Background. (a) Puget Sound Naval Shipyard is a major naval ship repair facility, with... interruption. Additionally, most of Puget Sound Naval Shipyard is dedicated to heavy industrial activity where...

  6. Impact of the mitochondrial genetic background in complex III deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Carmen Gil Borlado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent years clinical evidence has emphasized the importance of the mtDNA genetic background that hosts a primary pathogenic mutation in the clinical expression of mitochondrial disorders, but little experimental confirmation has been provided. We have analyzed the pathogenic role of a novel homoplasmic mutation (m.15533 A>G in the cytochrome b (MT-CYB gene in a patient presenting with lactic acidosis, seizures, mild mental delay, and behaviour abnormalities. METHODOLOGY: Spectrophotometric analyses of the respiratory chain enzyme activities were performed in different tissues, the whole muscle mitochondrial DNA of the patient was sequenced, and the novel mutation was confirmed by PCR-RFLP. Transmitochondrial cybrids were constructed to confirm the pathogenicity of the mutation, and assembly/stability studies were carried out in fibroblasts and cybrids by means of mitochondrial translation inhibition in combination with blue native gel electrophoresis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biochemical analyses revealed a decrease in respiratory chain complex III activity in patient's skeletal muscle, and a combined enzyme defect of complexes III and IV in fibroblasts. Mutant transmitochondrial cybrids restored normal enzyme activities and steady-state protein levels, the mutation was mildly conserved along evolution, and the proband's mother and maternal aunt, both clinically unaffected, also harboured the homoplasmic mutation. These data suggested a nuclear genetic origin of the disease. However, by forcing the de novo functioning of the OXPHOS system, a severe delay in the biogenesis of the respiratory chain complexes was observed in the mutants, which demonstrated a direct functional effect of the mitochondrial genetic background. CONCLUSIONS: Our results point to possible pitfalls in the detection of pathogenic mitochondrial mutations, and highlight the role of the genetic mtDNA background in the development of mitochondrial disorders.

  7. Mathematical Background of Public Key Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Gerhard; Lange, Tanja

    2005-01-01

    The two main systems used for public key cryptography are RSA and protocols based on the discrete logarithm problem in some cyclic group. We focus on the latter problem and state cryptographic protocols and mathematical background material.......The two main systems used for public key cryptography are RSA and protocols based on the discrete logarithm problem in some cyclic group. We focus on the latter problem and state cryptographic protocols and mathematical background material....

  8. A Practical Theorem on Gravitational Wave Backgrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Phinney, E. S.

    2001-01-01

    There is an extremely simple relationship between the spectrum of the gravitational wave background produced by a cosmological distribution of discrete gravitational wave sources, the total time-integrated energy spectrum of an individual source, and the present-day comoving number density of remnants. Stated in this way, the background is entirely independent of the cosmology, and only weakly dependent on the evolutionary history of the sources. This relationship allows one easily to compute...

  9. Isotherms clustering in cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bershadskii, A.

    2006-01-01

    Isotherms clustering in cosmic microwave background (CMB) has been studied using the 3-year WMAP data on cosmic microwave background radiation. It is shown that the isotherms clustering could be produced by the baryon-photon fluid turbulence in the last scattering surface. The Taylor-microscale Reynolds number of the turbulence is estimated directly from the CMB data as Re λ ∼10 2

  10. Classification of supersymmetric backgrounds of string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gran, U.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.; Roest, D.

    2007-01-01

    We review the recent progress made towards the classification of supersymmetric solutions in ten and eleven dimensions with emphasis on those of IIB supergravity. In particular, the spinorial geometry method is outlined and adapted to nearly maximally supersymmetric backgrounds. We then demonstrate its effectiveness by classifying the maximally supersymmetric IIB G-backgrounds and by showing that N=31 IIB solutions do not exist. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Superstring gravitational wave backgrounds with spacetime supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kiritsis, Elias B; Lüst, Dieter; Kiritsis, E; Kounnas, C; Lüst, D

    1994-01-01

    We analyse the stringy gravitational wave background based on the current algebra E.sup(c).sub(2). We determine its exact spectrum and construct the modular invariant vacuum energy. The corresponding N=1 extension is also constructed. The algebra is again mapped to free bosons and fermions and we show that this background has N=4 (N=2) unbroken spacetime supersymmetry in the type II (heterotic case).

  12. Moving object detection using background subtraction

    CERN Document Server

    Shaikh, Soharab Hossain; Chaki, Nabendu

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief presents a comprehensive survey of the existing methodologies of background subtraction methods. It presents a framework for quantitative performance evaluation of different approaches and summarizes the public databases available for research purposes. This well-known methodology has applications in moving object detection from video captured with a stationery camera, separating foreground and background objects and object classification and recognition. The authors identify common challenges faced by researchers including gradual or sudden illumination change, dynamic bac

  13. TRIGA reactor health physics considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.G.

    1970-01-01

    The factors influencing the complexity of a TRIGA health physics program are discussed in details in order to serve as a basis for later consideration of various specific aspects of a typical TRIGA health physics program. The health physics program must be able to provide adequate assistance, control, and safety for individuals ranging from the inexperienced student to the experienced postgraduate researcher. Some of the major aspects discussed are: effluent release and control; reactor area air monitoring; area monitoring; adjacent facilities monitoring; portable instrumentation, personnel monitoring. TRIGA reactors have not been associated with many significant occurrences in the area of health physics, although some operational occurrences have had health physics implications. One specific occurrence at OSU is described involving the detection of non-fission-product radioactive particulates by the continuous air monitor on the reactor top. The studies of this particular situation indicate that most of the particulate activity is coming from the rotating rack and exhausting to the reactor top through the rotating rack loading tube

  14. MARKETING CONSIDERATIONS ON BRAND COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-C. Budac

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most consumers spend an important part of their free time looking for online information about the brands before taking a decision to purchase. The Internet is the main factor which has led to a considerable increase of the time allotted by consumers for search and comparing information about brands, as a step preceding the decision to purchase and also one of the most important factors that influence the interaction between the brand and the consumer. Although the general trend is that the public to become more active and more involved in the choice of the brand, consumer's responses to its messages obviously depend on cultural, social or economic factors. The work has the purpose to clarify what brand community means and how it appeared - if it was really built from scratch or it has already existed in a latent way and it must only be recognized - the characteristics of successful communities, which of the objectives of the brands can be achieved by means of these groups, what is the role of social media in the development of these communities, what kind of types of mem¬bers are likely to be encountered inside of the online communities and what is their proportion for each and which are the research methodologies that can give support to companies in monitoring these groups.

  15. Ethical Considerations of Preclinical Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Goldenthal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The numbers of animal tests being conducted are on a sharp incline.  Much of this increase is directly due to our ability to generate transgenic models and knock-outs, thereby increasing the validity of the animal model but not necessarily correlating directly with any translational medical benefits to the human counterpart.  In spite of our best efforts, there still exist species differences that prevent the application directly from animal to human, and in some examples having a completely different and adverse effect from that seen in the animal model. There are several ways in which we can improve the opportunity for a positive test outcome and at the same time reduce the animal usage which is associated with our current animal testing practices. The benefit of the 3R’s is that they encourage us not only to avoid wastage of life but that they require us to provide considerable foresight and extrapolated thought before directly engaging in the preclinical testing phase.

  16. CONSIDERATIONS ON CONSUMER PERCEIVED RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Catalina Timiras

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we identified a number of factors influencing the consumers’ perceived risk. In the first part we conducted a review of the main issues that define the perceived risk by the consumer at the time of purchase, some of the lines of action of the organizations to diminish this risk perception and a number of influencing factors presented in the literature, with significant impact on the intensity with which risk is perceived by consumers. The second part of the article is based on the statistical information regarding e-commerce market, market in which the perceived risk plays an important role in the purchasing decision. Thus, based on available official statistics provided by Eurostat we have revealed the existence of certain links between electronic commerce and orientation towards risk and income levels, age and consumer educational level. The review is not intended to be exhaustive, the study taking into consideration only those links that can be identified from using official statistical data.

  17. Considerations regarding dosimetry in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilday, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The most important consideration when deciding whether or not to perform a nuclear medicine procedure in a child is whether the benefit of the information obtained exceeds the potential risk. In most circumstances the potential benefits are well define. No patient should be studied unless the question to be answered is clearly understood and there is a reasonable change to answer it. To properly perform procedures in children one must not only have a schedule to scale the radiopharmaceutical dose to be administered to the child's body surface area but also one must have an established minimum dose for small babies and infants. There is no point in under-dosing the patient as then the information will not be obtained from the nuclear medicine society. The value of nuclear medicine in the pediatric population cannot be underestimated. It is often the single most important test that can be performed diagnostically. For these reasons it is very important to understand the proper relationship of an adequate study versus the minimization of radiation. 3 references

  18. Enabling fast charging - Vehicle considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meintz, Andrew; Zhang, Jiucai; Vijayagopal, Ram; Kreutzer, Cory; Ahmed, Shabbir; Bloom, Ira; Burnham, Andrew; Carlson, Richard B.; Dias, Fernando; Dufek, Eric J.; Francfort, James; Hardy, Keith; Jansen, Andrew N.; Keyser, Matthew; Markel, Anthony; Michelbacher, Christopher; Mohanpurkar, Manish; Pesaran, Ahmad; Scoffield, Don; Shirk, Matthew; Stephens, Thomas; Tanim, Tanvir

    2017-11-01

    To achieve a successful increase in the plug-in battery electric vehicle (BEV) market, it is anticipated that a significant improvement in battery performance is required to increase the range that BEVs can travel and the rate at which they can be recharged. While the range that BEVs can travel on a single recharge is improving, the recharge rate is still much slower than the refueling rate of conventional internal combustion engine vehicles. To achieve comparable recharge times, we explore the vehicle considerations of charge rates of at least 400 kW. Faster recharge is expected to significantly mitigate the perceived deficiencies for long-distance transportation, to provide alternative charging in densely populated areas where overnight charging at home may not be possible, and to reduce range anxiety for travel within a city when unplanned charging may be required. This substantial increase in charging rate is expected to create technical issues in the design of the battery system and the vehicle's electrical architecture that must be resolved. This work focuses on vehicle system design and total recharge time to meet the goals of implementing improved charge rates and the impacts of these expected increases on system voltage and vehicle components.

  19. Aircraft and background noise annoyance effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate annoyance of multiple noise sources, two experiments were conducted. The first experiment, which used 48 subjects, was designed to establish annoyance-noise level functions for three community noise sources presented individually: jet aircraft flyovers, air conditioner, and traffic. The second experiment, which used 216 subjects, investigated the effects of background noise on aircraft annoyance as a function of noise level and spectrum shape; and the differences between overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance. In both experiments, rated annoyance was the dependent measure. Results indicate that the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for traffic is significantly different from that of flyover and air conditioner noise and that further research was justified to determine the influence of the two background noises on overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance (e.g., experiment two). In experiment two, total noise exposure, signal-to-noise ratio, and background source type were found to have effects on all three types of annoyance. Thus, both signal-to-noise ratio, and the background source must be considered when trying to determine community response to combined noise sources.

  20. Low energy background radiation in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, D.V.

    1980-01-01

    Spectral distribution of background radiation at 9 locations spread all over India has been measured. Specifications of the counting set-up standardised for measurement are given. At one of the places, the background spectrum was measured with four different types of detectors. A broad peak in 60-100 keV with differing intensity and standard deviation is observed in all the spectra. In the Kalpakkam area, the peak near the seashore is observed to be more intense than away from the shore. This could be due to the presence of monazite sands on the seashore. The natural background radiation is observed to have a steep rise below 20 keV. Peak intensity is found to be independent of both the location (i.e. the source of energy) and the type of detector used for measurement. The calculated spectra due to multiple scattered radiation (with a nominal source energy of 1 MeV) through paraffin wax and the measured background spectrum with the detector shielded with 20 cm wax show good agreement above 40 keV. This shows that 80 keV hump in the natural background radiation is a property of air. The peak, therefore, in the spectra of natural background radiation is essentially a property of medium and it is independent of location or detector. (M.G.B.)