WorldWideScience

Sample records for backbone chemical shifts

  1. Inferential protein structure determination and refinement using fast, electronic structure based backbone amide chemical shift predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    This report covers the development of a new, fast method for calculating the backbone amide proton chemical shifts in proteins. Through quantum chemical calculations, structure-based forudsiglese the chemical shift for amidprotonen in protein has been parameterized. The parameters are then implemented in a computer program called Padawan. The program has since been implemented in protein folding program Phaistos, wherein the method andvendes to de novo folding of the protein structures and to refine the existing protein structures.

  2. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated.

  3. Combining ambiguous chemical shift mapping with structure-based backbone and NOE assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMRbased drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically. However, automated methods are necessary for high-throughput drug screening. We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C- labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-toone mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  4. 1H, 13C and 15N backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignment of the Fyn SH2 domain and its complex with a phosphotyrosine peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huculeci, Radu; Buts, Lieven; Lenaerts, Tom; van Nuland, Nico A J

    2011-10-01

    SH2 domains are interaction modules uniquely dedicated to recognize phosphotyrosine sites, playing a central role in for instance the activation of tyrosine kinases or phosphatases. Here we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C backbone and side-chain chemical shift assignments of the SH2 domain of the human protein tyrosine kinase Fyn, both in its free state and bound to a high-affinity phosphotyrosine peptide corresponding to a specific sequence in the hamster middle-T antigen. The BMRB accession numbers are 17,368 and 17,369, respectively.

  5. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Pan [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu [School of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Shi, Chaowei [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  6. Protein Chemical Shift Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    The protein chemical shifts holds a large amount of information about the 3-dimensional structure of the protein. A number of chemical shift predictors based on the relationship between structures resolved with X-ray crystallography and the corresponding experimental chemical shifts have been developed. These empirical predictors are very accurate on X-ray structures but tends to be insensitive to small structural changes. To overcome this limitation it has been suggested to make chemical shift predictors based on quantum mechanical(QM) calculations. In this thesis the development of the QM derived chemical shift predictor Procs14 is presented. Procs14 is based on 2.35 million density functional theory(DFT) calculations on tripeptides and contains corrections for hydrogen bonding, ring current and the effect of the previous and following residue. Procs14 is capable at performing predictions for the 13CA, 13CB, 13CO, 15NH, 1HN and 1HA backbone atoms. In order to benchmark Procs14, a number of QM NMR calculatio...

  7. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N Experiment to Facilitate the Assignment of Backbone Resonances in Proteins Exhibiting High Backbone Shift Degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh; Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish; Guleria, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three dimensional NMR experiments involving amide 1H and 15N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(5,3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate (and/or to validate) the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide 15N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. HiNi and Hi-1Ni-1) for overlapping amide NH peaks. The experiment -encoding 5D spectral information- leads to a conventional 3D spectrum with significantly reduced spectral crowding and complexity. The impr...

  8. Empirical isotropic chemical shift surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czinki, Eszter; Csaszar, Attila G. [Eoetvoes University, Laboratory of Molecular Spectroscopy, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary)], E-mail: csaszar@chem.elte.hu

    2007-08-15

    A list of proteins is given for which spatial structures, with a resolution better than 2.5 A, are known from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and isotropic chemical shift (ICS) values are known from the RefDB database related to the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) database. The structures chosen provide, with unknown uncertainties, dihedral angles {phi} and {psi} characterizing the backbone structure of the residues. The joint use of experimental ICSs of the same residues within the proteins, again with mostly unknown uncertainties, and ab initio ICS({phi},{psi}) surfaces obtained for the model peptides For-(l-Ala){sub n}-NH{sub 2}, with n = 1, 3, and 5, resulted in so-called empirical ICS({phi},{psi}) surfaces for all major nuclei of the 20 naturally occurring {alpha}-amino acids. Out of the many empirical surfaces determined, it is the 13C{sup {alpha}} ICS({phi},{psi}) surface which seems to be most promising for identifying major secondary structure types, {alpha}-helix, {beta}-strand, left-handed helix ({alpha}{sub D}), and polyproline-II. Detailed tests suggest that Ala is a good model for many naturally occurring {alpha}-amino acids. Two-dimensional empirical 13C{sup {alpha}}-{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} ICS({phi},{psi}) correlation plots, obtained so far only from computations on small peptide models, suggest the utility of the experimental information contained therein and thus they should provide useful constraints for structure determinations of proteins.

  9. Three-Dimensional Protein Fold Determination from Backbone Amide Pseudocontact Shifts Generated by Lanthanide Tags at Multiple Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Yagi, Hiromasa

    2013-06-01

    Site-specific attachment of paramagnetic lanthanide ions to a protein generates pseudocontact shifts (PCS) in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the protein that are easily measured as changes in chemical shifts. By labeling the protein with lanthanide tags at four different sites, PCSs are observed for most amide protons and accurate information is obtained about their coordinates in three-dimensional space. The approach is demonstrated with the chaperone ERp29, for which large differences have been reported between X-ray and NMR structures of the C-terminal domain, ERp29-C. The results unambiguously show that the structure of rat ERp29-C in solution is similar to the crystal structure of human ERp29-C. PCSs of backbone amides were the only structural restraints required. Because these can be measured for more dilute protein solutions than other NMR restraints, the approach greatly widens the range of proteins amenable to structural studies in solution. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Using NMR chemical shifts to calculate the propensity for structural order and disorder in proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamiola, Kamil; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy offers the unique possibility to relate the structural propensities of disordered proteins and loop segments of folded peptides to biological function and aggregation behaviour. Backbone chemical shifts are ideally suited for this task, provided that appropriate reference data are a

  11. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...

  12. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Linnet, Troels Emtekær; Borg, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level...... QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift...

  13. Relationship between chemical shift value and accessible surface area for all amino acid atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieping Wolfgang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical shifts obtained from NMR experiments are an important tool in determining secondary, even tertiary, protein structure. The main repository for chemical shift data is the BioMagResBank, which provides NMR-STAR files with this type of information. However, it is not trivial to link this information to available coordinate data from the PDB for non-backbone atoms due to atom and chain naming differences, as well as sequence numbering changes. Results We here describe the analysis of a consistent set of chemical shift and coordinate data, in which we focus on the relationship between the per-atom solvent accessible surface area (ASA in the reported coordinates and their reported chemical shift value. The data is available online on http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pdbe/docs/NMR/shiftAnalysis/index.html. Conclusion Atoms with zero per-atom ASA have a significantly larger chemical shift dispersion and often have a different chemical shift distribution compared to those that are solvent accessible. With higher per-atom ASA, the chemical shift values also tend towards random coil values. The per-atom ASA, although not the determinant of the chemical shift, thus provides a way to directly correlate chemical shift information to the atomic coordinates.

  14. Essential roles of four-carbon backbone chemicals in the control of metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sabrina; Chriett; Luciano; Pirola

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of obesity worldwide and its related cardiometabolic complications is an urgent public health problem. While weight gain results from a negative balance between the energy expenditure and calorie intake, recent research has demonstrated that several small organic molecules containing a four-carbon backbone can modulate this balance by favoring energy expenditure, and alleviating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Such small molecules include the bacterially produced short chain fatty acid butyric acid, its chemically produced derivative 4-phenylbutyric acid, the main ketone body D-β-hydroxybutyrate- synthesized by the liver- and the recently discovered myokine β-aminoisobutyric acid. Conversely, another butyraterelated molecule, α-hydroxybutyrate, has been found to be an early predictor of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. In this minireview, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these molecules, and discuss their use as therapeutics to improve metabolic homeostasis or their detection as early biomarkers of incipient insulin resistance.

  15. Protein Structure Determination Using Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen

    In this thesis, a protein structure determination using chemical shifts is presented. The method is implemented in the open source PHAISTOS protein simulation framework. The method combines sampling from a generative model with a coarse-grained force field and an energy function that includes...... chemical shifts. The method is benchmarked on folding simulations of five small proteins. In four cases the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data, the fifth case fail likely due to inaccuracies in the energy function. For the Chymotrypsin Inhibitor protein, a structure...... is determined using only chemical shifts recorded and assigned through automated processes. The CARMSD to the experimental X-ray for this structure is 1.1. Å. Additionally, the method is combined with very sparse NOE-restraints and evolutionary distance restraints and tested on several protein structures >100...

  16. Chemical shift prediction for denatured proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestegard, James H., E-mail: jpresteg@ccrc.uga.edu; Sahu, Sarata C.; Nkari, Wendy K.; Morris, Laura C.; Live, David; Gruta, Christian

    2013-02-15

    While chemical shift prediction has played an important role in aspects of protein NMR that include identification of secondary structure, generation of torsion angle constraints for structure determination, and assignment of resonances in spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins, interest has arisen more recently in using it in alternate assignment strategies for crosspeaks in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC spectra of sparsely labeled proteins. One such approach involves correlation of crosspeaks in the spectrum of the native protein with those observed in the spectrum of the denatured protein, followed by assignment of the peaks in the latter spectrum. As in the case of disordered proteins, predicted chemical shifts can aid in these assignments. Some previously developed empirical formulas for chemical shift prediction have depended on basis data sets of 20 pentapeptides. In each case the central residue was varied among the 20 amino common acids, with the flanking residues held constant throughout the given series. However, previous choices of solvent conditions and flanking residues make the parameters in these formulas less than ideal for general application to denatured proteins. Here, we report {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N shifts for a set of alanine based pentapeptides under the low pH urea denaturing conditions that are more appropriate for sparse label assignments. New parameters have been derived and a Perl script was created to facilitate comparison with other parameter sets. A small, but significant, improvement in shift predictions for denatured ubiquitin is demonstrated.

  17. Protein structural information derived from NMR chemical shift with the neural network program TALOS-N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Chemical shifts are obtained at the first stage of any protein structural study by NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts are known to be impacted by a wide range of structural factors, and the artificial neural network based TALOS-N program has been trained to extract backbone and side-chain torsion angles from (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C shifts. The program is quite robust and typically yields backbone torsion angles for more than 90 % of the residues and side-chain χ 1 rotamer information for about half of these, in addition to reliably predicting secondary structure. The use of TALOS-N is illustrated for the protein DinI, and torsion angles obtained by TALOS-N analysis from the measured chemical shifts of its backbone and (13)C(β) nuclei are compared to those seen in a prior, experimentally determined structure. The program is also particularly useful for generating torsion angle restraints, which then can be used during standard NMR protein structure calculations.

  18. PPM-One: a static protein structure based chemical shift predictor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dawei; Brüschweiler, Rafael, E-mail: bruschweiler.1@osu.edu [The Ohio State University, Campus Chemical Instrument Center (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We mined the most recent editions of the BioMagResDataBank and the protein data bank to parametrize a new empirical knowledge-based chemical shift predictor of protein backbone atoms using either a linear or an artificial neural network model. The resulting chemical shift predictor PPM-One accepts a single static 3D structure as input and emulates the effect of local protein dynamics via interatomic steric contacts. Furthermore, the chemical shift prediction was extended to most side-chain protons and it is found that the prediction accuracy is at a level allowing an independent assessment of stereospecific assignments. For a previously established set of test proteins some overall improvement was achieved over current top-performing chemical shift prediction programs.

  19. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda K; Dybas, Joseph M; Fiser, Andras

    2013-06-04

    A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences with no sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein backbone supersecondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago. Therefore, it should be possible to build any structure from a combination of existing Smotifs with the help of limited experimental data that are sufficient to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known structures. Here, we present a hybrid modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins, the algorithm delivered 90 homology-model-quality models, among them 24 high-quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available.

  20. Accessible surface area from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafsa, Noor E.; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S., E-mail: david.wishart@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Accessible surface area (ASA) is the surface area of an atom, amino acid or biomolecule that is exposed to solvent. The calculation of a molecule’s ASA requires three-dimensional coordinate data and the use of a “rolling ball” algorithm to both define and calculate the ASA. For polymers such as proteins, the ASA for individual amino acids is closely related to the hydrophobicity of the amino acid as well as its local secondary and tertiary structure. For proteins, ASA is a structural descriptor that can often be as informative as secondary structure. Consequently there has been considerable effort over the past two decades to try to predict ASA from protein sequence data and to use ASA information (derived from chemical modification studies) as a structure constraint. Recently it has become evident that protein chemical shifts are also sensitive to ASA. Given the potential utility of ASA estimates as structural constraints for NMR we decided to explore this relationship further. Using machine learning techniques (specifically a boosted tree regression model) we developed an algorithm called “ShiftASA” that combines chemical-shift and sequence derived features to accurately estimate per-residue fractional ASA values of water-soluble proteins. This method showed a correlation coefficient between predicted and experimental values of 0.79 when evaluated on a set of 65 independent test proteins, which was an 8.2 % improvement over the next best performing (sequence-only) method. On a separate test set of 92 proteins, ShiftASA reported a mean correlation coefficient of 0.82, which was 12.3 % better than the next best performing method. ShiftASA is available as a web server ( http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com ) for submitting input queries for fractional ASA calculation.

  1. Effects of structural differences on the NMR chemical shifts in isostructural dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altheimer, Benjamin D; Mehta, Manish A

    2014-04-10

    Porous crystalline dipeptides have gained recent attention for their potential as gas-storage materials. Within this large class is a group of dipeptides containing alanine, valine, and isoleucine with very similar crystal structures. We report the (13)C (carbonyl and Cα) and (15)N (amine and amide) solid-state NMR isotropic chemical shifts in a series of seven such isostructural porous dipeptides as well as shift tensor data for the carbonyl and amide sites. Using their known crystal structures and aided by ab initio quantum chemical calculations for the resonance assignments, we elucidate trends relating local structure, hydrogen-bonding patterns, and chemical shift. We find good correlation between the backbone dihedral angles and the Cα1 and Cα2 shifts. For the C1 shift tensor, the δ11 value shifts downfield as the hydrogen-bond distance increases, δ22 shifts upfield, and δ33 shows little variation. The C2 shift tensor shows no appreciable correlation with structural parameters. For the N2 tensor, δ11 shows little dependence on the hydrogen-bond length, whereas δ22 and δ33 both show a decrease in shielding as the hydrogen bond shortens. Our analysis teases apart some, but not all, structural contributors to the observed differences the solid-state NMR chemical shifts.

  2. Random coil chemical shift for intrinsically disordered proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Brander, Søren; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2011-01-01

    . Temperature has a non-negligible effect on the (13)C random coil chemical shifts, so temperature coefficients are reported for the random coil chemical shifts to allow extrapolation to other temperatures. The pH dependence of the histidine random coil chemical shifts is investigated in a titration series......, which allows the accurate random coil chemical shifts to be obtained at any pH. By correcting the random coil chemical shifts for the effects of temperature and pH, systematic biases of the secondary chemical shifts are minimized, which will improve the reliability of detection of transient secondary...

  3. Protein structure validation and refinement using amide proton chemical shifts derived from quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    We present the ProCS method for the rapid and accurate prediction of protein backbone amide proton chemical shifts - sensitive probes of the geometry of key hydrogen bonds that determine protein structure. ProCS is parameterized against quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and reproduces high level QM results obtained for a small protein with an RMSD of 0.25 ppm (r = 0.94). ProCS is interfaced with the PHAISTOS protein simulation program and is used to infer statistical protein ensembles that reflect experimentally measured amide proton chemical shift values. Such chemical shift-based structural refinements, starting from high-resolution X-ray structures of Protein G, ubiquitin, and SMN Tudor Domain, result in average chemical shifts, hydrogen bond geometries, and trans-hydrogen bond (h3JNC') spin-spin coupling constants that are in excellent agreement with experiment. We show that the structural sensitivity of the QM-based amide proton chemical shift predictions is needed to refine protein structures to this...

  4. A NMR experiment for simultaneous correlations of valine and leucine/isoleucine methyls with carbonyl chemical shifts in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugarinov, Vitali; Venditti, Vincenzo; Marius Clore, G

    2014-01-01

    A methyl-detected 'out-and-back' NMR experiment for obtaining simultaneous correlations of methyl resonances of valine and isoleucine/leucine residues with backbone carbonyl chemical shifts, SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO, is described. The developed pulse-scheme serves the purpose of convenience in recording a single data set for all Ile(δ1), Leu(δ) and Val(γ) (ILV) methyl positions instead of acquiring two separate spectra selective for valine or leucine/isoleucine residues. The SIM-HMCM(CGCBCA)CO experiment can be used for ILV methyl assignments in moderately sized protein systems (up to ~100 kDa) where the backbone chemical shifts of (13)C(α), (13)Cβ and (13)CO are known from prior NMR studies and where some losses in sensitivity can be tolerated for the sake of an overall reduction in NMR acquisition time.

  5. Deuterium isotope shifts for backbone ¹H, ¹⁵N and ¹³C nuclei in intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2012-10-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in nature and characterization of their potential structural propensities remains a widely pursued but challenging task. Analysis of NMR secondary chemical shifts plays an important role in such studies, but the output of such analyses depends on the accuracy of reference random coil chemical shifts. Although uniform perdeuteration of IDPs can dramatically increase spectral resolution, a feature particularly important for the poorly dispersed IDP spectra, the impact of deuterium isotope shifts on random coil values has not yet been fully characterized. Very precise (2)H isotope shift measurements for (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (13)C', (15)N, and (1)H(N) have been obtained by using a mixed sample of protonated and uniformly perdeuterated α-synuclein, a protein with chemical shifts exceptionally close to random coil values. Decomposition of these isotope shifts into one-bond, two-bond and three-bond effects as well as intra- and sequential residue contributions shows that such an analysis, which ignores conformational dependence, is meaningful but does not fully describe the total isotope shift to within the precision of the measurements. Random coil (2)H isotope shifts provide an important starting point for analysis of such shifts in structural terms in folded proteins, where they are known to depend strongly on local geometry.

  6. Highly red-shifted NIR emission from a novel anthracene conjugated polymer backbone containing Pt( ii ) porphyrins

    KAUST Repository

    Freeman, D. M. E.

    2015-11-30

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016. We present the synthesis of a novel diphenylanthracene (DPA) based semiconducting polymer. The polymer is solubilised by alkoxy groups attached directly to a DPA monomer, meaning the choice of co-monomer is not limited to exclusively highly solubilising moieties. Interestingly, the polymer shows a red-shifted elecroluminescence maximum (510 nm) when compared to its photoluminescence maximum (450 nm) which we attribute to excimer formation. The novel polymer was utilised as a host for a covalently-linked platinum(ii) complexed porphyrin dopant. Emission from these polymers was observed in the NIR and again showed almost a 100 nm red shift from photoluminescence to electroluminescence. This work demonstrates that utilising highly aggregating host materials is an effective tool for inducing red-shifted emission in OLEDs.

  7. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Christensen, Anders Steen; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim;

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term...... content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain......Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model...

  8. Is the Lamb shift chemically significant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Schwenke, David W.; Pyykko, Pekka; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of the Lamb shift to the atomization energies of some prototype molecules, BF3, AlF3, and GaF3, is estimated by a perturbation procedure. It is found to be in the range of 3-5% of the one-electron scalar relativistic contribution to the atomization energy. The maximum absolute value is 0.2 kcal/mol for GaF3. These sample calculations indicate that the Lamb shift is probably small enough to be neglected for energetics of molecules containing light atoms if the target accuracy is 1 kcal/mol, but for higher accuracy calculations and for molecules containing heavy elements it must be considered.

  9. Improved chemical shift prediction by Rosetta conformational sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Ye [Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States); Opella, Stanley J. [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Chemical shift frequencies represent a time-average of all the conformational states populated by a protein. Thus, chemical shift prediction programs based on sequence and database analysis yield higher accuracy for rigid rather than flexible protein segments. Here we show that the prediction accuracy can be significantly improved by averaging over an ensemble of structures, predicted solely from amino acid sequence with the Rosetta program. This approach to chemical shift and structure prediction has the potential to be useful for guiding resonance assignments, especially in solid-state NMR structural studies of membrane proteins in proteoliposomes.

  10. Calculations of proton chemical shifts in olefins and aromatics

    CERN Document Server

    Escrihuela, M C

    2000-01-01

    induced reagents on alpha,beta unsaturated ketones has also been investigated in order to deduce molecular structures and to obtain the assignment of the spectra of these molecules. A semi-empirical calculation of the partial atomic charges in organic compounds based on molecular dipole moments (CHARGE3) was developed into a model capable of predicting proton chemical shifts in a wide variety of organic compounds to a reasonable degree of accuracy. The model has been modified to include condensed aromatic hydrocarbons and substituted benzenes, alkenes, halo-monosubstituted benzenes and halo-alkenes. Within the aromatic compounds the influence of the pi electron densities and the ring current have been investigated, along with the alpha, beta and gamma effects. The model gives the first accurate calculation of the proton chemical shifts of condensed aromatic compounds and the proton substituent chemical shifts (SCS) in the benzene ring. For the data set of 55 proton chemical shifts spanning 3 ppm the rms error...

  11. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Christensen, Anders Steen; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim;

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model...... Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term......, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction....

  12. Counterion influence on chemical shifts in strychnine salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metaxas, Athena E.; Cort, John R.

    2013-05-01

    The highly toxic plant alkaloid strychnine is often isolated in the form of the anion salt of its protonated tertiary amine. Here we characterize the relative influence of different counterions on 1H and 13C chemical shifts in several strychnine salts in D2O, methanol-d4 (CD3OD) and chloroform-d (CDCl3) solvents. In organic solvents, but not in water, substantial variation in chemical shifts of protons near the tertiary amine was observed among different salts. These secondary shifts reveal differences in the way each anion influences electronic structure within the protonated amine. The distributions of secondary shifts allow salts to be easily distinguished from each other as well as from the free base form. The observed effects are much greater in organic solvents than in water. Slight concentration-dependence in chemical shifts of some protons near the amine was observed for two salts in CDCl3, but this effect is small compared to the influence of the counterion. Distinct chemical shifts in different salt forms of the same compound may be useful as chemical forensic signatures for source attribution and sample matching of alkaloids such as strychnine and possibly other organic acid and base salts.

  13. Sequential acquisition of multi-dimensional heteronuclear chemical shift correlation spectra with 1H detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellstedt, Peter; Ihle, Yvonne; Wiedemann, Christoph; Kirschstein, Anika; Herbst, Christian; Görlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2014-03-01

    RF pulse schemes for the simultaneous acquisition of heteronuclear multi-dimensional chemical shift correlation spectra, such as {HA(CA)NH & HA(CACO)NH}, {HA(CA)NH & H(N)CAHA} and {H(N)CAHA & H(CC)NH}, that are commonly employed in the study of moderately-sized protein molecules, have been implemented using dual sequential 1H acquisitions in the direct dimension. Such an approach is not only beneficial in terms of the reduction of experimental time as compared to data collection via two separate experiments but also facilitates the unambiguous sequential linking of the backbone amino acid residues. The potential of sequential 1H data acquisition procedure in the study of RNA is also demonstrated here.

  14. Effects of side-chain orientation on the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of antiparallel {beta}-sheet model peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, Myriam E.; Vila, Jorge A. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas y Naturales, Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, CONICET (Argentina); Scheraga, Harold A. [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)], E-mail: has5@cornell.edu

    2007-02-15

    The dependence of the {sup 13}C chemical shift on side-chain orientation was investigated at the density functional level for a two-strand antiparallel {beta}-sheet model peptide represented by the amino acid sequence Ac-(Ala){sub 3}-X-(Ala){sub 12}-NH{sub 2} where X represents any of the 17 naturally occurring amino acids, i.e., not including alanine, glycine and proline. The dihedral angles adopted for the backbone were taken from, and fixed at, observed experimental values of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet. We carried out a cluster analysis of the ensembles of conformations generated by considering the side-chain dihedral angles for each residue X as variables, and use them to compute the {sup 13}C chemical shifts at the density functional theory level. It is shown that the adoption of the locally-dense basis set approach for the quantum chemical calculations enabled us to reduce the length of the chemical-shift calculations while maintaining good accuracy of the results. For the 17 naturally occurring amino acids in an antiparallel {beta}-sheet, there is (i) good agreement between computed and observed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts, with correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.99, respectively; (ii) significant variability of the computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts as a function of {chi}{sup 1} for all amino acid residues except Ser; and (iii) a smaller, although significant, dependence of the computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts on {chi}{sup {xi}} (with {xi} {>=} 2) compared to {chi}{sup 1} for eleven out of seventeen residues. Our results suggest that predicted {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts, based only on backbone ({phi},{psi}) dihedral angles from high-resolution X-ray structure data or from NMR-derived models, may differ significantly from those observed in solution if the dihedral-angle preferences for the side chains are not taken into

  15. Toward structural dynamics: protein motions viewed by chemical shift modulations and direct detection of C'N multiple-quantum relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Mirko; Kateb, Fatiha; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Piccioli, Mario; Abergel, Daniel

    2010-03-17

    Multiple quantum relaxation in proteins reveals unexpected relationships between correlated or anti-correlated conformational backbone dynamics in alpha-helices or beta-sheets. The contributions of conformational exchange to the relaxation rates of C'N coherences (i.e., double- and zero-quantum coherences involving backbone carbonyl (13)C' and neighboring amide (15)N nuclei) depend on the kinetics of slow exchange processes, as well as on the populations of the conformations and chemical shift differences of (13)C' and (15)N nuclei. The relaxation rates of C'N coherences, which reflect concerted fluctuations due to slow chemical shift modulations (CSMs), were determined by direct (13)C detection in diamagnetic and paramagnetic proteins. In well-folded proteins such as lanthanide-substituted calbindin (CaLnCb), copper,zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn SOD), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP12), slow conformational exchange occurs along the entire backbone. Our observations demonstrate that relaxation rates of C'N coherences arising from slow backbone dynamics have positive signs (characteristic of correlated fluctuations) in beta-sheets and negative signs (characteristic of anti-correlated fluctuations) in alpha-helices. This extends the prospects of structure-dynamics relationships to slow time scales that are relevant for protein function and enzymatic activity.

  16. Improving 3D structure prediction from chemical shift data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schot, Gijs van der [Utrecht University, Computational Structural Biology, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands); Zhang, Zaiyong [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, Department Chemie (Germany); Vernon, Robert [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Shen, Yang [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Vranken, Wim F. [VIB, Department of Structural Biology (Belgium); Baker, David [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J., E-mail: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Computational Structural Biology, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands); Lange, Oliver F., E-mail: oliver.lange@tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, Department Chemie (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    We report advances in the calculation of protein structures from chemical shift nuclear magnetic resonance data alone. Our previously developed method, CS-Rosetta, assembles structures from a library of short protein fragments picked from a large library of protein structures using chemical shifts and sequence information. Here we demonstrate that combination of a new and improved fragment picker and the iterative sampling algorithm RASREC yield significant improvements in convergence and accuracy. Moreover, we introduce improved criteria for assessing the accuracy of the models produced by the method. The method was tested on 39 proteins in the 50-100 residue size range and yields reliable structures in 70 % of the cases. All structures that passed the reliability filter were accurate (<2 A RMSD from the reference)

  17. Magnetic shift of the chemical freezeout and electric charge fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effect of a strong magnetic field on the chemical freezeout points in the ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collision. As a result of the inverse magnetic catalysis or the magnetic inhibition, the crossover onset to hot and dense matter out of quarks and gluons should be shifted to a lower temperature. To quantify this shift we employ the hadron resonance gas model and an empirical condition for the chemical freezeout. We point out that the charged particle abundances are significantly affected by the magnetic field so that the electric charge fluctuation is largely enhanced especially at high baryon density. The charge conservation partially cancels the enhancement but our calculation shows that the electric charge fluctuation could serve as a magnetometer.

  18. Protein secondary structure prediction using NMR chemical shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuzhong; Alipanahi, Babak; Li, Shuai Cheng; Li, Ming

    2010-10-01

    Accurate determination of protein secondary structure from the chemical shift information is a key step for NMR tertiary structure determination. Relatively few work has been done on this subject. There needs to be a systematic investigation of algorithms that are (a) robust for large datasets; (b) easily extendable to (the dynamic) new databases; and (c) approaching to the limit of accuracy. We introduce new approaches using k-nearest neighbor algorithm to do the basic prediction and use the BCJR algorithm to smooth the predictions and combine different predictions from chemical shifts and based on sequence information only. Our new system, SUCCES, improves the accuracy of all existing methods on a large dataset of 805 proteins (at 86% Q(3) accuracy and at 92.6% accuracy when the boundary residues are ignored), and it is easily extendable to any new dataset without requiring any new training. The software is publicly available at http://monod.uwaterloo.ca/nmr/succes.

  19. Estimation of optical chemical shift in nuclear spin optical rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fang [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yao, Guo-hua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); He, Tian-jing [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Chen, Dong-ming, E-mail: dmchen@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Liu, Fan-chen, E-mail: fcliu@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-05-19

    Highlights: • Analytical theory of nuclear spin optical rotation (NSOR) is further developed. • Derive formula of NSOR ratio R between different nuclei in a same molecule. • Calculated results of R agree with the experiments. • Analyze influence factors on R and chemical distinction by NSOR. - Abstract: A recently proposed optical chemical shift in nuclear spin optical rotation (NSOR) is studied by theoretical comparison of NSOR magnitude between chemically non-equivalent or different element nuclei in the same molecule. Theoretical expressions of the ratio R between their NSOR magnitudes are derived by using a known semi-empirical formula of NSOR. Taking methanol, tri-ethyl-phosphite and 2-methyl-benzothiazole as examples, the ratios R are calculated and the results approximately agree with the experiments. Based on those, the important influence factors on R and chemical distinction by NSOR are discussed.

  20. Theoretical Modeling of 99 Tc NMR Chemical Shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Gabriel B.; Andersen, Amity; Washton, Nancy M.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2016-09-06

    Technetium (Tc) displays a rich chemistry due to the wide range of oxidation states (from -I to +VII) and ability to form coordination compounds. Determination of Tc speciation in complex mixtures is a major challenge, and 99Tc NMR spec-troscopy is widely used to probe chemical environments of Tc in odd oxidation states. However interpretation of the 99Tc NMR data is hindered by the lack of reference compounds. DFT computations can help fill this gap, but to date few com-putational studies have focused on 99Tc NMR of compounds and complexes. This work systematically evaluates the inclu-sion small percentages of Hartree-Fock exchange correlation and relativistic effects in DFT computations to support in-terpretation of the 99Tc NMR spectra. Hybrid functionals are found to perform better than their pure GGA counterparts, and non-relativistic calculations have been found to generally show a lower mean absolute deviation from experiment. Overall non-relativistic PBE0 and B3PW91 calculations are found to most accurately predict 99Tc NMR chemical shifts.

  1. Applications of Chemical Shift Imaging to Marine Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haakil Lee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The successful applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in medicine are mostly due to the non-invasive and non-destructive nature of MRI techniques. Longitudinal studies of humans and animals are easily accomplished, taking advantage of the fact that MRI does not use harmful radiation that would be needed for plain film radiographic, computerized tomography (CT or positron emission (PET scans. Routine anatomic and functional studies using the strong signal from the most abundant magnetic nucleus, the proton, can also provide metabolic information when combined with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. MRS can be performed using either protons or hetero-nuclei (meaning any magnetic nuclei other than protons or 1H including carbon (13C or phosphorus (31P. In vivo MR spectra can be obtained from single region ofinterest (ROI or voxel or multiple ROIs simultaneously using the technique typically called chemical shift imaging (CSI. Here we report applications of CSI to marine samples and describe a technique to study in vivo glycine metabolism in oysters using 13C MRS 12 h after immersion in a sea water chamber dosed with [2-13C]-glycine. This is the first report of 13C CSI in a marine organism.

  2. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found to be nega......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found...

  3. Testing Backbone.js

    CERN Document Server

    Roemer, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This book is packed with the step by step tutorial and instructions in recipe format helping you setup test infrastructure and gradually advance your skills to plan, develop, and test your backbone applications.If you are a JavaScript developer looking for recipes to create and implement test support for your backbone application, then this book is ideal for you.

  4. Chemical shift as a probe of molecular interfaces: NMR studies of DNA binding by the three amino-terminal zinc finger domains from transcription factor IIIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Mark P.; Wuttke, Deborah S.; Clemens, Karen R.; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar; Tennant, Linda; Reymond, Martine; Chung, John; Wright, Peter E. [Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology and Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology (United States)

    1998-07-15

    We report the NMR resonance assignments for a macromolecular protein/DNA complex containing the three amino-terminal zinc fingers (92 amino acid residues) of Xenopus laevis TFIIIA (termed zf1-3) bound to the physiological DNA target (15 base pairs), and for the free DNA. Comparisons are made of the chemical shifts of protein backbone{sup 1} H{sup N}, {sup 15}N,{sup 13} C{sup {alpha}} and{sup 13} C{sup {beta}} and DNA base and sugar protons of the free and bound species. Chemical shift changes are analyzed in the context of the structures of the zf1-3/DNA complex to assess the utility of chemical shift change as a probe of molecular interfaces. Chemical shift perturbations that occur upon binding in the zf1-3/DNA complex do not correspond directly to the structural interface, but rather arise from a number of direct and indirect structural and dynamic effects.

  5. A probabilistic model for secondary structure prediction from protein chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechelke, Martin; Habeck, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Protein chemical shifts encode detailed structural information that is difficult and computationally costly to describe at a fundamental level. Statistical and machine learning approaches have been used to infer correlations between chemical shifts and secondary structure from experimental chemical shifts. These methods range from simple statistics such as the chemical shift index to complex methods using neural networks. Notwithstanding their higher accuracy, more complex approaches tend to obscure the relationship between secondary structure and chemical shift and often involve many parameters that need to be trained. We present hidden Markov models (HMMs) with Gaussian emission probabilities to model the dependence between protein chemical shifts and secondary structure. The continuous emission probabilities are modeled as conditional probabilities for a given amino acid and secondary structure type. Using these distributions as outputs of first- and second-order HMMs, we achieve a prediction accuracy of 82.3%, which is competitive with existing methods for predicting secondary structure from protein chemical shifts. Incorporation of sequence-based secondary structure prediction into our HMM improves the prediction accuracy to 84.0%. Our findings suggest that an HMM with correlated Gaussian distributions conditioned on the secondary structure provides an adequate generative model of chemical shifts.

  6. Characterization of mu s-ms dynamics of proteins using a combined analysis of N-15 NMR relaxation and chemical shift: Conformational exchange in plastocyanin induced by histidine protonations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    An approach is presented that allows a detailed, quantitative characterization of conformational exchange processes in proteins on the mus-ms time scale. The approach relies on a combined analysis of NMR relaxation rates and chemical shift changes and requires that the chemical shift...... variabilis (A.v. PCu) (Ma, L.; Hass, M. A. S.; Vierick, N.; Kristensen, S. M.; Ulstrup, J.; Led, J. J. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 320-330). The R-1 and R-2 relaxation rates of the backbone N-15 nuclei were measured at a series of pH and temperatures on an 15N labeled sample of A.v. PCu, and the 15 N chemical...... quantitatively by the correlation between the R-ex terms and the corresponding chemical shift differences of the exchanging species. By this approach, the R-ex terms of N-15 nuclei belonging to contiguous regions in the protein could be assigned to the same exchange process. Furthermore, the analysis...

  7. Ab Initio Calculation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shift Anisotropy Tensors 1. Influence of Basis Set on the Calculation of 31P Chemical Shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, T.M.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of changes in the contracted Gaussian basis set used for ab initio calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phosphorous chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors was investigated. The isotropic chemical shitl and chemical shift anisotropy were found to converge with increasing complexity of the basis set at the Hartree-Fock @IF) level. The addition of d polarization function on the phosphorous nucIei was found to have a major impact of the calculated chemical shi~ but diminished with increasing number of polarization fimctions. At least 2 d polarization fimctions are required for accurate calculations of the isotropic phosphorous chemical shift. The introduction of density fictional theory (DFT) techniques through tie use of hybrid B3LYP methods for the calculation of the phosphorous chemical shift tensor resulted in a poorer estimation of the NMR values, even though DFT techniques result in improved energy and force constant calculations. The convergence of the W parametem with increasing basis set complexity was also observed for the DFT calculations, but produced results with consistent large deviations from experiment. The use of a HF 6-31 l++G(242p) basis set represents a good compromise between accuracy of the simulation and the complexity of the calculation for future ab initio calculations of 31P NMR parameters in larger complexes.

  8. Correlation of chemical shifts predicted by molecular dynamics simulations for partially disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Jerome M.; Erylimaz, Ertan; Cowburn, David, E-mail: cowburn@cowburnlab.org, E-mail: David.cowburn@einstein.yu.edu [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-01-15

    There has been a longstanding interest in being able to accurately predict NMR chemical shifts from structural data. Recent studies have focused on using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data as input for improved prediction. Here we examine the accuracy of chemical shift prediction for intein systems, which have regions of intrinsic disorder. We find that using MD simulation data as input for chemical shift prediction does not consistently improve prediction accuracy over use of a static X-ray crystal structure. This appears to result from the complex conformational ensemble of the disordered protein segments. We show that using accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations improves chemical shift prediction, suggesting that methods which better sample the conformational ensemble like aMD are more appropriate tools for use in chemical shift prediction for proteins with disordered regions. Moreover, our study suggests that data accurately reflecting protein dynamics must be used as input for chemical shift prediction in order to correctly predict chemical shifts in systems with disorder.

  9. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S

    2015-11-01

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and "PDB worthy". The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca.

  10. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  11. Chemical shift assignments of two oleanane triterpenes from Euonymus hederaceus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU He-jiao; WANG Kui-wu; WU Bin; SUN Cui-rong; PAN Yuan-jiang

    2005-01-01

    1H-NMR and 13C-NMR assignments of 12-oleanene-3,11-dione (compound 1) were completely described for the first time through conventional 1D NMR and 2D shift-correlated NMR experiments using 1H-1HCOSY, HMQC, HMBC techniques.Based on its NMR data, the assignments of 28-hydroxyolean-12-ene-3,11-dione (compound 2) were partially revised.

  12. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joshua D.; Summers, Michael F. [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Johnson, Bruce A., E-mail: bruce.johnson@asrc.cuny.edu [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides.

  13. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J;

    1988-01-01

    Optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3...... were only shown in 3/16 (19%) of the patients with optic neuritis. Nevertheless, the presented chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence may be of great value for detection of retrobulbar lesions....

  14. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0.

  15. Chemical shift MRI can aid in the diagnosis of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douis, H. [University Hospital Birmingham, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Davies, A.M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Jeys, L. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Sian, P. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Spinal Surgery and Spinal Oncology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the role of chemical shift MRI in the characterisation of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine as benign or malignant. Fifty-five patients (mean age 54.7 years) with 57 indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine were included in this retrospective study. In addition to conventional MRI at 3 T which included at least sagittal T1WI and T2WI/STIR sequences, patients underwent chemical shift MRI. A cut-off value with a signal drop-out of 20 % was used to differentiate benign lesions from malignant lesions (signal drop-out <20 % being malignant). There were 45 benign lesions and 12 malignant lesions. Chemical shift imaging correctly diagnosed 33 of 45 lesions as benign and 11 of 12 lesions as malignant. In contrast, there were 12 false positive cases and 1 false negative case based on chemical shift MRI. This yielded a sensitivity of 91.7 %, a specificity of 73.3 %, a negative predictive value of 97.1 %, a positive predictive value of 47.8 % and a diagnostic accuracy of 82.5 %. Chemical shift MRI can aid in the characterisation of indeterminate skeletal lesions of the spine in view of its high sensitivity in diagnosing malignant lesions. Chemical shift MRI can potentially avoid biopsy in a considerable percentage of patients with benign skeletal lesions of the spine. (orig.)

  16. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy, E-mail: ramamoor@umich.edu [Biophysics and Department of Chemistry, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1055 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  17. Further conventions for NMR shielding and chemical shifts (IUPAC Recommendations 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.K. [University of Durham, Durham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Becker, E.D. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Menezes, S.M. Cabral de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Granger, P. [University Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France). Inst. of Chemistry; Hoffman, R.E. [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Safra Campus, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Organic Chemistry; Zilm, K.W., E-mail: r.k.harris@durham.ac.uk [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    IUPAC has published a number of recommendations regarding the reporting of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, especially chemical shifts. The most recent publication [Pure Appl. Chem. 73, 1795 (2001)] recommended that tetramethylsilane (TMS) serve as a universal reference for reporting the shifts of all nuclides, but it deferred recommendations for several aspects of this subject. This document first examines the extent to which the {sup 1}H shielding in TMS itself is subject to change by variation in temperature, concentration, and solvent. On the basis of recently published results, it has been established that the shielding of TMS in solution [along with that of sodium-3- (trimethylsilyl)propanesulfonate, DSS, often used as a reference for aqueous solutions] varies only slightly with temperature but is subject to solvent perturbations of a few tenths of a part per million (ppm). Recommendations are given for reporting chemical shifts under most routine experimental conditions and for quantifying effects of temperature and solvent variation, including the use of magnetic susceptibility corrections and of magic-angle spinning (MAS). This document provides the first IUPAC recommendations for referencing and reporting chemical shifts in solids, based on high-resolution MAS studies. Procedures are given for relating {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts in solids to the scales used for high resolution studies in the liquid phase. The notation and terminology used for describing chemical shift and shielding tensors in solids are reviewed in some detail, and recommendations are given for best practice. (author)

  18. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case.

  19. Benchmark quantum-chemical calculations on a complete set of rotameric families of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and their comparison with modern density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mládek, Arnošt; Krepl, Miroslav; Svozil, Daniel; Cech, Petr; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel; Zgarbová, Marie; Jurečka, Petr; Sponer, Jiří

    2013-05-21

    The DNA sugar-phosphate backbone has a substantial influence on the DNA structural dynamics. Structural biology and bioinformatics studies revealed that the DNA backbone in experimental structures samples a wide range of distinct conformational substates, known as rotameric DNA backbone conformational families. Their correct description is essential for methods used to model nucleic acids and is known to be the Achilles heel of force field computations. In this study we report the benchmark database of MP2 calculations extrapolated to the complete basis set of atomic orbitals with aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets, MP2(T,Q), augmented by ΔCCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ corrections. The calculations are performed in the gas phase as well as using a COSMO solvent model. This study includes a complete set of 18 established and biochemically most important families of DNA backbone conformations and several other salient conformations that we identified in experimental structures. We utilize an electronically sufficiently complete DNA sugar-phosphate-sugar (SPS) backbone model system truncated to prevent undesired intramolecular interactions. The calculations are then compared with other QM methods. The BLYP and TPSS functionals supplemented with Grimme's D3(BJ) dispersion term provide the best tradeoff between computational demands and accuracy and can be recommended for preliminary conformational searches as well as calculations on large model systems. Among the tested methods, the best agreement with the benchmark database has been obtained for the double-hybrid DSD-BLYP functional in combination with a quadruple-ζ basis set, which is, however, computationally very demanding. The new hybrid density functionals PW6B95-D3 and MPW1B95-D3 yield outstanding results and even slightly outperform the computationally more demanding PWPB95 double-hybrid functional. B3LYP-D3 is somewhat less accurate compared to the other hybrids. Extrapolated MP2(D,T) calculations are not as

  20. Effect of shifting cultivation on soil physical and chemical properties in Bandarban hill district, Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khandakar Showkat Osman; M. Jashimuddin; S. M. Sirajul Haque; Sohag Miah

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the effects of shifting cultivation at slashing stage on soil physicochemical properties at Bandarban Sadar Upazila in Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. At this initial stage of shifting cultivation no general trend was found for moisture content, maximum water holding capacity, field capacity, dry and moist bulk density, parti-cle density for some chemical properties between shifting cultivated land and forest having similar soil texture. Organic matter was significantly (p≤0.05) lower in 1-year and 3-year shifting cultivated lands and higher in 2-year shifting cultivation than in adjacent natural forest. Significant differences were also found for total N, exchangeable Ca, Mg and K and in CEC as well as for available P. Slashed area showed higher soil pH. Deterioration in land quality starts from burning of slashing materials and continues through subsequent stages of shifting cultivation.

  1. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  2. From NMR chemical shifts to amino acid types: Investigation of the predictive power carried by nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, Antoine; Malliavin, Therese E. [Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique, Laboratoire de Biochimie Theorique, CNRS UPR 9080 (France)], E-mail: therese.malliavin@ibpc.fr; Nicolas, Pierre; Delsuc, Marc-Andre [INRA - Domaine de Vilvert, Unite Mathematique Informatique et Genome (France)

    2004-09-15

    An approach to automatic prediction of the amino acid type from NMR chemical shift values of its nuclei is presented here, in the frame of a model to calculate the probability of an amino acid type given the set of chemical shifts. The method relies on systematic use of all chemical shift values contained in the BioMagResBank (BMRB). Two programs were designed, one (BMRB stats) for extracting statistical chemical shift parameters from the BMRB and another one (RESCUE2) for computing the probabilities of each amino acid type, given a set of chemical shifts. The Bayesian prediction scheme presented here is compared to other methods already proposed: PROTYP (Grzesiek and Bax, J. Biomol. NMR, 3, 185-204, 1993) RESCUE (Pons and Delsuc, J. Biomol. NMR, 15, 15-26, 1999) and PLATON (Labudde et al., J. Biomol. NMR, 25, 41-53, 2003) and is found to be more sensitive and more specific. Using this scheme, we tested various sets of nuclei. The two nuclei carrying the most information are C{sub {beta}} and H{sub {beta}}, in agreement with observations made in Grzesiek and Bax, 1993. Based on four nuclei: H{sub {beta}}, C{sub {beta}}, C{sub {alpha}} and C', it is possible to increase correct predictions to a rate of more than 75%. Taking into account the correlations between the nuclei chemical shifts has only a slight impact on the percentage of correct predictions: indeed, the largest correlation coefficients display similar features on all amino acids.

  3. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of negatively charged NH.N systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Grech, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are investigated in anions of 1,8-bis(4-toluenesulphonamido)naphthalenes together with N,N-(naphthalene-1,8-diyl)bis(2,2,2-trifluoracetamide) all with bis(1,8-dimethylamino)napthaleneH+ as counter ion. These compounds represent both “static......” and equilibrium cases. NMR assignments of the former have been revised. The NH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are rather unusual in these strongly hydrogen bonded systems between a NH and a negatively charged nitrogen atom. The formal four-bond effects are found to be negative...

  4. Protein Structure Validation and Refinement Using Chemical Shifts Derived from Quantum Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen

    In this thesis, my work involving dierent aspects of protein structure determination by computer modeling is presented. Determination of several protein's native fold were carried out with Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations in the PHAISTOS protein structure simulation framework, utilizing...... to within 3 A. Furthermore, a fast quantum mechanics based chemical shift predictor was developed together with methodology for using chemical shifts in structure simulations. The developed predictor was used for renement of several protein structures and for reducing the computational cost of quantum...

  5. Ontogenetic shift in response to prey-derived chemical cues in prairie rattlesnakes Crotalus viridis viridis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anthony J.SAVIOLA; David CHISZAR; Stephen P.MACKESSY

    2012-01-01

    Snakes often have specialized diets that undergo a shift from one prey type to another depending on the life stage of the snake.Crotalus viridis viridis (prairie rattlesnake) takes different prey at different life stages,and neonates typically prey on ectotherms,while adults feed almost entirely on small endotherms.We hypothesized that elevated rates of tongue flicking to chemical stimuli should correlate with particular prey consumed,and that this response shifts from one prey type to another as individuals age.To examine if an ontogenetic shift in response to chemical cues occurred,we recorded the rate of tongue flicking for 25 neonate,20 subadult,and 20 adult (average SVL=280.9,552,789.5 mm,respectively) wild-caught C.v.viridis to chemical stimuli presented on a cotton-tipped applicator; water-soluble cues from two ectotherms (prairie lizard,Sceloporus undulatus,and house gecko,Hemidactylusfrenatus),two endotherms (deer mouse,Peromyscus maniculatus and lab mouse,Mus musculus),and water controls were used.Neonates tongue flicked significantly more to chemical cues of their common prey,S.undulatus,than to all other chemical cues; however,the response to this lizard's chemical cues decreased in adult rattlesnakes.Subadults tongue flicked with a higher rate of tongue flicking to both S.undulatus and P.maniculatus than to all other treatments,and adults tongue flicked significantly more to P.maniculatus than to all other chemical cues.In addition,all three sub-classes demonstrated a greater response for natural prey chemical cues over chemical stimuli of prey not encountered in the wild (M.musculus and H.frenatus).This shift in chemosensory response correlated with the previously described ontogenetic shifts in C.v.viridis diet.Because many vipers show a similar ontogenetic shift in diet and venom composition,we suggest that this shift in prey cue discrimination is likely a general phenomenon among viperid snakes.

  6. Energy gap in tunneling spectroscopy: effect of the chemical potential shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, N. I.; Zaitsev-Zotov, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    We study the effect of a shift of the chemical potential level on the tunneling conductance spectra. In the systems with gapped energy spectra, significant chemical-potential dependent distortions of the differential tunneling conductance curves, dI/dV, arise in the gap region. An expression is derived for the correction of the dI/dV, which in a number of cases was found to be large. The sign of the correction depends on the chemical potential level position with respect to the gap. The correction of the dI/dV associated with the chemical potential shift has a nearly linear dependence on the tip-sample separation z and vanishes at z → 0.

  7. Sequence correction of random coil chemical shifts: correlation between neighbor correction factors and changes in the Ramachandran distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2011-01-01

    Random coil chemical shifts are necessary for secondary chemical shift analysis, which is the main NMR method for identification of secondary structure in proteins. One of the largest challenges in the determination of random coil chemical shifts is accounting for the effect of neighboring residues....... The contributions from the neighboring residues are typically removed by using neighbor correction factors determined based on each residue's effect on glycine chemical shifts. Due to its unusual conformational freedom, glycine may be particularly unrepresentative for the remaining residue types. In this study, we...... in the conformational ensemble are an important source of neighbor effects in disordered proteins. Glutamine derived random coil chemical shifts and correction factors modestly improve our ability to predict (13)C chemical shifts of intrinsically disordered proteins compared to existing datasets, and may thus improve...

  8. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static” ...

  9. Can the current density map topology be extracted from the nucleus independent chemical shifts?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Damme, Sofie; Acke, Guillaume; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Bultinck, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are characterised by the presence of a ring current when in a magnetic field. As a consequence, current density maps are used to assess (the degree of) aromaticity of a compound. However, often a more discrete set of so-called Nucleus Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) values is us

  10. Computation of Chemical Shifts for Paramagnetic Molecules: A Laboratory Experiment for the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Benjamin P.; Simpson, Scott; Zurek, Eva; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    A computational experiment investigating the [superscript 1]H and [superscript 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of molecules with unpaired electrons has been developed and implemented. This experiment is appropriate for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory course in computational, physical, or inorganic chemistry. The…

  11. The statistical shift of the chemical potential causing anomalous conductivity in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lof, R.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of the electrical conductivity in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μ c-Si:H) that is frequently observed is explained by considering the statistical shift in the chemical potential as a function of the crystalline fraction (Xc), the dangling bond density (N db), and the doping den

  12. Elucidating the Link between NMR Chemical Shifts and Electronic Structure in d(0) Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Stéphanie; Copéret, Christophe; Raynaud, Christophe; Eisenstein, Odile

    2016-02-24

    The nucleophilic carbon of d(0) Schrock alkylidene metathesis catalysts, [M] = CHR, display surprisingly low downfield chemical shift (δ(iso)) and large chemical shift anisotropy. State-of-the-art four-component relativistic calculations of the chemical shift tensors combined with a two-component analysis in terms of localized orbitals allow a molecular-level understanding of their orientations, the magnitude of their principal components (δ11 > δ22 > δ33) and associated δ(iso). This analysis reveals the dominating influence of the paramagnetic contribution yielding a highly deshielded alkylidene carbon. The largest paramagnetic contribution, which originates from the coupling of alkylidene σ(MC) and π*(MC) orbitals under the action of the magnetic field, is analogous to that resulting from coupling σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene; thus, δ11 is in the MCH plane and is perpendicular to the MC internuclear direction. The higher value of carbon-13 δ(iso) in alkylidene complexes relative to ethylene is thus due to the smaller energy gap between σ(MC) and π*(MC) vs this between σ(CC) and π*(CC) in ethylene. This effect also explains why the highest value of δ(iso) is observed for Mo and the lowest for Ta, the values for W and Re being in between. In the presence of agostic interaction, the chemical shift tensor principal components orientation (δ22 or δ33 parallel or perpendicular to π(MX)) is influenced by the MCH angle because it determines the orientation of the alkylidene CHR fragment relative to the MC internuclear axis. The orbital analysis shows how the paramagnetic terms, understood with a localized bond model, determine the chemical shift tensor and thereby δ(iso).

  13. Magnetic Shift of the Chemical Freeze-out and Electric Charge Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the effect of a strong magnetic field on the chemical freeze-out points in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. As a result of inverse magnetic catalysis or magnetic inhibition, the crossover onset to hot and dense matter out of quarks and gluons should be shifted to a lower temperature. To quantify this shift we employ the hadron resonance gas model and an empirical condition for the chemical freeze-out. We point out that the charged particle abundances are significantly affected by the magnetic field so that the electric charge fluctuation is largely enhanced, especially at high baryon density. The charge conservation partially cancels the enhancement, but our calculation shows that the electric charge fluctuation could serve as a magnetometer. We find that the fluctuation exhibits a crossover behavior rapidly increased for e B ≳(0.4 GeV )2, while the charge chemical potential has smoother behavior with an increasing magnetic field.

  14. Stereoelectronic effects on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts in methoxybenzenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Maja; Olsen, Lars; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    the Ar-OCH3 torsion out of the ring plane, resulting in large stereoelectronic effects on the chemical shift of Hpara. Conformational searches and geometry optimizations for 3-16 at the B3LYP/6-31G** level, followed by B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) calculations for all low-energy conformers, gave excellent......Investigation of all O-methyl ethers of 1,2,3-benzenetriol and 4-methyl-1,2,3-benzenetriol (3-16) by 1H NMR spectroscopy and density-functional calculations disclosed practically useful conformational effects on 1H NMR chemical shifts in the aromatic ring. While the conversion of phenol (2......) to anisole (1) causes only small positive changes of 1H NMR chemical shifts (Delta delta Hmeta > Hpara, the experimental O-methylation induced shifts in ortho-disubstituted phenols are largest for Hpara, Delta delta equals; 0.19 +/- 0.02 ppm (n = 11...

  15. Reduced Dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH Experiment: An Efficient Backbone Assignment tool for NMR studies of Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment and secondary structure determination of proteins form the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone (1H, 15N, 13Ca and 13C') resonances and secondary structure determination of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone (13Ca and 13C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text) for efficient and rapid data analysis. Further, the experiment leads to the spectrum with direct distinction of self (intra-residue) and sequential (inter-residue) carbon correlation peaks; these appear opposite in signs and therefore can easily be discriminated without using an additional complementary experiment. On ...

  16. Two-Dimensional Proton Chemical-Shift Imaging of Human Muscle Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiani; Willcott, M. Robert; Moore, Gregory J.

    1997-06-01

    Large lipid signals and strong susceptibility gradients introduced by muscle-bone interfaces represent major technical challenges forin vivoproton MRS of human muscle. Here, the demonstration of two-dimensional proton chemical-shift imaging of human muscle metabolites is presented. This technique utilizes a chemical-shift-selective method for water and lipid suppression and automatic shimming for optimal homogeneity of the magnetic field. The 2D1H CSI technique described facilitates the acquisition of high-spatial-resolution spectra, and allows one to acquire data from multiple muscle groups in a single experiment. A preliminary investigation utilizing this technique in healthy adult males (n= 4) revealed a highly significant difference in the ratio of the creatine to trimethylamine resonance between the fast and slow twitch muscle groups examined. The technique is robust, can be implemented on a commercial scanner with relative ease, and should prove to be a useful tool for both clinical and basic investigators.

  17. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L

    2012-10-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  18. Identifying Stereoisomers by ab-initio Calculation of Secondary Isotope Shifts on NMR Chemical Shieldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Böhm

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present ab-initio calculations of secondary isotope effects on NMR chemical shieldings. The change of the NMR chemical shift of a certain nucleus that is observed if another nucleus is replaced by a different isotope can be calculated by computing vibrational corrections on the NMR parameters using electronic structure methods. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the computational results is sufficient to even distinguish different conformers. For this purpose, benchmark calculations for fluoro(2-2Hethane in gauche and antiperiplanar conformation are carried out at the HF, MP2 and CCSD(T level of theory using basis sets ranging from double- to quadruple-zeta quality. The methodology is applied to the secondary isotope shifts for 2-fluoronorbornane in order to resolve an ambiguity in the literature on the assignment of endo- and exo-2-fluoronorbornanes with deuterium substituents in endo-3 and exo-3 positions, also yielding insight into mechanistic details of the corresponding synthesis.

  19. First-principles calculation of core-level binding energy shift in surface chemical processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combined with third generation synchrotron radiation light sources, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with higher energy resolution, brilliance, enhanced surface sensitivity and photoemission cross section in real time found extensive applications in solid-gas interface chemistry. This paper reports the calculation of the core-level binding energy shifts (CLS) using the first-principles density functional theory. The interplay between the CLS calculations and XPS measurements to uncover the structures, adsorption sites and chemical reactions in complex surface chemical processes are highlight. Its application on clean low index (111) and vicinal transition metal surfaces, molecular adsorption in terms of sites and configuration, and reaction kinetics are domonstrated.

  20. Relationship between electrophilicity index, Hammett constant and nucleus-independent chemical shift

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Elango; R Parthasarathi; G Karthik Narayanan; A Md Sabeelullah; U Sarkar; N S Venkatasubramaniyan; V Subramanian; P K Chattaraj

    2005-01-01

    Inter-relationships between the electrophilicity index (), Hammett constant (ó) and nucleusindependent chemical shift (NICS (1) - NICS value one å ngstrom above the ring centre) have been investigated for a series of meta- and para-substituted benzoic acids. Good linear relationships between Hammett constant vs electrophilicity and Hammett constant vs NICS (1) values have been observed. However, the variation of NICS (1) against shows only a low correlation coefficient.

  1. Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approva l 26 FEB 2016 1. Your paper, entitled Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Aoolication of...or technical information as a publication/presentation, a new 59 MDW Form 3039 must be submitted for review and approval.] Crime Scene Investiga...tion: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool 1. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED Crime Scene

  2. 4D Non-uniformly sampled HCBCACON and {sup 1}J(NC{sup {alpha}})-selective HCBCANCO experiments for the sequential assignment and chemical shift analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novacek, Jiri [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, NCBR, and CEITEC (Czech Republic); Haba, Noam Y.; Chill, Jordan H. [Bar Ilan University, Department of Chemistry (Israel); Zidek, Lukas, E-mail: lzidek@chemi.muni.cz; Sklenar, Vladimir [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, NCBR, and CEITEC (Czech Republic)

    2012-06-15

    A pair of 4D NMR experiments for the backbone assignment of disordered proteins is presented. The experiments exploit {sup 13}C direct detection and non-uniform sampling of the indirectly detected dimensions, and provide correlations of the aliphatic proton (H{sup {alpha}}, and H{sup {beta}}) and carbon (C{sup {alpha}}, C{sup {beta}}) resonance frequencies to the protein backbone. Thus, all the chemical shifts regularly used to map the transient secondary structure motifs in the intrinsically disordered proteins (H{sup {alpha}}, C{sup {alpha}}, C{sup {beta}}, C Prime , and N) can be extracted from each spectrum. Compared to the commonly used assignment strategy based on matching the C{sup {alpha}} and C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts, inclusion of the H{sup {alpha}} and H{sup {beta}} provides up to three extra resonance frequencies that decrease the chance of ambiguous assignment. The experiments were successfully applied to the original assignment of a 12.8 kDa intrinsically disordered protein having a high content of proline residues (26 %) in the sequence.

  3. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, H.B.W.; Thomsen, C.; Frederiksen, J.; Henriksen, O.; Olesen, J.

    Optic neuritis is often the first manifestion of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3 of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions were only shown in 3/16 (19%) of the patients with optic neuritis. Nevertheless, the presented chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence may be of great value for detection of retrobulbar lesions.

  4. Effects of Protein-pheromone Complexation on Correlated Chemical Shift Modulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perazzolo, Chiara; Wist, Julien [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (Switzerland); Loth, Karine; Poggi, Luisa [Ecole Normale Superieure, Departement de chimie, associe au CNRS (France); Homans, Steve [University of Leeds, School of Biochemistry and Microbiology (United Kingdom); Bodenhausen, Geoffrey [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institut des Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques (Switzerland)], E-mail: Geoffrey.Bodenhausen@ens.fr

    2005-12-15

    Major urinary protein (MUP) is a pheromone-carrying protein of the lipocalin family. Previous studies by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) show that the affinity of MUP for the pheromone 2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine (IBMP) is mainly driven by enthalpy, with a small unfavourable entropic contribution. Entropic terms can be attributed in part to changes in internal motions of the protein upon binding. Slow internal motions can lead to correlated or anti-correlated modulations of the isotropic chemical shifts of carbonyl C' and amide N nuclei. Correlated chemical shift modulations (CSM/CSM) in MUP have been determined by measuring differences of the transverse relaxation rates of zero- and double-quantum coherences ZQC{l_brace}C'N{r_brace} and DQC{l_brace}C'N{r_brace}, and by accounting for the effects of correlated fluctuations of dipole-dipole couplings (DD/DD) and chemical shift anisotropies (CSA/CSA). The latter can be predicted from tensor parameters of C' and N nuclei that have been determined in earlier work. The effects of complexation on slow time-scale protein dynamics can be determined by comparing the temperature dependence of the relaxation rates of APO-MUP (i.e., without ligand) and HOLO-MUP (i.e., with IBMP as a ligand)

  5. Substituent effects in the 13C NMR chemical shifts of alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Adriana K C A; Rittner, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    13C chemical shifts empirical calculations, through a very simple additivity relationship, for the alpha-methylene carbon of some alpha-mono-substituted acetonitriles, Y-CH(2)-CN (Y=H, F, Cl, Br, I, OMe, OEt, SMe, SEt, NMe(2), NEt(2), Me and Et), lead to similar, or even better, results in comparison to the reported values obtained through Quantum Mechanics methods. The observed deviations, for some substituents, are very similar for both approaches. This divergence between experimental and calculated, either empirically or theoretically, values are smaller than for the corresponding acetones, amides, acetic acids and methyl esters, which had been named non-additivity effects (or intramolecular interaction chemical shifts, ICS) and attributed to some orbital interactions. Here, these orbital interactions do not seem to be the main reason for the non-additivity effects in the empirical calculations, which must be due solely to the magnetic anisotropy of the heavy atom present in the substituent. These deviations, which were also observed in the theoretical calculations, were attributed in that case to the non-inclusion of relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling in the Hamiltonian. Some divergence is also observed for the cyano carbon chemical shifts, probably due to the same reasons.

  6. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ([superscript 13]C–[superscript 13]C, [superscript 15]N–[superscript 13]C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 [superscript 13]C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical...

  7. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-07

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T(2), which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/T(n) with n = 2 and higher.

  8. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation.

  9. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsching, Keith J., E-mail: kfritzsc@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Hong, Mei [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus, E-mail: srohr@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ({sup 13}C–{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N–{sup 13}C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 {sup 13}C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited “hand-picked” data sets, we show that ∼94 % of the {sup 13}C NMR data and almost all {sup 15}N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6 % of the {sup 13}C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. −2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra

  10. Conformationally selective multidimensional chemical shift ranges in proteins from a PACSY database purged using intrinsic quality criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We have determined refined multidimensional chemical shift ranges for intra-residue correlations ((13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, etc.) in proteins, which can be used to gain type-assignment and/or secondary-structure information from experimental NMR spectra. The chemical-shift ranges are the result of a statistical analysis of the PACSY database of >3000 proteins with 3D structures (1,200,207 (13)C chemical shifts and >3 million chemical shifts in total); these data were originally derived from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Using relatively simple non-parametric statistics to find peak maxima in the distributions of helix, sheet, coil and turn chemical shifts, and without the use of limited "hand-picked" data sets, we show that ~94% of the (13)C NMR data and almost all (15)N data are quite accurately referenced and assigned, with smaller standard deviations (0.2 and 0.8 ppm, respectively) than recognized previously. On the other hand, approximately 6% of the (13)C chemical shift data in the PACSY database are shown to be clearly misreferenced, mostly by ca. -2.4 ppm. The removal of the misreferenced data and other outliers by this purging by intrinsic quality criteria (PIQC) allows for reliable identification of secondary maxima in the two-dimensional chemical-shift distributions already pre-separated by secondary structure. We demonstrate that some of these correspond to specific regions in the Ramachandran plot, including left-handed helix dihedral angles, reflect unusual hydrogen bonding, or are due to the influence of a following proline residue. With appropriate smoothing, significantly more tightly defined chemical shift ranges are obtained for each amino acid type in the different secondary structures. These chemical shift ranges, which may be defined at any statistical threshold, can be used for amino-acid type assignment and secondary-structure analysis of chemical shifts from intra-residue cross peaks by inspection or by using a provided

  11. DFT calculations of 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in transition metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rosal, I; Maron, L; Poteau, R; Jolibois, F

    2008-08-14

    Transition metal hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential use as catalysts for hydrogenation. Among other available techniques, structural properties in transition metal (TM) complexes are often probed by NMR spectroscopy. In this paper we will show that it is possible to establish a viable methodological strategy in the context of density functional theory, that allows the determination of 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydride ligands attached to transition metal atoms in mononuclear systems and clusters with good accuracy with respect to experiment. 13C chemical shifts have also been considered in some cases. We have studied mononuclear ruthenium complexes such as Ru(L)(H)(dppm)2 with L = H or Cl, cationic complex [Ru(H)(H2O)(dppm)2]+ and Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2, in which hydride ligands are characterized by a negative 1H NMR chemical shift. For these complexes all calculations are in relatively good agreement compared to experimental data with errors not exceeding 20% except for the hydrogen atom in Ru(H)2(dppm)(PPh3)2. For this last complex, the relative error increases to 30%, probably owing to the necessity to take into account dynamical effects of phenyl groups. Carbonyl ligands are often encountered in coordination chemistry. Specific issues arise when calculating 1H or 13C NMR chemical shifts in TM carbonyl complexes. Indeed, while errors of 10 to 20% with respect to experiment are often considered good in the framework of density functional theory, this difference in the case of mononuclear carbonyl complexes culminates to 80%: results obtained with all-electron calculations are overall in very satisfactory agreement with experiment, the error in this case does not exceed 11% contrary to effective core potentials (ECPs) calculations which yield errors always larger than 20%. We conclude that for carbonyl groups the use of ECPs is not recommended, although their use could save time for very large systems, for

  12. Complete (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift assignments of mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as basis for NMR chemical shift predictions of polysaccharides using the computer program casper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslund, Mattias U; Säwén, Elin; Landström, Jens; Rönnols, Jerk; Jonsson, K Hanna M; Lundborg, Magnus; Svensson, Mona V; Widmalm, Göran

    2011-08-16

    The computer program casper uses (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data of mono- to trisaccharides for the prediction of chemical shifts of oligo- and polysaccharides. In order to improve the quality of these predictions the (1)H and (13)C, as well as (31)P when applicable, NMR chemical shifts of 30 mono-, di-, and trisaccharides were assigned. The reducing sugars gave two distinct sets of NMR resonances due to the α- and β-anomeric forms. In total 35 (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shift data sets were obtained from the oligosaccharides. One- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were used for the chemical shift assignments and special techniques were employed in some cases such as 2D (1)H,(13)C-HSQC Hadamard Transform methodology which was acquired approximately 45 times faster than a regular t(1) incremented (1)H,(13)C-HSQC experiment and a 1D (1)H,(1)H-CSSF-TOCSY experiment which was able to distinguish spin-systems in which the target protons were only 3.3Hz apart. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts were subsequently refined using total line-shape analysis with the PERCH NMR software. The acquired NMR data were then utilized in the casper program (http://www.casper.organ.su.se/casper/) for NMR chemical shift predictions of the O-antigen polysaccharides from Klebsiella O5, Shigella flexneri serotype X, and Salmonella arizonae O62. The data were compared to experimental data of the polysaccharides from the two former strains and the lipopolysaccharide of the latter strain showing excellent agreement between predicted and experimental (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

  13. Parameter-free calculation of K alpha chemical shifts for Al, Si, and Ge oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2001-01-01

    The chemical shifts of the K alpha radiation line from Al, Si, and Ge ions between their elemental and oxide forms are calculated within the framework of density functional theory using ultrasoft pseudopotentials. It is demonstrated that this theoretical approach yields quantitatively accurate...... results fur the systems investigated, provided that relaxations of the valence electrons upon the core-hole transition are properly accounted for. Therefore, such calculations provide a powerful tool for identification of impurity states based on x-ray fluorescence data. Results for an Al impurity...

  14. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Görling

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored.

  15. NMR Chemical Shift Ranges of Urine Metabolites in Various Organic Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görling, Benjamin; Bräse, Stefan; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Signal stability is essential for reliable multivariate data analysis. Urine samples show strong variance in signal positions due to inter patient differences. Here we study the exchange of the solvent of a defined urine matrix and how it affects signal and integral stability of the urinary metabolites by NMR spectroscopy. The exchange solvents were methanol, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, chloroform, acetone, dichloromethane, and dimethyl formamide. Some of these solvents showed promising results with a single batch of urine. To evaluate further differences between urine samples, various acid, base, and salt solutions were added in a defined way mimicking to some extent inter human differences. Corresponding chemical shift changes were monitored. PMID:27598217

  16. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  17. Optimal voxel size for measuring global gray and white matter proton metabolite concentrations using chemical shift imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Adalsteinsson, E; Pfefferbaum, A;

    2000-01-01

    Quantification of gray and white matter levels of spectroscopically visible metabolites can provide important insights into brain development and pathological conditions. Chemical shift imaging offers a gain in efficiency for estimation of global gray and white matter metabolite concentrations...

  18. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, D; Guerra, C Fonseca; de Oliveira, M A L; Ramalho, T C; Dos Santos, H F

    2016-10-01

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the Pt-195 NMR chemical shift, are presented for Pt and all elements commonly found as Pt-ligands. The new basis sets identified as NMR-DKH were partially contracted as a triple-zeta doubly polarized scheme with all coefficients obtained from a Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) second-order scalar relativistic calculation. The Pt-195 chemical shift was predicted through empirical models fitted to reproduce experimental data for a set of 183 Pt(II) complexes which NMR sign ranges from -1000 to -6000 ppm. Furthermore, the models were validated using a new set of 75 Pt(II) complexes, not included in the descriptive set. The models were constructed using non-relativistic Hamiltonian at density functional theory (DFT-PBEPBE) level with NMR-DKH basis set for all atoms. For the best model, the mean absolute deviation (MAD) and the mean relative deviation (MRD) were 150 ppm and 6%, respectively, for the validation set (75 Pt-complexes) and 168 ppm (MAD) and 5% (MRD) for all 258 Pt(II) complexes. These results were comparable with relativistic DFT calculation, 200 ppm (MAD) and 6% (MRD). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. 125Te NMR chemical-shift trends in PbTe–GeTe and PbTe–SnTe alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Njegic, Bosiljka [Ames Laboratory; Levin, Evgenii M. [Ames Laboratory; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus [Ames Laboratory

    2013-10-08

    Complex tellurides, such as doped PbTe, GeTe, and their alloys, are among the best thermoelectric materials. Knowledge of the change in 125Te NMR chemical shift due to bonding to dopant or “solute” atoms is useful for determination of phase composition, peak assignment, and analysis of local bonding. We have measured the 125Te NMR chemical shifts in PbTe-based alloys, Pb1-xGexTe and Pb1-xSnxTe, which have a rocksalt-like structure, and analyzed their trends. For low x, several peaks are resolved in the 22-kHz MAS 125Te NMR spectra. A simple linear trend in chemical shifts with the number of Pb neighbors is observed. No evidence of a proposed ferroelectric displacement of Ge atoms in a cubic PbTe matrix is detected at low Ge concentrations. The observed chemical shift trends are compared with the results of DFT calculations, which confirm the linear dependence on the composition of the first-neighbor shell. The data enable determination of the composition of various phases in multiphase telluride materials. They also provide estimates of the 125Te chemical shifts of GeTe and SnTe (+970 and +400±150 ppm, respectively, from PbTe), which are otherwise difficult to access due to Knight shifts of many hundreds of ppm in neat GeTe and SnTe.

  20. 125Te NMR chemical-shift trends in PbTe-GeTe and PbTe-SnTe alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njegic, B; Levin, E M; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2013-01-01

    Complex tellurides, such as doped PbTe, GeTe, and their alloys, are among the best thermoelectric materials. Knowledge of the change in (125)Te NMR chemical shift due to bonding to dopant or "solute" atoms is useful for determination of phase composition, peak assignment, and analysis of local bonding. We have measured the (125)Te NMR chemical shifts in PbTe-based alloys, Pb1-xGexTe and Pb1-xSnxTe, which have a rocksalt-like structure, and analyzed their trends. For low x, several peaks are resolved in the 22-kHz MAS (125)Te NMR spectra. A simple linear trend in chemical shifts with the number of Pb neighbors is observed. No evidence of a proposed ferroelectric displacement of Ge atoms in a cubic PbTe matrix is detected at low Ge concentrations. The observed chemical shift trends are compared with the results of DFT calculations, which confirm the linear dependence on the composition of the first-neighbor shell. The data enable determination of the composition of various phases in multiphase telluride materials. They also provide estimates of the (125)Te chemical shifts of GeTe and SnTe (+970 and +400±150 ppm, respectively, from PbTe), which are otherwise difficult to access due to Knight shifts of many hundreds of ppm in neat GeTe and SnTe.

  1. Reassigning the Structures of Natural Products Using NMR Chemical Shifts Computed with Quantum Mechanics: A Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Teresa A.; Truong, Tiana T.; Wong, Shirley M. T.; Mack, Emma T.; Lodewyk, Michael W.; Harrison, Jason G.; Gamage, R. Alan; Siegel, Justin B.; Kurth, Mark J.; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    An applied computational chemistry laboratory exercise is described in which students use modern quantum chemical calculations of chemical shifts to assign the structure of a recently isolated natural product. A pre/post assessment was used to measure student learning gains and verify that students demonstrated proficiency of key learning…

  2. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  3. The interplay between transient a-helix formation and side chain rotamer distributions in disordered proteins probed by methyl chemical shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Poulsen, Flemming M

    2011-01-01

    and retinoid receptors (ACTR). We find that small differences in the methyl carbon chemical shifts due to the ¿-gauche effect may provide information about the side chain rotamer distributions. However, the effects of neighboring residues on the methyl group chemical shifts obscure the direct observation...... of ¿-gauche effect. To overcome this, we reference the chemical shifts to those in a more disordered state resulting in residue specific random coil chemical shifts. The (13)C secondary chemical shifts of the methyl groups of valine, leucine, and isoleucine show sequence specific effects, which allow...

  4. Ab Initio Calculations of Deuterium Isotope Effects on Chemical Shifts of Salt-Bridged Lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Saif; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Williamson, Mike P.;

    2011-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation....... This method enables the determination of both the electronic and the protonic (deuteronic) wave functions simultaneously and can directly calculate the geometrical difference induced by H/D isotope effects. The calculations show that the one-bond deuterium isotope effects on 15N nuclear shielding, 1Δ15N......(D), in ammonium and amines decrease as a counterion or water molecule moves closer to the nitrogen. 1Δ15N(D) and 2Δ1H(D) of the NH3+ groups of lysine residues in the B1 domain of protein G have been calculated using truncated side chains and also determined experimentally by NMR. Comparisons show...

  5. Concurrent Increases and Decreases in Local Stability and Conformational Heterogeneity in Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutase Variants Revealed by Temperature-Dependence of Amide Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Colleen M; Rumfeldt, Jessica A; Broom, Helen R; Sekhar, Ashok; Kay, Lewis E; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2016-03-08

    The chemical shifts of backbone amide protons in proteins are sensitive reporters of local structural stability and conformational heterogeneity, which can be determined from their readily measured linear and nonlinear temperature-dependences, respectively. Here we report analyses of amide proton temperature-dependences for native dimeric Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (holo pWT SOD1) and structurally diverse mutant SOD1s associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Holo pWT SOD1 loses structure with temperature first at its periphery and, while having extremely high global stability, nevertheless exhibits extensive conformational heterogeneity, with ∼1 in 5 residues showing evidence for population of low energy alternative states. The holo G93A and E100G ALS mutants have moderately decreased global stability, whereas V148I is slightly stabilized. Comparison of the holo mutants as well as the marginally stable immature monomeric unmetalated and disulfide-reduced (apo(2SH)) pWT with holo pWT shows that changes in the local structural stability of individual amides vary greatly, with average changes corresponding to differences in global protein stability measured by differential scanning calorimetry. Mutants also exhibit altered conformational heterogeneity compared to pWT. Strikingly, substantial increases as well as decreases in local stability and conformational heterogeneity occur, in particular upon maturation and for G93A. Thus, the temperature-dependence of amide shifts for SOD1 variants is a rich source of information on the location and extent of perturbation of structure upon covalent changes and ligand binding. The implications for potential mechanisms of toxic misfolding of SOD1 in disease and for general aspects of protein energetics, including entropy-enthalpy compensation, are discussed.

  6. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sweany, M; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, M

    2011-01-01

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 $\\pm$ 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 $\\pm$ 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 $\\pm$ 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modele...

  7. Handling the influence of chemical shift in amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basse, Kristoffer; Shankar, Ravi; Bjerring, Morten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Nielsen, Anders B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of chemical shifts on amplitude-modulated heteronuclear dipolar recoupling experiments in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The method is demonstrated using the Rotor Echo Short Pulse IRrAdiaTION mediated Cross-Polarization (RESPIRATIONCP) experiment as an example. By going into the pulse sequence rf interaction frame and employing a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach, we describe how chemical shift offset and anisotropic chemical shift affect the efficiency of heteronuclear polarization transfer. In this description, it becomes transparent that the main attribute leading to non-ideal performance is a fictitious field along the rf field axis, which is generated from second-order cross terms arising mainly between chemical shift tensors and themselves. This insight is useful for the development of improved recoupling experiments. We discuss the validity of this approach and present quaternion calculations to determine the effective resonance conditions in a combined rf field and chemical shift offset interaction frame transformation. Based on this, we derive a broad-banded version of the RESPIRATIONCP experiment. The new sequence is experimentally verified using SNNFGAILSS amyloid fibrils where simultaneous 15N → 13CO and 15N → 13Cα coherence transfer is demonstrated on high-field NMR instrumentation, requiring great offset stability.

  8. 50 years anniversary of the discovery of the core level chemical shifts. The early years of photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mårtensson, Nils [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Sokolowski, Evelyn [Tvär-Ramsdal 1, 611 99 Tystberga (Sweden); Svensson, Svante, E-mail: Svante.Svensson@fysik.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • 50 years since the discovery of t the core level chemical shift. • The pioneering years of ESCA. • A critical review of the first core electron chemical shift results. - Abstract: The pioneering years of photoelectron spectroscopy in Uppsala are discussed, especially the work leading to the discovery of the core level chemical shifts. At a very early stage of the project, the pioneering group observed what they described as evidence for chemical shifts in the core level binding energies. However, it can now be seen that the initial observations to a large extent was due to charging of the samples. It is interesting to note that the decisive experiment was realized, not as a result of a systematic study, but was obtained with a large element of serendipity. Only when a chemical binding energy shift was observed between two S2p electron lines in the same molecule, the results were accepted internationally, and the fascinating expansion of modern core level photoelectron spectroscopy could start.

  9. Chemical shift tensor determination using magnetically oriented microcrystal array (MOMA): 13C solid-state CP NMR without MAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumi, R.; Kimura, F.; Song, G.; Kimura, T.

    2012-10-01

    Chemical shift tensors for the carboxyl and methyl carbons of L-alanine crystals were determined using a magnetically oriented microcrystal array (MOMA) prepared from a microcrystalline powder sample of L-alanine. A MOMA is a single-crystal-like composite in which microcrystals are aligned three-dimensionally in a matrix resin. The single-crystal rotation method was applied to the MOMA to determine the principal values and axes of the chemical shift tensors. The result showed good agreement with the literature data for the single crystal of L-alanine. This demonstrates that the present technique is a powerful tool for determining the chemical shift tensor of a crystal from a microcrystal powder sample.

  10. Chemical shift assignments of zinc finger domain of methionine aminopeptidase 1 (MetAP1) from Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachineni, Kavitha; Arya, Tarun; Singarapu, Kiran Kumar; Addlagatta, Anthony; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-10-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase Type I (MetAP1) cleaves the initiator methionine from about 70 % of all newly synthesized proteins in almost every living cell. Human MetAP1 is a two domain protein with a zinc finger on the N-terminus and a catalytic domain on the C-terminus. Here, we report the chemical shift assignments of the amino terminal zinc binding domain (ZBD) (1-83 residues) of the human MetAP1 derived by using advanced NMR spectroscopic methods. We were able to assign the chemical shifts of ZBD of MetAP1 nearly complete, which reveal two helical fragments involving residues P44-L49 (α1) and Q59-K82 (α2). The protein structure unfolds upon complex formation with the addition of 2 M excess EDTA, indicated by the appearance of amide resonances in the random coil chemical shift region of (15)NHSQC spectrum.

  11. Origin of the conformational modulation of the 13C NMR chemical shift of methoxy groups in aromatic natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toušek, Jaromír; Straka, Michal; Sklenář, Vladimír; Marek, Radek

    2013-01-24

    The interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters is essential to understanding experimental observations at the molecular and supramolecular levels and to designing new and more efficient molecular probes. In many aromatic natural compounds, unusual (13)C NMR chemical shifts have been reported for out-of-plane methoxy groups bonded to the aromatic ring (~62 ppm as compared to the typical value of ~56 ppm for an aromatic methoxy group). Here, we analyzed this phenomenon for a series of aromatic natural compounds using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. First, we checked the methodology used to optimize the structure and calculate the NMR chemical shifts in aromatic compounds. The conformational effects of the methoxy group on the (13)C NMR chemical shift then were interpreted by the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Natural Chemical Shift (NCS) approaches, and by excitation analysis of the chemical shifts, breaking down the total nuclear shielding tensor into the contributions from the different occupied orbitals and their magnetic interactions with virtual orbitals. We discovered that the atypical (13)C NMR chemical shifts observed are not directly related to a different conjugation of the lone pair of electrons of the methoxy oxygen with the aromatic ring, as has been suggested. Our analysis indicates that rotation of the methoxy group induces changes in the virtual molecular orbital space, which, in turn, correlate with the predominant part of the contribution of the paramagnetic deshielding connected with the magnetic interactions of the BD(CMet-H)→BD*(CMet-OMet) orbitals, resulting in the experimentally observed deshielding of the (13)C NMR resonance of the out-of-plane methoxy group.

  12. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

  13. Effects of Irritant Chemicals on Aedes aegypti Resting Behavior: Is There a Simple Shift to Untreated "Safe Sites"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    Effects of Irritant Chemicals on Aedes aegypti Resting Behavior: Is There a Simple Shift to Untreated ‘‘Safe Sites’’? Hortance Manda*, Luana M. Arce... aegypti to irritant and repellent chemicals that can be exploited to reduce man-vector contact. Maximum efficacy of interventions based on irritant...overall impact. Methods: Using a laboratory box assay, resting patterns of two population strains of female Ae. aegypti (THAI and PERU) were evaluated

  14. SUBSTITUENT CHEMICAL SHIFT (SCS) AND THE SEQUENCE STRUCTURE OF ETHYLENE-VINYL ALCOHOL COPOLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zinan; TIAN Wenjing; WU Shengrong; DAI Yingkun; FENG Zhiliu; SHEN Lianfang; YUAN Hanzhen

    1992-01-01

    Three ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were studied by means of the substituent chemical shift(SCS) method. The SCS parameters of hydroxy (-OH)in two different solvents were obtained: in deuterium oxide/phenol (20/80 W/W ) the parameters are S1 = 42.77 ± 0.08ppm, S2 = 7.15 ±0.06 ppm,S3(s )=-4.08±0.02ppm, S3(t)=-3.09±0.20ppm,S4=0.48±0.03ppm, S5 =0.26±0.05ppm. In o-dichlorobenzen-d4 S1(s)=44.79±0.61ppm, S2=7.40±0.00ppm, S3 (s)=-4.51±0.17ppm, S3 (t)= -3.13± 0.00 ppm, S4 =0 . 63±0.04ppm, S5=0.36±0.00ppm. Simultaneously the 13CNMR spectra of EVA copolymers were assigned by using the SCS parameters obtained.

  15. Chemical shift imaging and localised magnetic resonance spectroscopy in full-term asphyxiated neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brissaud, Olivier [Children' s Hospital, Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Bordeaux (France); Chateil, Jean-Francois; Bordessoules, Martine; Brun, Muriel [Children' s Hospital, Radiology Unit, Bordeaux (France)

    2005-10-01

    Diagnosis of brain lesions after birth anoxia-ischemia is essential for appropriate management. Clinical evaluation is not sufficient. MRI has been proven to provide useful information. To compare abnormalities observed with MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), localised magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and chemical shift imaging (CSI) and correlate these findings with the clinical outcome. Fourteen full-term neonates with birth asphyxia were studied. MRI, MRS and CSI were performed within the first 4 days of life. Lesions observed with DWI were correlated with outcome, but the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) did improve diagnostic confidence. The mean value of Lac/Cr for the neonates with a favourable outcome was statically lower than for those who died (0.22 vs 1.04; P = 0.01). The same results were observed for the Lac/NAA ratio (0.21 vs 1.23; P = 0.01). Data obtained with localised MRS and CSI were correlated for the ratio N-acetyl-aspartate/choline, but not for the other metabolites. No correlation was found between the ADC values and the metabolite ratios. Combination of these techniques could be helpful in our understanding of the physiopathological events occurring in neonates with asphyxia. (orig.)

  16. Future High Capacity Backbone Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jiayuan

    This thesis - Future High Capacity Backbone Networks - deals with the energy efficiency problems associated with the development of future optical networks. In the first half of the thesis, novel approaches for using multiple/single alternative energy sources for improving energy efficiency...... the context of the integrated control plane structure. Results show improvements of energy efficiency over three types of traffic, while still keeping acceptable QoS levels for high priority traffic....

  17. Analysis of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of cysteine and cystine residues in proteins: a quantum chemical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Osvaldo A.; Villegas, Myriam E.; Vila, Jorge A. [Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis (Argentina); Scheraga, Harold A., E-mail: has5@cornell.ed [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Cysteines possess a unique property among the 20 naturally occurring amino acids: it can be present in proteins in either the reduced or oxidized form, and can regulate the activity of some proteins. Consequently, to augment our previous treatment of the other types of residues, the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of 837 cysteines in disulfide-bonded cystine from a set of seven non-redundant proteins, determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, were computed at the DFT level of theory. Our results indicate that the errors between observed and computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts of such oxidized cysteines can be attributed to several effects such as: (a) the quality of the NMR-determined models, as evaluated by the conformational-average (ca) rmsd value; (b) the existence of high B-factor or crystal-packing effects for the X-ray-determined structures; (c) the dynamics of the disulfide bonds in solution; and (d) the differences in the experimental conditions under which the observed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts and the protein models were determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR-spectroscopy. These quantum-chemical-based calculations indicate the existence of two, almost non-overlapped, basins for the oxidized and reduced -SH {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, but not for the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, chemical shifts, in good agreement with the observation of 375 {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and 337 {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances from 132 proteins by Sharma and Rajarathnam (2000). Overall, our results indicate that explicit consideration of the disulfide bonds is a necessary condition for an accurate prediction of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of cysteines in cystines.

  18. Analysis of the contributions of ring current and electric field effects to the chemical shifts of RNA bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-02-21

    Ring current and electric field effects can considerably influence NMR chemical shifts in biomolecules. Understanding such effects is particularly important for the development of accurate mappings between chemical shifts and the structures of nucleic acids. In this work, we first analyzed the Pople and the Haigh-Mallion models in terms of their ability to describe nitrogen base conjugated ring effects. We then created a database (DiBaseRNA) of three-dimensional arrangements of RNA base pairs from X-ray structures, calculated the corresponding chemical shifts via a hybrid density functional theory approach and used the results to parametrize the ring current and electric field effects in RNA bases. Next, we studied the coupling of the electric field and ring current effects for different inter-ring arrangements found in RNA bases using linear model fitting, with joint electric field and ring current, as well as only electric field and only ring current approximations. Taken together, our results provide a characterization of the interdependence of ring current and electric field geometric factors, which is shown to be especially important for the chemical shifts of non-hydrogen atoms in RNA bases.

  19. Elucidation of the substitution pattern of 9,10-anthraquinones through the chemical shifts of peri-hydroxyl protons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schripsema, Jan; Danigno, Denise

    1996-01-01

    In 9,10-anthraquinones the chemical shift of a peri-hydroxyl proton is affected by the substituents in the other benzenoid ring. These effects are additive. They are useful for the determination of substitution patterns and have been used to revise the structures of six previously reported anthra...

  20. The local order of supercooled water in solution with LiCl studied by NMR proton chemical shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, C.; Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Cicero, N.; Dugo, G.; Mallamace, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the local order of water molecules in solution with lithium chloride at eutectic concentration. In particular, by measuring the proton chemical shift as a function of the temperature in the interval 203{ K}Widom line for water supporting the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  1. Correlation of 1H NMR Chemical Shift for Aqueous Solutions by Statistical Associating Fluid Theory Association Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许波; 李浩然; 王从敏; 许映杰; 韩世钧

    2005-01-01

    1H NMR chemical shifts of binary aqueous mixtures of acylamide, alcohol, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), and acetone are correlated by statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) association model. The comparison between SAFT association model and Wilson equation shows that the former is better for dealing with aqueous solutions. Finally, the specialties of both models are discussed.

  2. Female sea lamprey shift orientation toward a conspecific chemical cue to escape a sensory trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Cory O.; Johnson, Nicholas; Li, Ke; Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    The sensory trap model of signal evolution hypothesizes that signalers adapt to exploit a cue used by the receiver in another context. Although exploitation of receiver biases can result in conflict between the sexes, deceptive signaling systems that are mutually beneficial drive the evolution of stable communication systems. However, female responses in the nonsexual and sexual contexts may become uncoupled if costs are associated with exhibiting a similar response to a trait in both contexts. Male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) signal with a mating pheromone, 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (3kPZS), which may be a match to a juvenile cue used by females during migration. Upstream movement of migratory lampreys is partially guided by 3kPZS, but females only move toward 3kPZS with proximal accuracy during spawning. Here, we use in-stream behavioral assays paired with gonad histology to document the transition of female preference for juvenile- and male-released 3kPZS that coincides with the functional shift of 3kPZS as a migratory cue to a mating pheromone. Females became increasingly biased toward the source of synthesized 3kPZS as their maturation progressed into the reproductive phase, at which point, a preference for juvenile odor (also containing 3kPZS naturally) ceased to exist. Uncoupling of female responses during migration and spawning makes the 3kPZS communication system a reliable means of synchronizing mate search. The present study offers a rare example of a transition in female responses to a chemical cue between nonsexual and sexual contexts, provides insights into the origins of stable communication signaling systems.

  3. CheShift-2 resolves a local inconsistency between two X-ray crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila, Jorge A. [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Sue, Shih-Che [Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology (United States); Fraser, James S. [University of California, California Institute of Quantitative Biosciences (QB3) and Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Scheraga, Harold A. [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Dyson, H. Jane, E-mail: dyson@scripps.edu [Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Since chemical shifts provide important and relatively accessible information about protein structure in solution, a Web server, CheShift-2, was developed for structure interrogation, based on a quantum mechanics database of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. We report the application of CheShift-2 to a local inconsistency between two X-ray crystal structures (PDB IDs 1IKN and 1NFI) of the complex between the p65/p50 heterodimer of NF{kappa}B and its inhibitor I{kappa}B{alpha}. The availability of NMR resonance assignments that included the region of the inconsistency provided an opportunity for independent validation of the CheShift-2 server. Application of the server showed that the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts measured for the Gly270-Pro281 sequence close to the C-terminus of I{kappa}B{alpha} were unequivocally consistent with the backbone structure modeled in the 1IKN structure, and were inconsistent with the 1NFI structure. Previous NOE measurements had demonstrated that the position of a tryptophan ring in the region immediately N-terminal in this region was not consistent with either structure. Subsequent recalculation of the local structure in this region, based on the electron density of the deposited structure factors for 1IKN, confirmed that the local backbone structure was best modeled by 1IKN, but that the rotamer of Trp258 is consistent with the 1NFI structure, including the presence of a hydrogen bond between the ring N{epsilon}H of Trp258 and the backbone carbonyl group of Gln278. The consensus between all of these measures suggests that the CheShift-2 server operates well under circumstances in which backbone chemical shifts are available but where local plasticity may render X-ray structural data ambiguous.

  4. Cuticular hydrocarbon divergence in the jewel wasp Nasonia : evolutionary shifts in chemical communication channels?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buellesbach, J.; Gadau, J.; Beukeboom, L. W.; Echinger, F.; Raychoudhury, R.; Werren, J. H.; Schmitt, T.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution and maintenance of intraspecific communication channels constitute a key feature of chemical signalling and sexual communication. However, how divergent chemical communication channels evolve while maintaining their integrity for both sender and receiver is poorly understood. In this s

  5. Computer programming for nucleic acid studies. II. Total chemical shifts calculation of all protons of double-stranded helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessner-Prettre, C; Ribas Prado, F; Pullman, B; Kan, L; Kast, J R; Ts'o, P O

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program called SHIFTS is described. Through SHIFTS, one can calculate the NMR chemical shifts of the proton resonances of single and double-stranded nucleic acids of known sequences and of predetermined conformations. The program can handle RNA and DNA for an arbitrary sequence of a set of 4 out of the 6 base types A,U,G,C,I and T. Data files for the geometrical parameters are available for A-, A'-, B-, D- and S-conformations. The positions of all the atoms are calculated using a modified version of the SEQ program [1]. Then, based on this defined geometry three chemical shift effects exerted by the atoms of the neighboring nucleotides on the protons of each monomeric unit are calculated separately: the ring current shielding effect: the local atomic magnetic susceptibility effect (including both diamagnetic and paramagnetic terms); and the polarization or electric field effect. Results of the program are compared with experimental results for a gamma (ApApGpCpUpU) 2 helical duplex and with calculated results on this same helix based on model building of A'-form and B-form and on graphical procedure for evaluating the ring current effects.

  6. Towards the versatile DFT and MP2 computational schemes for 31P NMR chemical shifts taking into account relativistic corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Sergey V; Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2014-11-01

    The main factors affecting the accuracy and computational cost of the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts in the representative series of organophosphorous compounds are examined at the density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) levels. At the DFT level, the best functionals for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts are those of Keal and Tozer, KT2 and KT3. Both at the DFT and MP2 levels, the most reliable basis sets are those of Jensen, pcS-2 or larger, and those of Pople, 6-311G(d,p) or larger. The reliable basis sets of Dunning's family are those of at least penta-zeta quality that precludes their practical consideration. An encouraging finding is that basically, the locally dense basis set approach resulting in a dramatic decrease in computational cost is justified in the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts within the 1-2-ppm error. Relativistic corrections to (31)P NMR absolute shielding constants are of major importance reaching about 20-30 ppm (ca 7%) improving (not worsening!) the agreement of calculation with experiment. Further better agreement with the experiment by 1-2 ppm can be obtained by taking into account solvent effects within the integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model solvation scheme. We recommend the GIAO-DFT-KT2/pcS-3//pcS-2 scheme with relativistic corrections and solvent effects taken into account as the most versatile computational scheme for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts characterized by a mean absolute error of ca 9 ppm in the range of 550 ppm.

  7. Chemical shift of Mn and Cr K-edges in X-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Joseph; A K Yadav; S N Jha; D Bhattacharyya

    2013-11-01

    Mn and Cr K X-ray absorption edges were measured in various compounds containing Mn in Mn2+, Mn3+ and Mn4+ oxidation states and Cr in Cr3+ and Cr6+ oxidation states. Few compounds possess tetrahedral coordination in the 1st shell surrounding the cation while others possess octahedral coordination. Measurements have been carried out at the energy dispersive EXAFS beamline at INDUS-2 Synchrotron Radiation Source at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore. Energy shifts of ∼8–16 eV were observed for Mn K edge in the Mn-compounds while a shift of 13–20 eV was observed for Cr K edge in Cr-compounds compared to values in elementalMn and Cr, respectively. The different chemical shifts observed for compounds having the same oxidation state of the cation but different anions or ligands show the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cations in determining their X-ray absorption edges in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on Mn and Cr cations in the above compounds.

  8. Differential dynamic engagement within 24 SH3 domain: peptide complexes revealed by co-linear chemical shift perturbation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott J Stollar

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for the functional importance of multiple dynamically populated states within single proteins. However, peptide binding by protein-protein interaction domains, such as the SH3 domain, has generally been considered to involve the full engagement of peptide to the binding surface with minimal dynamics and simple methods to determine dynamics at the binding surface for multiple related complexes have not been described. We have used NMR spectroscopy combined with isothermal titration calorimetry to comprehensively examine the extent of engagement to the yeast Abp1p SH3 domain for 24 different peptides. Over one quarter of the domain residues display co-linear chemical shift perturbation (CCSP behavior, in which the position of a given chemical shift in a complex is co-linear with the same chemical shift in the other complexes, providing evidence that each complex exists as a unique dynamic rapidly inter-converting ensemble. The extent the specificity determining sub-surface of AbpSH3 is engaged as judged by CCSP analysis correlates with structural and thermodynamic measurements as well as with functional data, revealing the basis for significant structural and functional diversity amongst the related complexes. Thus, CCSP analysis can distinguish peptide complexes that may appear identical in terms of general structure and percent peptide occupancy but have significant local binding differences across the interface, affecting their ability to transmit conformational change across the domain and resulting in functional differences.

  9. Predicting Heats of Explosion of Nitroaromatic Compounds through NBO Charges and 15N NMR Chemical Shifts of Nitro Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Infante-Castillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new quantitative model to predict the heat of explosion of nitroaromatic compounds using the natural bond orbital (NBO charge and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitro groups (15NNitro as structural parameters. The values of the heat of explosion predicted for 21 nitroaromatic compounds using the model described here were compared with experimental data. The prediction ability of the model was assessed by the leave-one-out cross-validation method. The cross-validation results show that the model is significant and stable and that the predicted accuracy is within 0.146 MJ kg−1, with an overall root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP below 0.183 MJ kg−1. Strong correlations were observed between the heat of explosion and the charges (R2 = 0.9533 and 15N NMR chemical shifts (R2 = 0.9531 of the studied compounds. In addition, the dependence of the heat of explosion on the presence of activating or deactivating groups of nitroaromatic explosives was analyzed. All calculations, including optimizations, NBO charges, and 15NNitro NMR chemical shifts analyses, were performed using density functional theory (DFT and a 6-311+G(2d,p basis set. Based on these results, this practical quantitative model can be used as a tool in the design and development of highly energetic materials (HEM based on nitroaromatic compounds.

  10. Identification of zinc-ligated cysteine residues based on 13Calpha and 13Cbeta chemical shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhaber, Gregory J; Snyder, David; Moseley, Hunter N B; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2006-04-01

    Although a significant number of proteins include bound metals as part of their structure, the identification of amino acid residues coordinated to non-paramagnetic metals by NMR remains a challenge. Metal ligands can stabilize the native structure and/or play critical catalytic roles in the underlying biochemistry. An atom's chemical shift is exquisitely sensitive to its electronic environment. Chemical shift data can provide valuable insights into structural features, including metal ligation. In this study, we demonstrate that overlapped 13Cbeta chemical shift distributions of Zn-ligated and non-metal-ligated cysteine residues are largely resolved by the inclusion of the corresponding 13Calpha chemical shift information, together with secondary structural information. We demonstrate this with a bivariate distribution plot, and statistically with a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Using 287 13Calpha/13Cbeta shift pairs from 79 proteins with known three-dimensional structures, including 86 13Calpha and 13Cbeta shifts for 43 Zn-ligated cysteine residues, along with corresponding oxidation state and secondary structure information, we have built a logistic regression model that distinguishes between oxidized cystines, reduced (non-metal ligated) cysteines, and Zn-ligated cysteines. Classifying cysteines/cystines with a statistical model incorporating all three phenomena resulted in a predictor of Zn ligation with a recall, precision and F-measure of 83.7%, and an accuracy of 95.1%. This model was applied in the analysis of Bacillus subtilis IscU, a protein involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. The model predicts that all three cysteines of IscU are metal ligands. We confirmed these results by (i) examining the effect of metal chelation on the NMR spectrum of IscU, and (ii) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. To gain further insight into the frequency of occurrence of non-cysteine Zn

  11. Structural Expression of Chemical Environment and C-13 NMR Chemical Shift for Carbons in Alcohols%脂肪醇分子碳环境结构表征与碳谱化学位移

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘树深; 徐红

    2000-01-01

    A novel atomic electronegative distance vector (AEDV) has been developed to express the chemical environment of various equivalent carbon in alcohols and four 4-parameter linear relationship between chemical shift and AEDV are created by using multiple linear regression.

  12. An atomic electronegative distance vector and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of alcohols and alkanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU, Shu-Shea; XIA, Zhi-Ning; CAI, Shao-Xi; LIU, Yan

    2000-01-01

    A novel atomic electronegative distance vector (AEDV) has been developed to express the chemical environment of various chemically equivalent carbon atoms in alcohols and alkanes.Combining AEDV and γ parameter, four five-parameter Iinear relationship equations of chemical shift for four types of carbon atoms are created by using multiple linear regression.Correlation coefficients are R = 0.9887, 0.9972, 0.9978 and 0.9968 and roots of mean square error are RMS = 0.906, 0.821, 1.091and 1.091of four types of carbons, i.e., type1,2, 3, and 4 for primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary carbons, respectively. The stability and prediction capacity for external samples of four models have been tested by cross- validation.

  13. Thalassiosira spp. community composition shifts in response to chemical and physical forcing in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, P Dreux; Whitney, Leeann P; Haddock, Traci L; Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Roy, Eric G; Wells, Mark L; Jenkins, Bethany D

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are genetically diverse unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes that are key primary producers in the ocean. Many of the over 100 extant diatom species in the cosmopolitan genus Thalassiosira are difficult to distinguish in mixed populations using light microscopy. Here, we examine shifts in Thalassiosira spp. composition along a coastal to open ocean transect that encountered a 3-month-old Haida eddy in the northeast Pacific Ocean. To quantify shifts in Thalassiosira species composition, we developed a targeted automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) method to identify Thalassiosira spp. in environmental samples. As many specific fragment lengths are indicative of individual Thalassiosira spp., the ARISA method is a useful screening tool to identify changes in the relative abundance and distribution of specific species. The method also enabled us to assess changes in Thalassiosira community composition in response to chemical and physical forcing. Thalassiosira spp. community composition in the core of a 3-month-old Haida eddy remained largely (>80%) similar over a 2-week period, despite moving 24 km southwestward. Shifts in Thalassiosira species correlated with changes in dissolved iron (Fe) and temperature throughout the sampling period. Simultaneously tracking community composition and relative abundance of Thalassiosira species within the physical and chemical context they occurred allowed us to identify quantitative linkages between environmental conditions and community response.

  14. Thalassiosira spp. community composition shifts in response to chemical and physical forcing in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoebe Dreux Chappell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are genetically diverse unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes that are key primary producers in the ocean. Many of the over 100 extant diatom species in the cosmopolitan genus Thalassiosira are difficult to distinguish in mixed populations using light microscopy. Here we examine shifts in Thalassiosira spp. composition along a coastal to open ocean transect that encountered a three-month-old Haida eddy in the northeast Pacific Ocean. To quantify shifts in Thalassiosira species composition, we developed a targeted automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA method to identify Thalassiosira spp. in environmental samples. As many specific fragment lengths are indicative of individual Thalassiosira spp., the ARISA method is a useful screening tool to identify changes in the relative abundance and distribution of specific species. The method also enabled us to assess changes in Thalassiosira community composition in response to chemical and physical forcing. Thalassiosira spp. community composition in the core of a three-month-old Haida eddy remained largely (>80% similar over a two-week period, despite moving 24 km southwestward. Shifts in Thalassiosira species correlated with changes in dissolved iron (Fe and temperature throughout the sampling period. Simultaneously tracking community composition and relative abundance of Thalassiosira species within the physical and chemical context they occurred allowed us to identify quantitative linkages between environmental conditions and community response.

  15. Observed and calculated 1H and 13C chemical shifts induced by the in situ oxidation of model sulfides to sulfoxides and sulfones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracínský, Martin; Pohl, Radek; Slavetínská, Lenka; Budesínský, Milos

    2010-09-01

    A series of model sulfides was oxidized in the NMR sample tube to sulfoxides and sulfones by the stepwise addition of meta-chloroperbenzoic acid in deuterochloroform. Various methods of quantum chemical calculations have been tested to reproduce the observed (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of the starting sulfides and their oxidation products. It has been shown that the determination of the energy-minimized conformation is a very important condition for obtaining realistic data in the subsequent calculation of the NMR chemical shifts. The correlation between calculated and observed chemical shifts is very good for carbon atoms (even for the 'cheap' DFT B3LYP/6-31G* method) and somewhat less satisfactory for hydrogen atoms. The calculated chemical shifts induced by oxidation (the Delta delta values) agree even better with the experimental values and can also be used to determine the oxidation state of the sulfur atom (-S-, -SO-, -SO(2)-).

  16. Predicting paramagnetic 1H NMR chemical shifts and state-energy separations in spin-crossover host-guest systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isley, William C; Zarra, Salvatore; Carlson, Rebecca K; Bilbeisi, Rana A; Ronson, Tanya K; Nitschke, Jonathan R; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J

    2014-06-14

    The behaviour of metal-organic cages upon guest encapsulation can be difficult to elucidate in solution. Paramagnetic metal centres introduce additional dispersion of signals that is useful for characterisation of host-guest complexes in solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, paramagnetic centres also complicate spectral assignment due to line broadening, signal integration error, and large changes in chemical shifts, which can be difficult to assign even for known compounds. Quantum chemical predictions can provide information that greatly facilitates the assignment of NMR signals and identification of species present. Here we explore how the prediction of paramagnetic NMR spectra may be used to gain insight into the spin crossover (SCO) properties of iron(II)-based metal organic coordination cages, specifically examining how the structure of the local metal coordination environment affects SCO. To represent the tetrahedral metal-organic cage, a model system is generated by considering an isolated metal-ion vertex: fac-ML3(2+) (M = Fe(II), Co(II); L = N-phenyl-2-pyridinaldimine). The sensitivity of the (1)H paramagnetic chemical shifts to local coordination environments is assessed and utilised to shed light on spin crossover behaviour in iron complexes. Our data indicate that expansion of the metal coordination sphere must precede any thermal SCO. An attempt to correlate experimental enthalpies of SCO with static properties of bound guests shows that no simple relationship exists, and that effects are likely due to nuanced dynamic response to encapsulation.

  17. Halodemetallation of (Z)-1-[2-(Triarylstannyl)vinyl]-cyclooctanol and Correlation of Proton Chemical Shift with Electronegativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Introduction Organotin compounds have attracted attention as an optimal model for antitumour agents due to the function of the interesting intramolecular O→Sn coordination[1,2]. Our recent concern has been focused on the preparation of (Z)-1-[2-(triarylstannyl)vinyl]-cyclooctanol[3]. In order to find more appropriate compounds used as anticancer agents and explore the effect of the coordinate O→Sn interaction to the antitumor activity, the new compounds were halodemetallated and characterized. During the course of the process, some linear correlations between proton chemical shifts and the sum of the electronegativities of the tin substituents of halogens were found for the first time.

  18. Predicting Heats of Explosion of Nitroaromatic Compounds through NBO Charges and 15N NMR Chemical Shifts of Nitro Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Infante-Castillo; Samuel P. Hernández-Rivera

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a new quantitative model to predict the heat of explosion of nitroaromatic compounds using the natural bond orbital (NBO) charge and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitro groups (15NNitro) as structural parameters. The values of the heat of explosion predicted for 21 nitroaromatic compounds using the model described here were compared with experimental data. The prediction ability of the model was assessed by the leave-one-out cross-validation method. The cross-validation re...

  19. The Effect of Molecular Conformation on the Accuracy of Theoretical (1)H and (13)C Chemical Shifts Calculated by Ab Initio Methods for Metabolic Mixture Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Shimbo, Yudai; Komatsu, Keiko; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-14

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for analyzing metabolic mixtures. The information obtained from an NMR spectrum is in the form of physical parameters, such as chemical shifts, and construction of databases for many metabolites will be useful for data interpretation. To increase the accuracy of theoretical chemical shifts for development of a database for a variety of metabolites, the effects of sets of conformations (structural ensembles) and the levels of theory on computations of theoretical chemical shifts were systematically investigated for a set of 29 small molecules in the present study. For each of the 29 compounds, 101 structures were generated by classical molecular dynamics at 298.15 K, and then theoretical chemical shifts for 164 (1)H and 123 (13)C atoms were calculated by ab initio quantum chemical methods. Six levels of theory were used by pairing Hartree-Fock, B3LYP (density functional theory), or second order Møller-Plesset perturbation with 6-31G or aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The six average fluctuations in the (1)H chemical shift were ±0.63, ± 0.59, ± 0.70, ± 0.62, ± 0.75, and ±0.66 ppm for the structural ensembles, and the six average errors were ±0.34, ± 0.27, ± 0.32, ± 0.25, ± 0.32, and ±0.25 ppm. The results showed that chemical shift fluctuations with changes in the conformation because of molecular motion were larger than the differences between computed and experimental chemical shifts for all six levels of theory. In conclusion, selection of an appropriate structural ensemble should be performed before theoretical chemical shift calculations for development of an accurate database for a variety of metabolites.

  20. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding.

  1. NMR chemical shift as analytical derivative of the Helmholtz free energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Heuvel, Willem; Soncini, Alessandro

    2013-02-07

    We present a theory for the temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic shielding tensor of molecules with arbitrary electronic structure. The theory is a generalization of Ramsey's theory for closed-shell molecules. The shielding tensor is defined as a second derivative of the Helmholtz free energy of the electron system in equilibrium with the applied magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moments. This derivative is analytically evaluated and expressed as a sum over states formula. Special consideration is given to a system with an isolated degenerate ground state for which the size of the degeneracy and the composition of the wave functions are arbitrary. In this case, the paramagnetic part of the shielding tensor is expressed in terms of the g and A tensors of the electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian of the degenerate state. As an illustration of the proposed theory, we provide an explicit formula for the paramagnetic shift of the central lanthanide ion in endofullerenes Ln@C(60), with Ln = Ce(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Dy(3+), Er(3+), and Yb(3+), where the ground state can be a strongly spin-orbit coupled icosahedral sextet for which the paramagnetic shift cannot be described by previous theories.

  2. Modeling the chemical shift of lanthanide 4f electron binding energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Lanthanides in compounds can adopt the tetravalent [Xe]4fn−1 (like Ce4+, Pr4+, Tb4+), the trivalent [Xe]4fn (all lanthanides), or the divalent [Xe]4f n+1 configuration (like Eu2+, Yb2+, Sm2+, Tm2+). The 4f-electron binding energy depends on the charge Q of the lanthanide ion and its chemical environ

  3. Changing the topology of protein backbone: the effect of backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a SH3 domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank H Schumann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the effects of the backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a protein is essential for using protein topology engineering to alter protein stability and function. Here we have determined, for the first time, the structure and dynamics of the linear and various circular constructs of the N-SH3 domain from protein c-Crk. These constructs differ in the length and amino acid composition of the cyclization region. The backbone cyclization was carried out using intein-mediated intramolecular chemical ligation between the juxtaposed N- and the C-termini. The structure and backbone dynamics studies were performed using solution NMR. Our data suggest that the backbone cyclization has little effect on the overall three-dimensional structure of the SH3 domain: besides the termini, only minor structural changes were found in the proximity of the cyclization region. In contrast to the structure, backbone dynamics are significantly affected by the cyclization. On the subnanosecond time scale, the backbone of all circular constructs on average appears more rigid than that of the linear SH3 domain; this effect is observed over the entire backbone and is not limited to the cyclization site. The backbone mobility of the circular constructs becomes less restricted with increasing length of the circularization loop. In addition, significant conformational exchange motions (on the sub-millisecond time scale were found in the N-Src loop and in the adjacent β-strands in all circular constructs studied in this work. These effects of backbone cyclization on protein dynamics have potential implications for the stability of the protein fold and for ligand binding.

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Tubbs, Jason D; Kennedy, Scott D; Lopez, Michael J; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2015-11-17

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure-function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5' to 3' directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5' to 3' directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure.

  5. Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

    2010-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

  6. Theory of NMR chemical shift in an electronic state with arbitrary degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Heuvel, Willem Van den

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors for electronic states with arbitrary degeneracy. The shieldings are here expressed in terms of generalized Zeeman ($g^{(k)}$) and hyperfine ($A^{(k)}$) tensors, of all ranks $k$ allowed by the size of degeneracy. Contrary to recent proposals [T. O. Pennanen and J. Vaara, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 133002 (2008)], our theory is valid in the strong spin-orbit coupling limit. Ab initio calculations for the 4-fold degenerate $\\Gamma_8$ ground state of lanthanide-doped fluorite crystals CaF$_2$:Ln (Ln = Pr$^{2+}$, Nd$^{3+}$, Sm$^{3+}$, and Dy$^{3+}$) show that previously neglected contributions can account for more than 50% of the paramagnetic shift.

  7. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Tamim A., E-mail: tamim.darwish@ansto.gov.au [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J. [National Deuteration Facility, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 21, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); James, Michael [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual {sup 1}H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D{sub 2}O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary {sup 13}C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing {sup 13}C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve {sup 13}C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ({sup 1}H, {sup 2}H) resolves closely separated quaternary {sup 13}C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up. - Graphical abstract: The relative intensities of quaternary {sup 13}C {"1H,"2H} resonances are equal despite the different relaxation delays, allowing the relative abundance of the different deuterated isotopologues to be calculated using NMR fast

  8. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back About Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  9. NMR chemical shift as analytical derivative of the Helmholtz free energy

    CERN Document Server

    Heuvel, Willem Van den

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory for the temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic shielding tensor of molecules with arbitrary electronic structure. The theory is a generalization of Ramsey's theory for closed-shell molecules. The shielding tensor is defined as a second derivative of the Helmholtz free energy of the electron system in equilibrium with the applied magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moments. This derivative is analytically evaluated and expressed as a sum over states formula. Special consideration is given to a system with an isolated degenerate ground state for which the size of the degeneracy and the composition of the wave functions are arbitrary. In this case the paramagnetic part of the shielding tensor is expressed in terms of the $g$ and $A$ tensors of the EPR spin Hamiltonian of the degenerate state. As an illustration of the proposed theory, we provide an explicit formula for the paramagnetic shift of the central lanthanide ion in endofullerenes Ln@C$_{60}$, with Ln=Ce$^{3+}$, Nd$^{3+}$, Sm$^{3+...

  10. Liver fat quantification: Comparison of dual-echo and triple-echo chemical shift MRI to MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satkunasingham, Janakan; Besa, Cecilia [Department of Radiology, Body MRI, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Bane, Octavia [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Shah, Ami [Department of Radiology, Body MRI, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Oliveira, André de; Gilson, Wesley D.; Kannengiesser, Stephan [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Taouli, Bachir, E-mail: bachir.taouli@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiology, Body MRI, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We present a large cohort of patients who underwent dual and triple echo chemical shift imaging against multi-echo T{sub 2} corrected MR spectroscopy (MRS) for liver fat quantification. • Our data suggests that a triple-echo sequence is highly accurate for detection of liver fat, even in the presence of T{sub 2}{sup *} shortening, with minor discrepancies when compared with the advanced fat quantification method. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess the diagnostic value of MRI using dual-echo (2PD) and triple-echo (3PD) chemical shift imaging for liver fat quantification against multi-echo T{sub 2} corrected MR spectroscopy (MRS) used as the reference standard, and examine the effect of T{sub 2}{sup *} imaging on accuracy of MRI for fat quantification. Materials and methods: Patients who underwent 1.5 T liver MRI that incorporated 2PD, 3PD, multi-echo T{sub 2}{sup *} and MRS were included in this IRB approved prospective study. Regions of interest were placed in the liver to measure fat fraction (FF) with 2PD and 3PD and compared with MRS-FF. A random subset of 25 patients with a wide range of MRS-FF was analyzed with an advanced FF calculation method, to prove concordance with the 3PD. The statistical analysis included correlation stratified according to T{sub 2}{sup *}, Bland-Altman analysis, and calculation of diagnostic accuracy for detection of MRS-FF > 6.25%. Results: 220 MRI studies were identified in 217 patients (mean BMI 28.0 ± 5.6). 57/217 (26.2%) patients demonstrated liver steatosis (MRS-FF > 6.25%). Bland-Altman analysis revealed strong agreement between 3PD and MRS (mean ± 1.96 SD: −0.5% ± 4.6%) and weaker agreement between 2PD and MRS (4.7% ± 16.0%). Sensitivity of 3PD for diagnosing FF> 6.25% was higher than that of 2PD. 3PD-FF showed minor discrepancies (coefficient of variation <10%) from FF measured with the advanced method. Conclusion: Our large series study validates the use of 3PD chemical shift sequence for detection of

  11. Chemical structure elucidation from ¹³C NMR chemical shifts: efficient data processing using bipartite matching and maximal clique algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koichi, Shungo; Arisaka, Masaki; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Atsushi; Iwata, Satoru; Uno, Takeaki; Satoh, Hiroko

    2014-04-28

    Computer-assisted chemical structure elucidation has been intensively studied since the first use of computers in chemistry in the 1960s. Most of the existing elucidators use a structure-spectrum database to obtain clues about the correct structure. Such a structure-spectrum database is expected to grow on a daily basis. Hence, the necessity to develop an efficient structure elucidation system that can adapt to the growth of a database has been also growing. Therefore, we have developed a new elucidator using practically efficient graph algorithms, including the convex bipartite matching, weighted bipartite matching, and Bron-Kerbosch maximal clique algorithms. The utilization of the two matching algorithms especially is a novel point of our elucidator. Because of these sophisticated algorithms, the elucidator exactly produces a correct structure if all of the fragments are included in the database. Even if not all of the fragments are in the database, the elucidator proposes relevant substructures that can help chemists to identify the actual chemical structures. The elucidator, called the CAST/CNMR Structure Elucidator, plays a complementary role to the CAST/CNMR Chemical Shift Predictor, and together these two functions can be used to analyze the structures of organic compounds.

  12. Chemical shift powder spectra enhanced by multiple-contact cross-polarization under slow magic-angle spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Jésus; Perrone, Barbara; Hirschinger, Jérôme

    2013-02-01

    A simple multiple-contact cross-polarization (CP) scheme is applied to a powder sample of ferrocene and β-calcium formate under static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The method is described analytically through the density matrix formalism. We show that multiple equilibrations-re-equilibrations with the proton spin bath improves the polarization transfer efficiency at short contact times and provides higher signal enhancements than state-of-the art techniques such as adiabatic passage through the Hartmann-Hahn condition CP (APHH-CP) when MAS is applied. The resulting chemical shift powder spectra then are identical to the ones obtained by using ROtor-Directed Exchange of Orientations CP (APHH-RODEO-CP) with intensity gains of a factor 1.1-1.3.

  13. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical...... side missing structural elements in the models can be suggested. A number of proposed structures for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on the above analysis....... shifts of all substructures from the proposed models. A full reconstruction makes sure that all carbons are accounted for and enables on the negative side to discuss structural elements identified from recorded spectra of humic substances that cannot be observed in the simulated spectrum. On the positive...

  14. Chemical shift powder spectra enhanced by multiple-contact cross-polarization under slow magic-angle spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Jésus; Perrone, Barbara; Hirschinger, Jérôme

    2013-02-01

    A simple multiple-contact cross-polarization (CP) scheme is applied to a powder sample of ferrocene and β-calcium formate under static and magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The method is described analytically through the density matrix formalism. We show that multiple equilibrations-re-equilibrations with the proton spin bath improves the polarization transfer efficiency at short contact times and provides higher signal enhancements than state-of-the art techniques such as adiabatic passage through the Hartmann-Hahn condition CP (APHH-CP) when MAS is applied. The resulting chemical shift powder spectra then are identical to the ones obtained by using ROtor-Directed Exchange of Orientations CP (APHH-RODEO-CP) with intensity gains of a factor 1.1-1.3.

  15. Portable Sequentially Shifted Excitation Raman spectroscopy as an innovative tool for in situ chemical interrogation of painted surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Claudia; Botteon, Alessandra; Bertasa, Moira; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Sali, Diego

    2016-08-07

    We present the first validation and application of portable Sequentially Shifted Excitation (SSE) Raman spectroscopy for the survey of painted layers in art. The method enables the acquisition of shifted Raman spectra and the recovery of the spectral data through the application of a suitable reconstruction algorithm. The technique has a great potentiality in art where commonly a strong fluorescence obscures the Raman signal of the target, especially when conventional portable Raman spectrometers are used for in situ analyses. Firstly, the analytical capability of portable SSE Raman spectroscopy is critically discussed using reference materials and laboratory specimens, comparing its results with other conventional high performance laboratory instruments (benchtop FT-Raman and dispersive Raman spectrometers with an external fiber optic probe); secondly, it is applied directly in situ to study the complex polychromy of Italian prestigious terracotta sculptures of the 16(th) century. Portable SSE Raman spectroscopy represents a new investigation modality in art, expanding the portfolio of non-invasive, chemically specific analytical tools.

  16. Microscopic structures of ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate in water probed by the relative chemical shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The relative chemical shifts (△δ) △δwere put forward to investigate the microscopic structure of 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EmimBF4) during the dilution process with water.The concentration-dependent △δ(C2)H-(C4)H,△δ(C2)H-(C5)H and △δ(C4)H-(C5)H were analyzed.The results reveal that the variations of the microscopic structures of three aromatic protons are inconsistent.The strength of the H-bond between water and three aromatic protons follows the order:(C2)H···O > (C4)H···O > (C5)H···O.The concentration-dependent △δ(C6)H-(C7)H and △δ(C6)H-(C8)H indicate the formation of the H-bonds of (Calkyl)H···O is impossible,and more water is located around (C6)H than around (C7)H or (C8)H.The concentration-dependent △δ(C2)H-(C4)H and △δ(C2)H-(C5)H both increase rapidly when xwater > 0.9 or so,suggesting the ionic pairs of EmimBF4 are dissociated rapidly.The turning points of concentration-dependent △δ(C2)H-(C4)H and △δ(C2)H-(C5)H indicate that some physical properties of the EmimBF4/water mixtures also change at the corresponding concentration point.The microscopic structures of EmimBF4 in water could be clearly detected by the relative chemical shifts.

  17. Thickness-Dependent Binding Energy Shift in Few-Layer MoS2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Chen, Ruei-San; Chou, Tsu-Chin; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yang-Fang; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2016-08-31

    The thickness-dependent surface states of MoS2 thin films grown by the chemical vapor deposition process on the SiO2-Si substrates are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Raman and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy suggest the thicknesses of MoS2 films to be ranging from 3 to 10 layers. Both the core levels and valence band edges of MoS2 shift downward ∼0.2 eV as the film thickness increases, which can be ascribed to the Fermi level variations resulting from the surface states and bulk defects. Grainy features observed from the atomic force microscopy topographies, and sulfur-vacancy-induced defect states illustrated at the valence band spectra imply the generation of surface states that causes the downward band bending at the n-type MoS2 surface. Bulk defects in thick MoS2 may also influence the Fermi level oppositely compared to the surface states. When Au contacts with our MoS2 thin films, the Fermi level downshifts and the binding energy reduces due to the hole-doping characteristics of Au and easy charge transfer from the surface defect sites of MoS2. The shift of the onset potentials in hydrogen evolution reaction and the evolution of charge-transfer resistances extracted from the impedance measurement also indicate the Fermi level varies with MoS2 film thickness. The tunable Fermi level and the high chemical stability make our MoS2 a potential catalyst. The observed thickness-dependent properties can also be applied to other transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and facilitates the development in the low-dimensional electronic devices and catalysts.

  18. Zero discharge tanning: a shift from chemical to biocatalytic leather processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, Thirumalachari

    2002-10-01

    Beam house processes (Beam house processes generally mean liming-reliming processes, which employ beam.) contribute more than 60% of the total pollution from leather processing. The use of lime and sodium sulfide is of environmental concern (1, 2). Recently, the authors have developed an enzyme-based dehairing assisted with a very low amount of sodium sulfide, which completely avoids the use of lime. However, the dehaired pelt requires opening up of fiber bundles for further processing, where lime is employed to achieve this through osmotic swelling. Huge amounts of lime sludge and total solids are the main drawbacks of lime. An alternative bioprocess, based on alpha-amylase for fiber opening, has been attempted after enzymatic unhairing. This totally eliminates the use of lime in leather processing. This method enables subsequent processes and operations in leather making feasible without a deliming process. A control experiment was run in parallel using conventional liming-reliming processes. It has been found that the extent of opening up of fiber bundles using alpha-amylase is comparable to that of the control. This has been substantiated through scanning electron microscopic, stratigraphic chrome distribution analysis, and softness measurements. Performance of the leathers is shown to be on a par with leathers produced by the conventional process through physical and hand evaluation. Importantly, softness of the leathers is numerically proven to be comparable with that of control. The process also demonstrates reduction in chemical oxygen demand load by 45% and total solids load by 20% compared to the conventional process. The total dry sludge from the beam house processes is brought down from 152 to 8 kg for processing 1 ton of raw hides.

  19. Comparison of experimental and DFT-calculated NMR chemical shifts of 2-amino and 2-hydroxyl substituted phenyl benzimidazoles, benzoxazoles and benzothiazoles in four solvents using the IEF-PCM solvation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierens, Gregory K; Venkatachalam, T K; Reutens, David C

    2016-04-01

    A comparative study of experimental and calculated NMR chemical shifts of six compounds comprising 2-amino and 2-hydroxy phenyl benzoxazoles/benzothiazoles/benzimidazoles in four solvents is reported. The benzimidazoles showed interesting spectral characteristics, which are discussed. The proton and carbon chemical shifts were similar for all solvents. The largest chemical shift deviations were observed in benzene. The chemical shifts were calculated with density functional theory using a suite of four functionals and basis set combinations. The calculated chemical shifts revealed a good match to the experimentally observed values in most of the solvents. The mean absolute error was used as the primary metric. The use of an additional metric is suggested, which is based on the order of chemical shifts. The DP4 probability measures were also used to compare the experimental and calculated chemical shifts for each compound in the four solvents. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. High-Frequency (1)H NMR Chemical Shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) Hydrides Induced by Relativistic Effects: Quest for Pb(II) Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vícha, Jan; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2016-10-17

    The role of relativistic effects on (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides is investigated by using fully relativistic DFT calculations. The stability of possible Pb(II) hydride isomers is studied together with their (1)H NMR chemical shifts, which are predicted in the high-frequency region, up to 90 ppm. These (1)H signals are dictated by sizable relativistic contributions due to spin-orbit coupling at the heavy atom and can be as large as 80 ppm for a hydrogen atom bound to Pb(II). Such high-frequency (1)H NMR chemical shifts of Pb(II) hydride resonances cannot be detected in the (1)H NMR spectra with standard experimental setup. Extended (1)H NMR spectral ranges are thus suggested for studies of Pb(II) compounds. Modulation of spin-orbit relativistic contribution to (1)H NMR chemical shift is found to be important also in the experimentally known Sn(II) hydrides. Because the (1)H NMR chemical shifts were found to be rather sensitive to the changes in the coordination sphere of the central metal in both Sn(II) and Pb(II) hydrides, their application for structural investigation is suggested.

  1. Predictions of the fluorine NMR chemical shifts of perfluorinated carboxylic acids, CnF(2n+1)COOH (n = 6-8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zizhong; Goddard, John D

    2009-12-17

    Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) are a class of persistent environmental pollutants. Commercially available PFCAs are mixtures of linear and branched isomers, possibly with impurities. Different isomers have different physical and chemical properties and toxicities. However, little is known about the properties and the finer details of the structures of the individual branched isomers. Full geometry optimizations for the linear n-alkane (C(6)-C(27)) PFCAs indicated that all have helical structures. The helical angle increases slightly with increasing chain length, from 16.3 degrees in C(6)F(13)COOH to 17.0 degrees in C(27)F(55)COOH. This study predicts (19)F NMR parameters for 69 linear and branched isomers of the perfluoro carboxylic acids C(6)F(13)COOH, C(7)F(15)COOH, and C(8)F(17)COOH. B3LYP-GIAO/6-31++G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) was used for the NMR calculations with analysis of the chemical shifts by the natural bond orbital method. The predictions of the (19)F chemical shifts revealed the differences among the CF(3), CF(2), and CF groups. In general, the absolute values for the chemical shifts for the CF(3) group are smaller than 90 ppm, for the CF larger than 160 ppm, and for the CF(2) between 110 and 130 ppm. The chemical shifts of the branched isomers are smaller in magnitude than the linear ones. The decrease is correlated with the steric hindrance of the CF(3) groups, the more hindered the CF(3), the greater the decrease in the (19)F chemical shifts. The predicted (19)F chemical shifts are similar to those for analogous perfluoro compounds with other terminal functional groups such as -SO(3)H or -SO(3)NH(2)CH(2)CH(3).

  2. Green Network Planning Model for Optical Backbones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Jensen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Communication networks are becoming more essential for our daily lives and critically important for industry and governments. The intense growth in the backbone traffic implies an increment of the power demands of the transmission systems. This power usage might have a significant negative effect...... on the environment in general. In network planning there are existing planning models focused on QoS provisioning, investment minimization or combinations of both and other parameters. But there is a lack of a model for designing green optical backbones. This paper presents novel ideas to be able to define...

  3. High accuracy NMR chemical shift corrected for bulk magnetization as a tool for structural elucidation of dilutable microemulsions. Part 1 - Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Roy E; Darmon, Eliezer; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2016-02-01

    In microemulsions, changes in droplet size and shape and possible transformations occur under various conditions. They are difficult to characterize by most analytical tools because of their nano-sized structure and dynamic nature. Several methods are usually combined to obtain reliable information, guiding the scientist in understanding their physical behavior. We felt that there is a need for a technique that complements those in use today in order to provide more information on the microemulsion behavior, mainly as a function of dilution with water. The improvement of NMR chemical shift measurements independent of bulk magnetization effects makes it possible to study the very weak intermolecular chemical shift effects. In the present study, we used NMR high resolution magic angle spinning to measure the chemical shift very accurately, free of bulk magnetization effects. The chemical shift of microemulsion components is measured as a function of the water content in order to validate the method in an interesting and promising, U-type dilutable microemulsion, which had been previously studied by a variety of techniques. Phase transition points of the microemulsion (O/W, bicontinuous, W/O) and changes in droplet shape were successfully detected using high-accuracy chemical shift measurements. We analyzed the results and found them to be compatible with the previous studies, paving the way for high-accuracy chemical shifts to be used for the study of other microemulsion systems. We detected two transition points along the water dilution line of the concentrate (reverse micelles) corresponding to the transition from swollen W/O nano-droplets to bicontinuous to the O/W droplets along with the changes in the droplets' sizes and shapes. The method seems to be in excellent agreement with other previously studied techniques and shows the advantage of this easy and valid technique.

  4. Rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments using cryogenic probes, a distributed Linux-based computing architecture, and an integrated set of spectral analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monleón, Daniel; Colson, Kimberly; Moseley, Hunter N B; Anklin, Clemens; Oswald, Robert; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2002-01-01

    Rapid data collection, spectral referencing, processing by time domain deconvolution, peak picking and editing, and assignment of NMR spectra are necessary components of any efficient integrated system for protein NMR structure analysis. We have developed a set of software tools designated AutoProc, AutoPeak, and AutoAssign, which function together with the data processing and peak-picking programs NMRPipe and Sparky, to provide an integrated software system for rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments. In this paper we demonstrate that these tools, together with high-sensitivity triple resonance NMR cryoprobes for data collection and a Linux-based computer cluster architecture, can be combined to provide nearly complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structures (based on chemical shift data) for a 59-residue protein in less than 30 hours of data collection and processing time. In this optimum case of a small protein providing excellent spectra, extensive backbone resonance assignments could also be obtained using less than 6 hours of data collection and processing time. These results demonstrate the feasibility of high throughput triple resonance NMR for determining resonance assignments and secondary structures of small proteins, and the potential for applying NMR in large scale structural proteomics projects.

  5. A maximum entropy approach to the study of residue-specific backbone angle distributions in α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Hummer, Gerhard; Bax, Ad

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein of 140 residues that switches to an α-helical conformation upon binding phospholipid membranes. We characterize its residue-specific backbone structure in free solution with a novel maximum entropy procedure that integrates an extensive set of NMR data. These data include intraresidue and sequential HN–Hα and HN–HN NOEs, values for 3JHNHα, 1JHαCα, 2JCαN, and 1JCαN, as well as chemical shifts of 15N, 13Cα, and 13C′ nuclei, which are sensitive to backbone torsion angles. Distributions of these torsion angles were identified that yield best agreement to the experimental data, while using an entropy term to minimize the deviation from statistical distributions seen in a large protein coil library. Results indicate that although at the individual residue level considerable deviations from the coil library distribution are seen, on average the fitted distributions agree fairly well with this library, yielding a moderate population (20–30%) of the PPII region and a somewhat higher population of the potentially aggregation-prone β region (20–40%) than seen in the database. A generally lower population of the αR region (10–20%) is found. Analysis of 1H–1H NOE data required consideration of the considerable backbone diffusion anisotropy of a disordered protein. PMID:24976112

  6. A maximum entropy approach to the study of residue-specific backbone angle distributions in α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Hummer, Gerhard; Bax, Ad

    2014-09-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein of 140 residues that switches to an α-helical conformation upon binding phospholipid membranes. We characterize its residue-specific backbone structure in free solution with a novel maximum entropy procedure that integrates an extensive set of NMR data. These data include intraresidue and sequential H(N) − H(α) and H(N) − H(N) NOEs, values for (3) JHNHα, (1) JHαCα, (2) JCαN, and (1) JCαN, as well as chemical shifts of (15)N, (13)C(α), and (13)C' nuclei, which are sensitive to backbone torsion angles. Distributions of these torsion angles were identified that yield best agreement to the experimental data, while using an entropy term to minimize the deviation from statistical distributions seen in a large protein coil library. Results indicate that although at the individual residue level considerable deviations from the coil library distribution are seen, on average the fitted distributions agree fairly well with this library, yielding a moderate population (20-30%) of the PPII region and a somewhat higher population of the potentially aggregation-prone β region (20-40%) than seen in the database. A generally lower population of the αR region (10-20%) is found. Analysis of (1)H − (1)H NOE data required consideration of the considerable backbone diffusion anisotropy of a disordered protein.

  7. Intermolecular Interactions in Crystalline Theobromine as Reflected in Electron Deformation Density and (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzková, Kateřina; Babinský, Martin; Novosadová, Lucie; Marek, Radek

    2013-06-11

    An understanding of the role of intermolecular interactions in crystal formation is essential to control the generation of diverse crystalline forms which is an important concern for pharmaceutical industry. Very recently, we reported a new approach to interpret the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonding, redistribution of electron density in the system, and NMR chemical shifts (Babinský et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 497). Here, we employ this approach to characterize a full set of crystal interactions in a sample of anhydrous theobromine as reflected in (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs). The important intermolecular contacts are identified by comparing the DFT-calculated NMR CSTs for an isolated theobromine molecule and for clusters composed of several molecules as selected from the available X-ray diffraction data. Furthermore, electron deformation density (EDD) and shielding deformation density (SDD) in the proximity of the nuclei involved in the proposed interactions are calculated and visualized. In addition to the recently reported observations for hydrogen bonding, we focus here particularly on the stacking interactions. Although the principal relations between the EDD and CST for hydrogen bonding (HB) and stacking interactions are similar, the real-space consequences are rather different. Whereas the C-H···X hydrogen bonding influences predominantly and significantly the in-plane principal component of the (13)C CST perpendicular to the HB path and the C═O···H hydrogen bonding modulates both in-plane components of the carbonyl (13)C CST, the stacking modulates the out-of-plane electron density resulting in weak deshielding (2-8 ppm) of both in-plane principal components of the CST and weak shielding (∼ 5 ppm) of the out-of-plane component. The hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions may add to or subtract from one another to produce total values observed experimentally. On the example of theobromine, we demonstrate

  8. Microsoft Operations Framework implementation for The Backbone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienhuis, G.H.

    2007-01-01

    Doel The Backbone ontwerpt, implementeert en beheert IT infrastructuren voor bedrijven en instellingen. Beheer wordt proactief uitgevoerd met behulp van Microsoft Operation Manager (MOM) 2005. MOM is een applicatie die de status en gebeurtenissen van systemen zichtbaar maakt vanuit één locatie. Om

  9. Shifting Phases for Patchy Particles - Effect of mutagenesis and chemical modification on the phase diagram of human gamma D crystallin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Jennifer J.; James, Susan; McNamara, Ruth; Quinn, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    Single mutations in human gamma D crystallin (HGD), a protein found in the eye lens are associated with several childhood cataracts. Phase diagrams for several of these protein mutants have been measured and reveal that phase boundaries are shifted compared with the native protein, leading to condensation of protein in a physiologically relevant regime. Using HGD as a model protein, we have constructed phase diagrams for double mutants of the protein, incorporating two single amino acid substitutions for which phase diagrams are already known. In doing so, the characteristics of each of the single mutations are maintained but both are now present in the same protein particle. While these proteins are not of interest physiologically, this strategy allows the controlled synthesis of nano-scale patchy particles in which features associated with a known phase behavior can be included. It can also provide a strategy for the controlled crystallisation of proteins. Phase boundaries also change after the chemical modification of the protein, through the covalent attachment of fluorescent labels, for example, and this will also be discussed. The authors acknowledge Science Foundation Ireland Stokes Lectureship and Grant 11/RFP.1/PHY/3165. The authors also acknowledge the Irish Research Council and the John and Pat Hume Scholarship.

  10. Molecular structure and vibrational and chemical shift assignments of 3'-chloro-4-dimethylamino azobenzene by DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Mehmet; Tanak, Hasan

    2016-01-05

    In the present work, a combined experimental and theoretical study on ground state molecular structure, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of azo compound 3'-chloro-4-dimethlamino azobenzene are reported. The molecular geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the title compound were calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The optimized geometric parameters obtained by using DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) show good agreement with the experimental data. The vibrational transitions were identified based on the recorded FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-400cm(-1) for solid state. The (1)H isotropic chemical shifts with respect to TMS were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental data. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the title compound have been predicted, and good agreement is determined with the experimental ones. To investigate the NLO properties of the title compound, the polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability were calculated using the density functional B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. According to results, the title compound exhibits non-zero first hyperpolarizability value revealing second order NLO behavior. In addition, DFT calculations of the title compound, molecular electrostatic potential and frontier molecular orbitals were also performed at 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  11. 13C-detected NMR experiments for measuring chemical shifts and coupling constants in nucleic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Radovan; Sklenár, Vladimír

    2007-10-01

    The paper presents a set of two-dimensional experiments that utilize direct (13)C detection to provide proton-carbon, carbon-carbon and carbon-nitrogen correlations in the bases of nucleic acids. The set includes a (13)C-detected proton-carbon correlation experiment for the measurement of (13)C-(13)C couplings, the CaCb experiment for correlating two quaternary carbons, the HCaCb experiment for the (13)C-(13)C correlations in cases where one of the carbons has a proton attached, the HCC-TOCSY experiment for correlating a proton with a network of coupled carbons, and a (13)C-detected (13)C-(15)N correlation experiment for detecting the nitrogen nuclei that cannot be detected via protons. The IPAP procedure is used for extracting the carbon-carbon couplings and/or carbon decoupling in the direct dimension, while the S(3)E procedure is preferred in the indirect dimension of the carbon-nitrogen experiment to obtain the value of the coupling constant. The experiments supply accurate values of (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts and carbon-carbon and carbon-nitrogen coupling constants. These values can help to reveal structural features of nucleic acids either directly or via induced changes when the sample is dissolved in oriented media.

  12. Chemical shifts assignments of the archaeal MC1 protein and a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA duplex in complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Karine; Landon, Céline; Paquet, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55 in laboratory growth conditions and is structurally unrelated to other DNA-binding proteins. MC1 functions are to shape and to protect DNA against thermal denaturation by binding to it. Therefore, MC1 has a strong affinity for any double-stranded DNA. However, it recognizes and preferentially binds to bent DNA, such as four-way junctions and negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles. Combining NMR data, electron microscopy data, biochemistry, molecular modelisation and docking approaches, we proposed recently a new type of DNA/protein complex, in which the monomeric protein MC1 binds on the concave side of a strongly bent 15 base pairs DNA. We present here the NMR chemical shifts assignments of each partner in the complex, (1)H (15)N MC1 protein and (1)H (13)C (15)N bent duplex DNA, as first step towards the first experimental 3D structure of this new type of DNA/protein complex.

  13. Fragment-Based Approach for the Evaluation of NMR Chemical Shifts for Large Biomolecules Incorporating the Effects of the Solvent Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K V Jovan; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2017-03-14

    We present an efficient implementation of the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based quantum chemical method for the evaluation of NMR chemical shifts of large biomolecules. Density functional techniques have been employed in conjunction with large basis sets and including the effects of the solvent environment in these calculations. The MIM-NMR method is initially benchmarked on a set of (alanine)10 conformers containing strong intramolecular interactions. The incorporation of a second low level of theory to recover the missing long-range interactions in the primary fragmentation scheme is critical to yield reliable chemical shifts, with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) from direct unfragmented calculations of 0.01 ppm for (1)H chemical shifts and 0.07 ppm for (13)C chemical shifts. In addition, the performance of MIM-NMR has been assessed on two large peptides: the helical portion of ubiquitin ( 1UBQ ) containing 12 residues where the X-ray structure is known, and E6-binding protein of papilloma virus ( 1RIJ ) containing 23 residues where the structure has been derived from solution-phase NMR analysis. The solvation environment is incorporated in these MIM-NMR calculations, either through an explicit, implicit, or a combination of both solvation models. Using an explicit treatment of the solvent molecules within the first solvation sphere (3 Å) and an implicit solvation model for the rest of the interactions, the (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts of ubiquitin show excellent agreement with experiment (mean absolute deviation of 0.31 ppm for (1)H and 1.72 ppm for (13)C), while the larger E6-binding protein yields a mean absolute deviation of 0.34 ppm for (1)H chemical shifts. The proposed MIM-NMR method is computationally cost-effective and provides a substantial speedup relative to conventional full calculations, the largest density functional NMR calculation included in this work involving more than 600 atoms and over 10,000 basis functions. The MIM

  14. Multilinear relations between {sup 13} C NMR chemical shifts of aliphatic halides; Relacoes lineares multiplas entre deslocamentos quimicos em RMN {sup 13} C de haletos alifaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyama, Julio Toshimi [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Quimica e Bioquimica; Tornero, Maria Teresinha Trovarelli [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Bioestatistica; Yoshida, Massayoshi [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica

    1999-07-01

    The {sup 13} C NMR chemical shifts of the {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} and {delta} carbons of 17 sets of aliphatic halides (F, Cl, Br and I), including mono, bi and tricyclic compounds, can be reproduced by a linear equation composed with two constants and two variables: {delta}{sub RX} = A{sup *} {delta}{sub R-X2}, where A and B are constants derived from multilinear regression of {sup 13} C chemical shifts observed; {delta}{sub R-X}, the chemical shifts of aliphatic halide (R-X); and {delta}{sub R-X1}, {delta}{sub R-X2} the chemical shifts of other halides. It was observed a better correlation for aliphatic bromides (R-X) by using data of aliphatic fluorides (R-X 1) and aliphatic iodides (R-X 2), resulting R{sup 2} of 0.9989 and average absolute deviation (AVG) of 0.39 ppm. For the chlorides (R-X), the better correlation was observed by using data of bromides (R-X 1) was observed better correlation with data of bromides (R-X 1) and iodides (R-X 2), R{sup 2} of 0.997 and AVG of 1.10 ppm. For the iodides (R-X) was observed better correlation with data of fluorides (R-X 1) and bromides (R-X 2), R{sup 2} of 0.9972 and AVG of 0.60 ppm. (author)

  15. Orientation-dependent backbone-only residue pair scoring functions for fixed backbone protein design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordner Andrew J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical scoring functions have proven useful in protein structure modeling. Most such scoring functions depend on protein side chain conformations. However, backbone-only scoring functions do not require computationally intensive structure optimization and so are well suited to protein design, which requires fast score evaluation. Furthermore, scoring functions that account for the distinctive relative position and orientation preferences of residue pairs are expected to be more accurate than those that depend only on the separation distance. Results Residue pair scoring functions for fixed backbone protein design were derived using only backbone geometry. Unlike previous studies that used spherical harmonics to fit 2D angular distributions, Gaussian Mixture Models were used to fit the full 3D (position only and 6D (position and orientation distributions of residue pairs. The performance of the 1D (residue separation only, 3D, and 6D scoring functions were compared by their ability to identify correct threading solutions for a non-redundant benchmark set of protein backbone structures. The threading accuracy was found to steadily increase with increasing dimension, with the 6D scoring function achieving the highest accuracy. Furthermore, the 3D and 6D scoring functions were shown to outperform side chain-dependent empirical potentials from three other studies. Next, two computational methods that take advantage of the speed and pairwise form of these new backbone-only scoring functions were investigated. The first is a procedure that exploits available sequence data by averaging scores over threading solutions for homologs. This was evaluated by applying it to the challenging problem of identifying interacting transmembrane alpha-helices and found to further improve prediction accuracy. The second is a protein design method for determining the optimal sequence for a backbone structure by applying Belief Propagation

  16. Transforming plastic surfaces with electrophilic backbones from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Samuel; Bowen, Raffick A R; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-28

    We demonstrate a simple nonaqueous reaction scheme for transforming the surface of plastics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The chemical modification is achieved by base-catalyzed trans-esterification with polyols. It is permanent, does not release contaminants, and causes no optical or mechanical distortion of the plastic. We present contact angle measurements to show successful modification of several types of plastics including poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polycarbonate (PC). Its applicability to blood analysis is explored using chemically modified PET blood collection tubes and found to be quite satisfactory. We expect this approach will reduce the cost of manufacturing plastic devices with optimized wettability and can be generalized to other types of plastic materials having an electrophilic linkage as its backbone.

  17. Chemical shift of U L3 edges in different uranium compounds obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Joseph; C Nayak; P Venu Babu; S N Jha; D Bhattacharyya

    2014-05-01

    Uranium L3 X-ray absorption edge was measured in various compounds containing uranium in U4+, U5+ and U6+ oxidation states. The measurements have been carried out at the Energy Dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore. Energy shifts of ∼ 2–3 eV were observed for U L3 edge in the U-compounds compared to their value in elemental U. The different chemical shifts observed for the compounds having the same oxidation state of the cation but different anions or ligands show the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cations in determining their X-ray absorption edges in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on U cation in the above compounds.

  18. Constructing backbone network by using tinker algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiwei; Zhan, Meng; Wang, Jianxiong; Yao, Chenggui

    2017-01-01

    Revealing how a biological network is organized to realize its function is one of the main topics in systems biology. The functional backbone network, defined as the primary structure of the biological network, is of great importance in maintaining the main function of the biological network. We propose a new algorithm, the tinker algorithm, to determine this core structure and apply it in the cell-cycle system. With this algorithm, the backbone network of the cell-cycle network can be determined accurately and efficiently in various models such as the Boolean model, stochastic model, and ordinary differential equation model. Results show that our algorithm is more efficient than that used in the previous research. We hope this method can be put into practical use in relevant future studies.

  19. High resolution 4D HPCH experiment for sequential assignment of {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs via phosphodiester backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Saurabh; Stanek, Jan [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland); Cevec, Mirko; Plavec, Janez [National Institute of Chemistry, Slovenian NMR Centre (Slovenia); Koźmiński, Wiktor, E-mail: kozmin@chem.uw.edu.pl [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland)

    2015-11-15

    The three-dimensional structure determination of RNAs by NMR spectroscopy requires sequential resonance assignment, often hampered by assignment ambiguities and limited dispersion of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts, especially of C4′/H4′. Here we present a novel through-bond 4D HPCH NMR experiment involving phosphate backbone where C4′–H4′ correlations are resolved along the {sup 1}H3′–{sup 31}P spectral planes. The experiment provides high peak resolution and effectively removes ambiguities encountered during assignments. Enhanced peak dispersion is provided by the inclusion of additional {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H3′ dimensions and constant-time evolution of chemical shifts. High spectral resolution is obtained by using non-uniform sampling in three indirect dimensions. The experiment fully utilizes the isotopic {sup 13}C-labeling with evolution of C4′ carbons. Band selective {sup 13}C inversion pulses are used to achieve selectivity and prevent signal dephasing due to the C4′–C3′ and C4′–C5′ homonuclear couplings. Multiple quantum line narrowing is employed to minimize sensitivity loses. The 4D HPCH experiment is verified and successfully applied to a non-coding 34-nt RNA consisting typical structure elements and a 14-nt RNA hairpin capped by cUUCGg tetraloop.

  20. Quantitative residue-specific protein backbone torsion angle dynamics from concerted measurement of 3J couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Ho; Li, Fang; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2015-02-04

    Three-bond (3)J(C'C') and (3)J(HNHα) couplings in peptides and proteins are functions of the intervening backbone torsion angle ϕ. In well-ordered regions, (3)J(HNHα) is tightly correlated with (3)J(C'C'), but the presence of large ϕ angle fluctuations differentially affects the two types of couplings. Assuming the ϕ angles follow a Gaussian distribution, the width of this distribution can be extracted from (3)J(C'C') and (3)J(HNHα), as demonstrated for the folded proteins ubiquitin and GB3. In intrinsically disordered proteins, slow transverse relaxation permits measurement of (3)J(C'C') and (3)J(HNH) couplings at very high precision, and impact of factors other than the intervening torsion angle on (3)J will be minimal, making these couplings exceptionally valuable structural reporters. Analysis of α-synuclein yields rather homogeneous widths of 69 ± 6° for the ϕ angle distributions and (3)J(C'C') values that agree well with those of a recent maximum entropy analysis of chemical shifts, J couplings, and (1)H-(1)H NOEs. Data are consistent with a modest (≤30%) population of the polyproline II region.

  1. Relativistic four-component DFT calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts in transition-metal hydride complexes: unusual high-field shifts beyond the Buckingham-Stephens model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrobárik, Peter; Hrobáriková, Veronika; Meier, Florian; Repiský, Michal; Komorovský, Stanislav; Kaupp, Martin

    2011-06-09

    State-of-the-art relativistic four-component DFT-GIAO-based calculations of (1)H NMR chemical shifts of a series of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition-metal hydrides have revealed significant spin-orbit-induced heavy atom effects on the hydride shifts, in particular for several 4d and 5d complexes. The spin-orbit (SO) effects provide substantial, in some cases even the dominant, contributions to the well-known characteristic high-field hydride shifts of complexes with a partially filled d-shell, and thereby augment the Buckingham-Stephens model of off-center paramagnetic ring currents. In contrast, complexes with a 4d(10) and 5d(10) configuration exhibit large deshielding SO effects on their hydride (1)H NMR shifts. The differences between the two classes of complexes are attributed to the dominance of π-type d-orbitals for the true transition-metal systems compared to σ-type orbitals for the d(10) systems.

  2. Solvent-induced chemical shifts of methoxyl nuclear resonance signals in chalcones by benzene and trifluoroacetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Shashi K.; Krishnamoorthy, V.; Parmar, Virinder S.

    The 1H NMR spectra of eight different methoxylated chalcones have separately been recorded, (1) in deuterated chloroform; (2) in a mixture (1:1) of deuterated chloroform and benzene; and (3) in a mixture of deuterated chloroform, benzene and trifluoroacetic acid (2:2:1) and the benzene induced and TFA induced shift values have been assigned to different methoxyl groups. These shift values can serve as a guide in determining the structures of natural or new chalcones. The steric, electronic and conformational factors are discussed to explain the shift values.

  3. Precision Measurement of the Quadrupole Coupling and Chemical Shift Tensors of the Deuterons in α-Calcium Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Heike; Zimmermann, H.; Körner, O.; Stumber, M.; Meinel, C.; Haeberlen, U.

    2001-07-01

    Using calcium formate, α-Ca(DCOO)2, as a test sample, we explore how precisely deuteron quadrupole coupling (QC) and chemical shift (CS) tensors Q and σ can currently be measured. The error limits, ±0.09 kHz for the components of Q and ±0.06 ppm for those of σ, are at least three times lower than in any comparable previous experiment. The concept of a new receiver is described. A signal/noise ratio of 100 is realized in single-shot FT spectra. The measurement strategies and a detailed error analysis are presented. The precision of the measurement of Q is limited by the uncertainty of the rotation angles of the sample and that of σ by the uncertainty of the phase correction parameters needed in FT spectroscopy. With a 4-sigma confidence, it is demonstrated for the first time that the unique QC tensor direction of a deuteron attached to a carbon deviates from the bond direction; the deviation found is (1.2±0.3°). Evidence is provided for intermolecular QC contributions. In terms of Q, their size is roughly 4 kHz. The deuteron QC tensors in α-Ca(DCOO)2 (two independent deuteron sites) are remarkable in three respects. For deuterons attached to sp2 carbons, first, the asymmetry factors η and, second, the quadrupole coupling constants CQ, are unusually small, η1=0.018, η2=0.011, and CQ1=(151.27±0.06) kHz, CQ2=(154.09±0.06) kHz. Third, the principal direction associated with the largest negative QC tensor component lies in and not, as usual, perpendicular to the molecular plane. A rationalization is provided for these observations. The CS tensors obtained are in quantitative agreement with the results of an earlier, less precise, line-narrowing multiple-pulse study of α-Ca(HCOO)2. The assignment proposed in that work is confirmed. Finally we argue that a further 10-fold increase of the measurement precision of deuteron QC tensors, and a 2-fold increase of that of CS tensors, should be possible. We indicate the measures that need to be taken.

  4. Detection of chemical vapor with high sensitivity by using the symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide-enhanced Goos-Hänchen shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yiyou; Li, Yuanhua; Wu, Zhijing; Wang, Xianping; Yuan, Wen; Sang, Minghuang

    2014-04-21

    We present a novel and simple optical structure, i.e., the symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide, in which a polymer layer is added into the guiding layer, for sensitive detection of chemical vapor by using the enhanced Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift (nearly a millimeter scale). Owing to the high sensitivity of the excited ultrahigh-order modes, the vapor-induced effect (swelling effect and refractive index change) in the polymer layer will lead to a dramatic variation of the GH shift. The detected GH shift signal is irrelevant to the power fluctuation of the incident light. The detection limit of 9.5 ppm for toluene and 28.5 ppm for benzene has been achieved.

  5. Porous solid backbone impregnation for electrochemical energy conversion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Boulfrad, Samir

    2013-09-19

    An apparatus and method for impregnating a porous solid backbone. The apparatus may include a platform for holding a porous solid backbone, an ink jet nozzle configured to dispense a liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone, a positioning mechanism configured to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to a plurality of locations of the porous solid backbone, and a control unit configured to control the positioning mechanism to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to the plurality of locations and cause the ink jet nozzle to dispense the liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone.

  6. Chemical shifts of K-X-ray absorption edges on copper in different compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with Synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, D., E-mail: djoseph@barc.gov.in [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Basu, S.; Jha, S.N.; Bhattacharyya, D. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2012-03-01

    Cu K X-ray absorption edges were measured in compounds such as CuO, Cu(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}, Cu(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and CuSO{sub 4} where Cu is present in oxidation state of 2+, using the energy dispersive EXAFS beamline at INDUS-2 Synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore. Energy shifts of {approx}4-7 eV were observed for Cu K X-ray absorption edge in the above compounds compared to its value in elemental copper. The difference in the Cu K edge energy shifts in the different compounds having same oxidation state of Cu shows the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cation in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on Cu cations in the above compounds.

  7. Chemical shifts of K-X-ray absorption edges on copper in different compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with Synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, D.; Basu, S.; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2012-03-01

    Cu K X-ray absorption edges were measured in compounds such as CuO, Cu(CH3CO2)2, Cu(CO3)2, and CuSO4 where Cu is present in oxidation state of 2+, using the energy dispersive EXAFS beamline at INDUS-2 Synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore. Energy shifts of ˜4-7 eV were observed for Cu K X-ray absorption edge in the above compounds compared to its value in elemental copper. The difference in the Cu K edge energy shifts in the different compounds having same oxidation state of Cu shows the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cation in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on Cu cations in the above compounds.

  8. Solid state NMR of proteins at high MAS frequencies: symmetry-based mixing and simultaneous acquisition of chemical shift correlation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellstedt, Peter [Fritz Lipmann Institute, Biomolecular NMR spectroscopy, Leibniz Institute for Age Research (Germany); Herbst, Christian [Ubon Ratchathani University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Haefner, Sabine; Leppert, Joerg; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai, E-mail: raman@fli-leibniz.de [Fritz Lipmann Institute, Biomolecular NMR spectroscopy, Leibniz Institute for Age Research (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    We have carried out chemical shift correlation experiments with symmetry-based mixing sequences at high MAS frequencies and examined different strategies to simultaneously acquire 3D correlation spectra that are commonly required in the structural studies of proteins. The potential of numerically optimised symmetry-based mixing sequences and the simultaneous recording of chemical shift correlation spectra such as: 3D NCAC and 3D NHH with dual receivers, 3D NC Prime C and 3D C Prime NCA with sequential {sup 13}C acquisitions, 3D NHH and 3D NC Prime H with sequential {sup 1}H acquisitions and 3D CANH and 3D C'NH with broadband {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N mixing are demonstrated using microcrystalline samples of the {beta}1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB1) and the chicken {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain.

  9. Free magnesium levels in normal human brain and brain tumors: sup 31 P chemical-shift imaging measurements at 1. 5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.S.; Vigneron, D.B.; Murphy-Boesch, J.; Nelson, S.J.; Kessler, H.B.; Coia, L.; Curran, W.; Brown, T.R. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The authors have studied a series of normal subjects and patients with brain tumors, by using {sup 31}P three-dimensional chemical shift imaging to obtain localized {sup 31}P spectra of the brain. A significant proportion of brain cytosolic ATP in normal brain is not complexed to Mg{sup 2+}, as indicated by the chemical shift {delta} of the {beta}-P resonance of ATP. The ATP {beta}P resonance position in brain thus is sensitive to changes in intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and in the proportion of ATP complexed with Mg because this shift lies on the rising portion of the {delta} vs. Mg{sup 2+} titration curve for ATP. They have measured the ATP {beta}-P shift and compared intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} concentration and fractions of free ATP for normal individuals and a limited series of patients with brain tumors. In four of the five spectra obtained from brain tissue containing a substantial proportion of tumor, intracellular free Mg{sup 2+} was increased, and the fraction of free ATP was decreased, compared with normal brain.

  10. Impact of Backbone Fluorination on π-Conjugated Polymers in Organic Photovoltaic Devices: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Leclerc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed bulk heterojunction solar cells have experienced a remarkable acceleration in performances in the last two decades, reaching power conversion efficiencies above 10%. This impressive progress is the outcome of a simultaneous development of more advanced device architectures and of optimized semiconducting polymers. Several chemical approaches have been developed to fine-tune the optoelectronics and structural polymer parameters required to reach high efficiencies. Fluorination of the conjugated polymer backbone has appeared recently to be an especially promising approach for the development of efficient semiconducting polymers. As a matter of fact, most currently best-performing semiconducting polymers are using fluorine atoms in their conjugated backbone. In this review, we attempt to give an up-to-date overview of the latest results achieved on fluorinated polymers for solar cells and to highlight general polymer properties’ evolution trends related to the fluorination of their conjugated backbone.

  11. Peptoid-Peptide hybrid backbone architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian Adam

    2010-01-01

    -amino acids (alpha/beta-peptides) have been investigated in some detail as well. The present Minireview is a survey of the literature concerning hybrid structures of alpha-amino acids and peptoids, including beta-peptoids (N-alkyl-beta-alanine oligomers), and is intended to give an overview of this area......Peptidomimetic oligomers and foldamers have received considerable attention for over a decade, with beta-peptides and the so-called peptoids (N-alkylglycine oligomers) representing prominent examples of such architectures. Lately, hybrid or mixed backbones consisting of both alpha- and beta...

  12. Instant Backbone.js application development

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This book is a practical, step-by-step tutorial that will teach you to build Backbone.js applications quickly and efficiently.This book is targeted towards developers. It is assumed that you have at least a basic understanding of JavaScript and jQuery selectors. If you are interested in building dynamic Single Page Applications that interact heavily with a backend server, then this is the book for you.

  13. Evidence of chemical-potential shift with hole doping in Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8+. delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z.; Dessau, D.S.; Wells, B.O. (Stanford Electronics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)); Olson, C.G. (Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)); Mitzi, D.B.; Lombado, L. (Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)); List, R.S.; Arko, A.J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1991-12-01

    We have performed photoemission studies on high-quality Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} samples with various {delta}. Our results show a clear chemical-potential shift (0.15--0.2 eV) as a function of doping. This result and the existing angle-resolved-photoemission data give a rather standard doping behavior of this compound in its highly doped regime.

  14. Progress in spin dynamics solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the application of Floquet-Magnus expansion to chemical shift anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an historical overview of theoretical approaches used for describing spin dynamics under static or rotating experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The article gives a brief historical overview for major theories in nuclear magnetic resonance and the promising theories. We present the first application of Floquet-Magnus expansion to chemical shift anisotropy when irradiated by BABA pulse sequence.

  15. All-atom Molecular Dynamic Simulations Combined with the Chemical Shifts Study on the Weak Interactions of Ethanol-water System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rong; LUO San-Lai; WU Wen-Juan

    2008-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics(MD)simulation combined with chemical shifts was performed to investigate the interactions over the entire concentration range of the ethanol(EtOH)-water system.The results of the simulation were adopted to explain the NMR experiments by hydrogen bonding analysis.The strong hydrogen bonds and weak C-H…O contacts coexist in the mixtures through the analysis of the radial distribution functions.And the liquid structures in the whole concentration of EtOH-water mixtures can be classified into three regions by the statistic analysis of the hydrogen-bonding network in the MD simulations.Moreover,the chemical shifts of the hydrogen atom are in agreement witb the statistical results of the average number hydrogen bonds in the MD simulations.Interestingly,the excess relative extent Eηrel calculated by the MD simulations and chemical shifts in the EtOH aqueous solutions shows the largest deviation at XEtOH≈0.18.The excess properties present good agreement with the excess enthalpy in the concentration dependence.

  16. Homonuclear chemical shift correlation in rotating solids via RN{sup {nu}}{sub n} symmetry-based adiabatic RF pulse schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, Kerstin; Leppert, Joerg; Haefner, Sabine; Ohlenschlaeger, Oliver; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai [Institut fuer Molekulare Biotechnologie, Abteilung Molekulare Biophysik/NMR-Spektroskopie (Germany)], E-mail: raman@imb-jena.de

    2004-12-15

    The efficacy of RN{sup {nu}}{sub n} symmetry-based adiabatic Zero-Quantum (ZQ) dipolar recoupling schemes for obtaining chemical shift correlation data at moderate magic angle spinning frequencies has been evaluated. RN{sub n}{sup {nu}} sequences generally employ basic inversion elements that correspond to a net 180 deg. rotation about the rotating frame x-axis. It is shown here via numerical simulations and experimental measurements that it is also possible to achieve efficient ZQ dipolar recoupling via RN{sub n}{sup {nu}} schemes employing adiabatic pulses. Such an approach was successfully used for obtaining {sup 1}3C chemical shift correlation spectra of a uniformly labelled sample of (CUG){sub 9}7- a triplet repeat expansion RNA that has been implicated in the neuromuscular disease myotonic dystrophy. An analysis of the {sup 1}3C sugar carbon chemical shifts suggests, in agreement with our recent {sup 1}5N MAS-NMR studies, that this RNA adopts an A-helical conformation.

  17. Identification of Zinc-ligated Cysteine Residues Based on {sup 13}C{alpha} and {sup 13}C{beta} Chemical Shift Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornhaber, Gregory J.; Snyder, David; Moseley, Hunter N. B.; Montelione, Gaetano T. [Rutgers University, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (United States)], E-mail: guy@cabm.rutgers.edu

    2006-04-15

    Although a significant number of proteins include bound metals as part of their structure, the identification of amino acid residues coordinated to non-paramagnetic metals by NMR remains a challenge. Metal ligands can stabilize the native structure and/or play critical catalytic roles in the underlying biochemistry. An atom's chemical shift is exquisitely sensitive to its electronic environment. Chemical shift data can provide valuable insights into structural features, including metal ligation. In this study, we demonstrate that overlapped {sup 13}C{beta} chemical shift distributions of Zn-ligated and non-metal-ligated cysteine residues are largely resolved by the inclusion of the corresponding {sup 13}C{alpha} chemical shift information, together with secondary structural information. We demonstrate this with a bivariate distribution plot, and statistically with a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Using 287 {sup 13}C{alpha}/{sup 13}C{beta} shift pairs from 79 proteins with known three-dimensional structures, including 86 {sup 13}C{alpha} and{sup 13}C{beta} shifts for 43 Zn-ligated cysteine residues, along with corresponding oxidation state and secondary structure information, we have built a logistic regression model that distinguishes between oxidized cystines, reduced (non-metal ligated) cysteines, and Zn-ligated cysteines. Classifying cysteines/cystines with a statisical model incorporating all three phenomena resulted in a predictor of Zn ligation with a recall, precision and F-measure of 83.7%, and an accuracy of 95.1%. This model was applied in the analysis of Bacillus subtilis IscU, a protein involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. The model predicts that all three cysteines of IscU are metal ligands. We confirmed these results by (i) examining the effect of metal chelation on the NMR spectrum of IscU, and (ii) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. To gain further insight into

  18. Uncovering symmetry-breaking vector and reliability order for assigning secondary structures of proteins from atomic NMR chemical shifts in amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wookyung [Pusan National University, Department of Physics, Center for Proteome Biophysics (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woonghee; Lee, Weontae [Yonsei University, Department of Biochemistry, Structural Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Laboratory (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suhkmann [Pusan National University, Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Bio-NMR Laboratory (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Iksoo, E-mail: iksoochang@pusan.ac.kr [Pusan National University, Department of Physics, Center for Proteome Biophysics (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Unravelling the complex correlation between chemical shifts of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C Prime , {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 15}N, {sup 1}H{sup N} atoms in amino acids of proteins from NMR experiment and local structural environments of amino acids facilitates the assignment of secondary structures of proteins. This is an important impetus for both determining the three-dimensional structure and understanding the biological function of proteins. The previous empirical correlation scores which relate chemical shifts of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C Prime , {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 15}N, {sup 1}H{sup N} atoms to secondary structures resulted in progresses toward assigning secondary structures of proteins. However, the physical-mathematical framework for these was elusive partly due to both the limited and orthogonal exploration of higher-dimensional chemical shifts of hetero-nucleus and the lack of physical-mathematical understanding underlying those correlation scores. Here we present a simple multi-dimensional hetero-nuclear chemical shift score function (MDHN-CSSF) which captures systematically the salient feature of such complex correlations without any references to a random coil state of proteins. We uncover the symmetry-breaking vector and its reliability order not only for distinguishing different secondary structures of proteins but also for capturing the delicate sensitivity interplayed among chemical shifts of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C Prime , {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 15}N, {sup 1}H{sup N} atoms simultaneously, which then provides a straightforward framework toward assigning secondary structures of proteins. MDHN-CSSF could correctly assign secondary structures of training (validating) proteins with the favourable (comparable) Q3 scores in comparison with those from the previous correlation scores. MDHN-CSSF provides a simple and robust strategy for the

  19. In Situ Solid-State Reactions Monitored by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Temperature-Induced Proton Transfer Leads to Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Walczak, Monika; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A

    2016-10-24

    The dramatic colour and phase alteration with the solid-state, temperature-dependent reaction between squaric acid and 4,4'-bipyridine has been probed in situ with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The electronic and chemical sensitivity to the local atomic environment through chemical shifts in the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) revealed proton transfer from the acid to the bipyridine base through the change in nitrogen protonation state in the high-temperature form. Direct detection of proton transfer coupled with structural analysis elucidates the nature of the solid-state process, with intermolecular proton transfer occurring along an acid-base chain followed by a domino effect to the subsequent acid-base chains, leading to the rapid migration along the length of the crystal. NEXAFS thereby conveys the ability to monitor the nature of solid-state chemical reactions in situ, without the need for a priori information or long-range order.

  20. Extracting the information backbone in online system

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers mainly dedicated to improve the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improve both of...

  1. Sofosbuvir as backbone of interferon free treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlière, Marc; Oules, Valèrie; Ansaldi, Christelle; Adhoute, Xavier; Castellani, Paul

    2014-12-15

    Sofosbuvir is the first-in-class NS5B nucleotide analogues to be launched for hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. Its viral potency, pangenotypic activity and high barrier to resistance make it the ideal candidate to become a backbone for several IFN-free regimens. Recent data demonstrated that sofosbuvir either with ribavirin alone or in combination with other direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) as daclatasvir, ledipasvir or simeprevir are able to cure HCV in at least 90% or over of patients. Treatment experienced genotype 3 population may remain the most difficult to treat population, but ongoing DAA combination studies will help to fill this gap. Safety profile of sofosbuvir or combination with other DAAs is good. Resistance to sofosbuvir did not appear as a significant issue. The rationale for using this class of drug and the available clinical data are reviewed.

  2. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency.

  3. Effects of irritant chemicals on Aedes aegypti resting behavior: is there a simple shift to untreated "safe sites"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortance Manda

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have identified the behavioral responses of Aedes aegypti to irritant and repellent chemicals that can be exploited to reduce man-vector contact. Maximum efficacy of interventions based on irritant chemical actions will, however, require full knowledge of variables that influence vector resting behavior and how untreated "safe sites" contribute to overall impact. METHODS: Using a laboratory box assay, resting patterns of two population strains of female Ae. aegypti (THAI and PERU were evaluated against two material types (cotton and polyester at various dark:light surface area coverage (SAC ratio and contrast configuration (horizontal and vertical under chemical-free and treated conditions. Chemicals evaluated were alphacypermethrin and DDT at varying concentrations. RESULTS: Under chemical-free conditions, dark material had significantly higher resting counts compared to light material at all SAC, and significantly increased when material was in horizontal configuration. Cotton elicited stronger response than polyester. Within the treatment assays, significantly higher resting counts were observed on chemical-treated dark material compared to untreated light fabric. However, compared to matched controls, significantly less resting observations were made on chemical-treated dark material overall. Most importantly, resting observations on untreated light material (or "safe sites" in the treatment assay did not significantly increase for many of the tests, even at 25% SAC. Knockdown rates were ≤5% for all assays. Significantly more observations of flying mosquitoes were made in test assays under chemical-treatment conditions as compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: When preferred Ae. aegypti resting sites are treated with chemicals, even at reduced treatment coverage area, mosquitoes do not simply move to safe sites (untreated areas following contact with the treated material. Instead, they become agitated

  4. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  5. Backbone analysis and algorithm design for the quadratic assignment problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG He; ZHANG XianChao; CHEN GuoLiang; LI MingChu

    2008-01-01

    As the hot line in NP-hard problems research in recent years, backbone analysis is crucial for phase transition, hardness, and algorithm design. Whereas theoretical analysis of backbone and its applications in algorithm design are still at a begin-ning state yet, this paper took the quadratic assignment problem (QAP) as a case study and proved by theoretical analysis that it is NP-hard to find the backbone, l.e., no algorithm exists to obtain the backbone of a QAP in polynomial time. Results of this paper showed that it is reasonable to acquire approximate backbone by inter-section of local optimal solutions. Furthermore, with the method of constructing biased instances, this paper proposed a new meta-heuristic - biased instance based approximate backbone (BI-AB), whose basic idea is as follows: firstly, con-struct a new biased instance for every QAP instance (the optimal solution of the new instance is also optimal for the original one); secondly, the approximate backbone is obtained by intersection of multiple local optimal solutions computed by some existing algorithm; finally, search for the optimal solutions in the reduced space by fixing the approximate backbone. Work of the paper enhanced the re-search area of theoretical analysis of backbone. The meta-heuristic proposed in this paper provided a new way for general algorithm design of NP-hard problems as well.

  6. (1)H, (15)N, (13)C backbone resonance assignments of human soluble catechol O-methyltransferase in complex with S-adenosyl-L-methionine and 3,5-dinitrocatechol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnota, Sylwia; Baxter, Nicola J; Cliff, Matthew J; Waltho, Jonathan P; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2016-12-15

    Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an enzyme that plays a major role in catechol neurotransmitter deactivation. Inhibition of COMT can increase neurotransmitter levels, which provides a means of treatment for Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and depression. COMT exists as two isozymes: a soluble cytoplasmic form (S-COMT), expressed in the liver and kidneys and a membrane-bound form (MB-COMT), found mostly in the brain. Here we report the backbone (1)H, (15)N and (13)C chemical shift assignments of S-COMT in complex with S-adenosyl-L-methionine, 3,5-dinitrocatechol and Mg(2+). Assignments were obtained by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. In total, 97 % of all backbone resonances were assigned in the complex, with 205 out of a possible 215 residues assigned in the (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectrum. Prediction of solution secondary structure from a chemical shift analysis using the TALOS+ webserver is in good agreement with published X-ray crystal structures.

  7. 平衡电负性与烷烃核磁共振碳谱位移%EQUILIBRIUM ELECTRONEGATIVITY AND 13C NMR CHEMICAL SHIFTS OF ALKANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂长明; 文松年

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the atomic equilibrium electronegativity in a molecule has been defined and the model of 13C NMR chemical shifts of alkanes has been studied with the atomic equilibrium electronegativity and the structural information parameters NiH(i=0,α,β,γ) and NjC(j=α,β,γ). The results indicate that the 13C NMR chemical shifts of alkanes can be described as follows: CS=-1736.776+755.118AEE+5.2539N0H+1.8837NβH-0.2066NγH By the use of the formula the chemical shifts of 99 carbon atoms are predicated, and the standard error is only 0.9861ppm. The average absolute error is 0.78ppm, The calculated values conform very much to the observed values.%定义了烷烃分子中碳原子的平衡电负性(AEE),用平衡电负性和NiH(i=0,α,β,γ)和NjC(j=α,β,γ)结构信息参数研究了烷烃的13C NMR化学位移模型.结果表明,烷烃13C NMR化学位移(CS)可用下式来定量描述: CS=-1736.776+755.118AEE+5.2539N0H+1.8837NβH-0.2066NγH   用上式估算了99个碳原子的化学位移,标准差为0.9861ppm,平均绝对误差0.78ppm,预测值与实验值十分吻合.

  8. Prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinomas with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging: Impact of intra-tumoral fat detected on chemical-shift images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kon, E-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sanghyeok [Department of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC. • Alfa-fetoprotein, tumor size, and fat component were associated with MVI of HCC. • Chemical shift MRI should be considered for the evaluation of HCC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the impact of intra-tumoral fat detected by chemical-shift MR imaging in predicting the MVI of HCC. Materials and methods: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging of 365 surgically proven HCCs from 365 patients (306 men, 59 women; mean age, 55.6 years) were evaluated. HCCs were classified into two groups, fat-containing and non-fat-containing, based on the presence of fat on chemical-shift images. Fat-containing HCCs were subdivided into diffuse or focal fatty change groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify clinical and MR findings associated with MVI. Results: Based on MR imaging, 66 tumors were classified as fat-containing HCCs and 299 as non-fat-containing HCCs. Among the 66 fat-containing HCCs, 38 (57.6%) showed diffuse fatty changes and 28 (42.4%) showed focal fatty changes. MVI was present in 18 (27.3%) fat-containing HCCs and in 117 (39.1%) non-fat-containing HCCs (P = 0.07). Univariate analysis revealed that serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumor size were significantly associated with MVI (P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that log AFP (odds ratio 1.178, P = 0.0016), tumor size (odds ratio 1.809, P < 0.001), and intra-tumoral fat (odds ratio 0.515, P = 0.0387) were independent variables associated with MVI. Conclusion: Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC and, therefore, a possibly more favorable prognosis, but the clinical value of this finding is uncertain.

  9. Chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging in differentiation of benign from malignant vertebral collapse in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Puneet; Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Joshi, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of the first choice for evaluation of vertebral compression/collapse. Many MRI qualitative features help to differentiate benign from malignant collapse. We conducted this study to look for a quantitative difference in chemical shift values in benign and malignant collapse using dual-echo gradient echo in-phase/out-phase imaging. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations of a total of 38 patients were retrospectively included in the study who had vertebral compression/collapse with marrow edema in which final diagnosis was available at the time of imaging/follow-up. Signal intensity value in the region of abnormal marrow signal and adjacent normal vertebra was measured on in phase/out phase images. Signal intensity ratio (SIR) was measured by dividing signal intensity value on opposite phase images to that on in phase images. SIR was compared in normal vertebrae and benign and malignant vertebral collapse. Results: There were 21 males and 17 females with mean age of 52.4 years (range 28–76 years). Out of total 38 patients, 18 were of benign vertebral collapse and 20 of malignant vertebral collapse. SIR in normal vertebrae was 0.30 ± 0.14, 0.67 ± 0.18 in benign vertebral collapse, and 1.20 ± 0.27 in malignant vertebral collapse with significant difference in SIR of normal vertebrae versus benign collapse (P < 0.01) and in benign collapse versus malignant collapse (P < 0.01). Assuming a cutoff of <0.95 for benign collapse and ≥0.95 for malignant collapse, chemical shift imaging had a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.4%. Conclusion: Chemical shift imaging is a rapid and useful sequence in differentiating benign from malignant vertebral collapse with good specificity and sensitivity.

  10. 1H NMR spectra. Part 30(+): 1H chemical shifts in amides and the magnetic anisotropy, electric field and steric effects of the amide group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Griffiths, Lee; Perez, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The (1)H spectra of 37 amides in CDCl(3) solvent were analysed and the chemical shifts obtained. The molecular geometries and conformational analysis of these amides were considered in detail. The NMR spectral assignments are of interest, e.g. the assignments of the formamide NH(2) protons reverse in going from CDCl(3) to more polar solvents. The substituent chemical shifts of the amide group in both aliphatic and aromatic amides were analysed using an approach based on neural network data for near (≤3 bonds removed) protons and the electric field, magnetic anisotropy, steric and for aromatic systems π effects of the amide group for more distant protons. The electric field is calculated from the partial atomic charges on the N.C═O atoms of the amide group. The magnetic anisotropy of the carbonyl group was reproduced with the asymmetric magnetic anisotropy acting at the midpoint of the carbonyl bond. The values of the anisotropies Δχ(parl) and Δχ(perp) were for the aliphatic amides 10.53 and -23.67 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule) and for the aromatic amides 2.12 and -10.43 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). The nitrogen anisotropy was 7.62 (×10(-6) Å(3)/molecule). These values are compared with previous literature values. The (1)H chemical shifts were calculated from the semi-empirical approach and also by gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations with the density functional theory method and B3LYP/6-31G(++) (d,p) basis set. The semi-empirical approach gave good agreement with root mean square error of 0.081 ppm for the data set of 280 entries. The gauge-independent atomic orbital approach was generally acceptable, but significant errors (ca. 1 ppm) were found for the NH and CHO protons and also for some other protons.

  11. Halogen effect on structure and 13C NMR chemical shift of 3,6-disubstituted-N-alkyl carbazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radula-Janik, Klaudia; Kupka, Teobald; Ejsmont, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Structures of selected 3,6-dihalogeno-N-alkyl carbazole derivatives were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level of theory and their 13C NMR isotropic nuclear shieldings were predicted using density functional theory (DFT). The model compounds contained 9H-, N-methyl and N-ethyl derivatives......). The decreasing electronegativity of the halogen substituent (F, Cl, Br and I) was reflected in both nonrelativistic and relativistic NMR results as decreased values of chemical shifts of carbon atoms attached to halogen (C3 and C6) leading to a strong sensitivity to halogen atom type at 3 and 6 positions...

  12. Other compounds isolated from Simira glaziovii and the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments of new 1-epi-castanopsol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Marcelo F. de; Vieira, Ivo J. Curcino [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas. Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas; Carvalho, Mario G. de, E-mail: mgeraldo@ufrrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (NPPN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude. Nucleo de Pesquisa em Produtos Naturais

    2012-07-01

    A new triterpene, 1-epi-castanopsol, besides eleven known compounds: sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol, lupeol, lupenone, simirane B, syringaresinol, scopoletin, isofraxidin, 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin and harman, were isolated from the wood of Simira glaziovii. The structures of the known compounds were defined by 1D, 2D {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectra data analyses and comparison with literature data. The detailed spectral data analyses allowed the definition of the structure of the new 1-epi isomer of castanopsol and performance of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift assignments. (author)

  13. Accurate calculation of chemical shifts in highly dynamic H2@C60 through an integrated quantum mechanics/molecular dynamics scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; García, José I; Corzana, Francisco; Elguero, José

    2011-05-20

    A new protocol combining classical MD simulations and DFT calculations is presented to accurately estimate the (1)H NMR chemical shifts of highly mobile guest-host systems and their thermal dependence. This strategy has been successfully applied for the hydrogen molecule trapped into C(60) fullerene, an unresolved and challenging prototypical case for which experimental values have never been reproduced. The dependence of the final values on the theoretical method and their implications to avoid over interpretation of the obtained results are carefully described.

  14. Liver steatosis (LS) evaluated through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging liver enzymes in morbid obesity; effect of weight loss obtained with intragastric balloon gastric banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folini, Laura; Veronelli, Annamaria; Benetti, Alberto; Pozzato, Carlo; Cappelletti, Marco; Masci, Enzo; Micheletto, Giancarlo; Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in morbid obesity clinical and metabolic effects related to weight loss on liver steatosis (LS), measured through chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and liver enzymes. Forty obese subjects (8 M/32 W; BMI 42.8 ± 7.12 kg/m(2), mean ± SD) were evaluated for LS through ultrasound (US-LS), chemical-shift MRI (MRI-LS), liver enzymes [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)], anthropometric parameters [weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC)], lipids, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), oral glucose tolerance test, and body composition [fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) at bio-impedance analysis (BIA)]. Anthropometric measures, MRI-LS, BIA, and biochemical parameters were reevaluated 6 months later in 18 subjects undergoing restrictive bariatric approach, i.e., intragastric balloon (BIB, n = 13) or gastric banding (LAGB, n = 5), and in 13 subjects receiving hypocaloric diet. At baseline, US-LS correlates only with MRI-LS, and the latter correlates with ALT, AST, and GGT. After 6 months, subjects undergoing BIB or LAGB had significant changes of BMI, weight, WC, ALT, AST, GGT, ALP, HbA1c, insulin, HOMA-IR, FM, FFM, and MRI-LS. Diet-treated obese subjects had no significant change of any parameter under study; change of BMI, fat mass, and fat-free mass was significantly greater in LAGB/BIB subjects than in diet-treated subjects. Change of MRI-LS showed a significant correlation with changes in weight, BMI, WC, GGT, ALP, and basal MRI-LS. Significant weight loss after BIB or LAGB is associated with decrease in chemical-shift MRI-LS and with reduction in liver enzymes; chemical-shift MRI and liver enzymes allow monitoring of LS in follow-up studies.

  15. Quantitative and qualitative shifts in defensive metabolites define chemical defense investment during leaf development in Inga, a genus of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Natasha L; Forrister, Dale L; Endara, María-José; Coley, Phyllis D; Kursar, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures imposed by herbivores are often positively correlated with investments that plants make in defense. Research based on the framework of an evolutionary arms race has improved our understanding of why the amount and types of defenses differ between plant species. However, plant species are exposed to different selective pressures during the life of a leaf, such that expanding leaves suffer more damage from herbivores and pathogens than mature leaves. We hypothesize that this differential selective pressure may result in contrasting quantitative and qualitative defense investment in plants exposed to natural selective pressures in the field. To characterize shifts in chemical defenses, we chose six species of Inga, a speciose Neotropical tree genus. Focal species represent diverse chemical, morphological, and developmental defense traits and were collected from a single site in the Amazonian rainforest. Chemical defenses were measured gravimetrically and by characterizing the metabolome of expanding and mature leaves. Quantitative investment in phenolics plus saponins, the major classes of chemical defenses identified in Inga, was greater for expanding than mature leaves (46% and 24% of dry weight, respectively). This supports the theory that, because expanding leaves are under greater selective pressure from herbivores, they rely more upon chemical defense as an antiherbivore strategy than do mature leaves. Qualitatively, mature and expanding leaves were distinct and mature leaves contained more total and unique metabolites. Intraspecific variation was greater for mature leaves than expanding leaves, suggesting that leaf development is canalized. This study provides a snapshot of chemical defense investment in a speciose genus of tropical trees during the short, few-week period of leaf development. Exploring the metabolome through quantitative and qualitative profiling enables a more comprehensive examination of foliar chemical defense investment.

  16. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Paradiso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C2-symmetric and C1-symmetric NHCs is provided.

  17. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Veronica; Costabile, Chiara; Grisi, Fabia

    2016-01-20

    The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C₂-symmetric and C₁-symmetric NHCs is provided.

  18. The Backbone of the Climate Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y.; Donges, J. F.; Marwan, N.; Kurths, J.

    2009-12-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct and analyze a complex network from data generated by a spatio-temporal dynamical system, relying on the nonlinear mutual information of time series analysis and betweenness centrality of complex network theory. We show, that this approach reveals a rich internal structure in complex climate networks constructed from reanalysis and model surface air temperature data. Our novel method uncovers peculiar wave-like structures of high energy flow, that we relate to global surface ocean currents. This points to a major role of the oceanic surface circulation in coupling and stabilizing the global temperature field in the long term mean (140 years for the model run and 60 years for reanalysis data). We find that these results cannot be obtained using classical linear methods of multivariate data analysis. Furthermore, we introduce significance tests to quantify the robustness of measured network properties to uncertainties. References: [1] J.F. Donges, Y. Zou, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths. Complex networks in climate dynamics -- -- Comparing linear and nonlinear network construction methods. European Physical Journal -- Special Topics, 174, 157-179, 2009. [2] J.F. Donges, Y. Zou, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths. Backbone of the climate network. Europhysics Letters, in press, 2009.

  19. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Ming Zhang

    Full Text Available Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency.

  20. NET amyloidogenic backbone in human activated neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulze, L; Bassani, B; Gini, E; D'Antona, P; Grimaldi, A; Luini, A; Marino, F; Noonan, D M; Tettamanti, G; Valvassori, R; de Eguileor, M

    2016-03-01

    Activated human neutrophils produce a fibrillar DNA network [neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)] for entrapping and killing bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Our results suggest that the neutrophil extracellular traps show a resistant amyloidogenic backbone utilized for addressing reputed proteins and DNA against the non-self. The formation of amyloid fibrils in neutrophils is regulated by the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm. The intensity and source of the ROS signal is determinant for promoting stress-associated responses such as amyloidogenesis and closely related events: autophagy, exosome release, activation of the adrenocorticotrophin hormone/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (ACTH/α-MSH) loop and synthesis of specific cytokines. These interconnected responses in human activated neutrophils, that have been evaluated from a morphofunctional and quantitative viewpoint, represent primitive, but potent, innate defence mechanisms. In invertebrates, circulating phagocytic immune cells, when activated, show responses similar to those described previously for activated human neutrophils. Invertebrate cells within endoplasmic reticulum cisternae produce a fibrillar material which is then assembled into an amyloidogenic scaffold utilized to convey melanin close to the invader. These findings, in consideration to the critical role played by NET in the development of several pathologies, could explain the structural resistance of these scaffolds and could provide the basis for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in immunomediated diseases in which the innate branch of the immune system has a pivotal role.

  1. High Speed Fibre Optic Backbone LAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Masaaki; Hara, Shingo; Kajita, Yuji; Kashu, Fumitoshi; Ikeuchi, Masaru; Hagihara, Satoshi; Tsuzuki, Shinji

    1987-09-01

    Our firm has developed the SUMINET-4100 series, a fibre optic local area network (LAN), to serve the communications system trunk line needs for facilities, such as steel refineries, automobile plants and university campuses, that require large transmission capacity, and for the backbone networks used in intelligent building systems. The SUMINET-4100 series is already in service in various fields of application. Of the networks available in this series, the SUMINET-4150 has a trunk line speed of 128 Mbps and the multiplexer used for time division multiplexing (TDM) was enabled by designing an ECL-TTL gate array (3000 gates) based custom LSI. The synchronous, full-duplex V.24 and V.3.5 interfaces (SUMINET-2100) are provided for use with general purpose lines. And the IBM token ring network, the SUMINET-3200, designed for heterogeneous PCs and the Ethernet can all be connected to sub loops. Further, the IBM 3270 TCA and 5080 CADAM can be connected in the local mode. Interfaces are also provided for the NTT high-speed digital service, the digital PBX systems, and the Video CODEC system. The built-in loop monitor (LM) and network supervisory processor (NSP) provide management of loop utilization and send loop status signals to the host CPU's network configuration and control facility (NCCF). These built-in functions allow both the computer system and LAN to be managed from a single source at the host. This paper outlines features of the SUMINET-4150 and provides an example of its installation.

  2. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The concept of using highly ionic conducting backbones with subsequent infiltration of electronically conducting particles has widely been used to develop alternative anode-supported SOFC's. In this work, the idea was to develop infiltrated backbones as an alternative design based on cathode......-supported SOFC. The cathodes are obtained by infiltrating LSM into a sintered either thick (300 μm) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) backbone or a thin YSZ backbone (10-15 μm) integrated onto a thick (300 μm) porous strontium substituted lanthanum manganite (LSM) and YSZ composite. Fabrication challenges...... printed symmetrical cells. Samples with LSM/YSZ composite and YSZ backbones made with graphite+PMMA as pore formers exhibited comparable Rp values to the screen printed LSM/YSZ cathode. This route was chosen as the best to fabricate the cathode supported cells. SEM micrograph of a cathode supported cell...

  3. Fractional enrichment of proteins using [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source facilitates measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts with improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Khan, Shahid N. [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden); Kay, Lewis E. [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, One King’s College Circle (Canada); Lundström, Patrik, E-mail: patlu@ifm.liu.se [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    A selective isotope labeling scheme based on the utilization of [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source during protein overexpression has been evaluated for the measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts using Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments. As expected, the fractional incorporation of label at the Cα positions is increased two-fold relative to labeling schemes based on [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose, effectively doubling the sensitivity of NMR experiments. Applications to a binding reaction involving an SH3 domain from the protein Abp1p and a peptide from the protein Ark1p establish that accurate excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts can be obtained from RD experiments, with errors on the order of 0.06 ppm for exchange rates ranging from 100 to 1000 s{sup −1}, despite the small fraction of {sup 13}Cα–{sup 13}Cβ spin-pairs that are present for many residue types. The labeling approach described here should thus be attractive for studies of exchanging systems using {sup 13}Cα spin probes.

  4. Free variable selection QSPR study to predict (19)F chemical shifts of some fluorinated organic compounds using Random Forest and RBF-PLS methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Nasser

    2016-04-05

    In this work, two new and powerful chemometrics methods are applied for the modeling and prediction of the (19)F chemical shift values of some fluorinated organic compounds. The radial basis function-partial least square (RBF-PLS) and random forest (RF) are employed to construct the models to predict the (19)F chemical shifts. In this study, we didn't used from any variable selection method and RF method can be used as variable selection and modeling technique. Effects of the important parameters affecting the ability of the RF prediction power such as the number of trees (nt) and the number of randomly selected variables to split each node (m) were investigated. The root-mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) for the training set and the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 44.70, 23.86, 29.77, and 23.69, respectively. Also, the correlation coefficients of the prediction set for the RBF-PLS and RF models were 0.8684 and 0.9313, respectively. The results obtained reveal that the RF model can be used as a powerful chemometrics tool for the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies.

  5. Evaluation of a rabbit model for osteomyelitis by high field, high resolution imaging using the chemical-shift-specific-slice-selection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, A; Crémieux, A C; Belmatoug, N; Vallois, J M; Pocidalo, J J; Carbon, C

    1994-01-01

    The rabbit model of osteomyelitis introduced by C.W. Norden, based on injection of an infecting solution (Staphylococcus aureus, sodium morrhuate) into the tibia, was studied at 4.7 Tesla with a time-efficient chemical shift selective imaging technique, Chemical Shift Specific Slice Selection (C4S). The evolution of the disease over several weeks was followed on water-selective, fat-selective, and sum images obtained simultaneously with this imaging sequence. Experiments were performed either on different groups of rabbits at different times after infection with subsequent sacrifice of the animal and microbiological analysis of the infected tibia or on the same group of animals imaged several times after infection. Associated analysis of the water and fat selective images revealed marrow modifications very early (Day 5 after inoculation) demonstrating the high sensitivity of the employed imaging technique. Later on, bone modifications were best identified on the sum images. Additional experiments performed on animals injected with a noninfecting solution containing only sodium morrhuate showed however that the sclerosing agent alone can yield images similar to those produced by infection at early stages after inoculation. Therefore, the Norden model would not be suitable for monitoring quantitatively outcome of therapy by magnetic resonance imaging. It is however well adapted for the evaluation and optimization of MRI techniques or protocols intended to detect early changes of bone marrow produced by septic or aseptic infarct.

  6. Optical Red shift in ZnO Nanoflowers Fabricated on Non-Seeded Substrates by Soft Wet Chemical Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, K. V.; Preetha, K. C.; Ragina, A. J.; Deepa, K.; Remadevi, T. L.

    2011-10-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoflowers were fabricated on non-seeded glass substrates by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method using different complex agents. Influence of complex agents ammonia, lithium hydroxide and hexamine on the optical properties of the as-synthesized and the samples annealed at 400 °C was studied. Optical red shift was observed in ZnO samples and was analyzed with respect to the complex agents. All samples possessed a steep absorption edge in the wavelength range 375-425 nm. ZnO nanostructures except that synthesized using hexamine have low and steady absorbance and show higher transmittance (70-85%) in the entire visible region. SEM, XRD and EDAX studies confirmed the high surface-to-volume ratio, good optical quality, excellent crystalline nature and purity of the formed and annealed ZnO nanostructures.

  7. Final Technical Report: A Paradigm Shift in Chemical Processing: New Sustainable Chemistries for Low-VOC Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kenneth F.

    2006-07-26

    The project employed new processes to make emulsion polymers from reduced levels of petroleum-derived chemical feedstocks. Most waterborne paints contain spherical, emulsion polymer particles that serve as the film-forming binder phase. Our goal was to make emulsion polymer particles containing 30 percent feedstock that would function as effectively as commercial emulsions made from higher level feedstock. The processes developed yielded particles maintained their film formation capability and binding capacity while preserving the structural integrity of the particles after film formation. Rohm and Haas Company (ROH) and Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) worked together to employ novel polymer binders (ROH) and new, non-volatile, biomass-derived coalescing agents (ADM). The University of Minnesota Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science utilized its unique microscopy capabilities to characterize films made from the New Emulsion Polymers (NEP).

  8. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2012-03-21

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  9. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Geun [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chin-Ju [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Eun; Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Ae-Ree; Choi, Seo-Ree; Lee, Shim Sung; Lee, Joon-Hwa, E-mail: joonhwa@gnu.ac.kr [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 3{sub 10}-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins.

  10. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  11. β-Sheet 13C Structuring Shifts Appear only at the H-bonded Sites of Hairpins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Irene; Stewart, James M.; Scian, Michele; Kier, Brandon L.

    2011-01-01

    The 13C chemical shifts measured for designed β hairpins indicate that the structuring shifts (upfield for Cα and C′, downfield for Cβ) previously reported as diagnostic for β structuring in protein appear only at the H-bonded strand residues. The resulting periodicity of structuring shift magnitudes is not, however, a consequence of H-bonding status; rather, it reflects a previously unrecognized alternation in the backbone torsion angles of β strands. This feature of hairpins is also likely to be present in proteins. The study provides reference values for the expectation shifts for 13C sites in β structures that should prove useful in the characterization of the folding equilibria of β sheet models. PMID:21214243

  12. Reduced Dimensionality tailored HN(C)N Pulse Sequences for Efficient Backbone Resonance Assignment of Proteins through Rapid Identification of Sequential HSQC peaks

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) experiments -(4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH- have been presented here to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. The experiments basically represent an improvisation of previously reported HN(C)N experiment [Panchal et. al., J. Biomol. NMR. (2002), 20 (2), 135-147] and exploit the simple reduced dimensionality NMR concept [Szyperski et. al. (2002), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99(12), 8009-8014] to achieve (a) higher dispersion and resolution along the co-evolved F1 dimension and (b) rapid identification of sequential HSQC peaks on its F2(15N)- F3(1H) planes. The current implementation is based on the fact that the linear combination of 15N and 13CO/13Ca chemical shifts offers relatively better dispersion and randomness compared to the individual chemical shifts; thus enables the assignment of crowded HSQC spectra by resolving the ambiguities generally encountered in HNCN based assignment protocol because of ...

  13. Correlations of the chemical shift on fasly rotating biological solids by means of NMR spectroscopy; Korrelationen der chemischen Verschiebung an schnell rotierenden biologischen Festkoerpern mittels NMR-Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Christian

    2010-04-27

    The basic aim of the thesis was the development and improvement of homo- and heteronuclear feedback sequences for the generation of correlation spectra of the chemical shift. In a first step the possibility of the acquisition of {sup 13}C-{sup 13} correlation spectra of the chemical shift by means of inversion pulses with low RF power factor was studied. Furthermore it was shown that broad-band phase-modulated inversion and universal rotational pulses can be constructed by means of global optimization procedures like the genetic algorithms under regardment of the available RF field strength. By inversion, universal rotational, and 360 pulses as starting values of the optimization efficient homonuclear CN{sub n}{sup {nu}} and RN{sub n}{sup {nu}} mixing sequences as well as heteronuclear RN{sub n}{sup {nu}{sub s},{nu}{sub k}} feedback sequences were generated. The satisfactory power of the numerically optimized sequences was shown by means of the simulation as well by means of correlation experiments of the chemical shift of L-histidine, L-arginine, and the (CUG){sub 97}-RNA. This thesis deals furthermore with the possibility to acquire simultaneously different signals with several receivers. By means of numerically optimized RN{sub n}{sup {nu}{sub s},{nu}{sub k}} pulse sequences both {sup 15}N-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N correlation spectra were simultaneously generated. Furthermore it could be shown that the simultaneous acquisition of 3D-{sup 15}N-{sup 13}C-{sup 13}C and {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N-({sup 1}H)-{sup 1}H correlation spectra is possible. By this in only one measurement process resonance assignments can be met and studies of the global folding performed. A further application of several receivers is the simultaneous acquisition of CHHC, NHHN, NHHC, as well as CHHN spectra. By such experiments it is possible to characterize the hydrogen-bonding pattern and the glycosidic torsion angle {sup {chi}} in RNA. This was demonstrated by means of the (CUG){sub 97

  14. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    A four-step infiltration method has been developed to infiltrate La0.75Sr0.25MnO3+δ (LSM25) nanoparticles into porous structures (YSZ or LSM-YSZ backbones). The pore size distribution in the backbones is obtained either by using PMMA and/or graphites as pore formers or by leaching treatment of sa...... of samples with Ni remained in the YSZ structure at high temperatures. All impregnated backbones, presented Rs comparable to a standard screen printed cathode, which proves that LSM nanoparticles forms a pathway for electron conduction....

  15. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine (Russian Federation); Shen, Yang; Lee, Jung Ho [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Hummer, Gerhard [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics (Germany); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2015-09-15

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts ({sup 15}N, {sup 13}C{sup α}, and {sup 13}C′), six types of J couplings ({sup 3}J{sub HNHα}, {sup 3}J{sub C′C′}, {sup 3}J{sub C′Hα}, {sup 1}J{sub HαCα}, {sup 2}J{sub CαN} and {sup 1}J{sub CαN}), as well as the {sup 15}N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3.

  16. Stereochemistry of Complex Marine Natural Products by Quantum Mechanical Calculations of NMR Chemical Shifts: Solvent and Conformational Effects on Okadaic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto J. Domínguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine organisms are an increasingly important source of novel metabolites, some of which have already inspired or become new drugs. In addition, many of these molecules show a high degree of novelty from a structural and/or pharmacological point of view. Structure determination is generally achieved by the use of a variety of spectroscopic methods, among which NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance plays a major role and determination of the stereochemical relationships within every new molecule is generally the most challenging part in structural determination. In this communication, we have chosen okadaic acid as a model compound to perform a computational chemistry study to predict 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts. The effect of two different solvents and conformation on the ability of DFT (density functional theory calculations to predict the correct stereoisomer has been studied.

  17. Examination of anticipated chemical shift and shape distortion effect on materials commonly used in prosthetic socket fabrication when measured using MRI: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad Reza; Rowe, Philip; Buis, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting). Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS) and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers) to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98%) (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30%], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03%], standard deviation = 0.89 mm). The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/-2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel) dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb.

  18. Examination of anticipated chemical shift and shape distortion effect on materials commonly used in prosthetic socket fabrication when measured using MRI: A validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Safari, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting. Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98% (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30%], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03%], standard deviation = 0.89 mm. The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/–2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb.

  19. Backbone cyclization of a recombinant cystine-knot peptide by engineered Sortase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Karen; Maurer, Till; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Coons, Mary; Franke, Yvonne; Hannoush, Rami N

    2014-11-28

    Cyclotides belong to the family of cyclic cystine-knot peptides and have shown promise as scaffolds for protein engineering and pharmacological modulation of cellular protein activity. Cyclotides are characterized by a cystine-knotted topology and a head-to-tail cyclic polypeptide backbone. While they are primarily produced in plants, cyclotides have also been obtained by chemical synthesis. However, there is still a need for methods to generate cyclotides in high yields to near homogeneity. Here, we report a biomimetic approach which utilizes an engineered version of the enzyme Sortase A to catalyze amide backbone cyclization of the recombinant cyclotide MCoTI-II, thereby allowing the efficient production of active homogenous species in high yields. Our results provide proof of concept for using engineered Sortase A to produce cyclic MCoTI-II and should be generally applicable to generating other cyclic cystine-knot peptides.

  20. A backbone lever-arm effect enhances polymer mechanochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukovich, Hope M.; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B.; Kean, Zachary S.; Lenhardt, Jeremy M.; Craig, Stephen L.

    2013-02-01

    Mechanical forces along a polymer backbone can be used to bring about remarkable reactivity in embedded mechanically active functional groups, but little attention has been paid to how a given polymer backbone delivers that force to the reactant. Here, single-molecule force spectroscopy was used to directly quantify and compare the forces associated with the ring opening of gem-dibromo and gem-dichlorocyclopropanes affixed along the backbone of cis-polynorbornene and cis-polybutadiene. The critical force for isomerization drops by about one-third in the polynorbornene scaffold relative to polybutadiene. The root of the effect lies in more efficient chemomechanical coupling through the polynorbornene backbone, which acts as a phenomenological lever with greater mechanical advantage than polybutadiene. The experimental results are supported computationally and provide the foundation for a new strategy by which to engineer mechanochemical reactivity.

  1. LOAD AWARE ADAPTIVE BACKBONE SYNTHESIS IN WIRELESS MESH NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yuan; Zheng Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) are envisioned to support the wired backbone with a wireless Backbone Networks (BNet) for providing internet connectivity to large-scale areas.With a wide range of internet-oriented applications with different Quality of Service (QoS) requirement,the large-scale WMNs should have good scalability and large bandwidth.In this paper,a Load Aware Adaptive Backbone Synthesis (LAABS) algorithm is proposed to automatically balance the traffic flow in the WMNs.The BNet will dynamically split into smaller size or merge into bigger one according to statistic load information of Backbone Nodes (BNs).Simulation results show LAABS generates moderate BNet size and converges quickly,thus providing scalable and stable BNet to facilitate traffic flow.

  2. On Backbone Structure for a Future Multipurpose Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Cuevas, Ruben; Riaz, M. Tahir

    2008-01-01

    Telecommunications are evolving towards the unification of services and infrastructures. This unification must be achieved at the highest hierarchical level for a complete synergy of services. Therefore, one of the requirements is a multipurpose backbone network capable of supporting all the curr......Telecommunications are evolving towards the unification of services and infrastructures. This unification must be achieved at the highest hierarchical level for a complete synergy of services. Therefore, one of the requirements is a multipurpose backbone network capable of supporting all...

  3. Backbone topology, access, and the commercial Internet, 1997 - 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Morton E O'Kelly; Grubesic, Tony H.

    2002-01-01

    As the Internet grows in popularity, telecommunications infrastructure in the United States continues to increase in capacity and geographic reach to meet market demand. Important components of this infrastructure include the commercial fiber-optic backbones used to transport digital information between locations. The spatial organization of commercial Internet backbones reflects an increasingly competitive privatized market for service provision, in which certain locations are more accessibl...

  4. Triazine-Based Sequence-Defined Polymers with Side-Chain Diversity and Backbone-Backbone Interaction Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W; Mo, Kai-For; Daily, Michael D

    2016-03-14

    Sequence control in polymers, well-known in nature, encodes structure and functionality. Here we introduce a new architecture, based on the nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry of cyanuric chloride, that creates a new class of sequence-defined polymers dubbed TZPs. Proof of concept is demonstrated with two synthesized hexamers, having neutral and ionizable side chains. Molecular dynamics simulations show backbone-backbone interactions, including H-bonding motifs and pi-pi interactions. This architecture is arguably biomimetic while differing from sequence-defined polymers having peptide bonds. The synthetic methodology supports the structural diversity of side chains known in peptides, as well as backbone-backbone hydrogen-bonding motifs, and will thus enable new macromolecules and materials with useful functions.

  5. Effect of backbone chemistry on hybridization thermodynamics of oligonucleic acids: a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2016-02-28

    In this paper we study how varying oligonucleic acid backbone chemistry affects the hybridization/melting thermodynamics of oligonucleic acids. We first describe the coarse-grained (CG) model with tunable parameters that we developed to enable the study of both naturally occurring oligonucleic acids, such as DNA, and their chemically-modified analogues, such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and locked nucleic acids (LNAs). The DNA melting curves obtained using such a CG model and molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit solvent and with explicit ions match with the melting curves obtained using the empirical nearest-neighbor models. We use these CG simulations to then elucidate the effect of backbone flexibility, charge, and nucleobase spacing along the backbone on the melting curves, potential energy and conformational entropy change upon hybridization and base-pair hydrogen bond residence time. We find that increasing backbone flexibility decreases duplex thermal stability and melting temperature mainly due to increased conformational entropy loss upon hybridization. Removing charges from the backbone enhances duplex thermal stability due to the elimination of electrostatic repulsion and as a result a larger energetic gain upon hybridization. Lastly, increasing nucleobase spacing decreases duplex thermal stability due to decreasing stacking interactions that are important for duplex stability.

  6. Measurement of the principal values of the chemical-shift tensors of overlapping protonated and unprotonated carbons with the 2D-SUPER technique and dipolar dephasing (DD-SUPER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Wei D.; Wang, Wei; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2010-09-01

    A modified 2D-SUPER technique is demonstrated to allow independent measurement of the principal values of the chemical-shift tensors of overlapping protonated and unprotonated carbons. The insertion of a dipolar-dephasing period into the sequence causes loss of signal from protonated carbons. The spectrum obtained with this modification allows one to determine the principal values of the unprotonated carbons with high precision. Subsequent fitting of the usual 2D-SUPER spectrum, with the chemical-shift parameters of the unprotonated carbons fixed, gives the parameters of the overlapped resonances of the protonated carbons. As an example, we report the determination of the 13C chemical-shift parameters of the carbons of form II of piroxicam. The experimental results are compared with those obtained from calculations using the DFT/GIAO method. Potential applications of this method are discussed.

  7. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus

    2015-07-01

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common (13)C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR.

  8. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus, E-mail: rali@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for NMR-Based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common {sup 13}C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR.

  9. The effects of librations on the 13C chemical shift and 2H electric field gradient tensors in β-calcium formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Kevin J.; Lee, Dong Kuk; Ramamoorthy, A.

    2000-12-01

    The magnitudes and orientations of the principal elements of the 13C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor in the molecular frame of the formate ion in β-calcium formate is determined using one-dimensional dipolar-shift spectroscopy. The magnitudes of the principal elements of the 13C CSA tensor are σ11C=104 ppm, σ22C=179 ppm, and σ33C=233 ppm. The least shielding element of the 13C CSA tensor, σ33C, is found to be collinear with the C-H bond. The temperature dependence of the 13C CSA and the 2H quadrupole coupling tensors in β-calcium formate are analyzed for a wide range of temperature (173-373 K). It was found that the span of the 13C CSA and the magnitude of the 2H quadrupole coupling interactions are averaged with the increasing temperature. The experimental results also show that the 2H quadrupole coupling tensor becomes more asymmetric with increasing temperature. A librational motion about the σ22C axis of the 13C CSA tensor is used to model the temperature dependence of the 13C CSA tensor. The temperature dependence of the mean-square amplitude of the librational motion is found to be =2.6×10-4(T) rad2 K-1. The same librational motion also accounts for the temperature-dependence of the 2H quadrupole coupling tensor after the relative orientation of the 13C CSA and 2H electric field gradient tensors are taken into account. Reconsideration of the results of a previous study found that the librational motion, not the vibrational motion, accounts for an asymmetry in the 1H-13C dipolar coupling tensor of α-calcium formate at room temperature.

  10. A lanthanide complex with dual biosensing properties: CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer) and BIRDS (biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts) with europium DOTA-tetraglycinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Daniel; Kiefer, Garry E; Rothman, Douglas L; Sherry, A Dean; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2011-12-01

    Responsive contrast agents (RCAs) composed of lanthanide(III) ion (Ln3R) complexes with a variety of1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (DOTA4S) derivatives have shown great potential as molecular imaging agents for MR. A variety of LnDOTA–tetraamide complexes have been demonstrated as RCAs for molecular imaging using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). The CEST method detects proton exchange between bulk water and any exchangeable sites on the ligand itself or an inner sphere of bound water that is shifted by a paramagnetic Ln3R ion bound in the core of the macrocycle. It has also been shown that molecular imaging is possible when the RCA itself is observed (i.e. not its effect on bulk water) using a method called biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS). The BIRDS method utilizes redundant information stored in the nonexchangeable proton resonances emanating from the paramagnetic RCA for ambient factors such as temperature and/or pH.Thus, CEST and BIRDS rely on exchangeable and nonexchangeable protons, respectively, for biosensing. We posited that it would be feasible to combine these two biosensing features into the same RCA (i.e. dual CEST and BIRDS properties). A complex between europium(III) ion (Eu3R) and DOTA–tetraglycinate [DOTA–(gly)S4] was used to demonstrate that its CEST characteristics are preserved, while its BIRDS properties are also detectable. The in vitro temperature sensitivity of EuDOTA–(gly)S4 was used to show that qualitative MR contrast with CEST can be calibrated using quantitative MR mapping with BIRDS, thereby enabling quantitative molecular imaging at high spatial resolution.

  11. Chemical constituents of Ottonia corcovadensis Miq. from Amazon forest: {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments; Constituintes quimicos de Ottonia corcovadensis Miq. da floresta Amazonica - atribuicao dos deslocamentos quimicos dos atomos de hidrogenio e carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facundo, Valdir A. [Rondonia Univ., Porto Velho, RO (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Morais, Selene M. [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica e Fisica; Braz Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais. Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas. Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais]. E-mail: braz@uenf.br

    2004-02-01

    In an ethanolic extract of leaves of Ottonia corcovadensis (Piperaceae) were identified sixteen terpenoids of essential oil and the three flavonoids 3',4',5,5',7-penta methoxyflavone (1), 3',4',5,7-tetra methoxyflavone (2) and 5-hydroxy-3',4',5',7-tetra methoxyflavone (3) and cafeic acid (4). Two amides (5 and 6) were isolated from an ethanolic extract of the roots. The structures were established by spectral analysis, meanly NMR (1D and 2D) and mass spectra. Extensive NMR analysis was also used to complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments of the flavonoids and amides. The components of the essential oil were identified by computer library search, retention indices and visual interpretation of mass spectra. (author)

  12. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  13. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations, Part I: Chemical shifts assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Solid-state NMR is an excellent and useful method for analyzing solid-state forms of drugs. In the (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra of the solid dosage forms many of the signals originate from the excipients and should be distinguished from those of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this work the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in the solid drug formulations: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. Their (13)C CP/MAS NMR spectra were recorded and the signals were assigned, employing the results (R(2): 0.948-0.998) of GIPAW calculations and theoretical chemical shifts. The (13)C ssNMR spectra for some of the studied excipients have not been published before while for the other signals in the spectra they were not properly assigned or the assignments were not correct. The results summarize and complement the data on the (13)C ssNMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients and are essential for further NMR studies of API-excipient interactions in the pharmaceutical formulations.

  14. Reproducibility of Intra- and Inter-scanner Measurements of Liver Fat Using Complex Confounder-corrected Chemical Shift Encoded MRI at 3.0 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing; Han, Wei; Li, Zhenhong; Zhao, Yonghua; Ge, Mingmei; Guo, Xueqing; Wu, Xinhuai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the reproducibility of the proton density fat-fraction (PDFF) of the liver using the IDEAL algorithm, a quantitative confounder-corrected chemical-shift-encoded MRI method. Data were obtained from 15 volunteers on four different days. The first and the third examinations were conducted on scanner one with one-week intervals, while the second and the fourth tests were performed on scanner two with same time interval. For each test, two MR scans were performed, one before and one after a meal. Regions-of-interest measurements were manually calculated to estimate the PDFF in the right and left lobes on the PDFF images. Reproducibility was measured using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The ICCs of the PDFF in the right and left lobes were 0.935 and 0.878, respectively. The intra-scanner ICCs of the right lobe before and after a meal or at a one-week interval were 0.924 and 0.953, respectively. The inter-scanner ICCs of PDFF the next day and at a one-week interval were 0.920 and 0.864, respectively. The PDFF of liver derived from IDEAL demonstrated high intra- and inter-scanner measurement reproducibility. The PDFF of the right lobe before a meal was more reproducible than after-meal measurements. PMID:26763303

  15. Scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence. Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingaertner, Sebastian; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Wetterling, Friedrich [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Dublin Univ. (Ireland) Trinity Inst. of Neuroscience; Fatar, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Neumaier-Probst, Eva [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI {sup 23}Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered {sup 1}H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error < 12%) and an almost identical delineation of the stroke region (mismatch < 6%). The acquisition of undersampled {sup 23}Na-CSI images enables up to three-fold scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving.

  16. VITAL NMR: Using Chemical Shift Derived Secondary Structure Information for a Limited Set of Amino Acids to Assess Homology Model Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brothers, Michael C [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Nesbitt, Anna E [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Hallock, Michael J [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Tang, Ming [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Harris, Jason B [ORNL; Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Schuler, Mary A [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Rienstra, Chad M [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2011-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  17. VITAL NMR: using chemical shift derived secondary structure information for a limited set of amino acids to assess homology model accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brothers, Michael C.; Nesbitt, Anna E.; Hallock, Michael J. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States); Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology (United States); Tang Ming [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States); Harris, Jason; Baudry, Jerome [University of Tennessee, Department of Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology (United States); Schuler, Mary A. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology (United States); Rienstra, Chad M., E-mail: rienstra@illinois.edu [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  18. Adding diverse noncanonical backbones to rosetta: enabling peptidomimetic design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Drew

    Full Text Available Peptidomimetics are classes of molecules that mimic structural and functional attributes of polypeptides. Peptidomimetic oligomers can frequently be synthesized using efficient solid phase synthesis procedures similar to peptide synthesis. Conformationally ordered peptidomimetic oligomers are finding broad applications for molecular recognition and for inhibiting protein-protein interactions. One critical limitation is the limited set of design tools for identifying oligomer sequences that can adopt desired conformations. Here, we present expansions to the ROSETTA platform that enable structure prediction and design of five non-peptidic oligomer scaffolds (noncanonical backbones, oligooxopiperazines, oligo-peptoids, [Formula: see text]-peptides, hydrogen bond surrogate helices and oligosaccharides. This work is complementary to prior additions to model noncanonical protein side chains in ROSETTA. The main purpose of our manuscript is to give a detailed description to current and future developers of how each of these noncanonical backbones was implemented. Furthermore, we provide a general outline for implementation of new backbone types not discussed here. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we describe the first tests of the ROSETTA molecular mechanics energy function in the context of oligooxopiperazines, using quantum mechanical calculations as comparison points, scanning through backbone and side chain torsion angles for a model peptidomimetic. Finally, as an example of a novel design application, we describe the automated design of an oligooxopiperazine that inhibits the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. For the general biological and bioengineering community, several noncanonical backbones have been incorporated into web applications that allow users to freely and rapidly test the presented protocols (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org. This work helps address the peptidomimetic community's need for an automated and expandable

  19. Simultaneous Chemical and Optical Patterning of Polyacrylonitrile Film by Vapor-Based Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-Won; Lee, Choonghyeon; Cha, Sang-Ho; Jang, Jyongsik; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2015-06-01

    The surface of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) film is treated with ethyleneamines (EDA) in a simple chemical vapor phase reaction. Successful introduction of amine functional groups on the cyano group of PAN backbone is verified by FT-IR and NMR measurements. Further UV-vis and photoluminescence analyses show a red shift of the emission peak after repeated EDA treatment, which might be attributed to the formation of imine conjugation from newly formed carbon-nitrogen bonds on the PAN backbone. Further confocal laser scanning microscopy reveals that selective patterning of EDA on PAN films is possible via local polydimethylsiloxane masking. The results indicate that both chemical and optical patterning on PAN film can be realized via a single reaction and show the potential of this novel methodology in selective patterning.

  20. APPECT: An Approximate Backbone-Based Clustering Algorithm for Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Yu; Xu, Guandong; Jin, Pin

    2011-01-01

    algorithm for Tags (APPECT). The main steps of APPECT are: (1) we execute the K-means algorithm on a tag similarity matrix for M times and collect a set of tag clustering results Z={C1,C2,…,Cm}; (2) we form the approximate backbone of Z by executing a greedy search; (3) we fix the approximate backbone...... resulting from the severe difficulty of ambiguity, redundancy and less semantic nature of tags. Clustering method is a useful tool to address the aforementioned difficulties. Most of the researches on tag clustering are directly using traditional clustering algorithms such as K-means or Hierarchical...

  1. Chemical shift assignments and secondary structure prediction of the C-terminal domain of the response regulator BfmR from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Andrew L; Thompson, Richele J; Melander, Christian; Cavanagh, John

    2014-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for severe nocosomial infections by forming biofilms in healthcare environments. The two-domain response regulator BfmR has been shown to be the master controller for biofilm formation. Inactivation of BfmR resulted in an abolition of pili production and consequently biofilm creation. Here we report backbone and sidechain resonance assignments and secondary structure prediction for the C-terminal domain of BfmR (residues 130-238) from A. baumannii.

  2. Determination of the Tautomeric Equilibria of Pyridoyl Benzoyl -Diketones in the Liquid and Solid State through the use of Deuterium Isotope Effects on 1H and 13C NMR Chemical Shifts and Spin Coupling Constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Borisov, Eugeny V.; Lindon, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The tautomeric equilibria for 2-pyridoyl-, 3-pyridoyl-, and 4-pyridoyl-benzoyl methane have been investigated using deuterium isotope effects on 1H and 13C chemical shifts both in the liquid and the solid state. Equilibria are established both in the liquid and the solid state. In addition, in th...

  3. Shifting Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  4. Tough Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Robert S.; Verdezoto, Nervo; Holst, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    in a student dormitory and found that players did not shift their electricity use, because they were unwilling to change their schedules and found it easier to focus on reducing electricity use. Based on our findings, we discuss the implications for encouraging shifting, and also the challenges of integrating...

  5. Optimal sink placement in backbone assisted wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Snigdh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a scheme for selecting the best site for sink placement in WSN applications employing backbone assisted communications. By placing the sink at a specific position, energy scavenging and delay constraints can effectively be controlled. In contrast to the conventional scheme for base station placement at the geographical centre or random placement at the end of the region of interest, the proposed scheme places the base station at either the graph theoretical centre or centroid of the backbone connecting nodes in the region of interest. This strategy shows a considerable reduction in the total number of hops that each packet needs to travel to reach the sink. The proposed scheme is applied on all the families of graphs prevalent in backbone assisted sensor networks to confirm the performance consistency and improvement in network parameters of the communication backbone measured in terms of delay, the carried load and the total energy consumption, eventually affected by the average number of hops for the message to reach the sink.

  6. The Graphical Representation of the Digital Astronaut Physiology Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briers, Demarcus

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes my internship project with the NASA Digital Astronaut Project to analyze the Digital Astronaut (DA) physiology backbone model. The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) applies integrated physiology models to support space biomedical operations, and to assist NASA researchers in closing knowledge gaps related to human physiologic responses to space flight. The DA physiology backbone is a set of integrated physiological equations and functions that model the interacting systems of the human body. The current release of the model is HumMod (Human Model) version 1.5 and was developed over forty years at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC). The physiology equations and functions are scripted in an XML schema specifically designed for physiology modeling by Dr. Thomas G. Coleman at UMMC. Currently it is difficult to examine the physiology backbone without being knowledgeable of the XML schema. While investigating and documenting the tags and algorithms used in the XML schema, I proposed a standard methodology for a graphical representation. This standard methodology may be used to transcribe graphical representations from the DA physiology backbone. In turn, the graphical representations can allow examination of the physiological functions and equations without the need to be familiar with the computer programming languages or markup languages used by DA modeling software.

  7. The use of chemical shift temperature gradients to establish the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor orientation: Implication for structure determination/refinement in paramagnetic metalloproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Zhicheng; Nguyen, Bao D.; La Mar, Gerd N. [University of California, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2000-06-15

    The use of dipolar shifts as important constraints in refining molecular structure of paramagnetic metalloproteins by solution NMR is now well established. A crucial initial step in this procedure is the determination of the orientation of the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility tensor in the molecular frame which is generated interactively with the structure refinement. The use of dipolar shifts as constraints demands knowledge of the diamagnetic shift, which, however, is very often not directly and easily accessible. We demonstrate that temperature gradients of dipolar shifts can serve as alternative constraints for determining the orientation of the magnetic axes, thereby eliminating the need to estimate the diamagnetic shifts. This approach is tested on low-spin, ferric sperm whale cyanometmyoglobin by determining the orientation, anisotropies and anisotropy temperature gradients by the alternate routes of using dipolar shifts and dipolar shift gradients as constraints. The alternate routes ultimately lead to very similar orientation of the magnetic axes, magnetic anisotropies and magnetic anisotropy temperature gradients which, by inference, would lead to an equally valid description of the molecular structure. It is expected that the use of the dipolar shift temperature gradients, rather than the dipolar shifts directly, as constraints will provide an accurate shortcut in a solution structure determination of a paramagnetic metalloprotein.

  8. Solution NMR analysis of the interaction between the actinoporin sticholysin I and DHPC micelles--correlation with backbone dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Castilla, Aracelys; Pazos, Fabiola; Schreier, Shirley; Pires, José Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    Sticholysin I (StI), an actinoporin expressed as a water-soluble protein by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, binds to natural and model membranes, forming oligomeric pores. It is proposed that the first event of a multistep pore formation mechanism consists of the monomeric protein attachment to the lipid bilayer. To date there is no high-resolution structure of the actinoporin pore or other membrane-bound form available. Here we evaluated StI:micelle complexes of variable lipid composition to look for a suitable model for NMR studies. Micelles of pure or mixed lysophospholipids and of dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) were examined. The StI:DHPC micelle was found to be the best system, yielding a stable sample and good quality spectra. A comprehensive chemical shift perturbation analysis was performed to map the StI membrane recognition site in the presence of DHPC micelles. The region mapped (residues F(51), R(52), S(53) in loop 3; F(107), D(108), Y(109), W(111), Y(112), W(115) in loop 7; Q(129), Y(132), D(134), M(135), Y(136), Y(137), G(138) in helix-α2) is in agreement with previously reported data, but additional residues were found to interact, especially residues V(81), A(82), T(83), G(84) in loop 5, and A(85), A(87) in strand-β5. Backbone dynamics measurements of StI free in solution and bound to micelles highlighted the relevance of protein flexibility for membrane binding and suggested that a conformer selection process may take place during protein-membrane interaction. We conclude that the StI:DHPC micelles system is a suitable model for further characterization of an actinoporin membrane-bound form by solution NMR.

  9. The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Li, Jianjun; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Helander, Ilkka M

    2004-06-22

    The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104 was analyzed using chemical degradations, NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing in the presence or absence of an octasaccharide fragment. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS, that could be deduced from experimental results, consists of 20 monosaccharides arranged in a nonrepetitive sequence: [carbohydrate structure: see text] where R is H or 4-O-Me-alpha-L-Fuc-(1-2)-4-O-Me-beta-Hep-(1-3)-alpha-GlcNAc-(1-2)-beta-Man-(1-3)-beta-ManNAc-(1-4)-alpha-Gal-(1-4)-beta-Hep-(1-3)-beta-GalNAc-(1- where Hep is a residue of D-glycero-D-galacto-heptose; all monosaccharides have the D-configuration except for 4-O-Me-L-Fuc and L-Ara4N. This structure is architecturally similar to the oligosaccharide system reported previously in P. frisingensis VTT E-82164 LPS, but differs from the latter in composition and also in the size of the outer region.

  10. Origin of the chemical shift in X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy at the Mn K-Edge in manganese oxide compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, AH; Hozoi, L; Broer, R; Broer-Braam, H.B.

    2003-01-01

    The absorption edge in Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectra of manganese oxide compounds shows a shift of several electronvolts in going from MnO through LaMnO3 to CaMnO3. On the other hand, in X-ray photoelectron spectra much smaller shifts are observed. To identify the mechanisms that cause the obse

  11. (1) H NMR Spectra. Part 28: Proton chemical shifts and couplings in three-membered rings. A ring current model for cyclopropane and a novel dihedral angle dependence for (3) J(HH) couplings involving the epoxy proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Leonard, Paul; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2012-04-01

    The (1) H chemical shifts of selected three-membered ring compounds in CDCl(3) solvent were obtained. This allowed the determination of the substituent chemical shifts of the substituents in the three-membered rings and the long-range effect of these rings on the distant protons. The substituent chemical shifts of common substituents in the cyclopropane ring differ considerably from the same substituents in acyclic fragments and in cyclohexane and were modelled in terms of a three-bond (γ)-effect. For long-range protons (more than three bonds removed), the substituent effects of the cyclopropane ring were analysed in terms of the cyclopropane magnetic anisotropy and steric effect. The cyclopropane magnetic anisotropy (ring current) shift was modelled by (a) a single equivalent dipole perpendicular to and at the centre of the cyclopropane ring and (b) by three identical equivalent dipoles perpendicular to the ring placed at each carbon atom. Model (b) gave a more accurate description of the (1) H chemical shifts and was the selected model. After parameterization, the overall root mean square error for the dataset of 289 entries was 0.068 ppm. The anisotropic effects are significant for the cyclopropane protons (ca 1 ppm) but decrease rapidly with distance. The heterocyclic rings of oxirane, thiirane and aziridine do not possess a ring current. (3) J(HH) couplings of the epoxy ring proton with side-chain protons were obtained and shown to be dependent on both the H-C-C-H and H-C-C-O orientations. Both density functional theory calculations and a simple Karplus-type equation gave general agreement with the observed couplings (root mean square error 0.5 Hz over a 10-Hz range).

  12. Utility of chemical-shift MR imaging in detecting small amounts of fat in extrahepatic abdominal tumors; Utilidad de la tecnica de desplazamiento quimico den RM para la deteccion de pequenas cantidades de grasa en tumores abdominales extrahepaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.; Falco, J.; Puig, J.; Donoso, L. [Unidad de Diagnostico por Imagen de Alta Tecnologia (UDIAT). Sabadell (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    To determine the utility of the chemical shift technique in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm small amounts of fat in extrahepatic intraabdominal tumours. 7 extrahepatic abdominal tumours that are suspected to have fat as seen in the axial computed tomography (TC) are analysed retrospectively. In order to confirm the fat content, the chemical displacement technique with gradient echo sequences (GE) in phase (P) and in opposite phase (OP) was used with MRI 1 T equipment. The tumours corresponded to renal angiomyolipoma (AML) (n=4), intraperitoneal liposarcoma (n=1), retroperitoneal liposarcoma (n=1) and intraabdominal extramedular hematopoiesis (n=1). To confirm the existence of fat in the tumours, we used a quantitative percentage variation parameter of the intensity of the signals (VIS) between the images in P and OP, according to the formula: IS{sub (}p)-IS({sub o}p)x100/IS{sub (}op), where IS is the intensity of the signal. The chemical shift technique showed fat in the seven tumours. Upon visual inspection, all the tumoral areas that were suspected to have fat showed a notable difference in the signal intensity, being hypointense in OP and hyperintense in P. In these areas the average VIS percentage was 170% while in the rest of the tumour the average VIS percentage was 3%. The chemical shift technique with RG sequences can be easily used in MRI equipment and allows us to confirm if a specific abdominal tumour has fat, even if there is only a small quantity. (Author) 13 refs.

  13. Polystyrene Backbone Polymers Consisting of Alkyl-Substituted Triazine Side Groups for Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ch. D. Salert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the synthesis of new electron-transporting styrene monomers and their corresponding polystyrenes all with a 2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine basic structure in the side group. The monomers differ in the alkyl substitution and in the meta-/paralinkage of the triazine to the polymer backbone. The thermal and spectroscopic properties of the new electron-transporting polymers are discussed in regard to their chemical structures. Phosphorescent OLEDs were prepared using the obtained electron-transporting polymers as the emissive layer material in blend systems together with a green iridium-based emitter 13 and a small molecule as an additional cohost with wideband gap characteristics (CoH-001. The performance of the OLEDs was characterized and discussed in regard to the chemical structure of the new electron-transporting polymers.

  14. Subpicosecond protein backbone changes detected during the green-absorbing proteorhodopsin primary photoreaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsden, Jason J; Kralj, Joel M; Chieffo, Logan R; Wang, Xihua; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Spudich, Elena N; Spudich, John L; Ziegler, Lawrence D; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2007-10-11

    Recent studies demonstrate that photoactive proteins can react within several picoseconds to photon absorption by their chromophores. Faster subpicosecond protein responses have been suggested to occur in rhodopsin-like proteins where retinal photoisomerization may impulsively drive structural changes in nearby protein groups. Here, we test this possibility by investigating the earliest protein structural changes occurring in proteorhodopsin (PR) using ultrafast transient infrared (TIR) spectroscopy with approximately 200 fs time resolution combined with nonperturbing isotope labeling. PR is a recently discovered microbial rhodopsin similar to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) found in marine proteobacteria and functions as a proton pump. Vibrational bands in the retinal fingerprint (1175-1215 cm(-1)) and ethylenic stretching (1500-1570 cm(-1)) regions characteristic of all-trans to 13-cis chromophore isomerization and formation of a red-shifted photointermediate appear with a 500-700 fs time constant after photoexcitation. Bands characteristic of partial return to the ground state evolve with a 2.0-3.5 ps time constant. In addition, a negative band appears at 1548 cm(-1) with a time constant of 500-700 fs, which on the basis of total-15N and retinal C15D (retinal with a deuterium on carbon 15) isotope labeling is assigned to an amide II peptide backbone mode that shifts to near 1538 cm(-1) concomitantly with chromophore isomerization. Our results demonstrate that one or more peptide backbone groups in PR respond with a time constant of 500-700 fs, almost coincident with the light-driven retinylidene chromophore isomerization. The protein changes we observe on a subpicosecond time scale may be involved in storage of the absorbed photon energy subsequently utilized for proton transport.

  15. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  16. Identification of systems containing nonlinear stiffnesses using backbone curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londoño, Julián M.; Cooper, Jonathan E.; Neild, Simon A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a method for the dynamic identification of structures containing discrete nonlinear stiffnesses. The approach requires the structure to be excited at a single resonant frequency, enabling measurements to be made in regimes of large displacements where nonlinearities are more likely to be significant. Measured resonant decay data is used to estimate the system backbone curves. Linear natural frequencies and nonlinear parameters are identified using these backbone curves assuming a form for the nonlinear behaviour. Numerical and experimental examples, inspired by an aerospace industry test case study, are considered to illustrate how the method can be applied. Results from these models demonstrate that the method can successfully deliver nonlinear models able to predict the response of the test structure nonlinear dynamics.

  17. Double-echo gradient chemical shift MR imaging fails to differentiate minimal fat renal angiomyolipomas from other homogeneous solid renal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferré, R., E-mail: kn638@yahoo.fr [Department of Radiology, Necker Hospital, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75730 Paris (France); Cornelis, F. [Department of Radiology, Pellegrin Hospital, Place Amélie Raba Léon, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Verkarre, V. [Department of Pathology, Necker Hospital, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75730 Paris (France); Eiss, D.; Correas, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Necker Hospital, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75730 Paris (France); Grenier, N. [Department of Radiology, Pellegrin Hospital, Place Amélie Raba Léon, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Hélénon, O. [Department of Radiology, Necker Hospital, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75730 Paris (France)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Diagnosis of AMLs with minimal fat (mfAMLs) is still challenging with MRI. •Drop of signal on opposed-phase MR imaging is not specific of mfAMLs. •Double-echo gradient-echo sequences cannot accurately differentiate renal mfAMLs from other renal tumors. -- Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of double-echo gradient chemical shift (GRE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the differentiation of angiomyolipomas with minimal fat (mfAML) from other homogeneous solid renal tumors. Methods: Between 2005 and 2010 in two institutions, all histologically proven homogenous solid renal tumors imaged with computed tomography and MR imaging, including GRE sequences, have been retrospectively selected. A total of 118 patients (mean age: 61 years; range: 20–87) with 119 tumors were included. Two readers measured independently the signal intensity (SI) on GRE images and calculated SI index (SII) and tumor-to-spleen ratio (TSR) on in-phase and opposed-phase images. Intra- and interreader agreement was obtained. Cut-off values were derived from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: Twelve mfAMLs in 11 patients were identified (mean size: 2.8 cm; range: 1.2–3.5), and 107 non-AML tumors (3.2 cm; 1–7.8) in 107 patients. The intraobserver reproducibility of SII and TSR was excellent with an intraclass correlation coefficient equal to 0.99 [0.98–0.99]. The coefficient of correlation between the readers was 0.99. The mean values of TSR for mfAMLs and non-mfAMLs were −7.0 ± 22.8 versus −8.2 ± 21.2 for reader 1 and −6.7 ± 22.8 versus −8.4 ± 20.9 for reader 2 respectively. No significant difference was noticed between the two groups for SII (p = 0.98) and TSR (p = 0.86). Only 1 out of 12 mfAMLs and 11 of 107 non-AML tumors presented with a TSR inferior to −30% (p = 0.83). Conclusion: In a routine practice, GRE sequences cannot be a confident tool to

  18. Synthesis, NMR spectroscopic characterization and structure of a divinyldisilazane-(triphenylphosphine)platinum(0) complex: observation of isotope-induced chemical shifts (1)Δ(12/13)C((195)Pt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrackmeyer, Bernd; Klimkina, Elena V; Schmalz, Thomas; Milius, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    Tetramethyldivinyldisilazane-(triphenylphosphine)platinum(0) was prepared, characterized in solid state by X-ray crystallography and in solution by multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N, (29)Si, (31)P and (195)Pt NMR). Numerous signs of spin-spin coupling constants were determined by two-dimensional heteronuclear shift correlations (HETCOR) and two-dimensional (1)H/(1)H COSY experiments. Isotope-induced chemical shifts (1)Δ(12/13)C((195)Pt) were measured from (195)Pt NMR spectra of the title compound as well as of other Pt(0), Pt(II) and Pt(IV) compounds for comparison. In contrast to other heavy nuclei such as (199)Hg or (207)Pb, the "normal" shifts of the heavy isotopomers to low frequencies are found, covering a range of >500 ppb.

  19. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    OpenAIRE

    Sharley, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure....

  20. Backbone decomposition for continuous-state branching processes with immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, A E Kyprianou Y-X

    2011-01-01

    In the spirit of Duqesne and Winkel (2007) and Berestycki et al. (2011) we show that supercritical continuous-state branching process with a general branching mechanism and general immigration mechanism is equal in law to a continuous-time Galton Watson process with immigration with Poissonian dressing. The result also characterises the limiting backbone decomposition which is predictable from the work on consistent growth of Galton-Watson trees with immigration in Cao and Winkel (2010).

  1. Extracting the multiscale backbone of complex weighted networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; Boguñá, Marián; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A large number of complex systems find a natural abstraction in the form of weighted networks whose nodes represent the elements of the system and the weighted edges identify the presence of an interaction and its relative strength. In recent years, the study of an increasing number of large-scale networks has highlighted the statistical heterogeneity of their interaction pattern, with degree and weight distributions that vary over many orders of magnitude. These features, along with the large number of elements and links, make the extraction of the truly relevant connections forming the network's backbone a very challenging problem. More specifically, coarse-graining approaches and filtering techniques come into conflict with the multiscale nature of large-scale systems. Here, we define a filtering method that offers a practical procedure to extract the relevant connection backbone in complex multiscale networks, preserving the edges that represent statistically significant deviations with respect to a null model for the local assignment of weights to edges. An important aspect of the method is that it does not belittle small-scale interactions and operates at all scales defined by the weight distribution. We apply our method to real-world network instances and compare the obtained results with alternative backbone extraction techniques. PMID:19357301

  2. Determination of pKa values of tenoxicam from 1H NMR chemical shifts and of oxicams from electrophoretic mobilities (CZE) with the aid of programs SQUAD and HYPNMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Barrientos, Damaris; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Gutiérrez, Atilano; Moya-Hernández, Rosario; Gómez-Balderas, Rodolfo; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa

    2009-12-15

    In this work it is explained, by the first time, the application of programs SQUAD and HYPNMR to refine equilibrium constant values through the fit of electrophoretic mobilities determined by capillary zone electrophoresis experiments, due to the mathematical isomorphism of UV-vis absorptivity coefficients, NMR chemical shifts and electrophoretic mobilities as a function of pH. Then, the pK(a) values of tenoxicam in H(2)O/DMSO 1:4 (v/v) have been obtained from (1)H NMR chemical shifts, as well as of oxicams in aqueous solution from electrophoretic mobilities determined by CZE, at 25 degrees C. These values are in very good agreement with those reported by spectrophotometric and potentiometric measurements.

  3. Lanthanide ion (III) complexes of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaminophosphonate for dual biosensing of pH with chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuegao; Coman, Daniel; Ali, Meser M; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Relaxivity-based magnetic resonance of phosphonated ligands chelated with gadolinium (Gd(3+)) shows promise for pH imaging. However instead of monitoring the paramagnetic effect of lanthanide complexes on the relaxivity of water protons, biosensor (or molecular) imaging with magnetic resonance is also possible by detecting either the nonexchangeable or the exchangeable protons on the lanthanide complexes themselves. The nonexchangeable protons (e.g. -CHx, where 3 ≥ x ≥ 1) are detected using a three-dimensional chemical shift imaging method called biosensor imaging of redundant deviation in shifts (BIRDS), whereas the exchangeable protons (e.g. -OH or -NHy , where 2 ≥ y ≥ 1) are measured with chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast. Here we tested the feasibility of BIRDS and CEST for pH imaging of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraaminophosphonate (DOTA-4AmP(8-)) chelated with thulium (Tm(3+) ) and ytterbium (Yb(3+)). BIRDS and CEST experiments show that both complexes are responsive to pH and temperature changes. Higher pH and temperature sensitivities are obtained with BIRDS for either complex when using the chemical shift difference between two proton resonances vs using the chemical shift of a single proton resonance, thereby eliminating the need to use water resonance as reference. While CEST contrast for both agents is linearly dependent on pH within a relatively large range (i.e. 6.3-7.9), much stronger CEST contrast is obtained with YbDOTA-4AmP(5-) than with TmDOTA-4AmP(5-). In addition, we demonstrate the prospect of using BIRDS to calibrate CEST as new platform for quantitative pH imaging.

  4. Comparison of the backbone dynamics of wild-type Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c{sub 552} and its b-type variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozawa, Kaeko; Ferguson, Stuart J.; Redfield, Christina, E-mail: christina.redfield@bioch.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Smith, Lorna J., E-mail: lorna.smith@chem.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Cytochrome c{sub 552} from the thermophilic bacterium Hydrogenobacter thermophilus is a typical c-type cytochrome which binds heme covalently via two thioether bonds between the two heme vinyl groups and two cysteine thiol groups in a CXXCH sequence motif. This protein was converted to a b-type cytochrome by substitution of the two cysteine residues by alanines (Tomlinson and Ferguson in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 97:5156–5160, 2000a). To probe the significance of the covalent attachment of the heme in the c-type protein, {sup 15}N relaxation and hydrogen exchange studies have been performed for the wild-type and b-type proteins. The two variants share very similar backbone dynamic properties, both proteins showing high {sup 15}N order parameters in the four main helices, with reduced values in an exposed loop region (residues 18–21), and at the C-terminal residue Lys80. Some subtle changes in chemical shift and hydrogen exchange protection are seen between the wild-type and b-type variant proteins, not only for residues at and neighbouring the mutation sites, but also for some residues in the heme binding pocket. Overall, the results suggest that the main role of the covalent linkages between the heme group and the protein chain must be to increase the stability of the protein.

  5. Power Shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ "We are entering a new era of world history: the end of Western domination and the arrival of the Asian century. The question is: will Washington wake up to this reality?" This is the central premise of Kishore Mahbubani's provocative new book The New Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Global Power to the East.

  6. Control of polymer-packing orientation in thin films through synthetic tailoring of backbone coplanarity

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Mark S.

    2013-10-22

    Controlling solid-state order of π-conjugated polymers through macromolecular design is essential for achieving high electronic device performance; yet, it remains a challenge, especially with respect to polymer-packing orientation. Our work investigates the influence of backbone coplanarity on a polymer\\'s preference to pack face-on or edge-on relative to the substrate. Isoindigo-based polymers were synthesized with increasing planarity by systematically substituting thiophenes for phenyl rings in the acceptor comonomer. This increasing backbone coplanarity, supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of representative trimers, leads to the narrowing of polymer band gaps as characterized by ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Among the polymers studied, regiosymmetric II and TII polymers exhibited the highest hole mobilities in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), while in organic photovoltaics (OPVs), TBII polymers that display intermediate levels of planarity provided the highest power conversion efficiencies. Upon thin-film analysis by atomic force microscropy (AFM) and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), we discovered that polymer-packing orientation could be controlled by tuning polymer planarity and solubility. Highly soluble, planar polymers favor face-on orientation in thin films while the less soluble, nonplanar polymers favor an edge-on orientation. This study advances our fundamental understanding of how polymer structure influences nanostructural order and reveals a new synthetic strategy for the design of semiconducting materials with rationally engineered solid-state properties. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Protonation–deprotonation of the glycine backbone as followed by Raman scattering and multiconformational analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, Belén; Pflüger, Fernando [Groupe de Biophysique Moléculaire, UFR Santé-Médecine-Biologie Humaine, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny cedex (France); Kruglik, Sergei G. [Laboratoire Jean Perrin, FRE 3231, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), Case courrier 138, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Ghomi, Mahmoud, E-mail: mahmoud.ghomi@univ-paris13.fr [Groupe de Biophysique Moléculaire, UFR Santé-Médecine-Biologie Humaine, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny cedex (France)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: • New pH-dependent Raman spectra in the middle wavenumber region (1800-300 cm{sup −1}). • New quantum mechanical calculations for exploring the Gly conformational landscape. • Construction of muticonformation based theoretical Raman spectra. - Abstract: Because of the absence of the side chain in its chemical structure and its well defined Raman spectra, glycine was selected here to follow its backbone protonation–deprotonation. The scan of the recorded spectra in the 1800–300 cm{sup −1} region led us to assign those obtained at pH 1, 6 and 12 to the cationic, zwitterionic and anionic species, respectively. These data complete well those previously published by Bykov et al. (2008) [16] devoted to the high wavenumber Raman spectra (>2500 cm{sup −1}). To reinforce our discussion, DFT calculations were carried out on the clusters of glycine + 5H{sub 2}O, mimicking reasonably the first hydration shell of the amino acid. Geometry optimization of 141 initial clusters, reflecting plausible combinations of the backbone torsion angles, allowed exploration of the conformational features, as well as construction of the theoretical Raman spectra by considering the most stable clusters containing each glycine species.

  8. Influence of Backbone Fluorination in Regioregular Poly(3-alkyl-4-fluoro)thiophenes

    KAUST Repository

    Fei, Zhuping

    2015-06-03

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. We report two strategies toward the synthesis of 3-alkyl-4-fluorothiophenes containing straight (hexyl and octyl) and branched (2-ethylhexyl) alkyl groups. We demonstrate that treatment of the dibrominated monomer with 1 equiv of alkyl Grignard reagent leads to the formation of a single regioisomer as a result of the pronounced directing effect of the fluorine group. Polymerization of the resulting species affords highly regioregular poly(3-alkyl-4-fluoro)thiophenes. Comparison of their properties to those of the analogous non-fluorinated polymers shows that backbone fluorination leads to an increase in the polymer ionization potential without a significant change in optical band gap. Fluorination also results in an enhanced tendency to aggregate in solution, which is ascribed to a more co-planar backbone on the basis of Raman and DFT calculations. Average charge carrier mobilities in field-effect transistors are found to increase by up to a factor of 5 for the fluorinated polymers.

  9. Prediction of (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of dissolution products of H2 [Pt(OH)6 ] in nitric acid solutions by DFT methods: how important are the counter-ion effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipis, Athanassios C; Karapetsas, Ioannis N

    2016-08-01

    (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of octahedral Pt(IV) complexes with general formula [Pt(NO3 )n (OH)6 - n ](2-) , [Pt(NO3 )n (OH2 )6 - n ](4 - n) (n = 1-6), and [Pt(NO3 )6 - n  - m (OH)m (OH2 )n ](-2 + n - m) formed by dissolution of platinic acid, H2 [Pt(OH)6 ], in aqueous nitric acid solutions are calculated employing density functional theory methods. Particularly, the gauge-including atomic orbitals (GIAO)-PBE0/segmented all-electron relativistically contracted-zeroth-order regular approximation (SARC-ZORA)(Pt) ∪ 6-31G(d,p)(E)/Polarizable Continuum Model computational protocol performs the best. Excellent second-order polynomial plots of δcalcd ((195) Pt) versus δexptl ((195) Pt) chemical shifts and δcalcd ((195) Pt) versus the natural atomic charge QPt are obtained. Despite of neglecting relativistic and spin orbit effects the good agreement of the calculated δ (195) Pt chemical shifts with experimental values is probably because of the fact that the contribution of relativistic and spin orbit effects to computed σ(iso) (195) Pt magnetic shielding of Pt(IV) coordination compounds is effectively cancelled in the computed δ (195) Pt chemical shifts, because the relativistic corrections are expected to be similar in the complexes and the proper reference standard used. To probe the counter-ion effects on the (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of the anionic [Pt(NO3 )n (OH)6 - n ](2-) and cationic [Pt(NO3 )n (OH2 )6 - n ](4 - n) (n = 0-3) complexes we calculated the (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of the neutral (PyH)2 [Pt(NO3 )n (OH)6 - n ] (n = 1-6; PyH = pyridinium cation, C5 H5 NH(+) ) and [Pt(NO3 )n (H2 O)6 - n ](NO3 )4 - n (n = 0-3) complexes. Counter-anion effects are very important for the accurate prediction of the (195) Pt NMR chemical shifts of the cationic [Pt(NO3 )n (OH2 )6 - n ](4 - n) complexes, while counter-cation effects are less important for the anionic [Pt(NO3 )n (OH)6

  10. Design of an IPTV Multicast System for Internet Backbone Networks

    OpenAIRE

    T. H. Szymanski; Gilbert, D

    2010-01-01

    The design of an IPTV multicast system for the Internet backbone network is presented and explored through extensive simulations. In the proposed system, a resource reservation algorithm such as RSVP, IntServ, or DiffServ is used to reserve resources (i.e., bandwidth and buffer space) in each router in an IP multicast tree. Each router uses an Input-Queued, Output-Queued, or Crosspoint-Queued switch architecture with unity speedup. A recently proposed Recursive Fair Stochastic Matrix Decompos...

  11. Application of Multicast-based Video Conference on CERNET Backbone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Multicast-based video conference is a representative application in advanced network. In multi-point video conference using multicast can get better efficiency facilitated by inner-group broadcast mechanism. In the application, the multicast-based network resources assignment, management and security should be considered together. This paper presents a framework model of multicast-based video conferencing application with three layers. And a practical multicast-based video conferencing is implemented in CERNET(China Education and Research Network) backbone. The practice is valuable for the development of multicast-based video conferencing application in China.

  12. Resistance of Feynman diagrams and the percolation backbone dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, H K; Stenull, O; Oerding, K

    1999-06-01

    We present an alternative view of Feynman diagrams for the field theory of random resistor networks, in which the diagrams are interpreted as being resistor networks themselves. This simplifies the field theory considerably as we demonstrate by calculating the fractal dimension D(B) of the percolation backbone to three loop order. Using renormalization group methods we obtain D(B)=2+epsilon/21-172epsilon(2)/9261+2epsilon(3)[-74 639+22 680zeta(3)]/4 084 101, where epsilon=6-d with d being the spatial dimension and zeta(3)=1.202 057... .

  13. Unique optimal solution instance and computational complexity of backbone in the graph bi-partitioning problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As an important tool for heuristic design of NP-hard problems, backbone analysis has become a hot spot in theoretical computer science in recent years. Due to the difficulty in the research on computational complexity of the backbone, many researchers analyzed the backbone by statistic ways. Aiming to increase the backbone size which is usually very small by the existing methods, the unique optimal solution instance construction (UOSIC) is proposed for the graph bi-partitioning problem (GBP). Also, we prove by using the UOSIC that it is NP-hard to obtain the backbone, i.e. no algorithm exists to obtain the backbone of a GBP in polynomial time under the assumption that P ( NP. Our work expands the research area of computational complexity of the backbone. And the UOSIC provides a new way for heuristic design of NP-hard problems.

  14. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Liu, J.; Macias, B.; Martin, D. S.; Minkoff, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Sargsyan, A.; Smith, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  15. Controlled Conjugated Backbone Twisting for an Increased Open-Circuit Voltage while Having a High Short-Circuit Current in Poly(hexylthiophene) Derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Ko, Sangwon

    2012-03-21

    Conjugated polymers with nearly planar backbones have been the most commonly investigated materials for organic-based electronic devices. More twisted polymer backbones have been shown to achieve larger open-circuit voltages in solar cells, though with decreased short-circuit current densities. We systematically impose twists within a family of poly(hexylthiophene)s and examine their influence on the performance of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. A simple chemical modification concerning the number and placement of alkyl side chains along the conjugated backbone is used to control the degree of backbone twisting. Density functional theory calculations were carried out on a series of oligothiophene structures to provide insights on how the sterically induced twisting influences the geometric, electronic, and optical properties. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering measurements were performed to investigate how the thin-film packing structure was affected. The open-circuit voltage and charge-transfer state energy of the polymer:fullerene BHJ solar cells increased substantially with the degree of twist induced within the conjugated backbone-due to an increase in the polymer ionization potential-while the short-circuit current decreased as a result of a larger optical gap and lower hole mobility. A controlled, moderate degree of twist along the poly(3,4-dihexyl-2,2′:5′,2′′- terthiophene) (PDHTT) conjugated backbone led to a 19% enhancement in the open-circuit voltage (0.735 V) vs poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based devices, while similar short-circuit current densities, fill factors, and hole-carrier mobilities were maintained. These factors resulted in a power conversion efficiency of 4.2% for a PDHTT:[6,6]-phenyl-C 71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC 71BM) blend solar cell without thermal annealing. This simple approach reveals a molecular design avenue to increase open-circuit voltage while retaining the short-circuit current. © 2012 American

  16. Process-based network decomposition reveals backbone motif structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanyu; Du, Chenghang; Chen, Hao; Simha, Rahul; Rong, Yongwu; Xiao, Yi; Zeng, Chen

    2010-06-08

    A central challenge in systems biology today is to understand the network of interactions among biomolecules and, especially, the organizing principles underlying such networks. Recent analysis of known networks has identified small motifs that occur ubiquitously, suggesting that larger networks might be constructed in the manner of electronic circuits by assembling groups of these smaller modules. Using a unique process-based approach to analyzing such networks, we show for two cell-cycle networks that each of these networks contains a giant backbone motif spanning all the network nodes that provides the main functional response. The backbone is in fact the smallest network capable of providing the desired functionality. Furthermore, the remaining edges in the network form smaller motifs whose role is to confer stability properties rather than provide function. The process-based approach used in the above analysis has additional benefits: It is scalable, analytic (resulting in a single analyzable expression that describes the behavior), and computationally efficient (all possible minimal networks for a biological process can be identified and enumerated).

  17. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laurence Tremblay

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Spider aciniform (wrapping silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units. In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy-based 15N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps–ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W1 and the two unit concatemer (W2. Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W2 was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W1 and W2 reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre.

  18. Backbone building from quadrilaterals: a fast and accurate algorithm for protein backbone reconstruction from alpha carbon coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gront, Dominik; Kmiecik, Sebastian; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2007-07-15

    In this contribution, we present an algorithm for protein backbone reconstruction that comprises very high computational efficiency with high accuracy. Reconstruction of the main chain atomic coordinates from the alpha carbon trace is a common task in protein modeling, including de novo structure prediction, comparative modeling, and processing experimental data. The method employed in this work follows the main idea of some earlier approaches to the problem. The details and careful design of the present approach are new and lead to the algorithm that outperforms all commonly used earlier applications. BBQ (Backbone Building from Quadrilaterals) program has been extensively tested both on native structures as well as on near-native decoy models and compared with the different available existing methods. Obtained results provide a comprehensive benchmark of existing tools and evaluate their applicability to a large scale modeling using a reduced representation of protein conformational space. The BBQ package is available for downloading from our website at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/services/BBQ/. This webpage also provides a user manual that describes BBQ functions in detail.

  19. Plakilactones G and H from a marine sponge. Stereochemical determination of highly flexible systems by quantitative NMR-derived interproton distances combined with quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Di Micco

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the stereostructural investigation of two new oxygenated polyketides, plakilactones G and H, isolated from the marine sponge Plakinastrella mamillaris collected at Fiji Islands, is reported. The stereostructural studies began on plakilactone H by applying an integrated approach of the NOE-based protocol and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C chemical shifts. In particular, plakilactone H was used as a template to extend the application of NMR-derived interproton distances to a highly flexible molecular system with simultaneous assignment of four non-contiguous stereocenters. Chemical derivatization and quantum mechanical calculations of 13C on plakilactone G along with a plausible biogenetic interconversion between plakilactone G and plakilactone H allowed us to determine the absolute configuration in this two new oxygenated polyketides.

  20. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and non-polyproline helix such as alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure. The electrostatic properties including permittivity of amino acid residue sidegroups influence the electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide. The significance of this factor relative to other factors in protein folding depends on the magnitude of electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide, and preliminary protein-scale calculations of the magnitude of these components suggest this factor warrants investigation in ...

  1. Backbones of evolutionary history test biodiversity theory for microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, James P; Kembel, Steven W; Sharpton, Thomas J

    2015-07-07

    Identifying the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that determine biological diversity is a central question in ecology. In microbial ecology, phylogenetic diversity is an increasingly common and relevant means of quantifying community diversity, particularly given the challenges in defining unambiguous species units from environmental sequence data. We explore patterns of phylogenetic diversity across multiple bacterial communities drawn from different habitats and compare these data to evolutionary trees generated using theoretical models of biodiversity. We have two central findings. First, although on finer scales the empirical trees are highly idiosyncratic, on coarse scales the backbone of these trees is simple and robust, consistent across habitats, and displays bursts of diversification dotted throughout. Second, we find that these data demonstrate a clear departure from the predictions of standard neutral theories of biodiversity and that an alternative family of generalized models provides a qualitatively better description. Together, these results lay the groundwork for a theoretical framework to connect ecological mechanisms to observed phylogenetic patterns in microbial communities.

  2. Phase Transitions and Backbones of the Asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, W

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in phase transitions of combinatorial problems. Phase transitions have been successfully used to analyze combinatorial optimization problems, characterize their typical-case features and locate the hardest problem instances. In this paper, we study phase transitions of the asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problem (ATSP), an NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem that has many real-world applications. Using random instances of up to 1,500 cities in which intercity distances are uniformly distributed, we empirically show that many properties of the problem, including the optimal tour cost and backbone size, experience sharp transitions as the precision of intercity distances increases across a critical value. Our experimental results on the costs of the ATSP tours and assignment problem agree with the theoretical result that the asymptotic cost of assignment problem is pi ^2 /6 the number of cities goes to infinity. In addition, we show that the average computation...

  3. Bioactivities of fish protein hydrolysates from defatted salmon backbones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa Slizyte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioactivities of bulk fish protein hydrolysates (FPH from defatted salmon backbones obtained with eight different commercial enzymes and their combinations were tested. All FPH showed antioxidative activity in vitro. DPPH scavenging activity increased, while iron chelating ability decreased with increasing time of hydrolysis. All FPH showed ACE inhibiting effect which depended on type of enzyme and increased with time of hydrolysis. The highest effect was found for FPH produced with Trypsin. Bromelain + Papain hydrolysates reduced the uptake of radiolabelled glucose into CaCo-2 cells, a model of human enterocytes, indicating a potential antidiabetic effect of FPH. FPH obtained by Trypsin, Bromelain + Papain and Protamex showed the highest ACE inhibitory, cellular glucose transporter (GLUT/SGLT inhibitory and in vitro antioxidative activities, respectively. Correlation was observed between the measured bioactivities, degree of hydrolysis and molecular weight profiles, supporting prolonged hydrolysis to obtain high bioactivities.

  4. Design of an IPTV Multicast System for Internet Backbone Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Szymanski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of an IPTV multicast system for the Internet backbone network is presented and explored through extensive simulations. In the proposed system, a resource reservation algorithm such as RSVP, IntServ, or DiffServ is used to reserve resources (i.e., bandwidth and buffer space in each router in an IP multicast tree. Each router uses an Input-Queued, Output-Queued, or Crosspoint-Queued switch architecture with unity speedup. A recently proposed Recursive Fair Stochastic Matrix Decomposition algorithm used to compute near-perfect transmission schedules for each IP router. The IPTV traffic is shaped at the sources using Application-Specific Token Bucker Traffic Shapers, to limit the burstiness of incoming network traffic. The IPTV traffic is shaped at the destinations using Application-Specific Playback Queues, to remove residual network jitter and reconstruct the original bursty IPTV video streams at each destination. All IPTV traffic flows are regenerated at the destinations with essentially zero delay jitter and essentially-perfect QoS. The destination nodes deliver the IPTV streams to the ultimate end users using the same IPTV multicast system over a regional Metropolitan Area Network. It is shown that all IPTV traffic is delivered with essentially-perfect end-to-end QoS, with deterministic bounds on the maximum delay and jitter on each video frame. Detailed simulations of an IPTV distribution system, multicasting several hundred high-definition IPTV video streams over several essentially saturated IP backbone networks are presented.

  5. Reconstruction of Protein Backbones from the BriX Collection of Canonical Protein Fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Lies Baeten; Joke Reumers; Vicente Tur; François Stricher; Tom Lenaerts; Luis Serrano; Frederic Rousseau; Joost Schymkowitz

    2008-01-01

    As modeling of changes in backbone conformation still lacks a computationally efficient solution, we developed a discretisation of the conformational states accessible to the protein backbone similar to the successful rotamer approach in side chains. The BriX fragment database, consisting of fragments from 4 to 14 residues long, was realized through identification of recurrent backbone fragments from a non-redundant set of high-resolution protein structures. BriX contains an alphabet of more ...

  6. Effects of Tryptophan Content and Backbone Spacing on the Uptake Efficiency of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-07-10

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to traverse cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo. Uptake occurs through both endocytotic and nonendocytotic pathways, but the molecular requirements for efficient internalization are not fully understood. Here we investigate how the presence of tryptophans and their position within an oligoarginine influence uptake mechanism and efficiency. Flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence imaging are used to estimate uptake efficiency, intracellular distribution and toxicity in Chinese hamster ovarian cells. Further, membrane leakage and lipid membrane affinity are investigated. The peptides contain eight arginine residues and one to four tryptophans, the tryptophans positioned either at the N-terminus, in the middle, or evenly distributed along the amino acid sequence. Our data show that the intracellular distribution varies among peptides with different tryptophan content and backbone spacing. Uptake efficiency is higher for the peptides with four tryptophans in the middle, or evenly distributed along the peptide sequence, than for the peptide with four tryptophans at the N-terminus. All peptides display low cytotoxicity except for the one with four tryptophans at the N-terminus, which was moderately toxic. This finding is consistent with their inability to induce efficient leakage of dye from lipid vesicles. All peptides have comparable affinities for lipid vesicles, showing that lipid binding is not a decisive parameter for uptake. Our results indicate that tryptophan content and backbone spacing can affect both the CPP uptake efficiency and the CPP uptake mechanism. The low cytotoxicity of these peptides and the possibilities of tuning their uptake mechanism are interesting from a therapeutic point of view. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin.

  8. Thin Films Formed from Conjugated Polymers with Ionic, Water-Soluble Backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voortman, Thomas P; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-12-30

    This paper compares the morphologies of films of conjugated polymers in which the backbone (main chain) and pendant groups are varied between ionic/hydrophilic and aliphatic/hydrophobic. We observe that conjugated polymers in which the pendant groups and backbone are matched, either ionic-ionic or hydrophobic-hydrophobic, form smooth, structured, homogeneous films from water (ionic) or tetrahydrofuran (hydrophobic). Mismatched conjugated polymers, by contrast, form inhomogeneous films with rough topologies. The polymers with ionic backbone chains are conjugated polyions (conjugated polymers with closed-shell charges in the backbone), which are semiconducting materials with tunable bad-gaps, not unlike uncharged conjugated polymers.

  9. A hierarchical virtual backbone construction protocol for mobile ad hoc networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a hierarchical backbone construction protocol for mobile ad hoc networks. Our protocol is based on the idea of using an efficient extrema finding method to create clusters comprising the nodes that are within certain prespecified wireless hop distance. Afterward, we apply our ‘diameter’ algorithm among clusters to identify the dominating nodes that are, finally, connected via multi-hop virtual links to construct the backbone. We present the analytic as well as simulation study of our algorithm and also a method for the dynamic maintenance of constructed backbone. In the end, we illustrate the use of the virtual backbone with the help of an interesting application.

  10. Influence of Chemical Effect on the Kβ/Kα Intensity Ratios and Kβ Energy Shift of Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Apaydma, V. Ayhkg; Z. Biyiklioglu; E. Tirasoglu; H. Kantekin

    2008-01-01

    Chemical effects on the Kβ/Kα intensity ratios and ΔE energy differences for Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn complexes were investigated. The samples were excited by 59.5 keV γ-rays from a 241 Am annular radioactive source. K X-rays emitted by samples were counted by an Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. We observed the effects of different ligands on the Kβ/Kα intensity ratios and ΔE energy differences for Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn complexes. We tried to investigate chemical effects on central atoms using the behaviors of different ligands in these complexes. The experimental values of Kβ/Kα were compared with the theoretical and other experimental values of pure Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn.

  11. Phylogenomics resolves a spider backbone phylogeny and rejects a prevailing paradigm for orb web evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Jason E; Garrison, Nicole L; Hamilton, Chris A; Godwin, Rebecca L; Hedin, Marshal; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2014-08-04

    Spiders represent an ancient predatory lineage known for their extraordinary biomaterials, including venoms and silks. These adaptations make spiders key arthropod predators in most terrestrial ecosystems. Despite ecological, biomedical, and biomaterial importance, relationships among major spider lineages remain unresolved or poorly supported. Current working hypotheses for a spider "backbone" phylogeny are largely based on morphological evidence, as most molecular markers currently employed are generally inadequate for resolving deeper-level relationships. We present here a phylogenomic analysis of spiders including taxa representing all major spider lineages. Our robust phylogenetic hypothesis recovers some fundamental and uncontroversial spider clades, but rejects the prevailing paradigm of a monophyletic Orbiculariae, the most diverse lineage, containing orb-weaving spiders. Based on our results, the orb web either evolved much earlier than previously hypothesized and is ancestral for a majority of spiders or else it has multiple independent origins, as hypothesized by precladistic authors. Cribellate deinopoid orb weavers that use mechanically adhesive silk are more closely related to a diverse clade of mostly webless spiders than to the araneoid orb-weaving spiders that use adhesive droplet silks. The fundamental shift in our understanding of spider phylogeny proposed here has broad implications for interpreting the evolution of spiders, their remarkable biomaterials, and a key extended phenotype--the spider web.

  12. Synthesis, antimicrobial evaluation and theoretical prediction of NMR chemical shifts of thiazole and selenazole derivatives with high antifungal activity against Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z.; Motylewska, Katarzyna; Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Biernasiuk, Anna; Misiura, Konrad; Malm, Anna; Fernández, Berta

    2016-03-01

    Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activities of novel thiazoles and selenazoles is presented. Their structures were determined using NMR, FAB(+)-MS, HRMS and elemental analyses. To support the experiment, theoretical calculations of the 1H NMR shifts were carried out for representative systems within the DFT B3LYP/6-311++G** approximation which additionally confirmed the structure of investigated compounds. Among the derivatives, compounds 4b, 4h, 4j and 4l had very strong activity against reference strains of Candida albicans ATCC and Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 with MIC = 0.49-7.81 μg/ml. In the case of compounds 4b, 4c, 4h - 4j and 4l, the activity was very strong against of Candida spp. isolated from clinical materials, i.e. C. albicans, Candida krusei, Candida inconspicua, Candida famata, Candida lusitaniae, Candida sake, C. parapsilosis and Candida dubliniensis with MIC = 0.24-15.62 μg/ml. The activity of several of these was similar to the activity of commonly used antifungal agent fluconazole. Additionally, compounds 4m - 4s were found to be active against Gram-positive bacteria, both pathogenic staphylococci Staphylococcus aureus ATCC with MIC = 31.25-125 μg/ml and opportunistic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228 and Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 with MIC = 7.81-31.25 μg/ml.

  13. Thin Films Formed from Conjugated Polymers with Ionic, Water-Soluble Backbones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, Thomas P; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the morphologies of films of conjugated polymers in which the backbone (main chain) and pendant groups are varied between ionic/hydrophilic and aliphatic/hydrophobic. We observe that conjugated polymers in which the pendant groups and backbone are matched, either ionic-ionic or h

  14. Unusual Physical and Chemical Properties of Ni in Ce1-xNixO2-y Oxides: Structural Characterization and Catalytic Activity for the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, L.; Kubacka, A; Zhou, G; Estrella, M; Martinez-Arias, A; Hanson, J; Fernandez-Garcia, M; Rodriguez, J

    2010-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} nanosystems prepared by a reverse microemulsion method were characterized with synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional calculations. The Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} systems adopt a lattice with a fluorite-type structure with an acute local order where Ni displays a strongly distorted (oxygen) nearest-neighbor coordination and the presence of Ni atoms as first cation distances, pointing to the existence of Ni-O-Ni entities embedded into the ceria lattice. A Ni {leftrightarrow} Ce exchange within the CeO{sub 2} leads to a charge redistribution and the appearance of O vacancies. The Ni-O bonds in Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} are more difficult to reduce than the bonds in pure NiO. The specific structural configuration of Ni inside the mixed-metal oxide leads to a unique catalyst with a high activity for the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction and a simultaneous reduction of the methanation activity of nickel. Characterization results indicate that small particles of metallic Ni at the interface position of a ceria network may be the key for high WGS activity and that the formate-carbonate route is operative for the production of hydrogen.

  15. Unusual Physical and Chemical Properties of Ni in Ce1-xNixO2-y Oxides: Structural Characterization and Catalytic Activity for the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Barrio, L.; Kubacka, A.; Zhou, G.; Estrella, M.; Mart& #305; nez-Arias, A.; Hanson, J.C.; Fernandez-Garc& #305; a, M.

    2010-07-29

    The structural and electronic properties of Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} nanosystems prepared by a reverse microemulsion method were characterized with synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional calculations. The Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} systems adopt a lattice with a fluorite-type structure with an acute local order where Ni displays a strongly distorted (oxygen) nearest-neighbor coordination and the presence of Ni atoms as first cation distances, pointing to the existence of Ni-O-Ni entities embedded into the ceria lattice. A Ni {leftrightarrow} Ce exchange within the CeO{sub 2} leads to a charge redistribution and the appearance of O vacancies. The Ni?O bonds in Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y} are more difficult to reduce than the bonds in pure NiO. The specific structural configuration of Ni inside the mixed-metal oxide leads to a unique catalyst with a high activity for the water gas shift (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) reaction and a simultaneous reduction of the methanation activity of nickel. Characterization results indicate that small particles of metallic Ni at the interface position of a ceria network may be the key for high WGS activity and that the formate?carbonate route is operative for the production of hydrogen.

  16. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the (15)N/(13)C/(1)H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins.

  17. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Unnerståle

    Full Text Available Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1 is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs. ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the (15N/(13C/(1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3 domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins.

  18. Data acquisition backbone core DABC release v1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski-Musch, Joern; Essel, Hans G.; Kurz, Nikolaus; Linev, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The new experiments at FAIR require new concepts of data acquisition systems for the distribution of self-triggered, time stamped data streams over high performance networks for event building. The Data Acquisition Backbone Core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework developed for the implementation of such data acquisition systems. A DABC application consists of functional components like data input, combiner, scheduler, event builder, filter, analysis and storage which can be configured at runtime. Application specific code including the support of all kinds of data channels (front-end systems) is implemented by C++ program plug-ins. DABC is also well suited as environment for various detector and readout components test beds. A set of DABC plug-ins has been developed for the FAIR experiment CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter) at GSI. This DABC application is used as DAQ system for test beamtimes. Front-end boards equipped with n-XYTER ASICs and ADCs are connected to read-out controller boards (ROC). From there the data is sent over Ethernet (UDP), or over optics and PCIe interface cards into Linux PCs. DABC does the controlling, event building, archiving and data serving. The first release of DABC was published in 2009 and is available under GPL license.

  19. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: The flow of control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glattfelder, J. B.; Battiston, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  20. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: the flow of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glattfelder, J B; Battiston, S

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  1. Iboga alkaloids from Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae) - unequivocal {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments: antioxidant activity; Alcaloides iboga de Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae) - atribuicao inequivoca dos deslocamentos quimicos dos atomos de hidrogenio e carbono: atividade antioxidante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Allana Kellen L.; Magalhaes, Ticiane S.; Monte, Francisco Jose Q.; Mattos, Marcos Carlos de; Oliveira, Maria Conceicao F. de; Almeida, Maria Mozarina B.; Lemos, Telma L.G.; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica], e-mail: tlemos@dqoi.ufc.br

    2009-07-01

    Six known alkaloids iboga type and the triterpene {alpha}- and {beta}-amyrin acetate were isolated from the roots and stems of Peschiera affinis. Their structures were characterized on the basis of spectral data mainly NMR and mass spectra. 1D and 2D NMR spectra were also used to unequivocal {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shift assignments of alkaloids. The ethanolic extract of roots, alkaloidic and no-alkaloidic fractions and iso-voacristine hydroxyindolenine and voacangine were evaluated for their antioxidative properties using an autographic assay based on {beta}-carotene bleaching on TLC plates, and also spectrophotometric detection by reduction of the stable DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical. (author)

  2. Formation of Hierarchical Structure Composed of (Co/Ni)Mn-LDH Nanosheets on MWCNT Backbones for Efficient Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Gan; Hu, Yingfei; Qian, Qinfeng; Yao, Yingfang; Zhang, Shiying; Li, Zhaosheng; Zou, Zhigang

    2016-06-15

    Active, stable, and cost-effective electrocatalysts are attractive alternatives to the noble metal oxides that have been used in water splitting. The direct nucleation and growth of electrochemically active LDH materials on chemically modified MWCNTs exhibit considerable electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen evolution from water oxidation. CoMn-based and NiMn-based hybrids were synthesized using a facile chemical bath deposition method and the as-synthesized materials exhibited three-dimensional hierarchical configurations with tunable Co/Mn and Ni/Mn ratio. Benefiting from enhanced electrical conductivity with MWCNT backbones and LDH lamellar structure, the Co5Mn-LDH/MWCNT and Ni5Mn-LDH/MWCNT could generated a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at overpotentials of ∼300 and ∼350 mV, respectively, in 1 M KOH. In addition, the materials also exhibited outstanding long-term electrocatalytic stability.

  3. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectra (HXPES) of bulk non-conductor vitreous SiO{sub 2}: Minimum linewidths and surface chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y.F., E-mail: Yongfeng.hu@lightsource.ca [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Xiao, Q.; Wang, D.; Cui, X. [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Nesbitt, H.W. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ONT (Canada); Bancroft, G.M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ONT (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Electronic structure of non-conducting glass studied by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • A thin film of Cr was deposited on the vitreous SiO{sub 2} glass to overcome the sample charging. • Excellent O 1s and Si 1s linewidths were obtained, matching those reported using the laboratory based Kratos Axis Ultra spectrometer equipped with a magnetic compensation system. • The bulk and interface states of non-conducting samples are studied as a function of photon energy. - Abstract: Hard X-ray photoelectron spectra (2200 eV to 5000 eV photon energies) have been obtained for the first time on a bulk non-conductor, vitreous SiO{sub 2}, on a high resolution (E/ΔE of 10,000) synchrotron beamline at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). To minimize charging and differential charging, the SiO{sub 2} was coated with very thin layers (0.5 to 1.5 nm) of Cr metal. The O 1s linewidth obtained at 2500 eV photon energy was 1.26 eV—the minimum linewidth for SiO{sub 2}—and in good agreement with that obtained at 1486 eV on a Kratos Axis Ultra spectrometer equipped with a magnetic charge compensation system. The Si 1s linewidth of 1.5 eV, somewhat broader than that previously obtained at 1486 eV on the Si 2p{sub 3/2} line of 1.16 eV, is mainly due to the much larger inherent Si 1s linewidth (0.5 eV) compared to the inherent Si 2p linewidth (<0.1 eV). Both linewidths are dominated by the large final state vibrational broadening previously described. The Cr coating produces surface monolayers of interfacial Cr “suboxide” (Cr-subox), Cr metal, and a surface Cr oxide (Cr-surfox). Cr-subox (Si−O−Cr) gives rise to the weak near-surface Si 1s peak, while both oxides give rise to both the weak surface O 1s peak and the Cr 2p oxide peak. Both the O 1s and Si 1s surface peaks are shifted by ∼2 eV relative to the large bulk Si 1s and O 1s peaks. The weak Si 1s and O 1s surface peaks along with the Cr 2p oxide peak decrease in intensity greatly as the photon

  4. Peptide Backbone Sampling Convergence with the Adaptive Biasing Force Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Christina E.; Reilly, Kyle A.; Hills, Ronald D.; Guvench, Olgun

    2013-01-01

    Complete Boltzmann sampling of reaction coordinates in biomolecular systems continues to be a challenge for unbiased molecular dynamics simulations. A growing number of methods have been developed for applying biases to biomolecular systems to enhance sampling while enabling recovery of the unbiased (Boltzmann) distribution of states. The Adaptive Biasing Force (ABF) algorithm is one such method, and works by canceling out the average force along the desired reaction coordinate(s) using an estimate of this force progressively accumulated during the simulation. Upon completion of the simulation, the potential of mean force, and therefore Boltzmann distribution of states, is obtained by integrating this average force. In an effort to characterize the expected performance in applications such as protein loop sampling, ABF was applied to the full ranges of the Ramachandran ϕ/ψ backbone dihedral reaction coordinates for dipeptides of the 20 amino acids using all-atom explicit-water molecular dynamics simulations. Approximately half of the dipeptides exhibited robust and rapid convergence of the potential of mean force as a function of ϕ/ψ in triplicate 50-ns simulations, while the remainder exhibited varying degrees of less complete convergence. The greatest difficulties in achieving converged ABF sampling were seen in the branched-sidechain amino acids threonine and valine, as well as the special case of proline. Proline dipeptide sampling was further complicated by trans-to-cis peptide bond isomerization not observed in unbiased control molecular dynamics simulations. Overall, the ABF method was found to be a robust means of sampling the entire ϕ/ψ reaction coordinate for the 20 amino acids, including high free-energy regions typically inaccessible in standard molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:23215032

  5. MCBT: Multi-Hop Cluster Based Stable Backbone Trees for Data Collection and Dissemination in WSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Inyoung; Kim, Moonseong; Mutka, Matt W; Choo, Hyunseung; Lee, Tae-Jin

    2009-01-01

    We propose a stable backbone tree construction algorithm using multi-hop clusters for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The hierarchical cluster structure has advantages in data fusion and aggregation. Energy consumption can be decreased by managing nodes with cluster heads. Backbone nodes, which are responsible for performing and managing multi-hop communication, can reduce the communication overhead such as control traffic and minimize the number of active nodes. Previous backbone construction algorithms, such as Hierarchical Cluster-based Data Dissemination (HCDD) and Multicluster, Mobile, Multimedia radio network (MMM), consume energy quickly. They are designed without regard to appropriate factors such as residual energy and degree (the number of connections or edges to other nodes) of a node for WSNs. Thus, the network is quickly disconnected or has to reconstruct a backbone. We propose a distributed algorithm to create a stable backbone by selecting the nodes with higher energy or degree as the cluster heads. This increases the overall network lifetime. Moreover, the proposed method balances energy consumption by distributing the traffic load among nodes around the cluster head. In the simulation, the proposed scheme outperforms previous clustering schemes in terms of the average and the standard deviation of residual energy or degree of backbone nodes, the average residual energy of backbone nodes after disseminating the sensed data, and the network lifetime.

  6. Ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis accelerated by the steric effect of the backbone substituent in cyclic (alkyl)(amino) carbenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Song, Shangfei; Wang, Xiao; Jiao, Jiajun; Shi, Min

    2013-10-21

    Three ruthenium complexes bearing backbone-monosubstituted CAACs were prepared and displayed dramatic improvement in catalytic efficiency not only in RCM reaction but also in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate, compared to those bearing backbone-disubstituted CAACs.

  7. Structure-based predictions of 13C-NMR chemical shifts for a series of 2-functionalized 5-(methylsulfonyl)-1-phenyl-1H-indoles derivatives using GA-based MLR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavami, Raouf; Sadeghi, Faridoon; Rasouli, Zolikha; Djannati, Farhad

    2012-12-01

    Experimental values for the 13C NMR chemical shifts (ppm, TMS = 0) at 300 K ranging from 96.28 ppm (C4' of indole derivative 17) to 159.93 ppm (C4' of indole derivative 23) relative to deuteride chloroform (CDCl3, 77.0 ppm) or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO, 39.50 ppm) as internal reference in CDCl3 or DMSO-d6 solutions have been collected from literature for thirty 2-functionalized 5-(methylsulfonyl)-1-phenyl-1H-indole derivatives containing different substituted groups. An effective quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models were built using hybrid method combining genetic algorithm (GA) based on stepwise selection multiple linear regression (SWS-MLR) as feature-selection tools and correlation models between each carbon atom of indole derivative and calculated descriptors. Each compound was depicted by molecular structural descriptors that encode constitutional, topological, geometrical, electrostatic, and quantum chemical features. The accuracy of all developed models were confirmed using different types of internal and external procedures and various statistical tests. Furthermore, the domain of applicability for each model which indicates the area of reliable predictions was defined.

  8. Synthesis and properties of polybenzazoles containing flexible methylene in backbone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui XU; Xiaoyun LIU; Chengjun ZHOU; Qixin ZHUANG; Zhewen HAN

    2008-01-01

    A novel series of polybenzazoles with rigid-rod benzoxazole cycle and soft methylene segment was designed and synthesized via solution condensation poly-merizations from 4,6-diamino-l,3-benzenediol dipho-sphate, terephthalic acid and aliphatic dicarboxylic acid. The structures of polybenzazoles were characterized by means of FT-IR,1H NMR and Wide-angle X-ray diffrac-tion (WAXRD). All the polymers show excellent thermal stability and the TdS was above 471℃, The intrinsic vis-cosities [η] of the polymers ranged from 0.8 to 0.9. The UV-Vis absorption peaks of the polymers in MSA were blue-shifted from 429 nm for PBO to 291 nm for PBOC7, and the Stokes shifts in PL spectra enlarged.

  9. Influence of backbone rigidness on single chain conformation of thiophene-based conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongjian; Liu, Jianhua; Simón-Bower, Lauren; Zhai, Lei; Gesquiere, Andre J

    2013-04-25

    Structural order of conjugated polymers at different length scales directs the optoelectronic properties of the corresponding materials; thus it is of critical importance to understand and control conjugated polymer morphology for successful application of these materials in organic optoelectronics. Herein, with the aim of probing the dependence of single chain folding properties on the chemical structure and rigidness of the polymer backbones, single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to four thiophene-based conjugated polymers. These include regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT), poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT-14), poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thiophene-2-yl)thiophen-2-ylthiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole) (PTzQT-12), and poly(3,3-didodecylquaterthiophene)] (PQT-12). Our previous work has shown that RR-P3HT and PBTTT-14 polymer chains fold in their nanostructures, whereas PQT-12 and PTzQT-12 do not fold in their nanostructures. At the single molecule level, it was found that RR-P3HT single chains almost exclusively fold into loosely and strongly aggregated conformations, analogous to the folding properties in nanostructures. PQT-12 displays significant chain folding as well, but only into loosely aggregated conformations, showing an absence of strongly aggregated polymer chains. PBTTT-14 exhibits a significant fraction of rigid polymer chain. The findings made for single molecules of PQT-12 and PBTTT-14 are thus in contrast with the observations made in their corresponding nanostructures. PTzQT-12 appears to be the most rigid and planar conjugated polymer of these four polymers. However, although the presumably nonfolding polymers PQT-12 and PTzQT-12 exhibit less folding than RR-P3HT, there is still a significant occurrence of chain folding for these polymers at the single molecule level. These results suggest that the folding properties of conjugated polymers can be influenced by the architecture of the

  10. Origin of the Red-Shifted Optical Spectra Recorded for Aza-BODIPY Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Joshua K G; Harriman, Anthony

    2016-04-28

    The optical properties are compared for two boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes that differ by virtue of the substituent at the meso-site, namely, aza-N versus C-methine atoms. Both compounds are equipped with aryl rings at the 3- and 5-positions of the dipyrrin backbone, which help to extend the degree of π-delocalization. The aza-BODIPY dye absorbs and fluoresces at much lower energy than does the conventional BODIPY dye, with red shifts of about 100 nm being observed in fluid solution, but with comparable fluorescence yield and lifetime. Hydrogen bonding donors, such as alcohols, attach to the aza-N atom and promote nonradiative decay without affecting the properties of the conventional dye. Triplet formation is ineffective in the absence of a spin-orbit coupler. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the electronegative aza-N atom lowers the energy of the LUMO while having little effect on the corresponding HOMO energy. The resultant decrease in the HOMO-LUMO energy gap is primarily responsible for the red shift. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap is also affected by the dihedral angle subtended by the aryl rings, but this is insensitive to the geometry around the central 6-membered ring. The aza-N atom, by virtue of restricting spatial overlap between the HOMO and LUMO, decreases the energy gap between excited-singlet and -triplet states.

  11. A Distributed Virtual Backbone Formation for Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yong-tao; HE Chen; JIANG Ling-ge

    2007-01-01

    The virtual backbone is an approach for solving routing problems in wireless ad hoc and sensor networks. A connected dominating set (CDS) was proposed as a virtual backbone to improve the performance of wireless networks. The quality of a virtual backbone is measured not only by approximation factor, which is the ratio of its size to that of minimum CDS, but also time complexity and message complexity. In this paper, a distributed algorithm is presented to construct a minimum CDS for ad hoc and sensor networks. By destroying triangular loops in the virtual backbone, the proposed algorithm can effectively construct a CDS with smaller size. Moreover, our algorithm, which is fully localized, has a constant approximation ratio, linear message and time complexity, and low implementation complexity. The simulation results and theoretical analysis show that our algorithm has better efficiency and performance than conventional approaches.

  12. On the calculation of Mossbauer isomer shift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filatov, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A quantum chemical computational scheme for the calculation of isomer shift in Mossbauer spectroscopy is suggested. Within the described scheme, the isomer shift is treated as a derivative of the total electronic energy with respect to the radius of a finite nucleus. The explicit use of a finite nuc

  13. Xinjiang Guanghui Shifts to Coal Chemical Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Xinjiang Guanghui Industry Co., Ltd.(Xinjiang Guanghui, SH: 600256) was established on April 10th, 1999. It is located in Urumqi Economic and Technological Development Zone,Xinjiang of western China. The company got listed in Shanghai Stock Exchange on May 26th, 2000.

  14. Poly(meta-phenylene) Derivative with Rigid Twisted Biphenyl Units in Backbone: Synthesis, Structural Characterization,Photophysical Properties and Electroluminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yan; YANG Bing; ZHANG Hai-quan; LU Ping; SHEN Fang-zhong; LIU Lin-lin; XU Hai; YANG Guang-di; MA Yu-guang

    2007-01-01

    A soluble poly(meta-phenylene) derivative with rigid twisted biphenyl unit was synthesized by the Yamamoto coupling reaction. The polymer is soluble in common organic solvents, and the number-average molecular weight is about 6500. The UV-Vis and quantum chemical calculation indicate that the different conformation segments named "conformers" exist in the polymer backbones; it was also further confirmed by the single crystal X-ray diffraction study of the dimeric model compound. The π-π* transition of biphenyl segments of twisted and planar conformations made the polymer exhibit a strong absorption around 256 nm and a weak absorption at about 300 nm. Furthermore,the polymer exhibits a strong UV photoluminescence at 372 nm when the excitation wavelengths are longer than 300 nm. The ultraviolet-emitting electroluminescence(EL) device with the single layer structure shows EL λmax of the derivative at 370 nm.

  15. Comparison of clinical semi-quantitative assessment of muscle fat infiltration with quantitative assessment using chemical shift-based water/fat separation in MR studies of the calf of post-menopausal women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizai, Hamza; Nardo, Lorenzo; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Yap, Samuel P.; Baum, Thomas; Krug, Roland; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The goal of this study was to compare the semi-quantitative Goutallier classification for fat infiltration with quantitative fat-fraction derived from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) chemical shift-based water/fat separation technique. Sixty-two women (age 61 {+-} 6 years), 27 of whom had diabetes, underwent MRI of the calf using a T1-weighted fast spin-echo sequence and a six-echo spoiled gradient-echo sequence at 3 T. Water/fat images and fat fraction maps were reconstructed using the IDEAL algorithm with T2* correction and a multi-peak model for the fat spectrum. Two radiologists scored fat infiltration on the T1-weighted images using the Goutallier classification in six muscle compartments. Spearman correlations between the Goutallier grades and the fat fraction were calculated; in addition, intra-observer and inter-observer agreement were calculated. A significant correlation between the clinical grading and the fat fraction values was found for all muscle compartments (P < 0.0001, R values ranging from 0.79 to 0.88). Goutallier grades 0-4 had a fat fraction ranging from 3.5 to 19%. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreement values of 0.83 and 0.81 were calculated for the semi-quantitative grading. Semi-quantitative grading of intramuscular fat and quantitative fat fraction were significantly correlated and both techniques had excellent reproducibility. However, the clinical grading was found to overestimate muscle fat. (orig.)

  16. Root-mean-square-deviation-based rapid backbone resonance assignments in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Ashok K; Barnwal, Ravi P; Agarwal, Geetika; Chary, Kandala V R

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that the methodology based on the estimation of root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) between two sets of chemical shifts is very useful to rapidly assign the spectral signatures of (1)H(N), (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (13)C', (1)H(α) and (15)N spins of a given protein in one state from the knowledge of its resonance assignments in a different state, without resorting to routine established procedures (manual and automated). We demonstrate the utility of this methodology to rapidly assign the 3D spectra of a metal-binding protein in its holo-state from the knowledge of its assignments in apo-state, the spectra of a protein in its paramagnetic state from the knowledge of its assignments in diamagnetic state and, finally, the spectra of a mutant protein from the knowledge of the chemical shifts of the corresponding wild-type protein. The underlying assumption of this methodology is that, it is impossible for any two amino acid residues in a given protein to have all the six chemical shifts degenerate and that the protein under consideration does not undergo large conformational changes in going from one conformational state to another. The methodology has been tested using experimental data on three proteins, M-crystallin (8.5 kDa, predominantly β-sheet, for apo- to holo-state), Calbindin (7.5 kDa, predominantly α-helical, for diamagnetic to paramagnetic state and apo to holo) and EhCaBP1 (14.3 kDa, α-helical, the wild-type protein with one of its mutant). In all the cases, the extent of assignment is found to be greater than 85%.

  17. Compressive Shift Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Eldar, Yonina C.; Yang, Allen Y.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2014-08-01

    The classical shift retrieval problem considers two signals in vector form that are related by a shift. The problem is of great importance in many applications and is typically solved by maximizing the cross-correlation between the two signals. Inspired by compressive sensing, in this paper, we seek to estimate the shift directly from compressed signals. We show that under certain conditions, the shift can be recovered using fewer samples and less computation compared to the classical setup. Of particular interest is shift estimation from Fourier coefficients. We show that under rather mild conditions only one Fourier coefficient suffices to recover the true shift.

  18. Gender features of functional condition of backbone of teenagers with scoliotic posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiy Afanasiev

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study mobility of backbone, endurance of muscles of a trunk and to define gender features of functional condition of backbone at children of the middle school age with scoliotic posture depending on the direction of the top of arch of curvature of spine. Material & Methods: 40 girls and 40 boys, including 18 girls and 18 boys with the right-side deformation of backbone in the thoracic department, the left-side – 22 girls and 22 boys are examined. Results: features of changes of indicators, depending on sex of children and frontage of the top of arch of curvature of spine column, are revealed when studying the level of flexibility of backbone and endurance of muscles of a trunk at children of the middle school age with scoliotic posture. Conclusions: it is established that the level of decrease in flexibility of backbone is higher at boys, than at girls, whereas indicators of contractile ability and tone of muscles of "muscular corset" are higher at boys.

  19. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  20. Constituintes químicos de Ottonia corcovadensis Miq. da floresta Amazônica: atribuição dos deslocamentos químicos dos átomos de hidrogênio e carbono Chemical constituents of Ottonia corcovadensis Miq. from Amazon forest: ¹h and 13c chemical shift assignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir A. Facundo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In an ethanolic extract of leaves of Ottonia corcovadensis (Piperaceae were identified sixteen terpenoids of essential oil and the three flavonoids 3',4',5,5',7-pentamethoxyflavone (1, 3',4',5,7-tetramethoxyflavone (2 and 5-hydroxy-3',4',5',7-tetramethoxyflavone (3 and cafeic acid (4. Two amides (5 and 6 were isolated from an ethanolic extract of the roots. The structures were established by spectral analysis, meanly NMR (1D and 2D and mass spectra. Extensive NMR analysis was also used to complete ¹H and 13C chemical shift assignments of the flavonoids and amides. The components of the essential oil were identified by computer library search, retention indices and visual interpretation of mass spectra.

  1. INFLUENCE OF BACKBONE RIGIDITY ON THE LIQUID CRYSTALLINITY OF MESOGEN-CONTAINING POLYACETYLENES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Two acetylene polymers containing cyanobiphenyl-based mesogens,poly{10-[((4'-cyano-4-biphenylyl)oxy)carbonyl]-1-decyne} (PA8CN), which has a relatively flexible polyalkyne backbone, and poly {[4-(((12-((4'-cyano-4-biphenylyl)oxy)dodecyl)oxy)carbonyl) phenyl]-acetylene} (PB12CN), which has a fairly rigid poly(phenylacetylene)backbone, were synthesized using respectively WCl6 and [Rh(nbd)Cl]2 as the catalysts.PA8CN exhibits enantiotropic interdigitated smectic A phase (SAd) over a temperature range as wide as ca. 100℃, whereas PB12CN is non-mesomorphic, demonstrating that the backbone rigidity plays an important role in determining the liquid crystallinity of the polyacetylenes.

  2. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  3. Side-Chain-Induced Rigid Backbone Organization of Polymer Semiconductors through Semifluoroalkyl Side Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Boseok; Kim, Ran; Lee, Seon Baek; Kwon, Soon-Ki; Kim, Yun-Hi; Cho, Kilwon

    2016-03-23

    While high-mobility p-type conjugated polymers have been widely reported, high-mobility n-type conjugated polymers are still rare. In the present work, we designed semifluorinated alkyl side chains and introduced them into naphthalene diimide-based polymers (PNDIF-T2 and PNDIF-TVT). We found that the strong self-organization of these side chains induced a high degree of order in the attached polymer backbones by forming a superstructure composed of "backbone crystals" and "side-chain crystals". This phenomenon was shown to greatly enhance the ordering along the backbone direction, and the resulting polymers thus exhibited unipolar n-channel transport in field-effect transistors with remarkably high electron mobility values of up to 6.50 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and with a high on-off current ratio of 10(5).

  4. No-Enclave Percolation Corresponds to Holes in the Cluster Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Ziff, Robert M.; Deng, Youjin

    2016-10-01

    The no-enclave percolation (NEP) model introduced recently by Sheinman et al. can be mapped to a problem of holes within a standard percolation backbone, and numerical measurements of such holes give the same size-distribution exponent τ =1.82 (1 ) as found for the NEP model. An argument is given that τ =1 +dB/2 ≈1.822 for backbone holes, where dB is the backbone dimension. On the other hand, a model of simple holes within a percolation cluster yields τ =1 +df/2 =187 /96 ≈1.948 , where df is the fractal dimension of the cluster, and this value is consistent with the experimental results of gel collapse of Sheinman et al., which give τ =1.91 (6 ). This suggests that the gel clusters are of the universality class of percolation cluster holes. Both models give a discontinuous maximum hole size at pc, signifying explosive percolation behavior.

  5. Comparison of brown and white adipose tissue fat fractions in ob, seipin, and Fsp27 gene knockout mice by chemical shift-selective imaging and (1)H-MR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xin-Gui; Ju, Shenghong; Fang, Fang; Wang, Yu; Fang, Ke; Cui, Xin; Liu, George; Li, Peng; Mao, Hui; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2013-01-15

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a key role in thermogenesis to protect the body from cold and obesity. White adipose tissue (WAT) stores excess energy in the form of triglycerides. To better understand the genetic effect on regulation of WAT and BAT, we investigated the fat fraction (FF) in two types of adipose tissues in ob/ob, human BSCL2/seipin gene knockout (SKO), Fsp27 gene knockout (Fsp27(-/-)), and wild-type (WT) mice in vivo using chemical shift selective imaging and (1)H-MR spectroscopy. We reported that the visceral fat volume in WAT was significantly larger in ob/ob mice, but visceral fat volumes were lower in SKO and Fsp27(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. BAT FF was significantly higher in ob/ob mice than the WT group and similar to that of WAT. In contrast, WAT FFs in SKO and Fsp27(-/-) mice were lower and similar to that of BAT. The adipocyte size of WAT in ob/ob mice and the BAT adipocyte size in ob/ob, SKO, and Fsp27 mice were significantly larger compared with WT mice. However, the WAT adipocyte size was significantly smaller in SKO mice than in WT mice. Positive correlations were observed between the adipocyte size and FFs of WAT and BAT. These results suggested that smaller adipocyte size correlates with lower FFs of WAT and BAT. In addition, the differences in FFs in WAT and BAT measured by MR methods in different mouse models were related to the different regulation effects of ob, seipin, or Fsp27 gene on developing WAT and BAT.

  6. Using Excel To Study The Relation Between Protein Dihedral Angle Omega And Backbone Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Christopher; Evans, Samari; Tao, Xiuping

    How to involve the uninitiated undergraduate students in computational biophysics research? We made use of Microsoft Excel to carry out calculations of bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles of proteins. Specifically, we studied protein backbone dihedral angle omega by examining how its distribution varies with the length of the backbone length. It turns out Excel is a respectable tool for this task. An ordinary current-day desktop or laptop can handle the calculations for midsized proteins in just seconds. Care has to be taken to enter the formulas for the spreadsheet column after column to minimize the computing load. Supported in part by NSF Grant #1238795.

  7. Conformational energetics of cationic backbone rearrangements in triterpenoid biosynthesis provide an insight into enzymatic control of product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürti, László; Chein, Rong-Jie; Corey, E J

    2008-07-16

    2,3-( S)-Oxidosqualene (C 30H 50O) serves as a versatile starting point for the remarkable biosynthesis of many isomeric naturally occurring triterpenoids of formula C 30H 50O. These biosyntheses all involve polycyclization via cationic intermediates. The fully cyclized primary products then are converted to various structures by cationic rearrangements involving the polycyclic backbone. The energetics of these rearrangements has been examined by B3LYP 6-31 G* DFT calculations and by ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations at the 6-31G* or 3-21G(*) level. The results have led to the conclusion that the biosynthesis of friedelin, the most drastically rearranged of the pentacyclic triterpenes, involves a complex nonstop process, with no stable intermediates between 2,3-( S)-oxidosqualene and friedelin. It is proposed that this single-reaction biosynthesis consists of pentacyclization to the lupanyl cation followed directly by a sequence of 10 suprafacial 1,2-shifts of carbon and hydrogen, driven by the large exergonicity of the pentacyclization and electrostatic acceleration of the rearrangement steps.

  8. Influence of structures of polymer backbones on cooperative photoreorientation behavior of p-cyanoazobenzene side chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Mina; Kidowaki, Masatoshi; Ichimura, Kunihiro;

    2001-01-01

    Photoinduced orientational behavior of a polymethacrylate (CN6) and a polyester (p6a12) with p-cyanoazobenzene side chains was studied to reveal the structural effect of the liquid crystalline polymer backbones. Irradiation with linearly polarized W light resulted in the reorientation of the azob...

  9. Analysis of components of conserved "backbone sequences" among genomes of Shigella spp. strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong; PENG Junping; YANG Jian; SUN Lilian; CHEN Shuxia; Jin Qi

    2004-01-01

    Difference in the genomic compositions of prokaryotes is the basis of the diversity in their biological characters. However, besides their flora- or strain-specific genes, those floras with closer relationship in the evolution also have conserved "backbone sequences", which reveal the marks of their origin and evolution, and these "backbone sequences" are just the basis of their elementary living abilities and common biological properties. Shigella is very closely related to E. coli in the origin and evolution, and may turn out to belong to the same genus. In this study, a microarray containing E. coli K-12 whole genome and Sf301 specific ORFs is used to investigate the genomic components of four Shigella strains. The results indicate that 16%-22% K-12 ORFs sequences are not detected in the genome of Shigella strains while the genome of Shigella contains at least 2800 conserved ORFs, which compose the common "backbone sequences". Advanced analysis indicated that the "backbone sequences" are the essential components in maintaining the normal physiological activities of intestinal bacteria. Furthermore, only 20% Sf301-specific ORFs exist in other strains simultaneously, which demonstrate the great genome heterogeneity and the genetic diversity among the strains.

  10. Peptide-functionalized semiconductor surfaces: strong surface electronic effects from minor alterations to backbone composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matmor, Maayan; Lengyel, George A; Horne, W Seth; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2017-02-22

    The use of non-canonical amino acids is a powerful way to control protein structure. Here, we show that subtle changes to backbone composition affect the ability of a dipeptide to modify solid surface electronic properties. The extreme sensitivity of the interactions to the peptide structure suggests potential applications in improving the performance of electronic devices.

  11. Integrative technology of massage manipulations in physical rehabilitation of students with backbone pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotelevskiy V.I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze effectiveness of massage manipulations’ integrative technology in physical rehabilitation of higher educational establishments’ students with backbone pathology. Material: in the research 195 students of 19-20 years’ age participated. All students had periodical initial neurological symptoms of functional pathology and first stage osteochondrosis in different parts of backbone. We conducted a course of 10 sessions of therapeutic massage. Results: the sense of massage integrative technology is that every specialist shall have certain optimal set of skills and knowledge in technique of manipulation sessions of massage. Integrative technology of massage manipulations consists of psycho-corrective and manipulation parts. It considers psycho-somatic, mechanical and reflex rehabilitation aspects of patho-genesis of backbone functional disorders and vertebral osteochondrosis. Conclusions: depending on pathological process or backbone functional state of every person (peculiarities of his (her psycho-somatic status or, even, his (her bents. Individual approach in choice of strategy, tactic and methodological provisioning of massage session shall be used.

  12. Sequential insertion of three different organometallics into a versatile building block containing a PNA backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Malay; Gasser, Gilles; Bobukhov, Dmytro; Merz, Klaus; Shtemenko, Alexander V; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2010-06-28

    In the view of developing a synthetic route for the controlled insertion of distinct organometallic moieties into peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers, a proof-of-principle study of the chemoselective insertion of three different organometallics into a building block containing both a PNA backbone and an alkyne side-chain is presented in this study.

  13. Treatment Results of Injuries of Thoracic and Lumbar Backbone Departments at Osteoporosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Y. Sumin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Information relates to radiologic (computer tomography manifestations providing the visualization of thoracic and lumbar backbone department injuries at osteoporotic patients. Contemporary methods of transcutaneous and trans-pedicle vertebroplasty with bone cement allows to obtain a stable positive healing effect against such pathologies.

  14. Synthesis of a Backbone Hexasaccharide Fragment of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakharova, Alexandra N.; Madsen, Robert; Clausen, Mads H.

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of the fully unprotected hexasaccharide backbone of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan I is described. The strategy relies on iterative coupling of a common pentenyl disaccharide glycosyl donor followed by a late-stage oxidation of the C-6 positions of the galactose residues. ...

  15. Interconnection and Competition Among Asymmetric Networks in the Internet Backbone Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jahn, E.; Prüfer, J.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the interrelation between interconnection and competition in the internet backbone market.Networks asymmetric in size choose among different interconnection regimes and compete for end-users.We show that a direct interconnection regime, Peering, softens competition compared to indirect in

  16. Solvent-induced differentiation of protein backbone hydrogen bonds in calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juranić, Nenad; Atanasova, Elena; Streiff, John H; Macura, Slobodan; Prendergast, Franklyn G

    2007-07-01

    In apo and holoCaM, almost half of the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) at the protein backbone expected from the corresponding NMR or X-ray structures were not detected by h3JNC' couplings. The paucity of the h3JNC' couplings was considered in terms of dynamic features of these structures. We examined a set of seven proteins and found that protein-backbone H-bonds form two groups according to the h3JNC' couplings measured in solution. H-bonds that have h3JNC' couplings above the threshold of 0.2 Hz show distance/angle correlation among the H-bond geometrical parameters, and appear to be supported by the backbone dynamics in solution. The other H-bonds have no such correlation; they populate the water-exposed and flexible regions of proteins, including many of the CaM helices. The observed differentiation in a dynamical behavior of backbone H-bonds in apo and holoCaM appears to be related to protein functions.

  17. Graduate Education in Kinesiology: Are We Part of "America's Backbone for Competitiveness and Innovation"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education in the United States has been identified as being the backbone of American competitiveness and innovation in a recent report by the Council of Graduate Schools. The report provides a framework for examining the role of graduate education in partnership with business and government to advance an action agenda for achieving…

  18. Animals without Backbones: The Invertebrate Story. Grade Level 5-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Brian; Fuqua, Paul

    This guide, when used in tandem with the videotape "Animals Without Backbones," helps students learn about invertebrates. These materials promote hands-on discovery and learning. The guide is composed of six curriculum-based teaching units: (1) "Getting Started"; (2) "Porifera"; (3) "Cnidarians"; (4) "Worms"; (5) "Mollusks"; (6) "Arthropods"; and…

  19. A Network Flow Approach to Predict Protein Targets and Flavonoid Backbones to Treat Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Vargas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in lower respiratory tract in infants and young children. Attempts to develop effective vaccines or pharmacological treatments to inhibit RSV infection without undesired effects on human health have been unsuccessful. However, RSV infection has been reported to be affected by flavonoids. The mechanisms underlying viral inhibition induced by these compounds are largely unknown, making the development of new drugs difficult. Methods. To understand the mechanisms induced by flavonoids to inhibit RSV infection, a systems pharmacology-based study was performed using microarray data from primary culture of human bronchial cells infected by RSV, together with compound-proteomic interaction data available for Homo sapiens. Results. After an initial evaluation of 26 flavonoids, 5 compounds (resveratrol, quercetin, myricetin, apigenin, and tricetin were identified through topological analysis of a major chemical-protein (CP and protein-protein interacting (PPI network. In a nonclustered form, these flavonoids regulate directly the activity of two protein bottlenecks involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Conclusions. Our findings may potentially help uncovering mechanisms of action of early RSV infection and provide chemical backbones and their protein targets in the difficult quest to develop new effective drugs.

  20. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins.

  1. Implementing OpenShift

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial-based approach to using OpenShift and deploying custom or pre-built web applications to the OpenShift Online cloud.This book is for software developers and DevOps alike who are interested in learning how to use the OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service for developing and deploying applications, how the environment works on the back end, and how to deploy their very own open source Platform-as-a-Service based on the upstream OpenShift Origin project.

  2. Quantized beam shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Kort-Kamp, W J M; Dalvit, D A R

    2015-01-01

    We predict quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-H\\"anchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$, while the Goos- H\\"anchen ones in multiples of $\\alpha^2$. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  3. Making Shifts toward Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGatha, Maggie B.; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    The Leading for Mathematical Proficiency (LMP) Framework (Bay-Williams et al.) has three components: (1) The Standards for Mathematical Practice; (2) Shifts in classroom practice; and (3) Teaching skills. This article briefly describes each component of the LMP framework and then focuses more in depth on the second component, the shifts in…

  4. Shifting employment revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan; Gramuglia, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The CLR-network examined in 2006 the phenomenon of undeclared labour, with specific regard to the construction sector. The resulting study, Shifting Employment: undeclared labour in construction (Shifting-study hereafter), gave evidence that this is an area particularly affected by undeclared activi

  5. Shifted Independent Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2007-01-01

    Delayed mixing is a problem of theoretical interest and practical importance, e.g., in speech processing, bio-medical signal analysis and financial data modelling. Most previous analyses have been based on models with integer shifts, i.e., shifts by a number of samples, and have often been carried...

  6. OpenShift cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gulati, Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web application developer who wants to use the OpenShift platform to host your next big idea but are looking for guidance on how to achieve this, then this book is the first step you need to take. This is a very accessible cookbook where no previous knowledge of OpenShift is needed.

  7. Protein structure prediction using global optimization by basin-hopping with NMR shift restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Falk; Strodel, Birgit

    2013-01-14

    Computational methods that utilize chemical shifts to produce protein structures at atomic resolution have recently been introduced. In the current work, we exploit chemical shifts by combining the basin-hopping approach to global optimization with chemical shift restraints using a penalty function. For three peptides, we demonstrate that this approach allows us to find near-native structures from fully extended structures within 10,000 basin-hopping steps. The effect of adding chemical shift restraints is that the α and β secondary structure elements form within 1000 basin-hopping steps, after which the orientation of the secondary structure elements, which produces the tertiary contacts, is driven by the underlying protein force field. We further show that our chemical shift-restraint BH approach also works for incomplete chemical shift assignments, where the information from only one chemical shift type is considered. For the proper implementation of chemical shift restraints in the basin-hopping approach, we determined the optimal weight of the chemical shift penalty energy with respect to the CHARMM force field in conjunction with the FACTS solvation model employed in this study. In order to speed up the local energy minimization procedure, we developed a function, which continuously decreases the width of the chemical shift penalty function as the minimization progresses. We conclude that the basin-hopping approach with chemical shift restraints is a promising method for protein structure prediction.

  8. Analytical Model based on Green Criteria for Optical Backbone Network Interconnection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2011-01-01

    to the evaluation of the environmental impact of networks from physical interconnection point of view. Networks deployment, usage, and disposal are analyzed as contributing elements to ICT’s (Information and Communications Technology) CO2 emissions. This paper presents an analytical model for evaluating...... and quantifying the CO2 emissions of optical backbone networks during their lifetime. The main goal of this work is to present the model and illustrate how to evaluate the physical interconnection of backbones from an environmental perspective. This model can be applied as a new type of decision support criteria...... for backbone’s interconnection, since minimization of CO2 emissions is becoming an important factor. In addition, two case studies are presented to illustrate the use and application of this model, and the need for de facto and international standards to reduce CO2 emissions through good network planning....

  9. Smart-Grid Backbone Network Real-Time Delay Reduction via Integer Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagadrai, Sasikanth; Yilmaz, Muhittin; Valluri, Pratyush

    2016-08-01

    This research investigates an optimal delay-based virtual topology design using integer linear programming (ILP), which is applied to the current backbone networks such as smart-grid real-time communication systems. A network traffic matrix is applied and the corresponding virtual topology problem is solved using the ILP formulations that include a network delay-dependent objective function and lightpath routing, wavelength assignment, wavelength continuity, flow routing, and traffic loss constraints. The proposed optimization approach provides an efficient deterministic integration of intelligent sensing and decision making, and network learning features for superior smart grid operations by adaptively responding the time-varying network traffic data as well as operational constraints to maintain optimal virtual topologies. A representative optical backbone network has been utilized to demonstrate the proposed optimization framework whose simulation results indicate that superior smart-grid network performance can be achieved using commercial networks and integer programming.

  10. Protein and peptide alkoxyl radicals can give rise to C-terminal decarboxylation and backbone cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    when the free amino acid does not, and that hydroperoxides can be formed on both the backbone (at alpha-carbon positions) and the side chain. Decomposition of alpha-carbon hydroperoxides by Fe(II)-EDTA gives initially an alkoxyl radical via a pseudo-Fenton reaction; these radicals fragment rapidly...... with k estimated as > or = 10(7) s(-1). With N-acetyl amino acids and dipeptides beta-scission of an alkoxyl radical at the C-terminal alpha-carbon results in C-terminal decarboxylation, with release of CO2.-; the corresponding amides undergo deamidation with release of .C(O)NH2. Cyclic dipeptides...... undergo analogous reactions with cleavage of the alpha-carbon to carbonyl-carbon bond and formation of .C(O)NHR radicals. With substrates with large aliphatic side chains, radicals from side-chain hydroperoxides are also observed. C-terminal decarboxylation and backbone fragmentation are also observed...

  11. Aromatic Copolyamides with Anthrazoline Units in the Backbone: Synthesis, Characterization, Pervaporation Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina A. Polotskaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Copolyamides with anthrazoline units in the backbone (coPA were synthesized and dense nonporous films were prepared by solvent evaporation. Glass transition temperature, density, and fractional free volume were determined for the dense nonporous films composed of polyamide and two of its copolymers containing 20 and 30 mol % anthrazoline units in the backbone. Transport properties of the polymer films were estimated by sorption and pervaporation tests toward methanol, toluene, and their mixtures. An increase in anthrazoline fragments content leads to an increasing degree of methanol sorption but to a decreasing degree of toluene sorption. Pervaporation of a methanol–toluene mixture was studied over a wide range of feed concentration (10–90 wt % methanol. Maximal separation factor was observed for coPA-20 containing 20 mol % fragments with anthrazoline units; maximal total flux was observed for coPA-30 with the highest fractional free volume.

  12. Energy Efficient Low-Cost Virtual Backbone Construction for Optimal Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohaideen Pitchai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many prominent applications in wireless sensor networks which require collected information have to be routed to end nodes in an efficient manner. In general, weighted connected dominating Sets (WCDS based routing is a promising approach for enhancing the routing efficiency in sensor networks. Backbone has been used extensively in routing. Here an efficient WCDS algorithm for constructing a virtual backbone with low total cost, hop spanning ratio, and minimum number of dominators is proposed. We report a systematic approach, which has three phases. Initial phase considers the issues of revoking a partial CDS tree from a complete CDS tree. Secondary and final phases make the design of the complete algorithm by considering the determination of dominators using an iteration process. Our findings reveal better performance than the existing algorithms in terms of total cost, hop spanning ratio, and number of dominators.

  13. Synthesis, Characterization and Structure of Chiral Amino Acids and Their Corresponding Amino Alcohols with Camphoric Backbone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Hui-Fen; HUANG Wei; LI Hui-Hui; YAO Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Chiral amino acids and their corresponding amino alcohols bearing camphoric backbone were prepared from D-(+)-camphoric imide and characterized by infrared, elemental analysis, ESI-MS, and NMR measurements. Among them, one intermediate (lS,3R)-3-amino-2,2,3-trimethyl cyclopentane-1-carboxylic acid hydrochloride 3 was structurally elucidated by X-ray diffraction techniques. Versatile intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions observed in its packing structure result in a two-dimensional framework.

  14. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Five main types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed-source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results, and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  15. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LightWater Reactors (CASL). Fivemain types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  16. Protein backbone dynamics revealed by quasi spectral density function analysis of amide N-15 nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishima, R; Nagayama, K

    1995-03-14

    Spectral density functions J(0), J(omega N), and J(omega H + omega N) of individual amide N-15 nuclei in proteins were approximated by a quasi spectral density function (QSDF). Using this function, the backbone dynamics were analyzed for seven protein systems on which data have been published. We defined J(0; omega N) as the difference between the J(0) and the J(omega N) values, which describes motions slower than 50 (or 60) MHz, and J(omega N; omega H+N) as the difference between the J(omega N) and the J(omega H + omega N) values, which describes motions slower than 450 (or 540) MHz. The QSDF analysis can easily extract the J(0; omega N) of protein backbones, which have often some relation to biologically relevant reactions. Flexible N-terminal regions in eglin c and glucose permease IIA and a loop region in eglin c showed smaller values of both the J(0; omega N) and the J(omega N; omega H+N) as compared with the other regions, indicating increases in motions faster than nanosecond. The values of the J(0; omega N) for the backbone of the FK506 binding protein showed a large variation in the apoprotein but fell in a very narrow range after the binding of FK506. Characteristic increase or decrease in the values of J(0) and J(omega N) was observed in two or three residues located between secondary structures.

  17. NMR backbone dynamics of VEK-30 bound to the human plasminogen kringle 2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Prorok, Mary; Castellino, Francis J

    2010-07-07

    To gain insights into the mechanisms for the tight and highly specific interaction of the kringle 2 domain of human plasminogen (K2(Pg)) with a 30-residue internal peptide (VEK-30) from a group A streptococcal M-like protein, the dynamic properties of free and bound K2(Pg) and VEK-30 were investigated using backbone amide (15)N-NMR relaxation measurements. Dynamic parameters, namely the generalized order parameter, S(2), the local correlation time, tau(e), and the conformational exchange contribution, R(ex), were obtained for this complex by Lipari-Szabo model-free analysis. The results show that VEK-30 displays distinctly different dynamic behavior as a consequence of binding to K2(Pg), manifest by decreased backbone flexibility, particularly at the binding region of the peptide. In contrast, the backbone dynamics parameters of K2(Pg) displayed similar patterns in the free and bound forms, but, nonetheless, showed interesting differences. Based on our previous structure-function studies of this interaction, we also made comparisons of the VEK-30/K2(Pg) dynamics results from different kringle modules complexed with small lysine analogs. The differences in dynamics observed for kringles with different ligands provide what we believe to be new insights into the interactions responsible for protein-ligand recognition and a better understanding of the differences in binding affinity and binding specificity of kringle domains with various ligands.

  18. Systematic determination of the mosaic structure of bacterial genomes: species backbone versus strain-specific loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gendrault-Jacquemard A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public databases now contain multitude of complete bacterial genomes, including several genomes of the same species. The available data offers new opportunities to address questions about bacterial genome evolution, a task that requires reliable fine comparison data of closely related genomes. Recent analyses have shown, using pairwise whole genome alignments, that it is possible to segment bacterial genomes into a common conserved backbone and strain-specific sequences called loops. Results Here, we generalize this approach and propose a strategy that allows systematic and non-biased genome segmentation based on multiple genome alignments. Segmentation analyses, as applied to 13 different bacterial species, confirmed the feasibility of our approach to discern the 'mosaic' organization of bacterial genomes. Segmentation results are available through a Web interface permitting functional analysis, extraction and visualization of the backbone/loops structure of documented genomes. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we performed a precise analysis of the mosaic organization of three E. coli strains and functional characterization of the loops. Conclusion The segmentation results including the backbone/loops structure of 13 bacterial species genomes are new and available for use by the scientific community at the URL: http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/mosaic.

  19. An Analytic Method for the Kinematics and Dynamics of a Multiple-Backbone Continuum Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuum robots have been the subject of extensive research due to their potential use in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we propose a new continuum robot with three backbones, and provide a unified analytic method for the kinematics and dynamics of a multiple‐backbone continuum robot. The robot achieves actuation by independently pulling three backbones to carry out a bending motion of two‐degrees‐of‐freedom (DoF. A three‐dimensional CAD model of the robot is built and the kinematical equation is established on the basis of the Euler‐Bernoulli beam. The dynamical model of the continuum robot is constructed by using the Lagrange method. The simulation and the experiment’s validation results show the continuum robot can exactly bend into pre‐set angles in the two‐dimensional space (the maximum error is less than 5% of the robot length and can make a circular motion in three‐dimensional space. The results demonstrate that the proposed analytic method for the kinematics and dynamics of a continuum robot is feasible.

  20. East vergent structure of Backbone Range: Insights from A-Lan-Yi area and sandbox modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Taiwan, including Pingtung peninsula and Taitung, is the incipient oblique collision zone of Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate. The Luzon volcanic arc converged toward Taiwan Island and formed Hengchun Ridge south offshore Taiwan. Thus, Taiwan mountain belt developed from north to south as the Backbone Range, so that we can infer the incipient feature structure from the topography and outcrop study of southern Taiwan. Our field survey of this study concentrated at the southeast coastline of Taiwan, also known as A-Lan-Yi Trail. According to previous study, the deformational structures such as faults and folds are consistent with regional kinematic processes, and the preserved transpression structure is the most important evidence of incipient collision. In this study, we use the sedimentary sequences of study area to trace the regional tectonics from north to south. Discovered structures in this area show the similar kinematic history as the eastern flank of Backbone Range, so that we suggest they are at the same series of a tectonic event. To complete the regional structure mapping in this accessible area, besides the field geological data, we also applied the LiDAR-derived DTM which is a 3D visualization technology to improve our topography information. In addition, we use the sandbox modeling to demonstrate the development of structures in the eastern flank of Backbone Range. After combining the results of field observation and regional structure mapping, this study provides a strong evidence of backthrusting and backfolding deformation during the incipient oblique collision stage.

  1. Structure of the exceptionally large nonrepetitive carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-82164.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Petersen, Bent O; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Duus, Jens Ø; Helander, Ilkka M

    2003-07-01

    The structures of the oligosaccharides obtained after acetic acid hydrolysis and alkaline deacylation of the rough-type lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-82164 were analysed using NMR spectroscopy, MS and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing by a decasaccharide fragment, and some minor variants lacking the terminal glucose residue. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS that could be deduced from experimental results consists of 25 monosaccharides (including the previously found Ara4NP residue in lipid A) arranged in a well-defined nonrepetitive structure: We presume that the shorter variant with R1 = H represents the core-lipid A part of the LPS, and the additional fragment is present instead of the O-specific polysaccharide. Structures of this type have not been previously described. Analysis of the deacylation products obtained from the LPS of the smooth strain, VTT E-79100T, showed that it contains a very similar core but with one different glycosidic linkage.

  2. a Proposal for a General Method for Determining Semi-Experimental Equilibrium Structures of Carbon Atom Backbones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Norman C.

    2010-06-01

    Semi-experimental equilibrium structures are determined from ground state rotational constants derived from the analysis of rotational transitions in high-resolution spectra and from the quantum chemical calculation of spectroscopic alphas. In the full application of this method, spectra of numerous isotopic species must be investigated. Most of these isotopic species require specialized synthesis. We now propose focusing on the carbon atoms, for which microwave spectroscopy routinely yields spectra for polar molecules with 13C substitution in natural abundance. Needed spectroscopic alphas can be computed with Gaussian software. Application of the Kraitchman substitution relationships gives Cartesian coordinates for the carbon atoms and thence bond parameters for the carbon backbone. This method will be evaluated with ethylene, 1,1-difluoroethylene, 1,1-difluorocyclopropane, propene, and butadiene. The method will then be applied to cis-hexatriene and the two conformers of glycidol. R. D. Suenram, B. H. Pate, A. Lessari, J. L. Neill, S. Shipman, R. A. Holmes, M. C. Leyden, and N. C. Craig, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 1864-1868 (2009). A. R. Conrad, N. H. Teumelsan, P. E. Wang, and M. J. Tubergen, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 336-342 (2010).

  3. A refined model of the chlorosomal antennae of the green bacterium chlorobium tepidum from proton chemical shift constraints obtained with high-field 2-D and 3-D MAS NMR dipolar correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, van B.E.J.; Steengaard, D.B.; Boender, G.J.; Schaffner, K.; Holzwarth, A.R.; Groot, de H.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Heteronuclear 2-D and 3-D magic-angle spinning NMR dipolar correlation spectroscopy was applied to determine solid-state 1H shifts for aggregated bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c) in uniformly 13C-enriched light harvesting chlorosomes of the green photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. A complete

  4. Significant Role of DNA Backbone in Mediating the Transition Origin of Electronic Excitations of B-DNA - Implication from Long Range Corrected TDDFT and Quantified NTO Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Hao; Guo, Guang-Yu; Hayashi, Michitoshi

    2011-01-01

    We systematically investigate the possible complex transition origin of electronic excitations of giant molecular systems by using the recently proposed QNTO analysis [J.-H. Li, J.-D. Chai, G. Y. Guo and M. Hayashi, Chem. Phys. Lett., 2011, 514, 362.] combined with long-range corrected TDDFT calculations. Thymine (Thy) related excitations of biomolecule B-DNA are then studied as examples, where the model systems have been constructed extracting from the perfect or a X-ray crystal (PDB code 3BSE) B-DNA structure with at least one Thy included. In the first part, we consider the systems composed of a core molecular segment (e.g. Thy, di-Thy) and a surrounding physical/chemical environment of interest (e.g. backbone, adjacent stacking nucleobases) and examine how the excitation properties of the core vary in response to the environment. We find that the orbitals contributed from DNA backbone and surrounding nucleobases often participate in a transition of Thy-related excitations affecting their composition, abso...

  5. Synthesis of the spacer-containing β-D-GalpNAc-(1→4)-β-D-GlcpNAc-(1→3)-α-D-Galp moiety, representing the non-fucosylated backbone trisaccharide of the glycocalyx glycan of the parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Halkes, K.M.; Lefeber, D.J.; Fransen, C.T.M.; Kamerling, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of beta-d-GalpNAc-(1->4)-beta-d-GlcpNAc-(1->3)-beta-d-Galp-(1->O)- (CH2)5NH2 is described. This structure represents the nonfucosylated backbone trisaccharide of the glycocalyx glycan of the cercarial stage of the parasite Schistosoma mansoni. Synthesis of the trisaccharide wa

  6. Membrane adsorption and binding, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Xiaona; Yang, Mingjun; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna

    2012-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a promising approach for enhancing intracellular delivery of therapeutic biomacromolecules by increasing transport through membrane barriers. Here, proteolytically stable cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone were studied to ev...

  7. Synthesis and Molecular Recognition of Novel Cyclic Pseudopeptides Containing L-Glutamic Acid or L-Aspartic Acid Backbones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tao王涛; HUANG Xiao-Yi黄小毅; XIA Chuan-Qin夏传琴; YU Xiao-Qi余孝其; XIE Ru-Gang谢如刚

    2004-01-01

    Novel cyclic pseudopeptides containing L-glutamic acid or L-aspartic acid backbone structures were efficiently synthesized and characterized. Their chiral recognition properties for L- and D-amino acid methyl ester hydrochloride were discussed also.

  8. Oxidation Responsive Polymers with a Triggered Degradation via Arylboronate Self-Immolative Motifs on a Polyphosphazene Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation responsive polymers with triggered degradation pathways have been prepared via attachment of self-immolative moieties onto a hydrolytically unstable polyphosphazene backbone. After controlled main-chain growth, postpolymerization functionalization allows the preparation of hydrolytically stable poly(organo)phosphazenes decorated with a phenylboronic ester caging group. In oxidative environments, triggered cleavage of the caging group is followed by self-immolation, exposing the unstable glycine-substituted polyphosphazene which subsequently undergoes to backbone degradation to low-molecular weight molecules. As well as giving mechanistic insights, detailed GPC and 1H and 31P NMR analysis reveal the polymers to be stable in aqueous solutions, but show a selective, fast degradation upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide containing solutions. Since the post-polymerization functionalization route allows simple access to polymer backbones with a broad range of molecular weights, the approach of using the inorganic backbone as a platform significantly expands the toolbox of polymers capable of stimuli-responsive degradation.

  9. Synthesis of novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile linkages between the hydrocarbon chains and pseudoglyceryl backbone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Bhattacharya; Saubhik Haldar

    2002-06-01

    Five novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile linkage regions between the pseudoglyceryl backbone and the hydrocarbon chains have been synthesized. The membrane-forming properties of these new lipids are briefly presented.

  10. E-2-Benzylidenebenzocycloalkanones. IV. Studies on transmission of substituent effects on 13C NMR chemical shifts of E-2-(X-benzylidene)-1-tetralones, and -benzosuberones. Comparison with the 13C NMR data of chalcones and E-2-(X-benzylidene)-1-indanones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perjési, Pál; Linnanto, Juha; Kolehmainen, Erkki; Ősz, Erzsébet; Virtanen, Elina

    2005-04-01

    Single substituent parameter (SSP) and dual substituent parameter (DSP) analyses were applied to study the transmission of substituent effects on selected 13C NMR chemical shifts of the cyclic chalcone analogues, E-2-(4'-X-benzylidene)-1-tetralones ( 2) and E-2-(4'-X-benzylidene)-1-benzosuberones ( 3). In order to study how the geometry of the cyclic chalcone analogues affects the transmission of substituent effects similar investigations with the respective chalcones ( 4) were also performed. The results obtained earlier with the five-membered analogue E-2-(4'-X-benzylidene)-1-indanones ( 1) were also involved in the comparisons. Geometry optimization of the unsubstituted 1a, 2a, 3a and 4a as well as the substituted 2 and 3 was performed by ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Both SSP and DSP analyses reflected that resonance effects contribute more to the chemical shift of C-α (C2), while inductive effects primarily affect that of C-β (C10) of the enone moiety of all the four series. This latter effect, however, is far not as pronounced as that of the former one. It was found that DSP analysis data ( ρF and ρR values) of transmission of substituent effects on the δC2 data can serve as a measure of choice to study the conformation (planarity) of the investigated enones in the four series.

  11. A Shift of Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Administrative reforms are shifting prefecture government powers to the county level in an effort to boost local economies on July 8, the government of China’s southernmost Hainan Province announced that it was to hand over 177 of its administrative powers to county-level governments. The move practically dismantled the powers of the

  12. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2017-01-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature ( T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature ( T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  13. Predicting the tolerated sequences for proteins and protein interfaces using RosettaBackrub flexible backbone design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A Smith

    Full Text Available Predicting the set of sequences that are tolerated by a protein or protein interface, while maintaining a desired function, is useful for characterizing protein interaction specificity and for computationally designing sequence libraries to engineer proteins with new functions. Here we provide a general method, a detailed set of protocols, and several benchmarks and analyses for estimating tolerated sequences using flexible backbone protein design implemented in the Rosetta molecular modeling software suite. The input to the method is at least one experimentally determined three-dimensional protein structure or high-quality model. The starting structure(s are expanded or refined into a conformational ensemble using Monte Carlo simulations consisting of backrub backbone and side chain moves in Rosetta. The method then uses a combination of simulated annealing and genetic algorithm optimization methods to enrich for low-energy sequences for the individual members of the ensemble. To emphasize certain functional requirements (e.g. forming a binding interface, interactions between and within parts of the structure (e.g. domains can be reweighted in the scoring function. Results from each backbone structure are merged together to create a single estimate for the tolerated sequence space. We provide an extensive description of the protocol and its parameters, all source code, example analysis scripts and three tests applying this method to finding sequences predicted to stabilize proteins or protein interfaces. The generality of this method makes many other applications possible, for example stabilizing interactions with small molecules, DNA, or RNA. Through the use of within-domain reweighting and/or multistate design, it may also be possible to use this method to find sequences that stabilize particular protein conformations or binding interactions over others.

  14. ngs_backbone: a pipeline for read cleaning, mapping and SNP calling using Next Generation Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cañizares Joaquin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The possibilities offered by next generation sequencing (NGS platforms are revolutionizing biotechnological laboratories. Moreover, the combination of NGS sequencing and affordable high-throughput genotyping technologies is facilitating the rapid discovery and use of SNPs in non-model species. However, this abundance of sequences and polymorphisms creates new software needs. To fulfill these needs, we have developed a powerful, yet easy-to-use application. Results The ngs_backbone software is a parallel pipeline capable of analyzing Sanger, 454, Illumina and SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection sequence reads. Its main supported analyses are: read cleaning, transcriptome assembly and annotation, read mapping and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP calling and selection. In order to build a truly useful tool, the software development was paired with a laboratory experiment. All public tomato Sanger EST reads plus 14.2 million Illumina reads were employed to test the tool and predict polymorphism in tomato. The cleaned reads were mapped to the SGN tomato transcriptome obtaining a coverage of 4.2 for Sanger and 8.5 for Illumina. 23,360 single nucleotide variations (SNVs were predicted. A total of 76 SNVs were experimentally validated, and 85% were found to be real. Conclusions ngs_backbone is a new software package capable of analyzing sequences produced by NGS technologies and predicting SNVs with great accuracy. In our tomato example, we created a highly polymorphic collection of SNVs that will be a useful resource for tomato researchers and breeders. The software developed along with its documentation is freely available under the AGPL license and can be downloaded from http://bioinf.comav.upv.es/ngs_backbone/ or http://github.com/JoseBlanca/franklin.

  15. Exposing Hidden Alternative Backbone Conformations in X-ray Crystallography Using qFit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Keedy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechain conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the "flap" regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Overall, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems.

  16. Limits on variations in protein backbone dynamics from precise measurements of scalar couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögeli, Beat; Ying, Jinfa; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2007-08-01

    3JHN,Halpha, 3JHN,Cbeta, and 3JHN,C' couplings, all related to the backbone torsion angle phi, were measured for the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G, or GB3. Measurements were carried out using both previously published methods and novel sequences based on the multiple-quantum principle, which limit attenuation of experimental couplings caused by finite lifetimes of the spin states of passive spins. High reproducibility between the multiple-quantum and conventional approaches confirms the accuracy of the measurements. With few exceptions, close agreement between 3JHN,Halpha, 3JHN,Cbeta, and 3JHN,C' and values predicted by their respective Karplus equations is observed. For the three types of couplings, up to 20% better agreement is obtained when fitting the experimental couplings to a dynamic ensemble NMR structure, which has a phi angle root-mean-square spread of 9 +/- 4 degrees and was previously calculated on the basis of a very extensive set of residual dipolar couplings, than for any single static NMR structure. Fits of 3J couplings to a 1.1-A X-ray structure, with hydrogens added in idealized positions, are 40-90% worse. Approximately half of the improvement when fitting to the NMR structures relates to the amide proton deviating from its idealized, in-peptide-plane position, indicating that the positioning of hydrogens relative to the backbone atoms is one of the factors limiting the accuracy at which the backbone torsion angle phi can be extracted from 3J couplings. Introducing an additional, residue-specific variable for the amplitude of phi angle fluctuations does not yield a statistically significant improvement when fitting to a set of dynamic Karplus curves, pointing to a homogeneous behavior of these amplitudes.

  17. Exposing Hidden Alternative Backbone Conformations in X-ray Crystallography Using qFit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Daniel A; Fraser, James S; van den Bedem, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechain conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the "flap" regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Overall, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems.

  18. On an accidental degeneracy in the {sup 31}P{l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace} NMR chemical shifts in ruthenium diphosphine complexes; Sobre uma degenerescencia acidental nos deslocamentos quimicos de RMN {sup 31}P{l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace} em complexos difosfinicos de rutenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Eliana Maira Agostini; Nascimento, Fabio Batista do; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Batista, Alzir A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: alzir@dq.ufscar.br; Monteiro, Marcos Claudio Rodrigues; Machado, Sergio de Paula [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica; Ellena, Javier; Castellano, Eduardo E.; Azevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2008-07-01

    The [RuCl(bipy)(dppb)(4-pic)]PF{sub 6} complex was prepared and fully characterized. The X-ray crystal structure of this complex was determined in order to make an unambiguous distinction between the two possible positions of the 4-methylpyridine ligand (4-pic) in the compound: trans to phosphorus atom or trans to nitrogen atom. The [RuCl(bipy)(dppb)(4-pic)]PF{sub 6} complex exhibits an unusual temperature-dependent accidental degeneracy of the {sup 31}P chemical shifts in its solution NMR spectrum. (author)

  19. RosettaRemodel: a generalized framework for flexible backbone protein design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ssu Huang

    Full Text Available We describe RosettaRemodel, a generalized framework for flexible protein design that provides a versatile and convenient interface to the Rosetta modeling suite. RosettaRemodel employs a unified interface, called a blueprint, which allows detailed control over many aspects of flexible backbone protein design calculations. RosettaRemodel allows the construction and elaboration of customized protocols for a wide range of design problems ranging from loop insertion and deletion, disulfide engineering, domain assembly, loop remodeling, motif grafting, symmetrical units, to de novo structure modeling.

  20. Backbone resonance assignments of the micro-RNA precursor binding region of human TRBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Matthieu P M H; Plevin, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    TAR-RNA binding protein (TRBP) is a multidomain human protein involved in micro-RNA (miRNA) biogenesis. TRBP is a component of both the Dicer complex, which processes precursor miRNAs, and the RNA-induced silencing complex-loading complex. In addition, TRBP is implicated in the human immunodeficiency virus replication cycle and interferon-protein kinase R activity. TRBP contains 3 double-stranded RNA binding domains the first two of which have been shown to interact with miRNA precursors. Here we present the backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure of residues 19-228 of human TRBP2.

  1. SEVA Linkers: A Versatile and Automatable DNA Backbone Exchange Standard for Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Rennig, Maja

    2016-01-01

    DNA vectors serve to maintain and select recombinant DNA in cell factories, and as design complexity increases, there is a greater need for well-characterized parts and methods for their assembly. Standards in synthetic biology are top priority, but standardizing molecular cloning contrasts...... flexibility, and different researchers prefer and master different molecular technologies. Here, we describe a new, highly versatile and automatable standard “SEVA linkers” for vector exchange. SEVA linkers enable backbone swapping with 20 combinations of classical enzymatic restriction/ligation, Gibson...... to the synthetic biology community....

  2. Sulfation and Cation Effects on the Conformational Properties of the Glycan Backbone of Chondroitin Sulfate Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Christina E.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is one of several glycosaminoglycans that are major components of proteoglycans. A linear polymer consisting of repeats of the disaccharide -4GlcAβ1-3GalNAcβ1-, CS undergoes differential sulfation resulting in five unique sulfation patterns. Because of the dimer repeat, the CS glycosidic “backbone” has two distinct sets of conformational degrees of freedom defined by pairs of dihedral angles: (ϕ1, ψ1) about the β1-3 glycosidic linkage and (ϕ2, ψ2) about the β1-4 glycosidic linkage. Differential sulfation and the possibility of cation binding, combined with the conformational flexibility and biological diversity of CS, complicate experimental efforts to understand CS three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution. Therefore, all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations with Adaptive Biasing Force sampling of the CS backbone were applied to obtain high resolution, high precision free energies of CS disaccharides as a function of all possible backbone geometries. All ten disaccharides (β1-3 vs. β1-4 linkage x five different sulfation patterns) were studied; additionally, ion effects were investigated by considering each disaccharide in the presence of either neutralizing sodium or calcium cations. GlcAβ1-3GalNAc disaccharides have a single, broad, thermodynamically important free-energy minimum whereas GalNAcβ1-4GlcA disaccharides have two such minima. Calcium cations but not sodium cations bind to the disaccharides, and binding is primarily to the GlcA –COO− moiety as opposed to sulfate groups. This binding alters the glycan backbone thermodynamics in instances where a calcium cation bound to –COO− can act to bridge and stabilize an interaction with an adjacent sulfate group, whereas, in the absence of this cation, the proximity of a sulfate group to –COO− results in two like charges being both desolvated and placed adjacent to each other and is found to be destabilizing. In addition to providing

  3. Backbone tuning in indenylidene–ruthenium complexes bearing an unsaturated N-heterocyclic carbene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Urbina-Blanco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The steric and electronic influence of backbone substitution in IMes-based (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenylimidazol-2-ylidene N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC was probed by synthesizing the [RhCl(CO2(NHC] series of complexes to quantify experimentally the Tolman electronic parameter (electronic and the percent buried volume (%Vbur, steric parameters. The corresponding ruthenium–indenylidene complexes were also synthesized and tested in benchmark metathesis transformations to establish possible correlations between reactivity and NHC electronic and steric parameters.

  4. Synthesis of Aminophosphine Ligands with Binaphthyl Backbones for Silver(I)-catalyzed Enantioselective Allylation of Benzaldehyde

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Yi(王以); JI,Bao-Ming(吉保明); DING,Kui-Ling(丁奎岭)

    2002-01-01

    A series of aminophosphine ligands was synthesized from 2amino-2′-hydroxy-1,1′-binaphthyl (NOBIN). Their asymmetric induction efficiency was examined for silver(I)catalyzed enantioselective allylation reaction of benzaldehyde with allyltributyltin.Under the optimized reaction conditions,quantitative yield as well as moderate ee value (54.5% ee)of product was achieved by the catalysis with silver(I)/3 complex. The effects of the binaphthyl backbone and the substituted situated at chelating N, Patoms on enantioselectivity of the reaction were also discussed.

  5. Relative specificities of water and ammonia losses from backbone fragments in collision-activated dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank; Nielsen, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of a database containing over 20,000 high-resolution collision-activation mass spectra of tryptic peptide dications was employed to study the relative specificity of neutral losses from backbone fragments. The high resolution of the FTMS instrument allowed for the first time the first...... isotope of the water loss and the monoisotope of the ammonia loss to be distinguished. Contrary to a popular belief, water losses from y' ions are not specific enough to rely upon for detecting the presence of amino acids with oxygen in the side chains. At the same time, ammonia loss from b ions...

  6. Redox-controlled backbone dynamics of human cytochrome c revealed by {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Koichi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kamiya, Masakatsu [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Uchida, Takeshi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kawano, Keiichi [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Ishimori, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} The dynamic parameters for the backbone dynamics in Cyt c were determined. {yields} The backbone mobility of Cyt c is highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme. {yields} The backbone mobility of Cyt c is more restricted upon the oxidation of the heme. {yields} The redox-dependent dynamics are shown in the backbone of Cyt c. {yields} The backbone dynamics of Cyt c would regulate the electron transfer from Cyt c. -- Abstract: Redox-controlled backbone dynamics in cytochrome c (Cyt c) were revealed by 2D {sup 15}N NMR relaxation experiments. {sup 15}N T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} values and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N NOEs of uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled reduced and oxidized Cyt c were measured, and the generalized order parameters (S{sup 2}), the effective correlation time for internal motion ({tau}{sub e}), the {sup 15}N exchange broadening contributions (R{sub ex}) for each residue, and the overall correlation time ({tau}{sub m}) were estimated by model-free dynamics formalism. These dynamic parameters clearly showed that the backbone dynamics of Cyt c are highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme that functions as the stable hydrophobic core. Upon oxidation of the heme iron in Cyt c, the average S{sup 2} value was increased from 0.88 {+-} 0.01 to 0.92 {+-} 0.01, demonstrating that the mobility of the backbone is further restricted in the oxidized form. Such increases in the S{sup 2} values were more prominent in the loop regions, including amino acid residues near the thioether bonds to the heme moiety and positively charged region around Lys87. Both of the regions are supposed to form the interaction site for cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and the electron pathway from Cyt c to CcO. The redox-dependent mobility of the backbone in the interaction site for the electron transfer to CcO suggests an electron transfer mechanism regulated by the backbone dynamics in the Cyt c-CcO system.

  7. Label-free surface-enhanced infrared spectro-electro-chemical analysis of the Redox potential shift of cytochrome c complexed with a cardiolipin-containing lipid membrane of varied composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Wu, Lie; Zeng, Li; Jiang, Xiu-E.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a lipid membrane was fabricated by fusing cardiolipin-phosphatidylcholine (CL_PC, 1:4) vesicles onto a hydrophobic surface of 1-dodecanethiol (DT) preadsorbed on a nanostructured gold film. By changing the concentration of the DT adsorption solution, we constructed a series of CL_PC-DT bilayers with different hydrophobicity to study the effects of lipid membrane characteristics on the adsorption conformation of cytochrome c (Cyt c). Electrochemical analysis showed that the formal potential is 0.24 V for Cyt c-CL_PC-DT(10), 0.2 V for Cyt c-CL_PC-DT(20), and 0.16 V for Cyt c-CL_PC-DT(40) — a gradual positive shift with the decreasing DT concentration — relative to the potential of native cyt c (0.02 V). Potential-induced surface-enhanced infrared adsorption difference spectroscopy revealed that the gradual positive shift of the formal potential of CL-bound cyt c is determined by the environment with the gradually lowered dielectric constant for the heme cofactor in CL-bound cyt c (Fe3+). Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91227114, 21322510, and 21105097), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M530998), the Natural Science Foundation of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 201215092), and the President Funds of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. A New Paradigm for Chemical Engineering?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    businesses has been observed. There is an increasing trend within the chemical industry to focus on products and the sustainable processes that can make them. Do these changes point to a paradigm shift in chemical engineering as a discipline? Historically, two previous paradigm shifts in chemical engineering...... corresponded to major shifts in chemical engineering as a discipline, which affected not only the education of chemical engineers, but also the development of chemical engineering as a discipline. Has the time come for a new paradigm shift that will prepare the current and future chemical engineering graduates...... to tackle the complex problems facing the chemicals based industries and serve the modern society more efficiently? The lecture will review the current status of chemical engineering as a discipline, the proposals for the third paradigm, the need for such a paradigm shift and related educational issues....

  9. Chemical contamination of material cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    ) chemicals in paper and plastic materials, and furthermore discuss the likely impacts of chemical contamination on material recycling. The work is part of the new Danish initiative focusing on Integrated Resource Management and Recovery (IRMAR, grant no. 11‐116775). The outcomes of the work will provide......Material recycling represents a backbone of sustainable society in the context of circular economy. Ideally, materials are converted into products, used by the consumers, and discarded, just to be recycled and converted into newly manufactured products. Furthermore, materials may also contain...... chemicals, which would be re‐introduced into the loop once a product is recycled. Such chemicals may not be removed in the recycling process, persist, and contaminate the newly manufactured products. Chemical contamination could potentially put product consumers at unnecessary risk and jeopardize public...

  10. Importance of backbone angles versus amino acid configurations in peptide vibrational Raman optical activity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Carmen; Ruud, Kenneth; Reiher, Markus

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we investigate whether the differential scattering of right- and left-circularly polarized light in peptide Raman optical activity spectra are uniquely dominated by the backbone conformation, or whether the configurations of the individual amino acid also play a significant role. This is achieved by calculating Raman optical activity spectra using density functional theory for four structurally related peptides with a common backbone conformation, but with different sequences of amino acid configurations. Furthermore, the ROA signals of the amide normal modes are decomposed into contributions from groups of individual atoms. It is found that the amino acid configuration has a considerable influence on the ROA peaks in the amide I, II, and III regions, although the local decomposition reveals that the side-chain atoms only contribute to those peaks directly in the case of the amide II vibrations. Furthermore, small changes in the amide normal modes may lead to large and irregular modifications in the ROA intensity differences, making it difficult to establish transferable ROA intensity differences even for structurally similar vibrations.

  11. A fusion networking model for smart grid power distribution backbone communication network based on PTN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In current communication network for distribution in Chinese power grid systems, the fiber communication backbone network for distribution and TD-LTE power private wireless backhaul network of power grid are both bearing by the SDH optical transmission network, which also carries the communication network of transformer substation and main electric. As the data traffic of the distribution communication and TD-LTE power private wireless network grow rapidly in recent years, it will have a big impact with the SDH network’s bearing capacity which is mainly used for main electric communication in high security level. This paper presents a fusion networking model which use a multiple-layer PTN network as the unified bearing of the TD-LTE power private wireless backhaul network and fiber communication backbone network for distribution. Network dataflow analysis shows that this model can greatly reduce the capacity pressure of the traditional SDH network as well as ensure the reliability of the transmission of the communication network for distribution and TD-LTE power private wireless network.

  12. Di-Isocyanate Crosslinked Aerogels with 1, 6-Bis (Trimethoxysilyl) Hexane Incorporated in Silica Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivod, Stephanie L.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Quade, Derek; Randall, Jason; Perry, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are desirable materials for many applications that take advantage of their light weight and low thermal conductivity. Addition of a conformal polymer coating which bonds with the amine decorated surface of the silica network improves the strength of the aerogels by as much as 200 times. Even with vast improvement in strength they still tend to undergo brittle failure due to the rigid silica backbone. We hope to increase the flexibility and elastic recovery of the silica based aerogel by altering the silica back-bone by incorporation of more flexible hexane links. To this end, we investigated the use of 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMSH), a polysilsesquioxane precursor3, as an additional co-reactant to prepare silica gels which were subsequently cross-linked with di-isocyanate. Previously, this approach of adding flexibility by BTMSH incorporation was demonstrated with styrene cross-linked aerogels. In our study, we varied silane concentration, mol % of silicon from BTMSH and di-isocyanate concentration by weight percent to attempt to optimize both the flexibility and the strength of the aerogels.

  13. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  14. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cozzi

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468 encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  15. Automatic assignment of protein backbone resonances by direct spectrum inspection in targeted acquisition of NMR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Leo E; Masse, James E; Jaravine, Victor; Orekhov, Vladislav; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2008-10-01

    The necessity to acquire large multidimensional datasets, a basis for assignment of NMR resonances, results in long data acquisition times during which substantial degradation of a protein sample might occur. Here we propose a method applicable for such a protein for automatic assignment of backbone resonances by direct inspection of multidimensional NMR spectra. In order to establish an optimal balance between completeness of resonance assignment and losses of cross-peaks due to dynamic processes/degradation of protein, assignment of backbone resonances is set as a stirring criterion for dynamically controlled targeted nonlinear NMR data acquisition. The result is demonstrated with the 12 kDa (13)C,(15) N-labeled apo-form of heme chaperone protein CcmE, where hydrolytic cleavage of 29 C-terminal amino acids is detected. For this protein, 90 and 98% of manually assignable resonances are automatically assigned within 10 and 40 h of nonlinear sampling of five 3D NMR spectra, respectively, instead of 600 h needed to complete the full time domain grid. In addition, resonances stemming from degradation products are identified. This study indicates that automatic resonance assignment might serve as a guiding criterion for optimal run-time allocation of NMR resources in applications to proteins prone to degradation.

  16. Automatic assignment of protein backbone resonances by direct spectrum inspection in targeted acquisition of NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Leo E. [Nanyang Technological University, School of Biological Sciences (Singapore); Masse, James E. [National Institutes of Health (United States); Jaravine, Victor [J. W. Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Orekhov, Vladislav [Gothenburg University, Swedish NMR Centre (Sweden); Pervushin, Konstantin [Nanyang Technological University, School of Biological Sciences (Singapore)], E-mail: kpervushin@ntu.edu.sg

    2008-10-15

    The necessity to acquire large multidimensional datasets, a basis for assignment of NMR resonances, results in long data acquisition times during which substantial degradation of a protein sample might occur. Here we propose a method applicable for such a protein for automatic assignment of backbone resonances by direct inspection of multidimensional NMR spectra. In order to establish an optimal balance between completeness of resonance assignment and losses of cross-peaks due to dynamic processes/degradation of protein, assignment of backbone resonances is set as a stirring criterion for dynamically controlled targeted nonlinear NMR data acquisition. The result is demonstrated with the 12 kDa {sup 13}C,{sup 15} N-labeled apo-form of heme chaperone protein CcmE, where hydrolytic cleavage of 29 C-terminal amino acids is detected. For this protein, 90 and 98% of manually assignable resonances are automatically assigned within 10 and 40 h of nonlinear sampling of five 3D NMR spectra, respectively, instead of 600 h needed to complete the full time domain grid. In addition, resonances stemming from degradation products are identified. This study indicates that automatic resonance assignment might serve as a guiding criterion for optimal run-time allocation of NMR resources in applications to proteins prone to degradation.

  17. Cellulose nanofiber backboned Prussian blue nanoparticles as powerful adsorbents for the selective elimination of radioactive cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipin, Adavan Kiliyankil; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Sakata, Ichiro; Isogai, Akira; Endo, Morinobu; Li, Mingda; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2016-11-01

    On 11 March 2011, the day of the unforgettable disaster of the 9 magnitude Tohoku earthquake and quickly followed by the devastating Tsunami, a damageable amount of radionuclides had dispersed from the Fukushima Daiichi’s damaged nuclear reactors. Decontamination of the dispersed radionuclides from seawater and soil, due to the huge amounts of coexisting ions with competitive functionalities, has been the topmost difficulty. Ferric hexacyanoferrate, also known as Prussian blue (PB), has been the most powerful material for selectively trapping the radioactive cesium ions; its high tendency to form stable colloids in water, however, has made PB to be impossible for the open-field radioactive cesium decontamination applications. A nano/nano combinatorial approach, as is described in this study, has provided an ultimate solution to this intrinsic colloid formation difficulty of PB. Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) were used to immobilize PB via the creation of CNF-backboned PB. The CNF-backboned PB (CNF/PB) was found to be highly tolerant to water and moreover, it gave a 139 mg/g capability and a million (106) order of magnitude distribution coefficient (Kd) for absorbing of the radioactive cesium ion. Field studies on soil and seawater decontaminations in Fukushima gave satisfactory results, demonstrating high capabilities of CNF/PB for practical applications.

  18. Optimization of Protein Backbone Dihedral Angles by Means of Hamiltonian Reweighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margreitter, Christian; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-09-26

    Molecular dynamics simulations depend critically on the accuracy of the underlying force fields in properly representing biomolecules. Hence, it is crucial to validate the force-field parameter sets in this respect. In the context of the GROMOS force field, this is usually achieved by comparing simulation data to experimental observables for small molecules. In this study, we develop new amino acid backbone dihedral angle potential energy parameters based on the widely used 54A7 parameter set by matching to experimental J values and secondary structure propensity scales. In order to find the most appropriate backbone parameters, close to 100 000 different combinations of parameters have been screened. However, since the sheer number of combinations considered prohibits actual molecular dynamics simulations for each of them, we instead predicted the values for every combination using Hamiltonian reweighting. While the original 54A7 parameter set fails to reproduce the experimental data, we are able to provide parameters that match significantly better. However, to ensure applicability in the context of larger peptides and full proteins, further studies have to be undertaken.

  19. On the role of thermal backbone fluctuations in myoglobin ligand gate dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Peng, Xubiao

    2012-01-01

    We construct an energy function that describes the crystallographic structure of spermwhale myoglobin backbone. As a model in our construction, we use the Protein Data Bank entry 1ABS that has been measured at liquid helium temperature. Consequently the thermal B-factor fluctuations are very small, which is an advantage in our construction. The energy function that we utilize resembles that of the discrete non-linear Schrodinger equation. Likewise, ours supports solitons as local minimum energy configurations. We describe the 1ABS backbone in terms of solitons with a precision that deviates from 1ABS by an average root-mean-square distance, which is less than the experimentally observed Debye-Waller B-factor fluctuation distance. We then subject the multisoliton solution to extensive numerical heating and cooling experiments, over a very wide range of temperatures. We concentrate in particular to temperatures above 300K and below the theta-point unfolding temperature, which is around 348K. We confirm that the...

  20. RNA-Redesign: a web server for fixed-backbone 3D design of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesselman, Joseph D; Das, Rhiju

    2015-07-01

    RNA is rising in importance as a design medium for interrogating fundamental biology and for developing therapeutic and bioengineering applications. While there are several online servers for design of RNA secondary structure, there are no tools available for the rational design of 3D RNA structure. Here we present RNA-Redesign (http://rnaredesign.stanford.edu), an online 3D design tool for RNA. This resource utilizes fixed-backbone design to optimize the sequence identity and nucleobase conformations of an RNA to match a desired backbone, analogous to fundamental tools that underlie rational protein engineering. The resulting sequences suggest thermostabilizing mutations that can be experimentally verified. Further, sequence preferences that differ between natural and computationally designed sequences can suggest whether natural sequences possess functional constraints besides folding stability, such as cofactor binding or conformational switching. Finally, for biochemical studies, the designed sequences can suggest experimental tests of 3D models, including concomitant mutation of base triples. In addition to the designs generated, detailed graphical analysis is presented through an integrated and user-friendly environment.

  1. Improving VANETs Connectivity with a Totally Ad Hoc Living Mobile Backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joilson Alves Junior

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vehicular ad hoc network (VANET for intelligent transportation systems is an emerging concept to improve transportation security, reliability, and management. The network behavior can be totally different in topological aspects because of the mobility of vehicular nodes. The topology can be fully connected when the flow of vehicles is high and may have low connectivity or be invalid when the flow of vehicles is low or unbalanced. In big cities, the metropolitan buses that travel on exclusive lanes may be used to set up a metropolitan vehicular data network (backbone, raising the connectivity among the vehicles. Therefore, this paper proposes the implementation of a living mobile backbone, totally ad hoc (MOB-NET, which will provide infrastructure and raise the network connectivity. In order to show the viability of MOB-NET, statistical analyses were made with real data of express buses that travel through exclusive lanes, besides evaluations through simulations and analytic models. The statistic, analytic, and simulation results prove that the buses that travel through exclusive lanes can be used to build a communication network totally ad hoc and provide connectivity in more than 99% of the time, besides raising the delivery rate up to 95%.

  2. On the Lamb shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarroel, D. [Av. Tobalaba 3696, Puente Alto, Santiago, Metropolitana (Chile)

    2008-02-15

    The Lamb shift is calculated, in an approximate way, considering the hydrogen atom as an isolated physical system; the quantized radiation field does not play any role in the present approach. Our formalism is based on the generalization of the Dirac wave equation that incorporates the effects of the electron self-fields directly into it. Both the physical picture as well as the mathematical formalism have their roots in the classical theory of the electron. (author)

  3. HIV-1 phenotypic reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance test interpretation is not dependent on the subtype of the virus backbone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Bronze

    Full Text Available To date, the majority of HIV-1 phenotypic resistance testing has been performed with subtype B virus backbones (e.g. HXB2. However, the relevance of using this backbone to determine resistance in non-subtype B HIV-1 viruses still needs to be assessed. From 114 HIV-1 subtype C clinical samples (36 ARV-naïve, 78 ARV-exposed, pol amplicons were produced and analyzed for phenotypic resistance using both a subtype B- and C-backbone in which the pol fragment was deleted. Phenotypic resistance was assessed in resulting recombinant virus stocks (RVS for a series of antiretroviral drugs (ARV's and expressed as fold change (FC, yielding 1660 FC comparisons. These Antivirogram® derived FC values were categorized as having resistant or sensitive susceptibility based on biological cut-off values (BCOs. The concordance between resistance calls obtained for the same clinical sample but derived from two different backbones (i.e. B and C accounted for 86.1% (1429/1660 of the FC comparisons. However, when taking the assay variability into account, 95.8% (1590/1660 of the phenotypic data could be considered as being concordant with respect to their resistance call. No difference in the capacity to detect resistance associated with M184V, K103N and V106M mutations was noted between the two backbones. The following was concluded: (i A high level of concordance was shown between the two backbone phenotypic resistance profiles; (ii Assay variability is largely responsible for discordant results (i.e. for FC values close to BCO; (iii Confidence intervals should be given around the BCO's, when assessing resistance in HIV-1 subtype C; (iv No systematic resistance under- or overcalling of subtype C amplicons in the B-backbone was observed; (v Virus backbone subtype sequence variability outside the pol region does not contribute to phenotypic FC values. In conclusion the HXB2 virus backbone remains an acceptable vector for phenotyping HIV-1 subtype C pol amplicons.

  4. Tuning backbones and side-chains of cationic conjugated polymers for optical signal amplification of fluorescent DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Qin; Liu, Xing-Fen; Fan, Qu-Li; Wang, Lihua; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lian-Hui; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Wei

    2009-06-15

    Three cationic conjugated polymers (CCPs) exhibiting different backbone geometries and charge densities were used to investigate how their conjugated backbone and side chain properties, together with the transitions of DNA amphiphilic properties, interplay in the CCP/DNA-C* (DNA-C*: fluorophore-labeled DNA) complexes to influence the optical signal amplification of fluorescent DNA detection based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). By examining the FRET efficiencies to dsDNA-C* (dsDNA: double-stranded DNA) and ssDNA-C* (ssDNA: single-stranded DNA) for each CCP, twisted conjugated backbones and higher charge densities were proved to facilitate electrostatic attraction in CCP/dsDNA-C* complexes, and induced improved sensitivity to DNA hybridization. Especially, by using the CCP with twisted conjugated backbone and the highest charge density, a more than 7-fold higher efficiency of FRET to dsDNA-C* was found than to ssDNA-C*, indicating a high signal amplification for discriminating between dsDNA and ssDNA. By contrast, linear conjugated backbones and lower charge density were demonstrated to favor hydrophobic interactions in CCP/ssDNA-C* complexes. These findings provided guidelines for the design of novel sensitive CCP, which can be useful to recognize many other important DNA activities involving transitions of DNA amphiphilic properties like DNA hybridization, such as specific DNA binding with ions, some secondary or tertiary structural changes of DNA, and so forth.

  5. Polarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model (POSSIM) force field: Developing parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Sergei Y.; Kaminski, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A previously introduced POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model) force field has been extended to include parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbones. New features were introduced into the fitting protocol, as compared to the previous generation of the polarizable force field for proteins. A reduced amount of quantum mechanical data was employed in fitting the electrostatic parameters. Transferability of the electrostatics between our recently developed NMA model and the protein backbone was confirmed. Binding energy and geometry for complexes of alanine dipeptide with a water molecule were estimated and found in a good agreement with high-level quantum mechanical results (for example, the intermolecular distances agreeing within ca. 0.06Å). Following the previously devised procedure, we calculated average errors in alanine di- and tetra-peptide conformational energies and backbone angles and found the agreement to be adequate (for example, the alanine tetrapeptide extended-globular conformational energy gap was calculated to be 3.09 kcal/mol quantim mechanically and 3.14 kcal/mol with the POSSIM force field). However, we have now also included simulation of a simple alpha-helix in both gas-phase and water as the ultimate test of the backbone conformational behavior. The resulting alanine and protein backbone force field is currently being employed in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins. PMID:21743799

  6. Comb-type prepolymers consisting of a polyacrylamide backbone and poly(L-lysine) graft chains for multivalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, S; Maruyama, A; Akaike, T

    1999-01-01

    The comb-type copolymers consisting of a polyacrylamide (PAAm) backbone and poly(L-lysine) (PLL) graft chains have been prepared as the "prepolymer" for designing multivalent ligands. To regulate the length and density of the clusters of primary amino groups, the Nalpha-carboxyanhydride of Nepsilon-carbobenzoxy (CBZ)-L-lysine was first polymerized using p-vinylbenzylamine as an initiator. The resulting poly(CBZ-L-lysine) macromonomer was then radically copolymerized with AAm, followed by the deprotection of amino groups. For the model study, the reactive clusters of primary amino groups were completely converted into anion clusters by the reaction with succinic anhydride. The model multivalent ligands having the biotin label on the PAAm backbone were prepared by the terpolymerization of the macromonomer, AAm, and the biotin derivative having a vinyl group. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the biotin with no spacer on the PAAm backbone was recognized by the avidin-peroxidase conjugate specifically. Therefore, the highly sensitive detection of the interaction between cells and various model multivalent ligands was possible. The selective labeling onto the PAAm backbone revealed that the converted anion clusters of graft chains interacted exclusively with the cell and that the backbone was inert to the interaction with the cell. These results indicate that the various PAAm-graft-PLL comb-type copolymers with the defined length and density of the PLL-grafts are the potential prepolymers to investigate and to optimize the affinity of the multivalent ligands for receptors.

  7. CORBA and MPI-based 'backbone' for coupling advanced simulation tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seydaliev, M.; Caswell, D., E-mail: marat.seydaliev@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing international interest in using coupled, multidisciplinary computer simulations for a variety of purposes, including nuclear reactor safety analysis. Reactor behaviour can be modeled using a suite of computer programs simulating phenomena or predicting parameters that can be categorized into disciplines such as Thermalhydraulics, Neutronics, Fuel, Fuel Channels, Fission Product Release and Transport, Containment and Atmospheric Dispersion, and Severe Accident Analysis. Traditionally, simulations used for safety analysis individually addressed only the behaviour within a single discipline, based upon static input data from other simulation programs. The limitation of using a suite of stand-alone simulations is that phenomenological interdependencies or temporal feedback between the parameters calculated within individual simulations cannot be adequately captured. To remove this shortcoming, multiple computer simulations for different disciplines must exchange data during runtime to address these interdependencies. This article describes the concept of a new framework, which we refer to as the 'Backbone', to provide the necessary runtime exchange of data. The Backbone, currently under development at AECL for a preliminary feasibility study, is a hybrid design using features taken from the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), a standard defined by the Object Management Group, and the Message Passing Interface (MPI), a standard developed by a group of researchers from academia and industry. Both have well-tested and efficient implementations, including some that are freely available under the GNU public licenses. The CORBA component enables individual programs written in different languages and running on different platforms within a network to exchange data with each other, thus behaving like a single application. MPI provides the process-to-process intercommunication between these programs. This paper outlines the different

  8. Catastrophic shifts in ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Marten; Carpenter, Steve; Foley, Jonathan A.; Folke, Carl; Walker, Brian

    2001-10-01

    All ecosystems are exposed to gradual changes in climate, nutrient loading, habitat fragmentation or biotic exploitation. Nature is usually assumed to respond to gradual change in a smooth way. However, studies on lakes, coral reefs, oceans, forests and arid lands have shown that smooth change can be interrupted by sudden drastic switches to a contrasting state. Although diverse events can trigger such shifts, recent studies show that a loss of resilience usually paves the way for a switch to an alternative state. This suggests that strategies for sustainable management of such ecosystems should focus on maintaining resilience.

  9. Probing the role of backbone hydrogen bonds in protein-peptide interactions by amide-to-ester mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eildal, Jonas N N; Hultqvist, Greta; Balle, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    -protein interactions, those of the PDZ domain family involve formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: C-termini or internal linear motifs of proteins bind as β-strands to form an extended antiparallel β-sheet with the PDZ domain. Whereas extensive work has focused on the importance of the amino acid side chains...... of the protein ligand, the role of the backbone hydrogen bonds in the binding reaction is not known. Using amide-to-ester substitutions to perturb the backbone hydrogen-bonding pattern, we have systematically probed putative backbone hydrogen bonds between four different PDZ domains and peptides corresponding...... to natural protein ligands. Amide-to-ester mutations of the three C-terminal amides of the peptide ligand severely affected the affinity with the PDZ domain, demonstrating that hydrogen bonds contribute significantly to ligand binding (apparent changes in binding energy, ΔΔG = 1.3 to >3.8 kcal mol(-1...

  10. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  11. On correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central C$_\\alpha$ carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high resolution X-ray structures in Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the C$_\\beta$ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a sub-atomic precision. As an example we construct the C$_\\alpha$-C$_\\beta$ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 \\.A in root-mean-square distance from the experimental X-ray structure.

  12. A renormalization approach to describe charge transport in quasiperiodic dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Fulco, U.L. [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Albuquerque, E.L., E-mail: eudenilson@gmail.com [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Caetano, E.W.S. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Freire, V.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2011-10-31

    Highlights: → One-step renormalization approach to describe the DBL-DNA molecule. → Electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model. → A quasiperiodic sequence to mimic the DNA nucleotides arrangement. → Electronic transmission spectra. → I-V characteristics. -- Abstract: We study the charge transport properties of a dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecule focusing on a quasiperiodic arrangement of its constituent nucleotides forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) and Fibonacci (FB) Poly (CG) sequences, as well as a natural DNA sequence (Ch22) for the sake of comparison. Making use of a one-step renormalization process, the DBL-DNA molecule is modeled in terms of a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate its transmissivity and current-voltage (I-V) profiles. Beyond the semiconductor I-V characteristics, a striking similarity between the electronic transport properties of the RS quasiperiodic structure and the natural DNA sequence was found.

  13. The Effects of NHC-Backbone Substitution on Efficiency in Ruthenium-based Olefin Metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Kevin M.; Bourg, Jean-Baptiste; Chung, Cheol K.; Virgil, Scott C.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    A series of ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts bearing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands with varying degrees of backbone and N-aryl substitution have been prepared. These complexes show greater resistance to decomposition through C–H activation of the N-aryl group, resulting in increased catalyst lifetimes. This work has utilized robotic technology to examine the activity and stability of each catalyst in metathesis, providing insights into the relationship between ligand architecture and enhanced efficiency. The development of this robotic methodology has also shown that, under optimized conditions, catalyst loadings as low as 25 ppm can lead to 100% conversion in the ring-closing metathesis of diethyl diallylmalonate. PMID:19351207

  14. Extensive Air Showers: from the muonic smoking guns to the hadronic backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazon L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive Air Showers are complex macroscopic objects initiated by single ultra-high energy particles. They are the result of millions of high energy reactions in the atmosphere and can be described as the superposition of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The hadronic cascade is the air shower backbone, and it is mainly made of pions. Decays of neutral pions initiate electromagnetic cascades, while the decays of charged pions produce muons which leave the hadronic core and travel many kilometers almost unaffected. Muons are smoking guns of the hadronic cascade: the energy, transverse momentum, spatial distribution and depth of production are key to reconstruct the history of the air shower. In this work, we overview the phenomenology of muons on the air shower and its relation to the hadronic cascade. We briefly review the experimental efforts to analyze muons within air showers and discuss possible paths to use this information.

  15. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever.

  16. Icosahedral medium-range orders and backbone formation in an amorphous alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mirim; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Jae-Chul

    2010-12-01

    Analyses of metallic amorphous solids constructed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have demonstrated that individual short-range orders (SROs) are linked with neighboring SROs and form various medium-range orders (MROs). These MROs have been observed to have different structural stability depending on their linking patterns. On the basis of the assessment of the structural stability of various MROs, we propose new types of structural organization, namely, icosahedral medium-range orders (I-MROs) and their extended-range order that forms the backbone of amorphous solids. We also discuss why the atomic-scale structure of an amorphous alloy can be more appropriately described in terms of I-MROs, rather than by the degree of short-range ordering as characterized by the fractions of SROs.

  17. A renormalization approach to describe charge transport in quasiperiodic dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.

    2011-10-01

    We study the charge transport properties of a dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecule focusing on a quasiperiodic arrangement of its constituent nucleotides forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) and Fibonacci (FB) Poly (CG) sequences, as well as a natural DNA sequence (Ch22) for the sake of comparison. Making use of a one-step renormalization process, the DBL-DNA molecule is modeled in terms of a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate its transmissivity and current-voltage (I-V) profiles. Beyond the semiconductor I-V characteristics, a striking similarity between the electronic transport properties of the RS quasiperiodic structure and the natural DNA sequence was found.

  18. Solid-phase synthesis of lidocaine and procainamide analogues using backbone amide linker (BAL) anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Simon K; Peacock, Mandy J; Kates, Steven A; Barany, George

    2003-01-01

    New solid-phase strategies have been developed for the synthesis of lidocaine (1) and procainamide (2) analogues, using backbone amide linker (BAL) anchoring. Both sets were prepared starting from a common resin-bound intermediate, followed by four general steps: (i) attachment of a primary aliphatic or aromatic amine to the solid support via reductive amination (as monitored by a novel test involving reaction of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with residual aldehyde groups); (ii) acylation of the resultant secondary amine; (iii) displacement of halide with an amine; and (iv) trifluoroacetic acid-mediated release from the support. A manual parallel strategy was followed to provide 60 novel compounds, of which two dozen have not been previously described. In most cases, initial crude purities were >80%, and overall isolated yields were in the 40-88% range.

  19. Design of a sialylglycopolymer with a chitosan backbone having efficient inhibitory activity against influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Myco; Itoh, Masae; Makimura, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Kohji; Umekawa, Midori; Masui, Ayano; Matahira, Yoshiharu; Shibata, Mari; Ashida, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2008-08-14

    We verified here the inhibitory activity of a sialylglycopolymer prepared from natural products, chitosan and hen egg yolk, against influenza virus infection and estimated the requirements of the molecule for efficient inhibition. The inhibitory activity clearly depended on two factors, the length (the degree of polymerization: DP) of the chitosan backbone and the amount (the degree of substitution: DS) of conjugated sialyloligosaccharide side chain. The inhibitory efficiency increased in accordance with the DP value, with the highest inhibitory activity obtained when the DP was 1430. The inhibition of virus infection reached more than 90% as the DS value increased up to 15.6% when the neighboring sialyloligosaccharide side chains came as close as 4 nm, which was nearly the distance between two receptor-binding pockets in a hemagglutinin trimer. These results demonstrate that the sialylglycopolymer could be an excellent candidate of the safe and efficient anti-influenza drug.

  20. Hamiltonian replica-exchange simulations with adaptive biasing of peptide backbone and side chain dihedral angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermeir, Katja; Zacharias, Martin

    2014-01-15

    A Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics (REMD) simulation method has been developed that employs a two-dimensional backbone and one-dimensional side chain biasing potential specifically to promote conformational transitions in peptides. To exploit the replica framework optimally, the level of the biasing potential in each replica was appropriately adapted during the simulations. This resulted in both high exchange rates between neighboring replicas and improved occupancy/flow of all conformers in each replica. The performance of the approach was tested on several peptide and protein systems and compared with regular MD simulations and previous REMD studies. Improved sampling of relevant conformational states was observed for unrestrained protein and peptide folding simulations as well as for refinement of a loop structure with restricted mobility of loop flanking protein regions.

  1. Modification of rifamycin polyketide backbone leads to improved drug activity against rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Aeshna; Almabruk, Khaled H; Saxena, Anjali; Yang, Jongtae; Mukherjee, Udita; Kaur, Hardeep; Kohli, Puneet; Kumari, Rashmi; Singh, Priya; Zakharov, Lev N; Singh, Yogendra; Mahmud, Taifo; Lal, Rup

    2014-07-25

    Rifamycin B, a product of Amycolatopsis mediterranei S699, is the precursor of clinically used antibiotics that are effective against tuberculosis, leprosy, and AIDS-related mycobacterial infections. However, prolonged usage of these antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of rifamycin-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As part of our effort to generate better analogs of rifamycin, we substituted the acyltransferase domain of module 6 of rifamycin polyketide synthase with that of module 2 of rapamycin polyketide synthase. The resulting mutants (rifAT6::rapAT2) of A. mediterranei S699 produced new rifamycin analogs, 24-desmethylrifamycin B and 24-desmethylrifamycin SV, which contained modification in the polyketide backbone. 24-Desmethylrifamycin B was then converted to 24-desmethylrifamycin S, whose structure was confirmed by MS, NMR, and X-ray crystallography. Subsequently, 24-desmethylrifamycin S was converted to 24-desmethylrifampicin, which showed excellent antibacterial activity against several rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains.

  2. Quality of service estimation based on maximum bottleneck algorithm for domain aggregation in backbone networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yang; ZHAN Yi-chun; YU Shao-hua

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the routing among autonomous systems (ASs) with quality of service (QoS) requirements. To avoid the intractability of the problem, abstract QoS capability must be informed among ASs, because the routhing which constrained QoS has been proved to be nondeterministic polynomial-time (NP) hard even inside an AS. This paper employs the modified Dijkstra algorithm to compute the maximum bottleneck bandwidth inside an AS. This approach lays a basis for the AS-level switching capability on which interdomain advertisement can be performed. Furthermore, the paper models the aggregated traffic in backbone network with fractional Brownian motion (FBM), and by integrating along the time axis in short intervals, a good estimation of the distribution of queue length in the next short intervals can be obtained. The proposed advertisement mechanism can be easily implemented with the current interdomain routing protocols. Numerical study indicates that the presented scheme is effective and feasible.

  3. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  4. RNABC: forward kinematics to reduce all-atom steric clashes in RNA backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueyi; Kapral, Gary; Murray, Laura; Richardson, David; Richardson, Jane; Snoeyink, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Although accurate details in RNA structure are of great importance for understanding RNA function, the backbone conformation is difficult to determine, and most existing RNA structures show serious steric clashes (>or= 0.4 A overlap) when hydrogen atoms are taken into account. We have developed a program called RNABC (RNA Backbone Correction) that performs local perturbations to search for alternative conformations that avoid those steric clashes or other local geometry problems. Its input is an all-atom coordinate file for an RNA crystal structure (usually from the MolProbity web service), with problem areas specified. RNABC rebuilds a suite (the unit from sugar to sugar) by anchoring the phosphorus and base positions, which are clearest in crystallographic electron density, and reconstructing the other atoms using forward kinematics. Geometric parameters are constrained within user-specified tolerance of canonical or original values, and torsion angles are constrained to ranges defined through empirical database analyses. Several optimizations reduce the time required to search the many possible conformations. The output results are clustered and presented to the user, who can choose whether to accept one of the alternative conformations. Two test evaluations show the effectiveness of RNABC, first on the S-motifs from 42 RNA structures, and second on the worst problem suites (clusters of bad clashes, or serious sugar pucker outliers) in 25 unrelated RNA structures. Among the 101 S-motifs, 88 had diagnosed problems, and RNABC produced clash-free conformations with acceptable geometry for 71 of those (about 80%). For the 154 worst problem suites, RNABC proposed alternative conformations for 72. All but 8 of those were judged acceptable after examining electron density (where available) and local conformation. Thus, even for these worst cases, nearly half the time RNABC suggested corrections suitable to initiate further crystallographic refinement. The program is

  5. Contribution of Peptide Backbone to Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibody Reactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Hartwig Trier

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the most common autoimmune diseases, affecting approximately 1-2% of the world population. One of the characteristic features of RA is the presence of autoantibodies. Especially the highly specific anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPAs, which have been found in up to 70% of RA patients' sera, have received much attention. Several citrullinated proteins are associated with RA, suggesting that ACPAs may react with different sequence patterns, separating them from traditional antibodies, whose reactivity usually is specific towards a single target. As ACPAs have been suggested to be involved in the development of RA, knowledge about these antibodies may be crucial. In this study, we examined the influence of peptide backbone for ACPA reactivity in immunoassays. The antibodies were found to be reactive with a central Cit-Gly motif being essential for ACPA reactivity and to be cross-reactive between the selected citrullinated peptides. The remaining amino acids within the citrullinated peptides were found to be of less importance for antibody reactivity. Moreover, these findings indicated that the Cit-Gly motif in combination with peptide backbone is essential for antibody reactivity. Based on these findings it was speculated that any amino acid sequence, which brings the peptide into a properly folded structure for antibody recognition is sufficient for antibody reactivity. These findings are in accordance with the current hypothesis that structural homology rather than sequence homology are favored between citrullinated epitopes. These findings are important in relation to clarifying the etiology of RA and to determine the nature of ACPAs, e.g., why some Cit-Gly-containing sequences are not targeted by ACPAs.

  6. Preparation of stable spherical micelles with rigid backbones based on polyaryletherketone copolymers containing lateral pyridyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuling; Liu, Lingzhi; Guo, Yunliang; Jiang, Zhenhua; Wang, Guibin, E-mail: wgb@jlu.edu.cn

    2013-07-15

    A new bisphenol monomer, 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenylimine) pyridine (PYPH), was synthesized via a deoxidization reaction of an amine. A series of novel polyaryletherketone copolymers containing lateral pyridyl groups (PY-PAEKs) based on PYPH, 2,2-di(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane and 4,4′-difluorobenzophenone were prepared by nucleophilic aromatic substitution polycondensation reactions. Furthermore, spherical micelles with rigid PY-PAEKs as the inner cores and flexible polyacrylic acid (PAA) as the outer shells were obtained in a selective solvent (H{sub 2}O) successfully. The formation of the spherical micelles was confirmed by scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy as well as by surface tension measurements. The formation and size of the spherical micelles depended on the weight ratio of PAA/PY-PAEK, the concentration and pH value of the mixed solution containing the PY-PAEK and PAA, and the number of pyridyl groups in the PY-PAEK. The structure of the spherical micelles could be stabilized by a cross-linking reaction between the pyridyl groups of the PY-PAEKs and 1,4-dibromobutane. The diameter of the spherical micelles decreased because of the removal of the PAA shell from the PY-PAEK core after the cross-linking reaction. The resulting stable spherical micelles with rigid backbones did not dissolve in a number of polar solvents and remained unaffected by changes in the pH values. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Polyaryletherketone copolymers containing lateral pyridyl groups were synthesized. • Spherical micelles were prepared using these copolymers and polyacrylic acid. • The copolymers and polyacrylic acid formed the core and the shell of the micelles, respectively. • The obtained micelles were stabilized by a cross-linking reaction. • The cross-linked micelles had rigid backbones, independent of solvents and pH values.

  7. Backbone-hydrazone-containing biodegradable copolymeric micelles for anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Luan, Shujuan; Qin, Benkai; Wang, Yingying; Wang, Kai; Qi, Peilan; Song, Shiyong

    2016-11-01

    Well-defined biodegradable, pH-sensitive amphiphilic block polymers, poly(ethylene glycol)-Hyd-poly(lactic acid) (mPEG-Hyd-PLA) which have acid-cleavable linkages in their backbones, were synthesized via ring-opening polymerization initiated from hydrazone-containing macroinitiators. Introducing a hydrazone bond onto the backbone of an amphiphilic copolymer will find a broad-spectrum encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy showed that the diblock copolymers self-assembled into stable micelles with average diameters of 100 nm. The mean diameters and size distribution of the hydrazone-containing micelles changed obviously in mildly acidic pH (multiple peaks from 1 to 202 nm appeared under a pH 4.0 condition) than in neutral, while there were no changes in the case of non-sensitive ones. Doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX) were loaded with drug loading content ranging from 2.4 to 3.5 %, respectively. Interestingly, the anticancer drugs released from mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles could also be promoted by the increased acidity. An in vitro cytotoxicity study showed that the DOX-loaded mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles have significantly enhanced cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells compared with the non-sensitive poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) (mPEG-PLA) micelles. Confocal microscopy observation indicated that more DOX were delivered into the nuclei of cells following 6 or 12 h incubation with DOX-loaded mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles. In vivo studies on H22-bearing Swiss mice demonstrated the superior anticancer activity of DOX-loaded mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles over free DOX and DOX-loaded mPEG-PLA micelles. These hydrazone-containing pH-responsive degradable micelles provide a useful strategy for antitumor drug delivery.

  8. Enhanced biosynthetically directed fractional carbon-13 enrichment of proteins for backbone NMR assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich, Broc R; Sonstrom, Reilly E; Gupta, Riju A; Rovnyak, David

    2015-11-01

    Routes to carbon-13 enrichment of bacterially expressed proteins include achieving uniform or positionally selective (e.g. ILV-Me, or (13)C', etc.) enrichment. We consider the potential for biosynthetically directed fractional enrichment (e.g. carbon-13 incorporation in the protein less than 100%) for performing routine n-(D)dimensional NMR spectroscopy of proteins. First, we demonstrate an approach to fractional isotope addition where the initial growth media containing natural abundance glucose is replenished at induction with a small amount (e.g. 10%(w/w)u-(13)C-glucose) of enriched nutrient. The approach considered here is to add 10% (e.g. 200mg for a 2g/L culture) u-(13)C-glucose at the induction time (OD600=0.8), resulting in a protein with enhanced (13)C incorporation that gives almost the same NMR signal levels as an exact 20% (13)C sample. Second, whereas fractional enrichment is used for obtaining stereospecific methyl assignments, we find that (13)C incorporation levels no greater than 20%(w/w) yield (13)C and (13)C-(13)C spin pair incorporation sufficient to conduct typical 3D-bioNMR backbone experiments on moderate instrumentation (600 MHz, RT probe). Typical 3D-bioNMR experiments of a fractionally enriched protein yield expected backbone connectivities, and did not show amino acid biases in this work, with one exception. When adding 10% u-(13)C glucose to expression media at induction, there is poor preservation of (13)Cα-(13)Cβ spin pairs in the amino acids ILV, leading to the absence of Cβ signals in HNCACB spectra for ILV, a potentially useful editing effect. Enhanced fractional carbon-13 enrichment provides lower-cost routes to high throughput protein NMR studies, and makes modern protein NMR more cost-accessible.

  9. Structural dynamics of protein backbone {phi} angles: extended molecular dynamics simulations versus experimental {sup 3}J scalar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwick, Phineus R. L. [CNRS/CEA/UJF, Protein Dynamics and Flexibility, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel UMR 5075 (France); Showalter, Scott A. [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, NHMFL (United States); Bouvignies, Guillaume [CNRS/CEA/UJF, Protein Dynamics and Flexibility, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel UMR 5075 (France); Brueschweiler, Rafael [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, NHMFL (United States)], E-mail: bruschweiler@magnet.fsu.edu; Blackledge, Martin [CNRS/CEA/UJF, Protein Dynamics and Flexibility, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel UMR 5075 (France)], E-mail: martin.blackledge@ibs.fr

    2009-09-15

    {sup 3}J scalar couplings report on the conformational averaging of backbone {phi} angles in peptides and proteins, and therefore represent a potentially powerful tool for studying the details of both structure and dynamics in solution. We have compared an extensive experimental dataset with J-couplings predicted from unrestrained molecular dynamics simulation using enhanced sampling available from accelerated molecular dynamics or using long timescale trajectories (200 ns). The dynamic fluctuations predicted to be present along the backbone, in agreement with residual dipolar coupling analysis, are compatible with the experimental {sup 3}J scalar couplings providing a slightly better reproduction of these experimental parameters than a high-resolution static structure.

  10. Backbone dynamics of reduced plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: Regions involved in electron transfer have enhanced mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, L.X.; Hass, M.A.S.; Vierick, N.;

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model-free appr......The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model...

  11. The extension of a DNA double helix by an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, P.; Sharma, P. K.; Madsen, Charlotte S.

    2013-01-01

    Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand.......Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand....

  12. Polymeric Amines by chemical modifications of alternating aliphatic polyketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Youchun; Broekhuis, A. A.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Picchioni, F.

    2008-01-01

    Alternating, aliphatic polyketones were chemically modified by using di-amines to obtain polymeric products having pendant amino groups. The used reaction, Paal-Knorr, involves the formation of pyrrole rings along the polyketone backbone. The corresponding kinetics and final conversions are clearly

  13. Alcaloides iboga de Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae - Atribuição inequívoca dos deslocamentos químicos dos átomos de hidrogênio e carbono: atividade antioxidante Iboga alkaloids from Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae - unequivocal 1H and 13C chemical shift assignments: antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allana Kellen L. Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Six known alkaloids iboga type and the triterpen α- and β-amyrin acetate were isolated from the roots and stems of Peschiera affinis. Their structures were characterized on the basis of spectral data mainly NMR and mass spectra. 1D and 2D NMR spectra were also used to unequivocal ¹H and 13C chemical shift assignments of alkaloids. The ethanolic extract of roots, alkaloidic and no-alkaloidic fractions and iso-voacristine hydroxyindolenine and voacangine were evaluated for their antioxidative properties using an autographic assay based on β-carotene bleaching on TLC plates, and also spectrophotometric detection by reduction of the stable DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical.

  14. A Multi-Objective Approach for Protein Structure Prediction Based on an Energy Model and Backbone Angle Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Jyh-Jong; Su, Shih-Chieh; Yu, Chin-Sheng

    2015-07-03

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is concerned with the prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure and is a challenging calculation problem. After decades of research effort, numerous solutions have been proposed for optimisation methods based on energy models. However, further investigation and improvement is still needed to increase the accuracy and similarity of structures. This study presents a novel backbone angle preference factor, which is one of the factors inducing protein folding. The proposed multiobjective optimisation approach simultaneously considers energy models and backbone angle preferences to solve the ab initio PSP. To prove the effectiveness of the multiobjective optimisation approach based on the energy models and backbone angle preferences, 75 amino acid sequences with lengths ranging from 22 to 88 amino acids were selected from the CB513 data set to be the benchmarks. The data sets were highly dissimilar, therefore indicating that they are meaningful. The experimental results showed that the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the multiobjective optimization approach based on energy model and backbone angle preferences was superior to those of typical energy models, indicating that the proposed approach can facilitate the ab initio PSP.

  15. A Multi-Objective Approach for Protein Structure Prediction Based on an Energy Model and Backbone Angle Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Jong Tsay

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein structure prediction (PSP is concerned with the prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure and is a challenging calculation problem. After decades of research effort, numerous solutions have been proposed for optimisation methods based on energy models. However, further investigation and improvement is still needed to increase the accuracy and similarity of structures. This study presents a novel backbone angle preference factor, which is one of the factors inducing protein folding. The proposed multiobjective optimisation approach simultaneously considers energy models and backbone angle preferences to solve the ab initio PSP. To prove the effectiveness of the multiobjective optimisation approach based on the energy models and backbone angle preferences, 75 amino acid sequences with lengths ranging from 22 to 88 amino acids were selected from the CB513 data set to be the benchmarks. The data sets were highly dissimilar, therefore indicating that they are meaningful. The experimental results showed that the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD of the multiobjective optimization approach based on energy model and backbone angle preferences was superior to those of typical energy models, indicating that the proposed approach can facilitate the ab initio PSP.

  16. Backbone amide linker strategy for the synthesis of 1,4-triazole-containing cyclic tetra- and pentapeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springer, J.; de Cuba, K.R.; Calvet-Vitale, S.; Geenevasen, J.A.J.; Hermkens, P.H.H.; Hiemstra, H.; van Maarseveen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    A backbone amide linker strategy was chosen for the solid-phase synthesis of triazole-containing Cyclic tetra- and pentapeptides. An alkyne-substituted linker derived from 4-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzaldehyde was elongated by using standard "Fmoc-based" solid phase chemistry and terminated by coupling of

  17. Alkali metal salts of formazanate ligands : diverse coordination modes as a result of the nitrogen-rich [NNCNN] ligand backbone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travieso-Puente, Raquel; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Otten, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Alkali metal salts of redox-active formazanate ligands were prepared, and their structures in the solid-state and in solution are determined. The nitrogen-rich [NNCNN] backbone of formazanates results in a varied coordination chemistry, with both the internal and terminal nitrogen atoms available fo

  18. VPLS: alternativa de interconexión a través del backbone IP/MPLS de ETECSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmel Barreto Prieto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available La Empresa de Telecomunicaciones de Cuba (ETECSA maneja en condiciones de exclusividad la infraestructura de telecomunicaciones del país, por lo que el resto de los proveedores necesitan utilizar dicha infraestructura como soporte para la interconexión de los nodos que componen sus redes. Teniendo en cuenta el desarrollo de las tecnologías de las telecomunicaciones, ETECSA ha apostado por la implementación de un backbone IP/MPLS (Internet Protocol over  MultiProtocol Label Switching: Protocolo de Internet sobre Conmutación Multiprotocolo basada en Etiquetas en su red, el cual se espera absorba todos los servicios actualmente soportados por el backbone ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode/Frame Relay. Sin embargo, en estos momentos, la red IP/MPLS solamente oferta servicios VPN (Virtual Private Network: Red Privada Virtual a nivel de red (nivel tres del modelo OSI, cuestión que, para los otros proveedores, resulta inadmisible. El presente artículo describe una propuesta de implementación de una entidad VPLS (Virtual Private LAN Service: Servicio de LAN Privada Virtual como alternativa para la migración de los servicios de VPN de nivel dos que actualmente se soportan sobre el backbone ATM/Frame Relay, hacia el backbone IP/MPLS, variante que garantiza la independencia por parte de los proveedores que son clientes de ETECSA en la operación y enrutamiento de su red.

  19. Tailor-made synthesis of various backbone-substituted imidazolinium salts by triflic anhydride mediated intramolecular cyclisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Su, Xiaolong; Fu, Jun; Qin, Xinke; Zhao, Meixin; Shi, Min

    2012-09-21

    We have found a Tf(2)O-mediated intramolecular cyclization reaction and have revealed an intriguing stereoselectivity and a regioselectivity during the preparation of intermediate alcohols, which allow for the tailor-made synthesis of various backbone-substituted imidazolinium salts, and structurally specific syn-4,5-disubstituted imidazolinium salts.

  20. Interaction of Al-induced peptide backbone ring structure with the sidechains of His, Phe, Trp and Tyr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴清雷; 宋波

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is widely used as an antimicrobial coagulant, food additive, and cookware. However, many reports indicate that aluminium may be a critical factor in many amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood, which limits efforts to prevent and treat these diseases. In this paper, using an ab initio method, we studied the interaction of Al-backbone ring structure with theπ-electron-rich sidechains of His, Phe, Trp, and Tyr. We found that in the absence of water, the Al-backbone ring can stably bind with those sidechains. In the presence of water, the Al-backbone ring can bind to the His sidechain and cannot bind to the other sidechains. As revealed by further investigations, this could be attributed to the fact that there was a coordinate bond of the Al-backbone ring with the His sidechain, while there were theπ-πstacking and cation-π-like interactions with the other sidechains. These findings potentially provide a molecular understanding of Al-related toxicity, and may be helpful in designing drugs for those aforementioned aluminum-linked diseases and encourage treatment of Al-polluted water.

  1. In the Near Future Backbone Aluminum Enterprises will Close Down About 2.4 million Tonnes of Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    On August 21,China Nonferrous Metals Industry Association Aluminum Industry Branch assembled some backbone aluminum enterprises and Henan Nonferrous Metal Industry Association to hold a discussion meeting in Beijing over the current operation trend of aluminum industry,dilemma and opportunity ahead and measures to diffuse surplus capacity,the meeting also discussed the

  2. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.

  3. Energy phase shift as mechanism for catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2012-05-01

    Catalysts are agents that by binding reactant molecules lower the energy barriers to chemical reaction. After reaction the catalyst is regenerated, its unbinding energy recruited from the environment, which is associated with an inevitable loss of energy. We show that combining several catalytic sites to become energetically and temporally phase-shifted relative to each other provides a possibility to sustain the overall reaction by internal \\'energy recycling\\', bypassing the need for thermal activation, and in principle allowing the system to work adiabatically. Using an analytical model for superimposed, phase-shifted potentials of F 1-ATP synthase provides a description integrating main characteristics of this rotary enzyme complex. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Backbone, side chain and heme resonance assignments of cytochrome OmcF from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Silva E Sousa, Marta; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Bruix, Marta

    2015-10-01

    Gene knockout studies on Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs) cells showed that the outer membrane cytochrome OmcF is involved in respiratory pathways leading to the extracellular reduction of Fe(III) citrate and U(VI) oxide. In addition, microarray analysis of OmcF-deficient mutant versus the wild-type strain revealed that many of the genes with decreased transcript level were those whose expression is upregulated in cells grown with a graphite electrode as electron acceptor. This suggests that OmcF also regulates the electron transfer to electrode surfaces and the concomitant electrical current production by Gs in microbial fuel cells. Extracellular electron transfer processes (EET) constitute nowadays the foundations to develop biotechnological applications in biofuel production, bioremediation and bioenergy. Therefore, the structural characterization of OmcF is a fundamental step to understand the mechanisms underlying EET. Here, we report the complete assignment of the heme proton signals together with (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side chain assignments of the OmcF, excluding the hydrophobic residues of the N-terminal predicted lipid anchor.

  5. Is there a Climate Network - A Backbone of the Climate System? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurths, J.

    2010-12-01

    We consider an inverse problem: Is there a backbone-like structure underlying the climate system? For this we propose a method to reconstruct and analyze a complex network from data generated by a spatio-temporal dynamical system. This technique is then applied to reanalysis and model surface air temperature data. Parameters of this network, as betweenness centrality, uncover relations to global circulation patterns in oceans and atmosphere. We especially study the role of hubs and of long range connections, called teleconnections, in the flows of energy and matter in the climate system. The global scale view on climate networks offers promising new perspectives for detecting dynamical structures based on nonlinear physical processes in the climate system. References Arenas, A., A. Diaz-Guilera, J. Kurths, Y. Moreno, and C. Zhou, Phys. Reports 2008, 469, 93. Donges, J., Y. Zou, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Europ. Phys. J. ST 2009, 174, 157-179. Donges, J., Y. Zou, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Europhys. Lett. 2009, 87, 48007. Nawrath, J. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2010, 104, 038701. Donner, R., Y. Zou, J. Donges, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 2010, 81, 015101(R ).

  6. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, UMR 5280 CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1 (France); Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination.

  7. Navigating the massive world of reddit: using backbone networks to map user interests in social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randal S. Olson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the massive online worlds of social media, users frequently rely on organizing themselves around specific topics of interest to find and engage with like-minded people. However, navigating these massive worlds and finding topics of specific interest often proves difficult because the worlds are mostly organized haphazardly, leaving users to find relevant interests by word of mouth or using a basic search feature. Here, we report on a method using the backbone of a network to create a map of the primary topics of interest in any social network. To demonstrate the method, we build an interest map for the social news web site reddit and show how such a map could be used to navigate a social media world. Moreover, we analyze the network properties of the reddit social network and find that it has a scale-free, small-world, and modular community structure, much like other online social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. We suggest that the integration of interest maps into popular social media platforms will assist users in organizing themselves into more specific interest groups, which will help alleviate the overcrowding effect often observed in large online communities.

  8. An Enhanced Backbone-Assisted Reliable Framework for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Ali

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An extremely reliable source to sink communication is required for most of the contemporary WSN applications especially pertaining to military, healthcare and disaster-recovery. However, due to their intrinsic energy, bandwidth and computational constraints, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs encounter several challenges in reliable source to sink communication. In this paper, we present a novel reliable topology that uses reliable hotlines between sensor gateways to boost the reliability of end-to-end transmissions. This reliable and efficient routing alternative reduces the number of average hops from source to the sink. We prove, with the help of analytical evaluation, that communication using hotlines is considerably more reliable than traditional WSN routing. We use reliability theory to analyze the cost and benefit of adding gateway nodes to a backbone-assisted WSN. However, in hotline assisted routing some scenarios where source and the sink are just a couple of hops away might bring more latency, therefore, we present a Signature Based Routing (SBR scheme. SBR enables the gateways to make intelligent routing decisions, based upon the derived signature, hence providing lesser end-to-end delay between source to the sink communication. Finally, we evaluate our proposed hotline based topology with the help of a simulation tool and show that the proposed topology provides manifold increase in end-to-end reliability.

  9. Structure and backbone dynamics of a microcrystalline metalloprotein by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Michael J; Pell, Andrew J; Bertini, Ivano; Felli, Isabella C; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Pierattelli, Roberta; Herrmann, Torsten; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-07-10

    We introduce a new approach to improve structural and dynamical determination of large metalloproteins using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with (1)H detection under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS). The approach is based on the rapid and sensitive acquisition of an extensive set of (15)N and (13)C nuclear relaxation rates. The system on which we demonstrate these methods is the enzyme Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), which coordinates a Cu ion available either in Cu(+) (diamagnetic) or Cu(2+) (paramagnetic) form. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements are obtained from the difference in rates measured in the two forms and are employed as structural constraints for the determination of the protein structure. When added to (1)H-(1)H distance restraints, they are shown to yield a twofold improvement of the precision of the structure. Site-specific order parameters and timescales of motion are obtained by a gaussian axial fluctuation (GAF) analysis of the relaxation rates of the diamagnetic molecule, and interpreted in relation to backbone structure and metal binding. Timescales for motion are found to be in the range of the overall correlation time in solution, where internal motions characterized here would not be observable.

  10. Dependence of crystallite formation and preferential backbone orientations on the side chain pattern in PBDTTPD polymers

    KAUST Repository

    El Labban, Abdulrahman

    2014-11-26

    (Figure Presented) Alkyl substituents appended to the π-conjugated main chain account for the solution-processability and film-forming properties of most π-conjugated polymers for organic electronic device applications, including field-effect transistors (FETs) and bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Beyond film-forming properties, recent work has emphasized the determining role that side-chain substituents play on polymer self-assembly and thin-film nanostructural order, and, in turn, on device performance. However, the factors that determine polymer crystallite orientation in thin-films, implying preferential backbone orientation relative to the device substrate, are a matter of some debate, and these structural changes remain difficult to anticipate. In this report, we show how systematic changes in the side-chain pattern of poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-alt-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD) polymers can (i) influence the propensity of the polymer to order in the π-stacking direction, and (ii) direct the preferential orientation of the polymer crystallites in thin films (e.g., "face-on" vs "edge-on"). Oriented crystallites, specifically crystallites that are well-ordered in the π-stacking direction, are believed to be a key contributor to improved thin-film device performance in both FETs and BHJ solar cells.

  11. Noise assisted excitation energy transfer in a linear model of a selectivity filter backbone strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassereh, Hassan; Salari, Vahid; Shahbazi, Farhad

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of noise and disorder on the efficiency of excitation energy transfer (EET) in a N = 5 sites linear chain with 'static' dipole-dipole couplings. In fact, here, the disordered chain is a toy model for one strand of the selectivity filter backbone in ion channels. It has recently been discussed that the presence of quantum coherence in the selectivity filter is possible and can play a role in mediating ion-conduction and ion-selectivity in the selectivity filter. The question is 'how a quantum coherence can be effective in such structures while the environment of the channel is dephasing (i.e. noisy)?' Basically, we expect that the presence of the noise should have a destructive effect in the quantum transport. In fact, we show that such expectation is valid for ordered chains. However, our results indicate that introducing the dephasing in the disordered chains leads to the weakening of the localization effects, arising from the multiple back-scatterings due to the randomness, and then increases the efficiency of quantum energy transfer. Thus, the presence of noise is crucial for the enhancement of EET efficiency in disordered chains. We also show that the contribution of both classical and quantum mechanical effects are required to improve the speed of energy transfer along the chain. Our analysis may help for better understanding of fast and efficient functioning of the selectivity filters in ion channels.

  12. Dependence of crystallite formation and preferential backbone orientations on the side chain pattern in PBDTTPD polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Labban, Abdulrahman; Warnan, Julien; Cabanetos, Clément; Ratel, Olivier; Tassone, Christopher; Toney, Michael F; Beaujuge, Pierre M

    2014-11-26

    Alkyl substituents appended to the π-conjugated main chain account for the solution-processability and film-forming properties of most π-conjugated polymers for organic electronic device applications, including field-effect transistors (FETs) and bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Beyond film-forming properties, recent work has emphasized the determining role that side-chain substituents play on polymer self-assembly and thin-film nanostructural order, and, in turn, on device performance. However, the factors that determine polymer crystallite orientation in thin-films, implying preferential backbone orientation relative to the device substrate, are a matter of some debate, and these structural changes remain difficult to anticipate. In this report, we show how systematic changes in the side-chain pattern of poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-alt-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD) polymers can (i) influence the propensity of the polymer to order in the π-stacking direction, and (ii) direct the preferential orientation of the polymer crystallites in thin films (e.g., "face-on" vs "edge-on"). Oriented crystallites, specifically crystallites that are well-ordered in the π-stacking direction, are believed to be a key contributor to improved thin-film device performance in both FETs and BHJ solar cells.

  13. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; Lehoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6.

  14. Amino acid preference against beta sheet through allowing backbone hydration enabled by the presence of cation

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2016-01-01

    It is known that steric blocking by peptide sidechains of hydrogen bonding, HB, between water and peptide groups, PGs, in beta sheets accords with an amino acid intrinsic beta sheet preference. The present observations with Quantum Molecular Dynamics, QMD, simulation with quantum mechanical treatment of every water molecule solvating a beta sheet that would be transient in nature suggest that this steric blocking is not applicable in a hydrophobic region unless a cation is present, so that the amino acid beta sheet preference due to this steric blocking is only effective in the presence of a cation. We observed backbone hydration in a polyalanine and to a lesser extent polyvaline alpha helix without a cation being present, but a cation could increase the strength of these HBs. Parallel beta sheets have a greater tendency than antiparallel beta sheets of equivalent small size to retain regular structure in solvated QMD, and a 4 strand 4 inter-PG HB chain parallel beta sheet was used. Stability was reinforced b...

  15. Comparison of the backbone dynamics of a natural and a consensus designed 3-TPR domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarymowycz, Virginia A; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Regan, Lynne; Stone, Martin J

    2008-07-01

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) is a 34-amino acid helix-turn-helix motif that occurs in tandem arrays in numerous proteins. Here we compare the backbone dynamics of a natural 3-repeat TPR domain, from the protein UBP, with the behavior of a designed protein CTPR3, which consists of three identical consensus TPR units. Although the three tandem TPR repeats in both CTPR3 and UBP behave as a single unit, with no evidence of independent repeat motions, the data indicate that certain positions in UBP are significantly more flexible than are the corresponding positions in CTPR3. Most of the dynamical changes occur at or adjacent to positions that are involved in intra-repeat packing interactions. These observations lead us to suggest that the three-TPR domain of UBP does not incorporate optimized packing, compared to that seen in the idealized CTPR. The natural TPR domain is not only less stable overall than CTPR3, but also presents increased local flexibility at the positions where the sequences differs from the conserved consensus.

  16. Noise assisted excitation energy transfer in a linear model of a selectivity filter backbone strand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassereh, Hassan; Salari, Vahid; Shahbazi, Farhad

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of noise and disorder on the efficiency of excitation energy transfer (EET) in a N=5 sites linear chain with ‘static’ dipole-dipole couplings. In fact, here, the disordered chain is a toy model for one strand of the selectivity filter backbone in ion channels. It has recently been discussed that the presence of quantum coherence in the selectivity filter is possible and can play a role in mediating ion-conduction and ion-selectivity in the selectivity filter. The question is ‘how a quantum coherence can be effective in such structures while the environment of the channel is dephasing (i.e. noisy)?’ Basically, we expect that the presence of the noise should have a destructive effect in the quantum transport. In fact, we show that such expectation is valid for ordered chains. However, our results indicate that introducing the dephasing in the disordered chains leads to the weakening of the localization effects, arising from the multiple back-scatterings due to the randomness, and then increases the efficiency of quantum energy transfer. Thus, the presence of noise is crucial for the enhancement of EET efficiency in disordered chains. We also show that the contribution of both classical and quantum mechanical effects are required to improve the speed of energy transfer along the chain. Our analysis may help for better understanding of fast and efficient functioning of the selectivity filters in ion channels.

  17. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinitsyn, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  18. Beam shifts and distribution functions

    CERN Document Server

    Aiello, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    When a beam of light is reflected by a smooth surface its behavior deviates from geometrical optics predictions. Such deviations are quantified by the so-called spatial and angular Goos-Haenchen (GH) and Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shifts of the reflected beam. These shifts depend upon the shape of the incident beam, its polarization and on the material composition of the reflecting surface. In this article we suggest a novel approach that allows one to unambiguously isolate the beam-shape dependent aspects of GH and IF shifts. We show that this separation is possible as a result of some universal features of shifted distribution functions which are presented and discussed.

  19. Dolutegravir treatment response by baseline viral load and NRTI backbone in treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Small

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In two 48-week studies in naïve subjects, dolutegravir with NRTI of choice has shown non-inferiority to raltegravir and, with ABC/3TC, superiority to Atripla. Factors that influenced choice of NRTIs included viral load, resistance and safety. Methods: We analysed response rates and time to virologic failure by NRTI backbone and baseline viral load in the pivotal DTG-naïve studies. SPRING-2 randomized participants to DTG 50 mg QD or RAL 400 mg BID, each in combination with investigator-selected NRTIs (TDF/FTC or ABC/3TC. SINGLE randomised participants to DTG 50 mg+ABC/3TC QD or TDF/FTC/EFV (Atripla QD. In SPRING-2, changes in serum creatinine were examined by INI and NRTI backbone. Results: The two studies randomized and treated 1655 subjects, of whom 249 (15% were female, 388 (23% non-white, 495 (30% had HIV-1 RNA >100,000 c/ml, and 224 (14% had CD4+ count <200 cells/mm3. Primary analyses demonstrated non-inferiority of DTG to RAL in SPRING-2 (Δ=2.5%; 95% CI:−2.2% to +7.1%, excluding −10%, and superiority of the DTG regimen in SINGLE (7.4%; +2.5% to +12.3%. In SPRING-2, response rates by NRTI backbone were comparable in each viral load stratum. In SINGLE, a 7% difference in response (favoring DTG+ABC/3TC was observed in each viral load stratum. Exploratory analyses examining time-to-virologic failure showed no difference in response rates between the NRTIs irrespective of baseline viral load or study. Resistance to INIs or NRTIs was not demonstrated in any subject on DTG-based therapy through 48 weeks. Withdrawals due to AEs on DTG-based regimen were few (2% in both studies. In SPRING-2, no significant differences were observed in serum creatinine change from baseline to Week 48 by NRTI backbones. Conclusions: In SPRING-2 and SINGLE, DTG was effective with both ABC/3TC and TDF/FTC, and in subjects with high and low viral load. DTG was well tolerated in both studies. Renal safety also was similar by NRTI backbone. DTG is a once

  20. Work shifts in Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Recupero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency Medicine is known as a high stress specialty. The adverse effect of constantly rotating shifts is the single most important reason given for premature attrition from the field. In this work problems tied with night shift work will be taken into account and some solutions to reduce the impact of night work on the emergency physicians will be proposed.

  1. Regime shifts in resource management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zeeuw, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Resource management has to take account of the possibility of tipping points and regime shifts in ecological systems that provide the resources. This article focuses on the typical model of regime shifts in the ecological literature and analyzes optimal management and common-property issues when tra

  2. From building blocks of proteins to drugs: A quantum chemical study on structure-property relationships of phenylalanine, tyrosine and dopa

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory and ab initio methods have been employed to address the impacts of hydroxyl (OH) group substitutions on the physico-chemical properties of levodopa (or L-dopa) against the natural amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine. L-dopa, which is an important therapeutic drug for Parkinson's disease, shares structural homology with the amino acids, whose structures differ only by OH substitutions in their phenyl side chains. It is revealed that the backbone geometries of the aromatic molecules do not show apparent OH-dependent differences; however, their other molecular-level properties, such as molecular dipole moment, electronic properties and aromaticity, change significantly. The core binding energy spectra indicate that the atom sites that undergo modifications exhibit large energy shifts, so as to accommodate the changes in the intra-molecular chemical environment of the molecules. The binding energies of the modified C 1s sites in the molecules shift as much as 1.8 eV, whereas the elec...

  3. Metabolic impact of shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimberg, Ioná Zalcman; Fernandes Junior, Silvio A; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, shift work represents a considerable contingent workforce. Recently, studies have shown that overweight and obesity are more prevalent in shift workers than day workers. In addition, shift work has been associated with a higher propensity for the development of many metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance, diabetes, dislipidemias and metabolic syndrome. Recent data have pointed that decrease of the sleep time, desynchronization of circadian rhythm and alteration of environmental aspects are the main factors related to such problems. Shortened or disturbed sleep is among the most common health-related effects of shift work. The plausible physiological and biological mechanisms are related to the activation of the autonomic nervous system, inflammation, changes in lipid and glucose metabolism, and related changes in the risk for atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes. The present review will discuss the impact of shift work on obesity and metabolic disorders and how disruption of sleep and circadian misalignment may contribute to these metabolic dysfunctions.

  4. 动载下饱和重塑黄土的骨干曲线变化研究%Study of variation of backbone curve of saturated remolded loess under dynamic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖红建; 肖正华; 刘健

    2011-01-01

    针对饱和重塑黄土进行了一系列等向固结和偏压同结下的排水与不排水动三轴试验,分析了饱和重塑黄土的动力性质、骨干曲线模型及其影响因素.基于动三轴试验结果,探讨了在考虑累积塑性应变影响下,修正 Hardin-Drnevich模型的适用性.结果表明,考虑累积塑性应变时,修正Hardin-Drnevich模型能够较好地模拟饱和重塑黄土的骨干曲线试验结果.进而分析了等向固结和偏压固结、固结围压、波形和排水条件等因素对饱和重塑黄土骨干曲线的影响,得到偏压固结和同结围压的增大使骨干曲线上移,土体强度增加,而波形对骨干曲线的影响较小;排水条件下的骨干曲线较不排水条件下的有所上移,土体强度增加.所得结论可供工程设计人员参考.%A series of triaxial tests of saturated remolded loess under dynamic loading in isotropic and anisotropic consolidation stress states on condition of drain and undrain are performed to analyse its dynamic characteristics and backbone curves.Based on the dynamic triaxial test results, the effect of accumulated plastic strain is considered; and then the applicability of modified model of Hardin-Drnevich to saturated remolded loess is discussed.The results show that the modified model of Hardin-Drnevich could simulate the backbone curve of saturated remolded loess well.After that, the influences of isotropic and anisotropic consolidation stress states, confining pressure of consolidation, wave form and drain or undrain on the backbone curve for saturated remolded loess are also discussed.The backbone curves are all upper shift under anisotropic consolidation with the increasing confining pressure of consolidation; and it is shown that the strength of samples is increased; the impact of wave form on backbone curve is little; the effect of drain condition on it is upper shift comparing with undrained condition and this indicates that the strength of samples

  5. A new mixed-backbone oligonucleotide against glucosylceramide synthase sensitizes multidrug-resistant tumors to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri A Patwardhan

    Full Text Available Enhanced ceramide glycosylation catalyzed by glucosylceramide synthase (GCS limits therapeutic efficiencies of antineoplastic agents including doxorubicin in drug-resistant cancer cells. Aimed to determine the role of GCS in tumor response to chemotherapy, a new mixed-backbone oligonucleotide (MBO-asGCS with higher stability and efficiency has been generated to silence human GCS gene. MBO-asGCS was taken up efficiently in both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cells, but it selectively suppressed GCS overexpression, and sensitized drug-resistant cells. MBO-asGCS increased doxorubicin sensitivity by 83-fold in human NCI/ADR-RES, and 43-fold in murine EMT6/AR1 breast cancer cells, respectively. In tumor-bearing mice, MBO-asGCS treatment dramatically inhibited the growth of multidrug-resistant NCI/ADR-RE tumors, decreasing tumor volume to 37%, as compared with scrambled control. Furthermore, MBO-asGCS sensitized multidrug-resistant tumors to chemotherapy, increasing doxorubicin efficiency greater than 2-fold. The sensitization effects of MBO-asGCS relied on the decreases of gene expression and enzyme activity of GCS, and on the increases of C(18-ceramide and of caspase-executed apoptosis. MBO-asGCS was accumulation in tumor xenografts was greater in other tissues, excepting liver and kidneys; but MBO-asGCS did not exert significant toxic effects on liver and kidneys. This study, for the first time in vivo, has demonstrated that GCS is a promising therapeutic target for cancer drug resistance, and MBO-asGCS has the potential to be developed as an antineoplastic agent.

  6. Soluble and Membrane-Bound β-Glucosidases Are Involved in Trimming the Xyloglucan Backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Javier; Valdivia, Elene R; Fraga, Patricia; Iglesias, Natalia; Revilla, Gloria; Zarra, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    In many flowering plants, xyloglucan is a major component of primary cell walls, where it plays an important role in growth regulation. Xyloglucan can be degraded by a suite of exoglycosidases that remove specific sugars. In this work, we show that the xyloglucan backbone, formed by (1→4)-linked β-d-glucopyranosyl residues, can be attacked by two different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) β-glucosidases from glycoside hydrolase family 3. While BGLC1 (At5g20950; for β-glucosidase active against xyloglucan 1) is responsible for all or most of the soluble activity, BGLC3 (At5g04885) is usually a membrane-anchored protein. Mutations in these two genes, whether on their own or combined with mutations in other exoglycosidase genes, resulted in the accumulation of partially digested xyloglucan subunits, such as GXXG, GXLG, or GXFG. While a mutation in BGLC1 had significant effects on its own, lack of BGLC3 had only minor effects. On the other hand, double bglc1 bglc3 mutants revealed a synergistic interaction that supports a role for membrane-bound BGLC3 in xyloglucan metabolism. In addition, bglc1 bglc3 was complemented by overexpression of either BGLC1 or BGLC3 In overexpression lines, BGLC3 activity was concentrated in a microsome-enriched fraction but also was present in soluble form. Finally, both genes were generally expressed in the same cell types, although, in some cases, BGLC3 was expressed at earlier stages than BGLC1 We propose that functional specialization could explain the separate localization of both enzymes, as a membrane-bound β-glucosidase could specifically digest soluble xyloglucan without affecting the wall-bound polymer.

  7. Backbone structures in human milk oligosaccharides: trans-glycosylation by metagenomic β-N-acetylhexosaminidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Zeuner, Birgitte; Łężyk, Mateusz; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Logtenberg, Madelon J; Schols, Henk A; Meyer, Anne S; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the discovery and characterization of two novel β-N-acetylhexosaminidases HEX1 and HEX2, capable of catalyzing the synthesis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) backbone structures with fair yields using chitin oligomers as β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) donor. The enzyme-encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenomic library. The β-N-acetylhexosaminidases were expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His6-tag and were purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The sequence similarities of the enzymes with their respective closest homologues are 59 % for HEX1 and 51 % for HEX2 on the protein level. Both β-N-acetylhexosaminidases are classified into glycosyl hydrolase family 20 (GH 20) are able to hydrolyze para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylglucosamine (pNP-GlcNAc) as well as para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylgalactosamine (pNP-GalNAc) and exhibit pH optima of 8 and 6 for HEX1 and HEX2, respectively. The enzymes are able to hydrolyze N-acetylchitooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of two, three, and four. The major findings were, that HEX1 and HEX2 catalyze trans-glycosylation reactions with lactose as acceptor, giving rise to the human milk oligosaccharide precursor lacto-N-triose II (LNT2) with yields of 2 and 8 % based on the donor substrate. In total, trans-glycosylation reactions were tested with the disaccharide acceptors β-lactose, sucrose, and maltose, as well as with the monosaccharides galactose and glucose resulting in the successful attachment of GlcNAc to the acceptor in all cases.

  8. 磁共振梯度双回波化学位移成像定量诊断脂肪肝的临床应用%Clinical application of MR dual-echo chemical shift gradient-echo imaging in quantitative diagnosis of fatty liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐东风; 施蒋巍; 沈莉; 戴鸿志; 赵雪文; 刘利; 沈一易; 刘柯柯; 李曼

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨磁共振梯度双回波化学位移成像定量诊断脂肪肝的临床应用.方法 20例弥漫性脂肪肝病例,同期行CT及磁共振梯度双回波化学位移成像,分别对肝VI段及IV段(Couinaud法)选取同一部位感兴趣区进行测量.正反相位信号强度差/正相位信号强度(SIP-SOP)/SIP及正反相位信号强度差SIP-SOP与肝/脾CT值比值(L/S)进行Spearman相关性分析及建立直线回归方程.根据L/S评价脂肪肝程度的标准,计算(SIP-SOP)/SIP、SIP-SOP评价脂肪肝程度的标准.结果 (SIP-SOP)/SIP、SIP-SOP与L/S的相关系数分别是r=-0.908及r=-0.844(P(SIP-SOP)/SIP≥0.159、中度0.444>(SIP-SOP)/SIP≥0.329,重度为(SIP-SOP)/SIP≥0.444.SIP-SOP诊断脂肪肝的标准为轻度:193.0>SIP-SOP≥3.2,中度:319.6>SIP-SOP≥193.0,重度:SIP-SOP≥319.6.结论 磁共振梯度双回波化学位移技术与CT定量诊断脂肪肝具有较好的相关性,可成为临床定量诊断脂肪肝的一种简单、有效方法.%Objective To evaluate the clinical application of MR dual-echo chemical shift gradient-echo imaging in quantitative diagnosis of fatty liver. Methods 20 patients with diffused fatty liver underwent CT and MR dual-echo chemical shift gradient-echo imaging simutaneously. The liver segments (Couinaud) VI and IV were selected separately at region of interest (ROI) in the same site to study the relationship between(Sip -Sop )/Sip ,Sip - Sop and L/S (Sip :signal intensity of in-phase, Sop :signal intensity of out-phase, L/S: CT attenuation ratio of liver to spleen) using Spearman correlation coefficient and linear regression equation. The diagnostic criteria of fatty liver using(Sip-Sop)/Sip and Sip - Sop were calculated refer to the criteria of L/S. Results (Sip - Sop)/Sip and Sip - Sop had significant relationship with L/S(r= -0. 908 and r= -0. 844 ,P(S,P - Sop )/S,P>0. 159,moderate level :0. 444>(S,P - Sop ) /S,P>0. 329 and severe level; (S,P-Sop )/SipS?0. 444 ,and the diagnostic

  9. Role of monomer sequence and backbone structure in polypeptoid and polypeptide polymers for anti-fouling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Anastasia; Rizis, Georgios; Wenning, Brandon; Finlay, John; Ober, Christopher; Segalman, Rachel

    Polymeric coatings rely on a fine balance of surface properties to achieve biofouling resistance. Bioinsipired polymers and oligomers provide a modular strategy for the inclusion of multiple functionalities with controlled architecture, sequence and surface properties. In this work, polypeptoid and polypeptide functionalized coatings based on PEO and PDMS block copolymers were compared with respect to surface presentation and fouling by Ulva linza. While polypeptoids and polypeptides are simple isomers of each other, the lack of backbone chirality and hydrogen bonding in polypeptoids leads to surprisingly different surface behavior. Specifically, the polypeptoids surface segregate much more strongly than analogous polypeptide functionalized polymers, which in turn affects the performance of the coating. Indeed, polypeptoid functionalized surfaces were significantly better both in terms of anti-fouling and fouling release than the corresponding polypeptide-bearing polymers. The role of specific monomer sequence and backbone chemistry will be further discussed in this poster.

  10. Progress in palladium-based catalytic systems for the sustainable synthesis of annulated heterocycles: a focus on indole backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, Mélanie; Amardeil, Régine; Djakovitch, Laurent; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2012-05-21

    A survey highlighting the most recent palladium catalytic systems produced and their performances for progress in direct synthesis of indole backbones by heterocarbocyclization of reactive substrates is provided. The discussion is developed in relation with the principles of sustainable chemistry concerning atom and mass economy. In this respect, the general convergent character of the syntheses is of particular interest (one-pot, domino, cascade or tandem reactions), and the substrates accessibility and reactivity, together with the final waste production, are also important. This critical review clearly indicates that the development of ligand chemistry, mainly phosphines and carbenes, in the last few decades gave a significant impetus to powerful functionalization of indoles at virtually all positions of this ubiquitous backbone (118 references).

  11. Direct measurement of the correlated dynamics of the protein-backbone and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxin; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of the correlation times of the protein backbone carbons and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The experimental data indicate a decrease in the correlation times of the carbonyl carbons as the strain on the biopolymer is increased. These observations are in good agreement with short 4ns molecular dynamics simulations of (VPGVG)3, a well studied mimetic peptide of elastin. The experimental results also indicate a reduction in the correlation time of proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain applied to the elastomer. A simple model is suggested that correlates the increase in the motion of proximal waters of hydration to the increase in frequency of libration of the protein backbone that develops with increasing strain. Together, the reduction in the protein entropy accompanied with the increase in entropy of the proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain, support the notion that the source ...

  12. Generation of marker- and/or backbone-free transgenic wheat plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Genping

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to animals and vertical transfer of herbicide resistance genes to the weedy relatives are perceived as major biosafety concerns in genetically modified (GM crops. In this study, five novel vectors which used gusA and bar as a reporter gene and a selection marker gene, respectively, were constructed based on the pCLEAN dual binary vector system. Among these vectors, 1G7B and 5G7B carried two T-DNAs located on two respective plasmids with 5G7B possessing an additional virGwt gene. 5LBTG154 and 5TGTB154 carried two T-DNAs in the target plasmid with either one or double right borders, and 5BTG154 carried the selectable marker gene on the backbone outside of the T-DNA left border in the target plasmid. In addition, 5BTG154, 5LBTG154 and 5TGTB154 used pAL154 as a helper plasmid which contains Komari fragment to facilitate transformation. These five dual binary vector combinations were transformed into Agrobacterium strain AGL1 and used to transform durum wheat cv Stewart 63. Evaluation of the co-transformation efficiencies, the frequencies of marker-free transgenic plants and integration of backbone sequences in the obtained transgenic lines indicated that two vectors (5G7B and 5TGTB154 were more efficient in generating marker-free transgenic wheat plants with no or minimal integration of backbone sequences in the wheat genome. The vector series developed in this study for generation of marker- and/or backbone-free transgenic wheat plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation will be useful to facilitate the creation of ‘clean’ GM wheat containing only the foreign genes of agronomic importance.

  13. Generation of Marker- and/or Backbone-Free Transgenic Wheat Plants via Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gen-Ping; Yu, Xiu-Dao; Sun, Yong-Wei; Jones, Huw D.; Xia, Lan-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to animals and vertical transfer of herbicide resistance genes to the weedy relatives are perceived as major biosafety concerns in genetically modified (GM) crops. In this study, five novel vectors which used gusA and bar as a reporter gene and a selection marker gene, respectively, were constructed based on the pCLEAN dual binary vector system. Among these vectors, 1G7B and 5G7B carried two T-DNAs located on two respective plasmids with 5G7B possessing an additional virGwt gene. 5LBTG154 and 5TGTB154 carried two T-DNAs in the target plasmid with either one or double right borders, and 5BTG154 carried the selectable marker gene on the backbone outside of the T-DNA left border in the target plasmid. In addition, 5BTG154, 5LBTG154, and 5TGTB154 used pAL154 as a helper plasmid which contains Komari fragment to facilitate transformation. These five dual binary vector combinations were transformed into Agrobacterium strain AGL1 and used to transform durum wheat cv Stewart 63. Evaluation of the co-transformation efficiencies, the frequencies of marker-free transgenic plants, and integration of backbone sequences in the obtained transgenic lines indicated that two vectors (5G7B and 5TGTB154) were more efficient in generating marker-free transgenic wheat plants with no or minimal integration of backbone sequences in the wheat genome. The vector series developed in this study for generation of marker- and/or backbone-free transgenic wheat plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation will be useful to facilitate the creation of “clean” GM wheat containing only the foreign genes of agronomic importance. PMID:27708648

  14. The Role of Backbone Hydrogen Bonds in the Transition State for Protein Folding of a PDZ Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren W. Pedersen

    Full Text Available Backbone hydrogen bonds are important for the structure and stability of proteins. However, since conventional site-directed mutagenesis cannot be applied to perturb the backbone, the contribution of these hydrogen bonds in protein folding and stability has been assessed only for a very limited set of small proteins. We have here investigated effects of five amide-to-ester mutations in the backbone of a PDZ domain, a 90-residue globular protein domain, to probe the influence of hydrogen bonds in a β-sheet for folding and stability. The amide-to-ester mutation removes NH-mediated hydrogen bonds and destabilizes hydrogen bonds formed by the carbonyl oxygen. The overall stability of the PDZ domain generally decreased for all amide-to-ester mutants due to an increase in the unfolding rate constant. For this particular region of the PDZ domain, it is therefore clear that native hydrogen bonds are formed after crossing of the rate-limiting barrier for folding. Moreover, three of the five amide-to-ester mutants displayed an increase in the folding rate constant suggesting that the hydrogen bonds are involved in non-native interactions in the transition state for folding.

  15. The determinants of bond angle variability in protein/peptide backbones: A comprehensive statistical/quantum mechanics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana

    2015-11-01

    The elucidation of the mutual influence between peptide bond geometry and local conformation has important implications for protein structure refinement, validation, and prediction. To gain insights into the structural determinants and the energetic contributions associated with protein/peptide backbone plasticity, we here report an extensive analysis of the variability of the peptide bond angles by combining statistical analyses of protein structures and quantum mechanics calculations on small model peptide systems. Our analyses demonstrate that all the backbone bond angles strongly depend on the peptide conformation and unveil the existence of regular trends as function of ψ and/or φ. The excellent agreement of the quantum mechanics calculations with the statistical surveys of protein structures validates the computational scheme here employed and demonstrates that the valence geometry of protein/peptide backbone is primarily dictated by local interactions. Notably, for the first time we show that the position of the H(α) hydrogen atom, which is an important parameter in NMR structural studies, is also dependent on the local conformation. Most of the trends observed may be satisfactorily explained by invoking steric repulsive interactions; in some specific cases the valence bond variability is also influenced by hydrogen-bond like interactions. Moreover, we can provide a reliable estimate of the energies involved in the interplay between geometry and conformations.

  16. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Ollikainen

    Full Text Available Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein-ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art "fixed backbone" design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new "coupled moves" design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein-ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution.

  17. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking.

  18. Computational Protocols for Prediction of Solute NMR Relative Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Janus Juul; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Aidas, Kestutis;

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have applied two different spanning protocols for obtaining the molecular conformations of L-tryptophan in aqueous solution, namely a molecular dynamics simulation and a molecular mechanics conformational search with subsequent geometry re-optimization of the stable conformers...... using a quantum mechanically based method. These spanning protocols represent standard ways of obtaining a set of conformations on which NMR calculations may be performed. The results stemming from the solute–solvent configurations extracted from the MD simulation at 300 K are found to be inferior...

  19. 15N NMR chemical shifts in papaverine decomposition products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyrski, Andrzej; Girreser, Ulrich; Hermann, Tadeusz

    2013-03-01

    Papaverine can be easily oxidized to papaverinol, papaveraldine and 2,3,9,10-tetramethoxy-12-oxo-12H-indolo[2,1-a]isoquinolinium chloride. On addition of alkali solution the latter compound forms 2-(2-carboxy-4,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dimethoxyisoquinolinium inner salt. Together with these structures the interesting 13-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3,8,9-tetramethoxy-6a-12a-diazadibenzo[a,g]fluorenylium chloride is discussed, which is formed in the Gadamer-Schulemann reaction of papaverine as a side product. This letter reports the 15N NMR spectra of the above mentioned compounds.

  20. VP Anaphors and Object Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsnes, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the placement of the VP anaphor det ‘it’ as a complement of verbs selecting VP complements in Danish. With verbs that only allow a VP complement, the VP anaphor must be in SpecCP regardless of its information structure properties. If SpecCP is occupied by an operator, the an...... be in situ. The article argues that a shifted pronominal in Danish must be categorially licensed by the verb and extends this analysis to shifting locatives. An Optimality Theory analysis is proposed that accounts for the observed facts......., the anaphor can be in situ, but it cannot shift. With verbs that allow its VP complement to alternate with an NP complement, the VP anaphor can be in SpecCP, shifted or in situ according to the information structural properties of the anaphor. Only if SpecCP is occupied by an operator, must a topical anaphor...