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Sample records for backbone protein design

  1. Orientation-dependent backbone-only residue pair scoring functions for fixed backbone protein design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordner Andrew J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical scoring functions have proven useful in protein structure modeling. Most such scoring functions depend on protein side chain conformations. However, backbone-only scoring functions do not require computationally intensive structure optimization and so are well suited to protein design, which requires fast score evaluation. Furthermore, scoring functions that account for the distinctive relative position and orientation preferences of residue pairs are expected to be more accurate than those that depend only on the separation distance. Results Residue pair scoring functions for fixed backbone protein design were derived using only backbone geometry. Unlike previous studies that used spherical harmonics to fit 2D angular distributions, Gaussian Mixture Models were used to fit the full 3D (position only and 6D (position and orientation distributions of residue pairs. The performance of the 1D (residue separation only, 3D, and 6D scoring functions were compared by their ability to identify correct threading solutions for a non-redundant benchmark set of protein backbone structures. The threading accuracy was found to steadily increase with increasing dimension, with the 6D scoring function achieving the highest accuracy. Furthermore, the 3D and 6D scoring functions were shown to outperform side chain-dependent empirical potentials from three other studies. Next, two computational methods that take advantage of the speed and pairwise form of these new backbone-only scoring functions were investigated. The first is a procedure that exploits available sequence data by averaging scores over threading solutions for homologs. This was evaluated by applying it to the challenging problem of identifying interacting transmembrane alpha-helices and found to further improve prediction accuracy. The second is a protein design method for determining the optimal sequence for a backbone structure by applying Belief Propagation

  2. Backbone flexibility in protein design theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Alyce

    The role of backbone flexibility in protein design was studied. First, the effect of explicit backbone motion on the selection of amino acids in protein design was assessed in the core of the streptococcal protein Gβ1 domain (Gβ1). Concerted backbone motion was introduced by varying Gβ1's supersecondary structure parameter values. The stability and structural flexibility of seven of the redesigned proteins were determined experimentally. Core variants containing as many as six of ten possible mutations retained native-like properties. This result demonstrates that backbone flexibility can be combined with amino acid side-chain selection and that the selection algorithm is sufficiently robust to tolerate perturbations as large as 15% of the native parameter values. Second, a general, quantitative design method for computing de novo backbone templates was developed. The method had to compute atomic resolution backbones compatible with the atomistic sequence selection algorithm we were using and it had to be applicable to all protein motifs. We again developed a method that uses super-secondary structure parameters to determine the orientation among secondary structural elements, given a target protein fold. Possible backbone arrangements were screened using a cost function which evaluates core packing, hydrogen bonding, loop closure, and backbone torsional geometry. Given a specified number of residues for each secondary structural element, a family of optimal configurations was found. We chose three motifs to test our method (ββα, βαβ, and αα) since their combination could be used to approximate most possible backbone fold. The best structure found for the ββα motif is similar to a zinc finger, and the best structure for the ββα motif is similar to a segment of a β-barrel. The backbone obtained for the αα motif resembles minimized protein A. Last, our backbone design method was evaluated by testing the thermal stability and structural properties

  3. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian (UNC); (Buffalo)

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  4. RosettaRemodel: a generalized framework for flexible backbone protein design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ssu Huang

    Full Text Available We describe RosettaRemodel, a generalized framework for flexible protein design that provides a versatile and convenient interface to the Rosetta modeling suite. RosettaRemodel employs a unified interface, called a blueprint, which allows detailed control over many aspects of flexible backbone protein design calculations. RosettaRemodel allows the construction and elaboration of customized protocols for a wide range of design problems ranging from loop insertion and deletion, disulfide engineering, domain assembly, loop remodeling, motif grafting, symmetrical units, to de novo structure modeling.

  5. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Ollikainen

    Full Text Available Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein-ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art "fixed backbone" design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new "coupled moves" design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein-ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution.

  6. De novo backbone and sequence design of an idealized alpha/beta-barrel protein: Evidence of stable tertiary structure

    OpenAIRE

    Offredi, Fabrice; Dubail, Fabien; Kischel, Philippe; Sarinski, K.; Stern, A S; Van de Weerdt, Cécile; Hoch, J. C.; Prosperi, Christelle; François, Jean-Marie; Mayo, S. L.; Martial, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    We have designed, synthesized, and characterized a 216 amino acid residue sequence encoding a putative idealized alpha/beta-barrel protein. The design was elaborated in two steps. First, the idealized backbone was defined with geometric parameters representing our target fold: a central eight parallel-stranded beta-sheet surrounded by eight parallel alpha-helices, connected together with short structural turns on both sides of the barrel. An automated sequence selection algorithm, based on th...

  7. Prediction of mutational tolerance in HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase using flexible backbone protein design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Humphris-Narayanan

    Full Text Available Predicting which mutations proteins tolerate while maintaining their structure and function has important applications for modeling fundamental properties of proteins and their evolution; it also drives progress in protein design. Here we develop a computational model to predict the tolerated sequence space of HIV-1 protease reachable by single mutations. We assess the model by comparison to the observed variability in more than 50,000 HIV-1 protease sequences, one of the most comprehensive datasets on tolerated sequence space. We then extend the model to a second protein, reverse transcriptase. The model integrates multiple structural and functional constraints acting on a protein and uses ensembles of protein conformations. We find the model correctly captures a considerable fraction of protease and reverse-transcriptase mutational tolerance and shows comparable accuracy using either experimentally determined or computationally generated structural ensembles. Predictions of tolerated sequence space afforded by the model provide insights into stability-function tradeoffs in the emergence of resistance mutations and into strengths and limitations of the computational model.

  8. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Targeting Protein Backbone: An Effective Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki (GSU); (Kumamoto Univ., Japan); (Purdue)

    2008-06-03

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) and their utilization in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been a major turning point in the management of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite the successes in disease management and the decrease of HIV/AIDS-related mortality, several drawbacks continue to hamper first-generation protease inhibitor therapies. The rapid emergence of drug resistance has become the most urgent concern because it renders current treatments ineffective and therefore compels the scientific community to continue efforts in the design of inhibitors that can efficiently combat drug resistance.

  9. Adding diverse noncanonical backbones to rosetta: enabling peptidomimetic design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Drew

    Full Text Available Peptidomimetics are classes of molecules that mimic structural and functional attributes of polypeptides. Peptidomimetic oligomers can frequently be synthesized using efficient solid phase synthesis procedures similar to peptide synthesis. Conformationally ordered peptidomimetic oligomers are finding broad applications for molecular recognition and for inhibiting protein-protein interactions. One critical limitation is the limited set of design tools for identifying oligomer sequences that can adopt desired conformations. Here, we present expansions to the ROSETTA platform that enable structure prediction and design of five non-peptidic oligomer scaffolds (noncanonical backbones, oligooxopiperazines, oligo-peptoids, [Formula: see text]-peptides, hydrogen bond surrogate helices and oligosaccharides. This work is complementary to prior additions to model noncanonical protein side chains in ROSETTA. The main purpose of our manuscript is to give a detailed description to current and future developers of how each of these noncanonical backbones was implemented. Furthermore, we provide a general outline for implementation of new backbone types not discussed here. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we describe the first tests of the ROSETTA molecular mechanics energy function in the context of oligooxopiperazines, using quantum mechanical calculations as comparison points, scanning through backbone and side chain torsion angles for a model peptidomimetic. Finally, as an example of a novel design application, we describe the automated design of an oligooxopiperazine that inhibits the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. For the general biological and bioengineering community, several noncanonical backbones have been incorporated into web applications that allow users to freely and rapidly test the presented protocols (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org. This work helps address the peptidomimetic community's need for an automated and expandable

  10. Geometry motivated alternative view on local protein backbone structures

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharias, Jan; Knapp, Ernst Walter

    2013-01-01

    We present an alternative to the classical Ramachandran plot (R-plot) to display local protein backbone structure. Instead of the (ϕ, ψ)-backbone angles relating to the chemical architecture of polypeptides generic helical parameters are used. These are the rotation or twist angle ϑ and the helical rise parameter d. Plots with these parameters provide a different view on the nature of local protein backbone structures. It allows to display the local structures in polar (d, ϑ)-coordinates, whi...

  11. Determination of Protein Backbone Structures from Residual Dipolar Couplings

    OpenAIRE

    Prestegard, J H; Mayer, K. L.; Valafar, H.; Benison, G. C.

    2005-01-01

    There are a number of circumstances where a focus on determination of the backbone structure of a protein, as opposed to a complete all-atom structure, may be appropriate. This is particularly the case for structures determined as a part of a structural genomics initiative where computational modeling of many sequentially related structures from the backbone of a single family representative is anti...

  12. A sampling approach for protein backbone fragment conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J Y; Zhang, W

    2013-01-01

    In protein structure prediction, backbone fragment bias information can narrow down the conformational space of the whole polypeptide chain significantly. Unlike existing methods that use fragments as building blocks, the paper presents a probabilistic sampling approach for protein backbone torsion angles by modelling angular correlation of (phi, psi) with a directional statistics distribution. Given a protein sequence and secondary structure information, this method samples backbone fragments conformations by using a backtrack sampling algorithm for the hidden Markov model with multiple inputs and a single output. The proposed approach is applied to a fragment library, and some well-known structural motifs are sampled very well on the optimal path. Computational results show that the method can help to obtain native-like backbone fragments conformations. PMID:23777175

  13. Automated protein backbone assignment using the projection-decomposition approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral projection experiments by NMR in conjunction with decomposition analysis have been previously introduced for the backbone assignment of proteins; various pulse sequences as well as the behaviour with low signal-to-noise or chemical shift degeneracy have been illustrated. As a guide for routine applications of this combined tool, we provide here a systematic analysis on different types of proteins using welldefined run-time parameters. As a second result of this study, the backbone assignment module SHABBA was extensively rewritten and improved. Calculations on ubiquitin yielded again fully correct and nearly complete backbone and CHβ assignments. For the 128 residue long azurin, missing assignments mostly affect Hα and Hβ. Among the remaining backbone (plus Cβ) nuclei 97.5% could be assigned with 1.0% differences to a reference. Finally, the new SHABBA algorithm was applied to projections recorded for a yeast histone protein domain at room temperature, where the protein is subject to partial unfolding: this leads to unobservable resonances (about a dozen missing signals in a normal 15N-HSQC) and extensive degeneracy among the resonances. From the clearly observable residues, 97.5% of the backbone and CHβresonances could be assigned, of which only 0.8 % showed differences to published shifts. An additional study on the protein MMP20, which exhibits spectral difficulties to an even larger extent, explores the limitations of the approach.

  14. Local backbone structure prediction of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Benros, Cristina; Gautier, Romain; Valadié, Héléne; Hazout, Serge; Etchebest, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the PDB structures has led us to define a new set of small 3D structural prototypes called Protein Blocks (PBs). This structural alphabet includes 16 PBs, each one is defined by the (phi, psi) dihedral angles of 5 consecutive residues. The amino acid distributions observed in sequence windows encompassing these PBs are used to predict by a Bayesian approach the local 3D structure of proteins from the sole knowledge of their sequences. LocPred is a software which allows the users to submit a protein sequence and performs a prediction in terms of PBs. The prediction results are given both textually and graphically. PMID:15724288

  15. Increasing protein production by directed vector backbone evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob, Felix; Lehmann, Christian; Martinez, Ronny; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms was a key enabling technology for the rapid development of industrial and molecular biotechnology. However, despite all progress the improvement of protein production is an ongoing challenge and of high importance for cost-effective enzyme production. With the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for vector backbone optimization we report a novel directed evolution based approach to increase protein production levels by randoml...

  16. The orientational preferences of backbones of proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying; WANG Jun; XUE Bin; WANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    The orientation between the backboneresidues of proteins is defined based on the local configurations and the corresponding preferences are analyzed by statistics. It is found that all the residue pairs have some specific preferences of orientations. The statistical analysis is mainly concentrated in the orientational distributions for two kinds of groupings of residues based on the hydrophobicity and secondary structural features. The statistics for such two types of groupings shows different orientational preferences. It is found that for the former grouping the orientational preference is rather weak,while for the later a kind of strong orientational preferences. This suggests that the formation of local structures and of secondary structures are highly related to the orientational preferences.

  17. Protein-Backbone Thermodynamics across the Membrane Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamics of insertion of a protein in a membrane depends on the fine interplay between backbone and side-chain contributions interacting with the lipid environment. Using computer simulations, we probe how different descriptions of the backbone glycyl unit affect the thermodynamics of insertion of individual residues, dipeptides, and entire transmembrane helices. Due to the lack of reference data, we first introduce an efficient methodology to estimate atomistic potential of mean force (PMF) curves from a series of representative and uncorrelated coarse-grained (CG) snapshots. We find strong discrepancies between two CG models, Martini and PLUM, against reference atomistic PMFs and experiments. Atomistic simulations suggest a weak free energy of insertion between water and a POPC membrane for the glycyl unit, in overall agreement with experimental results despite severe assumptions in our calculations. We show that refining the backbone contribution in PLUM significantly improves the PMF of insertion of the WALP16 transmembrane peptide. An improper balance between the glycyl backbone and the attached side chain will lead to energetic artifacts, rationalizing Martini's overstabilization of WALP's adsorbed interfacial state. It illustrates difficulties associated with free-energy-based parametrizations of single-residue models, as the relevant free energy of partitioning used for force-field parametrization does not arise from the entire residue but rather the solvent-accessible chemical groups. PMID:27138459

  18. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    OpenAIRE

    Sharley, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure....

  19. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and non-polyproline helix such as alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure. The electrostatic properties including permittivity of amino acid residue sidegroups influence the electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide. The significance of this factor relative to other factors in protein folding depends on the magnitude of electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide, and preliminary protein-scale calculations of the magnitude of these components suggest this factor warrants investigation in ...

  20. A Generic Program for Multistate Protein Design

    OpenAIRE

    Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Jacak, Ron; Stranges, P. Benjamin; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Some protein design tasks cannot be modeled by the traditional single state design strategy of finding a sequence that is optimal for a single fixed backbone. Such cases require multistate design, where a single sequence is threaded onto multiple backbones (states) and evaluated for its strengths and weaknesses on each backbone. For example, to design a protein that can switch between two specific conformations, it is necessary to to find a sequence that is compatible with both backbone confo...

  1. Design of an IPTV Multicast System for Internet Backbone Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, D.; Szymanski, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    The design of an IPTV multicast system for the Internet backbone network is presented and explored through extensive simulations. In the proposed system, a resource reservation algorithm such as RSVP, IntServ, or DiffServ is used to reserve resources (i.e., bandwidth and buffer space) in each router in an IP multicast tree. Each router uses an Input-Queued, Output-Queued, or Crosspoint-Queued switch architecture with unity speedup. A recently proposed Recursive Fair Stochastic Matrix Decompos...

  2. Design of an IPTV Multicast System for Internet Backbone Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of an IPTV multicast system for the Internet backbone network is presented and explored through extensive simulations. In the proposed system, a resource reservation algorithm such as RSVP, IntServ, or DiffServ is used to reserve resources (i.e., bandwidth and buffer space in each router in an IP multicast tree. Each router uses an Input-Queued, Output-Queued, or Crosspoint-Queued switch architecture with unity speedup. A recently proposed Recursive Fair Stochastic Matrix Decomposition algorithm used to compute near-perfect transmission schedules for each IP router. The IPTV traffic is shaped at the sources using Application-Specific Token Bucker Traffic Shapers, to limit the burstiness of incoming network traffic. The IPTV traffic is shaped at the destinations using Application-Specific Playback Queues, to remove residual network jitter and reconstruct the original bursty IPTV video streams at each destination. All IPTV traffic flows are regenerated at the destinations with essentially zero delay jitter and essentially-perfect QoS. The destination nodes deliver the IPTV streams to the ultimate end users using the same IPTV multicast system over a regional Metropolitan Area Network. It is shown that all IPTV traffic is delivered with essentially-perfect end-to-end QoS, with deterministic bounds on the maximum delay and jitter on each video frame. Detailed simulations of an IPTV distribution system, multicasting several hundred high-definition IPTV video streams over several essentially saturated IP backbone networks are presented.

  3. Simultaneous NMR assignment of backbone and side chain amides in large proteins with IS-TROSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new strategy for the simultaneous NMR assignment of both backbone and side chain amides in large proteins with isotopomer-selective transverse-relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (IS-TROSY) is reported. The method considers aspects of both the NMR sample preparation and the experimental design. First, the protein is dissolved in a buffer with 50%H2O/50%D2O in order to promote the population of semideuterated NHD isotopomers in side chain amides of Asn/Gln residues. Second, a 13C'-coupled 2D 15N-1H IS-TROSY spectrum provides a stereospecific distinction between the geminal protons in the E and Z configurations of the carboxyamide group. Third, a suite of IS-TROSY-based triple-resonance NMR experiments, e.g. 3D IS-TROSY-HNCA and 3D IS-TROSY-HNCACB, are designed to correlate aliphatic carbon atoms with backbone amides and, for Asn/Gln residues, at the same time with side chain amides. The NMR assignment procedure is similar to that for small proteins using conventional 3D HNCA/3D HNCACB spectra, in which, however, signals from NH2 groups are often very weak or even missing due to the use of broad-band proton decoupling schemes and NOE data have to be used as a remedy. For large proteins, the use of conventional TROSY experiments makes resonances of side chain amides not observable at all. The application of IS-TROSY experiments to the 35-kDa yeast cytosine deaminase has established a complete resonance assignment for the backbone and stereospecific assignment for side chain amides, which otherwise could not be achieved with existing NMR experiments. Thus, the development of IS-TROSY-based method provides new opportunities for the NMR study of important structural and biological roles of carboxyamides and side chain moieties of arginine and lysine residues in large proteins as well as amino moieties in nucleic acids

  4. Radiation safety system (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication and installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmarth, J.E.; Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.

    1998-12-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) Backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system insuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS Backbones control the safety fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low energy beam transport. The Backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the Backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two Linac Backbone segments and experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3,500 feet from beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The Backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely.

  5. Radiation safety system (RSS) backbones: Design, engineering, fabrication and installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) Backbones are part of an electrical/electronic/mechanical system insuring safe access and exclusion of personnel to areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator. The RSS Backbones control the safety fusible beam plugs which terminate transmission of accelerated ion beams in response to predefined conditions. Any beam or access fault of the backbone inputs will cause insertion of the beam plugs in the low energy beam transport. The Backbones serve the function of tying the beam plugs to the access control systems, beam spill monitoring systems and current-level limiting systems. In some ways the Backbones may be thought of as a spinal column with beam plugs at the head and nerve centers along the spinal column. The two Linac Backbone segments and experimental area segments form a continuous cable plant over 3,500 feet from beam plugs to the tip on the longest tail. The Backbones were installed in compliance with current safety standards, such as installation of the two segments in separate conduits or tray. Monitoring for ground-faults and input wiring verification was an added enhancement to the system. The system has the capability to be tested remotely

  6. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Amino-bis-tetrahydrofuran Derivatives as P2-Ligands to Enhance Backbone-Binding Interactions. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Osswald, Heather L.; Sheri, Venkat Reddy; Kassekert, Luke A.; Chen, Shujing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Hayashi, Hironori; Aoki, Manabu; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki (GSU); (Kumamoto); (Purdue)

    2015-10-30

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of very potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to improve backbone ligand–binding site interactions, we have incorporated basic-amines at the C4 position of the bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) ring. We speculated that these substituents would make hydrogen bonding interactions in the flap region of HIV-1 protease. Synthesis of these inhibitors was performed diastereoselectively. A number of inhibitors displayed very potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 25f, 25i, and 25j were evaluated against a number of highly-PI-resistant HIV-1 strains, and they exhibited improved antiviral activity over darunavir. Two high resolution X-ray structures of 25f- and 25g-bound HIV-1 protease revealed unique hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone carbonyl group of Gly48 as well as with the backbone NH of Gly48 in the flap region of the enzyme active site. These ligand–binding site interactions are possibly responsible for their potent activity.

  7. Reconstruction of protein backbones from the BriX collection of canonical protein fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Lies; Reumers, Joke; Tur, Vicente; Stricher, François; Lenaerts, Tom; Serrano, Luis; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2008-05-01

    As modeling of changes in backbone conformation still lacks a computationally efficient solution, we developed a discretisation of the conformational states accessible to the protein backbone similar to the successful rotamer approach in side chains. The BriX fragment database, consisting of fragments from 4 to 14 residues long, was realized through identification of recurrent backbone fragments from a non-redundant set of high-resolution protein structures. BriX contains an alphabet of more than 1,000 frequently observed conformations per peptide length for 6 different variation levels. Analysis of the performance of BriX revealed an average structural coverage of protein structures of more than 99% within a root mean square distance (RMSD) of 1 Angstrom. Globally, we are able to reconstruct protein structures with an average accuracy of 0.48 Angstrom RMSD. As expected, regular structures are well covered, but, interestingly, many loop regions that appear irregular at first glance are also found to form a recurrent structural motif, albeit with lower frequency of occurrence than regular secondary structures. Larger loop regions could be completely reconstructed from smaller recurrent elements, between 4 and 8 residues long. Finally, we observed that a significant amount of short sequences tend to display strong structural ambiguity between alpha helix and extended conformations. When the sequence length increases, this so-called sequence plasticity is no longer observed, illustrating the context dependency of polypeptide structures. PMID:18483555

  8. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N Experiment to Facilitate the Assignment of Backbone Resonances in Proteins Exhibiting High Backbone Shift Degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh; Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish; Guleria, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three dimensional NMR experiments involving amide 1H and 15N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(5,3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate (and/or to validate) the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide 15N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. HiNi and Hi-1Ni-1) for overlapping amide NH peaks. The experiment -encoding 5D spectral information- leads to a conventional 3D spectrum with significantly reduced spectral crowding and complexity. The impr...

  9. Inferential protein structure determination and refinement using fast, electronic structure based backbone amide chemical shift predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    This report covers the development of a new, fast method for calculating the backbone amide proton chemical shifts in proteins. Through quantum chemical calculations, structure-based forudsiglese the chemical shift for amidprotonen in protein has been parameterized. The parameters are then implemented in a computer program called Padawan. The program has since been implemented in protein folding program Phaistos, wherein the method andvendes to de novo folding of the protein structures and to refine the existing protein structures.

  10. Using Excel To Study The Relation Between Protein Dihedral Angle Omega And Backbone Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Christopher; Evans, Samari; Tao, Xiuping

    How to involve the uninitiated undergraduate students in computational biophysics research? We made use of Microsoft Excel to carry out calculations of bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles of proteins. Specifically, we studied protein backbone dihedral angle omega by examining how its distribution varies with the length of the backbone length. It turns out Excel is a respectable tool for this task. An ordinary current-day desktop or laptop can handle the calculations for midsized proteins in just seconds. Care has to be taken to enter the formulas for the spreadsheet column after column to minimize the computing load. Supported in part by NSF Grant #1238795.

  11. A Novel Method for Sampling Alpha-Helical Protein Backbones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Boris; Levitt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel technique of sampling the configurations of helical proteins. Assuming knowledge of native secondary structure, we employ assembly rules gathered from a database of existing structures to enumerate the geometrically possible 3-D arrangements of the constituent helices. We produce a library of possible folds for 25 helical protein cores. In each case the method finds significant numbers of conformations close to the native structure. In addition we assign coordinates to all atoms for 4 of the 25 proteins. In the context of database driven exhaustive enumeration our method performs extremely well, yielding significant percentages of structures (0.02%--82%) within 6A of the native structure. The method's speed and efficiency make it a valuable contribution towards the goal of predicting protein structure.

  12. Quantification of protein backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Amo, Juan-Miguel; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd, E-mail: reif@tum.d [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We present the quantification of backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for immobilized proteins. The experiments make use of the deuterium isotope effect on the amide nitrogen chemical shift, as well as on proton dilution by deuteration. We find that backbone amides in the microcrystalline {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain exchange rather slowly with the solvent (with exchange rates negligible within the individual {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} timescales). We observed chemical exchange for 6 residues with HDX exchange rates in the range from 0.2 to 5 s{sup -1}. Backbone amide {sup 15}N longitudinal relaxation times that we determined previously are not significantly affected for most residues, yielding no systematic artifacts upon quantification of backbone dynamics (Chevelkov et al. 2008b). Significant exchange was observed for the backbone amides of R21, S36 and K60, as well as for the sidechain amides of N38, N35 and for W41{epsilon}. These residues could not be fit in our previous motional analysis, demonstrating that amide proton chemical exchange needs to be considered in the analysis of protein dynamics in the solid-state, in case D{sub 2}O is employed as a solvent for sample preparation. Due to the intrinsically long {sup 15}N relaxation times in the solid-state, the approach proposed here can expand the range of accessible HDX rates in the intermediate regime that is not accessible so far with exchange quench and MEXICO type experiments.

  13. Lasso peptide, a highly stable structure and designable multifunctional backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Pan, Yongxu; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2016-06-01

    Lasso peptide belongs to a new class of natural product with highly compact and stable structure. It has varieties of biological activities, among which the most important one is its antibacterial efficacy. Novel lasso peptides have been constantly discovered and analyzed by advanced techniques, and the biosynthesis or even chemical synthesis of lasso peptide has been studied after learning its constituent amino acids and maturation process. Structural identification of lasso peptide provides information for elucidating the mechanisms of its antibacterial activity and basis for further modifications. Ring of lasso peptide is the key to both its highly compact and stable structure and its intrinsic antibacterial property. The loop has been considered as suitable modification region of lasso peptide, such as V11-S18 of MccJ25 being modifiable without disrupting the lasso structure in biosynthesis. The tail is the immunity protein that can export lasso peptide out of its produced strain and serve as a self-protection mechanism at the same time. Most of currently known lasso peptides are non-pathogenic, which implies that the modified lasso peptides are promising candidates for medical applications. Arginine, glycine, and aspartic acid as a ligands of cancer-specific receptor have been grafted to the loop of lasso peptide without losing its bioactivity, and many other targets are expected to be used for lasso peptide modification. Multi-molecular modification and large-scale production need to be studied and solved in future for designing and using multifunctional lasso peptide based on its extraordinary stable structure. PMID:27074719

  14. High dimensional and high resolution pulse sequences for backbone resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, A.; Kozminski, W.; Šanderová, Hana; Krásný, Libor

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2012), s. 329-337. ISSN 0925-2738 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/0583 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Intrinsically disordered proteins * Non-uniform sampling * Backbone assignment Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2012

  15. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N experiment to facilitate the assignment of backbone resonances in proteins exhibiting high backbone shift degeneracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dinesh, E-mail: dineshcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India); Raikwal, Nisha [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India); Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish [Molecular and Structural Biology Division, CSIR, Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Guleria, Anupam, E-mail: anuguleriaphy@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A reduced dimensionality experiment – referred as pseudo 5D HN(C)N- is presented. • Encodes highly resolved 5D spectral information in a 3D spectrum. • Superior in terms of peak dispersion. • Facilitates assignment of crowded HSQC spectra of moderately sized proteins. • Modulated {sup 15}N chemical shifts are used to break the amide shift degeneracy. - Abstract: Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three-dimensional NMR experiments involving amide {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high-degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced-dimensionality (RD) experiment –(5, 3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate/validate the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. H{sub i}N{sub i} and H{sub i−1}N{sub i−1}) for overlapping amide-NH peaks. The experiment -in combination with routine triple resonance 3D-NMR experiments involving backbone amide ({sup 1}H/{sup 15}N) and carbon ({sup 13}C{sup α}/{sup 13}C′) chemical shifts- will serve as a powerful complementary tool to achieve the nearly complete assignment of protein backbone resonances in a time efficient manner.

  16. Efficient identification of amino acid types for fast protein backbone assignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a procedure that allows for very efficient identification of amino acid types in proteins by selective 15N-labeling. The usefulness of selective incorporation of 15N-labeled amino acids into proteins for the backbone assignment has been recognized for several years. However, widespread use of this method has been hindered by the need to purify each selectively labeled sample and by the relatively high cost of labeling with 15N-labeled amino acids. Here we demonstrate that purification of the selectively 15N-labeled samples is not necessary and that background-free HSQC spectra containing only the peaks of the overexpressed heterologous protein can be obtained in crude lysates from as little as 100 ml cultures, thus saving time and money. This method can be used for fast and automated backbone assignment of proteins

  17. 4D experiments measured with APSY for automated backbone resonance assignments of large proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed structural and functional characterization of proteins by solution NMR requires sequence-specific resonance assignment. We present a set of transverse relaxation optimization (TROSY) based four-dimensional automated projection spectroscopy (APSY) experiments which are designed for resonance assignments of proteins with a size up to 40 kDa, namely HNCACO, HNCOCA, HNCACB and HN(CO)CACB. These higher-dimensional experiments include several sensitivity-optimizing features such as multiple quantum parallel evolution in a ‘just-in-time’ manner, aliased off-resonance evolution, evolution-time optimized APSY acquisition, selective water-handling and TROSY. The experiments were acquired within the concept of APSY, but they can also be used within the framework of sparsely sampled experiments. The multidimensional peak lists derived with APSY provided chemical shifts with an approximately 20 times higher precision than conventional methods usually do, and allowed the assignment of 90 % of the backbone resonances of the perdeuterated primase-polymerase ORF904, which contains 331 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 38.4 kDa.

  18. Protein side-chain resonance assignment and NOE assignment using RDC-defined backbones without TOCSY data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Jianyang [Duke University, Department of Computer Science (United States); Zhou Pei [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Donald, Bruce Randall [Duke University, Department of Computer Science (United States)

    2011-08-15

    One bottleneck in NMR structure determination lies in the laborious and time-consuming process of side-chain resonance and NOE assignments. Compared to the well-studied backbone resonance assignment problem, automated side-chain resonance and NOE assignments are relatively less explored. Most NOE assignment algorithms require nearly complete side-chain resonance assignments from a series of through-bond experiments such as HCCH-TOCSY or HCCCONH. Unfortunately, these TOCSY experiments perform poorly on large proteins. To overcome this deficiency, we present a novel algorithm, called Nasca (NOE Assignment and Side-Chain Assignment), to automate both side-chain resonance and NOE assignments and to perform high-resolution protein structure determination in the absence of any explicit through-bond experiment to facilitate side-chain resonance assignment, such as HCCH-TOCSY. After casting the assignment problem into a Markov Random Field (MRF), Nasca extends and applies combinatorial protein design algorithms to compute optimal assignments that best interpret the NMR data. The MRF captures the contact map information of the protein derived from NOESY spectra, exploits the backbone structural information determined by RDCs, and considers all possible side-chain rotamers. The complexity of the combinatorial search is reduced by using a dead-end elimination (DEE) algorithm, which prunes side-chain resonance assignments that are provably not part of the optimal solution. Then an A* search algorithm is employed to find a set of optimal side-chain resonance assignments that best fit the NMR data. These side-chain resonance assignments are then used to resolve the NOE assignment ambiguity and compute high-resolution protein structures. Tests on five proteins show that Nasca assigns resonances for more than 90% of side-chain protons, and achieves about 80% correct assignments. The final structures computed using the NOE distance restraints assigned by Nasca have backbone RMSD 0

  19. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, ≥90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed (φ, ψ) torsion angles of ca 12º. TALOS-N also reports sidechain χ1 rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts

  20. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, {>=}90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed ({phi}, {psi}) torsion angles of ca 12 Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator . TALOS-N also reports sidechain {chi}{sup 1} rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts.

  1. Hash: a program to accurately predict protein H{sup {alpha}} shifts from neighboring backbone shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Jianyang, E-mail: zengjy@gmail.com [Tsinghua University, Institute for Interdisciplinary Information Sciences (China); Zhou Pei [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Donald, Bruce Randall [Duke University, Department of Computer Science (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Chemical shifts provide not only peak identities for analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, but also an important source of conformational information for studying protein structures. Current structural studies requiring H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts suffer from the following limitations. (1) For large proteins, the H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts can be difficult to assign using conventional NMR triple-resonance experiments, mainly due to the fast transverse relaxation rate of C{sup {alpha}} that restricts the signal sensitivity. (2) Previous chemical shift prediction approaches either require homologous models with high sequence similarity or rely heavily on accurate backbone and side-chain structural coordinates. When neither sequence homologues nor structural coordinates are available, we must resort to other information to predict H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. Predicting accurate H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts using other obtainable information, such as the chemical shifts of nearby backbone atoms (i.e., adjacent atoms in the sequence), can remedy the above dilemmas, and hence advance NMR-based structural studies of proteins. By specifically exploiting the dependencies on chemical shifts of nearby backbone atoms, we propose a novel machine learning algorithm, called Hash, to predict H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. Hash combines a new fragment-based chemical shift search approach with a non-parametric regression model, called the generalized additive model, to effectively solve the prediction problem. We demonstrate that the chemical shifts of nearby backbone atoms provide a reliable source of information for predicting accurate H{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. Our testing results on different possible combinations of input data indicate that Hash has a wide rage of potential NMR applications in structural and biological studies of proteins.

  2. Monitoring Backbone Hydrogen-Bond Formation in β-Barrel Membrane Protein Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschle, Thomas; Rios Flores, Perla; Opitz, Christian; Müller, Daniel J; Hiller, Sebastian

    2016-05-10

    β-barrel membrane proteins are key components of the outer membrane of bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Their three-dimensional structure is defined by a network of backbone hydrogen bonds between adjacent β-strands. Here, we employ hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange in combination with NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to monitor backbone hydrogen bond formation during folding of the outer membrane protein X (OmpX) from E. coli in detergent micelles. Residue-specific kinetics of interstrand hydrogen-bond formation were found to be uniform in the entire β-barrel and synchronized to formation of the tertiary structure. OmpX folding thus propagates via a long-lived conformational ensemble state in which all backbone amide protons exchange with the solvent and engage in hydrogen bonds only transiently. Stable formation of the entire OmpX hydrogen bond network occurs downhill of the rate-limiting transition state and thus appears cooperative on the overall folding time scale. PMID:27062600

  3. Protein backbone chemical shifts predicted from searching a database for torsion angle and sequence homology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical shifts of nuclei in or attached to a protein backbone are exquisitely sensitive to their local environment. A computer program, SPARTA, is described that uses this correlation with local structure to predict protein backbone chemical shifts, given an input three-dimensional structure, by searching a newly generated database for triplets of adjacent residues that provide the best match in φ/ψ/χ1 torsion angles and sequence similarity to the query triplet of interest. The database contains 15N, 1HN, 1Hα, 13Cα, 13Cβ and 13C' chemical shifts for 200 proteins for which a high resolution X-ray (≤2.4 A) structure is available. The relative importance of the weighting factors for the φ/ψ/χ1 angles and sequence similarity was optimized empirically. The weighted, average secondary shifts of the central residues in the 20 best-matching triplets, after inclusion of nearest neighbor, ring current, and hydrogen bonding effects, are used to predict chemical shifts for the protein of known structure. Validation shows good agreement between the SPARTA-predicted and experimental shifts, with standard deviations of 2.52, 0.51, 0.27, 0.98, 1.07 and 1.08 ppm for 15N, 1HN, 1Hα, 13Cα, 13Cβ and 13C', respectively, including outliers

  4. Refinement of the protein backbone angle {psi} in NMR structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprangers, R.; Bottomley, M.J.; Linge, J.P.; Schultz, J.; Nilges, M.; Sattler, M. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (Germany)

    2000-01-15

    Cross-correlated relaxation rates involving the C{sup {alpha}}-H{sup {alpha}} dipolar interaction and the carbonyl (C') chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) have been measured using two complementary 3D experiments. We show that the protein backbone angle {psi} can be directly refined against such cross-correlated relaxation rates ({gamma}{sup H{alpha}}{sup C{alpha}}{sup ,C'}) and the three-bond H/D isotope effect on the C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts ({sup 3}{delta}C{sup {alpha}}{sub (ND)}). By simultaneously using both experimental parameters as restraints during NMR structure calculations, a unique value for the backbone angle {psi} is defined. We have applied the new refinement method to the {alpha}-Spectrin SH3 domain (a {beta}-sheet protein) and to the Sgs1p HRDC domain (an {alpha}-helical protein) and show that the quality of the NMR structures is substantially improved, judging from the atomic coordinate precision and the Ramachandran map. In addition, the {psi}-refined NMR structures of the SH3 domain deviate less from the 1.8 A crystal structure, suggesting an improved accuracy. The proposed refinement method can be used to significantly improve the quality of NMR structures and will be applicable to larger proteins.

  5. On correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central C$_\\alpha$ carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high resolution X-ray structures in Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the C$_\\beta$ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a sub-atomic precision. As an example we construct the C$_\\alpha$-C$_\\beta$ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 \\.A in root-mean-square distance from the experimental X-ray structure.

  6. A generic program for multistate protein design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Leaver-Fay

    Full Text Available Some protein design tasks cannot be modeled by the traditional single state design strategy of finding a sequence that is optimal for a single fixed backbone. Such cases require multistate design, where a single sequence is threaded onto multiple backbones (states and evaluated for its strengths and weaknesses on each backbone. For example, to design a protein that can switch between two specific conformations, it is necessary to to find a sequence that is compatible with both backbone conformations. We present in this paper a generic implementation of multistate design that is suited for a wide range of protein design tasks and demonstrate in silico its capabilities at two design tasks: one of redesigning an obligate homodimer into an obligate heterodimer such that the new monomers would not homodimerize, and one of redesigning a promiscuous interface to bind to only a single partner and to no longer bind the rest of its partners. Both tasks contained negative design in that multistate design was asked to find sequences that would produce high energies for several of the states being modeled. Success at negative design was assessed by computationally redocking the undesired protein-pair interactions; we found that multistate design's accuracy improved as the diversity of conformations for the undesired protein-pair interactions increased. The paper concludes with a discussion of the pitfalls of negative design, which has proven considerably more challenging than positive design.

  7. A generic program for multistate protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Jacak, Ron; Stranges, P Benjamin; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Some protein design tasks cannot be modeled by the traditional single state design strategy of finding a sequence that is optimal for a single fixed backbone. Such cases require multistate design, where a single sequence is threaded onto multiple backbones (states) and evaluated for its strengths and weaknesses on each backbone. For example, to design a protein that can switch between two specific conformations, it is necessary to to find a sequence that is compatible with both backbone conformations. We present in this paper a generic implementation of multistate design that is suited for a wide range of protein design tasks and demonstrate in silico its capabilities at two design tasks: one of redesigning an obligate homodimer into an obligate heterodimer such that the new monomers would not homodimerize, and one of redesigning a promiscuous interface to bind to only a single partner and to no longer bind the rest of its partners. Both tasks contained negative design in that multistate design was asked to find sequences that would produce high energies for several of the states being modeled. Success at negative design was assessed by computationally redocking the undesired protein-pair interactions; we found that multistate design's accuracy improved as the diversity of conformations for the undesired protein-pair interactions increased. The paper concludes with a discussion of the pitfalls of negative design, which has proven considerably more challenging than positive design. PMID:21754981

  8. Protein backbone motions viewed by intraresidue and sequential HN-Hα residual dipolar couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triple resonance E.COSY-based techniques were used to measure intra-residue and sequential HN-Hα residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) for the third IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB3), aligned in Pf1 medium. Measurements closely correlate with values predicted on the basis of an NMR structure, previously determined on the basis of a large number of one-bond backbone RDCs measured in five alignment media. However, in particular the sequential HN-Hα RDCs are smaller than predicted for a static structure, suggesting a degree of motion for these internuclear vectors that exceeds that of the backbone amide N-H vectors. Of all experimentally determined GB3 structures available, the best correlation between experimental 1H-1H couplings is observed for a GB3 ensemble, previously derived to generate a realistic picture of the conformational space sampled by GB3 (Clore and Schwieters, J Mol Biol 355:879-886, 2006). However, for both NMR and X-ray-derived structures the 1H-1H couplings are found to be systematically smaller than expected on the basis of alignment tensors derived from 15N-1H amide RDCs, assuming librationally corrected N-H bond lengths of 1.041 A

  9. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, UMR 5280 CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1 (France); Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination.

  10. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination

  11. Highly automated protein backbone resonance assignment within a few hours: the strategy and software package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential resonance assignment represents an essential step towards the investigation of protein structure, dynamics, and interaction surfaces. Although the experimental sensitivity has significantly increased in recent years, with the availability of high field magnets and cryogenically cooled probes, resonance assignment, even of small globular proteins, still generally requires several days of data collection and analysis using standard protocols. Here we introduce the BATCH strategy for fast and highly automated backbone resonance assignment of 13C, 15N-labelled proteins. BATCH makes use of the fast data acquisition and analysis tools BEST, ASCOM, COBRA, and HADAMAC, recently developed in our laboratory. An improved Hadamard encoding scheme, presented here, further increases the performance of the HADAMAC experiment. A new software platform, interfaced to the NMRView software package, has been developed that enables highly automated NMR data processing and analysis, sequential resonance assignment, and 13C chemical shift extraction. We demonstrate for four small globular proteins that sequential resonance assignment can be routinely obtained within a few hours, or less, in a highly automated and robust way

  12. A new default restraint library for the protein backbone in Phenix: a conformation-dependent geometry goes mainstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Chemical restraints are a fundamental part of crystallographic protein structure refinement. In response to mounting evidence that conventional restraints have shortcomings, it has previously been documented that using backbone restraints that depend on the protein backbone conformation helps to address these shortcomings and improves the performance of refinements [Moriarty et al. (2014 ▸), FEBS J. 281, 4061–4071]. It is important that these improvements be made available to all in the protein crystallography community. Toward this end, a change in the default geometry library used by Phenix is described here. Tests are presented showing that this change will not generate increased numbers of outliers during validation, or deposition in the Protein Data Bank, during the transition period in which some validation tools still use the conventional restraint libraries. PMID:26894545

  13. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant functions of protein hydrolysate from backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta by proteolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, Sheik Abdulazeez; Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Ramamoorthy, Baranitharan; Ponnusamy, Ponmurugan

    2014-01-01

    Every year, a huge quantity of fishery wastes and by-products are generated by fish processing industries. These wastes are either underutilized to produce low market value products or dumped leading to environmental issues. Complete utilization of fishery wastes for recovering value added products would be beneficial to the society and individual. The fish protein hydrolysates and derived peptides of fishery resources are widely used as nutritional supplements, functional ingredients, and flavor enhancers in food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries. Antioxidants from fishery resources have attracted the attention of researchers as they are cheaper in cost, easy to derive, and do not have side effects. Thus the present investigation was designed to produce protein hydrolysate by pepsin and papain digestion from the backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta (Indian mackerel) and evaluate its antioxidant properties through various in vitro assays. The results reveal that both hydrolysates are potent antioxidants, capable of scavenging 46% and 36% of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl) and 58.5% and 37.54% of superoxide radicals respectively. The hydrolysates exhibit significant (p hydrolysates produced, pepsin derived fraction is superior than papain derived fraction in terms of yield, DH (Degree of hydrolysis), and antioxidant activity. PMID:24596496

  14. Direct measurement of the correlated dynamics of the protein-backbone and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxin; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of the correlation times of the protein backbone carbons and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The experimental data indicate a decrease in the correlation times of the carbonyl carbons as the strain on the biopolymer is increased. These observations are in good agreement with short 4ns molecular dynamics simulations of (VPGVG)3, a well studied mimetic peptide of elastin. The experimental results also indicate a reduction in the correlation time of proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain applied to the elastomer. A simple model is suggested that correlates the increase in the motion of proximal waters of hydration to the increase in frequency of libration of the protein backbone that develops with increasing strain. Together, the reduction in the protein entropy accompanied with the increase in entropy of the proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain, support the notion that the source ...

  15. n Silico Analysis of Envelope Dengue Virus-2 and Envelope Dengue Virus-3 Protein as the Backbone of Dengue Virus Tetravalent Vaccine by Using Homology Modeling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky I. Taufik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Dengue fever, which was caused by Dengue virus infection, had became a major public health problem in the tropic and subtropical countries. Dengue virus (DENV had four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4, based on their immunogenic in the human body. Preventive measure will be necessary to decrease the prevalence of dengue fever, by developing modern vaccine. Approach: This research was focused on in silico study of dengue virus vaccines, by using envelope (E protein of DENV-2 and DENV-3 as their backbones. T cell epitope prediction was determined by using MULTIPRED server and B cell epitope prediction was determined by using Conformational Epitope Prediction server (CEP. Homology modeling study of E DENV-3 protein as the vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (HMM Vaccine 1-6. Moreover, homology modeling study of E DENV-2 protein as vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (ANN vaccine 1-6. Results: The BLAST analysis of HMM and ANN vaccines had produced 93% and 91% identity, respectively. The Ramachandran Plot of both vaccines had shown less than 15% non glycine residue in the disallowed region, therefore it showed the solid stability of the proteins. The VAST analysis of E DENV-3 backbone vaccines had determined, that HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-3. HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest VAST score of 64.5. Moreover, the VAST analysis of E DENV-2 backbone vaccines had determined, that ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-2. ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 have the highest VAST score of 64.7. Conclusion/Recommendation: It could be inferred from this research that HMM4; HMM6; ANN1; ANN3; ANN4; ANN5; and ANN6 were the best in silico vaccine design, based on their similarity with native E DENV Proteins. This research could be applied for the wet

  16. The determinants of bond angle variability in protein/peptide backbones: A comprehensive statistical/quantum mechanics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana

    2015-11-01

    The elucidation of the mutual influence between peptide bond geometry and local conformation has important implications for protein structure refinement, validation, and prediction. To gain insights into the structural determinants and the energetic contributions associated with protein/peptide backbone plasticity, we here report an extensive analysis of the variability of the peptide bond angles by combining statistical analyses of protein structures and quantum mechanics calculations on small model peptide systems. Our analyses demonstrate that all the backbone bond angles strongly depend on the peptide conformation and unveil the existence of regular trends as function of ψ and/or φ. The excellent agreement of the quantum mechanics calculations with the statistical surveys of protein structures validates the computational scheme here employed and demonstrates that the valence geometry of protein/peptide backbone is primarily dictated by local interactions. Notably, for the first time we show that the position of the H(α) hydrogen atom, which is an important parameter in NMR structural studies, is also dependent on the local conformation. Most of the trends observed may be satisfactorily explained by invoking steric repulsive interactions; in some specific cases the valence bond variability is also influenced by hydrogen-bond like interactions. Moreover, we can provide a reliable estimate of the energies involved in the interplay between geometry and conformations. PMID:26264789

  17. The Role of Backbone Hydrogen Bonds in the Transition State for Protein Folding of a PDZ Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren W. Pedersen

    Full Text Available Backbone hydrogen bonds are important for the structure and stability of proteins. However, since conventional site-directed mutagenesis cannot be applied to perturb the backbone, the contribution of these hydrogen bonds in protein folding and stability has been assessed only for a very limited set of small proteins. We have here investigated effects of five amide-to-ester mutations in the backbone of a PDZ domain, a 90-residue globular protein domain, to probe the influence of hydrogen bonds in a β-sheet for folding and stability. The amide-to-ester mutation removes NH-mediated hydrogen bonds and destabilizes hydrogen bonds formed by the carbonyl oxygen. The overall stability of the PDZ domain generally decreased for all amide-to-ester mutants due to an increase in the unfolding rate constant. For this particular region of the PDZ domain, it is therefore clear that native hydrogen bonds are formed after crossing of the rate-limiting barrier for folding. Moreover, three of the five amide-to-ester mutants displayed an increase in the folding rate constant suggesting that the hydrogen bonds are involved in non-native interactions in the transition state for folding.

  18. Reduced Dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH Experiment: An Efficient Backbone Assignment tool for NMR studies of Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment and secondary structure determination of proteins form the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone (1H, 15N, 13Ca and 13C') resonances and secondary structure determination of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone (13Ca and 13C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text) for efficient and rapid data analysis. Further, the experiment leads to the spectrum with direct distinction of self (intra-residue) and sequential (inter-residue) carbon correlation peaks; these appear opposite in signs and therefore can easily be discriminated without using an additional complementary experiment. On ...

  19. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  20. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of 15N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S2) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S2) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S2 values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S2 parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S2 calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S2) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models

  1. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Yu, Lu [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhang, Longhua [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  2. Insight into a molecular interaction force supporting peptide backbones and its implication to protein loops and folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qi-Shi; Chen, Dong; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Although not being classified as the most fundamental protein structural elements like α-helices and β-strands, the loop segment may play considerable roles for protein stability, flexibility, and dynamic activity. Meanwhile, the protein loop is also quite elusive; i.e. its interactions with the other parts of protein as well as its own shape-maintaining forces have still remained as a puzzle or at least not quite clear yet. Here, we report a molecular force, the so-called polar hydrogen-π interaction (Hp-π), which may play an important role in supporting the backbones of protein loops. By conducting the potential energy surface scanning calculations on the quasi π-plane of peptide bond unit, we have observed the following intriguing phenomena: (1) when the polar hydrogen atom of a peptide unit is perpendicularly pointing to the π-plane of other peptide bond units, a remarkable Hp-π interaction occurs; (2) the interaction is distance and orientation dependent, acting in a broad space, and belonging to the 'point-to-plane' one. The molecular force reported here may provide useful interaction concepts and insights into better understanding the loop's unique stability and flexibility feature, as well as the driving force of the protein global folding. PMID:25375237

  3. Three-Dimensional Protein Fold Determination from Backbone Amide Pseudocontact Shifts Generated by Lanthanide Tags at Multiple Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Yagi, Hiromasa

    2013-06-01

    Site-specific attachment of paramagnetic lanthanide ions to a protein generates pseudocontact shifts (PCS) in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the protein that are easily measured as changes in chemical shifts. By labeling the protein with lanthanide tags at four different sites, PCSs are observed for most amide protons and accurate information is obtained about their coordinates in three-dimensional space. The approach is demonstrated with the chaperone ERp29, for which large differences have been reported between X-ray and NMR structures of the C-terminal domain, ERp29-C. The results unambiguously show that the structure of rat ERp29-C in solution is similar to the crystal structure of human ERp29-C. PCSs of backbone amides were the only structural restraints required. Because these can be measured for more dilute protein solutions than other NMR restraints, the approach greatly widens the range of proteins amenable to structural studies in solution. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the p...

  5. Bayesian probabilistic approach for predicting backbone structures in terms of protein blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brevern, A G; Etchebest, C; Hazout, S

    2000-11-15

    By using an unsupervised cluster analyzer, we have identified a local structural alphabet composed of 16 folding patterns of five consecutive C(alpha) ("protein blocks"). The dependence that exists between successive blocks is explicitly taken into account. A Bayesian approach based on the relation protein block-amino acid propensity is used for prediction and leads to a success rate close to 35%. Sharing sequence windows associated with certain blocks into "sequence families" improves the prediction accuracy by 6%. This prediction accuracy exceeds 75% when keeping the first four predicted protein blocks at each site of the protein. In addition, two different strategies are proposed: the first one defines the number of protein blocks in each site needed for respecting a user-fixed prediction accuracy, and alternatively, the second one defines the different protein sites to be predicted with a user-fixed number of blocks and a chosen accuracy. This last strategy applied to the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (alpha/beta protein) shows that 91% of the sites may be predicted with a prediction accuracy larger than 77% considering only three blocks per site. The prediction strategies proposed improve our knowledge about sequence-structure dependence and should be very useful in ab initio protein modelling. PMID:11025540

  6. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine (Russian Federation); Shen, Yang; Lee, Jung Ho [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Hummer, Gerhard [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics (Germany); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2015-09-15

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts ({sup 15}N, {sup 13}C{sup α}, and {sup 13}C′), six types of J couplings ({sup 3}J{sub HNHα}, {sup 3}J{sub C′C′}, {sup 3}J{sub C′Hα}, {sup 1}J{sub HαCα}, {sup 2}J{sub CαN} and {sup 1}J{sub CαN}), as well as the {sup 15}N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3.

  7. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts (15N, 13Cα, and 13C′), six types of J couplings (3JHNHα, 3JC′C′, 3JC′Hα, 1JHαCα, 2JCαN and 1JCαN), as well as the 15N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3

  8. Backbone assignment and secondary structure of the PsbQ protein from Photosystem II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horničáková, M.; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Schlagnitweit, J.; Wohlschlager, Ch.; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Fiala, R.; Schoefberger, W.; Müller, N.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2011), s. 169-175. ISSN 1874-2718 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Photosystem II * PsbQ * Missing link * NMR resonance assignment * Protein-protein interaction Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.720, year: 2011 http://www.springerlink.com/content/3n38075w5h1l1082/fulltext.pdf

  9. HMM-based prediction for protein structural motifs' two local properties: solvent accessibility and backbone torsion angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianyong; Xiang, Leijun; Hong, Jiang; Zhang, Weidong

    2013-02-01

    Protein structure prediction is often assisted by predicting one-dimensional structural properties including relative solvent accessibility (RSA) surface and backbone torsion angles (BTA) of residues, and these two properties are continuously varying variables because proteins can move freely in a three-dimensional space. Instead of subdividing them into a few arbitrarily defined states that many popular approaches used, this paper proposes an integrated system for realvalue prediction of protein structural motifs' two local properties, based on the modified Hidden Markov Model that we previously presented. The model was used to capture the relevance of RSA and the dependency of BTA between adjacent residues along the local protein chain in motifs with definite probabilities. These two properties were predicted according to their own probability distribution. The method was applied to a protein fragment library. For nine different classes of motifs, real values of RSA were predicted with mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.122-0.175 and Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.623-0.714 between predicted and actual RSA. Meanwhile, real values of BTA were obtained with MAE of 8.5⁰-29.4⁰ for Φ angles, 11.2⁰-38.5⁰ for ψ angles and PCC of 0.601-0.716 for Φ, 0.597-0.713 for ψ. The results were compared with well-known Real-SPINE Server, and indicate the proposed method may at least serve as the foundation to obtain better local properties from structural motifs for protein structure prediction. PMID:22894152

  10. The influence of DNA binding on the backbone dynamics of the yeast cell-cycle protein Mbp1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbp1 is a transcription factor involved in the regulation of the cell cycle in yeast. The N-terminus of this protein contains a DNA binding domain that includes a winged helix-turn-helix motif. The C-terminal 24 residues of this domain (the 'tail') are disordered in the crystal state, but are important for DNA binding. We have measured 15N NMR relaxation rates at 11.75 and 14.1 T to determine the dynamics of the free protein and in its complex with a specific DNA duplex. The dynamics data were quantitatively analysed using both spectral density mapping and the Lipari-Szabo formalism including the effects of chemical exchange and rotational anisotropy. A detailed analysis has been made of the effect of anisotropy, exchange and experimental precision on the recovered motional parameters. The backbone NH relaxation is affected by motions on a variety of time scales from millisecond to tens of picoseconds. The relaxation data show a structured core of 100 residues corresponding to that observed in the crystal state. Within the core of the protein, two regions on either side of the putative recognition helix (helix B) show slow (ca. 0.2 ms) conformational exchange dynamics that are quenched upon DNA binding. The C-terminal 24 residues are generally more dynamic than in the core. However, in the free protein, a stretch of ∼8 residues in the middle of the tail show relaxation behaviour similar to that in the core, indicating a structured region. NOEs between Ala 114 in this structured part of the tail and residues in the N-terminal beta strand of the core of the protein demonstrate that the tail folds back onto the core of the protein. In the complex with DNA, the structured part of the tail extends by ca. 3 residues. These data provide a framework for understanding the biochemical data on the mechanism and specificity of DNA binding

  11. Assessing protein conformational sampling methods based on bivariate lag-distributions of backbone angles

    KAUST Repository

    Maadooliat, Mehdi

    2012-08-27

    Despite considerable progress in the past decades, protein structure prediction remains one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology. Angular-sampling-based methods have been extensively studied recently due to their ability to capture the continuous conformational space of protein structures. The literature has focused on using a variety of parametric models of the sequential dependencies between angle pairs along the protein chains. In this article, we present a thorough review of angular-sampling-based methods by assessing three main questions: What is the best distribution type to model the protein angles? What is a reasonable number of components in a mixture model that should be considered to accurately parameterize the joint distribution of the angles? and What is the order of the local sequence-structure dependency that should be considered by a prediction method? We assess the model fits for different methods using bivariate lag-distributions of the dihedral/planar angles. Moreover, the main information across the lags can be extracted using a technique called Lag singular value decomposition (LagSVD), which considers the joint distribution of the dihedral/planar angles over different lags using a nonparametric approach and monitors the behavior of the lag-distribution of the angles using singular value decomposition. As a result, we developed graphical tools and numerical measurements to compare and evaluate the performance of different model fits. Furthermore, we developed a web-tool (http://www.stat.tamu. edu/~madoliat/LagSVD) that can be used to produce informative animations. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Backbone Dynamics of an Atypical Orphan Response Regulator Protein, Helicobacter pylori 1043

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Ki-Woong; Ko, Hyunsook; Lee, Sung-Ah; Hong, Eunmi; Ko, Sunggeon; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Weontae; Kim, Yangmee

    2013-01-01

    An atypical orphan response regulator protein, HP1043 (HP-RR) in Helicobacter pylori, is proven to be essential for cell growth and does not require the well known phosphorelay scheme. HP-RR was identified as a symmetric dimer with two functional domains, an N-terminal regulatory domain (HP-RRr) and a C-terminal effector domain (HP-RRe). HP-RR is a new class of response regulator, as a phosphorylation-independent regulator. Previously, we have presented a detailed three-dimensional structure ...

  13. Quantitative analysis of backbone motion in proteins using MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd [Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)], E-mail: reif@fmp-berlin.de

    2009-09-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of protein dynamics for a micro-crystallin protein in the solid-state. Experimental data include {sup 15}N T{sub 1} relaxation times measured at two different magnetic fields as well as {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N dipole, {sup 15}N CSA cross correlated relaxation rates which are sensitive to the spectral density function J(0) and are thus a measure of T{sub 2} in the solid-state. In addition, global order parameters are included from a {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N dipolar recoupling experiment. The data are analyzed within the framework of the extended model-free Clore-Lipari-Szabo theory. We find slow motional correlation times in the range of 5 and 150 ns. Assuming a wobbling in a cone motion, the amplitude of motion of the respective amide moiety is on the order of 10 deg. for the half-opening angle of the cone in most of the cases. The experiments are demonstrated using a perdeuterated sample of the chicken {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain.

  14. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 310-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins

  15. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Geun [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chin-Ju [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Eun; Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Ae-Ree; Choi, Seo-Ree; Lee, Shim Sung; Lee, Joon-Hwa, E-mail: joonhwa@gnu.ac.kr [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 3{sub 10}-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins.

  16. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together......Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part of...

  17. Consensus protein design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  18. A non-intuitive design of a cyclic decapeptide library with unique backbone structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, P K C

    2003-12-01

    An analysis of hydrogen bonding patterns of cyclic decapeptide (CDP) beta-sheet structures has resulted in a 'non-intuitive' design of cyclic decapeptides wherein their beta-turns and residue positions can be fixed by choosing 2 of the 10 residues, i.e. positions i and i+4, to be Prolines or N-substituted residues. This sequence relationship between the two Pro or N-substituted residues is shown to uniquely define the conformation of the CDP. Furthermore, this design of the 2 beta-turn, beta-sheet CDP structure is expected to be characterised by residues disposed in an exclusive fashion in which four residues are on one side of the ring, two on the other and the four corner residues in the beta-turn are in the plane of the ring. This opens up the possibility of fine-tuning the four residues facing one way and /or the two residues facing the other way such that a library containing a myriad of chemically diverse systems could be obtained. The design process along with the molecular modelling of specific CDP-s and the building of a CDP library are discussed in detail. PMID:14683511

  19. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: assignment of the carbonyl carbon 13C NMR resonances in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major coat protein of the filamentous bacteriophage M13 is a 50-residue amphiphilic polypeptide which is inserted, as an integral membrane-spanning protein, in the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli host during infection. 13C was incorporated biosynthetically into a total of 23 of the peptide carbonyls using labeled amino acids (alanine, glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, and proline). The structure and dynamics of carbonyl-labeled M13 coat protein were monitored by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Assignment of many resonances was achieved by using protease digestion, pH titration, or labeling of the peptide bond with both 13C and 15N. The carbonyl region of the natural-abundance 13C NMR spectrum of M13 coat protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution shows approximately eight backbone carbonyl resonances with line widths much narrower than the rest. Three of these more mobile residues correspond to assigned peaks (glycine-3, lysine-48, and alanine-49) in the individual amino acid spectra, and another almost certainly arises from glutamic acid-2. A ninth residue, alanine-1, also gives rise to a very narrow carbonyl resonance if the pH is well above or below the pK/sub a/ of the terminal amino group. These data suggest that only about four residues at either end of the protein experience large-amplitude spatial fluctuations; the rest of the molecule is essentially rigid on the time scale of the overall rotational tumbling of the protein-detergent complex. The relative exposure of different regions of detergent-bound protein was monitored by limited digestion with proteinase K. Comparable spectra and digestion patterns were obtained when the protein was solubilized in sodium deoxycholate, suggesting that the coat protein binds both amphiphiles in a similar fashion

  20. Design and modular parallel synthesis of a MCR derived α-helix mimetic protein-protein interaction inhibitor scaffold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antuch, Walfrido; Menon, Sanjay; Chen, Quin-Zene; Lu, Yingchun; Sakamuri, Sukumar; Beck, Barbara; Schauer-Vukašinović, Vesna; Agarwal, Seema; Hess, Sibylle; Dömling, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    A terphenyl α-helix mimetic scaffold recognized to be capable of disrupting protein-protein interactions was structurally morphed into an easily amenable and versatile multicomponent reaction (MCR) backbone. The design, modular in-parallel library synthesis, initial cell based biological data, and p

  1. Beta-scission of alkoxyl radicals on peptides and proteins can give rise to backbone cleavage and loss of side-chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 brings about multiple changes including side-chain oxidation, backbone fragmentation, cross-linking, unfolding, changes in hydrophobicity and conformation, altered susceptibility to proteolytic enzymes and formation of new reactive groups (e.g. hydroperoxides and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine). All of these processes can result in loss of structural or enzymatic activity. The mechanisms that give rise to backbone cleavage are only partly understood. Whilst it is known that direct hydrogen atom abstraction at a-carbon sites gives backbone cleavages it has also been proposed that initial attack at side-chain sites might also give rise to backbone cleavage. In this study we have examined whether initial attack at the β- (C-3) position can give rise to α-carbon radicals (and hence backbone cleavage) via the formation, and subsequent β- scission, of C-3 alkoxyl radicals. This process has been observed previously with protected amino acids in organic solvents (J. Chem. Soc. Perkin Trans. 2, 1997, 503-507) but the occurrence of such reactions with proteins in aqueous solution has not been explored. Alkoxyl radicals were generated at the C-3 position of a variety of protected amino acids and small peptides by two methods: metal-ion catalysed decomposition of hydroperoxides formed as a result of γ-radiolysis in the presence of O2, and UV photolysis of nitrate esters. In most cases radicals have been detected by EPR spectroscopy using nitroso and nitrone spin traps, which can be assigned by comparison with literature data to α-carbon radicals; in some case assignments were confirmed by the generation of the putative species by other routes. With Ala peptide hydroperoxides and nitrate esters, and MNP as the spin trap, the major radical detected in each case has been assigned to the adduct of an α-carbon radical with partial structure - NH-.CH-C(O) - consistent with the rapid occurrence of the above reaction

  2. Backbone conformational flexibility of the lipid modified membrane anchor of the human N-Ras protein investigated by solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alexander; Reuther, Guido; Roark, Matthew B; Tan, Kui-Thong; Waldmann, Herbert; Feller, Scott E; Huster, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The lipid modified human N-Ras protein, implicated in human cancer development, is of particular interest due to its membrane anchor that determines the activity and subcellular location of the protein. Previous solid-state NMR investigations indicated that this membrane anchor is highly dynamic, which may be indicative of backbone conformational flexibility. This article aims to address if a dynamic exchange between three structural models exist that had been determined previously. We applied a combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods and replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a Ras peptide that represents the terminal seven amino acids of the human N-Ras protein. Analysis of correlations between the conformations of individual amino acids revealed that Cys 181 and Met 182 undergo collective conformational exchange. Two major structures constituting about 60% of all conformations could be identified. The two conformations found in the simulation are in rapid exchange, which gives rise to low backbone order parameters and nuclear spin relaxation as measured by experimental NMR methods. These parameters were also determined from two 300 ns conventional MD simulations, providing very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19819220

  3. Transgene sequences free of CG dinucleotides lead to high level, long-term expression in the lung independent of plasmid backbone design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzani, Reto P; Pringle, Ian A; Connolly, Mary M; Davies, Lee A; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Schleef, Martin; Hyde, Stephen C; Gill, Deborah R

    2016-07-01

    Non-viral aerosol gene therapy offers great potential for treating chronic lung diseases of the airways such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Early clinical trials showed that transgene expression in the airways was transient whereas maximal duration of transgene expression is essential in order to minimise the frequency of aerosol treatments. Improved vector design, such as careful selection of the promoter/enhancer, can lead to more persistent levels of transgene expression, but multiple factors affect expression in vivo. Following aerosol delivery to the lungs of mice, we measured reporter gene expression from a CpG-free luciferase transgene cassette in the context of both a plasmid and minicircle vector configuration and showed that the vector backbone had no effect on expression. Transgene activity was affected by the vector backbone however, when a similar, but sub-optimal CpG-containing transgene was used, suggesting that aspects of the plasmid backbone had a negative impact on transgene expression. Similar studies were performed in Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) knockout mice to investigate a potential role for the TLR9 signalling pathway in detecting CpGs in the vector sequence. Even in the absence of TLR9, persistent expression could only be achieved with a CpG-free transgene. Together, these data indicate that in order to achieve high levels of persistent expression in vivo, a CpG-free transgene cassette is required. PMID:27061267

  4. Reduced dimensionality tailored HN(C)N experiments for facile backbone resonance assignment of proteins through unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) tailored HN(C)N [S.C. Panchal, N.S. Bhavesh, R.V. Hosur, Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: application to unfolded proteins, J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] experiments are proposed to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. These experiments - referred here as (4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH - exploit the linear combination of backbone 15N and 13C‧/13Cα chemical shifts simultaneously to achieve higher peak dispersion and randomness along their respective F1 dimensions. Simply, this has been achieved by modulating the backbone 15N(i) chemical shifts with that of 13C‧ (i - 1)/13Cα (i - 1) spins following the established reduced dimensionality NMR approach [T. Szyperski, D.C. Yeh, D.K. Sukumaran, H.N. Moseley, G.T. Montelione, Reduced-dimensionality NMR spectroscopy for high-throughput protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 8009-8014]. Though the modification is simple it has resulted an ingenious improvement of HN(C)N both in terms of peak dispersion and easiness of establishing the sequential connectivities. The increased dispersion along F1 dimension solves two purposes here: (i) resolves the ambiguities arising because of degenerate 15N chemical shifts and (ii) reduces the signal overlap in F2(15N)-F3(1H) planes (an important requisite in HN(C)N based assignment protocol for facile and unambiguous identification of sequentially connected HSQC peaks). The performance of both these experiments and the assignment protocol has been demonstrated using bovine apo Calbindin-d9k (75 aa) and urea denatured UNC60B (a 152 amino acid ADF/cofilin family protein of Caenorhabditis elegans), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  5. Backbone and Ile-δ1, Leu, Val Methyl 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments for human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Cuifeng; Aramini, James M.; Ma, LiChung; Cort, John R.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Krug, R. M.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    Human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein (ISG15), also called ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP), is the first identified ubiquitin-like protein containing two ubiquitin-like domains fused in tandem. The active form of ISG15 is conjugated to target proteins via the C-terminal glycine residue through an isopeptide bond in a manner similar to ubiquitin. The biological role of ISG15 is strongly associated with the modulation of cell immune function, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that many viral pathogens evade the host innate immune response by interfering with ISG15 conjugation to both host and viral proteins in a variety of ways. Here we report nearly complete backbone 1HN, 15N, 13CO, and 13Ca, as well as side chain 13Cb, methyl (Ile-d1, Leu, Val), amide (Asn, Gln), and indole NH (Trp) NMR resonance assignments for the 157-residue human ISG15 protein. These resonance assignments provide the basis for future structural and functional solution NMR studies of the biologically important human ISG15 protein.

  6. Green Network Planning Model for Optical Backbones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Jensen, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    Communication networks are becoming more essential for our daily lives and critically important for industry and governments. The intense growth in the backbone traffic implies an increment of the power demands of the transmission systems. This power usage might have a significant negative effect...... an analytical model to consider environmental aspects in the planning stage of backbones design....

  7. Testing Backbone.js

    CERN Document Server

    Roemer, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This book is packed with the step by step tutorial and instructions in recipe format helping you setup test infrastructure and gradually advance your skills to plan, develop, and test your backbone applications.If you are a JavaScript developer looking for recipes to create and implement test support for your backbone application, then this book is ideal for you.

  8. Backbone Dynamics of Triple-helical Collagen-like Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarev, Yu.A.; Lazareva, A.V.; Komarov, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    Some details of the backbone dynamics in the collagen-like triple helix is discussed and the role of backbone dynamics in functioning collagen proteins is illustrated. On a series of oligotripeptides synthetic analogs of collagen formation of high-frequency vibrational backbone dynamics and low-frequency nonlinear backbone dynamics upon stepwise elongation of peptide chain have been described using infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen-exchange method. In the fully completed triple helix the lev...

  9. ``Pinning strategy": a novel approach for predicting the backbone structure in terms of protein blocks from sequence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A G De Brevern; C Etchebest; C Benros; S Hazout

    2007-01-01

    The description of protein 3D structures can be performed through a library of 3D fragments, named a structural alphabet. Our structural alphabet is composed of 16 small protein fragments of 5 C in length, called protein blocks (PBs). It allows an efficient approximation of the 3D protein structures and a correct prediction of the local structure. The 72 most frequent series of 5 consecutive PBs, called structural words (SWs) are able to cover more than 90% of the 3D structures. PBs are highly conditioned by the presence of a limited number of transitions between them. In this study, we propose a new method called “pinning strategy” that used this specific feature to predict long protein fragments. Its goal is to define highly probable successions of PBs. It starts from the most probable SW and is then extended with overlapping SWs. Starting from an initial prediction rate of 34.4%, the use of the SWs instead of the PBs allows a gain of 4.5%. The pinning strategy simply applied to the SWs increases the prediction accuracy to 39.9%. In a second step, the sequence-structure relationship is optimized, the prediction accuracy reaches 43.6%.

  10. "Pinning strategy": a novel approach for predicting the backbone structure in terms of protein blocks from sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brevern, A G; Etchebest, C; Benros, C; Hazout, S

    2007-01-01

    The description of protein 3D structures can be performed through a library of 3D fragments, named a structural alphabet. Our structural alphabet is composed of 16 small protein fragments of 5 C alpha in length, called protein blocks (PBs). It allows an efficient approximation of the 3D protein structures and a correct prediction of the local structure. The 72 most frequent series of 5 consecutive PBs, called structural words (SWs)are able to cover more than 90% of the 3D structures. PBs are highly conditioned by the presence of a limited number of transitions between them. In this study, we propose a new method called "pinning strategy" that used this specific feature to predict long protein fragments. Its goal is to define highly probable successions of PBs. It starts from the most probable SW and is then extended with overlapping SWs. Starting from an initial prediction rate of 34.4%, the use of the SWs instead of the PBs allows a gain of 4.5%. The pinning strategy simply applied to the SWs increases the prediction accuracy to 39.9%. In a second step, the sequence-structure relationship is optimized, the prediction accuracy reaches 43.6%. PMID:17426380

  11. 5D 13C-detected experiments for backbone assignment of unstructured proteins with a very low signal dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováček, J.; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, A.; Papoušková, V.; Žídek, L.; Šanderová, Hana; Krásný, Libor; Kozminski, W.; Sklenář, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2011), s. 1-11. ISSN 0925-2738 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/0583 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Intrinsically disordered proteins * Non-uniform sampling * Longitudinal relaxation optimization Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.612, year: 2011

  12. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant functions of protein hydrolysate from backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta by proteolytic enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Sheriff, Sheik Abdulazeez; Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Ramamoorthy, Baranitharan; Ponnusamy, Ponmurugan

    2013-01-01

    Every year, a huge quantity of fishery wastes and by-products are generated by fish processing industries. These wastes are either underutilized to produce low market value products or dumped leading to environmental issues. Complete utilization of fishery wastes for recovering value added products would be beneficial to the society and individual. The fish protein hydrolysates and derived peptides of fishery resources are widely used as nutritional supplements, functional ingredients, and fl...

  13. Grid-based backbone correction to the ff12SB protein force field for implicit-solvent simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L; Brini, Emiliano; Simmerling, Carlos; Dill, Ken A

    2015-10-13

    Force fields, such as Amber's ff12SB, can be fairly accurate models of the physical forces in proteins and other biomolecules. When coupled with accurate solvation models, force fields are able to bring insight into the conformational preferences, transitions, pathways, and free energies for these biomolecules. When computational speed/cost matters, implicit solvent is often used but at the cost of accuracy. We present an empirical grid-like correction term, in the spirit of cMAPs, to the combination of the ff12SB protein force field and the GBneck2 implicit-solvent model. Ff12SB-cMAP is parametrized on experimental helicity data. We provide validation on a set of peptides and proteins. Ff12SB-cMAP successfully improves the secondary structure biases observed in ff12SB + Gbneck2. Ff12SB-cMAP can be downloaded ( https://github.com/laufercenter/Amap.git ) and used within the Amber package. It can improve the agreement of force fields + implicit solvent with experiments. PMID:26574266

  14. In vivo NMR field-cycling relaxation spectroscopy reveals 14N1H relaxation sinks in the backbones of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this preliminary note, the authors report an in vivo study of Hirudo medicinalis, using field-cycling relaxation spectroscopy, showing clear 14N1H quadrupole dips, proving that the amide 14N1H groups of proteins can act as relaxation sinks in a frequency range relevant for NMR tomography. Also, as a byproduct of this work it is noted that during these experiments, leeches were exposed to field variation rates of about 50 Ts-1 in several thousand field-cycles up and down, without any obvious damage. (U.K.)

  15. Easy and unambiguous sequential assignments of intrinsically disordered proteins by correlating the backbone {sup 15}N or {sup 13}C′ chemical shifts of multiple contiguous residues in highly resolved 3D spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Yuichi; Kulminskaya, Natalia V.; Mulder, Frans A. A., E-mail: fmulder@chem.au.dk [Aarhus University, Department of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) (Denmark)

    2015-02-15

    Sequential resonance assignment strategies are typically based on matching one or two chemical shifts of adjacent residues. However, resonance overlap often leads to ambiguity in resonance assignments in particular for intrinsically disordered proteins. We investigated the potential of establishing connectivity through the three-bond couplings between sequentially adjoining backbone carbonyl carbon nuclei, combined with semi-constant time chemical shift evolution, for resonance assignments of small folded and larger unfolded proteins. Extended sequential connectivity strongly lifts chemical shift degeneracy of the backbone nuclei in disordered proteins. We show here that 3D (H)N(COCO)NH and (HN)CO(CO)NH experiments with relaxation-optimized multiple pulse mixing correlate up to seven adjacent backbone amide nitrogen or carbonyl carbon nuclei, respectively, and connections across proline residues are also obtained straightforwardly. Multiple, recurrent long-range correlations with ultra-high resolution allow backbone {sup 1}H{sup N}, {sup 15}N{sup H}, and {sup 13}C′ resonance assignments to be completed from a single pair of 3D experiments.

  16. Strike a Balance: Optimization of Backbone Torsion Parameters of AMBER Polarizable Force Field for Simulations of Proteins and Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, ZHI-XIANG; ZHANG, WEI; WU, CHUN; LEI, HONGXING; CIEPLAK, PIOTR; DUAN, YONG

    2014-01-01

    Based on the AMBER polarizable model (ff02), we have reoptimized the parameters related to the main-chain (Φ, Ψ) torsion angles by fitting to the Boltzmann-weighted average quantum mechanical (QM) energies of the important regions (i.e., β, PII, αR, and αL regions). Following the naming convention of the AMBER force field series, this release will be called ff02pol.rl The force field has been assessed both by energetic comparison against the QM data and by the replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of short alanine peptides in water. For Ace-Ala-Nme, the simulated populations in the β, PII and αR regions were approximately 30, 43, and 26%, respectively. For Ace-(Ala)7-Nme, the populations in these three regions were approximately 24, 49, and 26%. Both were in qualitative agreement with the NMR and CD experimental conclusions. In comparison with the previous force field, ff02pol.rl demonstrated good balance among these three important regions. The optimized torsion parameters, together with those in ff02, allow us to carry out simulations on proteins and peptides with the consideration of polarization. PMID:16526038

  17. Backbone amide linker strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelton, Anne Pernille Tofteng; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    In the backbone amide linker (BAL) strategy, the peptide is anchored not at the C-terminus but through a backbone amide, which leaves the C-terminal available for various modifications. This is thus a very general strategy for the introduction of C-terminal modifications. The BAL strategy was...... assemble the final peptide. One useful application of this strategy is in the synthesis of C-terminal peptide aldehydes. The C-terminal aldehyde is masked as an acetal during synthesis and then conveniently demasked in the final cleavage step to generate the free aldehyde. Another application is in the...

  18. Reduced Dimensionality tailored HN(C)N Pulse Sequences for Efficient Backbone Resonance Assignment of Proteins through Rapid Identification of Sequential HSQC peaks

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) experiments -(4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH- have been presented here to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. The experiments basically represent an improvisation of previously reported HN(C)N experiment [Panchal et. al., J. Biomol. NMR. (2002), 20 (2), 135-147] and exploit the simple reduced dimensionality NMR concept [Szyperski et. al. (2002), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99(12), 8009-8014] to achieve (a) higher dispersion and resolution along the co-evolved F1 dimension and (b) rapid identification of sequential HSQC peaks on its F2(15N)- F3(1H) planes. The current implementation is based on the fact that the linear combination of 15N and 13CO/13Ca chemical shifts offers relatively better dispersion and randomness compared to the individual chemical shifts; thus enables the assignment of crowded HSQC spectra by resolving the ambiguities generally encountered in HNCN based assignment protocol because of ...

  19. Study on Lyophilized Protective for Recombinant Anti - artherosclerosis Protein on the Basis of SAK Backbone%重组SRH蛋白冻干保护剂的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹民吉; 徐涛; 刘深; 付文亮; 徐东刚

    2011-01-01

    Objective To select a lyophilized protective for recombinant anti - artherosclerosis protein on the basis of SAK backbone. Methods Mannitol, dextran 40, sucrose,and glycine in their different concentrations were selected to make up a single recipe or different complex recipes of their concentrations. After lyophilization, the thrombolytic activity and plasticity change should be examined, in the meantime, the lyophilized sample was rapidly thowed at 371 and the changes of thrombolytic activity and plasticity also should be examined. Results The protective effects on the protein of interest were not significantly different between glyceral and dextran 40 in their different concentrations. Both of them possessed better protective effect, however, that of the sucrose and glycine in different concentrations were less effective. The complex recipe of dextran 40, sucrose and glycine displayed the best protective effect on the protein of interest among the complex recipes, but the complex of gyceral, sucrose and glycine in the different concentrations had no obvious protective effect. Conclusion The dextran 40, sucrose and gycine in differet concentrations possess a significantly protective effect on the lyophilized process of the recombinant anti - artherosclerosis protein on the basis of SAK backbone.%目的 筛选并优化重组SRH蛋白的冻千保护剂,使其能够保持良好的生物学活性.方法 选择不同浓度的冻干保护剂,包括甘露醇、右旋糖酐40、蔗糖和甘氨酸等组成不同浓度的单一和复合配方,冷冻干燥后检测冻干样品的溶栓活性和成型的变化,同时,冻干样品经过37℃加速实验后,检测其溶栓活性和成型状况的改变,对比分析各组保护剂的效果.结果 不同浓度的甘露醇和右旋糖苷40对SRH蛋白的保护作用良好,没有明显差异,而不同浓度的蔗糖和甘氨酸保护效果较差.复方中以右旋糖苷40、蔗糖和甘胺酸的复合对目的蛋白的保

  20. 3D-TROSY-based backbone and ILV-methyl resonance assignments of a 319-residue homodimer from a single protein sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krejcirikova, Anna; Tugarinov, Vitali, E-mail: vitali@umd.edu [University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The feasibility of practically complete backbone and ILV methyl chemical shift assignments from a single [U-{sup 2}H,{sup 15}N,{sup 13}C; Ile{delta}1-{l_brace}{sup 13}CH{sub 3}{r_brace}; Leu,Val-{l_brace}{sup 13}CH{sub 3}/{sup 12}CD{sub 3}{r_brace}]-labeled protein sample of the truncated form of ligand-free Bst-Tyrosyl tRNA Synthetase (Bst-{Delta}YRS), a 319-residue predominantly helical homodimer, is established. Protonation of ILV residues at methyl positions does not appreciably detract from the quality of TROSY triple resonance data. The assignments are performed at 40 Degree-Sign C to improve the sensitivity of the measurements and alleviate the overlap of {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlations in the abundant {alpha}-helical segments of the protein. A number of auxiliary approaches are used to assist in the assignment process: (1) selection of {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N amide correlations of certain residue types (Ala, Thr/Ser) that simplifies 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N TROSY spectra, (2) straightforward identification of ILV residue types from the methyl-detected 'out-and-back' HMCM(CG)CBCA experiment, and (3) strong sequential HN-HN NOE connectivities in the helical regions. The two subunits of Bst-YRS were predicted earlier to exist in two different conformations in the absence of ligands. In agreement with our earlier findings (Godoy-Ruiz in J Am Chem Soc 133:19578-195781, 2011), no evidence of dimer asymmetry has been observed in either amide- or methyl-detected experiments.

  1. Characteristics of a de novo designed protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, T; Kimura, H.; Hayashi, M; Fujiyoshi, Y; Fukuhara, K; Nakamura, H

    1994-01-01

    A series of 204 amino acid proteins intended to form TIM (triose phosphate isomerase) barrel structures were designed de novo. Each protein was synthesized by expression of the synthetic gene as a fusion protein with a portion of human growth hormone in an Escherichia coli host. After BrCN treatment, the protein was purified to homogeneity. The refolded proteins are globular and exist as monomers. One of the designed proteins is stable toward guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) denaturation, with...

  2. Computational Protein Design Using AND/OR Branch-and-Bound Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yichao; Wu, Yuexin; Zeng, Jianyang

    2016-06-01

    The computation of the global minimum energy conformation (GMEC) is an important and challenging topic in structure-based computational protein design. In this article, we propose a new protein design algorithm based on the AND/OR branch-and-bound (AOBB) search, a variant of the traditional branch-and-bound search algorithm, to solve this combinatorial optimization problem. By integrating with a powerful heuristic function, AOBB is able to fully exploit the graph structure of the underlying residue interaction network of a backbone template to significantly accelerate the design process. Tests on real protein data show that our new protein design algorithm is able to solve many problems that were previously unsolvable by the traditional exact search algorithms, and for the problems that can be solved with traditional provable algorithms, our new method can provide a large speedup by several orders of magnitude while still guaranteeing to find the global minimum energy conformation (GMEC) solution. PMID:27167301

  3. On the Design of Low-Cost Fluorescent Protein Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Leah

    Proteins are the cell’s workhorses as they are involved in essentially all cellular activities. From the birth of a daughter cell until its death during apoptosis, proteins perform various functions as needed. Such versatility can be attributed to the seemingly infinite ways that the amino acids are sequenced in a polypeptide. The polypeptide backbone and each amino acid functional group contribute unique intermolecular interactions that determine the protein’s shape and size. However, more importantly, these interactions determine protein function, that is, its ability to interact with the external environment. For the same reasons, proteins make ideal biorecognition elements for sensors (see below and Fig. 1). Protein enzymes and receptors developed unmatched sensitivity and selectivity for their substrates through millions of years of natural selection. In contrast, chemically synthesized artificial receptors seldom approach the same level of sophistication in ligand selectivity, sensitivity range and ease of production. In addition, there is available to the sensor researcher an ever expanding library of proteins for various ligands important in all manner of application such as disease biomarkers, toxins, contaminants, drugs, etc. Using tools of genetic engineering, researchers can even go beyond known existing wild type proteins by introducing useful functional groups thereby tuning or even altering protein sensitivity and selectivity. This can be done by mutagenesis and directed evolution or by incorporation of unnatural amino acids during translation. Additionally, genes for the protein of interest can be inserted in vectors predesigned with handles for affinity purification or immobilization on a surface. Recombinant proteins can then be produced in large amounts in appropriate cellular hosts with very high reproducibility. In addition, chemical reactions involving the amino acids have become standard protocols. Thus, there are thousands of dyes

  4. Protein Design: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Lynne; Caballero, Diego; Hinrichsen, Michael R.; Virrueta, Alejandro; Williams, Danielle M.; O’Hern, Corey S.

    2016-01-01

    Building on the pioneering work of Ho and DeGrado (J Am Chem Soc 1987, 109, 6751–6758) in the late 1980s, protein design approaches have revealed many fundamental features of protein structure and stability. We are now in the era that the early work presaged – the design of new proteins with practical applications and uses. Here we briefly survey some past milestones in protein design, in addition to highlighting recent progress and future aspirations. PMID:25784145

  5. Getting started with Backbone Marionette

    CERN Document Server

    Armendariz, Raymundo

    2014-01-01

    This book is written with an easy-to-understand approach with the intention of giving small but concrete examples that will help you to quickly understand each component of Marionette. Follow along as we work together to build a practical application using Backbone Marionette.If you are a web application developer interested in using Backbone Marionette for a real-life project, then this book is for you. As a prerequisite, knowledge of JavaScript and a working knowledge of Backbone.js is required.

  6. What is the protein design alphabet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2004-03-01

    Selecting a protein sequence that corresponds to a specific three-dimensional protein structure is known as the protein design problem. One principal bottleneck in solving this problem is our lack of knowledge of precise atomic interactions. Using a simple model of amino acid interactions, we determine three crucial factors that are important for solving the protein design problem. Among these factors is the protein alphabet-a set of sequence elements that encodes protein structure. Our model predicts that alphabet size is independent of protein length, suggesting the possibility of designing a protein of arbitrary length with the natural protein alphabet. We also find that protein alphabet size is governed by protein structural properties and the energetic properties of the protein alphabet units. We discover that the usage of average types of amino acid in proteins is less than expected if amino acids were chosen randomly with naturally occurring frequencies. We propose three possible scenarios that account for amino acid underusage in proteins. These scenarios suggest the possibility that amino acids themselves might not constitute the alphabet of natural proteins. PMID:14997558

  7. Predicting evolutionary site variability from structure in viral proteins: buriedness, flexibility, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Spielman, Stephanie J; Jackson, Eleisha L; Dawson, Eric T; Meyer, Austin G; Wilke, Claus O

    2014-01-01

    Several recent works have shown that protein structure can predict site-specific evolutionary sequence variation. In particular, sites that are buried and/or have many contacts with other sites in a structure have been shown to evolve more slowly, on average, than surface sites with few contacts. Here, we present a comprehensive study of the extent to which numerous structural properties can predict sequence variation. The structural properties we considered include buriedness (relative solvent accessibility and contact number), structural flexibility (B factors, root-mean-square fluctuations, and variation in dihedral angles), and variability in designed structures. We obtained structural flexibility measures both from molecular dynamics simulations performed on 9 non-homologous viral protein structures and from variation in homologous variants of those proteins, where available. We obtained measures of variability in designed structures from flexible-backbone design in the Rosetta software. We found that mo...

  8. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of the human brain-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) in its apo form and the holo forms binding to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oeemig, Jesper S; Jørgensen, Mathilde L; Hansen, Mikka S;

    2009-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid.......In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid....

  9. Guaranteed Discrete Energy Optimization on Large Protein Design Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncini, David; Allouche, David; de Givry, Simon; Delmas, Céline; Barbe, Sophie; Schiex, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    In Computational Protein Design (CPD), assuming a rigid backbone and amino-acid rotamer library, the problem of finding a sequence with an optimal conformation is NP-hard. In this paper, using Dunbrack's rotamer library and Talaris2014 decomposable energy function, we use an exact deterministic method combining branch and bound, arc consistency, and tree-decomposition to provenly identify the global minimum energy sequence-conformation on full-redesign problems, defining search spaces of size up to 10(234). This is achieved on a single core of a standard computing server, requiring a maximum of 66GB RAM. A variant of the algorithm is able to exhaustively enumerate all sequence-conformations within an energy threshold of the optimum. These proven optimal solutions are then used to evaluate the frequencies and amplitudes, in energy and sequence, at which an existing CPD-dedicated simulated annealing implementation may miss the optimum on these full redesign problems. The probability of finding an optimum drops close to 0 very quickly. In the worst case, despite 1,000 repeats, the annealing algorithm remained more than 1 Rosetta unit away from the optimum, leading to design sequences that could differ from the optimal sequence by more than 30% of their amino acids. PMID:26610100

  10. Efficient Algorithms for Extension of Mobile Backbone Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswaramoorthi. R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Network wide communication is an essential criterion for all wireless sensor networks, to transmit the collected data from environment to base station (sink node in an efficient way. The wide network coverage is provided by constructing Mobile Backbone Networks (MBN, which are dynamic networks. These networks have two types of nodes. They are Mobile backbone nodes and Regular nodes. The Mobile backbone nodes have superior mobility and communication capability than regular nodes. All the information needs to be routed through mobile backbone nodes to regular nodes. The communication between clusters is done through backbone node so that transmission overhead is less. In this paper, we are mainly concentrates on throughput optimization and assigning new regular nodes. First the throughput range is calculated for each cluster, and then data packets are transmitted in such a way that the calculated range of throughput for each cluster is satisfied. The number of regular nodes that can be successfully assigned to mobile backbone nodes can be improved by means of adopting network design formulation technique. In case of any failure of mobile backbone node ,new cluster head is elected based on high energy first (HEF algorithm, where the residual energy of the nodes are considered for election.

  11. Backbone and side-chain 1H, 13C and 15N assignments of the ubiquitin-associated domain of human X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Sin-Kam; Tse, Man-Kit; Yang, Yinhua; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu; Sze, Kong-Hung

    2010-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), a leading member of the family of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, is considered as the most potent and versatile inhibitor of caspases and apoptosis. It has been reported that XIAP is frequently overexpressed in cancer and its expression level is implicated in contributing to tumorigenesis, disease progression, chemoresistance and poor patient-survival. Therefore, XIAP is one of the leading targets in drug development for cancer therapy. ...

  12. De novo design of a four-fold symmetric TIM-barrel protein with atomic-level accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Velasco, D. Alejandro Fernandez; Höcker, Birte; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts for over 25 years, de novo protein design has not succeeded in achieving the TIM-barrel fold. Here we describe the computational design of 4-fold symmetrical (β/α)8-barrels guided by geometrical and chemical principles. Experimental characterization of 33 designs revealed the importance of sidechain-backbone hydrogen bonding for defining the strand register between repeat units. The X-ray crystal structure of a designed thermostable 184-residue protein is nearly identical with the designed TIM-barrel model. PSI-BLAST searches do not identify sequence similarities to known TIM-barrel proteins, and sensitive profile-profile searches indicate that the design sequence is distant from other naturally occurring TIM-barrel superfamilies, suggesting that Nature has only sampled a subset of the sequence space available to the TIM-barrel fold. The ability to de novo design TIM-barrels opens new possibilities for custom-made enzymes. PMID:26595462

  13. Evaluation of Newcastle disease virus chimeras expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of velogenic strains in the context of a mesogenic recombinant virus backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major factor in the pathogenicity of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the amino acid sequence of the fusion protein cleavage site, but the role of other viral genes that contribute to virulence and different clinical forms of the disease remain undefined. To assess the role of other NDV genes in ...

  14. Designability of protein subunits on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitry, Green; Wingreen, Ned; Tang, Chao; Miller, Jonathan

    2001-03-01

    Native protein folds are often made up of distinct sub folds. We use a two-dimensional lattice protein model based on hydrophobicity to study this feature. The "designability" of a structure is defined as the number of sequences with that structure as their unique, lowest energy configuration. A "highly designable" structure is one that is encoded by a disproportionate share of sequences. The designability of a structure encapsulates the insensitivity to mutation of the sequences that fold into it. We consider structures on a 6x6 and an 8x8 lattice that are composed of two loops, and find that their designability is correlated with the designability of the component loops. This result points to a more general principle asserting that some proteins may be built up from highly designable subunits.

  15. Protein structure quality assessment based on the distance profiles of consecutive backbone Cα atoms [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2kg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the three dimensional native state structure of a protein from its primary sequence is an unsolved grand challenge in molecular biology. Two main computational approaches have evolved to obtain the structure from the protein sequence - ab initio/de novo methods and template-based modeling - both of which typically generate multiple possible native state structures. Model quality assessment programs (MQAP validate these predicted structures in order to identify the correct native state structure. Here, we propose a MQAP for assessing the quality of protein structures based on the distances of consecutive Cα atoms. We hypothesize that the root-mean-square deviation of the distance of consecutive Cα (RDCC atoms from the ideal value of 3.8 Å, derived from a statistical analysis of high quality protein structures (top100H database, is minimized in native structures. Based on tests with the top100H set, we propose a RDCC cutoff value of 0.012 Å, above which a structure can be filtered out as a non-native structure. We applied the RDCC discriminator on decoy sets from the Decoys 'R' Us database to show that the native structures in all decoy sets tested have RDCC below the 0.012 Å cutoff. While most decoy sets were either indistinguishable using this discriminator or had very few violations, all the decoy structures in the fisa decoy set were discriminated by applying the RDCC criterion. This highlights the physical non-viability of the fisa decoy set, and possible issues in benchmarking other methods using this set. The source code and manual is made available at https://github.com/sanchak/mqap and permanently available on 10.5281/zenodo.7134.

  16. De novo design of catalytic proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, J; DeGrado, W. F.

    2004-01-01

    The de novo design of catalytic proteins provides a stringent test of our understanding of enzyme function, while simultaneously laying the groundwork for the design of novel catalysts. Here we describe the design of an O2-dependent phenol oxidase whose structure, sequence, and activity are designed from first principles. The protein catalyzes the two-electron oxidation of 4-aminophenol (kcat/KM = 1,500 M·1·min·1) to the corresponding quinone monoimine by using a diiron cofactor. The catalyti...

  17. Enzyme-like proteins by computational design

    OpenAIRE

    Bolon, Daniel N.; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2001-01-01

    We report the development and initial experimental validation of a computational design procedure aimed at generating enzyme-like protein catalysts called “protozymes.” Our design approach utilizes a “compute and build” strategy that is based on the physical/chemical principles governing protein stability and catalytic mechanism. By using the catalytically inert 108-residue Escherichia coli thioredoxin as a scaffold, the histidine-mediated nucleophilic hydrolysis o...

  18. (H)N(COCA)NH and HN(COCA)NH experiments for 1H-15N backbone assignments in 13C/15N-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Clay; Palmer, Arthur G. III [Columbia University, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics (United States); Cavanagh, John [New York State Department of Health, NMR Structural Biology Facility, Wadsworth Center (United States)

    1997-01-15

    Triple resonance HN(COCA)NH pulse sequences for correlating 1H(i), 15N(i),1H(i-1), and 15N(i-1) spins that utilize overlapping coherence transfer periods provide increased sensitivity relative to pulse sequences that utilize sequential coherence transfer periods. Although the overlapping sequence elements reduce the overall duration of the pulse sequences, the principal benefit derives from a reduction in the number of 180 deg. pulses. Two versions of the technique are presented: a 3D (H)N(COCA)NH experiment that correlates 15N(i),1H(i-1), and 15N(i-1) spins, and a 3D HN(COCA)NH experiment that correlates 1H(i), 15N(i),1H(i-1), and 15N(i-1) spins by simultaneously encoding the 1H(i) and 15N(i) chemical shifts during the t1 evolution period. The methods are demonstrated on a 13C/15N-enriched sample of the protein ubiquitin and are easily adapted for application to 2H/13C/15N-enriched proteins.

  19. The Design and Development of a Regenerative Separatory Column Using Calixarenes as a Polymeric Backbone for the Purification of Water from Urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, M.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to design calixarenes, cup-shaped molecules, with the specific binding sites to the sodium chloride and nitrogen containing components of urine, such as urea and uric acid, in urine. The following partition of the research accomplishes this objective: (1) functionalization of calixarene, (2) development of a calixarene based medium for the separatory process, (3) design of the column regeneration protocol. Work was also accomplished in the area of temperature sensitive paint (TSP). Research was undertaken to design a TSP with insulating propertites. An important part of this research project is to discover the thermal conductivity of polymers for TSP.

  20. Recombinant protein blends: silk beyond natural design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjaski, Nina; Kaplan, David L

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant DNA technology and new material concepts are shaping future directions in biomaterial science for the design and production of the next-generation biomaterial platforms. Aside from conventionally used synthetic polymers, numerous natural biopolymers (e.g., silk, elastin, collagen, gelatin, alginate, cellulose, keratin, chitin, polyhydroxyalkanoates) have been investigated for properties and manipulation via bioengineering. Genetic engineering provides a path to increase structural and functional complexity of these biopolymers, and thereby expand the catalog of available biomaterials beyond that which exists in nature. In addition, the integration of experimental approaches with computational modeling to analyze sequence-structure-function relationships is starting to have an impact in the field by establishing predictive frameworks for determining material properties. Herein, we review advances in recombinant DNA-mediated protein production and functionalization approaches, with a focus on hybrids or combinations of proteins; recombinant protein blends or 'recombinamers'. We highlight the potential biomedical applications of fibrous protein recombinamers, such as Silk-Elastin Like Polypeptides (SELPs) and Silk-Bacterial Collagens (SBCs). We also discuss the possibility for the rationale design of fibrous proteins to build smart, stimuli-responsive biomaterials for diverse applications. We underline current limitations with production systems for these proteins and discuss the main trends in systems/synthetic biology that may improve recombinant fibrous protein design and production. PMID:26686863

  1. DNA-to-protein crosslinks and backbone breaks caused by far- and near-ultraviolet, and visible light radiations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral responses for DNA damages caused by far-uv, near-uv, and visible light radiations have been studied. The near congruence of the spectra for far-uv damages and the spectrum of DNA is good evidence that the mechanism is the same for the induction of breaks, crosslinks, and pyrimidine dimers. For near-uv, the different spectra imply that at least several nonDNA sensitizer molecules act as primary chromophores, but that DNA damage eventually results. With the understanding that near-uv and visible radiations produce a variety of chemically potent reactive oxygen species within the cell, we recognize the possibility for many types of DNA damage. If we assume that SSBs and DNA-to-protein crosslinks are random single events along the genome, it is possible to compute the number of events per cell genome per lethal event caused by the different energies used. In the near-uv and visible region, many more breaks and crosslinks are formed per lethal event than by far-uv. About 20 times more SSBs per lethal event are caused by 365-nm radiation than by x-rays, strong evidence that these breaks are effectively repaired. It is therefore likely that SSBs are not a serious event with regard to cellular lethality. The role of crosslinks and their repair in lethal events is less clear. The lack of any correlation at all between the action spectra for SSBs, or crosslinks, and lethality and mutagenesis in the same cells is evidence that another lesion or lesions are involved in these events. The multitude of chemical events that can be caused in cellular metabolites by the reactive species generated by these long wavelengths of radiation means that death is attributable to the total spectrum of changed chemicals delivered by a lethal dose, only some of which are DNA changes leading to SSBs and crosslinks. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. CO{sub H}(N)CACB experiments for assigning backbone resonances in {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrof, Nathan; Bracken, Clay; Cavanagh, John; Palmer, Arthur G

    1998-05-15

    A triple resonance NMR experiment, denoted CO{sub H}(N)CACB, correlates{sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 13}CO spins with the{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} spins of adjacent amino acids. The pulse sequence is an 'out-and-back' design that starts with{sup 1}H{sup N} magnetization and transfers coherence via the {sup 15}N spin simultaneously to the {sup 13}CO and{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spins, followed by transfer to the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} spin. Two versions of the sequence are presented: one in which the {sup 13}CO spins are frequency labeled during an incremented t{sub 1} evolution period prior to transfer of magnetization from the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} to the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances, and one in which the{sup 13}CO spins are frequency labeled in a constant-time manner during the coherence transfer to and from the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances. Because {sup 13}COand {sup 15}N chemical shifts are largely uncorrelated, the technique will be especially useful when degeneracy in the{sup 1}H{sup N}-{sup 15}N chemical shifts hinders resonance assignment. The CO{sub H}(N)CACB experiment is demonstrated using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled ubiquitin.

  3. Development of a Backbone Cyclic Peptide Library as Potential Antiparasitic Therapeutics Using Microwave Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvit, Nir; Kornfeld, Opher S

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are intimately involved in almost all biological processes and are linked to many human diseases. Therefore, there is a major effort to target PPIs in basic research and in the pharmaceutical industry. Protein-protein interfaces are usually large, flat, and often lack pockets, complicating the discovery of small molecules that target such sites. Alternative targeting approaches using antibodies have limitations due to poor oral bioavailability, low cell-permeability, and production inefficiency. Using peptides to target PPI interfaces has several advantages. Peptides have higher conformational flexibility, increased selectivity, and are generally inexpensive. However, peptides have their own limitations including poor stability and inefficiency crossing cell membranes. To overcome such limitations, peptide cyclization can be performed. Cyclization has been demonstrated to improve peptide selectivity, metabolic stability, and bioavailability. However, predicting the bioactive conformation of a cyclic peptide is not trivial. To overcome this challenge, one attractive approach it to screen a focused library to screen in which all backbone cyclic peptides have the same primary sequence, but differ in parameters that influence their conformation, such as ring size and position. We describe a detailed protocol for synthesizing a library of backbone cyclic peptides targeting specific parasite PPIs. Using a rational design approach, we developed peptides derived from the scaffold protein Leishmania receptor for activated C-kinase (LACK). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK that are conserved in parasites, but not in the mammalian host homolog, may represent interaction sites for proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. The cyclic peptides were synthesized using microwave irradiation to reduce reaction times and increase efficiency. Developing a library of backbone cyclic peptides with different ring sizes facilitates a

  4. Rational design of protein kinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarmoluk S. M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern methodological approaches to rational design of low molecular weight compounds with specific activity in relation to predetermined biomolecular targets are considered by example of development of high effective protein kinase inhibitors. The application of new computational methods that allow to significantly improve the quality of computational experiments (in, particular, accuracy of low molecular weight compounds activity prediction without increase of computational and time costs are highlighted. The effectiveness of strategy of rational design is demonstrated by examples of several own investigations devoted to development of new inhibitors that are high effective and selective towards protein kinases CK2, FGFR1 and ASK1.

  5. Emerging hydrogel designs for controlled protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ki Hyun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2016-08-19

    Hydrogels have evolved into indispensable biomaterials in the fields of drug delivery and regenerative medicine. This minireview aims to highlight the recent advances in the hydrogel design for controlled release of bioactive proteins. The latest developments of enzyme-responsive and externally regulated drug delivery systems are summarized. The design strategies and applications of phase-separated hydrogel systems are also described. We expect that these emerging approaches will enable expanded use of hydrogels in biomedicine and healthcare. PMID:27374633

  6. Backbone dynamics of a biologically active human FGF-1 monomer, complexed to a hexasaccharide heparin-analogue, by {sup 15}N NMR relaxation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Fayos, Rosa [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain); Angulo, Jesus; Ojeda, Rafael [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Martin-Pastor, Manuel [Unidad de RM y Unidad de RMN de Biomoleculas Asociada al CSIC, Laboratorio de Estructura e Estructura de Biomoleculas Jose Carracido (Spain); Nieto, Pedro M.; Martin-Lomas, Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Lozano, Rosa; Gimenez-Gallego, Guillermo; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain)], E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es

    2006-08-15

    The binding site and backbone dynamics of a bioactive complex formed by the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and a specifically designed heparin hexasaccharide has been investigated by HSQC and relaxation NMR methods. The comparison of the relaxation data for the free and bound states has allowed showing that the complex is monomeric, and still induces mutagenesis, and that the protein backbone presents reduced motion in different timescale in its bound state, except in certain points that are involved in the interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)

  7. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The concept of using highly ionic conducting backbones with subsequent infiltration of electronically conducting particles has widely been used to develop alternative anode-supported SOFC's. In this work, the idea was to develop infiltrated backbones as an alternative design based on cathode-supported...... printed symmetrical cells. Samples with LSM/YSZ composite and YSZ backbones made with graphite+PMMA as pore formers exhibited comparable Rp values to the screen printed LSM/YSZ cathode. This route was chosen as the best to fabricate the cathode supported cells. SEM micrograph of a cathode supported cell...... with infiltrated LSM nanoparticles is shown in Fig. 1. Figure 1. Cross section of LSM infiltrated cathode supported cell. [Formula]...

  8. A direct electrifying algorithm for backbone identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a new algorithm for identifying backbones in the application of percolation theory. This algorithm is based on the current-carrying definition of backbone and is carried out on the predetermined spanning cluster. It is fairly easy to implement and further parallelize. The efficiency is enhanced by the fact that the conductivity of a percolating system can be obtained in the same processing of backbone identification. The critical exponents of backbone mass, red bonds (sites) and conductivity obtained by this algorithm are in very good agreement with the existing results

  9. Design of Protein Multi-specificity Using an Independent Sequence Search Reduces the Barrier to Low Energy Sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Sevy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Computational protein design has found great success in engineering proteins for thermodynamic stability, binding specificity, or enzymatic activity in a 'single state' design (SSD paradigm. Multi-specificity design (MSD, on the other hand, involves considering the stability of multiple protein states simultaneously. We have developed a novel MSD algorithm, which we refer to as REstrained CONvergence in multi-specificity design (RECON. The algorithm allows each state to adopt its own sequence throughout the design process rather than enforcing a single sequence on all states. Convergence to a single sequence is encouraged through an incrementally increasing convergence restraint for corresponding positions. Compared to MSD algorithms that enforce (constrain an identical sequence on all states the energy landscape is simplified, which accelerates the search drastically. As a result, RECON can readily be used in simulations with a flexible protein backbone. We have benchmarked RECON on two design tasks. First, we designed antibodies derived from a common germline gene against their diverse targets to assess recovery of the germline, polyspecific sequence. Second, we design "promiscuous", polyspecific proteins against all binding partners and measure recovery of the native sequence. We show that RECON is able to efficiently recover native-like, biologically relevant sequences in this diverse set of protein complexes.

  10. An Exact Algorithm for Side-Chain Placement in Protein Design

    CERN Document Server

    Canzar, Stefan; Klau, Gunnar W

    2011-01-01

    Computational protein design aims at constructing novel or improved functions on the structure of a given protein backbone and has important applications in the pharmaceutical and biotechnical industry. The underlying combinatorial side-chain placement problem consists of choosing a side-chain placement for each residue position such that the resulting overall energy is minimum. The choice of the side-chain then also determines the amino acid for this position. Many algorithms for this NP-hard problem have been proposed in the context of homology modeling, which, however, reach their limits when faced with large protein design instances. In this paper, we propose a new exact method for the side-chain placement problem that works well even for large instance sizes as they appear in protein design. Our main contribution is a dedicated branch-and-bound algorithm that combines tight upper and lower bounds resulting from a novel Lagrangian relaxation approach for side-chain placement. Our experimental results show...

  11. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  12. Free backbone carbonyls mediate rhodopsin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Sanchez-Reyes, Omar B; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-08-01

    Conserved prolines in the transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often considered to function as hinges that divide the helix into two segments capable of independent motion. Depending on their potential to hydrogen-bond, the free C=O groups associated with these prolines can facilitate conformational flexibility, conformational switching or stabilization of the receptor structure. To address the role of conserved prolines in family A GPCRs through solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we focus on bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR in the visual receptor subfamily. The free backbone C=O groups on helices H5 and H7 stabilize the inactive rhodopsin structure through hydrogen-bonds to residues on adjacent helices. In response to light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore, hydrogen-bonding interactions involving these C=O groups are released, thus facilitating repacking of H5 and H7 onto the transmembrane core of the receptor. These results provide insights into the multiple structural and functional roles of prolines in membrane proteins. PMID:27376589

  13. Comparison of JavaScript frameworks, Angular, Backbone, and Ember

    OpenAIRE

    Simin, Matija

    2016-01-01

    The thesis compares three JavaScript frameworks for developing web applications: AngularJS, Ember.js and Backbone.js. In the thesis we compared their implementation of the MVC design pattern and their subversions. Besides their implementation of MVC design pattern we compared their functionalities and features, such as templating system, routing implementation, communications with a server, data binding, adjustability, size and activity of the community, quality of existing documentation, pos...

  14. Computational Protein Design with Explicit Consideration of Surface Hydrophobic Patches

    OpenAIRE

    Jacak, Ron; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    De novo protein design requires the identification of amino-acid sequences that favor the target folded conformation and are soluble in water. One strategy for promoting solubility is to disallow hydrophobic residues on the protein surface during design. However, naturally occurring proteins often have hydrophobic amino acids on their surface that contribute to protein stability via the partial burial of hydrophobic surface area or play a key role in the formation of protein-protein interacti...

  15. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people. (review)

  16. The Graphical Representation of the Digital Astronaut Physiology Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briers, Demarcus

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes my internship project with the NASA Digital Astronaut Project to analyze the Digital Astronaut (DA) physiology backbone model. The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) applies integrated physiology models to support space biomedical operations, and to assist NASA researchers in closing knowledge gaps related to human physiologic responses to space flight. The DA physiology backbone is a set of integrated physiological equations and functions that model the interacting systems of the human body. The current release of the model is HumMod (Human Model) version 1.5 and was developed over forty years at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC). The physiology equations and functions are scripted in an XML schema specifically designed for physiology modeling by Dr. Thomas G. Coleman at UMMC. Currently it is difficult to examine the physiology backbone without being knowledgeable of the XML schema. While investigating and documenting the tags and algorithms used in the XML schema, I proposed a standard methodology for a graphical representation. This standard methodology may be used to transcribe graphical representations from the DA physiology backbone. In turn, the graphical representations can allow examination of the physiological functions and equations without the need to be familiar with the computer programming languages or markup languages used by DA modeling software.

  17. A data acquisition backbone core library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the new experiments at FAIR new concepts of data acquisition systems have to be developed like the distribution of self-triggered, time stamped data streams over high performance networks for event building. The data acquisition backbone core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework designed for the implementation of such data acquisition systems. It provides the event building over networks like InfiniBand or Gigabit Ethernet. All kinds of data channels (front-end systems) are supported by program plug-ins into functional components of DABC like data input, combiner, scheduler, event builder, analysis and storage components. Commands and parameters of DABC and its application plug-ins are published by DIM servers. A Java based Graphical User Interface provides the dynamic control and visualization of these components. Application specific GUIs can be added. After a testing phase, DABC can be used to develop high performance data acquisition systems. Besides that DABC will be used for the implementation of various test beds needed for the final design of data acquisition systems at FAIR like detector tests, readout components test, and data flow investigations

  18. Computational approaches for rational design of proteins with novel functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Tiwari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are the most multifaceted macromolecules in living systems and have various important functions, including structural, catalytic, sensory, and regulatory functions. Rational design of enzymes is a great challenge to our understanding of protein structure and physical chemistry and has numerous potential applications. Protein design algorithms have been applied to design or engineer proteins that fold, fold faster, catalyze, catalyze faster, signal, and adopt preferred conformational states. The field of de novo protein design, although only a few decades old, is beginning to produce exciting results. Developments in this field are already having a significant impact on biotechnology and chemical biology. The application of powerful computational methods for functional protein designing has recently succeeded at engineering target activities. Here, we review recently reported de novo functional proteins that were developed using various protein design approaches, including rational design, computational optimization, and selection from combinatorial libraries, highlighting recent advances and successes.

  19. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can ...

  20. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  1. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  2. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: measurement of individual amide hydrogen-exchange rates in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein using 13C NMR hydrogen/deuterium isotope shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-exchange rates have been measured for individual assigned amide protons in M13 coat protein, a 50-residue integral membrane protein, using a 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) equilibrium isotope shift technique. The locations of the more rapidly exchanging amides have been determined. In D2O solutions, a peptide carbonyl resonance undergoes a small upfield isotope shift (0.08-0.09 ppm) from its position in H2O solutions; in 1:1 H2O/D2O mixtures, the carbonyl line shape is determined by the exchange rate at the adjacent nitrogen atom. M13 coat protein was labeled biosynthetically with 13C at the peptide carbonyls of alanine, glycine, phenylalanine, proline, and lysine, and the exchange rates of 12 assigned amide protons in the hydrophilic regions were measured as a function of pH by using the isotope shift method. This equilibrium technique is sensitive to the more rapidly exchanging protons which are difficult to measure by classical exchange-out experiments. In proteins, structural factors, notably H bonding, can decrease the exchange rate of an amide proton by many orders of magnitude from that observed in the freely exposed amides of model peptides such as poly(DL-alanine). With corrections for sequence-related inductive effects, the retardation of amide exchange in sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized coat protein has been calculated with respect to poly(DL-alanine). The most rapidly exchanging protons, which are retarded very little or not at all, are shown to occur at the N- and C-termini of the molecule. A model of the detergent-solubilized coat protein is constructed from these H-exchange data which is consistent with circular dichroism and other NMR results

  3. Computational design of proteins with novel structure and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yang; Lu-Hua, Lai

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of proteins is a relatively new field, where scientists search the enormous sequence space for sequences that can fold into desired structure and perform desired functions. With the computational approach, proteins can be designed, for example, as regulators of biological processes, novel enzymes, or as biotherapeutics. These approaches not only provide valuable information for understanding of sequence-structure-function relations in proteins, but also hold promise for applications to protein engineering and biomedical research. In this review, we briefly introduce the rationale for computational protein design, then summarize the recent progress in this field, including de novo protein design, enzyme design, and design of protein-protein interactions. Challenges and future prospects of this field are also discussed. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB910300), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012AA020308), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11021463).

  4. Computational approaches for rational design of proteins with novel functionalities

    OpenAIRE

    Manish Kumar Tiwari; Ranjitha Singh; Raushan Kumar Singh; In-Won Kim; Jung-Kul Lee

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are the most multifaceted macromolecules in living systems and have various important functions, including structural, catalytic, sensory, and regulatory functions. Rational design of enzymes is a great challenge to our understanding of protein structure and physical chemistry and has numerous potential applications. Protein design algorithms have been applied to design or engineer proteins that fold, fold faster, catalyze, catalyze faster, signal, and adopt preferred conformational ...

  5. Eukaryotic protein production in designed storage organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloheimo Markku

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein bodies (PBs are natural endoplasmic reticulum (ER or vacuole plant-derived organelles that stably accumulate large amounts of storage proteins in seeds. The proline-rich N-terminal domain derived from the maize storage protein γ zein (Zera is sufficient to induce PBs in non-seed tissues of Arabidopsis and tobacco. This Zera property opens up new routes for high-level accumulation of recombinant proteins by fusion of Zera with proteins of interest. In this work we extend the advantageous properties of plant seed PBs to recombinant protein production in useful non-plant eukaryotic hosts including cultured fungal, mammalian and insect cells. Results Various Zera fusions with fluorescent and therapeutic proteins accumulate in induced PB-like organelles in all eukaryotic systems tested: tobacco leaves, Trichoderma reesei, several mammalian cultured cells and Sf9 insect cells. This accumulation in membranous organelles insulates both recombinant protein and host from undesirable activities of either. Recombinant protein encapsulation in these PBs facilitates stable accumulation of proteins in a protected sub-cellular compartment which results in an enhancement of protein production without affecting the viability and development of stably transformed hosts. The induced PBs also retain the high-density properties of native seed PBs which facilitate the recovery and purification of the recombinant proteins they contain. Conclusion The Zera sequence provides an efficient and universal means to produce recombinant proteins by accumulation in ER-derived organelles. The remarkable cross-kingdom conservation of PB formation and their biophysical properties should have broad application in the manufacture of non-secreted recombinant proteins and suggests the existence of universal ER pathways for protein insulation.

  6. Lessons in Protein Design from Combined Evolution and Conformational Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Swarnendu Tripathi; M Neal Waxham; Cheung, Margaret S.; Yin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play important roles in the control of every cellular process. How natural selection has optimized protein design to produce molecules capable of binding to many partner proteins is a fascinating problem but not well understood. Here, we performed a combinatorial analysis of protein sequence evolution and conformational dynamics to study how calmodulin (CaM), which plays essential roles in calcium signaling pathways, has adapted to bind to a large number of partne...

  7. EvoDesign: de novo protein design based on structural and evolutionary profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Pralay; Shultis, David; Zhang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Protein design aims to identify new protein sequences of desirable structure and biological function. Most current de novo protein design methods rely on physics-based force fields to search for low free-energy states following Anfinsen’s thermodynamic hypothesis. A major obstacle of such approaches is the inaccuracy of the force field design, which cannot accurately describe the atomic interactions or distinguish correct folds. We developed a new web server, EvoDesign, to design optimal prot...

  8. The impact of amino acid side chain mutations in conformational design of peptides and proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Laufer, B.; Frank, A.O.; Chatterjee, J; Neubauer, T; Mas Moruno, Carlos; Kummerlöwe, G.; Kessler, H.

    2010-01-01

    Local energetic effects of amino acid replacements are often considered to have only a moderate influence on the backbone conformation of proteins or peptides. As these effects are difficult to determine experimentally, no comparison has yet been performed. However, knowledge of the influence of side chain mutations is essential in protein homology modeling and in optimizing biologically active peptide ligands in medicinal chemistry. Furthermore, the tool of N-methylation of peptides is of in...

  9. Design of structurally distinct proteins using strategies inspired by evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, T M; Williams, B; Williams, T; Xu, X; Eletsky, A; Federizon, J F; Szyperski, T; Kuhlman, B

    2016-05-01

    Natural recombination combines pieces of preexisting proteins to create new tertiary structures and functions. We describe a computational protocol, called SEWING, which is inspired by this process and builds new proteins from connected or disconnected pieces of existing structures. Helical proteins designed with SEWING contain structural features absent from other de novo designed proteins and, in some cases, remain folded at more than 100°C. High-resolution structures of the designed proteins CA01 and DA05R1 were solved by x-ray crystallography (2.2 angstrom resolution) and nuclear magnetic resonance, respectively, and there was excellent agreement with the design models. This method provides a new strategy to rapidly create large numbers of diverse and designable protein scaffolds. PMID:27151863

  10. Direct Calculation of Protein Fitness Landscapes through Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Loretta; Green, David F

    2016-01-01

    Naturally selected amino-acid sequences or experimentally derived ones are often the basis for understanding how protein three-dimensional conformation and function are determined by primary structure. Such sequences for a protein family comprise only a small fraction of all possible variants, however, representing the fitness landscape with limited scope. Explicitly sampling and characterizing alternative, unexplored protein sequences would directly identify fundamental reasons for sequence robustness (or variability), and we demonstrate that computational methods offer an efficient mechanism toward this end, on a large scale. The dead-end elimination and A(∗) search algorithms were used here to find all low-energy single mutant variants, and corresponding structures of a G-protein heterotrimer, to measure changes in structural stability and binding interactions to define a protein fitness landscape. We established consistency between these algorithms with known biophysical and evolutionary trends for amino-acid substitutions, and could thus recapitulate known protein side-chain interactions and predict novel ones. PMID:26745411

  11. Net neutrality at internet backbone provider level

    OpenAIRE

    Baglioni, Laura; Calabrese, Armando; Ghiron, Nathan Levialdi

    2013-01-01

    This paper analysis the Internet interconnection market and combine the main technical (i.e. service quality) and economic aspects (i.e. profits and utility) characterizing relations between market players (end users, EUs; Internet Service Providers, ISPs; Internet Backbone Providers, IBPs) in order to determine possible economic outcomes in the strategic interaction between them. The proposed model enables a comparison to be made between expected values of social welfare (i.e. EU utility and...

  12. Metal-Directed Design of Supramolecular Protein Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J B; Subramanian, R H; Churchfield, L A; Tezcan, F A

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their central roles in cellular signaling, construction, and biochemistry, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and protein self-assembly have become a major focus of molecular design and synthetic biology. In order to circumvent the complexity of constructing extensive noncovalent interfaces, which are typically involved in natural PPIs and protein self-assembly, we have developed two design strategies, metal-directed protein self-assembly (MDPSA) and metal-templated interface redesign (MeTIR). These strategies, inspired by both the proposed evolutionary roles of metals and their prevalence in natural PPIs, take advantage of the favorable properties of metal coordination (bonding strength, directionality, and reversibility) to guide protein self-assembly with minimal design and engineering. Using a small, monomeric protein (cytochrome cb562) as a model building block, we employed MDPSA and MeTIR to create a diverse array of functional supramolecular architectures which range from structurally tunable oligomers to metalloprotein complexes that can properly self-assemble in living cells into novel metalloenzymes. The design principles and strategies outlined herein should be readily applicable to other protein systems with the goal of creating new PPIs and protein assemblies with structures and functions not yet produced by natural evolution. PMID:27586336

  13. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B.; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K.; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N.; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P.; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology.

  14. Designing a nanotube using naturally occurring protein building blocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Jung Tsai

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Here our goal is to carry out nanotube design using naturally occurring protein building blocks. Inspection of the protein structural database reveals the richness of the conformations of proteins, their parts, and their chemistry. Given target functional protein nanotube geometry, our strategy involves scanning a library of candidate building blocks, combinatorially assembling them into the shape and testing its stability. Since self-assembly takes place on time scales not affordable for computations, here we propose a strategy for the very first step in protein nanotube design: we map the candidate building blocks onto a planar sheet and wrap the sheet around a cylinder with the target dimensions. We provide examples of three nanotubes, two peptide and one protein, in atomistic model detail for which there are experimental data. The nanotube models can be used to verify a nanostructure observed by low-resolution experiments, and to study the mechanism of tube formation.

  15. Structural analysis of heme proteins: implications for design and prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Bonkovsky Herbert L; Li Ting; Guo Jun-tao

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Heme is an essential molecule and plays vital roles in many biological processes. The structural determination of a large number of heme proteins has made it possible to study the detailed chemical and structural properties of heme binding environment. Knowledge of these characteristics can provide valuable guidelines in the design of novel heme proteins and help us predict unknown heme binding proteins. Results In this paper, we constructed a non-redundant dataset of 125 ...

  16. Shape-dependent designability studies of lattice proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One important problem in computational structural biology is protein designability, that is, why protein sequences are not random strings of amino acids but instead show regular patterns that encode protein structures. Many previous studies that have attempted to solve the problem have relied upon reduced models of proteins. In particular, the 2D square and the 3D cubic lattices together with reduced amino acid alphabet models have been examined extensively and have led to interesting results that shed some light on the evolutionary relationship among proteins. Here we perform designability studies on the 2D square lattice and explore the effects of variable overall shapes on protein designability using a binary hydrophobic-polar (HP) amino acid alphabet. Because we rely on a simple energy function that counts the total number of H-H interactions between non-sequential residues, we restrict our studies to protein shapes that have the same number of residues and also a constant number of non-bonded contacts. We have found that there is a marked difference in the designability between various protein shapes, with some of them accounting for a significantly larger share of the total foldable sequences

  17. Shape-dependent designability studies of lattice proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peto, Myron [Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Kloczkowski, Andrzej [Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Jernigan, Robert L [Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States)

    2007-07-18

    One important problem in computational structural biology is protein designability, that is, why protein sequences are not random strings of amino acids but instead show regular patterns that encode protein structures. Many previous studies that have attempted to solve the problem have relied upon reduced models of proteins. In particular, the 2D square and the 3D cubic lattices together with reduced amino acid alphabet models have been examined extensively and have led to interesting results that shed some light on the evolutionary relationship among proteins. Here we perform designability studies on the 2D square lattice and explore the effects of variable overall shapes on protein designability using a binary hydrophobic-polar (HP) amino acid alphabet. Because we rely on a simple energy function that counts the total number of H-H interactions between non-sequential residues, we restrict our studies to protein shapes that have the same number of residues and also a constant number of non-bonded contacts. We have found that there is a marked difference in the designability between various protein shapes, with some of them accounting for a significantly larger share of the total foldable sequences.

  18. Shape-dependent designability studies of lattice proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peto, Myron; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L

    2007-07-18

    One important problem in computational structural biology is protein designability, that is, why protein sequences are not random strings of amino acids but instead show regular patterns that encode protein structures. Many previous studies that have attempted to solve the problem have relied upon reduced models of proteins. In particular, the 2D square and the 3D cubic lattices together with reduced amino acid alphabet models have been examined extensively and have lead to interesting results that shed some light on evolutionary relationship among proteins. Here we perform designability studies on the 2D square lattice and explore the effects of variable overall shapes on protein designability using a binary hydrophobic-polar (HP) amino acid alphabet. Because we rely on a simple energy function that counts the total number of H-H interactions between non-sequential residues, we restrict our studies to protein shapes that have the same number of residues and also a constant number of non-bonded contacts. We have found that there is a marked difference in the designability between various protein shapes, with some of them accounting for a significantly larger share of the total foldable sequences. PMID:18079979

  19. Lessons in Protein Design from Combined Evolution and Conformational Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Waxham, M Neal; Cheung, Margaret S; Liu, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play important roles in the control of every cellular process. How natural selection has optimized protein design to produce molecules capable of binding to many partner proteins is a fascinating problem but not well understood. Here, we performed a combinatorial analysis of protein sequence evolution and conformational dynamics to study how calmodulin (CaM), which plays essential roles in calcium signaling pathways, has adapted to bind to a large number of partner proteins. We discovered that amino acid residues in CaM can be partitioned into unique classes according to their degree of evolutionary conservation and local stability. Holistically, categorization of CaM residues into these classes reveals enriched physico-chemical interactions required for binding to diverse targets, balanced against the need to maintain the folding and structural modularity of CaM to achieve its overall function. The sequence-structure-function relationship of CaM provides a concrete example of the general principle of protein design. We have demonstrated the synergy between the fields of molecular evolution and protein biophysics and created a generalizable framework broadly applicable to the study of protein-protein interactions. PMID:26388515

  20. Porous solid backbone impregnation for electrochemical energy conversion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Boulfrad, Samir

    2013-09-19

    An apparatus and method for impregnating a porous solid backbone. The apparatus may include a platform for holding a porous solid backbone, an ink jet nozzle configured to dispense a liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone, a positioning mechanism configured to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to a plurality of locations of the porous solid backbone, and a control unit configured to control the positioning mechanism to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to the plurality of locations and cause the ink jet nozzle to dispense the liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone.

  1. Backbone Guided Local Search for the Weighted Maximum Satisfiability Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, He; Xuan, Jifeng

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, analytical results on the backbone in weighted MAX-SAT were presented in this paper. We showed that it is intractable to retrieve the backbone in weighted MAX-SAT with any performance guarantee under the assumption that P NP . And a backbone guided local search algorithm was proposed for weighted MAX-SAT. Results of this paper imply a new way to incorporate the backbone in heuristics. The approximate backbone used to guide the flipping of literals in those local search based...

  2. Understanding VoIP from Backbone Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Birke, Robert Rene' Maria; Petracca, Michele; Mellia, Marco

    2007-01-01

    VoIP has widely been addressed as the technology that will change the Telecommunication model opening the path for convergence. Still today this revolution is far from being complete, since the majority of telephone calls are originated by circuit-oriented networks. In this paper for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we present a large dataset of measurements collected from the FastWeb backbone, which is one of the first worldwide Telecom operator to offer VoIP and high-speed data ...

  3. Peptoid-Peptide hybrid backbone architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian Adam

    2010-01-01

    Peptidomimetic oligomers and foldamers have received considerable attention for over a decade, with beta-peptides and the so-called peptoids (N-alkylglycine oligomers) representing prominent examples of such architectures. Lately, hybrid or mixed backbones consisting of both alpha- and beta......-amino acids (alpha/beta-peptides) have been investigated in some detail as well. The present Minireview is a survey of the literature concerning hybrid structures of alpha-amino acids and peptoids, including beta-peptoids (N-alkyl-beta-alanine oligomers), and is intended to give an overview of this area...

  4. Protein engineering by highly parallel screening of computationally designed variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mark G. F.; Seo, Moon-Hyeong; Nim, Satra; Corbi-Verge, Carles; Kim, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Current combinatorial selection strategies for protein engineering have been successful at generating binders against a range of targets; however, the combinatorial nature of the libraries and their vast undersampling of sequence space inherently limit these methods due to the difficulty in finely controlling protein properties of the engineered region. Meanwhile, great advances in computational protein design that can address these issues have largely been underutilized. We describe an integrated approach that computationally designs thousands of individual protein binders for high-throughput synthesis and selection to engineer high-affinity binders. We show that a computationally designed library enriches for tight-binding variants by many orders of magnitude as compared to conventional randomization strategies. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of our approach in a proof-of-concept study and successfully obtain low-nanomolar binders using in vitro and in vivo selection systems. PMID:27453948

  5. Protein engineering by highly parallel screening of computationally designed variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mark G F; Seo, Moon-Hyeong; Nim, Satra; Corbi-Verge, Carles; Kim, Philip M

    2016-07-01

    Current combinatorial selection strategies for protein engineering have been successful at generating binders against a range of targets; however, the combinatorial nature of the libraries and their vast undersampling of sequence space inherently limit these methods due to the difficulty in finely controlling protein properties of the engineered region. Meanwhile, great advances in computational protein design that can address these issues have largely been underutilized. We describe an integrated approach that computationally designs thousands of individual protein binders for high-throughput synthesis and selection to engineer high-affinity binders. We show that a computationally designed library enriches for tight-binding variants by many orders of magnitude as compared to conventional randomization strategies. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of our approach in a proof-of-concept study and successfully obtain low-nanomolar binders using in vitro and in vivo selection systems. PMID:27453948

  6. Base-pairing potential identified by in vitro selection predicts the kinked RNA backbone observed in the crystal structure of the alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-coat protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Michael; Scott, Felicia; Guogas, Laura M; Gehrke, Lee

    2006-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the 3' terminus of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA in complex with an amino-terminal coat protein peptide revealed an unusual RNA fold with inter-AUGC basepairing stabilized by key arginine residues (Guogas, et al., 2004). To probe viral RNA interactions with the full-length coat protein, we have used in vitro genetic selection to characterize potential folding patterns among RNAs isolated from a complex randomized pool. Nitrocellulose filter retention, electrophoretic mobility bandshift analysis, and hydroxyl radical footprinting techniques were used to define binding affinities and to localize the potential RNA-protein interaction sites. Minimized binding sites were identified that included both the randomized domain and a portion of the constant regions of the selected RNAs. The selected RNAs, identified by their ability to bind full-length coat protein, have the potential to form the same unusual inter-AUGC Watson-Crick base pairs observed in the crystal structure, although the primary sequences diverge from the wild-type RNA. A constant feature of both the wild-type RNA and the selected RNAs is a G ribonucleotide in the third position of an AUGC-like repeat. Competitive binding assays showed that substituting adenosine for the constant guanosine in either the wild-type or selected RNAs impaired coat protein binding. These data suggest that the interactions observed in the RNA-peptide structure are likely recapitulated when the full-length protein binds. Further, the results underscore the power of in vitro genetic selection for probing RNA-protein structure and function. PMID:16312015

  7. A synthetic HIV-1 subtype C backbone generates comparable PR and RT resistance profiles to a subtype B backbone in a recombinant virus assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Nauwelaers

    Full Text Available In order to determine phenotypic protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated resistance in HIV subtype C virus, we have synthetically constructed an HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1-C viral backbone for use in a recombinant virus assay. The in silico designed viral genome was divided into 4 fragments, which were chemically synthesized and joined together by conventional subcloning. Subsequently, gag-protease-reverse-transcriptase (GPRT fragments from 8 HIV-1 subtype C-infected patient samples were RT-PCR-amplified and cloned into the HIV-1-C backbone (deleted for GPRT using In-Fusion reagents. Recombinant viruses (1 to 5 per patient sample were produced in MT4-eGFP cells where cyto-pathogenic effect (CPE, p24 and Viral Load (VL were monitored. The resulting HIV-1-C recombinant virus stocks (RVS were added to MT4-eGFP cells in the presence of serial dilutions of antiretroviral drugs (PI, NNRTI, NRTI to determine the fold-change in IC50 compared to the IC50 of wild-type HIV-1 virus. Additionally, viral RNA was extracted from the HIV-1-C RVS and the amplified GPRT products were used to generate recombinant virus in a subtype B backbone. Phenotypic resistance profiles in a subtype B and subtype C backbone were compared. The following observations were made: i functional, infectious HIV-1 subtype C viruses were generated, confirmed by VL and p24 measurements; ii their rate of infection was slower than viruses generated in the subtype B backbone; iii they did not produce clear CPE in MT4 cells; and iv drug resistance profiles generated in both backbones were very similar, including re-sensitizing effects like M184V on AZT.

  8. Ribosomal proteins L11 and L10.(L12)4 and the antibiotic thiostrepton interact with overlapping regions of the 23 S rRNA backbone in the ribosomal GTPase centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, G; Douthwaite, S

    1993-01-01

    23 S rRNA. Within the ribosome, L11 also interacts with this rRNA region, although the protection effects are subtly different and extend to nucleotide 1098. The pentameric r-protein complex L10.(L12)4 binds to an adjacent site on the rRNA, protecting riboses at positions 1043, 1046 to 1049, 1053 to...... by L10.(L12)4 and other proteins within the ribosome. The antibiotics thiostrepton and micrococcin inhibit the catalytic functions of this region by slotting in between the accessible loops and interacting with nucleotides there....

  9. Computational design of co-assembling protein-DNA nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yun; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Wannier, Timothy M.; Guo, Chin-Lin; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular self-assemblies are of great interest to nanotechnologists because of their functional versatility and their biocompatibility. Over the past decade, sophisticated single-component nanostructures composed exclusively of nucleic acids, peptides and proteins have been reported, and these nanostructures have been used in a wide range of applications, from drug delivery to molecular computing. Despite these successes, the development of hybrid co-assemblies of nucleic acids and proteins has remained elusive. Here we use computational protein design to create a protein-DNA co-assembling nanomaterial whose assembly is driven via non-covalent interactions. To achieve this, a homodimerization interface is engineered onto the Drosophila Engrailed homeodomain (ENH), allowing the dimerized protein complex to bind to two double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules. By varying the arrangement of protein-binding sites on the dsDNA, an irregular bulk nanoparticle or a nanowire with single-molecule width can be spontaneously formed by mixing the protein and dsDNA building blocks. We characterize the protein-DNA nanowire using fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray crystallography, confirming that the nanowire is formed via the proposed mechanism. This work lays the foundation for the development of new classes of protein-DNA hybrid materials. Further applications can be explored by incorporating DNA origami, DNA aptamers and/or peptide epitopes into the protein-DNA framework presented here.

  10. SRM assay designing for Deinococcus radiodurans radiation responsive proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a robust organism, with extraordinary ability to tolerate various DNA damaging stresses such as exposure to ionizing radiation, desiccation, chemical mutagens etc. Gamma radiation stress responsive changes in gene expression have been well studies and detected by transcriptomic and proteomic based approaches. These approaches have revealed presence of an extraordinary and sequential DNA repair mechanism that utilizes both gamma-irradiation induced as well as constitutive proteins. However, response of the organism to the other DNA damaging stresses is not yet investigated in details. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics approach which measures the change in the abundance of selected proteins of user interest. Here, we have designed SRM assay for selected target proteins which are known to be differentially expressed in response to DNA damage inflicted by gamma irradiation. For SRM designing, MS/MS spectra for all Deinococcus radiodurans proteins were downloaded from the NIST mass spectrometry peptide library database and filtered using the SKYLINE tool to select best 3 transitions for each protein of interest, on the basis of the peak intensity ranking. SRM assay transition list was then used to design SRM method. The SRM assay, reported here, is an independent platform and can be used for further validation and refinement. It could be further applied to quantitate differential expression of selected proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans to other DNA damaging stresses. (author)

  11. Non-protein amino acids in peptide design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Aravinda; N Shamala; Rituparna S Roy; P Balaram

    2003-10-01

    An overview of the use of non-protein amino acids in the design of conformationally well-defined peptides, based on work from the author’s laboratory, is discussed. The crystal structures of several designed oligopeptides illustrate the use -aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) in the construction of helices, D-amino acids in the design of helix termination segments and DPro-Xxx segments for nucleating of -hairpin structures. - and -amino acid residues have been used to expand the range of designed polypeptide structures.

  12. Folding and design in coarse-grained protein models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in coarse-grained lattice and off-lattice protein models are reviewed. The sequence dependence of thermodynamical folding properties are investigated and evidence for non-randomness of the binary sequences of good folders are discussed. Similar patterns for non-randomness are found for real proteins. Dynamical parameter MC methods, such as the tempering and multisequence algorithms, are essential in order to obtain these results. Also, a new MC method for design, the inverse of folding, is presented. Here, one maximizes conditional probabilities rather than minimizing energies. By construction, this method ensures that the designed sequences represent good folders thermodynamically

  13. Global Transcriptional Regulation of Backbone Genes in Broad-Host-Range Plasmid RA3 from the IncU Group Involves Segregation Protein KorB (ParB Family).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinska, Anna; Godziszewska, Jolanta; Wojciechowska, Anna; Ludwiczak, Marta; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2016-04-01

    The KorB protein of the broad-host-range conjugative plasmid RA3 from the IncU group belongs to the ParB family of plasmid and chromosomal segregation proteins. As a partitioning DNA-binding factor, KorB specifically recognizes a 16-bp palindrome which is an essential motif in the centromere-like sequence parSRA3, forms a segrosome, and together with its partner IncC (ParA family) participates in active DNA segregation ensuring stable plasmid maintenance. Here we show that by binding to this palindromic sequence, KorB also acts as a repressor for the adjacent mobC promoter driving expression of the mobC-nicoperon, which is involved in DNA processing during conjugation. Three other promoters, one buried in the conjugative transfer module and two divergent promoters located at the border between the replication and stability regions, are regulated by KorB binding to additional KorB operators (OBs). KorB acts as a repressor at a distance, binding to OBs separated from their cognate promoters by between 46 and 1,317 nucleotides. This repressor activity is facilitated by KorB spreading along DNA, since a polymerization-deficient KorB variant with its dimerization and DNA-binding abilities intact is inactive in transcriptional repression. KorB may act as a global regulator of RA3 plasmid functions in Escherichia coli, since its overexpression in transnegatively interferes with mini-RA3 replication and stable maintenance of RA3. PMID:26850301

  14. An Atomistic Statistically Effective Energy Function for Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Christopher M; Barbe, Sophie; André, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Shortcomings in the definition of effective free-energy surfaces of proteins are recognized to be a major contributory factor responsible for the low success rates of existing automated methods for computational protein design (CPD). The formulation of an atomistic statistically effective energy function (SEEF) suitable for a wide range of CPD applications and its derivation from structural data extracted from protein domains and protein-ligand complexes are described here. The proposed energy function comprises nonlocal atom-based and local residue-based SEEFs, which are coupled using a novel atom connectivity number factor to scale short-range, pairwise, nonbonded atomic interaction energies and a surface-area-dependent cavity energy term. This energy function was used to derive additional SEEFs describing the unfolded-state ensemble of any given residue sequence based on computed average energies for partially or fully solvent-exposed fragments in regions of irregular structure in native proteins. Relative thermal stabilities of 97 T4 bacteriophage lysozyme mutants were predicted from calculated energy differences for folded and unfolded states with an average unsigned error (AUE) of 0.84 kcal mol(-1) when compared to experiment. To demonstrate the utility of the energy function for CPD, further validation was carried out in tests of its capacity to recover cognate protein sequences and to discriminate native and near-native protein folds, loop conformers, and small-molecule ligand binding poses from non-native benchmark decoys. Experimental ligand binding free energies for a diverse set of 80 protein complexes could be predicted with an AUE of 2.4 kcal mol(-1) using an additional energy term to account for the loss in ligand configurational entropy upon binding. The atomistic SEEF is expected to improve the accuracy of residue-based coarse-grained SEEFs currently used in CPD and to extend the range of applications of extant atom-based protein statistical

  15. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    A four-step infiltration method has been developed to infiltrate La0.75Sr0.25MnO3+δ (LSM25) nanoparticles into porous structures (YSZ or LSM-YSZ backbones). The pore size distribution in the backbones is obtained either by using PMMA and/or graphites as pore formers or by leaching treatment of...

  16. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure-function relationship. PMID:26978354

  17. Assembly of designed protein scaffolds into monolayers for nanoparticle patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, Sara H; Couleaud, Pierre; Casado, Santiago; Granados, Daniel; Garcia, Miguel Angel; Abad, Jose M; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2016-05-01

    The controlled assembly of building blocks to achieve new nanostructured materials with defined properties at different length scales through rational design is the basis and future of bottom-up nanofabrication. This work describes the assembly of the idealized protein building block, the consensus tetratricopeptide repeat (CTPR), into monolayers by oriented immobilization of the blocks. The selectivity of thiol-gold interaction for an oriented immobilization has been verified by comparing a non-thiolated protein building block. The physical properties of the CTPR protein thin biomolecular films including topography, thickness, and viscoelasticity, are characterized. Finally, the ability of these scaffolds to act as templates for inorganic nanostructures has been demonstrated by the formation of well-packed gold nanoparticles (GNPs) monolayer patterned by the CTPR monolayer. PMID:26844645

  18. Identical repeated backbone of the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzaga-Jauregui Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identical sequences with a minimal length of about 300 base pairs (bp have been involved in the generation of various meiotic/mitotic genomic rearrangements through non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR events. Genomic disorders and structural variation, together with gene remodelling processes have been associated with many of these rearrangements. Based on these observations, we identified and integrated all the 100% identical repeats of at least 300 bp in the NCBI version 36.2 human genome reference assembly into non-overlapping regions, thus defining the Identical Repeated Backbone (IRB of the reference human genome. Results The IRB sequences are distributed all over the genome in 66,600 regions, which correspond to ~2% of the total NCBI human genome reference assembly. Important structural and functional elements such as common repeats, segmental duplications, and genes are contained in the IRB. About 80% of the IRB bp overlap with known copy-number variants (CNVs. By analyzing the genes embedded in the IRB, we were able to detect some identical genes not previously included in the Ensembl release 50 annotation of human genes. In addition, we found evidence of IRB gene copy-number polymorphisms in raw sequence reads of two diploid sequenced genomes. Conclusions In general, the IRB offers new insight into the complex organization of the identical repeated sequences of the human genome. It provides an accurate map of potential NAHR sites which could be used in targeting the study of novel CNVs, predicting DNA copy-number variation in newly sequenced genomes, and improve genome annotation.

  19. Backbone resonance assignments of the outer membrane lipoprotein FrpD from Neisseria meningitidis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bumba, Ladislav; Sviridova, E.; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Veverka, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2014), s. 53-55. ISSN 1874-2718 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388971 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : Neisseria meningitidis * FrpC * FrpD * backbone assignments * NMR * iron-regulated protein Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.760, year: 2014

  20. Backbone resonance assignments of human cytosolic dNT-1 nucleotidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnízda, Aleš; Skleničková, Radka; Pachl, Petr; Fábry, Milan; Tošner, Z.; Brynda, Jiří; Veverka, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2014), s. 425-428. ISSN 1874-2718 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11205; GA ČR GA203/09/0820 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : 5 '-nucleotidase * haloacid dehalogenase superfamily * backbone assignments * NMR * perdeuterated protein * dimer * pyrimidine nucleotides Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 0.760, year: 2014

  1. Design of a Split Intein with Exceptional Protein Splicing Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Adam J; Brown, Zachary Z; Shah, Neel H; Sekar, Giridhar; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W

    2016-02-24

    Protein trans-splicing (PTS) by split inteins has found widespread use in chemical biology and biotechnology. Herein, we describe the use of a consensus design approach to engineer a split intein with enhanced stability and activity that make it more robust than any known PTS system. Using batch mutagenesis, we first conduct a detailed analysis of the difference in splicing rates between the Npu (fast) and Ssp (slow) split inteins of the DnaE family and find that most impactful residues lie on the second shell of the protein, directly adjacent to the active site. These residues are then used to generate an alignment of 73 naturally occurring DnaE inteins that are predicted to be fast. The consensus sequence from this alignment (Cfa) demonstrates both rapid protein splicing and unprecedented thermal and chaotropic stability. Moreover, when fused to various proteins including antibody heavy chains, the N-terminal fragment of Cfa exhibits increased expression levels relative to other N-intein fusions. The durability and efficiency of Cfa should improve current intein based technologies and may provide a platform for the development of new protein chemistry techniques. PMID:26854538

  2. Designing the lipid raft marker protein for synaptic vesicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lv Jihua; Sui Senfang

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains and implicated in many essential physiological activities such as the neurotransmitter release. Many studies have been carried out on the function of rafts in the plasma membranes, whereas little is known about the information of such microdomains in subcellular compartments especially synaptic vesicles (SVs). In the well-studied plasma membranes, several proteins have been recognized as raft markers, which are used to label or trace rafts. But the raft marker protein on SVs has not been identified yet. Although some SV proteins, including VAMP and CPE, have been found in raft fractions, they cannot be used as markers due to their low abundance in rafts. In this work, we designed several chimera proteins and tested their characteristics for using as SV raft makers. First, we detected whether they located in SVs, and then the chimeras exhibiting the better localization in SVs were further examined for their enrichment in raft using detergent treatment and gradient density floatation analysis. Our results indicate that one of the chimeric proteins is primarily located in SVs and distributed in raft microdomains, which strongly suggests that it could be served as a raft marker for SVs.

  3. Protein evolution analysis of S-hydroxynitrile lyase by complete sequence design utilizing the INTMSAlign software

    OpenAIRE

    Shogo Nakano; Yasuhisa Asano

    2015-01-01

    Development of software and methods for design of complete sequences of functional proteins could contribute to studies of protein engineering and protein evolution. To this end, we developed the INTMSAlign software, and used it to design functional proteins and evaluate their usefulness. The software could assign both consensus and correlation residues of target proteins. We generated three protein sequences with S-selective hydroxynitrile lyase (S-HNL) activity, which we call designed S-HNL...

  4. Security in Packet-Switched Land Mobile Radio Backbone Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Thomschutz, Hans Olaf Rutger

    2005-01-01

    Spurred by change in government regulations and to leverage lower-cost technology and services, many land mobile radio (LMR) operators have begun transitioning from circuit-switched to packet-switched backbone networks to handle their future communication needs. Due to the unique demands of packet-switched backbone networks for LMR, it may not be wise to carry over the previously implemented security methods used with circuit-switch systems or to treat an LMR backbone as a regular packet-swit...

  5. De novo design of protein mimics of B-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Deniz; Bianco, Piero R; Kumar, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Structural mimicry of DNA is utilized in nature as a strategy to evade molecular defences mounted by host organisms. One such example is the protein Ocr - the first translation product to be expressed as the bacteriophage T7 infects E. coli. The structure of Ocr reveals an intricate and deliberate arrangement of negative charges that endows it with the ability to mimic ∼24 base pair stretches of B-DNA. This uncanny resemblance to DNA enables Ocr to compete in binding the type I restriction modification (R/M) system, and neutralizes the threat of hydrolytic cleavage of viral genomic material. Here, we report the de novo design and biophysical characterization of DNA mimicking peptides, and describe the inhibitory action of the designed helical bundles on a type I R/M enzyme, EcoR124I. This work validates the use of charge patterning as a design principle for creation of protein mimics of DNA, and serves as a starting point for development of therapeutic peptide inhibitors against human pathogens that employ molecular camouflage as part of their invasion stratagem. PMID:26568416

  6. LOAD AWARE ADAPTIVE BACKBONE SYNTHESIS IN WIRELESS MESH NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yuan; Zheng Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) are envisioned to support the wired backbone with a wireless Backbone Networks (BNet) for providing internet connectivity to large-scale areas.With a wide range of internet-oriented applications with different Quality of Service (QoS) requirement,the large-scale WMNs should have good scalability and large bandwidth.In this paper,a Load Aware Adaptive Backbone Synthesis (LAABS) algorithm is proposed to automatically balance the traffic flow in the WMNs.The BNet will dynamically split into smaller size or merge into bigger one according to statistic load information of Backbone Nodes (BNs).Simulation results show LAABS generates moderate BNet size and converges quickly,thus providing scalable and stable BNet to facilitate traffic flow.

  7. The Formation of Protein Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins.......Dynamically induced curvature owing to long-range excitations along the backbones of protein molecules with non-linear elastic properties may control the folding of proteins....

  8. 使用Backbone JS搭建SPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕婷

    2012-01-01

    Backbone JSR从2010年发布以来,受到了业界的广泛关注。“豆瓣说”和“豆瓣阅读(阅读器)”是两款以它为基础框架搭建的SPA,本文将结合这两款产品,向读者介绍BackboneJS的方方面面。

  9. Side chain and backbone ordering in a polypeptide

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Y; Hansmann, U H E

    2006-01-01

    We report results from multicanonical simulations of polyglutamic acid chains of length of ten residues. For this simple polypeptide we observe a decoupling of backbone and side-chain ordering in the folding process. While the details of the two transitions vary between the peptide in gas phase and in an implicit solvent, our results indicate that, independent of the specific surroundings, upon continuously lowering the temperature side-chain ordering occurs only after the backbone topology is completely formed.

  10. Large-scale measurement and modeling of backbone Internet traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughan, Matthew; Gottlieb, Joel

    2002-07-01

    There is a brewing controversy in the traffic modeling community concerning how to model backbone traffic. The fundamental work on self-similarity in data traffic appears to be contradicted by recent findings that suggest that backbone traffic is smooth. The traffic analysis work to date has focused on high-quality but limited-scope packet trace measurements; this limits its applicability to high-speed backbone traffic. This paper uses more than one year's worth of SNMP traffic data covering an entire Tier 1 ISP backbone to address the question of how backbone network traffic should be modeled. Although the limitations of SNMP measurements do not permit us to comment on the fine timescale behavior of the traffic, careful analysis of the data suggests that irrespective of the variation at fine timescales, we can construct a simple traffic model that captures key features of the observed traffic. Furthermore, the model's parameters are measurable using existing network infrastructure, making this model practical in a present-day operational network. In addition to its practicality, the model verifies basic statistical multiplexing results, and thus sheds deep insight into how smooth backbone traffic really is.

  11. Pushing the limits of automatic computational protein design: Design, expression, and characterization of a large synthetic protein based on a fungal laccase scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Glykys D.J.; Szilvay G.R.; Tortosa P.; Suarez Diez M.; Jaramillo A.; Banta S.

    2011-01-01

    The de novo engineering of new proteins will allow the design of complex systems in synthetic biology. But the design of large proteins is very challenging due to the large combinatorial sequence space to be explored and the lack of a suitable selection system to guide the evolution and optimization. One way to approach this challenge is to use computational design methods based on the current crystallographic data and on molecular mechanics. We have used a laccase protein fold as a scaffold ...

  12. Robust design and optimization of retroaldol enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Althoff, Eric A; Wang, Ling; Jiang, Lin; Giger, Lars; Lassila, Jonathan K.; Wang, Zhizhi; Smith, Matthew; Hari, Sanjay; Kast, Peter; Herschlag, Daniel; Hilvert, Donald; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme catalysts of a retroaldol reaction have been generated by computational design using a motif that combines a lysine in a nonpolar environment with water-mediated stabilization of the carbinolamine hydroxyl and β-hydroxyl groups. Here, we show that the design process is robust and repeatable, with 33 new active designs constructed on 13 different protein scaffold backbones. The initial activities are not high but are increased through site-directed mutagenesis and laboratory evolution. ...

  13. Backbone dynamics of reduced plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: Regions involved in electron transfer have enhanced mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, L.X.; Hass, M.A.S.; Vierick, N.; Kristensen, S.M.; Ulstrup, Jens; Led, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    -free approach. The C-13 relaxation studies were performed using C-13 in natural abundance. Overall, it is found that the protein backbone is rigid. However, the regions that are important for the function of the protein show moderate mobility primarily on the microsecond to millisecond time scale. These regions...... are the "northern" hydrophobic site close to the metal site, the metal site itself, and the "eastern" face of the molecule. In particular, the mobility of the latter region is interesting in light of recent findings indicating that residues also on the eastern face of plastocyanins from prokaryotes...... are important for the function of the protein. The study also demonstrates that relaxation rates and NOEs of the C-13(alpha) nuclei of proteins are valuable supplements to the conventional N-15 relaxation measurements in studies of protein backbone dynamics....

  14. Rational design of enhanced photoresistance in a photoswitchable fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent proteins are particularly susceptible to photobleaching, the permanent loss of fluorescence emission resulting from photodestruction of the chromophore. In the case of Reversibly Switchable Fluorescent Proteins (RSFPs), which can be switched back and forth between a non-fluorescent and a fluorescent state, the achievable number of switching cycles is limited by photobleaching, a process known as photofatigue. Photofatigue has become a crucial limitation in a number of advanced applications based on repeated photoswitching of RSFPs, notably in the field of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, based on our previous structural investigation of photobleaching mechanisms in IrisFP, an RSFP also capable of green-to-red photoconversion, we present the rational design of a single-mutant IrisFP-M159A that displays considerably enhanced photostability. The results suggest that, under moderate illumination intensities, photobleaching of IrisFP-like Anthozoan fluorescent proteins such as EosFP, Dendra or Dronpa derivatives is mainly driven by an oxygen-dependent mechanism resulting in the irreversible sulfoxidation of methionine 159. The photofatigue decay profiles of IrisFP and its photoresistant mutant IrisFP-M159A were investigated in different experimental conditions, in vitro and in cellulo. Although the performance of the mutant was found to be always superior, the results showed switching behaviors strongly dependent on the nanoenvironment. Thus, in general, assessment of photostability and switching properties of RSFPs should be carried out in real experimental conditions. (paper)

  15. Smarter Drugs: How Protein Crystallography Revolutionizes Drug Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to Smith, protein crystallography allows scientists to design drugs in a much more efficient way than the standard methods traditionally used by large drug companies, which can cost close to a billion dollars and take 10 to 15 years. 'A lot of the work can be compressed down,' Smith said. Protein crystallography enables researchers to learn the structure of molecules involved in disease and health. Seeing the loops, folds and placement of atoms in anything from a virus to a healthy cell membrane gives important information about how these things work - and how to encourage, sidestep or stop their functions. Drug design can be much faster when the relationship between structure and function tells you what area of a molecule to target. Smith will use a timeline to illustrate the traditional methods of drug development and the new ways it can be done now. 'It is very exciting work. There have been some failures, but many successes too.' A new drug to combat the flu was developed in a year or so. Smith will tell us how. He will also highlight drugs developed to combat HIV, Tuberculosis, hypertension and Anthrax.

  16. Computational protein design: the Proteus software and selected applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Thomas; Gaillard, Thomas; Mignon, David; Schmidt am Busch, Marcel; Lopes, Anne; Amara, Najette; Polydorides, Savvas; Sedano, Audrey; Druart, Karen; Archontis, Georgios

    2013-10-30

    We describe an automated procedure for protein design, implemented in a flexible software package, called Proteus. System setup and calculation of an energy matrix are done with the XPLOR modeling program and its sophisticated command language, supporting several force fields and solvent models. A second program provides algorithms to search sequence space. It allows a decomposition of the system into groups, which can be combined in different ways in the energy function, for both positive and negative design. The whole procedure can be controlled by editing 2-4 scripts. Two applications consider the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase enzyme and its successful redesign to bind both O-methyl-tyrosine and D-tyrosine. For the latter, we present Monte Carlo simulations where the D-tyrosine concentration is gradually increased, displacing L-tyrosine from the binding pocket and yielding the binding free energy difference, in good agreement with experiment. Complete redesign of the Crk SH3 domain is presented. The top 10000 sequences are all assigned to the correct fold by the SUPERFAMILY library of Hidden Markov Models. Finally, we report the acid/base behavior of the SNase protein. Sidechain protonation is treated as a form of mutation; it is then straightforward to perform constant-pH Monte Carlo simulations, which yield good agreement with experiment. Overall, the software can be used for a wide range of application, producing not only native-like sequences but also thermodynamic properties with errors that appear comparable to other current software packages. PMID:24037756

  17. Comparing three stochastic search algorithms for computational protein design: Monte Carlo, replica exchange Monte Carlo, and a multistart, steepest-descent heuristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon, David; Simonson, Thomas

    2016-07-15

    Computational protein design depends on an energy function and an algorithm to search the sequence/conformation space. We compare three stochastic search algorithms: a heuristic, Monte Carlo (MC), and a Replica Exchange Monte Carlo method (REMC). The heuristic performs a steepest-descent minimization starting from thousands of random starting points. The methods are applied to nine test proteins from three structural families, with a fixed backbone structure, a molecular mechanics energy function, and with 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, or all amino acids allowed to mutate. Results are compared to an exact, "Cost Function Network" method that identifies the global minimum energy conformation (GMEC) in favorable cases. The designed sequences accurately reproduce experimental sequences in the hydrophobic core. The heuristic and REMC agree closely and reproduce the GMEC when it is known, with a few exceptions. Plain MC performs well for most cases, occasionally departing from the GMEC by 3-4 kcal/mol. With REMC, the diversity of the sequences sampled agrees with exact enumeration where the latter is possible: up to 2 kcal/mol above the GMEC. Beyond, room temperature replicas sample sequences up to 10 kcal/mol above the GMEC, providing thermal averages and a solution to the inverse protein folding problem. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27197555

  18. Backbone Fragility and the Local Search Cost Peak

    CERN Document Server

    Gent, I P; Smaill, A; 10.1613/jair.711

    2011-01-01

    The local search algorithm WSat is one of the most successful algorithms for solving the satisfiability (SAT) problem. It is notably effective at solving hard Random 3-SAT instances near the so-called `satisfiability threshold', but still shows a peak in search cost near the threshold and large variations in cost over different instances. We make a number of significant contributions to the analysis of WSat on high-cost random instances, using the recently-introduced concept of the backbone of a SAT instance. The backbone is the set of literals which are entailed by an instance. We find that the number of solutions predicts the cost well for small-backbone instances but is much less relevant for the large-backbone instances which appear near the threshold and dominate in the overconstrained region. We show a very strong correlation between search cost and the Hamming distance to the nearest solution early in WSat's search. This pattern leads us to introduce a measure of the backbone fragility of an instance, ...

  19. Smart-Grid Backbone Network Real-Time Delay Reduction via Integer Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagadrai, Sasikanth; Yilmaz, Muhittin; Valluri, Pratyush

    2016-08-01

    This research investigates an optimal delay-based virtual topology design using integer linear programming (ILP), which is applied to the current backbone networks such as smart-grid real-time communication systems. A network traffic matrix is applied and the corresponding virtual topology problem is solved using the ILP formulations that include a network delay-dependent objective function and lightpath routing, wavelength assignment, wavelength continuity, flow routing, and traffic loss constraints. The proposed optimization approach provides an efficient deterministic integration of intelligent sensing and decision making, and network learning features for superior smart grid operations by adaptively responding the time-varying network traffic data as well as operational constraints to maintain optimal virtual topologies. A representative optical backbone network has been utilized to demonstrate the proposed optimization framework whose simulation results indicate that superior smart-grid network performance can be achieved using commercial networks and integer programming. PMID:25935050

  20. Sub-nanoscale surface ruggedness provides a water-tight seal for exposed regions in soluble protein structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Schulz

    Full Text Available Soluble proteins must maintain backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs water-tight to ensure structural integrity. This protection is often achieved by burying the BHBs or wrapping them through intermolecular associations. On the other hand, water has low coordination resilience, with loss of hydrogen-bonding partnerships carrying significant thermodynamic cost. Thus, a core problem in structural biology is whether natural design actually exploits the water coordination stiffness to seal the backbone in regions that are exposed to the solvent. This work explores the molecular design features that make this type of seal operative, focusing on the side-chain arrangements that shield the protein backbone. We show that an efficient sealing is achieved by adapting the sub-nanoscale surface topography to the stringency of water coordination: an exposed BHB may be kept dry if the local concave curvature is small enough to impede formation of the coordination shell of a penetrating water molecule. Examination of an exhaustive database of uncomplexed proteins reveals that exposed BHBs invariably occur within such sub-nanoscale cavities in native folds, while this level of local ruggedness is absent in other regions. By contrast, BHB exposure in misfolded proteins occurs with larger local curvature promoting backbone hydration and consequently, structure disruption. These findings unravel physical constraints fitting a spatially dependent least-action for water coordination, introduce a molecular design concept, and herald the advent of water-tight peptide-based materials with sufficient backbone exposure to remain flexible.

  1. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process. PMID:27438863

  2. APPECT: An Approximate Backbone-Based Clustering Algorithm for Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Yu; Xu, Guandong; Jin, Pin;

    2011-01-01

    resulting from the severe difficulty of ambiguity, redundancy and less semantic nature of tags. Clustering method is a useful tool to address the aforementioned difficulties. Most of the researches on tag clustering are directly using traditional clustering algorithms such as K-means or Hierarchical...... algorithm for Tags (APPECT). The main steps of APPECT are: (1) we execute the K-means algorithm on a tag similarity matrix for M times and collect a set of tag clustering results Z={C1,C2,…,Cm}; (2) we form the approximate backbone of Z by executing a greedy search; (3) we fix the approximate backbone as...

  3. Computational Design of Self-Assembling Protein Nanomaterials with Atomic Level Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Neil P.; Sheffler, William; Sawaya, Michael R.; Vollmar, Breanna S.; Sumida, John P.; André, Ingemar; Gonen, Tamir; Yeates, Todd O.; Baker, David (UWASH); (UCLA); (HHMI); (Lund)

    2015-09-17

    We describe a general computational method for designing proteins that self-assemble to a desired symmetric architecture. Protein building blocks are docked together symmetrically to identify complementary packing arrangements, and low-energy protein-protein interfaces are then designed between the building blocks in order to drive self-assembly. We used trimeric protein building blocks to design a 24-subunit, 13-nm diameter complex with octahedral symmetry and a 12-subunit, 11-nm diameter complex with tetrahedral symmetry. The designed proteins assembled to the desired oligomeric states in solution, and the crystal structures of the complexes revealed that the resulting materials closely match the design models. The method can be used to design a wide variety of self-assembling protein nanomaterials.

  4. Transferable coarse-grained potential for $\\textit{de novo}$ protein folding and design

    CERN Document Server

    Coluzza, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding and design are major biophysical problems, the solution of which would lead to important applications especially in medicine. Here a novel protein model capable of simultaneously provide quantitative protein design and folding is introduced. With computer simulations it is shown that, for a large set of real protein structures, the model produces designed sequences with similar physical properties to the corresponding natural occurring sequences. The designed sequences are not yet fully realistic and require further experimental testing. For an independent set of proteins, notoriously difficult to fold, the correct folding of both the designed and the natural sequences is also demonstrated. The folding properties are characterized by free energy calculations. which not only are consistent among natural and designed proteins, but we also show a remarkable precision when the folded structures are compared to the experimentally determined ones. Ultimately, this novel coarse-grained protein model ...

  5. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Johannes; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  6. The unexpected structure of the designed protein Octarellin V.1 forms a challenge for protein structure prediction tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Maximiliano; Sleutel, Mike; Vandevenne, Marylene; Parvizi, Gregory; Attout, Sophie; Jacquin, Olivier; Vandenameele, Julie; Fischer, Axel W; Damblon, Christian; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Durand, Dominique; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Minard, Philippe; Maes, Dominique; Meiler, Jens; Matagne, André; Martial, Joseph A; Van de Weerdt, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Despite impressive successes in protein design, designing a well-folded protein of more 100 amino acids de novo remains a formidable challenge. Exploiting the promising biophysical features of the artificial protein Octarellin V, we improved this protein by directed evolution, thus creating a more stable and soluble protein: Octarellin V.1. Next, we obtained crystals of Octarellin V.1 in complex with crystallization chaperons and determined the tertiary structure. The experimental structure of Octarellin V.1 differs from its in silico design: the (αβα) sandwich architecture bears some resemblance to a Rossman-like fold instead of the intended TIM-barrel fold. This surprising result gave us a unique and attractive opportunity to test the state of the art in protein structure prediction, using this artificial protein free of any natural selection. We tested 13 automated webservers for protein structure prediction and found none of them to predict the actual structure. More than 50% of them predicted a TIM-barrel fold, i.e. the structure we set out to design more than 10years ago. In addition, local software runs that are human operated can sample a structure similar to the experimental one but fail in selecting it, suggesting that the scoring and ranking functions should be improved. We propose that artificial proteins could be used as tools to test the accuracy of protein structure prediction algorithms, because their lack of evolutionary pressure and unique sequences features. PMID:27181418

  7. Enabling large-scale design, synthesis and validation of small molecule protein-protein antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Koes

    Full Text Available Although there is no shortage of potential drug targets, there are only a handful known low-molecular-weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPIs. One problem is that current efforts are dominated by low-yield high-throughput screening, whose rigid framework is not suitable for the diverse chemotypes present in PPIs. Here, we developed a novel pharmacophore-based interactive screening technology that builds on the role anchor residues, or deeply buried hot spots, have in PPIs, and redesigns these entry points with anchor-biased virtual multicomponent reactions, delivering tens of millions of readily synthesizable novel compounds. Application of this approach to the MDM2/p53 cancer target led to high hit rates, resulting in a large and diverse set of confirmed inhibitors, and co-crystal structures validate the designed compounds. Our unique open-access technology promises to expand chemical space and the exploration of the human interactome by leveraging in-house small-scale assays and user-friendly chemistry to rationally design ligands for PPIs with known structure.

  8. Determination of backbone chain direction of PDA using FFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sadaharu; Okamoto, Kentaro; Takenaga, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    The effect of backbone chains on friction force was investigated on both Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid and the (0 1 0) surfaces of single crystals of 2,4-hexadiene-1,6-diol using friction force microscopy (FFM). It was observed that friction force decreased when the scanning direction was parallel to the [0 0 1] direction in both samples. Moreover, friction force decreased when the scanning direction was parallel to the crystallographic [1 0 2], [1 0 1], [1 0 0] and [1 0 1¯] directions in only the single crystals. For the LB films, the [0 0 1] direction corresponds to the backbone chain direction of 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid. For the single crystals, both the [0 0 1] and [1 0 1] directions correspond to the backbone chain direction, and the [1 0 2], [1 0 0] and [1 0 1¯] directions correspond to the low-index crystallographic direction. In both the LB films and single crystals, the friction force was minimized when the directions of scanning and the backbone chain were parallel.

  9. Protein-Protein Interfaces Mimics and Inhibitors Design for Cancers Caused by the disruption of HDAC-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rajaganapathy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein-Protein interactions are deregulated or disrupted; it’s a new target for an anti-cancer agent development. In this work, the protein-protein interfaces mimics on a small molecule inhibitors of a molecular combinatorial ligand library (as a similar structure of protein-protein interfaces was designed for disruption of NcoRSIN3- HDAC3 complexes. And molecular docking study was performed with Schrodinger-Maestro-9.3.5-Version, the designed five Ligands was shown good binding interactions and their docking score was around -11.9, As a result of five ligand of a novel analogue is showing superior anti- cancerous histone deacetylase inhibitor caused by the disruption of HDAC-3.

  10. Increased Diels-Alderase activity through backbone remodeling guided by Foldit players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiben, Christopher B; Siegel, Justin B; Bale, Jacob B; Cooper, Seth; Khatib, Firas; Shen, Betty W; Players, Foldit; Stoddard, Barry L; Popovic, Zoran; Baker, David

    2012-02-01

    Computational enzyme design holds promise for the production of renewable fuels, drugs and chemicals. De novo enzyme design has generated catalysts for several reactions, but with lower catalytic efficiencies than naturally occurring enzymes. Here we report the use of game-driven crowdsourcing to enhance the activity of a computationally designed enzyme through the functional remodeling of its structure. Players of the online game Foldit were challenged to remodel the backbone of a computationally designed bimolecular Diels-Alderase to enable additional interactions with substrates. Several iterations of design and characterization generated a 24-residue helix-turn-helix motif, including a 13-residue insertion, that increased enzyme activity >18-fold. X-ray crystallography showed that the large insertion adopts a helix-turn-helix structure positioned as in the Foldit model. These results demonstrate that human creativity can extend beyond the macroscopic challenges encountered in everyday life to molecular-scale design problems. PMID:22267011

  11. Designed armadillo repeat proteins as general peptide-binding scaffolds: consensus design and computational optimization of the hydrophobic core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Pellarin, Riccardo; Larsen, Anders Peter; Varadamsetty, Gautham; Stumpp, Michael T; Zerbe, Oliver; Caflisch, Amedeo; Plückthun, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    interactions with peptides or parts of proteins in extended conformation. The conserved binding mode of the peptide in extended form, observed for different targets, makes armadillo repeat proteins attractive candidates for the generation of modular peptide-binding scaffolds. Taking advantage of the large...... constitute the starting point for the generation of designed armadillo repeat protein libraries for the selection of peptide binders, exploiting their modular structure and their conserved binding mode....

  12. The role of local backrub motions in evolved and designed mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Keedy

    Full Text Available Amino acid substitutions in protein structures often require subtle backbone adjustments that are difficult to model in atomic detail. An improved ability to predict realistic backbone changes in response to engineered mutations would be of great utility for the blossoming field of rational protein design. One model that has recently grown in acceptance is the backrub motion, a low-energy dipeptide rotation with single-peptide counter-rotations, that is coupled to dynamic two-state sidechain rotamer jumps, as evidenced by alternate conformations in very high-resolution crystal structures. It has been speculated that backrubs may facilitate sequence changes equally well as rotamer changes. However, backrub-induced shifts and experimental uncertainty are of similar magnitude for backbone atoms in even high-resolution structures, so comparison of wildtype-vs.-mutant crystal structure pairs is not sufficient to directly link backrubs to mutations. In this study, we use two alternative approaches that bypass this limitation. First, we use a quality-filtered structure database to aggregate many examples for precisely defined motifs with single amino acid differences, and find that the effectively amplified backbone differences closely resemble backrubs. Second, we directly apply a provably-accurate, backrub-enabled protein design algorithm to idealized versions of these motifs, and discover that the lowest-energy computed models match the average-coordinate experimental structures. These results support the hypothesis that backrubs participate in natural protein evolution and validate their continued use for design of synthetic proteins.

  13. TRX-LOGOS - a graphical tool to demonstrate DNA information content dependent upon backbone dynamics in addition to base sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Fortin, Connor H.; Schulze, Katharina V.; Babbitt, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is now widely-accepted that DNA sequences defining DNA-protein interactions functionally depend upon local biophysical features of DNA backbone that are important in defining sites of binding interaction in the genome (e.g. DNA shape, charge and intrinsic dynamics). However, these physical features of DNA polymer are not directly apparent when analyzing and viewing Shannon information content calculated at single nucleobases in a traditional sequence logo plot. Thus, sequence lo...

  14. Constructing Battery-Aware Virtual Backbones in Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Chi Ma; Yuanyuan Yang; Zhenghao Zhang

    2007-01-01

    A critical issue in battery-powered sensor networks is to construct energy efficient virtual backbones for network routing. Recent study in battery technology reveals that batteries tend to discharge more power than needed and reimburse the over-discharged power if they are recovered. In this paper we first provide a mathematical battery model suitable for implementation in sensor networks. We then introduce the concept of battery-aware connected dominating set (BACDS) and show that in gener...

  15. Primerjava JavaScript ogrodij Angular, Backbone in Ember

    OpenAIRE

    Simin, Matija

    2016-01-01

    Diplomsko delo primerja tri JavaScript ogrodja za razvoj spletnih aplikacij, in sicer AngularJS, Ember.js in Backbone.js. V okviru dela smo primerjali njihovo implementacijo MVC arhitekturnega modela ali različice le-tega. Poleg implementacije MVC arhitekturnega modela smo primerjali njihove funkcionalnosti in lastnosti, kot so sistem predlog, implementacija usmerjevalnika, komunikacija s strežnikom, podatkovne povezave, prilagodljivosti, velikost in aktivnost skupnosti, kvaliteta obstoje...

  16. Backbone decomposition for continuous-state branching processes with immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, A E Kyprianou Y-X

    2011-01-01

    In the spirit of Duqesne and Winkel (2007) and Berestycki et al. (2011) we show that supercritical continuous-state branching process with a general branching mechanism and general immigration mechanism is equal in law to a continuous-time Galton Watson process with immigration with Poissonian dressing. The result also characterises the limiting backbone decomposition which is predictable from the work on consistent growth of Galton-Watson trees with immigration in Cao and Winkel (2010).

  17. Structural basis for specific single-stranded RNA recognition by designer pentatricopeptide repeat proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Cuicui; Zhang, Delin; Guan, Zeyuan; Liu, Yexing; Yang, Zhao; Yang, Yan; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, QunXia; Fan, Shilong; Zou, Tingting; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As a large family of RNA-binding proteins, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins mediate multiple aspects of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. Binding to their target single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) in a modular and base-specific fashion, PPR proteins can serve as designable modules for gene manipulation. However, the structural basis for nucleotide-specific recognition by designer PPR (dPPR) proteins remains to be elucidated. Here, we report four crystal structures of dPPR proteins in complex wi...

  18. STABLE DRUG DESIGNING BY MINIMIZING DRUG PROTEIN INTERACTION ENERGY USING PSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Ghosh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Each and every biological function in living organism happens as a result of protein-protein interactions. The diseases are no exception to this. Identifying one or more proteins for a particular disease and then designing a suitable chemical compound (known as drug to destroy these proteins has been an interesting topic of research in bio-informatics. In previous methods, drugs were designed using only seven chemical components and were represented as a fixedlength tree. But in reality, a drug contains many chemical groups collectively known as pharmacophore. Moreover, the chemical length of the drug cannot be determined before designing the drug.

  19. Energy functions for protein design I: Efficient and accurate continuum electrostatics and solvation

    OpenAIRE

    Pokala, Navin; Handel, Tracy M.

    2004-01-01

    Electrostatics and solvation energies are important for defining protein stability, structural specificity, and molecular recognition. Because these energies are difficult to compute quickly and accurately, they are often ignored or modeled very crudely in computational protein design. To address this problem, we have developed a simple, fast, and accurate approximation for calculating Born radii in the context of protein design calculations. When these approximate Born radii are used with th...

  20. Chamber Design For Slow Nucleation Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc Lee

    1995-01-01

    Multiple-chamber dialysis apparatus grows protein crystals on Earth or in microgravity with minimum of intervention by technician. Use of multiple chambers provides gradation of nucleation and growth rates.

  1. Modulating non-native aggregation and electrostatic protein-protein interactions with computationally designed single-point mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, C J; Blanco, M A; Costanzo, J A; Enterline, M; Fernandez, E J; Robinson, A S; Roberts, C J

    2016-06-01

    Non-native protein aggregation is a ubiquitous challenge in the production, storage and administration of protein-based biotherapeutics. This study focuses on altering electrostatic protein-protein interactions as a strategy to modulate aggregation propensity in terms of temperature-dependent aggregation rates, using single-charge variants of human γ-D crystallin. Molecular models were combined to predict amino acid substitutions that would modulate protein-protein interactions with minimal effects on conformational stability. Experimental protein-protein interactions were quantified by the Kirkwood-Buff integrals (G22) from laser scattering, and G22 showed semi-quantitative agreement with model predictions. Experimental initial-rates for aggregation showed that increased (decreased) repulsive interactions led to significantly increased (decreased) aggregation resistance, even based solely on single-point mutations. However, in the case of a particular amino acid (E17), the aggregation mechanism was altered by substitution with R or K, and this greatly mitigated improvements in aggregation resistance. The results illustrate that predictions based on native protein-protein interactions can provide a useful design target for engineering aggregation resistance; however, this approach needs to be balanced with consideration of how mutations can impact aggregation mechanisms. PMID:27160179

  2. TCP: a tool for designing chimera proteins based on the tertiary structure information

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida Reina; Yoneya Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Chimera proteins are widely used for the analysis of the protein-protein interaction region. One of the major issues is the epitope analysis of the monoclonal antibody. In the analysis, a continuous portion of an antigen is sequentially substituted into a different sequence. This method works well for an antibody recognizing a linear epitope, but not for that recognizing a discontinuous epitope. Although the designing the chimera proteins based on the tertiary structure in...

  3. Interaction of Al-induced peptide backbone ring structure with the sidechains of His, Phe, Trp and Tyr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴清雷; 宋波

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is widely used as an antimicrobial coagulant, food additive, and cookware. However, many reports indicate that aluminium may be a critical factor in many amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood, which limits efforts to prevent and treat these diseases. In this paper, using an ab initio method, we studied the interaction of Al-backbone ring structure with theπ-electron-rich sidechains of His, Phe, Trp, and Tyr. We found that in the absence of water, the Al-backbone ring can stably bind with those sidechains. In the presence of water, the Al-backbone ring can bind to the His sidechain and cannot bind to the other sidechains. As revealed by further investigations, this could be attributed to the fact that there was a coordinate bond of the Al-backbone ring with the His sidechain, while there were theπ-πstacking and cation-π-like interactions with the other sidechains. These findings potentially provide a molecular understanding of Al-related toxicity, and may be helpful in designing drugs for those aforementioned aluminum-linked diseases and encourage treatment of Al-polluted water.

  4. Computational Design of Proteins Targeting the Conserved Stem Region of Influenza Hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleishman, Sarel J.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Corn, Jacob E.; Strauch, Eva-Maria; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker, David (UWASH); (Scripps)

    2011-09-28

    We describe a general computational method for designing proteins that bind a surface patch of interest on a target macromolecule. Favorable interactions between disembodied amino acid residues and the target surface are identified and used to anchor de novo designed interfaces. The method was used to design proteins that bind a conserved surface patch on the stem of the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) from the 1918 H1N1 pandemic virus. After affinity maturation, two of the designed proteins, HB36 and HB80, bind H1 and H5 HAs with low nanomolar affinity. Further, HB80 inhibits the HA fusogenic conformational changes induced at low pH. The crystal structure of HB36 in complex with 1918/H1 HA revealed that the actual binding interface is nearly identical to that in the computational design model. Such designed binding proteins may be useful for both diagnostics and therapeutics.

  5. Protein crystallization for drug design in the last 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stura, Enrico A.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We live in an era where we expect to be able to visit our doctor and obtain a pill to cure any ailment from which we suffer. Yet, this is still not the case. Many of the current cures are still derived from natural sources although new drugs are increasingly the result of intelligent design. In this process, X-ray protein crystallography now plays a major and effective role in the discovery of new treatments. The developments that have made this possible have evolved during the past fifty years. The methods for crystallizing macromolecules and determining their structures by X-ray crystallography have been automated and the speed for X-ray data acquisition is several orders of magnitude faster. Fifty years ago it took several years to solve a single structure. Now, several protein–ligand complexes can be determined in single day. High-throughput crystallography is considered to be a great asset to the drug discovery process, providing a fast way to tailor drug candidates to their targets by analysing their binding mode in detail. Crystallization remains the main challenge.Vivimos en una época en la que esperamos ir al médico y obtener una pastilla para curar cualquier dolencia que padezcamos; por desgracia, esta expectativa no es real. Aunque muchos de los remedios en uso provienen de fuentes naturales, la mayoría de los nuevos medicamentos son el resultado de la investigación científica. En el proceso de diseño y descubrimiento de fármacos, la cristalografía de proteínas juega un papel central. Los conocimientos que han hecho esto posible han venido evolucionando desde hace cincuenta años aproximadamente. Los métodos de cristalización de macromoléculas y la determinación de sus estructuras a través de la cristalografía de rayos X han sido automatizados y miniaturizados y la velocidad de la adquisición de datos de difracción ha aumentado en varios órdenes de magnitud. Si hace cincuenta años la resolución de una sola

  6. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26672896

  7. An Optimized microRNA Backbone for Effective Single-Copy RNAi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Fellmann

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Short hairpin RNA (shRNA technology enables stable and regulated gene repression. For establishing experimentally versatile RNAi tools and minimizing toxicities, synthetic shRNAs can be embedded into endogenous microRNA contexts. However, due to our incomplete understanding of microRNA biogenesis, such “shRNAmirs” often fail to trigger potent knockdown, especially when expressed from a single genomic copy. Following recent advances in design of synthetic shRNAmir stems, here we take a systematic approach to optimize the experimental miR-30 backbone. Among several favorable features, we identify a conserved element 3′ of the basal stem as critically required for optimal shRNAmir processing and implement it in an optimized backbone termed “miR-E”, which strongly increases mature shRNA levels and knockdown efficacy. Existing miR-30 reagents can be easily converted to miR-E, and its combination with up-to-date design rules establishes a validated and accessible platform for generating effective single-copy shRNA libraries that will facilitate the functional annotation of the genome.

  8. An optimized microRNA backbone for effective single-copy RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellmann, Christof; Hoffmann, Thomas; Sridhar, Vaishali; Hopfgartner, Barbara; Muhar, Matthias; Roth, Mareike; Lai, Dan Yu; Barbosa, Inês A M; Kwon, Jung Shick; Guan, Yuanzhe; Sinha, Nishi; Zuber, Johannes

    2013-12-26

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology enables stable and regulated gene repression. For establishing experimentally versatile RNAi tools and minimizing toxicities, synthetic shRNAs can be embedded into endogenous microRNA contexts. However, due to our incomplete understanding of microRNA biogenesis, such "shRNAmirs" often fail to trigger potent knockdown, especially when expressed from a single genomic copy. Following recent advances in design of synthetic shRNAmir stems, here we take a systematic approach to optimize the experimental miR-30 backbone. Among several favorable features, we identify a conserved element 3' of the basal stem as critically required for optimal shRNAmir processing and implement it in an optimized backbone termed "miR-E", which strongly increases mature shRNA levels and knockdown efficacy. Existing miR-30 reagents can be easily converted to miR-E, and its combination with up-to-date design rules establishes a validated and accessible platform for generating effective single-copy shRNA libraries that will facilitate the functional annotation of the genome. PMID:24332856

  9. Control of polymer-packing orientation in thin films through synthetic tailoring of backbone coplanarity

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Mark S.

    2013-10-22

    Controlling solid-state order of π-conjugated polymers through macromolecular design is essential for achieving high electronic device performance; yet, it remains a challenge, especially with respect to polymer-packing orientation. Our work investigates the influence of backbone coplanarity on a polymer\\'s preference to pack face-on or edge-on relative to the substrate. Isoindigo-based polymers were synthesized with increasing planarity by systematically substituting thiophenes for phenyl rings in the acceptor comonomer. This increasing backbone coplanarity, supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of representative trimers, leads to the narrowing of polymer band gaps as characterized by ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Among the polymers studied, regiosymmetric II and TII polymers exhibited the highest hole mobilities in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), while in organic photovoltaics (OPVs), TBII polymers that display intermediate levels of planarity provided the highest power conversion efficiencies. Upon thin-film analysis by atomic force microscropy (AFM) and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), we discovered that polymer-packing orientation could be controlled by tuning polymer planarity and solubility. Highly soluble, planar polymers favor face-on orientation in thin films while the less soluble, nonplanar polymers favor an edge-on orientation. This study advances our fundamental understanding of how polymer structure influences nanostructural order and reveals a new synthetic strategy for the design of semiconducting materials with rationally engineered solid-state properties. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Designed Regular Tetragon-Shaped RNA-Protein Complexes with Ribosomal Protein L1 for Bionanotechnology and Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hirohisa; Inoue, Tan

    2015-05-26

    RNA nanotechnology has been established by employing the molecular architecture of RNA structural motifs. Here, we report two designed RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) composed of ribosomal protein L1 (RPL1) and its RNA-binding motif that are square-shaped nano-objects. The formation and the shape of the objects were confirmed by gel electrophoresis analysis and atomic force microscopy, respectively. Any protein can be attached to the RNA via a fusion protein with RPL1, indicating that it can be used as a scaffold for loading a variety of functional proteins or for building higher-order structures. In summary, the RNP object will serve as a useful tool in the fields of bionanotechnology and synthetic biology. Moreover, the RNP interaction enhances the RNA stability against nucleases, rendering these complexes stable in cells. PMID:25933202

  11. On the role of thermal backbone fluctuations in myoglobin ligand gate dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Peng, Xubiao

    2012-01-01

    We construct an energy function that describes the crystallographic structure of spermwhale myoglobin backbone. As a model in our construction, we use the Protein Data Bank entry 1ABS that has been measured at liquid helium temperature. Consequently the thermal B-factor fluctuations are very small, which is an advantage in our construction. The energy function that we utilize resembles that of the discrete non-linear Schrodinger equation. Likewise, ours supports solitons as local minimum energy configurations. We describe the 1ABS backbone in terms of solitons with a precision that deviates from 1ABS by an average root-mean-square distance, which is less than the experimentally observed Debye-Waller B-factor fluctuation distance. We then subject the multisoliton solution to extensive numerical heating and cooling experiments, over a very wide range of temperatures. We concentrate in particular to temperatures above 300K and below the theta-point unfolding temperature, which is around 348K. We confirm that the...

  12. Designing coarse grained-and atom based-potentials for protein-protein docking

    OpenAIRE

    Tobi Dror

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein-protein docking is a challenging computational problem in functional genomics, particularly when one or both proteins undergo conformational change(s) upon binding. The major challenge is to define a scoring function soft enough to tolerate these changes and specific enough to distinguish between near-native and "misdocked" conformations. Results Using a linear programming (LP) technique, we developed two types of potentials: (i) Side chain-based and (ii) Heavy ato...

  13. CORBA and MPI-based 'backbone' for coupling advanced simulation tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a growing international interest in using coupled, multidisciplinary computer simulations for a variety of purposes, including nuclear reactor safety analysis. Reactor behaviour can be modeled using a suite of computer programs simulating phenomena or predicting parameters that can be categorized into disciplines such as Thermalhydraulics, Neutronics, Fuel, Fuel Channels, Fission Product Release and Transport, Containment and Atmospheric Dispersion, and Severe Accident Analysis. Traditionally, simulations used for safety analysis individually addressed only the behaviour within a single discipline, based upon static input data from other simulation programs. The limitation of using a suite of stand-alone simulations is that phenomenological interdependencies or temporal feedback between the parameters calculated within individual simulations cannot be adequately captured. To remove this shortcoming, multiple computer simulations for different disciplines must exchange data during runtime to address these interdependencies. This article describes the concept of a new framework, which we refer to as the 'Backbone', to provide the necessary runtime exchange of data. The Backbone, currently under development at AECL for a preliminary feasibility study, is a hybrid design using features taken from the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), a standard defined by the Object Management Group, and the Message Passing Interface (MPI), a standard developed by a group of researchers from academia and industry. Both have well-tested and efficient implementations, including some that are freely available under the GNU public licenses. The CORBA component enables individual programs written in different languages and running on different platforms within a network to exchange data with each other, thus behaving like a single application. MPI provides the process-to-process intercommunication between these programs. This paper outlines the different CORBA and

  14. Monosaccharide templates for de novo designed 4-alpha-helix bundle proteins: template effects in carboproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Jesper; Dideriksen, J.M.; Nielsen, John; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    De novo design and total chemical synthesis of proteins provide powerful approaches to critically test our understanding of protein folding, structure, and stability. The 4-alpha-helix bundle is a frequently studied structure in which four amphiphilic alpha-helical peptide strands form a...... hydrophobic core. Assembly of protein models on a template has been suggested as a way to reduce the entropy of folding. We have previously developed the concept of carbohydrates as templates in the de novo design of protein models termed 'carboproteins'. Here we present the chemical synthesis of three 8.1 k...... melting points in chemical and thermal denaturation experiments....

  15. Performance of Flow-Aware Networking in LTE backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sniady, Aleksander; Soler, José

    2012-01-01

    According to traffic predictions, the growth in data networks usage will be increasing in the coming years, what will be especially visible in the mobile access networks. This brings new challenges in terms of traffic differentiation and network resource sharing, which need to be faced by wireless...... technologies, such as Long Term Evolution (LTE). This paper proposes usage of a modified Flow Aware Networking (FAN) technique for enhancing Quality of Service (QoS) in the all-IP transport networks underlying LTE backbone. The results obtained with OPNET Modeler show that FAN, in spite of being relatively...

  16. Synthesis of Polynucleotide Analogs Containing a Polyvinyl Alcohol Backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Carlsen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble homo-base polynucleotide analogues were synthesized in whichpolyvinyl alcohol and partially phosphonated polyvinyl alcohol constituted the backbones,onto which were grafted uracil or adenine via 1,3-dioxane spacers formed by acetalformation with the 1,3-diol moieties in PVA. The resulting adenine-PVA polynucleotideanalogs exhibited hyperchromic effects, which was not the case for the correspondinguracil compounds. Mixtures of the adenine- and aracil PVA-phosphate polynucleotideanalogs in solutions exhibited characteristic S-shaped UV-absorbance vs temperature andmelting curves with melting points at approximately 40 oC.

  17. Application of Multicast-based Video Conference on CERNET Backbone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Multicast-based video conference is a representative application in advanced network. In multi-point video conference using multicast can get better efficiency facilitated by inner-group broadcast mechanism. In the application, the multicast-based network resources assignment, management and security should be considered together. This paper presents a framework model of multicast-based video conferencing application with three layers. And a practical multicast-based video conferencing is implemented in CERNET(China Education and Research Network) backbone. The practice is valuable for the development of multicast-based video conferencing application in China.

  18. De novo design of protein-protein interactions through modification of inter-molecular helix-helix interface residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Sota; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Manami; Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2016-05-01

    For de novo design of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), information on the shape and chemical complementarity of their interfaces is generally required. Recent advances in computational PPI design have allowed for de novo design of protein complexes, and several successful examples have been reported. In addition, a simple and easy-to-use approach has also been reported that arranges leucines on a solvent-accessible region of an α-helix and places charged residues around the leucine patch to induce interactions between the two helical peptides. For this study, we adopted this approach to de novo design a new PPI between the helical bundle proteins sulerythrin and LARFH. A non-polar patch was created on an α-helix of LARFH around which arginine residues were introduced to retain its solubility. The strongest interaction found was for the LARFH variant cysLARFH-IV-3L3R and the sulerythrin mutant 6L6D (KD=0.16 μM). This artificial protein complex is maintained by hydrophobic and ionic interactions formed by the inter-molecular helical bundle structure. Therefore, by the simple and easy-to-use approach to create de novo interfaces on the α-helices, we successfully generated an artificial PPI. We also created a second LARFH variant with the non-polar patch surrounded by positively charged residues at each end. Upon mixing this LARFH variant with 6L6D, mesh-like fibrous nanostructures were observed by atomic force microscopy. Our method may, therefore, also be applicable to the de novo design of protein nanostructures. PMID:26867971

  19. Computational design of a self-assembling symmetrical β-propeller protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Arnout R. D.; Noguchi, Hiroki; Addy, Christine; Simoncini, David; Terada, Daiki; Unzai, Satoru; Park, Sam-Yong; Zhang, Kam Y. J.; Tame, Jeremy R. H.

    2014-01-01

    The modular structure of many protein families, such as β-propeller proteins, strongly implies that duplication played an important role in their evolution, leading to highly symmetrical intermediate forms. Previous attempts to create perfectly symmetrical propeller proteins have failed, however. We have therefore developed a new and rapid computational approach to design such proteins. As a test case, we have created a sixfold symmetrical β-propeller protein and experimentally validated the structure using X-ray crystallography. Each blade consists of 42 residues. Proteins carrying 2–10 identical blades were also expressed and purified. Two or three tandem blades assemble to recreate the highly stable sixfold symmetrical architecture, consistent with the duplication and fusion theory. The other proteins produce different monodisperse complexes, up to 42 blades (180 kDa) in size, which self-assemble according to simple symmetry rules. Our procedure is suitable for creating nano-building blocks from different protein templates of desired symmetry. PMID:25288768

  20. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 15N and 13C assignments of Tyrosine Phosphatase related to Biofilm formation A (TpbA) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Koveal, Dorothy; Jayasundera, Thusitha B.; Wood, Thomas K.; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the Tyrosine Phosphatase related to Biofilm formation A (TpbA) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been determined based on triple-resonance experiments using uniformly [13C,15N]-labeled protein. This assignment is the first step towards the determination of the 3-dimensional structure of TpbA.

  1. Gene Composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mixon Mark

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. Results An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. Conclusion We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene

  2. Design and characterization of protein-quercetin bioactive nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Xiaojing

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The synthesis of bioactive nanoparticles with precise molecular level control is a major challenge in bionanotechnology. Understanding the nature of the interactions between the active components and transport biomaterials is thus essential for the rational formulation of bio-nanocarriers. The current study presents a single molecule of bovine serum albumin (BSA, lysozyme (Lys, or myoglobin (Mb used to load hydrophobic drugs such as quercetin (Q and other flavonoids. Results Induced by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, BSA, Lys, and Mb formed spherical nanocarriers with sizes less than 70 nm. After loading Q, the size was further reduced by 30%. The adsorption of Q on protein is mainly hydrophobic, and is related to the synergy of Trp residues with the molecular environment of the proteins. Seven Q molecules could be entrapped by one Lys molecule, 9 by one Mb, and 11 by one BSA. The controlled releasing measurements indicate that these bioactive nanoparticles have long-term antioxidant protection effects on the activity of Q in both acidic and neutral conditions. The antioxidant activity evaluation indicates that the activity of Q is not hindered by the formation of protein nanoparticles. Other flavonoids, such as kaempferol and rutin, were also investigated. Conclusions BSA exhibits the most remarkable abilities of loading, controlled release, and antioxidant protection of active drugs, indicating that such type of bionanoparticles is very promising in the field of bionanotechnology.

  3. Denatured state is critical in determining the properties of model proteins designed on different folds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amatori, Andrea; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Tiana, Guido; Broglia, Richardo A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermodynamics of proteins designed on three common folds (SH3, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 [CI2], and protein G) is studied with a simplified C alpha, model and compared with the thermodynamics of proteins designed on random-generated folds. The model allows to design sequences to fold within a d......RMSD ranging from 1.2 to 4.2 angstrom from the crystallographic native conformation and to study properties that are hard to be measured experimentally. It is found that the denatured state of all of them is not random but is, to different extents, partially structured. The degree of structure is more abundant...... for SH3 and protein G, giving rise to a weaker stability but a more efficient folding kinetics than CI2 and, even more, than the random-generated folds. Consequently, the features of the unfolded state seem to be as important in the determination of the thermodynamic properties of these proteins as...

  4. Protein structure designability: The consequences of amino-acid alphabet and the underlying energy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchler, Nicolas Emile G.

    2001-11-01

    It has been noted by scientists that certain native, protein structures occur more frequently than others in the Protein Data Bank. A variety of models have been developed to explain this phenomenon by considering protein structure "designability". A protein structure is more designable if a larger fraction of all possible sequences can fold into it. Such highly-designable structures are more likely to have been found and maintained through the process of evolution hence they are likely to be over-represented. Proteins are biopolymers and the key to designability lies with understanding the thermodynamic constraints of how a biologically relevant protein sequence folds into a native protein structure. We begin by discussing protein folding in the context of free energy landscapes and phase transitions. The role of protein evolution, critical transitions, such as "freezing" into the native state ( Tf), collapse into molten globules (Ttheta), and glassy phase transitions (Tg), folding-funnels, and free energy landscape measures is a well studied subject of protein folding both computationally and theoretically. In particular, the relationship between folding funnels and relevant phase transition temperatures (T f, Tg) can be related to free energy landscape measures, such as foldability F and energy gap Delta. Using the Random Energy Model, we analytically demonstrate the statistical relationship between F , Delta. Using simplified models of protein structure and interactions, we have explored the relationship between protein structure designability, foldability, interaction parameters, and amino-acid alphabet. We shed new light on which structures are expected to be highly designable, for which types of energy models (solvation or pair-contact), and why these structures are designable. Moreover, we can also understand why free energy landscape measures, such as foldability F and energy gap Delta, must be correlated to protein structure designability. We further

  5. Investigating the Tradeoffs between Power Consumption and Quality of Service in a Backbone Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Gelenbe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy saving in networks has traditionally focussed on reducing battery consumption through smart wireless network design. Recently, researchers have turned their attention to the energy cost and carbon emissions of the backbone network that both fixed and mobile communications depend on, proposing primarily mechanisms that turn equipments OFF or put them into deep sleep. This is an effective way of saving energy, provided that the nodes can return to working condition quickly, but it introduces increased delays and packet losses that directly affect the quality of communication experienced by the users. Here we investigate the associated tradeoffs between power consumption and quality of service in backbone networks that employ deep sleep energy savings. We examine these tradeoffs by conducting experiments on a real PC-based network topology, where nodes are put into deep sleep at random times and intervals, resulting in a continuously changing network with reduced total power consumption. The average power consumption, the packet loss and the average delay of this network are examined with respect to the average value of the ON rate and the ON/OFF cycle of the nodes.

  6. Constructing Battery-Aware Virtual Backbones in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Ma

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in battery-powered sensor networks is to construct energy efficient virtual backbones for network routing. Recent study in battery technology reveals that batteries tend to discharge more power than needed and reimburse the over-discharged power if they are recovered. In this paper we first provide a mathematical battery model suitable for implementation in sensor networks. We then introduce the concept of battery-aware connected dominating set (BACDS and show that in general the minimum BACDS (MBACDS can achieve longer lifetime than the previous backbone structures. Then we show that finding a MBACDS is NP-hard and give a distributed approximation algorithm to construct the BACDS. The resulting BACDS constructed by our algorithm is at most (8+Δopt size, where Δ is the maximum node degree and opt is the size of an optimal BACDS. Simulation results show that the BACDS can save a significant amount of energy and achieve up to 30% longer network lifetime than previous schemes.

  7. Long-term forecasting of internet backbone traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannaki, Konstantina; Taft, Nina; Zhang, Zhi-Li; Diot, Christophe

    2005-09-01

    We introduce a methodology to predict when and where link additions/upgrades have to take place in an Internet protocol (IP) backbone network. Using simple network management protocol (SNMP) statistics, collected continuously since 1999, we compute aggregate demand between any two adjacent points of presence (PoPs) and look at its evolution at time scales larger than 1 h. We show that IP backbone traffic exhibits visible long term trends, strong periodicities, and variability at multiple time scales. Our methodology relies on the wavelet multiresolution analysis (MRA) and linear time series models. Using wavelet MRA, we smooth the collected measurements until we identify the overall long-term trend. The fluctuations around the obtained trend are further analyzed at multiple time scales. We show that the largest amount of variability in the original signal is due to its fluctuations at the 12-h time scale. We model inter-PoP aggregate demand as a multiple linear regression model, consisting of the two identified components. We show that this model accounts for 98% of the total energy in the original signal, while explaining 90% of its variance. Weekly approximations of those components can be accurately modeled with low-order autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models. We show that forecasting the long term trend and the fluctuations of the traffic at the 12-h time scale yields accurate estimates for at least 6 months in the future. PMID:16252820

  8. In vivo architectonic stability of fully de novo designed protein-only nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta Elorza, Ugutz; Tatkiewicz, Witold; Sánchez Chardi, Alejandro; Conchillo-Solé, Óscar; Álamo, Patricia; Xu, Zhikun; Casanova, Isolda; Corchero Nieto, José Luis; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Cedano, J.; Daura i Ribera, Xavier; Ratera Bastardas, Imma; Veciana i Miró, Jaume; Ferrer Miralles, Neus

    2014-01-01

    The fully de novo design of protein building blocks for self-assembling as functional nanoparticles is a challenging task in emerging nanomedicines, which urgently demand novel, versatile, and biologically safe vehicles for imaging, drug delivery, and gene therapy. While the use of viruses and virus-like particles is limited by severe constraints, the generation of protein-only nanocarriers is progressively reachable by the engineering of protein–protein interactions, resulting in self-assemb...

  9. Computational design and biochemical characterization of maize nonspecific lipid transfer protein variants for biosensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Eun Jung; Mao, Jessica; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of proteins that bind and transfer lipids. Utilizing the maize LTP, we have successfully engineered fluorescent reagentless biosensors for the natural ligand of LTPs; this was achieved by using computational protein design to remove a disulfide bridge and attaching a thio-reactive fluorophore. Conformational change induced by ligand titration is thought to affect the fluorescence of the fluorophore, allowing detection of ligand binding. Fluorescence...

  10. Deducing the Energetic Cost of Protein Folding in Zinc Finger Proteins Using Designed Metallopeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc finger transcription factors represent the largest single class of metalloproteins in the human genome. Binding of Zn(II) to their canonical Cys4, Cys3His1, or Cys2His2 sites results in metal-induced protein folding events required to achieve their proper structure for biological activity. The thermodynamic contribution of Zn(II) in each of these coordination spheres toward protein folding is poorly understood because of the coupled nature of the metal-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Using an unstructured peptide scaffold, GGG, we have employed fluorimetry, potentiometry, and calorimetry to determine the thermodynamics of Zn(II) binding to the Cys4, Cys3His1, and Cys2His2 ligand sets with minimal interference from protein folding effects. The data show that Zn(II) complexation is entropy driven and modulated by proton release. The formation constants for Zn(II)-GGG with a Cys4, Cys3His1, or Cys2His2 site are 5.6 x 1016, 1.5 x 1015, or 2.5 x 1013 M-1, respectively. Thus, the Zn(II)-Cys4, Zn(II)-Cys3His1, and Zn(II)-Cys2His2 interactions can provide up to 22.8, 20.7, and 18.3 kcal/mol, respectively, in driving force for protein stabilization, folding, and/or assembly at pH values above the ligand pKa values. While the contributions from the three coordination motifs differ by 4.5 kcal/mol in Zn(II) affinity at pH 9.0, they are equivalent at physiological pH, ?G = -16.8 kcal/mol or a Ka = 2.0 x 1012 M-1. Calorimetric data show that this is due to proton-based enthalpy-entropy compensation between the favorable entropic term from proton release and the unfavorable enthalpic term due to thiol deprotonation. Since protein folding effects have been minimized in the GGG scaffold, these peptides possess nearly the tightest Zn(II) affinities possible for their coordination motifs. The Zn(II) affinities in each coordination motif are compared between the GGG scaffold and natural zinc finger proteins to determine the free energy required to fold the latter

  11. In-silico designing of a potent analogue against HIV-1 Nef protein and protease by predicting its interaction network with host cell proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Shikha Pal; Madhur Mishra; D Raja Sudhakar; Mohammed Haris Siddiqui

    2013-01-01

    Background: HIV-1 has numerous proteins encoded within its genome, which acquaints it with the required arsenal to establish a favorable host cell environment suitable for viral replication and pathogenesis. Among these proteins, one protein that is indispensable and ambiguous is the Nef protein. Aim: Interaction of Nef protein with different host-cell protein was predicted and subsequently the down regulation of cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) was targeted through designing of inhibitors ...

  12. Octarellin VI: using rosetta to design a putative artificial (β/α8 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Figueroa

    Full Text Available The computational protein design protocol Rosetta has been applied successfully to a wide variety of protein engineering problems. Here the aim was to test its ability to design de novo a protein adopting the TIM-barrel fold, whose formation requires about twice as many residues as in the largest proteins successfully designed de novo to date. The designed protein, Octarellin VI, contains 216 residues. Its amino acid composition is similar to that of natural TIM-barrel proteins. When produced and purified, it showed a far-UV circular dichroism spectrum characteristic of folded proteins, with α-helical and β-sheet secondary structure. Its stable tertiary structure was confirmed by both tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism in the near UV. It proved heat stable up to 70°C. Dynamic light scattering experiments revealed a unique population of particles averaging 4 nm in diameter, in good agreement with our model. Although these data suggest the successful creation of an artificial α/β protein of more than 200 amino acids, Octarellin VI shows an apparent noncooperative chemical unfolding and low solubility.

  13. Sequential backbone resonance assignments of the E. coli dihydrofolate reductase Gly67Val mutant: folate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthenpurackal Narayanan, Sunilkumar; Maeno, Akihiro; Wada, Yuji; Tate, Shin-Ichi; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Occasionally, a mutation in an exposed loop region causes a significant change in protein function and/or stability. A single mutation Gly67Val of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in the exposed CD loop is such an example. We have carried out the chemical shift assignments for H(N), N(H), C(α) and C(β) atoms of the Gly67Val mutant of E. coli DHFR complexed with folate at pH 7.0, 35 °C, and then evaluated the H(N), N(H), C(α) and C(β) chemical shift changes caused by the mutation. The result indicates that, while the overall secondary structure remains the same, the single mutation Gly67Val causes site-specific conformational changes of the polypeptide backbone restricted around the adenosine-binding subdomain (residues 38-88) and not in the distant catalytic domain. PMID:26482924

  14. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  15. Marburg virus VP35 can both fully coat the backbone and cap the ends of dsRNA for interferon antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shridhar Bale

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses, including Marburg virus (MARV and Ebola virus (EBOV, cause fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. All filoviruses encode a unique multi-functional protein termed VP35. The C-terminal double-stranded (dsRNA-binding domain (RBD of VP35 has been implicated in interferon antagonism and immune evasion. Crystal structures of the VP35 RBD from two ebolaviruses have previously demonstrated that the viral protein caps the ends of dsRNA. However, it is not yet understood how the expanses of dsRNA backbone, between the ends, are masked from immune surveillance during filovirus infection. Here, we report the crystal structure of MARV VP35 RBD bound to dsRNA. In the crystal structure, molecules of dsRNA stack end-to-end to form a pseudo-continuous oligonucleotide. This oligonucleotide is continuously and completely coated along its sugar-phosphate backbone by the MARV VP35 RBD. Analysis of dsRNA binding by dot-blot and isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that multiple copies of MARV VP35 RBD can indeed bind the dsRNA sugar-phosphate backbone in a cooperative manner in solution. Further, MARV VP35 RBD can also cap the ends of the dsRNA in solution, although this arrangement was not captured in crystals. Together, these studies suggest that MARV VP35 can both coat the backbone and cap the ends, and that for MARV, coating of the dsRNA backbone may be an essential mechanism by which dsRNA is masked from backbone-sensing immune surveillance molecules.

  16. Upside-down protein crystallization: designing microbatch experiments for microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Sahir; Chayen, Naomi E

    2006-09-01

    The benefits of protein crystal growth in microgravity are well documented. The crystallization vessels currently employed for microgravity crystallization are far from optimal with regards to cost, sample volume, size, and ease of use. The use of microbatch experiments is a favorable alternative in each respect: 96 experiments of 0.5-2 microL volumes can be performed in a single microtiter tray measuring 5 x 8 cm and costing 1 pound sterling each. To date, the use of microbatch has not been pursued on account of concerns of oil leakage. To address this issue, a novel approach to microbatch crystallization experiments is described, where the microbatch plates are inverted throughout the duration of the experiment. The findings intimate the application of the microbatch method to space flight and the potential to drastically increase the output of microgravity crystallization research . PMID:17124125

  17. Cloning an artificial gene encoding angiostatic anginex: From designed peptide to functional recombinant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anginex, a designed peptide 33-mer, is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor and anti-tumor agent in vivo. Anginex functions by inhibiting endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration leading to detachment and apoptosis of activated EC's. To better understand tumor endothelium targeting properties of anginex and enable its use in gene therapy, we constructed an artificial gene encoding the biologically exogenous peptide and produced the protein recombinantly in Pichia pastoris. Mass spectrometry shows recombinant anginex to be a dimer and circular dichroism shows the recombinant protein folds with β-strand structure like the synthetic peptide. Moreover, like parent anginex, the recombinant protein is active at inhibiting EC growth and migration, as well as inhibiting angiogenesis in vivo in the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. This study demonstrated that it is possible to produce a functionally active protein version of a rationally designed peptide, using an artificial gene and the recombinant protein approach

  18. Protein-binding properties of a designed steroidal lactam compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-Xin; Liu, Y

    2014-02-01

    Introducing amide bonds into a steroid nucleus or its side chain may reduce the acute toxicity and enhance the pharmaceutical activity. In this work, a designed steroidal amide compound, named 3β-hydroxy-17-aza-d-homo-5-androsten-17-one (HAAO), was synthesized and identified. The interactions between HAAO and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied by multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling procedures. It was found that HAAO locates in Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecules, relying on hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power to form HAAO-HSA complexes at ground state. The number of binding sites, binding constants, enthalpy change (ΔH(θ)), Gibbs free energy change (ΔG(θ)) and entropy change (ΔS(θ)) were calculated at different temperatures based on fluorescence quenching theory and classical thermodynamic equation. The percentages content of the HSA's secondary structures in presence of HAAO were detected by circular dichroism (CD) spectra and compared with those in no presence of HAAO. In addition, the experimental results of both binding site and conformational change were further confirmed by molecular modeling investigation, in which more details of the binding were visually unfolded. The information provided by the study may be useful for designing novel chemotherapeutic drugs and be helpful both in the early stages of drug discovery and in clinical practice. PMID:24316162

  19. Rational design of α-helical tandem repeat proteins with closed architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Lindsey; Hallinan, Jazmine; Bolduc, Jill; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L; Bradley, Philip

    2015-12-24

    Tandem repeat proteins, which are formed by repetition of modular units of protein sequence and structure, play important biological roles as macromolecular binding and scaffolding domains, enzymes, and building blocks for the assembly of fibrous materials. The modular nature of repeat proteins enables the rapid construction and diversification of extended binding surfaces by duplication and recombination of simple building blocks. The overall architecture of tandem repeat protein structures--which is dictated by the internal geometry and local packing of the repeat building blocks--is highly diverse, ranging from extended, super-helical folds that bind peptide, DNA, and RNA partners, to closed and compact conformations with internal cavities suitable for small molecule binding and catalysis. Here we report the development and validation of computational methods for de novo design of tandem repeat protein architectures driven purely by geometric criteria defining the inter-repeat geometry, without reference to the sequences and structures of existing repeat protein families. We have applied these methods to design a series of closed α-solenoid repeat structures (α-toroids) in which the inter-repeat packing geometry is constrained so as to juxtapose the amino (N) and carboxy (C) termini; several of these designed structures have been validated by X-ray crystallography. Unlike previous approaches to tandem repeat protein engineering, our design procedure does not rely on template sequence or structural information taken from natural repeat proteins and hence can produce structures unlike those seen in nature. As an example, we have successfully designed and validated closed α-solenoid repeats with a left-handed helical architecture that--to our knowledge--is not yet present in the protein structure database. PMID:26675735

  20. Reconstruction of the Sunspot Group Number: the Backbone Method

    CERN Document Server

    Svalgaard, Leif

    2015-01-01

    We have reconstructed the sunspot group count, not by comparisons with other reconstructions and correcting those where they were deemed to be deficient, but by a re-assessment of original sources. The resulting series is a pure solar index and does not rely on input from other proxies, e.g. radionuclides, auroral sightings, or geomagnetic records. 'Backboning' the data sets, our chosen method, provides substance and rigidity by using long-time observers as a stiffness character. Solar activity, as defined by the Group Number, appears to reach and sustain for extended intervals of time the same level in each of the last three centuries since 1700 and the past several decades do not seem to have been exceptionally active, contrary to what is often claimed.

  1. The backbone of the post-synaptic density originated in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Michaël

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics of the early diverging metazoan lineages and of their unicellular sister-groups opens new window to reconstructing the genetic changes which preceded or accompanied the evolution of multicellular body plans. A recent analysis found that the genome of the nerve-less sponges encodes the homologues of most vertebrate post-synaptic proteins. In vertebrate excitatory synapses, these proteins assemble to form the post-synaptic density, a complex molecular platform linking membrane receptors, components of their signalling pathways, and the cytoskeleton. Newly available genomes from Monosiga brevicollis (a member of Choanoflagellata, the closest unicellular relatives of animals and Trichoplax adhaerens (a member of Placozoa: besides sponges, the only nerve-less metazoans offer an opportunity to refine our understanding of post-synaptic protein evolution. Results Searches for orthologous proteins and reconstruction of gene gains/losses based on the taxon phylogeny indicate that post-synaptic proteins originated in two main steps. The backbone scaffold proteins (Shank, Homer, DLG and some of their partners were acquired in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. A substantial additional set appeared in an exclusive ancestor of the Metazoa. The placozoan genome contains most post-synaptic genes but lacks some of them. Notably, the master-scaffold protein Shank might have been lost secondarily in the placozoan lineage. Conclusions The time of origination of most post-synaptic proteins was not concomitant with the acquisition of synapses or neural-like cells. The backbone of the scaffold emerged in a unicellular context and was probably not involved in cell-cell communication. Based on the reconstructed protein composition and potential interactions, its ancestral function could have been to link calcium signalling and cytoskeleton regulation. The complex later became integrated into the evolving

  2. Backbone dynamics of the human CC-chemokine eotaxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine with potent chemoattractant activity towards eosinophils. 15N NMR relaxation data have been used to characterize the backbone dynamics of recombinant human eotaxin. 15N longitudinal (R1) and transverse (R2) auto relaxation rates, heteronuclear 1H-15N steady-state NOEs, and transverse cross-relaxation rates (ηxy) were obtained at 30 deg. C for all resolved backbone secondary amide groups using 1 H-detected two-dimensional NMR experiments. Ratios of transverse auto and cross relaxation rates were used to identify NH groups influenced by slow conformational rearrangement. Relaxation data were fit to the extended model free dynamics formalism, yielding parameters describing axially symmetric molecular rotational diffusion and the internal dynamics of each NH group. The molecular rotational correlation time (τm) is 5.09±0.02 ns, indicating that eotaxin exists predominantly as a monomer under the conditions of the NMR study. The ratio of diffusion rates about unique and perpendicular axes (Dparallel/Dperpendicular) is 0.81±0.02. Residues with large amplitudes of subnanosecond motion are clustered in the N-terminal region (residues 1-19), the C-terminus (residues 68-73) and the loop connecting the first two β-strands (residues 30-37). N-terminal flexibility appears to be conserved throughout the chemokine family and may have implications for the mechanism of chemokine receptor activation. Residues exhibiting significant dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale are located close to the two conserved disulfide bonds, suggesting that these motions may be coupled to disulfide bond isomerization

  3. Use of glass transitions in carbohydrate excipient design for lyophilized protein formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Roughton, Brock C.; Topp, E.M.; Camarda, Kyle V.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes an effort to apply methods from process systems engineering to a pharmaceutical product design problem, with a novel application of statistical approaches to comparing solutions. A computational molecular design framework was employed to design carbohydrate molecules with high glass transition temperatures and low water content in the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix, with the objective of stabilizing lyophilized protein formulations. Quantitative structure–property re...

  4. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Liam M.; Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A compendium of different types of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 “prebiotic” α-amino acids. Before the emergence of biosynthetic pathways, this set is the most plausible resource for protein formation (i.e., proteogenesis) within the overall process of abiogenesis. An essential unsolved question regarding this prebiotic set is whether it defines a “foldable set”—that is, does it contain sufficient chemical information to permit cooperatively folding polypeptides?...

  5. Structural basis for specific single-stranded RNA recognition by designer pentatricopeptide repeat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Cuicui; Zhang, Delin; Guan, Zeyuan; Liu, Yexing; Yang, Zhao; Yang, Yan; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, QunXia; Fan, Shilong; Zou, Tingting; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As a large family of RNA-binding proteins, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins mediate multiple aspects of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. Binding to their target single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) in a modular and base-specific fashion, PPR proteins can serve as designable modules for gene manipulation. However, the structural basis for nucleotide-specific recognition by designer PPR (dPPR) proteins remains to be elucidated. Here, we report four crystal structures of dPPR proteins in complex with their respective ssRNA targets. The dPPR repeats are assembled into a right-handed superhelical spiral shell that embraces the ssRNA. Interactions between different PPR codes and RNA bases are observed at the atomic level, revealing the molecular basis for the modular and specific recognition patterns of the RNA bases U, C, A and G. These structures not only provide insights into the functional study of PPR proteins but also open a path towards the potential design of synthetic sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins. PMID:27088764

  6. The Folding of de Novo Designed Protein DS119 via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Moye; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Zhuqing

    2016-01-01

    As they are not subjected to natural selection process, de novo designed proteins usually fold in a manner different from natural proteins. Recently, a de novo designed mini-protein DS119, with a βαβ motif and 36 amino acids, has folded unusually slowly in experiments, and transient dimers have been detected in the folding process. Here, by means of all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, several comparably stable intermediate states were observed on the folding free-energy landscape of DS119. Conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations showed that when two unfolded DS119 proteins bound together, most binding sites of dimeric aggregates were located at the N-terminal segment, especially residues 5-10, which were supposed to form β-sheet with its own C-terminal segment. Furthermore, a large percentage of individual proteins in the dimeric aggregates adopted conformations similar to those in the intermediate states observed in REMD simulations. These results indicate that, during the folding process, DS119 can easily become trapped in intermediate states. Then, with diffusion, a transient dimer would be formed and stabilized with the binding interface located at N-terminals. This means that it could not quickly fold to the native structure. The complicated folding manner of DS119 implies the important influence of natural selection on protein-folding kinetics, and more improvement should be achieved in rational protein design. PMID:27128902

  7. The Folding of de Novo Designed Protein DS119 via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moye Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As they are not subjected to natural selection process, de novo designed proteins usually fold in a manner different from natural proteins. Recently, a de novo designed mini-protein DS119, with a βαβ motif and 36 amino acids, has folded unusually slowly in experiments, and transient dimers have been detected in the folding process. Here, by means of all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD simulations, several comparably stable intermediate states were observed on the folding free-energy landscape of DS119. Conventional molecular dynamics (CMD simulations showed that when two unfolded DS119 proteins bound together, most binding sites of dimeric aggregates were located at the N-terminal segment, especially residues 5–10, which were supposed to form β-sheet with its own C-terminal segment. Furthermore, a large percentage of individual proteins in the dimeric aggregates adopted conformations similar to those in the intermediate states observed in REMD simulations. These results indicate that, during the folding process, DS119 can easily become trapped in intermediate states. Then, with diffusion, a transient dimer would be formed and stabilized with the binding interface located at N-terminals. This means that it could not quickly fold to the native structure. The complicated folding manner of DS119 implies the important influence of natural selection on protein-folding kinetics, and more improvement should be achieved in rational protein design.

  8. A computational workflow for the design of irreversible inhibitors of protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Alberto; Sgobba, Miriam; Parenti, Marco Daniele; Degliesposti, Gianluca; Forestiero, Rosetta; Percivalle, Claudia; Conte, Pier Franco; Freccero, Mauro; Rastelli, Giulio

    2010-03-01

    Design of irreversible inhibitors is an emerging and relatively less explored strategy for the design of protein kinase inhibitors. In this paper, we present a computational workflow that was specifically conceived to assist such design. The workflow takes the form of a multi-step procedure that includes: the creation of a database of already known reversible inhibitors of protein kinases, the selection of the most promising scaffolds that bind one or more desired kinase templates, the modification of the scaffolds by introduction of chemically reactive groups (suitable cysteine traps) and the final evaluation of the reversible and irreversible protein-ligand complexes with molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy predictions. Most of these steps were automated. In order to prove that this is viable, the workflow was tested on a database of known inhibitors of ERK2, a protein kinase possessing a cysteine in the ATP site. The modeled ERK2-ligand complexes and the values of the estimated binding free energies of the putative ligands provide useful indicators of their aptitude to bind reversibly and irreversibly to the protein kinase. Moreover, the computational data are used to rank the ligands according to their computed binding free energies and their ability to bind specific protein residues in the reversible and irreversible complexes, thereby providing a useful decision-making tool for each step of the design. In this work we present the overall procedure and the first proof of concept results. PMID:20306284

  9. Correlations between designability and various structural characteristics of protein lattice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Yi; Yu, Zu-Guo; Anh, Vo

    2007-05-01

    Using six kinds of lattice types (4×4, 5×5, and 6×6 square lattices; 3×3×3 cubic lattice; and 2+3+4+3+2 and 4+5+6+5+4 triangular lattices), three different size alphabets (HP, HNUP, and 20 letters), and two energy functions, the designability of protein structures is calculated based on random samplings of structures and common biased sampling (CBS) of protein sequence space. Then three quantities stability (average energy gap), foldability, and partnum of the structure, which are defined to elucidate the designability, are calculated. The authors find that whatever the type of lattice, alphabet size, and energy function used, there will be an emergence of highly designable (preferred) structure. For all cases considered, the local interactions reduce degeneracy and make the designability higher. The designability is sensitive to the lattice type, alphabet size, energy function, and sampling method of the sequence space. Compared with the random sampling method, both the CBS and the Metropolis Monte Carlo sampling methods make the designability higher. The correlation coefficients between the designability, stability, and foldability are mostly larger than 0.5, which demonstrate that they have strong correlation relationship. But the correlation relationship between the designability and the partnum is not so strong because the partnum is independent of the energy. The results are useful in practical use of the designability principle, such as to predict the protein tertiary structure.

  10. An intramolecular disulfide bond designed in myoglobin fine-tunes both protein structure and peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei-Bin; Yuan, Hong; Zhou, Hu; Gao, Shu-Qin; Nie, Chang-Ming; Tan, Xiangshi; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2016-06-15

    Disulfide bond plays crucial roles in stabilization of protein structure and in fine-tuning protein functions. To explore an approach for rational heme protein design, we herein rationally introduced a pair of cysteines (F46C/M55C) into the scaffold of myoglobin (Mb), mimicking those in native neuroglobin. Molecular modeling suggested that it is possible for Cys46 and Cys55 to form an intramolecular disulfide bond, which was confirmed experimentally by ESI-MS analysis, DTNB reaction and CD spectrum. Moreover, it was shown that the spontaneously formed disulfide bond of Cys46-Cys55 fine-tunes not only the heme active site structure, but also the protein functions. The substitution of Phe46 with Ser46 in F46S Mb destabilizes the protein while facilitates H2O2 activation. Remarkably, the formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond of Cys46-Cys55 in F46C/M55C Mb improves the protein stability and regulates the heme site to be more favorable for substrate binding, resulting in enhanced peroxidase activity. This study provides valuable information of structure-function relationship for heme proteins regulated by an intramolecular disulfide bond, and also suggests that construction of such a covalent bond is useful for design of functional heme proteins. PMID:27117233

  11. PeptideMine - A webserver for the design of peptides for protein-peptide binding studies derived from protein-protein interactomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Balasubramanian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction events often involve transient, yet specific, interactions between structurally conserved protein domains and polypeptide sequences in target proteins. The identification and validation of these associating domains is crucial to understand signal transduction pathways that modulate different cellular or developmental processes. Bioinformatics strategies to extract and integrate information from diverse sources have been shown to facilitate the experimental design to understand complex biological events. These methods, primarily based on information from high-throughput experiments, have also led to the identification of new connections thus providing hypothetical models for cellular events. Such models, in turn, provide a framework for directing experimental efforts for validating the predicted molecular rationale for complex cellular processes. In this context, it is envisaged that the rational design of peptides for protein-peptide binding studies could substantially facilitate the experimental strategies to evaluate a predicted interaction. This rational design procedure involves the integration of protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology, physico-chemical calculations, domain-domain interaction data and information on functional sites or critical residues. Results Here we describe an integrated approach called "PeptideMine" for the identification of peptides based on specific functional patterns present in the sequence of an interacting protein. This approach based on sequence searches in the interacting sequence space has been developed into a webserver, which can be used for the identification and analysis of peptides, peptide homologues or functional patterns from the interacting sequence space of a protein. To further facilitate experimental validation, the PeptideMine webserver also provides a list of physico-chemical parameters corresponding to the peptide to determine the feasibility of

  12. NAA-modified DNA oligonucleotides with zwitterionic backbones: stereoselective synthesis of A-T phosphoramidite building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtgall, Boris; Höbartner, Claudia; Ducho, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of the nucleic acid backbone are essential for the development of oligonucleotide-derived bioactive agents. The NAA-modification represents a novel artificial internucleotide linkage which enables the site-specific introduction of positive charges into the otherwise polyanionic backbone of DNA oligonucleotides. Following initial studies with the introduction of the NAA-linkage at T-T sites, it is now envisioned to prepare NAA-modified oligonucleotides bearing the modification at X-T motifs (X = A, C, G). We have therefore developed the efficient and stereoselective synthesis of NAA-linked 'dimeric' A-T phosphoramidite building blocks for automated DNA synthesis. Both the (S)- and the (R)-configured NAA-motifs were constructed with high diastereoselectivities to furnish two different phosphoramidite reagents, which were employed for the solid phase-supported automated synthesis of two NAA-modified DNA oligonucleotides. This represents a significant step to further establish the NAA-linkage as a useful addition to the existing 'toolbox' of backbone modifications for the design of bioactive oligonucleotide analogues. PMID:25670992

  13. Designing coarse grained-and atom based-potentials for protein-protein docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobi Dror

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein docking is a challenging computational problem in functional genomics, particularly when one or both proteins undergo conformational change(s upon binding. The major challenge is to define a scoring function soft enough to tolerate these changes and specific enough to distinguish between near-native and "misdocked" conformations. Results Using a linear programming (LP technique, we developed two types of potentials: (i Side chain-based and (ii Heavy atom-based. To achieve this we considered a set of 161 transient complexes and generated a large set of putative docked structures (decoys, based on a shape complementarity criterion, for each complex. The demand on the potentials was to yield, for the native (correctly docked structure, a potential energy lower than those of any of the non-native (misdocked structures. We show that the heavy atom-based potentials were able to comply with this requirement but not the side chain-based one. Thus, despite the smaller number of parameters, the capability of heavy atom-based potentials to discriminate between native and "misdocked" conformations is improved relative to those of the side chain-based potentials. The performance of the atom-based potentials was evaluated by a jackknife test on a set of 50 complexes taken from the Zdock2.3 decoys set. Conclusions Our results show that, using the LP approach, we were able to train our potentials using a dataset of transient complexes only the newly developed potentials outperform three other known potentials in this test.

  14. A relational database of protein structures designed for flexible enquiries about conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S A; Sternberg, M J

    1989-03-01

    structure prediction, site-directed mutagenesis and de novo protein design. The availability of ISIS is described in the paper. PMID:2710780

  15. Rational design of highly potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins: Implication for developing antiviral therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant protein containing one heptad-repeat 1 (HR1) segment and one HR2 segment of the HIV-1 gp41 (HR1-HR2) has been shown to fold into thermally stable six-helix bundle, representing the fusogenic core of gp41. In this study, we have used the fusogenic core as a scaffold to design HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins by linking another HR1 to the C terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR121) or additional HR2 to the N terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR212). Both recombinant proteins could be abundantly and solubly expressed and easily purified, exhibiting high stability and potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 fusion with IC50 values of 16.2 ± 2.8 and 2.8 ± 0.63 nM, respectively. These suggest that these rationally designed proteins can be further developed as novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics

  16. Designing proteins to combat disease: Cardiac troponin C as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jonathan P; Shettigar, Vikram; Tikunova, Svetlana B; Little, Sean C; Liu, Bin; Siddiqui, Jalal K; Janssen, Paul M L; Ziolo, Mark T; Walton, Shane D

    2016-07-01

    Throughout history, muscle research has led to numerous scientific breakthroughs that have brought insight to a more general understanding of all biological processes. Potentially one of the most influential discoveries was the role of the second messenger calcium and its myriad of handling and sensing systems that mechanistically control muscle contraction. In this review we will briefly discuss the significance of calcium as a universal second messenger along with some of the most common calcium binding motifs in proteins, focusing on the EF-hand. We will also describe some of our approaches to rationally design calcium binding proteins to palliate, or potentially even cure cardiovascular disease. Considering not all failing hearts have the same etiology, genetic background and co-morbidities, personalized therapies will need to be developed. We predict designer proteins will open doors for unprecedented personalized, and potentially, even generalized medicines as gene therapy or protein delivery techniques come to fruition. PMID:26901433

  17. Structure-Based Design of a Protein Immunogen that Displays an HIV-1 gp41 Neutralizing Epitope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps)

    2012-06-27

    Antibody Z13e1 is a relatively broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody that recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. Based on the crystal structure of an MPER epitope peptide in complex with Z13e1 Fab, we identified an unrelated protein, interleukin (IL)-22, with a surface-exposed region that is structurally homologous in its backbone to the gp41 Z13e1 epitope. By grafting the gp41 Z13e1 epitope sequence onto the structurally homologous region in IL-22, we engineered a novel protein (Z13-IL22-2) that contains the MPER epitope sequence for use as a potential immunogen and as a reagent for the detection of Z13e1-like antibodies. The Z13-IL22-2 protein binds Fab Z13e1 with a K{sub d} of 73 nM. The crystal structure of Z13-IL22-2 in complex with Fab Z13e1 shows that the epitope region is faithfully replicated in the Fab-bound scaffold protein; however, isothermal calorimetry studies indicate that Fab binding to Z13-IL22-2 is not a lock-and-key event, leaving open the question of whether conformational changes upon binding occur in the Fab, in Z13-IL-22, or in both.

  18. Investigation of whey protein concentration by ultrafiltration elements designed for water treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kukučka Miroslav Đ.; Kukučka Nikoleta M.

    2013-01-01

    Suitability of polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes (UFM) commercial designed for water treatment have been investigated for separation of protein (PR) from sweet whey. Ultrafiltration (UF) of whey originated from dairy has been realized by self-made pilot plant which has been in service about one year. Influence of two whey temperatures (9 oC and 30 oC) on efficiency of protein concentration has been examined. Application of investigated UF elements has g...

  19. Computational Design of a DNA- and Fc-Binding Fusion Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Dominik Heider; Filippo Ledda; J. Nikolaj Dybowski; Oliver Kuhn; Giuliano Armano; Jonas Winkler

    2011-01-01

    Computational design of novel proteins with well-defined functions is an ongoing topic in computational biology. In this work, we generated and optimized a new synthetic fusion protein using an evolutionary approach. The optimization was guided by directed evolution based on hydrophobicity scores, molecular weight, and secondary structure predictions. Several methods were used to refine the models built from the resulting sequences. We have successfully combined two unrelated naturally occurr...

  20. In vivo architectonic stability of fully de novo designed protein-only nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Tatkiewicz, Witold; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Conchillo-Solé, Oscar; Álamo, Patricia; Xu, Zhikun; Casanova, Isolda; Corchero, José Luis; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Cedano, Juan; Daura, Xavier; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vazquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Mangues, Ramón

    2014-05-27

    The fully de novo design of protein building blocks for self-assembling as functional nanoparticles is a challenging task in emerging nanomedicines, which urgently demand novel, versatile, and biologically safe vehicles for imaging, drug delivery, and gene therapy. While the use of viruses and virus-like particles is limited by severe constraints, the generation of protein-only nanocarriers is progressively reachable by the engineering of protein-protein interactions, resulting in self-assembling functional building blocks. In particular, end-terminal cationic peptides drive the organization of structurally diverse protein species as regular nanosized oligomers, offering promise in the rational engineering of protein self-assembling. However, the in vivo stability of these constructs, being a critical issue for their medical applicability, needs to be assessed. We have explored here if the cross-molecular contacts between protein monomers, generated by end-terminal cationic peptides and oligohistidine tags, are stable enough for the resulting nanoparticles to overcome biological barriers in assembled form. The analyses of renal clearance and biodistribution of several tagged modular proteins reveal long-term architectonic stability, allowing systemic circulation and tissue targeting in form of nanoparticulate material. This observation fully supports the value of the engineered of protein building blocks addressed to the biofabrication of smart, robust, and multifunctional nanoparticles with medical applicability that mimic structure and functional capabilities of viral capsids. PMID:24708510

  1. Highly ordered protein nanorings designed by accurate control of glutathione S-transferase self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yushi; Luo, Quan; Zhang, Wei; Miao, Lu; Xu, Jiayun; Li, Hongbin; Liu, Junqiu

    2013-07-31

    Protein self-assembly into exquisite, complex, yet highly ordered architectures represents the supreme wisdom of nature. However, precise manipulation of protein self-assembly behavior in vitro is a great challenge. Here we report that by taking advantage of the cooperation of metal-ion-chelating interactions and nonspecific protein-protein interactions, we achieved accurate control of the orientation of proteins and their self-assembly into protein nanorings. As a building block, we utilized the C2-symmetric protein sjGST-2His, a variant of glutathione S-transferase from Schistosoma japonicum having two properly oriented His metal-chelating sites on the surface. Through synergic metal-coordination and non-covalent interactions, sjGST-2His self-assembled in a fixed bending manner to form highly ordered protein nanorings. The diameters of the nanorings can be regulated by tuning the strength of the non-covalent interaction network between sjGST-2His interfaces through variation of the ionic strength of the solution. This work provides a de novo design strategy that can be applied in the construction of novel protein superstructures. PMID:23865524

  2. Protein design for diversity of sequences and conformations using dead-end elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, Karl J M

    2012-01-01

    Proteins, especially antibodies, are widely used as therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Computational protein design is a powerful tool for improving the affinity and stability of these molecules. We describe a protein design method which employs the dead-end elimination (DEE) and A* discrete search algorithms with a few improvements aimed at making the procedure more useful for actual projects to design proteins for better affinity or stability. DEE/A* and related algorithms allow vast search spaces of protein sequences and their alternative side chain conformations ("rotamers") to be systematically explored, to find those with the best free energy of folding or binding. To maximize a protein design project's chance of success, it needs to find a diverse set of sequences to experimentally synthesize. It should also find structures that score well, not only on the pairwise-additive energy function which DEE/A* and related search algorithms must use, but also on a post-search energy function with accurate treatment of solvation effects. Straight DEE/A*, however, typically finds vast numbers of very similar low-energy conformations, making it infeasible to find a diverse set of sequences or conformations. Herein, we describe a three-level DEE/A* procedure that uses DEE/A* at the level of sequences, at the level of rotamers, and at an intermediate "fleximer" level, to ensure a wide variety of sequences as well as a diverse set of conformations for each sequence.A physics-based method is also described herein for calculating the free energy of folding based on a thermodynamic cycle with a model of the unfolded state. The free energies of both folding and binding may be used for the final evaluation of the designed structures. For example, when designing for improved affinity (binding), we can also ensure that stability is not degraded by screening on the free energy of folding. PMID:22735950

  3. Looking at proteins: representations, folding, packing, and design. Biophysical Society National Lecture, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J S; Richardson, D C; Tweedy, N B; Gernert, K M; Quinn, T P; Hecht, M H; Erickson, B W; Yan, Y; McClain, R D; Donlan, M E

    1992-11-01

    Looking at proteins is an active process of interpretation and selection, emphasizing some features and deleting others. Multiple representations are needed, for such purposes as showing motions or conveying both the chain connectivity and the three-dimensional shape simultaneously. In studying and comparing protein structures, ideas are suggested about the determinants of tertiary structure and of folding (e.g., that Greek key beta barrels may fold up two strands at a time). The design and synthesis of new proteins "from scratch" provides a route toward the experimental testing of such ideas. It has also been a fruitful new perspective from which to look at structures, requiring such things as statistics on very narrowly defined structural categories and explicit attention to "negative design" criteria that actively block unwanted alternatives (e.g., reverse topology of a helix bundle, or edge-to-edge aggregation of beta sheets). Recently, the field of protein design has produced a rather unexpected general result: apparently we do indeed know enough to successfully design proteins that fold into approximately correct structures, but not enough to design unique, native-like structures. The degree of order varies considerably, but even the best designed material shows multiple conformations by NMR, more similar to a "molten globule" folding intermediate than to a well ordered native tertiary structure. In response to this conclusion, we are now working on systems that test useful questions with approximate structures (such as determining which factors most influence the choice of helix-bundle topology) and also analyzing how natural proteins achieve unique core conformations (e.g., for side chains on the interior side of a beta sheet, illustrated in the kinemages). PMID:1477272

  4. Computational Design of a DNA- and Fc-Binding Fusion Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Winkler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational design of novel proteins with well-defined functions is an ongoing topic in computational biology. In this work, we generated and optimized a new synthetic fusion protein using an evolutionary approach. The optimization was guided by directed evolution based on hydrophobicity scores, molecular weight, and secondary structure predictions. Several methods were used to refine the models built from the resulting sequences. We have successfully combined two unrelated naturally occurring binding sites, the immunoglobin Fc-binding site of the Z domain and the DNA-binding motif of MyoD bHLH, into a novel stable protein.

  5. A new approach for protein design based on the relative entropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Yun(刘赟); WANG; Baohan(王宝翰); WANG; Cunxin(王存新); CHEN; Weizu(陈慰祖)

    2003-01-01

    A new effective and fast minimization approach completely based on the physical theory is proposed for protein design. The sequence space is essentially searched according to the Boltzmann distribution. In this approach, the relative entropy is used as a minimization object function. The method has been tested on an off-lattice model of proteins and the results are better than those obtained from other similar work. Therefore, it can be applied as a uniform frame for both folding and inverse folding of proteins.

  6. pKD: re-designing protein pK a values

    OpenAIRE

    Tynan-Connolly, Barbara M.; Nielsen, Jens Erik

    2006-01-01

    The pK a values in proteins govern the pH-dependence of protein stability and enzymatic activity. A large number of mutagenesis experiments have been carried out in the last three decades to re-engineer the pH-activity and pH-stability profile of enzymes and proteins. We have developed the pKD webserver (), which predicts sets of point mutations that will change the pK a values of a set of target residues in a given direction, thus allowing for targeted re-design of the pH-dependent character...

  7. PROTEOTRONICS: The emerging science of protein-based electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Pousset, Jeremy; Reggiani, Lino

    2015-10-01

    Protein-mediated charge transport is of relevant importance in the design of protein based electronics and in attaining an adequate level of understanding of protein functioning. This is particularly true for the case of transmembrane proteins, like those pertaining to the G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). These proteins are involved in a broad range of biological processes like catalysis, substance transport, etc., thus being the target of a large number of clinically used drugs. This paper briefly reviews a variety of experiments devoted to investigate charge transport in proteins and present a unified theoretical model able to relate macroscopic experimental results with the conformations of the amino acids backbone of the single protein.

  8. Backbone and side-chain ¹H, ¹⁵N, and ¹³C resonance assignments of the microtubule-binding domain of yeast cytoplasmic dynein in the high and low-affinity states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, Osamu; Nishida, Noritaka; Kikkawa, Masahide; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a motor protein that walks toward the minus end of microtubules (MTs) by utilizing the energy of ATP hydrolysis. The heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein contains the microtubule-binding domain (MTBD). Switching of MTBD between high and low affinity states for MTs is crucial for processive movement of cytoplasmic dynein. Previous biochemical studies demonstrated that the affinity of MTBD is regulated by the AAA+ family ATPase domain, which is separated by 15 nm long coiled-coil helix. In order to elucidate the structural basis of the affinity switching mechanism of MTBD, we designed two MTBD constructs, termed MTBD-High and MTBD-Low, which are locked in high and low affinity state for MTs, respectively, by introducing a disulfide bond between the coiled-coil helix. Here, we established the backbone and side-chain assignments of MTBD-High and MTBD-Low for further structural analyses. PMID:23975349

  9. 40-Gbps optical backbone network deep packet inspection based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yuan; Huang, Zhiping; Su, Shaojing

    2014-11-01

    In the era of information, the big data, which contains huge information, brings about some problems, such as high speed transmission, storage and real-time analysis and process. As the important media for data transmission, the Internet is the significant part for big data processing research. With the large-scale usage of the Internet, the data streaming of network is increasing rapidly. The speed level in the main fiber optic communication of the present has reached 40Gbps, even 100Gbps, therefore data on the optical backbone network shows some features of massive data. Generally, data services are provided via IP packets on the optical backbone network, which is constituted with SDH (Synchronous Digital Hierarchy). Hence this method that IP packets are directly mapped into SDH payload is named POS (Packet over SDH) technology. Aiming at the problems of real time process of high speed massive data, this paper designs a process system platform based on ATCA for 40Gbps POS signal data stream recognition and packet content capture, which employs the FPGA as the CPU. This platform offers pre-processing of clustering algorithms, service traffic identification and data mining for the following big data storage and analysis with high efficiency. Also, the operational procedure is proposed in this paper. Four channels of 10Gbps POS signal decomposed by the analysis module, which chooses FPGA as the kernel, are inputted to the flow classification module and the pattern matching component based on TCAM. Based on the properties of the length of payload and net flows, buffer management is added to the platform to keep the key flow information. According to data stream analysis, DPI (deep packet inspection) and flow balance distribute, the signal is transmitted to the backend machine through the giga Ethernet ports on back board. Practice shows that the proposed platform is superior to the traditional applications based on ASIC and NP.

  10. Design and engineering of a man-made diffusive electron-transport protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Bryan A; Solomon, Lee A; Leslie Dutton, P; Moser, Christopher C

    2016-05-01

    Maquettes are man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences. Here we focus on water-soluble maquettes designed and engineered to perform diffusive electron transport of the kind typically carried out by cytochromes, ferredoxins and flavodoxins and other small proteins in photosynthetic and respiratory energy conversion and oxido-reductive metabolism. Our designs were tested by analysis of electron transfer between heme maquettes and the well-known natural electron transporter, cytochrome c. Electron-transfer kinetics were measured from seconds to milliseconds by stopped-flow, while sub-millisecond resolution was achieved through laser photolysis of the carbon monoxide maquette heme complex. These measurements demonstrate electron transfer from the maquette to cytochrome c, reproducing the timescales and charge complementarity modulation observed in natural systems. The ionic strength dependence of inter-protein electron transfer from 9.7×10(6)M(-1)s(-1) to 1.2×10(9)M(-1)s(-1) follows a simple Debye-Hückel model for attraction between +8 net charged oxidized cytochrome c and -19 net charged heme maquette, with no indication of significant protein dipole moment steering. Successfully recreating essential components of energy conversion and downstream metabolism in man-made proteins holds promise for in vivo clinical intervention and for the production of fuel or other industrial products. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics - the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26423266

  11. Solid state radiation chemistry of the DNA backbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term goal of this program is to determine the fundamental rules needed to predict the type and yield of damage produced in DNA due to direct effects of ionizing radiation. The focus is on damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone, damage that would lead to strand breaks. Model systems have been chosen that permit various aspects of this problem to be investigated. The emphasis will be on single crystals of monosaccharides, nucleosides, and nucleotides but will also include some powder work on polynucleotides. In these model systems, free radical products and reactions are observed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The information thus gained is used in constructing rules that predict what primary free radicals are formed in single crystals of model compounds and the reactions stemming from the primary radicals. The formulation of a set of rules that work in model systems will represent a major advance toward formulating a set of rules that predict the direct damage in DNA itself. In a broader context this program is part of the effort to understand and predict the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation received at low dose rates over long periods of time. Assessment of low dose effects requires a basic understanding of the action of radiation at the molecular level. By contributing to that basic understanding, this program will help solve the problems of risk assessment under low dose conditions. 5 refs., 3 figs

  12. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: The flow of control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glattfelder, J. B.; Battiston, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  13. Data acquisition backbone core DABC release v1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new experiments at FAIR require new concepts of data acquisition systems for the distribution of self-triggered, time stamped data streams over high performance networks for event building. The Data Acquisition Backbone Core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework developed for the implementation of such data acquisition systems. A DABC application consists of functional components like data input, combiner, scheduler, event builder, filter, analysis and storage which can be configured at runtime. Application specific code including the support of all kinds of data channels (front-end systems) is implemented by C++ program plug-ins. DABC is also well suited as environment for various detector and readout components test beds. A set of DABC plug-ins has been developed for the FAIR experiment CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter) at GSI. This DABC application is used as DAQ system for test beamtimes. Front-end boards equipped with n-XYTER ASICs and ADCs are connected to read-out controller boards (ROC). From there the data is sent over Ethernet (UDP), or over optics and PCIe interface cards into Linux PCs. DABC does the controlling, event building, archiving and data serving. The first release of DABC was published in 2009 and is available under GPL license.

  14. Controlled Conjugated Backbone Twisting for an Increased Open-Circuit Voltage while Having a High Short-Circuit Current in Poly(hexylthiophene) Derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Ko, Sangwon

    2012-03-21

    Conjugated polymers with nearly planar backbones have been the most commonly investigated materials for organic-based electronic devices. More twisted polymer backbones have been shown to achieve larger open-circuit voltages in solar cells, though with decreased short-circuit current densities. We systematically impose twists within a family of poly(hexylthiophene)s and examine their influence on the performance of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. A simple chemical modification concerning the number and placement of alkyl side chains along the conjugated backbone is used to control the degree of backbone twisting. Density functional theory calculations were carried out on a series of oligothiophene structures to provide insights on how the sterically induced twisting influences the geometric, electronic, and optical properties. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering measurements were performed to investigate how the thin-film packing structure was affected. The open-circuit voltage and charge-transfer state energy of the polymer:fullerene BHJ solar cells increased substantially with the degree of twist induced within the conjugated backbone-due to an increase in the polymer ionization potential-while the short-circuit current decreased as a result of a larger optical gap and lower hole mobility. A controlled, moderate degree of twist along the poly(3,4-dihexyl-2,2′:5′,2′′- terthiophene) (PDHTT) conjugated backbone led to a 19% enhancement in the open-circuit voltage (0.735 V) vs poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based devices, while similar short-circuit current densities, fill factors, and hole-carrier mobilities were maintained. These factors resulted in a power conversion efficiency of 4.2% for a PDHTT:[6,6]-phenyl-C 71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC 71BM) blend solar cell without thermal annealing. This simple approach reveals a molecular design avenue to increase open-circuit voltage while retaining the short-circuit current. © 2012 American

  15. Rational design of selective small-molecule inhibitors for β-catenin/B-cell lymphoma 9 protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Logan R; Zhang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Min; Panic, Vanja; Wisniewski, John A; Ji, Haitao

    2015-09-30

    Selective inhibition of α-helix-mediated protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with small organic molecules provides great potential for the discovery of chemical probes and therapeutic agents. Protein Data Bank data mining using the HippDB database indicated that (1) the side chains of hydrophobic projecting hot spots at positions i, i + 3, and i + 7 of an α-helix had few orientations when interacting with the second protein and (2) the hot spot pockets of PPI complexes had different sizes, shapes, and chemical groups when interacting with the same hydrophobic projecting hot spots of α-helix. On the basis of these observations, a small organic molecule, 4'-fluoro-N-phenyl-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxamide, was designed as a generic scaffold that itself directly mimics the binding mode of the side chains of hydrophobic projecting hot spots at positions i, i + 3, and i + 7 of an α-helix. Convenient decoration of this generic scaffold led to the selective disruption of α-helix-mediated PPIs. A series of small-molecule inhibitors selective for β-catenin/B-cell lymphoma 9 (BCL9) over β-catenin/cadherin PPIs was designed and synthesized. The binding mode of new inhibitors was characterized by site-directed mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies. This new class of inhibitors can selectively disrupt β-catenin/BCL9 over β-catenin/cadherin PPIs, suppress the transactivation of canonical Wnt signaling, downregulate the expression of Wnt target genes, and inhibit the growth of Wnt/β-catenin-dependent cancer cells. PMID:26352795

  16. Design and characterization of an enhanced repressor of human papillomavirus E2 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Kakoli; Meinke, Gretchen; Bohm, Andrew; Baleja, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are causative agents of cervical and anogenital cancers. The viral E2 protein mediates viral DNA replication and transactivation of viral oncogenes and thus represents a specific target for therapeutic intervention. Short forms of E2, E2R, contain only the C-terminal dimerization domain, and repress the normal function of E2 due to formation of an inactive heterodimer. Using structure-guided design, we replaced conserved residues at the dimer interface to design a heterodimer...

  17. Fast, cheap and out of control - Insights into thermodynamic and informatic constraints on natural protein sequences from de novo protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisendine, Joseph M; Koder, Ronald L

    2016-05-01

    The accumulated results of thirty years of rational and computational de novo protein design have taught us important lessons about the stability, information content, and evolution of natural proteins. First, de novo protein design has complicated the assertion that biological function is equivalent to biological structure - demonstrating the capacity to abstract active sites from natural contexts and paste them into non-native topologies without loss of function. The structure-function relationship has thus been revealed to be either a generality or strictly true only in a local sense. Second, the simplification to "maquette" topologies carried out by rational protein design also has demonstrated that even sophisticated functions such as conformational switching, cooperative ligand binding, and light-activated electron transfer can be achieved with low-information design approaches. This is because for simple topologies the functional footprint in sequence space is enormous and easily exceeds the number of structures which could have possibly existed in the history of life on Earth. Finally, the pervasiveness of extraordinary stability in designed proteins challenges accepted models for the "marginal stability" of natural proteins, suggesting that there must be a selection pressure against highly stable proteins. This can be explained using recent theories which relate non-equilibrium thermodynamics and self-replication. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics - The design and engineering of electronc transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26498191

  18. Computational protein design suggests that human PCNA-partner interactions are not optimized for affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Yearit; Gur, Eyal; Fleishman, Sarel J; Aharoni, Amir

    2013-02-01

    Increasing the affinity of binding proteins is invaluable for basic and applied biological research. Currently, directed protein evolution experiments are the main approach for generating such proteins through the construction and screening of large mutant libraries. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential hub protein that interacts with many different partners to tightly regulate DNA replication and repair in all eukaryotes. Here, we used computational design to generate human PCNA mutants with enhanced affinity for several different partners. We identified double mutations in PCNA, outside the main partner binding site, that were predicted to increase PCNA-partner binding affinities compared to the wild-type protein by forming additional hydrophobic interactions with conserved residues in the PCNA partners. Affinity increases were experimentally validated with four different PCNA partners, demonstrating that computational design can reveal unexpected regions where affinity enhancements in natural systems are possible. The designed PCNA mutants can be used as a valuable tool for further examination of the regulation of PCNA-partner interactions during DNA replication and repair both in vitro and in vivo. More broadly, the ability to engineer affinity increases toward several PCNA partners suggests that interaction affinity is not an evolutionarily optimized trait of this system. PMID:23011891

  19. Benchmarking Inverse Statistical Approaches for Protein Structure and Design with Exactly Solvable Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquin, Hugo; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Rémi

    2016-01-01

    Inverse statistical approaches to determine protein structure and function from Multiple Sequence Alignments (MSA) are emerging as powerful tools in computational biology. However the underlying assumptions of the relationship between the inferred effective Potts Hamiltonian and real protein structure and energetics remain untested so far. Here we use lattice protein model (LP) to benchmark those inverse statistical approaches. We build MSA of highly stable sequences in target LP structures, and infer the effective pairwise Potts Hamiltonians from those MSA. We find that inferred Potts Hamiltonians reproduce many important aspects of ‘true’ LP structures and energetics. Careful analysis reveals that effective pairwise couplings in inferred Potts Hamiltonians depend not only on the energetics of the native structure but also on competing folds; in particular, the coupling values reflect both positive design (stabilization of native conformation) and negative design (destabilization of competing folds). In addition to providing detailed structural information, the inferred Potts models used as protein Hamiltonian for design of new sequences are able to generate with high probability completely new sequences with the desired folds, which is not possible using independent-site models. Those are remarkable results as the effective LP Hamiltonians used to generate MSA are not simple pairwise models due to the competition between the folds. Our findings elucidate the reasons for the success of inverse approaches to the modelling of proteins from sequence data, and their limitations. PMID:27177270

  20. Accurate design of megadalton-scale two-component icosahedral protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Jacob B; Gonen, Shane; Liu, Yuxi; Sheffler, William; Ellis, Daniel; Thomas, Chantz; Cascio, Duilio; Yeates, Todd O; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P; Baker, David

    2016-07-22

    Nature provides many examples of self- and co-assembling protein-based molecular machines, including icosahedral protein cages that serve as scaffolds, enzymes, and compartments for essential biochemical reactions and icosahedral virus capsids, which encapsidate and protect viral genomes and mediate entry into host cells. Inspired by these natural materials, we report the computational design and experimental characterization of co-assembling, two-component, 120-subunit icosahedral protein nanostructures with molecular weights (1.8 to 2.8 megadaltons) and dimensions (24 to 40 nanometers in diameter) comparable to those of small viral capsids. Electron microscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, and x-ray crystallography show that 10 designs spanning three distinct icosahedral architectures form materials closely matching the design models. In vitro assembly of icosahedral complexes from independently purified components occurs rapidly, at rates comparable to those of viral capsids, and enables controlled packaging of molecular cargo through charge complementarity. The ability to design megadalton-scale materials with atomic-level accuracy and controllable assembly opens the door to a new generation of genetically programmable protein-based molecular machines. PMID:27463675

  1. A Structure-Based Design Protocol for Optimizing Combinatorial Protein Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Mark W; Snow, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Protein variant libraries created via site-directed mutagenesis are a powerful approach to engineer improved proteins for numerous applications such as altering enzyme substrate specificity. Conventional libraries commonly use a brute force approach: saturation mutagenesis via degenerate codons that encode all 20 natural amino acids. In contrast, this chapter describes a protocol for designing "smarter" degenerate codon libraries via direct combinatorial optimization in "library space." Several case studies illustrate how it is possible to design degenerate codon libraries that are highly enriched for favorable, low-energy sequences as assessed using a standard all-atom scoring function. There is much to gain for experimental protein engineering laboratories willing to think beyond site saturation mutagenesis. In the common case that the exact experimental screening budget is not fixed, it is particularly helpful to perform a Pareto analysis to inspect favorable libraries at a range of possible library sizes. PMID:27094288

  2. Biomineralization of a Cadmium Chloride Nanocrystal by a Designed Symmetrical Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Arnout R D; Noguchi, Hiroki; Addy, Christine; Zhang, Kam Y J; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2015-08-17

    We have engineered a metal-binding site into the novel artificial β-propeller protein Pizza. This new Pizza variant carries two nearly identical domains per polypeptide chain, and forms a trimer with three-fold symmetry. The designed single metal ion binding site lies on the symmetry axis, bonding the trimer together. Two copies of the trimer associate in the presence of cadmium chloride in solution, and very high-resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals a nanocrystal of cadmium chloride, sandwiched between two trimers of the protein. This nanocrystal, containing seven cadmium ions lying in a plane and twelve interspersed chloride ions, is the smallest reported to date. Our results indicate the feasibility of using rationally designed symmetrical proteins to biomineralize nanocrystals with useful properties. PMID:26136355

  3. Trends in the Design and Development of Specific Aptamers Against Peptides and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarzad, Maryam; Jafari, Marzieh

    2016-04-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides, comparable to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in selectivity and affinity and have significant strategic properties in design, development and applications more than mAbs. Ease of design and development, simple chemical modification and the attachment of functional groups, easily handling and more adaptability with analytical methods, small size and adaptation with nanostructures are the valuable characteristics of aptamers in comparison to large protein based ligands. Among a broad range of targets that their specific aptamers developed, proteins and peptides have significant position according to the number of related studies performed so far. Since proteins control many of important physiological and pathological incidents in the living organisms, particularly human beings and because of the benefits of aptamers in clinical and analytical applications, aptamer related technologies in the field of proteins and peptides are under progress, exclusively. Currently, there is only one FDA approved therapeutic aptamer in the pharmaceutical market, which is specific to vascular endothelial growth factor and is prescribed for age related macular degenerative disease. Additionally, there are several aptamers in the different phases of clinical trials. Almost all of these aptamers are specific to clinically important peptide or protein targets. In addition, the application of protein specific aptamers in the design and development of targeted drug delivery systems and diagnostic biosensors is another intersting field of aptamer technology. In this review, significant efforts related to development and applications of aptamer technologies in proteins and peptides sciences were considered to emphasis on the importance of aptamers in medicinal and clinical applications. PMID:26984473

  4. Model-based high-throughput design of ion exchange protein chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Rushd; Heymann, Julia; LeSaout, Xavier; Monard, Florence; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-08-12

    This work describes the development of a model-based high-throughput design (MHD) tool for the operating space determination of a chromatographic cation-exchange protein purification process. Based on a previously developed thermodynamic mechanistic model, the MHD tool generates a large amount of system knowledge and thereby permits minimizing the required experimental workload. In particular, each new experiment is designed to generate information needed to help refine and improve the model. Unnecessary experiments that do not increase system knowledge are avoided. Instead of aspiring to a perfectly parameterized model, the goal of this design tool is to use early model parameter estimates to find interesting experimental spaces, and to refine the model parameter estimates with each new experiment until a satisfactory set of process parameters is found. The MHD tool is split into four sections: (1) prediction, high throughput experimentation using experiments in (2) diluted conditions and (3) robotic automated liquid handling workstations (robotic workstation), and (4) operating space determination and validation. (1) Protein and resin information, in conjunction with the thermodynamic model, is used to predict protein resin capacity. (2) The predicted model parameters are refined based on gradient experiments in diluted conditions. (3) Experiments on the robotic workstation are used to further refine the model parameters. (4) The refined model is used to determine operating parameter space that allows for satisfactory purification of the protein of interest on the HPLC scale. Each section of the MHD tool is used to define the adequate experimental procedures for the next section, thus avoiding any unnecessary experimental work. We used the MHD tool to design a polishing step for two proteins, a monoclonal antibody and a fusion protein, on two chromatographic resins, in order to demonstrate it has the ability to strongly accelerate the early phases of process

  5. Electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations of immobilized de novo designed heme proteins on metal electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, WW; Ulstrup, Jens;

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of rational design principles, template-assisted four-helix-bundle proteins that include two histidines for coordinative binding of a heme were synthesized. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic characterization of the proteins in solution reveals the expected bis-histidine coordinated heme...... involves the coupling of electron transfer and heme ligand dissociation, which was analyzed by time-resolved SERR spectroscopy. Electron transfer was found to be significantly slower for the mono-histidine-coordinated than for the bis-histidine-coordinated heme. For the latter, the formal heterogeneous...... electron-transfer rate constant of 13 s(-1) is similar to those reported for natural heme proteins with comparable electron-transfer distances, which indicates that covalently bound synthetic heme proteins provide efficient electronic communication with a metal electrode as a prerequisite for potential...

  6. Pressurized water extraction of isoflavones by experimental design from soybean flour and Soybean Protein Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moras, Benjamin; Rey, Stéphane; Vilarem, Gérard; Pontalier, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    A Doehlert experimental design was conducted and surface response methodology was used to determine the effect of temperature, contact time and solid liquid ratio on isoflavone extraction from soybean flour or Soybean Protein Isolate in pressurized water system. The optimal conditions conducted gave an extraction yield of 85% from soybean flour. For Soybean Protein Isolate compared to soybean flour, the isoflavone extraction yield is 61%. This difference could be explained by higher aglycon content, while aglycon appears to be the least extracted isoflavone by pressurized water. The solid liquid ratio in the ASE cell was the overriding factor in obtaining high yields with both soybean products, while temperature has less influence. A high temperature causes conversion of the malonyls-glucosides and glucosides isoflavone derivatives into glucosides or aglycons forms. pressurized water extraction showed a high solubilization of protein material up to 95% of inserted Soybean Protein Isolate. PMID:27507441

  7. Rapid Determination of Protein Solubility and Stability Conditions for NMR Studies Using Incomplete Factorial Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample preparation constitutes a crucial and limiting step in structural studies of proteins by NMR. The determination of the solubility and stability (SAS) conditions of biomolecules at millimolar concentrations stays today empirical and hence time- and material-consuming. Only few studies have been recently done in this field and they have highlighted the interest of using crystallogenesis tools to optimise sample conditions. In this study, we have adapted a method based on incomplete factorial design and making use of crystallisation plates to quantify the influence of physico-chemical parameters such as buffer pH and salts on protein SAS. A description of the experimental set up and an evaluation of the method are given by case studies on two functional domains from the bacterial regulatory protein LicT as well as two other proteins. Using this method, we could rapidly determine optimised conditions for extracting soluble proteins from bacterial cells and for preparing purified protein samples sufficiently concentrated and stable for NMR characterisation. The drastic reduction in the time and number of experiments required for searching protein SAS conditions makes this method particularly well-adapted for a systematic investigation on a large range of physico-chemical parameters

  8. Neutron beam-line shield design for the protein crystallography instrument at the Lujan Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a very useful methodology for calculating absolute total (neutron plus gamma-ray) dose equivalent rates for use in the design of neutron beam line shields at a spallation neutron source. We have applied this technique to the design of beam line shields for several new materials science instruments being built at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. These instruments have a variety of collimation systems and different beam line shielding issues. We show here some specific beam line shield designs for the Protein Crystallography Instrument. (author)

  9. Resistance issues with new nucleoside/nucleotide backbone options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainberg, Mark A; Turner, Dan

    2004-09-01

    The nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) remain an enduring feature of combination therapy. As NRTI/NtRTI options continue to expand, questions arise about how best to combine these agents to create effective dual NRTI/NtRTI backbones in antiretroviral regimens while avoiding treatment-emergent drug resistance. Clinicians must consider how NRTIs/NtRTIs such as tenofovir DF (TDF), abacavir (ABC), and emtricitabine (FTC), as well as new once-daily and coformulated NRTIs/NtRTIs, interact with older agents when combined in novel regimens and how sequencing the new NRTIs can preserve future treatment options. Resistance data from clinical trials have revealed important information on the patterns, prevalence, and effects of resistance seen among patients experiencing virologic failure. In recent years, the prevalence of some mutations such as M184V and Q151M has remained relatively constant, while the L74V mutation, the 69 insertions, and thymidine analogue mutations have decreased in prevalence. Other mutations such as K65R and Y115F, while still relatively uncommon, are increasing in prevalence. This increase may be due to the use of new treatment combinations that select for these mutations at a higher rate. Clinical trials suggest that new regimens containing TDF or ABC select for K65R and that this mutation is observed more frequently with TDF; in contrast, L74V is observed more frequently in ABC-containing regimens but is not commonly selected by TDF-containing regimens. Several lines of evidence are converging to suggest that the presence of zidovudine may decrease the risk of L74V and K65R in ABC- or TDF-containing regimens. This review summarizes the clinical implications of resistance profiles associated with new NRTI/NtRTI regimens in current use and in advanced clinical studies. PMID:15319668

  10. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian (UNC); (Buffalo)

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  11. Receptor-Guided De Novo Design of Dengue Envelope Protein Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Vishal H; Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Pandya, Himanshu A; Solanki, Hitesh A

    2015-10-01

    Inhibitor design associated with the dynamics of dengue envelope protein at pre-fusion stage is a prominent strategy to interfere fusion transition of dengue virus with the host cell membrane. Receptor-guided de novo inhibitors were designed based on the knowledge of co-crystallized detergent, β-octyl glucoside. Pharmacophore features distribution showed the preference of aromatic groups with H bonding features connected to aliphatic bulky group as the skeleton for inhibitor design. Molecular dynamic simulations revealed (2R)-2-[(6-amino-1-oxohexan-2-yl)amino]-4-[6-(4-phenylpiperidine-1-yl)-1,2-benzoxazol-3-yl]butanoate as the probable binder which developed extensive conservative interactions despite the local pocket residues movements especially from kl β-hairpin, the key structural unit for initiating conformational changes required for fusion transition. The electronic and hydrophobic potentials also indicated that butanoate molecule as the initial lead for envelope protein inhibitors. PMID:26299376

  12. Using protein design algorithms to understand the molecular basis of disease caused by protein-DNA interactions: the Pax6 example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibes, A.; Nadra, A.; De Masi, Federico;

    2010-01-01

    stability, or protein-protein interaction, but not for mutations that could affect protein-DNA binding. Here, we used the protein design algorithm FoldX to model all known missense mutations in the paired box domain of Pax6, a highly conserved transcription factor involved in eye development and in several...... diseases such as aniridia. The validity of FoldX to deal with protein-DNA interactions was demonstrated by showing that high levels of accuracy can be achieved for mutations affecting these interactions. Also we showed that protein-design algorithms can accurately reproduce experimental DNA-binding logos....... We conclude that 88% of the Pax6 mutations can be linked to changes in intrinsic stability (77%) and/or to its capabilities to bind DNA (30%). Our study emphasizes the importance of structure-based analysis to understand the molecular basis of diseases and shows that protein-DNA interactions can be...

  13. Investigation of whey protein concentration by ultrafiltration elements designed for water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukučka Miroslav Đ.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Suitability of polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes (UFM commercial designed for water treatment have been investigated for separation of protein (PR from sweet whey. Ultrafiltration (UF of whey originated from dairy has been realized by self-made pilot plant which has been in service about one year. Influence of two whey temperatures (9 oC and 30 oC on efficiency of protein concentration has been examined. Application of investigated UF elements has given whey protein concentrate (WPC with 5 to 6 times excess amount of protein content in regard to starting one. In the same time the prevalent content of lactose has been removed to permeate. Better results have been occurred during the cold whey filtration. Besides the fact that molecular weight cut-off (MWCO of investigated membranes were 50-100 kDa, results showed very successful concentrating of whey proteins of dominantly lower molar weights than 50-100 kDa. Investigated membranes are beneficial for design and construction of UF plants for exploitation in small dairies.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance secondary shifts of a light-harvesting 2 complex reveal local backbone perturbations induced by its higher-order interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Anjali; Wawrzyniak, Piotr K; van Gammeren, Adriaan J; Buda, Francesco; Ganapathy, Swapna; de Groot, Huub J M

    2010-01-26

    Protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) secondary chemical shifts are widely used to predict the secondary structure, and in solid-state NMR, they are often the only unambiguous structural parameters available. However, the employed prediction methods are empirical in nature, relying on the assumption that secondary shifts are only affected by shielding effects of neighboring atoms. We analyzed the secondary shifts of a photosynthetic membrane protein with a high density of chromophores and very tight packing, the light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. A relation was found between secondary shift anomalies and protein-protein or pigment-protein tertiary and quaternary contacts. For several residues, including the bacteriochlorophyll-coordinating histidines (alphaH31 and betaH30) and the phenylalanine alphaF41 that has strongly twisted C(b)-C(a)-C and C(a)-C-N conformations in the LH2 crystal structure, the perturbing effects on the backbone chemical shifts were tested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We propose that higher-order interactions in the tightly packed complex can induce localized perturbations of the backbone conformation and electronic structure, related to functional pigment-protein or protein-protein interactions. PMID:19954238

  15. A transfer matrix for the backbone exponent of two-dimensional percolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rephrasing the backbone of two-dimensional percolation as a monochromatic path crossing problem, we investigate the latter by a transfer matrix approach. Conformal invariance links the backbone dimension Db to the highest eigenvalue of the transfer matrix T, and we obtain the result Db=1.6431±0.0006. For a strip of width L, T is roughly of size 23L, but we manage to reduce it to ∼L!. We find that the value of Db is stable with respect to inclusion of additional 'blobs' tangent to the backbone in a finite number of points. (author)

  16. Downmodulation of El A Protein Expression as a Novel Strategy to Design Cancer-Selective Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jiang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenoviruses are being tested as potential therapies for human malignant tumors, including gliomas. Here we report for the first time that a mutation in the E1A gene results in low levels of ElA protein, conditioning the replication of mutant adenoviruses specifically to cancer cells. In this study, we compared the oncolytic potencies of three mutant adenoviruses encompassing deletions within the CRi (Delta-39, CR2 (Delta-24 regions, or both regions (Delta-24/39 of the ElA protein. Delta-39, Delta-24 induced a cytopathic effect with similar efficiency in glioma cells, a comparable capacity for replication. Importantly, the activity of Delta-39 was significantly attenuated compared to Delta-24 in proliferating normal human astrocytes. Direct analyses of the activation of E2F-1 promoter demonstrated the inability of Delta-39 to induce S-phase-related transcriptional activity in normal cells. Interestingly, ElA protein levels in cells infected with Delta-39 were remarkably downmodulated. Furthermore, protein stability studies revealed enhanced degradation of CRi mutant ElA proteins, inhibition of the proteasome activity resulted in the striking rescue of ElA levels. We conclude that the level of ElA protein is a critical determinant of oncolytic phenotype, we propose a completely novel strategy for the design, construction of conditionally replicative adenoviruses.

  17. Backbone structure of Yersinia pestis Ail determined in micelles by NMR-restrained simulated annealing with implicit membrane solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org; Ding, Yi [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology (United States); Tian, Ye; Yao, Yong [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) is a virulence factor of Yersinia pestis that mediates cell invasion, cell attachment and complement resistance. Here we describe its three-dimensional backbone structure determined in decyl-phosphocholine (DePC) micelles by NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was calculated using the membrane function of the implicit solvation potential, eefxPot, which we have developed to facilitate NMR structure calculations in a physically realistic environment. We show that the eefxPot force field guides the protein towards its native fold. The resulting structures provide information about the membrane-embedded global position of Ail, and have higher accuracy, higher precision and improved conformational properties, compared to the structures calculated with the standard repulsive potential.

  18. Backbone structure of Yersinia pestis Ail determined in micelles by NMR-restrained simulated annealing with implicit membrane solvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) is a virulence factor of Yersinia pestis that mediates cell invasion, cell attachment and complement resistance. Here we describe its three-dimensional backbone structure determined in decyl-phosphocholine (DePC) micelles by NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was calculated using the membrane function of the implicit solvation potential, eefxPot, which we have developed to facilitate NMR structure calculations in a physically realistic environment. We show that the eefxPot force field guides the protein towards its native fold. The resulting structures provide information about the membrane-embedded global position of Ail, and have higher accuracy, higher precision and improved conformational properties, compared to the structures calculated with the standard repulsive potential

  19. Peptide nanofibers modified with a protein by using designed anchor molecules bearing hydrophobic and functional moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, Ayaka; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Matsumura, Sachiko; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2010-06-11

    Self-assembly of peptides and proteins is a key feature of biological functions. Short amphiphilic peptides designed with a beta-sheet structure can form sophisticated nanofiber structures, and the fibers are available as nanomaterials for arranging biomolecules. Peptide FI (H-PKFKIIEFEP-OH) self-assembles into nanofibers with a coiled fine structure, as reported in our previous work. We have constructed anchor molecules that have both a binding moiety for the fiber structure and a functional unit capable of capturing target molecules, with the purpose of arranging proteins on the designed peptide nanofibers. Designed anchors containing an alkyl chain as a binding unit and biotin as a functional moiety were found to bind to peptide fibers FI and F2i (H-ALEAKFAAFEAKLA-NH(2)). The surface-exposed biotin moiety on the fibers could capture an anti-biotin antibody. Moreover, hydrophobic dipeptide anchor units composed of iminodiacetate connected to Phe-Phe or Ile-Ile and a peptide composed of six histidine residues connected to biotin could also connect FI peptide fibers to the anti-biotin antibody through the chelation of Ni(2+) ions. This strategy of using designed anchors opens a novel approach to constructing nanoscale protein arrays on peptide nanomaterials. PMID:20419712

  20. Rational design of a photo-responsive UVR8-derived protein and a self-assembling peptide-protein conjugate for responsive hydrogel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Dong, Chunming; Huang, Weiyun; Wang, Huaimin; Wang, Ling; Ding, Dan; Zhou, Hao; Long, Jiafu; Wang, Tingliang; Yang, Zhimou

    2015-10-01

    Responsive hydrogels hold great potential in controllable drug delivery, regenerative medicine, sensing, etc. We introduced in this study the first example of a photo-responsive protein for hydrogel formation. Based on the first example of the crystal structure of a photo-responsive protein, Arabidopsis thaliana protein UVR8, we designed and expressed its derived protein UVR8-1 with a hexa-peptide WRESAI. We also prepared supramolecular nanofibers with a TIP-1 protein at their surface. The simple mixing of these two components resulted in rapid hydrogel formation through the specific interactions between the protein TIP-1 and the peptide WRESAI. Since the protein could show a reversible dimer-monomer transformation, the resulting gels also showed a reversible gel-sol phase transition which was controlled by photo-irradiation. The photo-controllable gel-sol phase transition could be applied for protein delivery and cell separation.Responsive hydrogels hold great potential in controllable drug delivery, regenerative medicine, sensing, etc. We introduced in this study the first example of a photo-responsive protein for hydrogel formation. Based on the first example of the crystal structure of a photo-responsive protein, Arabidopsis thaliana protein UVR8, we designed and expressed its derived protein UVR8-1 with a hexa-peptide WRESAI. We also prepared supramolecular nanofibers with a TIP-1 protein at their surface. The simple mixing of these two components resulted in rapid hydrogel formation through the specific interactions between the protein TIP-1 and the peptide WRESAI. Since the protein could show a reversible dimer-monomer transformation, the resulting gels also showed a reversible gel-sol phase transition which was controlled by photo-irradiation. The photo-controllable gel-sol phase transition could be applied for protein delivery and cell separation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05213k

  1. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino, Elio A; Soares, Iaci N; Pedrote, Murilo M; de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Silva, Jerson L

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  2. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  3. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino, Elio A.; Soares, Iaci N.; Pedrote, Murilo M.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  4. Use of glass transitions in carbohydrate excipient design for lyophilized protein formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughton, Brock C; Topp, E M; Camarda, Kyle V

    2012-01-10

    This work describes an effort to apply methods from process systems engineering to a pharmaceutical product design problem, with a novel application of statistical approaches to comparing solutions. A computational molecular design framework was employed to design carbohydrate molecules with high glass transition temperatures and low water content in the maximally freeze-concentrated matrix, with the objective of stabilizing lyophilized protein formulations. Quantitative structure-property relationships were developed for glass transition temperature of the anhydrous solute, glass transition temperature of the maximally concentrated solute, melting point of ice and Gordon-Taylor constant for carbohydrates. An optimization problem was formulated to design an excipient with optimal property values. Use of a stochastic optimization algorithm, Tabu search, provided several carbohydrate excipient candidates with statistically similar property values, as indicated by prediction intervals calculated for each property. PMID:24385675

  5. The first dipeptide ligand of translocator protein: Design and anxiolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudasheva, T A; Deeva, O A; Mokrov, G V; Yarkov, S A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the structure of Alpidem, a pyrazolopyrimidine ligand of the translocator protein (TSPO), a dipeptide TSPO ligand, N-carbobenzoxy-L-tryptophanyl-L-isoleucine amide (GD-23), was designed and synthesized using our own original peptide design strategy. This compound exhibited anxiolytic activity in BALB/cAnN mice in the "open-field" test and in outbred CD1 mice in the "elevated plus maze" test. The stereoselectivity of the anxiolytic effect of GD-23 is demonstrated. The results of this study suggest that GD-23 is a ligand of the translocator protein, and its structure can become the basis for creating anxiolytics with a fundamentally new mechanism of action. PMID:26518550

  6. Mechanism of formation of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptococcus. Part II. Interplay of local backbone conformational dynamics and long-range hydrophobic interactions in hairpin formation

    OpenAIRE

    Skwierawska, Agnieszka; Żmudzińska, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2009-01-01

    Two peptides, corresponding to the turn region of the C-terminal β-hairpin of the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G from Streptoccocus, consisting of residues 51–56 [IG(51–56)] and 50–57 [IG(50–57)], respectively, were studied by CD and NMR spectroscopy at various temperatures and by differential scanning calorimetry. Our results show that the part of the sequence corresponding to the β-turn in the native structure (DDATKT) of the B3 domain forms bent conformations similar to ...

  7. In-silico designing of a potent analogue against HIV-1 Nef protein and protease by predicting its interaction network with host cell proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Pal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV-1 has numerous proteins encoded within its genome, which acquaints it with the required arsenal to establish a favorable host cell environment suitable for viral replication and pathogenesis. Among these proteins, one protein that is indispensable and ambiguous is the Nef protein. Aim: Interaction of Nef protein with different host-cell protein was predicted and subsequently the down regulation of cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 was targeted through designing of inhibitors of Nef protein for either preventing or if not at least delaying pathogenesis. Materials and Methods: The interaction network of Nef protein with host-cell proteins were predicted by PIMRider. Analogue of Lopinavir were prepared and evaluated considering all factors affecting the drug stability and toxicity. Finally Docking simulation were performed using an Auto-Dock Tool 4.0. Results: In the interaction network of Nef protein with different host-cell proteins it was found out that 22 host cell proteins are involved in the interaction and execution of different types of functions in host cell but these functions are altered with the interaction with the Nef protein. After extensive and controlled in silico analysis it has been observed that the analogue LOPI1 binds to Nef protein (2NEF at CD4 interacting site residues giving minimum binding energy of −7.68 Kcal/mole, low Ki value of 2.34 μM, maximum number of hydrogen bonds (8, good absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties, and less toxicity in comparison with the standard Lopinavir against HIV1 protease (1HPV. Conclusion: The newly designed analogue (LOPI1 is showing significant in silico interaction with Nef protein and protease and can be taken forward as a potent drug lead, which may finally emerge out to be even better than the standard Lopinavir.

  8. Design of a minimal protein oligomerization domain by a structural approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhard, P.; Meier, M; Lustig, A.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the simplicity and regularity of the alpha-helical coiled coil relative to other structural motifs, it can be conveniently used to clarify the molecular interactions responsible for protein folding and stability. Here we describe the de novo design and characterization of a two heptad-repeat peptide stabilized by a complex network of inter- and intrahelical salt bridges. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation show that this peptide is highly alpha-helica...

  9. Formation of mannitol hemihydrate in freeze-dried protein formulations-A design of experiment approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Helena Marie Lindholm; Trnka, Hjalte; Grohganz, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of mannitol hemihydrate, this form of mannitol has been seen as potentially negative with regard to the stability of pharmaceutical formulations. The formation of mannitol hemihydrate is reported in several case studies; however, no systematic investigation has been performed so...... of similar quality. The successful application of design of experiments showed that the most prominent factors enhancing the formation of hemihydrate were a high protein concentration, low relative mannitol content and annealing at -20°C....

  10. Design, synthesis, optimization and antiviral activity of a class of hybrid dengue virus E protein inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadav, Surender Singh; Kaptein, Suzanne; Timiri, Ajaykumar; De Burghgraeve, Tine; Badavath, Vishnu Nayak; Ganesan, Ramesh; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2015-04-15

    The β-OG pocket is a cavity in the flavivirus envelope (E) protein that was identified by Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.2003, 100, 6986 as a promising site for the design of antiviral agents that interfere with virus entry into the host cell. The availability of the X-ray crystal structure of the dengue virus (DENV) E protein provided an opportunity for in silico drug design efforts to identify candidate inhibitors. The present study was set up to explore whether it is possible to generate a novel class of molecules that are hybrids between two hit compounds that have been reported previously by ACS. Chem. Biol.2008, 3, 765 following an in silico screening effort against the DENV E protein. First, a library of twenty hybrid molecules were designed and synthesized to explore the feasibility of this strategy. Antiviral evaluation in a virus-cell-based assay for DENV proved this approach to be successful, after which another twenty-four molecules were produced to further explore and optimize the potency of this novel class of hybrid inhibitors. In the end, a molecule was obtained with an EC50 against dengue virus serotype 2 in the low micromolar range (23, 1.32±0.41μM). PMID:25791449

  11. New Insights to Clathrin and Adaptor Protein 2 for the Design and Development of Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebbe Toftgaard Poulsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, our understanding of the normal function of APP is still patchy. Emerging evidence indicates that a dysfunction in APP trafficking and degradation can be responsible for neuronal deficits and progressive degeneration in humans. We recently reported that the Y682 mutation in the 682YENPTY687 domain of APP affects its binding to specific adaptor proteins and leads to its anomalous trafficking, to defects in the autophagy machinery and to neuronal degeneration. In order to identify adaptors that influence APP function, we performed pull-down experiments followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS on hippocampal tissue extracts of three month-old mice incubated with either the 682YENPTY687 peptide, its mutated form, 682GENPTY687 or its phosphorylated form, 682pYENPTY687. Our experiments resulted in the identification of two proteins involved in APP internalization and trafficking: Clathrin heavy chain (hc and its Adaptor Protein 2 (AP-2. Overall our results consolidate and refine the importance of Y682 in APP normal functions from an animal model of premature aging and dementia. Additionally, they open the perspective to consider Clathrin hc and AP-2 as potential targets for the design and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  12. Polyolefin Backbone Substitution in Binders for Low Temperature Powder Injection Moulding Feedstocks

    OpenAIRE

    Berenika Hausnerova; Ivo Kuritka; Davit Bleyan

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the substitution of polyolefin backbone binder components with low melting temperature carnauba wax for powder injection moulding applications. The effect of various binder compositions of Al2O3 feedstock on thermal degradation parameters is investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. Within the experimental framework 29 original feedstock compositions were prepared and the superiority of carnauba wax over the polyethylene binder backbone was demonstrated in compositions co...

  13. Elucidating the backbone conformation of photoswitchable foldamers using vibrational circular dichroism

    OpenAIRE

    Domingos, S.R.; Roeters, S.J.; Amirjalayer, S.; Yu, Z.L.; Hecht, S; Woutersen, S.

    2013-01-01

    The backbone conformation of amphiphilic oligo(azobenzene) foldamers is investigated using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy on a mode involving the stretching of the N=N bonds in the backbone. From denaturation experiments, we find that the VCD response in the helical conformation arises mainly from through-space interaction between the N=N-stretch transition-dipole moments, so that the coupled-oscillator model can be used to predict the VCD spectrum associated with a particu...

  14. Design and characterization of novel recombinant listeriolysin O-protamine fusion proteins for enhanced gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Hyung; Provoda, Chester; Lee, Kyung-Dall

    2015-02-01

    To improve the efficiency of gene delivery for effective gene therapy, it is essential that the vector carries functional components that can promote overcoming barriers in various steps leading to the transport of DNA from extracellular to ultimately nuclear compartment. In this study, we designed genetically engineered fusion proteins as a platform to incorporate multiple functionalities in one chimeric protein. Prototypes of such a chimera tested here contain two domains: one that binds to DNA; the other that can facilitate endosomal escape of DNA. The fusion proteins are composed of listeriolysin O (LLO), the endosomolytic pore-forming protein from Listeria monocytogenes, and a 22 amino acid sequence of the DNA-condensing polypeptide protamine (PN), singly or as a pair: LLO-PN and LLO-PNPN. We demonstrate dramatic enhancement of the gene delivery efficiency of protamine-condensed DNA upon incorporation of a small amount of LLO-PN fusion protein and further improvement with LLO-PNPN in vitro using cultured cells. Additionally, the association of anionic liposomes with cationic LLO-PNPN/protamine/DNA complexes, yielding a net negative surface charge, resulted in better in vitro transfection efficiency in the presence of serum. An initial, small set of data in mice indicated that the observed enhancement in gene expression could also be applicable to in vivo gene delivery. This study suggests that incorporation of a recombinant fusion protein with multiple functional components, such as LLO-protamine fusion protein, in a nonviral vector is a promising strategy for various nonviral gene delivery systems. PMID:25521817

  15. Suitability assessment of OPC UA as the backbone of ground-based observatory control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common requirement of modern observatory control systems is to allow interaction between various heterogeneous subsystems in a transparent way. However, the integration of off-the-shelf (OTS) industrial products - such as Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) software - has long been hampered by the lack of an adequate interfacing method. With the advent of the Unified Architecture (UA) version of OPC (Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control), the limitations of the original industry accepted interface are now lifted, and also much more functionality has been defined. In this paper the most important features of OPC UA are matched against the requirements of ground-based observatory control systems in general and in particular of the 1.2 m Mercator Telescope. We investigate the opportunities of the 'information modelling' idea behind OPC UA, which could allow an extensive standardization in the field of astronomical instrumentation, similar to the efforts emerging in several industry domains. Because OPC UA is designed for both horizontal and vertical integration of heterogeneous subsystems, we explore its capabilities to serve as the backbone of a dependable and scalable observatory control system, treating industrial components like PLCs no differently than custom software components. Performance measurements and tests with a sample of OTS OPC UA products are presented. (authors)

  16. Computational protein design enables a novel one-carbon assimilation pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, JB; Smith, AL; Poust, S; Wargacki, AJ; Bar-Even, A; Louw, C; Shen, BW; Eiben, CB; Tran, HM; Noor, E; Gallaher, JL; Bale, J; Yoshikuni, Y; Gelb, MH; Keasling, JD; Stoddard, BL; Lidstrom, ME; Baker, D

    2015-03-09

    We describe a computationally designed enzyme, formolase (FLS), which catalyzes the carboligation of three one-carbon formaldehyde molecules into one three-carbon dihydroxyacetone molecule. The existence of FLS enables the design of a new carbon fixation pathway, the formolase pathway, consisting of a small number of thermodynamically favorable chemical transformations that convert formate into a three-carbon sugar in central metabolism. The formolase pathway is predicted to use carbon more efficiently and with less backward flux than any naturally occurring one-carbon assimilation pathway. When supplemented with enzymes carrying out the other steps in the pathway, FLS converts formate into dihydroxyacetone phosphate and other central metabolites in vitro. These results demonstrate how modern protein engineering and design tools can facilitate the construction of a completely new biosynthetic pathway.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Driven Design of pH-Stabilized Mutants of MNEI, a Sweet Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Leone

    Full Text Available MNEI is a single chain derivative of monellin, a plant protein that can interact with the human sweet taste receptor, being therefore perceived as sweet. This unusual physiological activity makes MNEI a potential template for the design of new sugar replacers for the food and beverage industry. Unfortunately, applications of MNEI have been so far limited by its intrinsic sensitivity to some pH and temperature conditions, which could occur in industrial processes. Changes in physical parameters can, in fact, lead to irreversible protein denaturation, as well as aggregation and precipitation. It has been previously shown that the correlation between pH and stability in MNEI derives from the presence of a single glutamic residue in a hydrophobic pocket of the protein. We have used molecular dynamics to study the consequences, at the atomic level, of the protonation state of such residue and have identified the network of intramolecular interactions responsible for MNEI stability at acidic pH. Based on this information, we have designed a pH-independent, stabilized mutant of MNEI and confirmed its increased stability by both molecular modeling and experimental techniques.

  18. Challenges, Applications, and Recent Advances of Protein-Ligand Docking in Structure-Based Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Z. Grinter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The docking methods used in structure-based virtual database screening offer the ability to quickly and cheaply estimate the affinity and binding mode of a ligand for the protein receptor of interest, such as a drug target. These methods can be used to enrich a database of compounds, so that more compounds that are subsequently experimentally tested are found to be pharmaceutically interesting. In addition, like all virtual screening methods used for drug design, structure-based virtual screening can focus on curated libraries of synthesizable compounds, helping to reduce the expense of subsequent experimental verification. In this review, we introduce the protein-ligand docking methods used for structure-based drug design and other biological applications. We discuss the fundamental challenges facing these methods and some of the current methodological topics of interest. We also discuss the main approaches for applying protein-ligand docking methods. We end with a discussion of the challenging aspects of evaluating or benchmarking the accuracy of docking methods for their improvement, and discuss future directions.

  19. Backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl Ile (δ1), Leu and Val side-chain chemical shift assignments of Crc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rakhi; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Ray, Malay K; Deshmukh, Mandar V

    2015-04-01

    Carbon catabolite repression (CCR) allows bacteria to selectively assimilate a preferred compound among a mixture of several potential carbon sources, thus boosting growth and economizing the cost of adaptability to variable nutrients in the environment. The RNA-binding catabolite repression control (Crc) protein acts as a global post-transcriptional regulator of CCR in Pseudomonas species. Crc triggers repression by inhibiting the expression of genes involved in transport and catabolism of non-preferred substrates, thus indirectly favoring assimilation of preferred one. We report here a nearly complete backbone and stereospecific (13)C methyl side-chain chemical shift assignments of Ile (δ1), Leu and Val of Crc (~ 31 kDa) from Pseudomonas syringae Lz4W. PMID:24496608

  20. A designed recombinant fusion protein for targeted delivery of siRNA to the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Mohamed Mohamed; Dar, Ghulam Hassan; Jeyalakshmi, Durga; Venkatraman, Uthra; Saba, Kamal; Rangaraj, Nandini; Patel, Anant Bahadur; Gopal, Vijaya

    2016-04-28

    RNA interference represents a novel therapeutic approach to modulate several neurodegenerative disease-related genes. However, exogenous delivery of siRNA restricts their transport into different tissues and specifically into the brain mainly due to its large size and the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To overcome these challenges, we developed here a strategy wherein a peptide known to target specific gangliosides was fused to a double-stranded RNA binding protein to deliver siRNA to the brain parenchyma. The designed fusion protein designated as TARBP-BTP consists of a double-stranded RNA-binding domain (dsRBD) of human Trans Activation response element (TAR) RNA Binding Protein (TARBP2) fused to a brain targeting peptide that binds to monosialoganglioside GM1. Conformation-specific binding of TARBP2 domain to siRNA led to the formation of homogenous serum-stable complex with targeting potential. Further, uptake of the complex in Neuro-2a, IMR32 and HepG2 cells analyzed by confocal microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorting, revealed selective requirement of GM1 for entry. Remarkably, systemic delivery of the fluorescently labeled complex (TARBP-BTP:siRNA) in ΑβPP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) led to distinctive localization in the cerebral hemisphere. Further, the delivery of siRNA mediated by TARBP-BTP led to significant knockdown of BACE1 in the brain, in both ΑβPP-PS1 mice and wild type C57BL/6. The study establishes the growing importance of fusion proteins in delivering therapeutic siRNA to brain tissues. PMID:26948382

  1. Potential application of FoldX force field based protein modeling in zinc finger nucleases design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, ZuYong; Mei, Gui; Zhao, ChunPeng; Chen, YaoSheng

    2011-05-01

    Engineered sequence-specific zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) make the highly efficient modification of eukaryotic genomes possible. However, most current strategies for developing zinc finger nucleases with customized sequence specificities require the construction of numerous tandem arrays of zinc finger proteins (ZFPs), and subsequent largescale in vitro validation of their DNA binding affinities and specificities via bacterial selection. The labor and expertise required in this complex process limits the broad adoption of ZFN technology. An effective computational assisted design strategy will lower the complexity of the production of a pair of functional ZFNs. Here we used the FoldX force field to build 3D models of 420 ZFP-DNA complexes based on zinc finger arrays developed by the Zinc Finger Consortium using OPEN (oligomerized pool engineering). Using nonlinear and linear regression analysis, we found that the calculated protein-DNA binding energy in a modeled ZFP-DNA complex strongly correlates to the failure rate of the zinc finger array to show significant ZFN activity in human cells. In our models, less than 5% of the three-finger arrays with calculated protein-DNA binding energies lower than -13.132 kcal mol(-1) fail to form active ZFNs in human cells. By contrast, for arrays with calculated protein-DNA binding energies higher than -5 kcal mol(-1), as many as 40% lacked ZFN activity in human cells. Therefore, we suggest that the FoldX force field can be useful in reducing the failure rate and increasing efficiency in the design of ZFNs. PMID:21455692

  2. Catalytic mechanism of RNA backbone cleavage by ribonuclease H from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA-cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ∼15 kcal mol(-1), encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ∼1-100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The nonmonotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton-transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA-cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  3. Catalytic Mechanism of RNA Backbone Cleavage by Ribonuclease H from QM/MM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ~15 kcal mol−1, encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ~1–100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The non-monotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  4. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... on the C-3 carbons of Ala, Val, Leu, and Asp residues undergo beta-scission to give backbone alpha-carbon radicals, with the release of the side- chain as a carbonyl compound. We now show that this is a general mechanism that occurs with a wide range of oxidants. The quantitative significance...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...

  5. Targeting a heterologous protein to multiple plant organelles via rationally designed 5′ mRNA tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voges, M.J.; Silver, P.A.; Way, J.C.; Mattozzi, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant bioengineers require simple genetic devices for predictable localization of heterologous proteins to multiple subcellular compartments. Results We designed novel hybrid signal sequences for multiple-compartment localization and characterize their function when fused to GFP in Nico

  6. Insights into the structural biology of G-protein coupled receptors impacts drug design for central nervous system neurodegenerative processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dalet, Farfán-García Eunice; Guadalupe, Trujillo-Ferrara José; María del Carmen, Castillo-Hernández; Humberto, Guerra-Araiza Christian; Antonio, Soriano-Ursúa Marvin

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, there have been important new insights into the structural biology of G-protein coupled receptors. It is now known that allosteric binding sites are involved in the affinity and selectivity of ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, and that signaling by these receptors involves both G-protein dependent and independent pathways. The present review outlines the physiological and pharmacological implications of this perspective for the design of new drugs to treat disord...

  7. Local structural differences in homologous proteins: specificities in different SCOP classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Valadié, Hélène; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2012-01-01

    The constant increase in the number of solved protein structures is of great help in understanding the basic principles behind protein folding and evolution. 3-D structural knowledge is valuable in designing and developing methods for comparison, modelling and prediction of protein structures. These approaches for structure analysis can be directly implicated in studying protein function and for drug design. The backbone of a protein structure favours certain local conformations which include α-helices, β-strands and turns. Libraries of limited number of local conformations (Structural Alphabets) were developed in the past to obtain a useful categorization of backbone conformation. Protein Block (PB) is one such Structural Alphabet that gave a reasonable structure approximation of 0.42 Å. In this study, we use PB description of local structures to analyse conformations that are preferred sites for structural variations and insertions, among group of related folds. This knowledge can be utilized in improving tools for structure comparison that work by analysing local structure similarities. Conformational differences between homologous proteins are known to occur often in the regions comprising turns and loops. Interestingly, these differences are found to have specific preferences depending upon the structural classes of proteins. Such class-specific preferences are mainly seen in the all-β class with changes involving short helical conformations and hairpin turns. A test carried out on a benchmark dataset also indicates that the use of knowledge on the class specific variations can improve the performance of a PB based structure comparison approach. The preference for the indel sites also seem to be confined to a few backbone conformations involving β-turns and helix C-caps. These are mainly associated with short loops joining the regular secondary structures that mediate a reversal in the chain direction. Rare β-turns of type I' and II' are also identified

  8. Atomic force microscopy reveals the mechanical design of a modular protein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongbin; Oberhauser, Andres F.; Fowler, Susan B.; Clarke, Jane; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2000-01-01

    Tandem modular proteins underlie the elasticity of natural adhesives, cell adhesion proteins, and muscle proteins. The fundamental unit of elastic proteins is their individually folded modules. Here, we use protein engineering to construct multimodular proteins composed of Ig modules of different mechanical strength. We examine the mechanical properties of the resulting tandem modular proteins by using single protein atomic force microscopy. We show that by combining modules of known mechanic...

  9. Charge density distributions derived from smoothed electrostatic potential functions: design of protein reduced point charge models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2011-10-01

    To generate reduced point charge models of proteins, we developed an original approach to hierarchically locate extrema in charge density distribution functions built from the Poisson equation applied to smoothed molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) functions. A charge fitting program was used to assign charge values to the so-obtained reduced representations. In continuation to a previous work, the Amber99 force field was selected. To easily generate reduced point charge models for protein structures, a library of amino acid templates was designed. Applications to four small peptides, a set of 53 protein structures, and four KcsA ion channel models, are presented. Electrostatic potential and solvation free energy values generated by the reduced models are compared with the corresponding values obtained using the original set of atomic charges. Results are in closer agreement with the original all-atom electrostatic properties than those obtained with a previous reduced model that was directly built from the smoothed MEP functions [Leherte and Vercauteren in J Chem Theory Comput 5:3279-3298, 2009]. PMID:21915750

  10. Optimization of protein solution by a novel experimental design method using thermodynamic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Ah; An, In Bok; Lee, Sang Yeol; Park, Eun-Seok; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the structural stability of hen egg white lysozyme in solution at various pH levels and in different types of buffers, including acetate, phosphate, histidine, and Tris, was investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Reasonable pH values were selected from the buffer ranges and were analyzed statistically through design of experiment (DoE). Four factors were used to characterize the thermograms: calorimetric enthalpy (ΔH), temperature at maximum heat flux (T( m )), van't Hoff enthalpy (ΔH( V )), and apparent activation energy of protein solution (E(app)). It was possible to calculate E(app) through mathematical elaboration from the Lumry-Eyring model by changing the scan rate. The transition temperature of protein solution, T( m ), increased when the scan rate was faster. When comparing the T( m ), ΔH( V ), ΔH, and E(app) of lysozyme in various pH ranges and buffers with different priorities, lysozyme in acetate buffer at pH 4.767 (scenario 9) to pH 4.969 (scenario 11) exhibited the highest thermodynamic stability. Through this experiment, we found a significant difference in the thermal stability of lysozyme in various pH ranges and buffers and also a new approach to investigate the physical stability of protein by DoE. PMID:23054718

  11. Regulation of the endogenous VEGF-A gene by exogenous designed regulatory proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Schröder, Oliver; Frey, Gerhard; Briggs, Steven P.; Sera, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    We describe a facile method to activate or repress transcription of endogenous genes in a quantitative and specific manner by treatment with designed regulatory proteins (DRPs), in which artificial transcription factors (ATFs) are fused to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). Penetration of DRPs into cells is mediated by an N-terminal CPP fused to a nuclear localization signal; a DNA-binding domain and a transactivation domain follow. The DNA-binding domain was targeted to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene. An agonist DRP was rapidly taken up by cells and transported to the nucleus; soon after, the cells began transcribing the gene and secreting VEGF-A protein in a dose-dependent manner. Multiple copies of a short oligopeptide derived from a minimal transactivation domain of human β-catenin was stronger than VP-16. The SRDX domain from the plant transcription factor, SUPERMAN, changed the DRP to a hypoxia-induced antagonist of VEGF-A. DRPs combine many of the potential benefits of transgenes with those of recombinant proteins. PMID:15475575

  12. Single flux quantum circuit technology innovation for backbone router applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of high-end routers will soon reach the limits of conventional technology. Single flux quantum (SFQ) digital technology is a key technology for achieving a breakthrough. We have already proposed a high-end router using SFQ technology. In this paper, we report on the latest innovation of SFQ router technology. First we describe a design methodology development. We have developed a new SFQ logic cell library for cell-based top-down circuit design. To expand the circuit scale further, a novel pseudo-automatic Josephson transmission line (JTL) routing technique has also been developed. And then, we discuss issues of passive interconnection, and show the operation of a passive transmission line interconnected circuit up to 40-Gbps throughput. Second we describe a packet switch circuit demonstration. We designed a 2 x 2 crossbar packet switch circuit, which is a key element in the packet switch. We successfully tested the circuit up to a clock frequency of 35 GHz. Finally we discuss an SFQ circuit application in the optical router as an alternative application strategy

  13. Mnn10 Maintains Pathogenicity in Candida albicans by Extending α-1,6-Mannose Backbone to Evade Host Dectin-1 Mediated Antifungal Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi Qun; Zou, Zui; Shen, Hui; Shen, Shuai Shuai; Miao, Qi; Huang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Li, Li Ping; Chen, Si Min; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Jun Dong; Zhao, Jing Jun; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-05-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that is important for the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. Mannan, which is located in the outermost layer of the cell wall, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans, however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. Here we identified a novel α-1,6-mannosyltransferase encoded by MNN10 in C. albicans. We found that Mnn10 is required for cell wall α-1,6-mannose backbone biosynthesis and polysaccharides organization. Deletion of MNN10 resulted in significant attenuation of the pathogenesis of C. albicans in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Inhibition of α-1,6-mannose backbone extension did not, however, impact the invasive ability of C. albicans in vitro. Notably, mnn10 mutant restored the invasive capacity in athymic nude mice, which further supports the notion of an enhanced host antifungal defense related to this backbone change. Mnn10 mutant induced enhanced Th1 and Th17 cell mediated antifungal immunity, and resulted in enhanced recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes for pathogen clearance in vivo. We also demonstrated that MNN10 could unmask the surface β-(1,3)-glucan, a crucial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) of C. albicans recognized by host Dectin-1. Our results demonstrate that mnn10 mutant could stimulate an enhanced Dectin-1 dependent immune response of macrophages in vitro, including the activation of nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and secretion of specific cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-12p40. In summary, our study indicated that α-1,6-mannose backbone is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans via shielding β-glucan from recognition by host Dectin-1 mediated immune recognition. Moreover, our work suggests that inhibition of α-1,6-mannose extension by Mnn10 may represent a novel modality to reduce the pathogenicity of C. albicans. PMID:27144456

  14. Mnn10 Maintains Pathogenicity in Candida albicans by Extending α-1,6-Mannose Backbone to Evade Host Dectin-1 Mediated Antifungal Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Qun Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is a dynamic structure that is important for the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. Mannan, which is located in the outermost layer of the cell wall, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans, however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. Here we identified a novel α-1,6-mannosyltransferase encoded by MNN10 in C. albicans. We found that Mnn10 is required for cell wall α-1,6-mannose backbone biosynthesis and polysaccharides organization. Deletion of MNN10 resulted in significant attenuation of the pathogenesis of C. albicans in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Inhibition of α-1,6-mannose backbone extension did not, however, impact the invasive ability of C. albicans in vitro. Notably, mnn10 mutant restored the invasive capacity in athymic nude mice, which further supports the notion of an enhanced host antifungal defense related to this backbone change. Mnn10 mutant induced enhanced Th1 and Th17 cell mediated antifungal immunity, and resulted in enhanced recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes for pathogen clearance in vivo. We also demonstrated that MNN10 could unmask the surface β-(1,3-glucan, a crucial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP of C. albicans recognized by host Dectin-1. Our results demonstrate that mnn10 mutant could stimulate an enhanced Dectin-1 dependent immune response of macrophages in vitro, including the activation of nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and secretion of specific cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-12p40. In summary, our study indicated that α-1,6-mannose backbone is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans via shielding β-glucan from recognition by host Dectin-1 mediated immune recognition. Moreover, our work suggests that inhibition of α-1,6-mannose extension by Mnn10 may represent a novel modality to reduce the pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  15. Mnn10 Maintains Pathogenicity in Candida albicans by Extending α-1,6-Mannose Backbone to Evade Host Dectin-1 Mediated Antifungal Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi Qun; Zou, Zui; Shen, Hui; Shen, Shuai Shuai; Miao, Qi; Huang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Li, Li Ping; Chen, Si Min; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Jun Dong; Zhao, Jing Jun; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that is important for the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. Mannan, which is located in the outermost layer of the cell wall, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans, however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. Here we identified a novel α-1,6-mannosyltransferase encoded by MNN10 in C. albicans. We found that Mnn10 is required for cell wall α-1,6-mannose backbone biosynthesis and polysaccharides organization. Deletion of MNN10 resulted in significant attenuation of the pathogenesis of C. albicans in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Inhibition of α-1,6-mannose backbone extension did not, however, impact the invasive ability of C. albicans in vitro. Notably, mnn10 mutant restored the invasive capacity in athymic nude mice, which further supports the notion of an enhanced host antifungal defense related to this backbone change. Mnn10 mutant induced enhanced Th1 and Th17 cell mediated antifungal immunity, and resulted in enhanced recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes for pathogen clearance in vivo. We also demonstrated that MNN10 could unmask the surface β-(1,3)-glucan, a crucial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) of C. albicans recognized by host Dectin-1. Our results demonstrate that mnn10 mutant could stimulate an enhanced Dectin-1 dependent immune response of macrophages in vitro, including the activation of nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and secretion of specific cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-12p40. In summary, our study indicated that α-1,6-mannose backbone is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans via shielding β-glucan from recognition by host Dectin-1 mediated immune recognition. Moreover, our work suggests that inhibition of α-1,6-mannose extension by Mnn10 may represent a novel modality to reduce the pathogenicity of C. albicans. PMID:27144456

  16. In Silico Design of a Chimeric Protein Containing Antigenic Fragments of Helicobacter pylori; A Bioinformatic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Nazanin; Karsabet, Mehrnaz Taghipour; Amani, Jafar; Ardjmand, Abolfazl; Zadeh, Mohsen Razavi; Gholi, Mohammad Khalifeh; Saffari, Mahmood; Ghasemi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a global health problem which has encouraged scientists to find new ways to diagnose, immunize and eradicate the H. pylori infection. In silico studies are a promising approach to design new chimeric antigen having the immunogenic potential of several antigens. In order to obtain such benefit in H. pylori vaccine study, a chimeric gene containing four fragments of FliD sequence (1-600 bp), UreB (327-334 bp),VacA (744-805 bp) and CagL(51-100 bp) which have a high density of B- and T-cell epitopes was designed. The secondary and tertiary structures of the chimeric protein and other properties such as stability, solubility and antigenicity were analyzed. The in silico results showed that after optimizing for the purpose of expression in Escherichia coli BL21, the solubility and antigenicity of the construct fragments were highly retained. Most regions of the chimeric protein were found to have a high antigenic propensity and surface accessibility. These results would be useful in animal model application and accounted for the development of an epitope-based vaccine against the H. pylori. PMID:27335622

  17. Strategy for a protein purification design using C-phycocyanin extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Caroline Costa; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2009-11-01

    A variety of techniques have been developed for the separation and recovery of proteins. The cost of purifying the product is frequently determined by the desired quality of the final product, which is evaluated by measuring the purity. In this work the design of a protein purification process for C-phycocyanin, a phycobiliprotein that can be used in the food and medical industries, was established. The study evaluated the use of ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration to purify C-phycocyanin in a variety of sequences. The final design included the C-phycocyanin extraction step, precipitation with ammonium sulfate and ion exchange chromatography. When the elution step was studied, the kind of elution and pH were considered in order to obtain a product with a final purity of 4.0 with a purification factor of 6.35, so that, at the end of the strategy, C-phycocyanin of analytical grade would be obtained. PMID:19523818

  18. Impact of Backbone Fluorination on π-Conjugated Polymers in Organic Photovoltaic Devices: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Leclerc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed bulk heterojunction solar cells have experienced a remarkable acceleration in performances in the last two decades, reaching power conversion efficiencies above 10%. This impressive progress is the outcome of a simultaneous development of more advanced device architectures and of optimized semiconducting polymers. Several chemical approaches have been developed to fine-tune the optoelectronics and structural polymer parameters required to reach high efficiencies. Fluorination of the conjugated polymer backbone has appeared recently to be an especially promising approach for the development of efficient semiconducting polymers. As a matter of fact, most currently best-performing semiconducting polymers are using fluorine atoms in their conjugated backbone. In this review, we attempt to give an up-to-date overview of the latest results achieved on fluorinated polymers for solar cells and to highlight general polymer properties’ evolution trends related to the fluorination of their conjugated backbone.

  19. A transfer matrix for the backbone exponent of two-dimensional percolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Zinn-Justin, Paul [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    2002-03-08

    Rephrasing the backbone of two-dimensional percolation as a monochromatic path crossing problem, we investigate the latter by a transfer matrix approach. Conformal invariance links the backbone dimension D{sub b} to the highest eigenvalue of the transfer matrix T, and we obtain the result D{sub b}=1.6431{+-}0.0006. For a strip of width L, T is roughly of size 2{sup 3L}, but we manage to reduce it to {approx}L{exclamation_point}. We find that the value of D{sub b} is stable with respect to inclusion of additional 'blobs' tangent to the backbone in a finite number of points. (author)

  20. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  1. A reduced amino acid alphabet for understanding and designing protein adaptation to mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchebest, C; Benros, C; Bornot, A; Camproux, A-C; de Brevern, A G

    2007-11-01

    Protein sequence world is considerably larger than structure world. In consequence, numerous non-related sequences may adopt similar 3D folds and different kinds of amino acids may thus be found in similar 3D structures. By grouping together the 20 amino acids into a smaller number of representative residues with similar features, sequence world simplification may be achieved. This clustering hence defines a reduced amino acid alphabet (reduced AAA). Numerous works have shown that protein 3D structures are composed of a limited number of building blocks, defining a structural alphabet. We previously identified such an alphabet composed of 16 representative structural motifs (5-residues length) called Protein Blocks (PBs). This alphabet permits to translate the structure (3D) in sequence of PBs (1D). Based on these two concepts, reduced AAA and PBs, we analyzed the distributions of the different kinds of amino acids and their equivalences in the structural context. Different reduced sets were considered. Recurrent amino acid associations were found in all the local structures while other were specific of some local structures (PBs) (e.g Cysteine, Histidine, Threonine and Serine for the alpha-helix Ncap). Some similar associations are found in other reduced AAAs, e.g Ile with Val, or hydrophobic aromatic residues Trp with Phe and Tyr. We put into evidence interesting alternative associations. This highlights the dependence on the information considered (sequence or structure). This approach, equivalent to a substitution matrix, could be useful for designing protein sequence with different features (for instance adaptation to environment) while preserving mainly the 3D fold. PMID:17565494

  2. Polyolefin Backbone Substitution in Binders for Low Temperature Powder Injection Moulding Feedstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenika Hausnerova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the substitution of polyolefin backbone binder components with low melting temperature carnauba wax for powder injection moulding applications. The effect of various binder compositions of Al2O3 feedstock on thermal degradation parameters is investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. Within the experimental framework 29 original feedstock compositions were prepared and the superiority of carnauba wax over the polyethylene binder backbone was demonstrated in compositions containing polyethylene glycol as the initial opening agent and governing the proper mechanism of the degradation process. Moreover, the replacement of synthetic polymer by the natural wax contributes to an increase of environmental sustainability of modern industrial technologies.

  3. Electric field induced localization phenomena in a ladder network with superlattice configuration: Effect of backbone environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramita Dutta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Electric field induced localization properties of a tight-binding ladder network in presence of backbone sites are investigated. Based on Green's function formalism we numerically calculate two-terminal transport together with density of states for different arrangements of atomic sites in the ladder and its backbone. Our results lead to a possibility of getting multiple mobility edges which essentially plays a switching action between a completely opaque to fully or partly conducting region upon the variation of system Fermi energy, and thus, support in fabricating mesoscopic or DNA-based switching devices.

  4. A Transfer Matrix for the Backbone Exponent of Two-Dimensional Percolation

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, J. L.; Zinn-Justin, P.

    2001-01-01

    Rephrasing the backbone of two-dimensional percolation as a monochromatic path crossing problem, we investigate the latter by a transfer matrix approach. Conformal invariance links the backbone dimension D_b to the highest eigenvalue of the transfer matrix T, and we obtain the result D_b=1.6431 \\pm 0.0006. For a strip of width L, T is roughly of size 2^{3^L}, but we manage to reduce it to \\sim L!. We find that the value of D_b is stable with respect to inclusion of additional ``blobs'' tangen...

  5. Convenient and scalable synthesis of fmoc-protected Peptide nucleic Acid backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagin, Trevor A; Shah, Nirmal I; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this molecule is anticipated to facilitate future investigations into the chemical properties and applications of nucleobase-modified PNA. PMID:22848796

  6. Convenient and Scalable Synthesis of Fmoc-Protected Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    OpenAIRE

    Feagin, Trevor A.; Shah, Nirmal I.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The peptide nucleic acid backbone Fmoc-AEG-OBn has been synthesized via a scalable and cost-effective route. Ethylenediamine is mono-Boc protected, then alkylated with benzyl bromoacetate. The Boc group is removed and replaced with an Fmoc group. The synthesis was performed starting with 50 g of Boc anhydride to give 31 g of product in 32% overall yield. The Fmoc-protected PNA backbone is a key intermediate in the synthesis of nucleobase-modified PNA monomers. Thus, improved access to this mo...

  7. Protein and peptide alkoxyl radicals can give rise to C-terminal decarboxylation and backbone cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gamma-irradiation of some free amino acids in the presence of oxygen gives high yields of side-chain hydroperoxides. It is shown in the present study that N-acetyl amino acids and peptides also give high levels of hydroperoxides on gamma-irradiation, even...

  8. Design of a minimal protein oligomerization domain by a structural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, P; Meier, M; Lustig, A

    2000-12-01

    Because of the simplicity and regularity of the alpha-helical coiled coil relative to other structural motifs, it can be conveniently used to clarify the molecular interactions responsible for protein folding and stability. Here we describe the de novo design and characterization of a two heptad-repeat peptide stabilized by a complex network of inter- and intrahelical salt bridges. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation show that this peptide is highly alpha-helical and 100% dimeric tinder physiological buffer conditions. Interestingly, the peptide was shown to switch its oligomerization state from a dimer to a trimer upon increasing ionic strength. The correctness of the rational design principles used here is supported by details of the atomic structure of the peptide deduced from X-ray crystallography. The structure of the peptide shows that it is not a molten globule but assumes a unique, native-like conformation. This de novo peptide thus represents an attractive model system for the design of a molecular recognition system. PMID:11206050

  9. Design of a combinatorial dna microarray for protein-dnainteraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mintseris, Julian; Eisen, Michael B.

    2006-07-07

    Background: Discovery of precise specificity oftranscription factors is an important step on the way to understandingthe complex mechanisms of gene regulation in eukaryotes. Recently,doublestranded protein-binding microarrays were developed as apotentially scalable approach to tackle transcription factor binding siteidentification. Results: Here we present an algorithmic approach toexperimental design of a microarray that allows for testing fullspecificity of a transcription factor binding to all possible DNA bindingsites of a given length, with optimally efficient use of the array. Thisdesign is universal, works for any factor that binds a sequence motif andis not species-specific. Furthermore, simulation results show that dataproduced with the designed arrays is easier to analyze and would resultin more precise identification of binding sites. Conclusion: In thisstudy, we present a design of a double stranded DNA microarray forprotein-DNA interaction studies and show that our algorithm allowsoptimally efficient use of the arrays for this purpose. We believe such adesign will prove useful for transcription factor binding siteidentification and other biological problems.

  10. Molecular modeling of the heterodimer of human CFTR’s nucleotide-binding domains using a protein–protein docking approach

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Sheng-You; Bolser, Diana; Liu, Hao-Yang; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2008-01-01

    We have presented a new protein–protein docking approach to model heterodimeric structures based on the conformations of the monomeric units. The conventional modeling method relies on superimposing two monomeric structures onto the crystal structure of a homologous protein dimer. The resulting structure may exhibit severe backbone clashes at the dimeric interface depending on the backbone dissimilarity between the target and template proteins. Our method overcomes the backbone clashing probl...

  11. Cassette Series Designed for Live-Cell Imaging of Proteins and High Resolution Techniques in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Carissa L.; Raden, David L.; Caplan, Jeffrey; Czymmek, Kirk; Robinson, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, it has become clear that protein function and regulation are highly dependent upon intracellular localization. Although fluorescent protein variants are ubiquitously used to monitor protein dynamics, localization, and abundance; fluorescent light microscopy techniques often lack the resolution to explore protein heterogeneity and cellular ultrastructure. Several approaches have been developed to identify, characterize, and monitor the spatial localization of proteins a...

  12. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2012-03-21

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. Combining ambiguous chemical shift mapping with structure-based backbone and NOE assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMRbased drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically. However, automated methods are necessary for high-throughput drug screening. We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C- labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-toone mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  14. Design and processing of nanogels as delivery systems for peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfast, Lærke; Madsen, Claus Greve; Jorgensen, Lene;

    2014-01-01

    Nanogels, cross-linked networks of >1 μm in size, are attractive drug-delivery systems, as they not only possess the potential advantages of nanoscale formulations, but also the attractive abilities of a hydrogel; high hydrophilicity, high loading capacity and the potential for biocompatibility and...... controlled release. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of the recent developments within the nanogel field, and how the chemical design of the nanogel polymer has been found to influence the properties of the nanogel system. Novel nanogel systems are discussed with respect to their type of...... cross-linkage and their suitability as therapeutic delivery systems, as well as their ability to stabilize the protein/peptide drug....

  15. Pharmacological Targeting of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Opportunities for Computer-Aided Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglianico, Marie; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-14

    As a central regulator of metabolism, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an established therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. Beyond the metabolic area, the number of medical fields that involve AMPK grows continuously, expanding the potential applications for AMPK modulators. Even though indirect AMPK activators are used in the clinics for their beneficial metabolic outcome, the few described direct agonists all failed to reach the market to date, which leaves options open for novel targeting methods. As AMPK is not actually a single molecule and has different roles depending on its isoform composition, the opportunity for isoform-specific targeting has notably come forward, but the currently available modulators fall short of expectations. In this review, we argue that with the amount of available structural and ligand data, computer-based drug design offers a number of opportunities to undertake novel and isoform-specific targeting of AMPK. PMID:26510622

  16. Design, Synthesis, and Dynamics of a Green Fluorescent Protein Fluorophore Mimic with an Ultrafast Switching Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Marco; Gueye, Moussa; Pieri, Elisa; Manathunga, Madushanka; Fusi, Stefania; Cappelli, Andrea; Latterini, Loredana; Pannacci, Danilo; Filatov, Michael; Léonard, Jérémie; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-08-10

    While rotary molecular switches based on neutral and cationic organic π-systems have been reported, structurally homologous anionic switches providing complementary properties have not been prepared so far. Here we report the design and preparation of a molecular switch mimicking the anionic p-HBDI chromophore of the green fluorescent protein. The investigation of the mechanism and dynamics of the E/Z switching function is carried out both computationally and experimentally. The data consistently support axial rotary motion occurring on a sub-picosecond time scale. Transient spectroscopy and trajectory simulations show that the nonadiabatic decay process occurs in the vicinity of a conical intersection (CInt) between a charge transfer state and a covalent/diradical state. Comparison of our anionic p-HBDI-like switch with the previously reported cationic N-alkyl indanylidene pyrrolinium switch mimicking visual pigments reveals that these similar systems translocate, upon vertical excitation, a similar net charge in the same axial direction. PMID:27322488

  17. Modeling and design of light powered biomimicry micropump utilizing transporter proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Sze, Tsun-Kay Jackie; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-11-01

    The creation of compact micropumps to provide steady flow has been an on-going challenge in the field of microfluidics. We present a mathematical model for a micropump utilizing Bacteriorhodopsin and sugar transporter proteins. This micropump utilizes transporter proteins as method to drive fluid flow by converting light energy into chemical potential. The fluid flow through a microchannel is simulated using the Nernst-Planck, Navier-Stokes, and continuity equations. Numerical results show that the micropump is capable of generating usable pressure. Designing parameters influencing the performance of the micropump are investigated including membrane fraction, lipid proton permeability, illumination, and channel height. The results show that there is a substantial membrane fraction region at which fluid flow is maximized. The use of lipids with low membrane proton permeability allows illumination to be used as a method to turn the pump on and off. This capability allows the micropump to be activated and shut off remotely without bulky support equipment. This modeling work provides new insights on mechanisms potentially useful for fluidic pumping in self-sustained bio-mimic microfluidic pumps. This work is supported in part by the National Science Fundation Grant CBET-1250107.

  18. Designability and cooperative folding in a four-letter hydrophobic-polar model of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Guang; Tang, Lei-Han

    2006-11-01

    The two-letter hydrophobic-polar (HP) model of Lau and Dill [Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] has been widely used in theoretical studies of protein folding due to its conceptual and computational simplicity. Despite its success in elucidating various aspects of the sequence-structure relationship, thermodynamic behavior of the model is not in agreement with a sharp two-state folding transition of many single-domain proteins. To gain a better understanding of this discrepancy, we consider an extension of the HP model by including an “antiferromagnetic” (AF) interaction in the contact potential that favors amino acid residues with complementary attributes. With an enlarged four-letter alphabet, the density of states on the low energy side can be significantly decreased. Computational studies of the four-letter HP model are performed on 36-mer sequences on a square lattice. It is found that the designability of folded structures in the extended model exhibits strong correlation with that of the two-letter HP model, while the AF interaction alone selects a very different class of structures that resembles the Greek key motif for beta sheets. A procedure is introduced to select sequences which have the largest energy gap to the native state. Based on density of states and specific heat calculations in the full configuration space, we show that the optimized sequence is able to fold nearly as cooperatively as a corresponding Gō model.

  19. Animals without Backbones: The Invertebrate Story. Grade Level 5-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Brian; Fuqua, Paul

    This guide, when used in tandem with the videotape "Animals Without Backbones," helps students learn about invertebrates. These materials promote hands-on discovery and learning. The guide is composed of six curriculum-based teaching units: (1) "Getting Started"; (2) "Porifera"; (3) "Cnidarians"; (4) "Worms"; (5) "Mollusks"; (6) "Arthropods"; and…

  20. Quantum Chemical Benchmark Study on 46 RNA Backbone Families Using a Dinucleotide Unit

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kruse, H.; Mládek, Arnošt; Gkionis, Konstantinos; Hansen, A.; Grimme, S.; Šponer, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2015), s. 4972-4991. ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS * DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY * SUGAR-PHOSPHATE BACKBONE Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.498, year: 2014

  1. Purification, crystallization and halide phasing of a Streptococcus agalactiae backbone pilin GBS80 fragment

    OpenAIRE

    Vengadesan, Krishnan; Ma, Xin; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V. L

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal fragment of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus) major (backbone) pilin GBS80 was purified and crystallized in two different space groups. Single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) data collected to 2.0 Å resolution on a iodide (NaI) derivative crystal using the home source were used to obtain initial phases.

  2. Treatment Results of Injuries of Thoracic and Lumbar Backbone Departments at Osteoporosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Y. Sumin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Information relates to radiologic (computer tomography manifestations providing the visualization of thoracic and lumbar backbone department injuries at osteoporotic patients. Contemporary methods of transcutaneous and trans-pedicle vertebroplasty with bone cement allows to obtain a stable positive healing effect against such pathologies.

  3. Relative specificities of water and ammonia losses from backbone fragments in collision-activated dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank; Nielsen, Michael L; Zubarev, Roman A

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of a database containing over 20,000 high-resolution collision-activation mass spectra of tryptic peptide dications was employed to study the relative specificity of neutral losses from backbone fragments. The high resolution of the FTMS instrument allowed for the first time the first is...

  4. Toward Improved Description of DNA Backbone: Revisiting Epsilon and Zeta Torsion Force Field Parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zgarbová, M.; Luque, F. J.; Šponer, Jiří; Cheatham III, Thomas E.; Otyepka, M.; Jurečka, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2013), s. 2339-2354. ISSN 1549-9618 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/10/1742 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : MOLECULAR- DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS * PHOSPHORUS CHEMICAL-SHIFTS * SUGAR-PHOSPHATE BACKBONE Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  5. Graduate Education in Kinesiology: Are We Part of "America's Backbone for Competitiveness and Innovation"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education in the United States has been identified as being the backbone of American competitiveness and innovation in a recent report by the Council of Graduate Schools. The report provides a framework for examining the role of graduate education in partnership with business and government to advance an action agenda for achieving…

  6. Protein folding and wring resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    protein folding takes place when the amplitude of a wring excitation becomes so large that it is energetically favorable to bend the protein backbone. The condition under which such structural transformations can occur is found, and it is shown that both cold and hot denaturation (the unfolding of...

  7. Lactobacillus plantarum possesses the capability for wall teichoic acid backbone alditol switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron Peter A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific strains of Lactobacillus plantarum are marketed as health-promoting probiotics. The role and interplay of cell-wall compounds like wall- and lipo-teichoic acids (WTA and LTA in bacterial physiology and probiotic-host interactions remain obscure. L. plantarum WCFS1 harbors the genetic potential to switch WTA backbone alditol, providing an opportunity to study the impact of WTA backbone modifications in an isogenic background. Results Through genome mining and mutagenesis we constructed derivatives that synthesize alternative WTA variants. The mutants were shown to completely lack WTA, or produce WTA and LTA that lack D-Ala substitution, or ribitol-backbone WTA instead of the wild-type glycerol-containing backbone. DNA micro-array experiments established that the tarIJKL gene cluster is required for the biosynthesis of this alternative WTA backbone, and suggest ribose and arabinose are precursors thereof. Increased tarIJKL expression was not observed in any of our previously performed DNA microarray experiments, nor in qRT-PCR analyses of L. plantarum grown on various carbon sources, leaving the natural conditions leading to WTA backbone alditol switching, if any, to be identified. Human embryonic kidney NF-κB reporter cells expressing Toll like receptor (TLR-2/6 were exposed to purified WTAs and/or the TA mutants, indicating that WTA is not directly involved in TLR-2/6 signaling, but attenuates this signaling in a backbone independent manner, likely by affecting the release and exposure of immunomodulatory compounds such as LTA. Moreover, human dendritic cells did not secrete any cytokines when purified WTAs were applied, whereas they secreted drastically decreased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12p70 and TNF-α after stimulation with the WTA mutants as compared to the wild-type. Conclusions The study presented here correlates structural differences in WTA to their functional characteristics, thereby

  8. High-yield secretion of recombinant proteins expressed in tobacco cell culture with a designer glycopeptide tag: Process development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ningning; Gonzalez, Maria; Savary, Brett; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    Low-yield protein production remains the most significant economic hurdle with plant cell culture technology. Fusions of recombinant proteins with hydroxyproline-O-glycosylated designer glycopeptide tags have consistently boosted secreted protein yields. This prompted us to study the process development of this technology aiming to achieve productivity levels necessary for commercial viability. We used a tobacco BY-2 cell culture expressing EGFP as fusion with a glycopeptide tag comprised of 32 repeat of "Ser-Pro" dipeptide, or (SP)32 , to study cell growth and protein secretion, culture scale-up, and establishment of perfusion cultures for continuous production. The BY-2 cells accumulated low levels of cell biomass (∼7.5 g DW/L) in Schenk & Hildebrandt medium, but secreted high yields of (SP)32 -tagged EGFP (125 mg/L). Protein productivity of the cell culture has been stable for 6.0 years. The BY-2 cells cultured in a 5-L bioreactor similarly produced high secreted protein yield at 131 mg/L. Successful operation of a cell perfusion culture for 30 days was achieved under the perfusion rate of 0.25 and 0.5 day(-1) , generating a protein volumetric productivity of 17.6 and 28.9 mg/day/L, respectively. This research demonstrates the great potential of the designer glycopeptide technology for use in commercial production of valuable proteins with plant cell cultures. PMID:26627201

  9. Landsat: The Backbone for Mapping and Monitoring Global Ecological Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, T. R.

    2011-12-01

    Long-term ecological monitoring requires consistent observation of key variables, long-term measurement continuity, and open and affordable access to measurements. The Landsat series of Earth observation missions uniquely meet those criteria, and Landsat's 30m-observation scale permits the detection and differentiation of natural versus human-caused land change. Landsat is the longest and most comprehensive record of the state of the global land surface in existence. No other high-resolution satellite program is either capable or committed to the systematic monitoring of global scale human and natural land change. Beginning with Landsat 1 in 1972, six Landsat missions have continuously recorded images of the Earth. As we near the fortieth anniversary of Landsat, we now have an archive of millions of repetitive images of the Earth with multispectral properties suited to assessing both biotic and abiotic conditions and at a scale appropriate for resource management. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Landsat archive contains nearly three million scenes and all are available to users at no cost. Furthermore, the entire Landsat record, Landsats 1-7, is now calibrated to a common radiometric standard and the majority of the data are orthorectified - enabling immediate assessment of long-term ecological conditions and land change. Landsats 5 and 7 continue to collect imagery and together they provide the potential to cover a significant portion of the Earth's land surfaces every eight days. Both of these missions now use a long-term acquisition plan designed to improve the collection of seasonal global coverage. Furthermore, recent agreements with international Landsat receiving stations are bringing previously inaccessible contemporary Landsat 5 data into the EROS archive. The amount of global coverage being acquired annually is the highest level in the history of the Landsat program. The EROS global historical archive is

  10. Design of a PROTAC that antagonizes and destroys the cancer-forming X-protein of the hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule (PROTAC) to treat hepatitis B. • The PROTAC antagonizes and destroys the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. • The PROTAC is a fusion of the X-protein oligomerization and instability domains. • The oligomerization domain is a dominant-negative inhibitor of X-protein function. • X-protein-targeting PROTACs have potential to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma. - Abstract: The X-protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is essential for virus infection and contributes to the development of HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a disease which causes more than one million deaths each year. Here we describe the design of a novel PROTAC (proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule) capable of simultaneously inducing the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizing its function. The PROTAC was constructed by fusing the N-terminal oligomerization and C-terminal instability domains of the X-protein to each other, and rendering them cell-permeable by the inclusion of a polyarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was predicted that the oligomerization domain would bind the X-protein, and that the instability domain would cause the X-protein to be targeted for proteasomal degradation. Addition of the PROTAC to HepG2 liver cancer cells, engineered to express full-length and C-terminally truncated forms of the X-protein, resulted in the degradation of both forms of the X-protein. A cell-permeable stand-alone form of the oligomerization domain was taken up by HepG2 cells, and acted as a dominant-negative inhibitor, causing inhibition of X-protein-induced apoptosis. In summary, the PROTAC described here induces the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizes its function, and warrants investigation in a preclinical study for its ability to prevent or treat HBV infection and/or the development of HCC

  11. Design of a PROTAC that antagonizes and destroys the cancer-forming X-protein of the hepatitis B virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montrose, Kristopher; Krissansen, Geoffrey W., E-mail: gw.krissansen@auckland.ac.nz

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • A novel proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule (PROTAC) to treat hepatitis B. • The PROTAC antagonizes and destroys the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. • The PROTAC is a fusion of the X-protein oligomerization and instability domains. • The oligomerization domain is a dominant-negative inhibitor of X-protein function. • X-protein-targeting PROTACs have potential to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma. - Abstract: The X-protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is essential for virus infection and contributes to the development of HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a disease which causes more than one million deaths each year. Here we describe the design of a novel PROTAC (proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule) capable of simultaneously inducing the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizing its function. The PROTAC was constructed by fusing the N-terminal oligomerization and C-terminal instability domains of the X-protein to each other, and rendering them cell-permeable by the inclusion of a polyarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was predicted that the oligomerization domain would bind the X-protein, and that the instability domain would cause the X-protein to be targeted for proteasomal degradation. Addition of the PROTAC to HepG2 liver cancer cells, engineered to express full-length and C-terminally truncated forms of the X-protein, resulted in the degradation of both forms of the X-protein. A cell-permeable stand-alone form of the oligomerization domain was taken up by HepG2 cells, and acted as a dominant-negative inhibitor, causing inhibition of X-protein-induced apoptosis. In summary, the PROTAC described here induces the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizes its function, and warrants investigation in a preclinical study for its ability to prevent or treat HBV infection and/or the development of HCC.

  12. Phase behaviour of two-component bottle-brush polymers with flexible backbones under poor solvent conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase behaviour of two-component bottle-brush polymers with fully flexible backbones under poor solvent conditions is studied via molecular-dynamics simulations, using a coarse-grained bead-spring model and side chains of up to N = 40 effective monomers. We consider a symmetric model where side chains of type A and B are grafted alternately onto a flexible backbone. The aim of this study is to explore the phase behaviour of two-component bottle-brushes depending on parameters, such as as the grafting density σ, the backbone length Nb, the side-chain length N, and the temperature T. Based on a cluster analysis, we identify for our range of parameters the regimes of fully phase separated systems, i.e., A-type side chains form one cluster and B-type chains another, while the interface that separates these two clusters contains the backbone monomers. We find that pearl-necklace or Janus-like structures, which normally occur for bottle-brush polymers with rigid backbones under poor solvent conditions, are fully attributed to the backbone rigidity, and, therefore, such structures are unlikely in the case of bottle brushes with fully flexible backbones. Also, a comparative discussion with earlier work on the phase behaviour of single-component bottle-brush polymers with flexible backbones is performed. (paper)

  13. NMR characterization of structure, backbone dynamics, and glutathione binding of the human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlhahn, P; Bernhagen, J; Czisch, M; Georgescu, J; Renner, C; Ross, A; Bucala, R; Holak, T A

    1996-10-01

    Human macrophage migration inhibitory factor is a 114 amino acid protein that belongs to the family of immunologic cytokines. Assignments of 1H, 15N, and 13C resonances have enabled the determination of the secondary structure of the protein, which consists of two alpha-helices (residues 18-31 and 89-72) and a central four-stranded beta-sheet. In the beta-sheet, two parallel beta-sheets are connected in an antiparallel sense. From the total of three cysteines present in the primary structure of MIF, none was found to form disulfide bridges. 1H-15N heteronuclear T1, T2, and steady-state NOE measurements indicate that the backbone of MIF exists in a rigid structure of limited conformational flexibility (on the nanosecond to picosecond time scale). Several residues located in the loop regions and at the N termini of two helices exhibit internal motions on the 1-3 ns time scale. The capacity to bind glutathione was investigated by titration of a uniform 15N-labeled sample and led us to conclude that MIF has, at best, very low affinity for glutathione. PMID:8897610

  14. In silico design, cloning and high level expression of L7/L12-TOmp31 fusion protein of Brucella antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Golshani, Maryam; Rafati, Sima; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Nejati-Moheimani, Mehdi; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Globally, Brucella melitensis and B. abortus are the most common cause of human brucellosis. The outer membrane protein 31 (Omp31) and L7/L12 are immunodominant and protective antigens conserved in human Brucella pathogens which are considered as potential vaccine candidates. We aimed to design the fusion protein from Brucella L7/L12 and truncated Omp31proteins, in silico, clone the fusion in pET28a vector, and express it in Escherichia coli host. Two possible fusion forms, L7/L12-TOmp31 and ...

  15. De novo design of protein homo-oligomers with modular hydrogen-bond network-mediated specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyken, Scott E; Chen, Zibo; Groves, Benjamin; Langan, Robert A; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Ford, Alex; Gilmore, Jason M; Xu, Chunfu; DiMaio, Frank; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Sankaran, Banumathi; Seelig, Georg; Zwart, Peter H; Baker, David

    2016-05-01

    In nature, structural specificity in DNA and proteins is encoded differently: In DNA, specificity arises from modular hydrogen bonds in the core of the double helix, whereas in proteins, specificity arises largely from buried hydrophobic packing complemented by irregular peripheral polar interactions. Here, we describe a general approach for designing a wide range of protein homo-oligomers with specificity determined by modular arrays of central hydrogen-bond networks. We use the approach to design dimers, trimers, and tetramers consisting of two concentric rings of helices, including previously not seen triangular, square, and supercoiled topologies. X-ray crystallography confirms that the structures overall, and the hydrogen-bond networks in particular, are nearly identical to the design models, and the networks confer interaction specificity in vivo. The ability to design extensive hydrogen-bond networks with atomic accuracy enables the programming of protein interaction specificity for a broad range of synthetic biology applications; more generally, our results demonstrate that, even with the tremendous diversity observed in nature, there are fundamentally new modes of interaction to be discovered in proteins. PMID:27151862

  16. Urokinase-targeted recombinant bacterial protein toxins-a rationally designed and engineered anticancer agent for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yizhen LIU; Shi-Yan LI

    2009-01-01

    Urokinase-targeted recombinant bacterial protein toxins are a sort of rationally designed and engineered anticancer recombinant fusion proteins representing a novel class of agents for cancer therapy.Bacterial protein toxins have long been known as the primary virulence factor(s) for a variety of pathogenic bacteria and are the most powerful human poisons.On the other hand,it has been well documented that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR),making up the uPA system,are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and tumor cell lines.The expression of uPA system is highly correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis.To exploit these characteristics in the design of tumor cell-selective cytotoxins,two prominent bacterial protein toxins,i.e.,the diphtheria toxin and anthrax toxin are deliberately engineered through placing a sequence targeted specifically by the uPA system to form anticancer recombinant fusion proteins.These uPA system-targeted bacterial protein toxins are activated selectively on the surface of uPA systemexpressing tumor cells,thereby killing these cells.This article provides a review on the latest progress in the exploitation of these recombinant fusion proteins as potent tumoricidal agents.It is perceptible that the strategies for cancer therapy are being innovated by this novel therapeutic approach.

  17. Toward the rational design of protein kinase casein kinase-2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Stefania; Moro, Stefano; Meggio, Flavio; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Dal Ben, Diego; Ghisellini, Paola; Battistutta, Roberto; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Pinna, Lorenzo A

    2002-01-01

    Casein kinase-2 (CK2) probably is the most pleiotropic member of the protein kinase family, with more than 200 substrates known to date. Unlike the great majority of protein kinases, which are tightly regulated enzymes, CK2 is endowed with high constitutive activity, a feature that is suspected to underlie its oncogenic potential and possible implication in viral infections. This makes CK2 an attractive target for anti-neoplastic and antiviral drugs. Here, we present an overview of our present knowledge about CK2 inhibitors, with special reference to the information drawn from two recently solved crystal structures of CK2alpha in complex with emodin and with 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-2-azabenzimidazole (TBB), this latter being the most specific CK2 inhibitor known to date. A comparison with a series of anthraquinone and xanthenone derivatives highlights the crucial relevance of the hydroxyl group at position 3 for inhibition by emodin, and discloses the possibility of increasing the inhibitory potency by placing an electron withdrawing group at position 5. We also present mutational data corroborating the relevance of two hydrophobic residues unique to CK2, Val66 and Ile174, for the interactions with emodin and TBB, but not with the flavonoid inhibitors quercetin and fisetin. In particular, the CK2alpha mutant V66A displays 27- and 11-fold higher IC(50) values with emodin and TBB, respectively, as compared with the wild-type, while the IC(50) value with quercetin is unchanged. The data presented pave the road toward the rational design of more potent and selective inhibitors of CK2 and the generation of CK2 mutants refractory to inhibition, useful to probe the implication of CK2 in specific cellular functions. PMID:12191608

  18. Computational Design of Multinuclear Metalloproteins Using Unnatural Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, William A; Mills, Jeremy H; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    Multinuclear metal ion clusters, coordinated by proteins, catalyze various critical biological redox reactions, including water oxidation in photosynthesis, and nitrogen fixation. Designed metalloproteins featuring synthetic metal clusters would aid in the design of bio-inspired catalysts for various applications in synthetic biology. The design of metal ion-binding sites in a protein chain requires geometrically constrained and accurate placement of several (between three and six) polar and/or charged amino acid side chains for every metal ion, making the design problem very challenging to address. Here, we describe a general computational method to redesign oligomeric interfaces of symmetric proteins for the purpose of creating novel multinuclear metalloproteins with tunable geometries, electrochemical environments, and metal cofactor stability via first and second-shell interactions.The method requires a target symmetric organometallic cofactor whose coordinating ligands resemble the side chains of a natural or unnatural amino acid and a library of oligomeric protein structures featuring the same symmetry as the target cofactor. Geometric interface matches between target cofactor and scaffold are determined using a program that we call symmetric protein recursive ion-cofactor sampler (SyPRIS). First, the amino acid-bound organometallic cofactor model is built and symmetrically aligned to the axes of symmetry of each scaffold. Depending on the symmetry, rigid body and inverse rotameric degrees of freedom of the cofactor model are then simultaneously sampled to locate scaffold backbone constellations that are geometrically poised to incorporate the cofactor. Optionally, backbone remodeling of loops can be performed if no perfect matches are identified. Finally, the identities of spatially proximal neighbor residues of the cofactor are optimized using Rosetta Design. Selected designs can then be produced in the laboratory using genetically incorporated unnatural

  19. Self-assembly of diphenylalanine backbone homologues and their combination with functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Bhimareddy; Squillaci, Marco A.; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Samorì, Paolo; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to transform the nanofibers into spherical structures. Moreover, the co-assembly of β and γ peptides with carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized with the same peptide generated unique dendritic assemblies. This comparative study on self-assembly using diphenylalanine backbone homologues and of the co-assembly with CNT covalent conjugates is the first example exploring the capacity of β and γ peptides to adopt precise nanostructures, particularly in combination with carbon nanotubes. The dendritic organization obtained by mixing carbon nanotubes and peptides might find interesting applications in tissue engineering and neuronal interfacing.The integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into organized nanostructures is of great interest for applications in materials science and biomedicine. In this work we studied the self-assembly of β and γ homologues of diphenylalanine peptides under different solvent and pH conditions. We aimed to investigate the role of peptide backbone in tuning the formation of different types of nanostructures alone or in combination with carbon nanotubes. In spite of having the same side chain, β and γ peptides formed distinctively different nanofibers, a clear indication of the role played by the backbone homologation on the self-assembly. The variation of the pH allowed to

  20. Elucidating the design principles of photosynthetic electron-transfer proteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishara Silva, K; Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H; Lakshmi, K V

    2016-05-01

    Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine solvent accessibility, side-chain dynamics, and inter-spin distances at specific sites in biological macromolecules. This information provides important insights into the structure and dynamics of both natural and designed proteins and protein complexes. Here, we discuss the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy in probing the charge-transfer cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) such as photosystem I (PSI) and the bacterial reaction center (bRC). Photosynthetic RCs are large multi-subunit proteins (molecular weight≥300kDa) that perform light-driven charge transfer reactions in photosynthesis. These reactions are carried out by cofactors that are paramagnetic in one of their oxidation states. This renders the RCs unsuitable for conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigations. However, the presence of native paramagnetic centers and the ability to covalently attach site-directed spin labels in RCs makes them ideally suited for the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic centers serve as probes of conformational changes, dynamics of subunit assembly, and the relative motion of cofactors and peptide subunits. In this review, we describe novel applications of SDSL EPR spectroscopy for elucidating the effects of local structure and dynamics on the electron-transfer cofactors of photosynthetic RCs. Because SDSL EPR Spectroscopy is uniquely suited to provide dynamic information on protein motion, it is a particularly useful method in the engineering and analysis of designed electron transfer proteins and protein networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics - the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26334844

  1. Enhancing the production of Fc fusion protein in fed-batch fermentation of Pichia pastoris by design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Henry; Kim, Tina; Xiong, Fei; Yang, Xiaoming

    2007-01-01

    This study focuses on the feasibility of producing a therapeutic Fc fusion protein in Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) and presents an optimization design of experiment (DOE) strategy in a well-defined experimental space. The parameters examined in this study include pH, temperature, salt supplementation, and batch glycerol concentration. The effects of these process conditions were captured by statistical analysis focusing on growth rate and titer responses. Batch medium and fermentation conditions were also investigated prior to the DOE study in order to provide a favorable condition to enable the production of this Fc fusion protein. The results showed that approximately 373 mg/L of the Fc fusion protein could be produced. The pH was found to be particularly critical for the production of this Fc fusion protein. It was significantly higher than the conventional, recommended pH for P. pastoris fermentation. The development of this process shows that protein production in P. pastoris is protein specific, and there is not a set of pre-defined conditions that can work well for all types of proteins. Thorough process development would need to be performed for every type of protein in order for large-scale production in P. pastoris to be feasible. PMID:17461547

  2. Protein folding and wring resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    protein folding takes place when the amplitude of a wring excitation becomes so large that it is energetically favorable to bend the protein backbone. The condition under which such structural transformations can occur is found, and it is shown that both cold and hot denaturation (the unfolding of......The polypeptide chain of a protein is shown to obey topological contraints which enable long range excitations in the form of wring modes of the protein backbone. Wring modes of proteins of specific lengths can therefore resonate with molecular modes present in the cell. It is suggested that...... proteins) are natural consequences of the suggested wring mode model. Native (folded) proteins are found to possess an intrinsic standing wring mode....

  3. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins: a new approach to mimic complex antigens for diagnostic purposes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hausammann

    Full Text Available Inhibitory antibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII can be found in patients with acquired and congenital hemophilia A. Such FVIII-inhibiting antibodies are routinely detected by the functional Bethesda Assay. However, this assay has a low sensitivity and shows a high inter-laboratory variability. Another method to detect antibodies recognizing FVIII is ELISA, but this test does not allow the distinction between inhibitory and non-inhibitory antibodies. Therefore, we aimed at replacing the intricate antigen FVIII by Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins mimicking the epitopes of FVIII inhibitors. As a model we used the well-described inhibitory human monoclonal anti-FVIII antibody, Bo2C11, for the selection on DARPin libraries. Two DARPins were selected binding to the antigen-binding site of Bo2C11, which mimic thus a functional epitope on FVIII. These DARPins inhibited the binding of the antibody to its antigen and restored FVIII activity as determined in the Bethesda assay. Furthermore, the specific DARPins were able to recognize the target antibody in human plasma and could therefore be used to test for the presence of Bo2C11-like antibodies in a large set of hemophilia A patients. These data suggest, that our approach might be used to isolate epitopes from different sets of anti-FVIII antibodies in order to develop an ELISA-based screening assay allowing the distinction of inhibitory and non-inhibitory anti-FVIII antibodies according to their antibody signatures.

  4. Elucidating the backbone conformation of photoswitchable foldamers using vibrational circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Sérgio R; Roeters, Steven J; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Yu, Zhilin; Hecht, Stefan; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-10-28

    The backbone conformation of amphiphilic oligo(azobenzene) foldamers is investigated using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy on a mode involving the stretching of the N=N bonds in the backbone. From denaturation experiments, we find that the VCD response in the helical conformation arises mainly from through-space interaction between the N=N-stretch transition-dipole moments, so that the coupled-oscillator model can be used to predict the VCD spectrum associated with a particular conformation. Using this approach, we elucidate the origin of the VCD signals in the folded conformation, and can assign the observed partial loss of VCD signals upon photo-induced unfolding to specific conformational changes. Our results show that the N=N-stretch VCD response provides an excellent probe of the helical conformation of the N=N bonds in this type of switchable molecular system. PMID:24018416

  5. New nucleoside/nucleotide backbone options: a review of recent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Peter J; DeJesus, Edwin

    2004-09-01

    The nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI/NtRTI) class continues to serve as an important component of the standard of care for HIV infection. Combinations of dual NRTIs/NtRTIs with protease inhibitors (PIs) or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) remain the most commonly used regimens in clinical practice. In recent years, clinical outcomes data on previously novel NRTI/NtRTI backbone combinations have provided clinicians with new options to address potency, tolerability, and convenience of antiretroviral therapy. However, the tolerability, drug-drug interactions, and resistance profiles of specific regimens using new NRTI/NtRTI combinations must be weighed against the needs and preferences of individual patients. This review summarizes recent efficacy and safety data on emerging NRTI/NtRTI combination backbones, including tenofovir DF (TDF) with lamivudine (3TC), abacavir with 3TC, didanosine (ddI) with 3TC, ddI with emtricitabine (FTC), and TDF with FTC. PMID:15319666

  6. Design of an In Situ Cross-Linked Eutectic Tablet for Enhanced Delivery of Gastro-Sensitive Proteins and Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choonara, Bibi F; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, a eutectic platform was designed as an in situ cross-linked eutectic tablet for structural protection, enhanced intestinal permeation, and controlled release of proteins after oral administration. Physicochemical and physicomechanical analyses of the eutectic tablets were undertaken to elucidate the in situ cross-linking mechanism, thermal transitions, crystallinity, ex vivo permeation, and in vitro release of the protein. Following thermal characterization, results revealed successful eutectic formation with a melting point to 37°C. Protein release from the formulation was controlled over 24 h with a maximum fractional release of ±0.8 for all formulations. The release pattern alternated between phases of burst and slow release which was attributed to the combined effects of swelling, surface erosion, and in situ cross-linking. Mathematical modeling of the protein release kinetics corresponded best with the Higuichi model with near zero-order (R(2) ≈ 0.9787) release. The permeation-enhancing effect of menthol contained within the eutectic powder blend was investigated and results showed an enhanced protein flux (0.0576-0.0720 mg·cm(-2) h(-1)) across the intestinal tissue model compared with a control formulation. Extensive in vitro characterization highlighted the successful design of the eutectic tablets as a potential oral delivery system for proteins with structural protection, enhanced intestinal permeation, and controlled release. PMID:27262202

  7. Structure and dynamics of the RNA backbone resolved with NMR spin-spin couplings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokáčová, Zuzana; Buděšínský, Miloš; Rosenberg, Ivan; Schneider, Bohdan; Šponer, Jiří; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    Helsinki : University of Helsinki, 2009 - (J. Polvi and H. Ristolainen). s. 320-320 ISBN 978-952-10-5618-5. [International Congress of Quantum Chemistry ICQC /13./. 22.06.2009-27-06.2009, Helsinki] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : NMR * nucleic acid backbone * ab initio calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  8. Extensive Air Showers: from the muonic smoking guns to the hadronic backbone

    OpenAIRE

    Cazon L.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive Air Showers are complex macroscopic objects initiated by single ultra-high energy particles. They are the result of millions of high energy reactions in the atmosphere and can be described as the superposition of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The hadronic cascade is the air shower backbone, and it is mainly made of pions. Decays of neutral pions initiate electromagnetic cascades, while the decays of charged pions produce muons which leave the hadronic core and travel many k...

  9. Integrating the university medical center. Phase one: providing an information backbone.

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, S J; Reber, E.; Offeman, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    UCLA School of Medicine represents a diverse computing community where the creation of each individual network has been driven by applications, price/performance and functionality. Indeed, the ability to connect to other computers has had no bearing on selection. Yet, there exists a need to seamlessly connect the individual networks to other minicomputers, mainframes and remote computers. We have created a school wide backbone network that will enable an individual from a single workstation t...

  10. Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, George A.; Nelson, David A.; Molton, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

  11. Effect of Backbone Structure on Membrane Properties for Poly(arylene ether) Random and Multiblock Copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Rowlett, Jarrett Robert

    2014-01-01

    Poly(arylene ether)s are a well-established class of thermoplastics that are known for their mechanical toughness, thermal stability, and fabrication into membranes. These materials can undergo a myriad of modifications including backbone structure variability, sulfonation, and crosslinking. In this dissertation, structure-property relationships are considered for poly(arylene ether)s with regard to membrane applications for proton exchange and gas separation membranes. All of the proton...

  12. Synthesis, Characterization and Structure of Chiral Amino Acids and Their Corresponding Amino Alcohols with Camphoric Backbone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Hui-Fen; HUANG Wei; LI Hui-Hui; YAO Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Chiral amino acids and their corresponding amino alcohols bearing camphoric backbone were prepared from D-(+)-camphoric imide and characterized by infrared, elemental analysis, ESI-MS, and NMR measurements. Among them, one intermediate (lS,3R)-3-amino-2,2,3-trimethyl cyclopentane-1-carboxylic acid hydrochloride 3 was structurally elucidated by X-ray diffraction techniques. Versatile intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions observed in its packing structure result in a two-dimensional framework.

  13. Release management as the backbone of service delivery for business critical enterprise applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ojasalo, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Application management services are initiated to take care of enterprise applications in the use phase of their lifecycle. Most important of the application management processes are incident, problem, change, knowledge and release management. The aim of this thesis of mine is to validate the position of release management. Release management can be the backbone for enterprise application management. It makes sure that the risk of negatively affecting the operation of the application is m...

  14. Navigating the massive world of reddit: Using backbone networks to map user interests in social media

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Randal S.; Neal, Zachary P.

    2013-01-01

    In the massive online worlds of social media, users frequently rely on organizing themselves around specific topics of interest to find and engage with like-minded people. However, navigating these massive worlds and finding topics of specific interest often proves difficult because the worlds are mostly organized haphazardly, leaving users to find relevant interests by word of mouth or using a basic search feature. Here, we report on a method using the backbone of a network to create a map o...

  15. Power consumption evaluation of circuit-switched versus packet-switched optical backbone networks

    OpenAIRE

    Van Heddeghem W.; Lannoo B.; Colle D.; Pickavet M.; Musumeci F.; Pattavina A.; Idzikowski F.

    2013-01-01

    While telecommunication networks have historically been dominated by a circuit-switched paradigm, the last decades have seen a clear trend towards packet-switched networks. In this paper we evaluate how both paradigms perform in optical backbone networks from a power consumption point of view, and whether the general agreement of circuit switching being more power-efficient holds. We consider artificially generated topologies of various sizes, mesh degrees and not yet previously explored in t...

  16. Surveying determinants of protein structure designability across different energy models and amino-acid alphabets: A consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchler, Nicolas E. G.; Goldstein, Richard A.

    2000-02-01

    A variety of analytical and computational models have been proposed to answer the question of why some protein structures are more "designable" (i.e., have more sequences folding into them) than others. One class of analytical and statistical-mechanical models has approached the designability problem from a thermodynamic viewpoint. These models highlighted specific structural features important for increased designability. Furthermore, designability was shown to be inherently related to thermodynamically relevant energetic measures of protein folding, such as the foldability F and energy gap Δ10. However, many of these models have been done within a very narrow focus: Namely, pair-contact interactions and two-letter amino-acid alphabets. Recently, two-letter amino-acid alphabets for pair-contact models have been shown to contain designability artifacts which disappear for larger-letter amino-acid alphabets. In addition, a solvation model was demonstrated to give identical designability results to previous two-letter amino-acid alphabet pair-contact models. In light of these discordant results, this report synthesizes a broad consensus regarding the relationship between specific structural features, foldability F, energy gap Δ10, and structure designability for different energy models (pair-contact vs solvation) across a wide range of amino-acid alphabets. We also propose a novel measure Zdk which is shown to be well correlated to designability. Finally, we conclusively demonstrate that two-letter amino-acid alphabets for pair-contact models appear to be solvation models in disguise.

  17. Design aspects of 24 h recall assesments may affect the estimates of protein and potassium intake in dietary surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crispim, S.P.; Geelen, A.; Siebelink, E.; Huybrechts, I.; Vries, de J.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of different modes of administration (face-to-face v. telephone), recall days (first v. second), clays of the week (weekday v. weekend) and interview clays (1 d later v. 2 d later) on bias in protein and K intakes collected with 24 h dietary recalls (24-HDR). Design

  18. Design and Testing of an Assessment Instrument to Measure Understanding of Protein Structure and Enzyme Inhibition in a New Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Sachel M.; Heyen, Bruce J.; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Loertscher, Jennifer; Minderhout, Vicky; Murray, Tracey Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Assessment instruments designed to measure student conceptual understanding and skills proficiency related to biochemistry are important to transform undergraduate biochemistry education. The purpose of this study was to develop an assessment instrument to measure student understanding of protein structure and enzyme inhibition in a new context,…

  19. Atlas of protein expression: image capture, analysis, and design of terabyte image database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiahua; Maslen, Gareth; Warford, Anthony; Griffin, Gareth; Xie, Jane; Crowther, Sandra; McCafferty, John

    2006-03-01

    The activity of genes in health and disease are manifested through the proteins which they encode. Ultimately, proteins drive functional processes in cells and tissues and so by measuring individual protein levels, studying modifications and discovering their sites of action we will understand better their function. It is possible to visualize the location of proteins of interest in tissue sections using labeled antibodies which bind to the target protein. This procedure, known as immunohistochemistry (IHC), provides valuable information on the cellular and sub-cellular distribution of proteins in tissue. The project, atlas of protein expression, aims to create a quality, information rich database of protein expression profiles, which is accessible to the world-wide research community. For the long term archival value of the data, the accompanying validated antibody and protein clones will potentially have great research, diagnostic and possibly therapeutic potential. To achieve this we had introduced a number of novel technologies, e.g. express recombinant proteins, select antibodies, stain proteins present in tissue section, and tissue microarray (TMA) image analysis. These are currently being optimized, automated and integrated into a multi-disciplinary production process. We had also created infrastructure for multi-terabyte scale image capture, established an image analysis capability for initial screening and quantization.

  20. East vergent structure of Backbone Range: Insights from A-Lan-Yi area and sandbox modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Taiwan, including Pingtung peninsula and Taitung, is the incipient oblique collision zone of Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate. The Luzon volcanic arc converged toward Taiwan Island and formed Hengchun Ridge south offshore Taiwan. Thus, Taiwan mountain belt developed from north to south as the Backbone Range, so that we can infer the incipient feature structure from the topography and outcrop study of southern Taiwan. Our field survey of this study concentrated at the southeast coastline of Taiwan, also known as A-Lan-Yi Trail. According to previous study, the deformational structures such as faults and folds are consistent with regional kinematic processes, and the preserved transpression structure is the most important evidence of incipient collision. In this study, we use the sedimentary sequences of study area to trace the regional tectonics from north to south. Discovered structures in this area show the similar kinematic history as the eastern flank of Backbone Range, so that we suggest they are at the same series of a tectonic event. To complete the regional structure mapping in this accessible area, besides the field geological data, we also applied the LiDAR-derived DTM which is a 3D visualization technology to improve our topography information. In addition, we use the sandbox modeling to demonstrate the development of structures in the eastern flank of Backbone Range. After combining the results of field observation and regional structure mapping, this study provides a strong evidence of backthrusting and backfolding deformation during the incipient oblique collision stage.

  1. An Analytic Method for the Kinematics and Dynamics of a Multiple-Backbone Continuum Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuum robots have been the subject of extensive research due to their potential use in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we propose a new continuum robot with three backbones, and provide a unified analytic method for the kinematics and dynamics of a multiple‐backbone continuum robot. The robot achieves actuation by independently pulling three backbones to carry out a bending motion of two‐degrees‐of‐freedom (DoF. A three‐dimensional CAD model of the robot is built and the kinematical equation is established on the basis of the Euler‐Bernoulli beam. The dynamical model of the continuum robot is constructed by using the Lagrange method. The simulation and the experiment’s validation results show the continuum robot can exactly bend into pre‐set angles in the two‐dimensional space (the maximum error is less than 5% of the robot length and can make a circular motion in three‐dimensional space. The results demonstrate that the proposed analytic method for the kinematics and dynamics of a continuum robot is feasible.

  2. Conformational Stability!? : Synthesis and Conformational Studies of Unnatural Backbone Modified Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Norgren, Anna S.

    2006-01-01

    The beauty of the wide functionality of proteins and peptides in Nature is determined by their ability to adopt three-dimensional structures. This thesis describes artificial molecules developed to mimic secondary structures similar to those found crucial for biological activities. In the first part of this thesis, we focused on post-translational modifications of a class of unnatural oligomers known as β-peptides. Through the design and synthesis of a glycosylated β3-peptide, the first such ...

  3. Complete resonance assignment for the polypeptide backbone of interleukin 1β using three-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete sequence-specific assignment of the 15N and 1H backbone resonances of the NMR spectrum of recombinant human interleukin 1β has been obtained by using primarily 15N-1H heteronuclear three-dimensional (3D) NMR techniques in combination with 15N-1H heteronuclear and 1H homonuclear two-dimensional NMR. The fingerprint region of the spectrum was analyzed by using a combination of 3D heteronuclear 1H Hartmann-Hahn 15N-1H multiple quantum coherence (3D HOHAHA-HMQC) and 3D heteronuclear 1H nuclear Overhauser 15N-1H multiple quantum coherence (3D NOESY-HMQC) spectroscopies. The authors show that the problems of amide NH and CαH chemical shift degeneracy that are prevalent for proteins of the size are readily overcome by using the 3D heteronuclear NMR technique. A doubling of some peaks in the spectrum was found to be due to N-terminal heterogeneity of the 15N-labeled protein, corresponding to a mixture of wild-type and des-Ala-1-interleukin 1β. The complete list of 15N and 1H assignments is given for all the amide NH and CαH resonances of all non-proline residues, as well as the 1H assignments for some of the amino acid side chains. This first example of the sequence-specific assignment of a protein using heteronuclear 3D NMR provides a basis for further conformational and dynamic studies of interleukin 1β

  4. Rational Design of Analyte Channels of the Green Fluorescent Protein for Biosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natta Tansila, Tanawut Tantimongcolwat, Chartchalerm Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chanin Nantasenamat, Virapong Prachayasittikul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel solvent-exposed analyte channel, generated by F165G substitution, on the surface of green fluorescent protein (designated His6GFPuv/F165G was successfully discovered by the aid of molecular modeling software (PyMOL in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis. Regarding the high predictive performance of PyMOL, two pore-containing mutants namely His6GFPuv/H148G and His6GFPuv/H148G/F165G were also revealed. The pore sizes of F165G, H148G, and the double mutant H148G/F165G were in the order of 4, 4.5 and 5.5 Å, respectively. These mutants were subjected to further investigation on the effect of small analytes (e.g. metal ions and hydrogen peroxide as elucidated by fluorescence quenching experiments. Results revealed that the F165G mutant exhibited the highest metal sensitivity at physiological pH. Meanwhile, the other 2 mutants lacking histidine at position 148 had lower sensitivity against Zn2+ and Cu2+ than those of the template protein (His6GFPuv. Hence, a significant role of this histidine residue in mediating metal transfer toward the GFP chromophore was proposed and evidently demonstrated by testing in acidic condition. Results revealed that at pH 6.5 the order of metal sensitivity was found to be inverted whereby the H148G/F165G became the most sensitive mutant. The dissociation constants (Kd to metal ions were in the order of 4.88×10-6 M, 16.67×10-6 M, 25×10-6 M, and 33.33×10-6 M for His6GFPuv/F165G, His6GFPuv, His6GFPuv/H148G/F165G and His6GFPuv/H148G, respectively. Sensitivity against hydrogen peroxide was in the order of H148G/F165G > H148G > F165G indicating the crucial role of pore diameters. However, it should be mentioned that H148G substitution caused a markedly decrease in pH- and thermo-stability. Taken together, our findings rendered the novel pore of GFP as formed by F165G substitution to be a high impact channel without adversely affecting the intrinsic fluorescent properties. This opens up a great potential of

  5. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-05-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  6. Improving biocompatibility by controlling protein adsorption: Modification and design of biomaterials using poly(ethylene glycol) microgels and microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Evan Alexander

    2009-12-01

    Guided by the clinical needs of patients and developments in biology and materials science, the primary focus of the biomaterials field remains at the solid/liquid interface between biomaterial surfaces and biological fluids. For blood-contacting devices, biological responses are initially elicited and directed by proteins that adsorb from this multicomponent solution to form thin films on their surfaces. The identity, conformation, and quantity of adsorbed proteins are related to the properties of a material's surface. For example, hydrophobic surfaces tend to be thrombotic via interactions between platelets and adsorbed fibrinogen, while surface-activation of specific enzymes initiates the coagulation cascade on hydrophilic surfaces. The objective of this thesis is to improve the design of biomaterials through the analysis and control of adsorbing protein layers. This goal is approached through three separate strategies. First, a proteomics-based methodology is presented for the assessment of protein conformation at the residue level after adsorption to biomaterial surfaces. A quantitative mass spectrometric technique is additionally suggested for the identification and quantification of proteins within adsorbed protein layers. Second, a method is described for the covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel coatings onto biomaterials surfaces for the minimization of protein adsorption. The coatings are applied using partially crosslinked PEG solutions containing polymer and protein oligomers and microgels that can be designed to control cell adhesion. Finally, a modular strategy is proposed for the assembly of bioactive PEG-based hydrogel scaffolds. This was accomplished using novel PEG microspheres with diverse characteristics that individually contribute to the ability of the scaffold to direct cellular infiltration. The methodologies proposed by this thesis contribute to the recent shift in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies

  7. Circling the enemy: cyclic proteins in plant defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, David J

    2009-06-01

    Cyclotides are ultra-stable plant proteins that have a circular peptide backbone crosslinked by a cystine knot of disulfide bonds. They are produced in large quantities by plants of the Violaceae and Rubiaceae families and have a role in plant defence against insect predation. As I discuss here, recent studies have begun to reveal how their unique circular topology evolved. Cyclization is achieved by hijacking existing plant proteolytic enzymes and operating them in 'reverse' to form a peptide bond between the N- and C-termini of a linear precursor. Such studies suggest that circular proteins are more common in the plant kingdom than was previously thought, and their exceptional stability has led to their application as protein-engineering templates in drug design. PMID:19423383

  8. Comparison of the backbone dynamics of wild-type Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c{sub 552} and its b-type variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozawa, Kaeko; Ferguson, Stuart J.; Redfield, Christina, E-mail: christina.redfield@bioch.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Smith, Lorna J., E-mail: lorna.smith@chem.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Cytochrome c{sub 552} from the thermophilic bacterium Hydrogenobacter thermophilus is a typical c-type cytochrome which binds heme covalently via two thioether bonds between the two heme vinyl groups and two cysteine thiol groups in a CXXCH sequence motif. This protein was converted to a b-type cytochrome by substitution of the two cysteine residues by alanines (Tomlinson and Ferguson in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 97:5156–5160, 2000a). To probe the significance of the covalent attachment of the heme in the c-type protein, {sup 15}N relaxation and hydrogen exchange studies have been performed for the wild-type and b-type proteins. The two variants share very similar backbone dynamic properties, both proteins showing high {sup 15}N order parameters in the four main helices, with reduced values in an exposed loop region (residues 18–21), and at the C-terminal residue Lys80. Some subtle changes in chemical shift and hydrogen exchange protection are seen between the wild-type and b-type variant proteins, not only for residues at and neighbouring the mutation sites, but also for some residues in the heme binding pocket. Overall, the results suggest that the main role of the covalent linkages between the heme group and the protein chain must be to increase the stability of the protein.

  9. Orientation Preferences of Backbone Secondary Amide Functional Groups in Peptide Nucleic Acid Complexes: Quantum Chemical Calculations Reveal an Intrinsic Preference of Cationic D-Amino Acid-Based Chiral PNA Analogues for the P-form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Topham, Christopher [University of Heidelberg

    2007-01-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like base pair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNADNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs.

  10. Orientation preferences of backbone secondary amide functional groups in peptide nucleic acid complexes: quantum chemical calculations reveal an intrinsic preference of cationic D-amino acid-based chiral PNA analogues for the P-form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2007-02-01

    Geometric descriptions of nonideal interresidue hydrogen bonding and backbone-base water bridging in the minor groove are established in terms of polyamide backbone carbonyl group orientation from analyses of residue junction conformers in experimentally determined peptide nucleic acid (PNA) complexes. Two types of interresidue hydrogen bonding are identified in PNA conformers in heteroduplexes with nucleic acids that adopt A-like basepair stacking. Quantum chemical calculations on the binding of a water molecule to an O2 base atom in glycine-based PNA thymine dimers indicate that junctions modeled with P-form backbone conformations are lower in energy than a dimer comprising the predominant conformation observed in A-like helices. It is further shown in model systems that PNA analogs based on D-lysine are better able to preorganize in a conformation exclusive to P-form helices than is glycine-based PNA. An intrinsic preference for this conformation is also exhibited by positively charged chiral PNA dimers carrying 3-amino-D-alanine or 4-aza-D-leucine residue units that provide for additional rigidity by side-chain hydrogen bonding to the backbone carbonyl oxygen. Structural modifications stabilizing P-form helices may obviate the need for large heterocycles to target DNA pyrimidine bases via PNA.DNA-PNA triplex formation. Quantum chemical modeling methods are used to propose candidate PNA Hoogsteen strand designs. PMID:17071666

  11. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated. PMID:27335085

  12. Design of improved membrane protein production experiments: Quantitation of the host response

    OpenAIRE

    Bonander, Nicklas; Hedfalk, Kristina; Larsson, Christer; Mostad, Petter; Chang, Celia; Gustafsson, Lena; Bill, Roslyn M.

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic membrane proteins cannot be produced in a reliable manner for structural analysis. Consequently, researchers still rely on trial-and-error approaches, which most often yield insufficient amounts. This means that membrane protein production is recognized by biologists as the primary bottleneck in contemporary structural genomics programs. Here, we describe a study to examine the reasons for successes and failures in recombinant membrane protein production in yeast, at the level of t...

  13. Electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations of immobilized de novo designed heme proteins on metal electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, WW; Ulstrup, Jens;

    2005-01-01

    configuration. The proteins possess different binding domains on the top surfaces of the bundles to allow for electrostatic, covalent, and hydrophobic binding to metal electrodes. Electrostatic immobilization was achieved for proteins with lysine-rich binding domains (MOP-P) that adsorb to electrodes covered by...... electron-transfer rate constant of 13 s(-1) is similar to those reported for natural heme proteins with comparable electron-transfer distances, which indicates that covalently bound synthetic heme proteins provide efficient electronic communication with a metal electrode as a prerequisite for potential...

  14. Vicinal solvent and protein coupling modulates the protein dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sezerman, Ayşe Özlem; Sezerman, Ayse Ozlem

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a folded protein is studied in water and glycerol at a series of temperatures below and above their respective dynamical transition. The system is modeled in two distinct states whereby the protein is decoupled from the bulk solvent at low temperatures, and communicates with it through a vicinal layer at physiological temperatures. A linear viscoelastic model elucidates the less-than-expected increase in the relaxation times observed in the backbone dynamics of the protein. Th...

  15. Peptide backbone orientation and dynamics in spider dragline silk and two-photon excitation in nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of the dissertation, spider dragline silk is studied by solid state NMR techniques. The dependence of NMR frequency on molecular orientation is exploited using the DECODER experiment to determine the orientation of the protein backbone within the silk fibre. Practical experimental considerations require that the silk fibres be wound about a cylindrical axis perpendicular to the external magnetic field, complicating the reconstruction of the underlying orientation distribution and necessitating the development of numerical techniques for this purpose. A two-component model of silk incorporating static b-sheets and polyglycine II helices adequately fits the NMR data and suggests that the b-sheets are well aligned along the silk axis (20 FWHM) while the helices are poorly aligned (68 FWHM). The effects of fibre strain, draw rate and hydration on orientation are measured. Measurements of the time-scale for peptide backbone motion indicate that when wet, a strain-dependent fraction of the poorly aligned component becomes mobile. This suggests a mechanism for the supercontraction of silk involving latent entropic springs that undergo a local strain-dependent phase transition, driving supercontraction. In the second part of this dissertation a novel method is developed for exciting NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) by rf irradiation at multiple frequencies that sum to (or differ by) the resonance frequency. This is fundamentally different than traditional NMR experiments where irradiation is applied on-resonance. With excitation outside the detection bandwidth, two-photon excitation allows for detection of free induction signals during excitation, completely eliminating receiver dead-time. A theoretical approach to describing two-photon excitation is developed based on average Hamiltonian theory. An intuition for two-photon excitation is gained by analogy to the coherent absorption of multiple photons requiring conservation of total energy and

  16. Structural mapping of the ClpB ATPases of Plasmodium falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion for antimalarial drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Koehl, Antoine; Cascio, Duilio; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-09-01

    Caseinolytic chaperones and proteases (Clp) belong to the AAA+ protein superfamily and are part of the protein quality control machinery in cells. The eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, has evolved an elaborate network of Clp proteins including two distinct ClpB ATPases. ClpB1 and ClpB2 are involved in different aspects of parasitic proteostasis. ClpB1 is present in the apicoplast, a parasite-specific and plastid-like organelle hosting various metabolic pathways necessary for parasite growth. ClpB2 localizes to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane where it drives protein export as core subunit of a parasite-derived protein secretion complex, the Plasmodium Translocon of Exported proteins (PTEX); this process is central to parasite virulence and survival in the human host. The functional associations of these two chaperones with parasite-specific metabolism and protein secretion make them prime drug targets. ClpB proteins function as unfoldases and disaggregases and share a common architecture consisting of four domains-a variable N-terminal domain that binds different protein substrates, followed by two highly conserved catalytic ATPase domains, and a C-terminal domain. Here, we report and compare the first crystal structures of the N terminal domains of ClpB1 and ClpB2 from Plasmodium and analyze their molecular surfaces. Solution scattering analysis of the N domain of ClpB2 shows that the average solution conformation is similar to the crystalline structure. These structures represent the first step towards the characterization of these two malarial chaperones and the reconstitution of the entire PTEX to aid structure-based design of novel anti-malarial drugs. PMID:26130467

  17. Design and expression of fusion protein consists of HBsAg and Polyepitope of HCV as an HCV potential vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Monireh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Memarnejadian, Arash; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Roohvand, Farzin; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Cohan, Reza Ahangari; Nazemi, Ali; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Asgary, Vahid; Arezumand, Roghaye

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious public health threat worldwide. Cellular immune responses, especially cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), play a critical role in immune response toward the HCV clearance. Since polytope vaccines have the ability to stimulate the cellular immunity, a recombinant fusion protein was developed in this study. Materials and Methods: The designed fusion protein is composed of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), as an immunocarrier, fused to an HCV polytope sequence. The polytope containing five immunogenic epitopes of HCV was designed to induce specific CTL responses. The construct was cloned into the pET-28a, and its expression was investigated in BL21 (DE3), BL21 pLysS, BL21 pLysE, and BL21 AI Escherichia coli strains using 12% gel sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Finally, the identity of expressed fusion protein was confirmed by Western blotting using anti-His monoclonal antibody and affinity chromatography was applied to purify the expressed protein. Results: The accuracy of the construct was confirmed by restriction map analysis and sequencing. The transformation of the construct into the BL21 (DE3), pLysS, and pLysE E. coli strains did not lead to any expression. The fusion protein was found to be toxic for E. coli DE3. By applying two steps inhibition, the fusion protein was successfully expressed in BL21 (AI) E. coli strain. Conclusion: The HBsAg-polytope fusion protein expressed in this study can be further evaluated for its immunogenicity in animal models. PMID:26682209

  18. Design aspects of 24 h recall assesments may affect the estimates of protein and potassium intake in dietary surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Crispim, S.P.; Geelen, A; Siebelink, E.; Huybrechts, I.; Vries, de, H.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of different modes of administration (face-to-face v. telephone), recall days (first v. second), clays of the week (weekday v. weekend) and interview clays (1 d later v. 2 d later) on bias in protein and K intakes collected with 24 h dietary recalls (24-HDR). Design: Two non-consecutive 24-HDR (collected with standardised EPIC-Soft software) were used to estimate protein and K intakes by a face-to-face interview at the research centres and a telephone intervi...

  19. Structural model for the interaction of a designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein with the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2

    OpenAIRE

    Epa, V. Chandana; Dolezal, Olan; Doughty, Larissa; Xiao, Xiaowen; Jost, Christian; Plückthun, Andreas; Adams, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins are a class of novel binding proteins that can be selected and evolved to bind to targets with high affinity and specificity. We are interested in the DARPin H10-2-G3, which has been evolved to bind with very high affinity to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). HER2 is found to be over-expressed in 30% of breast cancers, and is the target for the FDA-approved therapeutic monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab and small molecule tyros...

  20. Structural Model for the Interaction of a Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein with the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2

    OpenAIRE

    Epa, V. Chandana; Dolezal, Olan; Doughty, Larissa; Xiao, Xiaowen; Jost, Christian; Plückthun, Andreas; Adams, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins are a class of novel binding proteins that can be selected and evolved to bind to targets with high affinity and specificity. We are interested in the DARPin H10-2-G3, which has been evolved to bind with very high affinity to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). HER2 is found to be over-expressed in 30% of breast cancers, and is the target for the FDA-approved therapeutic monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab and small molecule tyros...

  1. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir N. Uversky; Dunker, A Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out im...

  2. Electrostatic Clustering and Free Energy Calculations Provide a Foundation for Protein Design and Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Gorham, Ronald D.; Kieslich, Chris A.; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions are ubiquitous in proteins and dictate stability and function. In this review, we discuss several methods for the analysis of electrostatics in protein–protein interactions. We discuss alanine-scanning mutagenesis, Poisson–Boltzmann electrostatics, free energy calculations, electrostatic similarity distances, and hierarchical clustering of electrostatic potentials. Our recently developed computational framework, known as Analysis of Electrostatic Similarities Of Pro...

  3. A protein-dependent side-chain rotamer library.

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, M.S.

    2011-12-14

    Protein side-chain packing problem has remained one of the key open problems in bioinformatics. The three main components of protein side-chain prediction methods are a rotamer library, an energy function and a search algorithm. Rotamer libraries summarize the existing knowledge of the experimentally determined structures quantitatively. Depending on how much contextual information is encoded, there are backbone-independent rotamer libraries and backbone-dependent rotamer libraries. Backbone-independent libraries only encode sequential information, whereas backbone-dependent libraries encode both sequential and locally structural information. However, side-chain conformations are determined by spatially local information, rather than sequentially local information. Since in the side-chain prediction problem, the backbone structure is given, spatially local information should ideally be encoded into the rotamer libraries. In this paper, we propose a new type of backbone-dependent rotamer library, which encodes structural information of all the spatially neighboring residues. We call it protein-dependent rotamer libraries. Given any rotamer library and a protein backbone structure, we first model the protein structure as a Markov random field. Then the marginal distributions are estimated by the inference algorithms, without doing global optimization or search. The rotamers from the given library are then re-ranked and associated with the updated probabilities. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed protein-dependent libraries significantly outperform the widely used backbone-dependent libraries in terms of the side-chain prediction accuracy and the rotamer ranking ability. Furthermore, without global optimization/search, the side-chain prediction power of the protein-dependent library is still comparable to the global-search-based side-chain prediction methods.

  4. Synthesis of novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile linkages between the hydrocarbon chains and pseudoglyceryl backbone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Bhattacharya; Saubhik Haldar

    2002-06-01

    Five novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile linkage regions between the pseudoglyceryl backbone and the hydrocarbon chains have been synthesized. The membrane-forming properties of these new lipids are briefly presented.

  5. BWM*: A Novel, Provable, Ensemble-based Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Sparse Approximations of Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Jonathan D; Jain, Swati; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Donald, Bruce R

    2016-06-01

    Sparse energy functions that ignore long range interactions between residue pairs are frequently used by protein design algorithms to reduce computational cost. Current dynamic programming algorithms that fully exploit the optimal substructure produced by these energy functions only compute the GMEC. This disproportionately favors the sequence of a single, static conformation and overlooks better binding sequences with multiple low-energy conformations. Provable, ensemble-based algorithms such as A* avoid this problem, but A* cannot guarantee better performance than exhaustive enumeration. We propose a novel, provable, dynamic programming algorithm called Branch-Width Minimization* (BWM*) to enumerate a gap-free ensemble of conformations in order of increasing energy. Given a branch-decomposition of branch-width w for an n-residue protein design with at most q discrete side-chain conformations per residue, BWM* returns the sparse GMEC in O([Formula: see text]) time and enumerates each additional conformation in merely O([Formula: see text]) time. We define a new measure, Total Effective Search Space (TESS), which can be computed efficiently a priori before BWM* or A* is run. We ran BWM* on 67 protein design problems and found that TESS discriminated between BWM*-efficient and A*-efficient cases with 100% accuracy. As predicted by TESS and validated experimentally, BWM* outperforms A* in 73% of the cases and computes the full ensemble or a close approximation faster than A*, enumerating each additional conformation in milliseconds. Unlike A*, the performance of BWM* can be predicted in polynomial time before running the algorithm, which gives protein designers the power to choose the most efficient algorithm for their particular design problem. PMID:26744898

  6. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  7. In Silico Study of Variable Surface Proteins in Plasmodium Species: Perspectives in Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manoj Kumar; Swati, D

    2016-09-01

    The variable surface proteins expressed by P. falciparum and P. vivax are transported to the surface of infected erythrocyte and are exposed to the host immune system. The possibility of using variable surface proteins as a common drug target has been analyzed in both the Plasmodium species. Sequence analysis of variable surface proteins showed a low-level conservation within as well as between the species. Amino acid composition analysis revealed higher frequency of hydrophilic amino acids as compared with that of hydrophobic residues. In order to gain more insight into their diverse functional role, the three-dimensional structure was predicted using comparative modeling approach. These models were evaluated and validated by checking stereochemistry of underlying amino acids. Structural alignment of variable surface proteins by superimposing them shows less conservation. Due to differences at sequence as well as structural level, the variable surface proteins are expected to show difference in their degree of invasiveness. These differences were also cross-examined by evolutionary study, and the results obtained were in accordance with the aforesaid study. The existence of structural differences noticed in the present study showed that the variable surface proteins could not be used as a common drug target in both the malarial species. Therefore, species-specific strategy may be followed for drug targeting against variable surface proteins of P. falciparum and P. vivax. PMID:26253721

  8. Design of a data model for developing laboratory information management and analysis systems for protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajon, Anne; Ionides, John; Diprose, Jon; Fillon, Joël; Fogh, Rasmus; Ashton, Alun W; Berman, Helen; Boucher, Wayne; Cygler, Miroslaw; Deleury, Emeline; Esnouf, Robert; Janin, Joël; Kim, Rosalind; Krimm, Isabelle; Lawson, Catherine L; Oeuillet, Eric; Poupon, Anne; Raymond, Stéphane; Stevens, Tim; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Westbrook, John; Wood, Peter; Ulrich, Eldon; Vranken, Wim; Xueli, Li; Laue, Ernest; Stuart, David I; Henrick, Kim

    2005-02-01

    Data management has emerged as one of the central issues in the high-throughput processes of taking a protein target sequence through to a protein sample. To simplify this task, and following extensive consultation with the international structural genomics community, we describe here a model of the data related to protein production. The model is suitable for both large and small facilities for use in tracking samples, experiments, and results through the many procedures involved. The model is described in Unified Modeling Language (UML). In addition, we present relational database schemas derived from the UML. These relational schemas are already in use in a number of data management projects. PMID:15562521

  9. Voltammetry and In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy of De Novo Designed Heme Protein Monolayers on Au(111)-Electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, Wu; Haehnel, Wolfgang;

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we report the electrochemical characterization and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies of monolayers of an artificial de novo designed heme protein MOP-C, covalently immobilized on modified Au(111) surfaces. The protein forms closely packed monolayers, which...... minimal and proteins could be imaged without detectable tip interference. The results indicate further that the structural sensitivity of (in situ) STM depends to a significant extent on associated electron transfer kinetics. In the present case, the heme group does not contribute significantly to the...... tunnelling current, apparently due to slow electron transfer kinetics. As a consequence, STM images of heme-containing and heme-free MOP-C did not reveal any notable differences in apparent height or physical extension. The apparent height of heme-containing MOP-C did not show any dependence on the substrate...

  10. Development of the designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) G3 for HER2 molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Robert; Livanos, Maria; Bhavsar, Gaurav; Rashid, Mohammed; Miranda, Enrique; Tolner, Berend; Meyer, Tim; Chester, Kerry [UCL Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom); Sosabowski, Jane; Leyton, Julius; Mather, Stephen [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom); Vigor, Kim [Clare Hall Laboratories, Biotherapeutics Development Unit, Cancer Research UK, South Mimms (United Kingdom); Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Plueckthun, Andreas [Universitaet Zuerich, Biochemisches Institut, Zuerich (Switzerland); Yeung, Jenny [UCL Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-13

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) overexpression is a predictor of response to anti-HER2 therapy in breast and gastric cancer. Currently, HER2 status is assessed by tumour biopsy, but this may not be representative of the larger tumour mass or other metastatic sites, risking misclassification and selection of suboptimal therapy. The designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) G3 binds HER2 with high affinity at an epitope that does not overlap with trastuzumab and is biologically inert. We hypothesized that radiolabelled DARPin G3 would be capable of selectively imaging HER2-positive tumours, and aimed to identify a suitable format for clinical application. G3 DARPins tagged with hexahistidine (His{sub 6}) or with histidine glutamate (HE){sub 3} and untagged G3 DARPins were manufactured using a GMP-compatible Pichia pastoris protocol and radiolabelled with {sup 125}I, or with {sup 111}In via DOTA linked to a C-terminal cysteine. BALB/c mice were injected with radiolabelled G3 and tissue biodistribution was evaluated by gamma counting. The lead construct ((HE){sub 3}-G3) was assessed in mice bearing HER2-positive human breast tumour (BT474) xenografts. For both isotopes, (HE){sub 3}-G3 had significantly lower liver uptake than His{sub 6}-G3 and untagged G3 counterparts in non-tumour-bearing mice, and there was no significantly different liver uptake between His{sub 6}-G3 and untagged G3. (HE){sub 3}-G3 was taken forward for evaluation in mice bearing HER2-positive tumour xenografts. The results demonstrated that radioactivity from {sup 111}In-(HE){sub 3}-G3 was better maintained in tumours and cleared faster from serum than radioactivity from {sup 125}I-(HE){sub 3}-G3, achieving superior tumour-to-blood ratios (343.7 ± 161.3 vs. 22.0 ± 11.3 at 24 h, respectively). On microSPECT/CT, {sup 111}In-labelled and {sup 125}I-labelled (HE){sub 3}-G3 could image HER2-positive tumours at 4 h after administration, but there was less normal tissue uptake of

  11. Development of the designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) G3 for HER2 molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) overexpression is a predictor of response to anti-HER2 therapy in breast and gastric cancer. Currently, HER2 status is assessed by tumour biopsy, but this may not be representative of the larger tumour mass or other metastatic sites, risking misclassification and selection of suboptimal therapy. The designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) G3 binds HER2 with high affinity at an epitope that does not overlap with trastuzumab and is biologically inert. We hypothesized that radiolabelled DARPin G3 would be capable of selectively imaging HER2-positive tumours, and aimed to identify a suitable format for clinical application. G3 DARPins tagged with hexahistidine (His6) or with histidine glutamate (HE)3 and untagged G3 DARPins were manufactured using a GMP-compatible Pichia pastoris protocol and radiolabelled with 125I, or with 111In via DOTA linked to a C-terminal cysteine. BALB/c mice were injected with radiolabelled G3 and tissue biodistribution was evaluated by gamma counting. The lead construct ((HE)3-G3) was assessed in mice bearing HER2-positive human breast tumour (BT474) xenografts. For both isotopes, (HE)3-G3 had significantly lower liver uptake than His6-G3 and untagged G3 counterparts in non-tumour-bearing mice, and there was no significantly different liver uptake between His6-G3 and untagged G3. (HE)3-G3 was taken forward for evaluation in mice bearing HER2-positive tumour xenografts. The results demonstrated that radioactivity from 111In-(HE)3-G3 was better maintained in tumours and cleared faster from serum than radioactivity from 125I-(HE)3-G3, achieving superior tumour-to-blood ratios (343.7 ± 161.3 vs. 22.0 ± 11.3 at 24 h, respectively). On microSPECT/CT, 111In-labelled and 125I-labelled (HE)3-G3 could image HER2-positive tumours at 4 h after administration, but there was less normal tissue uptake of radioactivity with 111In-(HE)3-G3. Preadministration of trastuzumab did not affect the uptake of (HE)3-G

  12. Design of a monomeric human glutathione transferase GSTP1, a structurally stable but catalytically inactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Bruns, Christopher M; Tainer, John A; Mannervik, Bengt; Stenberg, Gun

    2002-10-01

    By the introduction of 10 site-specific mutations in the dimer interface of human glutathione transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1), a stable monomeric protein variant, GSTP1, was obtained. The monomer had lost the catalytic activity but retained the affinity for a number of electrophilic compounds normally serving as substrates for GSTP1-1. Fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra of the monomer and wild-type proteins were similar, indicating that there are no large structural differences between the subunits of the respective proteins. The GSTs have potential as targets for in vitro evolution and redesign with the aim of developing proteins with novel properties. To this end, a monomeric GST variant may have distinct advantages. PMID:12468717

  13. Backbone tuning in indenylidene–ruthenium complexes bearing an unsaturated N-heterocyclic carbene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Urbina-Blanco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The steric and electronic influence of backbone substitution in IMes-based (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenylimidazol-2-ylidene N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC was probed by synthesizing the [RhCl(CO2(NHC] series of complexes to quantify experimentally the Tolman electronic parameter (electronic and the percent buried volume (%Vbur, steric parameters. The corresponding ruthenium–indenylidene complexes were also synthesized and tested in benchmark metathesis transformations to establish possible correlations between reactivity and NHC electronic and steric parameters.

  14. Silence is Golden with High Probability: Maintaining a Connected Backbone in Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Santi, Paolo; Simon, J?nos

    2003-01-01

    Reducing node energy consumption to extend network life- time is a vital requirement in wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we present and analyze the energy consumption of a class of cell-based energy conservation protocols. The goal of our protocols is to alternately turn off/on the transceivers of the nodes, while maintaining a connected backbone of active nodes. The protocols presented in this paper are shown to be optimal, in the sense that they extend the network lifetime by a fact...

  15. Dynamic Resource Allocation and QoS Control Capabilities of the Japanese Academic Backbone Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Aoki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic resource control capabilities have become increasingly important for academic networks that must support big scientific research projects at the same time as less data intensive research and educational activities. This paper describes the dynamic resource allocation and QoS control capabilities of the Japanese academic backbone network, called SINET3, which supports a variety of academic applications with a wide range of network services. The article describes the network architecture, networking technologies, resource allocation, QoS control, and layer-1 bandwidth on-demand services. It also details typical services developed for scientific research, including the user interface, resource control, and management functions, and includes performance evaluations.

  16. On the photostability of peptides after selective photoexcitation of the backbone: Prompt versus slow dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov, Camilla Skinnerup; Jensen, Frank; Jørgensen, Thomas J D;

    2014-01-01

    , which is remote from the initial site of excitation. Hence loss of CE serves as direct proof that energy has reached the charge-site end, leaving the backbone intact. Our work demonstrates that excitation of tertiary amide moieties (proline linkages) results in both prompt dissociation and statistical...... present a protocol to disentangle slow and non-hazardous statistical dissociation from prompt cleavage of peptide bonds by 210 nm light based on experiments on protonated peptides isolated in vacuo and tagged by 18-crown-6 ether (CE). The weakest link in the system is between the charged site and CE...

  17. Design of functional guanidinium ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems for the efficient purification of protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A series of novel cationic functional hexaalkylguanidinium ionic liquids and anionic functional tetraalkylguanidinium ionic liquids have been synthesized. • Functional guanidinium ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems have been first designed for the purification of protein. • Mechanisms and performances of the process were researched. • Simple, green, safety and presents better purified ability than ordinary process. • A potential efficient platform for protein purification and related studies. - Abstract: A series of novel cationic functional hexaalkylguanidinium ionic liquids and anionic functional tetraalkylguanidinium ionic liquids have been devised and synthesized based on 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine. The structures of the ionic liquids (ILs) were confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) and the production yields were all above 90%. Functional guanidinium ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems (FGIL-ATPSs) have been first designed with these functional guanidinium ILs and phosphate solution for the purification of protein. After phase separation, proteins had transferred into the IL-rich phase and the concentrations of proteins were determined by measuring the absorbance at 278 nm using an ultra violet visible (UV–vis) spectrophotometer. The advantages of FGIL-ATPSs were compared with ordinary ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems (IL-ATPSs). The proposed FGIL-ATPS has been applied to purify lysozyme, trypsin, ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin. Single factor experiments were used to research the effects of the process, such as the amount of ionic liquid (IL), the concentration of salt solution, temperature and the amount of protein. The purification efficiency reaches to 97.05%. The secondary structure of protein during the experimental process was observed upon investigation using UV–vis spectrophotometer, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT

  18. Design of functional guanidinium ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems for the efficient purification of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xueqin; Wang, Yuzhi, E-mail: wyzss@hnu.edu.cn; Zeng, Qun; Chen, Jing; Huang, Yanhua; Xu, Kaijia

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A series of novel cationic functional hexaalkylguanidinium ionic liquids and anionic functional tetraalkylguanidinium ionic liquids have been synthesized. • Functional guanidinium ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems have been first designed for the purification of protein. • Mechanisms and performances of the process were researched. • Simple, green, safety and presents better purified ability than ordinary process. • A potential efficient platform for protein purification and related studies. - Abstract: A series of novel cationic functional hexaalkylguanidinium ionic liquids and anionic functional tetraalkylguanidinium ionic liquids have been devised and synthesized based on 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine. The structures of the ionic liquids (ILs) were confirmed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) and the production yields were all above 90%. Functional guanidinium ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems (FGIL-ATPSs) have been first designed with these functional guanidinium ILs and phosphate solution for the purification of protein. After phase separation, proteins had transferred into the IL-rich phase and the concentrations of proteins were determined by measuring the absorbance at 278 nm using an ultra violet visible (UV–vis) spectrophotometer. The advantages of FGIL-ATPSs were compared with ordinary ionic liquid aqueous two-phase systems (IL-ATPSs). The proposed FGIL-ATPS has been applied to purify lysozyme, trypsin, ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin. Single factor experiments were used to research the effects of the process, such as the amount of ionic liquid (IL), the concentration of salt solution, temperature and the amount of protein. The purification efficiency reaches to 97.05%. The secondary structure of protein during the experimental process was observed upon investigation using UV–vis spectrophotometer, Fourier-transform infrared

  19. What is the best reference state for designing statistical atomic potentials in protein structure prediction?

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Haiyou; Jia, Ya; Wei, Yanyu; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Many statistical potentials were developed in last two decades for protein folding and protein structure recognition. The major difference of these potentials is on the selection of reference states to offset sampling bias. However, since these potentials used different databases and parameter cutoffs, it is difficult to judge what the best reference states are by examining the original programs. In this work, we aim to address this issue and evaluate the reference states by a unified databas...

  20. Development and design of double-layer co-injection moulded soy protein based drug delivery devices

    OpenAIRE

    Vaz, C. M.; Doeveren, P. F. N. M. van; R.L. Reis; Cunha, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Novel double-layer delivery devices based on soy protein derived materials were designed and produced using an innovative two material co-injection moulding technique. It was demonstrated that the viscosity ratio between core and skin layer materials played an important role in the formation of the interfacial shape, namely the skin thickness and uniformity of the bi-materials. The adequate selection of the materials used and the optimisation of the respective processing conditions enabled...

  1. Design of high productivity antibody capture by protein A chromatography using an integrated experimental and modeling approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, C. K.; Osuna-Sanchez, H.; Valéry, E.; Sørensen, E; Bracewell, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    An integrated experimental and modeling approach for the design of high productivity protein A chromatography is presented to maximize productivity in bioproduct manufacture. The approach consists of four steps: (1) small-scale experimentation, (2) model parameter estimation, (3) productivity optimization and (4) model validation with process verification. The integrated use of process experimentation and modeling enables fewer experiments to be performed, and thus minimizes the time and mate...

  2. Construction of a linker library with widely controllable flexibility for fusion protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Huang, Ziliang; Zhang, Chong; Dong, Bo-Jun; Guo, Ruo-Hai; Yue, Hong-Wei; Yan, Li-Tang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility or rigidity of the linker between two fused proteins is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. In this study, we constructed a linker library with five elementary units based on the combination of the flexible (GGGGS) and the rigid (EAAAK) units. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that more rigid units in the linkers lead to more helical conformation and hydrogen bonds, and less distance fluctuation between the N- and C-termini of the linker. The diversity of linker flexibility of the linker library was then studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion proteins, which showed that there is a wide range of distribution of the FRET efficiency. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation of CFP-YFP with different linkers also gave identical results with that of FRET efficiency analysis, and we further found that the combination manner of the linker peptide had a remarkable effect on the orientation of CFP and YFP domains. Our studies demonstrated that the construction of the linker library with the widely controllable flexibility could provide appropriate linkers with the desirable characteristics to engineer the fusion proteins with the expected functions. PMID:26394862

  3. Proteins with complex architecture as potential targets for drug design: a case study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Mészáros

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Lengthy co-evolution of Homo sapiens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main causative agent of tuberculosis, resulted in a dramatically successful pathogen species that presents considerable challenge for modern medicine. The continuous and ever increasing appearance of multi-drug resistant mycobacteria necessitates the identification of novel drug targets and drugs with new mechanisms of action. However, further insights are needed to establish automated protocols for target selection based on the available complete genome sequences. In the present study, we perform complete proteome level comparisons between M. tuberculosis, mycobacteria, other prokaryotes and available eukaryotes based on protein domains, local sequence similarities and protein disorder. We show that the enrichment of certain domains in the genome can indicate an important function specific to M. tuberculosis. We identified two families, termed pkn and PE/PPE that stand out in this respect. The common property of these two protein families is a complex domain organization that combines species-specific regions, commonly occurring domains and disordered segments. Besides highlighting promising novel drug target candidates in M. tuberculosis, the presented analysis can also be viewed as a general protocol to identify proteins involved in species-specific functions in a given organism. We conclude that target selection protocols should be extended to include proteins with complex domain architectures instead of focusing on sequentially unique and essential proteins only.

  4. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice. PMID:26549191

  5. Neural Networks for protein Structure Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    This is a review about neural network applications in bioinformatics. Especially the applications to protein structure prediction, e.g. prediction of secondary structures, prediction of surface structure, fold class recognition and prediction of the 3-dimensional structure of protein backbones, is...

  6. Colloidal quantum dot lasers built on a passive two-dimensional photonic crystal backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hojun; Min, Kyungtaek; Lee, Myungjae; Kang, Minsu; Park, Yeonsang; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Roh, Young-Geun; Woo Hwang, Sung; Jeon, Heonsu

    2016-03-01

    We report the room-temperature lasing action from two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures composed of a passive Si3N4 backbone with an over-coat of CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) for optical gain. When optically excited, devices lased in dual PC band-edge modes, with the modal dominance governed by the thickness of the CQD over-layer. The demonstrated laser platform should have an impact on future photonic integrated circuits as the on-chip coupling between active and passive components is readily achievable.We report the room-temperature lasing action from two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures composed of a passive Si3N4 backbone with an over-coat of CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) for optical gain. When optically excited, devices lased in dual PC band-edge modes, with the modal dominance governed by the thickness of the CQD over-layer. The demonstrated laser platform should have an impact on future photonic integrated circuits as the on-chip coupling between active and passive components is readily achievable. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08544f

  7. A fusion networking model for smart grid power distribution backbone communication network based on PTN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In current communication network for distribution in Chinese power grid systems, the fiber communication backbone network for distribution and TD-LTE power private wireless backhaul network of power grid are both bearing by the SDH optical transmission network, which also carries the communication network of transformer substation and main electric. As the data traffic of the distribution communication and TD-LTE power private wireless network grow rapidly in recent years, it will have a big impact with the SDH network’s bearing capacity which is mainly used for main electric communication in high security level. This paper presents a fusion networking model which use a multiple-layer PTN network as the unified bearing of the TD-LTE power private wireless backhaul network and fiber communication backbone network for distribution. Network dataflow analysis shows that this model can greatly reduce the capacity pressure of the traditional SDH network as well as ensure the reliability of the transmission of the communication network for distribution and TD-LTE power private wireless network.

  8. Influence of Backbone Fluorination in Regioregular Poly(3-alkyl-4-fluoro)thiophenes

    KAUST Repository

    Fei, Zhuping

    2015-06-03

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. We report two strategies toward the synthesis of 3-alkyl-4-fluorothiophenes containing straight (hexyl and octyl) and branched (2-ethylhexyl) alkyl groups. We demonstrate that treatment of the dibrominated monomer with 1 equiv of alkyl Grignard reagent leads to the formation of a single regioisomer as a result of the pronounced directing effect of the fluorine group. Polymerization of the resulting species affords highly regioregular poly(3-alkyl-4-fluoro)thiophenes. Comparison of their properties to those of the analogous non-fluorinated polymers shows that backbone fluorination leads to an increase in the polymer ionization potential without a significant change in optical band gap. Fluorination also results in an enhanced tendency to aggregate in solution, which is ascribed to a more co-planar backbone on the basis of Raman and DFT calculations. Average charge carrier mobilities in field-effect transistors are found to increase by up to a factor of 5 for the fluorinated polymers.

  9. Di-Isocyanate Crosslinked Aerogels with 1, 6-Bis (Trimethoxysilyl) Hexane Incorporated in Silica Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivod, Stephanie L.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Quade, Derek; Randall, Jason; Perry, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are desirable materials for many applications that take advantage of their light weight and low thermal conductivity. Addition of a conformal polymer coating which bonds with the amine decorated surface of the silica network improves the strength of the aerogels by as much as 200 times. Even with vast improvement in strength they still tend to undergo brittle failure due to the rigid silica backbone. We hope to increase the flexibility and elastic recovery of the silica based aerogel by altering the silica back-bone by incorporation of more flexible hexane links. To this end, we investigated the use of 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMSH), a polysilsesquioxane precursor3, as an additional co-reactant to prepare silica gels which were subsequently cross-linked with di-isocyanate. Previously, this approach of adding flexibility by BTMSH incorporation was demonstrated with styrene cross-linked aerogels. In our study, we varied silane concentration, mol % of silicon from BTMSH and di-isocyanate concentration by weight percent to attempt to optimize both the flexibility and the strength of the aerogels.

  10. Improving VANETs Connectivity with a Totally Ad Hoc Living Mobile Backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joilson Alves Junior

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vehicular ad hoc network (VANET for intelligent transportation systems is an emerging concept to improve transportation security, reliability, and management. The network behavior can be totally different in topological aspects because of the mobility of vehicular nodes. The topology can be fully connected when the flow of vehicles is high and may have low connectivity or be invalid when the flow of vehicles is low or unbalanced. In big cities, the metropolitan buses that travel on exclusive lanes may be used to set up a metropolitan vehicular data network (backbone, raising the connectivity among the vehicles. Therefore, this paper proposes the implementation of a living mobile backbone, totally ad hoc (MOB-NET, which will provide infrastructure and raise the network connectivity. In order to show the viability of MOB-NET, statistical analyses were made with real data of express buses that travel through exclusive lanes, besides evaluations through simulations and analytic models. The statistic, analytic, and simulation results prove that the buses that travel through exclusive lanes can be used to build a communication network totally ad hoc and provide connectivity in more than 99% of the time, besides raising the delivery rate up to 95%.

  11. Structure and stability of recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein: I. Design and analysis of monomeric mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Olga V.; Roginskii, Denis O.; Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine odorant-binding protein (bOBP) differs from other lipocalins by lacking the conserved disulfide bond and for being able to form the domain-swapped dimers. To identify structural features responsible for the formation of the bOBP unique dimeric structure and to understand the role of the domain swapping on maintaining the native structure of the protein, structural properties of the recombinant wild type bOBP and its mutant that cannot dimerize via the domain swapping were analyzed. We also looked at the effect of the disulfide bond by designing a monomeric bOBPs with restored disulfide bond which is conserved in other lipocalins. Finally, to understand which features in the microenvironment of the bOBP tryptophan residues play a role in the defining peculiarities of the intrinsic fluorescence of this protein we designed and investigated single-tryptophan mutants of the monomeric bOBP. Our analysis revealed that the insertion of the glycine after the residue 121 of the bOBP prevents domain swapping and generates a stable monomeric protein bOBP-Gly121+. We also show that the restored disulfide bond in the GCC-bOBP mutant leads to the noticeable stabilization of the monomeric structure. Structural and functional analysis revealed that none of the amino acid substitutions introduced to the bOBP affected functional activity of the protein and that the ligand binding leads to the formation of a more compact and stable state of the recombinant bOBP and its mutant monomeric forms. Finally, analysis of the single-tryptophan mutants of the monomeric bOBP gave us a unique possibility to find peculiarities of the microenvironment of tryptophan residues which were not previously described. PMID:27114880

  12. Design, production, and characterization of artificial protein- and silica-based biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, Wesley Darrell, II

    This work focused on a specific protein polymer, poly(EAK) n, denoting a protein with n repeats of the amino acid monomer sequence AEAEAKAKAEAEAKAK (where A=alanine, E=glutamic acid, and K=lysine). Previous work has focused on lower molecular weight versions of these proteins, where n=1 and n=9. Those studies showed that while poly(EAK)9 an order of magnitude increase in hydrogel strength over EAK1, even the higher molecular weight version forms a relatively weak hydrogel. The first part of this dissertation describes efforts to improve the mechanical properties of poly(EAK)n hydrogels by investigating the self-assembly of higher molecular weight versions of the protein, where n = 24 and n = 63. Genes encoding these proteins were constructed and expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli, and the proteins can be purified from cell culture by affinity chromatography. The solubility of these proteins, however, is significantly lower than the lower molecular weight versions of poly(EAK)n previously explored. Interestingly, despite decreased solubility, these proteins quickly form a stable gel-like matrix while in the milieu of the homogenized cell lysate. Congo Red binding assays and circular dichroism studies also indicate that poly(EAK)24 and poly(EAK)63 each self-assemble into stacked beta-sheet structures. While poor solubility prevents their use as a stand-alone biomaterial, these higher molecular weight protein polymers may prove useful as virtual crosslinking agents for hydrogels formed from lower molecular weight poly(EAK)n molecules. The second portion of this dissertation describes the generation of new biosilica matrices. Silica is one of the most abundant biominerals on Earth and is produced by a variety of organisms. One such organism is the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. From dilute aqueous solutions of silica and using relatively mild processing conditions, these unicellular organisms create silica frustules with exquisite microstructures having

  13. Accumulation and processing of a recombinant protein designed as a cleavable fusion to the endogenous Rubisco LSU protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Ryan E; Muto Machiko; Mayfield Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Expression of recombinant proteins in green algal chloroplast holds substantial promise as a platform for the production of human therapeutic proteins. A number of proteins have been expressed in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, including complex mammalian proteins, but many of these proteins accumulate to significantly lower levels than do endogenous chloroplast proteins. We examined if recombinant protein accumulation could be enhanced by genetically fusing ...

  14. A de novo designed monomeric, compact three helix bundle protein on a carbohydrate template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Leila; Nygård, Jesper; Christensen, Niels Johan;

    2015-01-01

    proteins, so called carboproteins. The hypothesis is that the template pre-organizes the secondary structure elements and directs the formation of a tertiary structure, thus achieving structural economy in the combination of peptide, linker, and template. We speculate that the structural information from...

  15. SUSTAINABLE PLASTICS: DESIGNING AND DEMONSTRATING RENEWABLE, BIODEGRADABLE PRODUCTS MADE OF SOY PROTEIN-BASED PLASTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have found that soy protein plastics have flow properties that are comparable to fossil fuel-based plastics. Soy plastics are processed at much lower temperatures, however, yielding energy savings over synthetic plastics during processing. These comparable flow properties m...

  16. On the origins of the weak folding cooperativity of a designed ββα ultrafast protein FSD-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wu

    Full Text Available FSD-1, a designed small ultrafast folder with a ββα fold, has been actively studied in the last few years as a model system for studying protein folding mechanisms and for testing of the accuracy of computational models. The suitability of this protein to describe the folding of naturally occurring α/β proteins has recently been challenged based on the observation that the melting transition is very broad, with ill-resolved baselines. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the AMBER protein force field (ff96 coupled with the implicit solvent model (IGB = 5, we shed new light into the nature of this transition and resolve the experimental controversies. We show that the melting transition corresponds to the melting of the protein as a whole, and not solely to the helix-coil transition. The breadth of the folding transition arises from the spread in the melting temperatures (from ∼325 K to ∼302 K of the individual transitions: formation of the hydrophobic core, β-hairpin and tertiary fold, with the helix formed earlier. Our simulations initiated from an extended chain accurately predict the native structure, provide a reasonable estimate of the transition barrier height, and explicitly demonstrate the existence of multiple pathways and multiple transition states for folding. Our exhaustive sampling enables us to assess the quality of the Amber ff96/igb5 combination and reveals that while this force field can predict the correct native fold, it nonetheless overstabilizes the α-helix portion of the protein (Tm = ∼387K as well as the denatured structures.

  17. Interfacial design and structure of protein/polymer films on oxidized AlGaN surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein detection using biologically or immunologically modified field-effect transistors (bio/immunoFETs) depends on the nanoscale structure of the polymer/protein film at sensor interfaces (Bhushan 2010 Springer Handbook of Nanotechnology 3rd edn (Heidelberg: Springer); Gupta et al 2010 The effect of interface modification on bioFET sensitivity, submitted). AlGaN-based HFETs (heterojunction FETs) are attractive platforms for many protein sensing applications due to their electrical stability in high osmolarity aqueous environments and favourable current drive capabilities. However, interfacial polymer/protein films on AlGaN, though critical to HFET protein sensor function, have not yet been fully characterized. These interfacial films are typically comprised of protein-polymer films, in which analyte-specific receptors are tethered to the sensing surface with a heterobifunctional linker molecule (often a silane molecule). Here we provide insight into the structure and tribology of silane interfaces composed of one of two different silane monomers deposited on oxidized AlGaN, and other metal oxide surfaces. We demonstrate distinct morphologies and wear properties for the interfacial films, attributable to the specific chemistries of the silane monomers used in the films. For each specific silane monomer, film morphologies and wear are broadly consistent on multiple oxide surfaces. Differences in interfacial film morphology also drive improvements in sensitivity of the underlying HFET (coincident with, though not necessarily caused by, differences in interfacial film thickness). We present a testable model of the hypothetical differential interfacial depth distribution of protein analytes on FET sensor interfaces with distinct morphologies. Empirical validation of this model may rationalize the actual behaviour of planar immunoFETs, which has been shown to be contrary to expectations of bio/immunoFET behaviour prevalent in the literature for the last 20 years

  18. Coherent topological phenomena in protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    A theory is presented for coherent topological phenomena in protein dynamics with implications for protein folding and stability. We discuss the relationship to the writhing number used in knot diagrams of DNA. The winding state defines a long-range order along the backbone of a protein with long......-range excitations, `wring' modes, that play an important role in protein denaturation and stability. Energy can be pumped into these excitations, either thermally or by an external force....

  19. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M Mott

    Full Text Available In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001 deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis.Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001.Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  20. A novel expression vector, designated as pHisJM, for producing recombinant His-fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Junko; Takayama, Eiji; Satoh, Ayano; Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko; Suzuki, Kimihiro; Matsumoto, Isamu

    2004-10-01

    Compared to glutathione S -transferase (GST), tagging with hexahistidine residues (His) has several merits: low levels of toxicity and immunogenicity, a smaller size and no electric charge. We have constructed a novel expression vector, designated as pHisJM (EMBL/GenBank/DDJB accession no. AB116367), for producing recombinant His-fusion proteins. This vector was constructed by replacing GST and multiple cloning site (MCS) cassettes in pGEX-5X-3 with those of hexahistidine and MCS derived from pRSET C vector. Human annexin IV (Anx IV) was used as target protein. His-Anx IV fusion protein was expressed using pHisJM and gave a 40 kDa band when immuno-stained with anti-His mAb or anti-Anx IV mAb as predicted. To compare expression efficiency, a Anx IV cDNA inserted-pHisJM or pGEX-5X-3 was transformed into Escherichia coli DH5alpha, JM109, BL21 and BL21(DE3). Using pHisJM, Anx IV protein was highly expressed in all cell strains. In addition to the merits of using His-tag, pHisJM has several advantages: 1) it has high expression efficiency; 2) it can be used in any Escherichia coli strain; and 3) it can be used in a single strain of Escherichia coli in all steps from plasmid construction to the expression of the target gene. PMID:15604794

  1. Hierarchical self-assembly of designed 2x2-alpha-helix bundle proteins on Au(111) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Tofteng, A.P.; Jensen, K.J.;

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers of biomolecules on atomically planar surfaces offer the prospect of complex combinations of controlled properties, e. g., for bioelectronics. We have prepared a novel hemi-4-alpha-helix bundle protein by attaching two alpha-helical peptides to a cyclo-dithiothreitol (cyclo......-DTT) template. The protein was de novo designed to self-assemble in solution to form a 4-alpha-helix bundle, whereas the disulfide moiety enables the formation of a self-assembled monolayer on a Au(111) surface by opening of the disulfide, thus giving rise to a two-step self-assembly process. The 2 x 2-alpha......, respectively. The 2 x 2-alpha-helix bundle protein adlayers were imaged by in situ STM. The images indicated a dense monolayer according with the voltammetric data. No long-range order could be detected, but two clearly distinct STM contrasts were assigned to 2 x 2-alpha-helix bundle protein molecules oriented...

  2. : Protein flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bornot, Aurélie; Offmann, Bernard; De Brevern, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    Protein structures and protein structural models are great tools to reach protein function and provide very relevant information for drug design. Nevertheless, protein structures are not rigid entities. Cutting-edge bioinformatics methods tend to take into account the flexibility of these macromolecules. We present new approaches used to define protein structure flexibility.

  3. ReX: A suite of computational tools for the design, visualization, and analysis of chimeric protein libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiliang; Johnston, Wayne A; Boden, Mikael; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2016-02-01

    Directed evolution has greatly facilitated protein engineering and provided new insights into protein structure-function relationships. DNA shuffling using restriction enzymes is a particularly simple and cost-effective means of recombinatorial evolution that is well within the capability of most molecular biologists, but tools for the design and analysis of such experiments are limited. Here we introduce a suite of freely available online tools to make the construction and analysis of chimeric libraries readily accessible to the novice. REcut (http://qpmf.rx.umaryland.edu/REcut.html) facilitates the choice of DNA fragmentation strategy, while Xover (http://qpmf.rx.umaryland.edu/Xover.html) analyzes chimeric mutants to reveal recombination patterns and extract quantitative data. PMID:26842355

  4. Improving the anti-toxin abilities of the CMG2-Fc fusion protein with the aid of computational design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyi Xi

    Full Text Available CMG2-Fc is a fusion protein composed of the extracellular domain of capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2 and the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G; CMG2-Fc neutralizes anthrax toxin and offers protection against Bacillus anthracis challenge. To enhance the efficacy of CMG2-Fc against anthrax toxin, we attempted to engineer a CMG2-Fc with an improved affinity for PA. Using the automatic design algorithm FoldX and visual inspection, we devised two CMG2-Fc variants that introduce mutations in the CMG2 binding interface and improve the computationally assessed binding affinity for PA. An experimental affinity assay revealed that the two variants showed increased binding affinity, and in vitro and in vivo toxin neutralization testing indicated that one of these mutants (CMG2-Fc(E117Q has superior activity against anthrax toxin and was suitable for further development as a therapeutic agent for anthrax infections. This study shows that the computational design of the PA binding interface of CMG2 to obtain CMG2-Fc variants with improving anti-toxin abilities is viable. Our results demonstrate that computational design can be further applied to generate other CMG2-Fc mutants with greatly improved therapeutic efficacy.

  5. Template-assembled melittin: structural and functional characterization of a designed, synthetic channel-forming protein.

    OpenAIRE

    PAWLAK, M.; Meseth, U; Dhanapal, B.; Mutter, M.; Vogel, H.

    1994-01-01

    Template-assembled proteins (TASPs) comprising 4 peptide blocks, each of either the natural melittin sequence (melittin-TASP) or of a truncated melittin sequence (amino acids 6-26, melittin6-26-TASP), C-terminally linked to a (linear or cyclic) 10-amino acid template were synthesized and characterized, structurally by CD, by fluorescence spectroscopy, and by monolayer experiments, and functionally, by electrical conductance measurements on planar bilayers and release experiments on dye-loaded...

  6. Antifouling coatings: recent developments in the design of surfaces that prevent fouling by proteins, bacteria, and marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Indrani; Pangule, Ravindra C.; Kane, Ravi S. [Howard P. Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Ricketts Building, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2011-02-08

    The major strategies for designing surfaces that prevent fouling due to proteins, bacteria, and marine organisms are reviewed. Biofouling is of great concern in numerous applications ranging from biosensors to biomedical implants and devices, and from food packaging to industrial and marine equipment. The two major approaches to combat surface fouling are based on either preventing biofoulants from attaching or degrading them. One of the key strategies for imparting adhesion resistance involves the functionalization of surfaces with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) or oligo(ethylene glycol). Several alternatives to PEG-based coatings have also been designed over the past decade. While protein-resistant coatings may also resist bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation, in order to overcome the fouling-mediated risk of bacterial infection it is highly desirable to design coatings that are bactericidal. Traditional techniques involve the design of coatings that release biocidal agents, including antibiotics, quaternary ammonium salts (QAS), and silver, into the surrounding aqueous environment. However, the emergence of antibiotic- and silver-resistant pathogenic strains has necessitated the development of alternative strategies. Therefore, other techniques based on the use of polycations, enzymes, nanomaterials, and photoactive agents are being investigated. With regard to marine antifouling coatings, restrictions on the use of biocide-releasing coatings have made the generation of nontoxic antifouling surfaces more important. While considerable progress has been made in the design of antifouling coatings, ongoing research in this area should result in the development of even better antifouling materials in the future. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Coherent topological phenomena in protein folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    A theory is presented for coherent topological phenomena in protein dynamics with implications for protein folding and stability. We discuss the relationship to the writhing number used in knot diagrams of DNA. The winding state defines a long-range order along the backbone of a protein with long......-range excitations, `wring' modes, that play an important role in protein denaturation and stability. Energy can be pumped into these excitations, either thermally or by an external force.......A theory is presented for coherent topological phenomena in protein dynamics with implications for protein folding and stability. We discuss the relationship to the writhing number used in knot diagrams of DNA. The winding state defines a long-range order along the backbone of a protein with long...

  8. Development of satiating and palatable high-protein meat products by using experimental design in food technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Kristine Sivertsen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Foods high in protein are known to satiate more fully than foods high in other constituents. One challenge with these types of food is the degree of palatability. This study was aimed at developing the frankfurter style of sausages that would regulate food intake as well as being the preferred food choice of the consumer. Design and measures: 16 sausage varieties with commercial (PE% 20 or higher amount of protein (PE% 40, being modified with vegetable fat (3% of rapeseed oil, and smoked or not, underwent a sensory descriptive analysis, in which the information was used to choose a subsample of four sausages for a satiety test. Twenty-seven subjects were recruited based on liking and frequency of sausage consumption. The participants ranged in age from 20 to 28, and in body mass index (BMI between 19.6 and 30.9. The students were served a sausage meal for five consecutive days and then filled out a questionnaire to describe their feelings of hunger, satiety, fullness, desire to eat an their prospective consumption on a visual analogue scale (VAS starting from right before, right after the meal, every half hour for 4 h until the next meal was served, and right after the second meal. Results and conclusion: The higher protein sausages were less juicy, oily, fatty, adhesive, but harder and more granular than with lower amount of protein. The high-protein sausages were perceived as more satiating the first 90 min after the first meal. Some indication of satiety effect of added oil versus meat fat. No significant differences in liking among the four sausage varieties.

  9. A renormalization approach to describe charge transport in quasiperiodic dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → One-step renormalization approach to describe the DBL-DNA molecule. → Electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model. → A quasiperiodic sequence to mimic the DNA nucleotides arrangement. → Electronic transmission spectra. → I-V characteristics. -- Abstract: We study the charge transport properties of a dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecule focusing on a quasiperiodic arrangement of its constituent nucleotides forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) and Fibonacci (FB) Poly (CG) sequences, as well as a natural DNA sequence (Ch22) for the sake of comparison. Making use of a one-step renormalization process, the DBL-DNA molecule is modeled in terms of a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate its transmissivity and current-voltage (I-V) profiles. Beyond the semiconductor I-V characteristics, a striking similarity between the electronic transport properties of the RS quasiperiodic structure and the natural DNA sequence was found.

  10. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-04-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever. PMID:26635182

  11. Modulation of Backbone Flexibility for Effective Dissociation of Antibacterial and Hemolytic Activity in Cyclic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Alberto; Thomsen, Thomas T; Britt, Hannah M; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Thulstrup, Peter W; Sanderson, John M; Hansen, Paul R

    2016-08-11

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic therapy is on the rise and threatens to evolve into a worldwide emergency: alternative solutions to current therapies are urgently needed. Cationic amphipathic peptides are potent membrane-active agents that hold promise as the next-generation therapy for multidrug-resistant infections. The peptides' behavior upon encountering the bacterial cell wall is crucial, and much effort has been dedicated to the investigation and optimization of this amphipathicity-driven interaction. In this study we examined the interaction of a novel series of nine-membered flexible cyclic AMPs with liposomes mimicking the characteristics of bacterial membranes. Employed techniques included circular dichroism and marker release assays, as well as microbiological experiments. Our analysis was aimed at correlating ring flexibility with their antimicrobial, hemolytic, and membrane activity. By doing so, we obtained useful insights to guide the optimization of cyclic antimicrobial peptides via modulation of their backbone flexibility without loss of activity. PMID:27563396

  12. Extensive Air Showers: From the muonic smoking guns to the hadronic backbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive Air Showers are complex macroscopic objects initiated by single ultra-high energy particles. They are the result of millions of high energy reactions in the atmosphere and can be described as the superposition of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The hadronic cascade is the air shower backbone, and it is mainly made of pions. Decays of neutral pions initiate electromagnetic cascades, while the decays of charged pions produce muons which leave the hadronic core and travel many kilometers almost unaffected. Muons are smoking guns of the hadronic cascade: the energy, transverse momentum, spatial distribution and depth of production are key to reconstruct the history of the air shower. In this work, we overview the phenomenology of muons on the air shower and its relation to the hadronic cascade. We briefly review the experimental efforts to analyze muons within air showers and discuss possible paths to use this information. (authors)

  13. Polystyrene Backbone Polymers Consisting of Alkyl-Substituted Triazine Side Groups for Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ch. D. Salert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the synthesis of new electron-transporting styrene monomers and their corresponding polystyrenes all with a 2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine basic structure in the side group. The monomers differ in the alkyl substitution and in the meta-/paralinkage of the triazine to the polymer backbone. The thermal and spectroscopic properties of the new electron-transporting polymers are discussed in regard to their chemical structures. Phosphorescent OLEDs were prepared using the obtained electron-transporting polymers as the emissive layer material in blend systems together with a green iridium-based emitter 13 and a small molecule as an additional cohost with wideband gap characteristics (CoH-001. The performance of the OLEDs was characterized and discussed in regard to the chemical structure of the new electron-transporting polymers.

  14. A renormalization approach to describe charge transport in quasiperiodic dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Fulco, U.L. [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Albuquerque, E.L., E-mail: eudenilson@gmail.com [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Caetano, E.W.S. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Freire, V.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2011-10-31

    Highlights: → One-step renormalization approach to describe the DBL-DNA molecule. → Electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model. → A quasiperiodic sequence to mimic the DNA nucleotides arrangement. → Electronic transmission spectra. → I-V characteristics. -- Abstract: We study the charge transport properties of a dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecule focusing on a quasiperiodic arrangement of its constituent nucleotides forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) and Fibonacci (FB) Poly (CG) sequences, as well as a natural DNA sequence (Ch22) for the sake of comparison. Making use of a one-step renormalization process, the DBL-DNA molecule is modeled in terms of a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate its transmissivity and current-voltage (I-V) profiles. Beyond the semiconductor I-V characteristics, a striking similarity between the electronic transport properties of the RS quasiperiodic structure and the natural DNA sequence was found.

  15. Extensive Air Showers: from the muonic smoking guns to the hadronic backbone

    CERN Document Server

    Cazon, L

    2013-01-01

    Extensive Air Showers are complex macroscopic objects initiated by single ultra-high energy particles. They are the result of millions of high energy reactions in the atmosphere and can be described as the superposition of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The hadronic cascade is the air shower backbone, and it is mainly made of pions. Decays of neutral pions initiate electromagnetic cascades, while the decays of charged pions produce muons which leave the hadronic core and travel many kilometers almost unaffected. Muons are smoking guns of the hadronic cascade: the energy, transverse momentum, spatial distribution and depth of production are key to reconstruct the history of the air shower. In this work, we overview the phenomenology of muons on the air shower and its relation to the hadronic cascade. We briefly review the experimental efforts to analyze muons within air showers and discuss possible paths to use this information.

  16. Extensive Air Showers: from the muonic smoking guns to the hadronic backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazon L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive Air Showers are complex macroscopic objects initiated by single ultra-high energy particles. They are the result of millions of high energy reactions in the atmosphere and can be described as the superposition of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The hadronic cascade is the air shower backbone, and it is mainly made of pions. Decays of neutral pions initiate electromagnetic cascades, while the decays of charged pions produce muons which leave the hadronic core and travel many kilometers almost unaffected. Muons are smoking guns of the hadronic cascade: the energy, transverse momentum, spatial distribution and depth of production are key to reconstruct the history of the air shower. In this work, we overview the phenomenology of muons on the air shower and its relation to the hadronic cascade. We briefly review the experimental efforts to analyze muons within air showers and discuss possible paths to use this information.

  17. Constructing Path Efficient and Energy Aware Virtual Multicast Backbones in Static Ad Hoc Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaghna Acharya

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available For stationary wireless ad hoc networks, one of the key challenging issues in routing and multicasting isto conserve as much energy as possible without compromising path efficiency measured as end-to-enddelay. In this paper, we address the problem of path efficient and energy aware multicasting in staticwireless ad hoc networks. We propose a novel distributed scalable algorithm for finding a virtualmulticast backbone (VMB. Based on this VMB, we have further developed a multicasting scheme thatjointly improves path efficiency and energy conservation. By exploiting inherent broadcast advantage ofwireless communication and employing a more realistic energy consumption model for wirelesscommunication which not only depends on radio propagation losses but also on energy losses intransceiver circuitry, our simulation results show that the proposed VMB-based multicasting schemeoutperforms existing prominent tree based energy conserving, path efficient multicasting schemes.

  18. Design of an efficient medium for heterologous protein production in Yarrowia lipolytica: case of human interferon alpha 2b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicaud Jean-Marc

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The non conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has aroused a strong industrial interest for heterologous protein production. However most of the studies describing recombinant protein production by this yeast rely on the use of complex media, such media are not convenient for large scale production particularly for products intended for pharmaceutical applications. In addition medium composition can also affect the production yield. Hence it is necessary to design an efficient medium for therapeutic protein expression by this host. Results Five different media, including four minimal media and a complex medium, were assessed in shake flasks for the production of human interferon alpha 2b (hIFN α2b by Y. lipolytica under the control of POX2 promoter inducible with oleic acid. The chemically defined medium SM4 formulated by Invitrogen for Pichia pastoris growth was the most suitable. Using statistical experimental design this medium was further optimized. The selected minimal medium consisting in SM4 supplemented with 10 mg/l FeCl3, 1 g/l glutamate, 5 ml/l PTM1 (Pichia Trace Metals solution and a vitamin solution composed of myo-inositol, thiamin and biotin was called GNY medium. Compared to shake flask, bioreactor culture in GNY medium resulted in 416-fold increase of hIFN α2b production and 2-fold increase of the biological activity. Furthermore, SM4 enrichment with 5 ml/l PTM1 solution contributed to protect hIFN α2b against the degradation by the 28 kDa protease identified by zymography gel in culture supernatant. The screening of the inhibitory effect of the trace elements present in PTM1 solution on the activity of this protease was achieved using a Box-Behnken design. Statistical data analysis showed that FeCl3 and MnSO4 had the most inhibitory effect. Conclusion We have designed an efficient medium for large scale production of heterologous proteins by Y. lipolytica. The optimized medium GNY is suitable for the

  19. Design of Smart Polymer-Protein Conjugates and Smart Magnetic Nanoparticles for Use in Microfluidic Diagnostic Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Allan; S.Hoffman

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In this talk,I will describe the design,synthesis and application of smart polymers for use in microfluidic diagnostic devices.We are synthesizing a variety of temperature- and pH-responsive polymers using RAFT living free radical polymerization techniques.This allows us to control molecular weight and to achieve a narrow MW distribution of the polymers. Furthermore,RAFT polymers have reactive end groups that are used to conjugate the polymers to proteins.We are also using those groups to bind...

  20. Effects of Tryptophan Content and Backbone Spacing on the Uptake Efficiency of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-07-10

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to traverse cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo. Uptake occurs through both endocytotic and nonendocytotic pathways, but the molecular requirements for efficient internalization are not fully understood. Here we investigate how the presence of tryptophans and their position within an oligoarginine influence uptake mechanism and efficiency. Flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence imaging are used to estimate uptake efficiency, intracellular distribution and toxicity in Chinese hamster ovarian cells. Further, membrane leakage and lipid membrane affinity are investigated. The peptides contain eight arginine residues and one to four tryptophans, the tryptophans positioned either at the N-terminus, in the middle, or evenly distributed along the amino acid sequence. Our data show that the intracellular distribution varies among peptides with different tryptophan content and backbone spacing. Uptake efficiency is higher for the peptides with four tryptophans in the middle, or evenly distributed along the peptide sequence, than for the peptide with four tryptophans at the N-terminus. All peptides display low cytotoxicity except for the one with four tryptophans at the N-terminus, which was moderately toxic. This finding is consistent with their inability to induce efficient leakage of dye from lipid vesicles. All peptides have comparable affinities for lipid vesicles, showing that lipid binding is not a decisive parameter for uptake. Our results indicate that tryptophan content and backbone spacing can affect both the CPP uptake efficiency and the CPP uptake mechanism. The low cytotoxicity of these peptides and the possibilities of tuning their uptake mechanism are interesting from a therapeutic point of view. © 2012 American Chemical Society.