WorldWideScience

Sample records for back pain

  1. Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  2. Low back pain - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that ...

  3. Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can increase your flexibility, strengthen your back and abdominal muscles, and improve your posture. Regular use of these ... best for you. Build muscle strength and flexibility. Abdominal and back muscle exercises (core-strengthening exercises) help condition these muscles ...

  4. Prevent Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and prevent back pain: Do back-strengthening and stretching exercises at least 2 or 3 times a ... risk of back pain. Do back-strengthening and stretching exercises [PDF - 244 KB] at least 2 or ...

  5. Medications for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back pain often goes away on its own over several weeks. In some people, back pain persists. It may not go away completely or ... at times. Medicines can also help with your back pain. OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS Over-the-counter ...

  6. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hurting your back when you exercise. How can pregnancy hormones contribute to back pain? To prepare for the ... of the baby through the birth canal, a hormone relaxes the ligaments in the ... back pain during pregnancy? To help prevent back pain, be aware of ...

  7. Back Pain in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadi Kayiran ; Sinan Mahir Kayiran;

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to popular knowledge, back pain is quite frequently seen in children. While very rare in the pre-school age group, frequency reaches 30% in the adolescent period. In many cases, the causes of back pain in childhood cannot be exactly determined and the pain disappears by itself in a short time. It should be remembered that back pain that persists for more than two weeks may be associated with organic causes. Whether or not there have been disruptions in neurological functions should be definitely probed in the medical history. Keeping in mind that back pain could be a part of a systemic disease, a systemic examination should be carried out in cases where there has been long-term back pain. The complaint of childhood back pain should be assessed with a thorough history, a careful physical examination and advanced testing tools. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(1.000: 115-118

  8. Low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitto, Anthony; George, Steven Z; Van Dillen, Linda R; Whitman, Julie M; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Shekelle, Paul; Denninger, Thomas R; Godges, Joseph J

    2012-04-01

    The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has an ongoing effort to create evidence-based practice guidelines for orthopaedic physical therapy management of patients with musculoskeletal impairments described in the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The purpose of these low back pain clinical practice guidelines, in particular, is to describe the peer-reviewed literature and make recommendations related to (1) treatment matched to low back pain subgroup responder categories, (2) treatments that have evidence to prevent recurrence of low back pain, and (3) treatments that have evidence to influence the progression from acute to chronic low back pain and disability.

  9. Myofascial low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsook, Ryan R; Malanga, Gerard A

    2012-10-01

    Low back pain is a common condition that is encountered by both primary care physicians as well as various specialists, which include: orthopedic surgeons, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists, neurologists, rheumatologists, and pain management specialists. Associated muscular pain is very common and often a reactive response from nociception from other structures. Myofascial pain may arise, which is characterized by the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) that are located in fascia, tendons, and/or muscle. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the pathophysiology, assessment, and recommended treatment options for myofascial low back pain.

  10. Back pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed.

  11. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  12. Back pain and parenthood.

    OpenAIRE

    Finkelstein, M M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that reports of back pain in a working population are associated with parenthood. METHODS--A questionnaire survey of back pain in municipal fire fighters and police officers in a municipality in Ontario, Canada. The questionnaire was distributed to current employees of fire and police departments. The survey was completed by 129 fire fighters (68% of the active force) and 346 police officers (74% of the force). RESULTS--36% of the respondents complained of a ...

  13. Epidural injections for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... be pregnant What medicines you are taking, including herbs, supplements, and other drugs you bought without a ...

  14. Back Pain and Modic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manniche, Claus; jordan, alan; mikkelsen, connie

    . Many of these patients will become free of pain and disability! This book provides readers with a thorough review of the latest information regarding Modic changes that the Danish research group was primarily responsible for after 10 years of intensive research. The book explains what the research...... results can mean for back pain patients and information is provided as to how Modic changes take place and develop as well developments that took place such that we are now able to provide effective treatment for more than 50% of patients that have been diagnosed with Modic changes type 1. Readers...

  15. Radiographic Assessment for Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiographic Assessment for Back Pain What are Radiographic Assessments? When Should I get an X-ray for Low Back Pain? Other Reasons for Having an X-ray What ... What are Radiographic Assessments? Radiographic assessments for low back pain involve the use of X-rays to determine ...

  16. Back pain during growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Carol C

    2013-01-08

    It is wrong to believe that back pain only burdens adults: the yearly incidence during growth ranges from 10-20%, continuously increasing from childhood to adolescence. Rapid growth-related muscular dysbalance and insufficiency, poor physical condition in an increasingly sedentary adolescent community or - vice versa - high level sports activities, account for the most prevalent functional pain syndromes. In contrast to adults the correlation of radiographic findings with pain is high: the younger the patient, the higher the probability to establish a rare morphologic cause such as benign or malignant tumours, congenital malformations and infections. In children younger than 5 years old, the likelihood is more than 50%. The following red flags should lower the threshold for a quick in-depth analysis of the problem: Age of the patient 4 weeks, history of tumour, exposition to tuberculosis, night pain and fever. High level sport equals a biomechanical field test which reveals the biologic individual response of the growing spine to the sports-related forces. Symptomatic or asymptomatic inhibitory or stimulatory growth disturbances like Scheuermann disease, scoliosis or fatigue fractures represent the most frequent pathomorphologies. They usually occur at the disk-growth plate compound: intraspongious disk herniation, diminuition of anterior growth with vertebral wedging and apophyseal ring fractures often occur when the biomechanical impacts exceed the mechanical resistance of the cartilaginous endplates. Spondylolysis is a benign condition which rarely becomes symptomatic and responds well to conservative measures. Associated slippage of L5 on S1 is frequent but rarely progresses. The pubertal spinal growth spurt is the main risk factor for further slippage, whereas sports activity - even at a high level - is not. Therefore, the athlete should only be precluded from training if pain persists or in case of high grade slips. Perturbance of the sagittal profile with

  17. Trajectories of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axén, Iben; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain is not a self-limiting problem, but rather a recurrent and sometimes persistent disorder. To understand the course over time, detailed investigation, preferably using repeated measurements over extended periods of time, is needed. New knowledge concerning short-term trajectories...... indicates that the low back pain 'episode' is short lived, at least in the primary care setting, with most patients improving. Nevertheless, in the long term, low back pain often runs a persistent course with around two-thirds of patients estimated to be in pain after 12 months. Some individuals never have...... low back pain, but most have it on and off or persistently. Thus, the low back pain 'condition' is usually a lifelong experience. However, subgroups of patients with different back pain trajectories have been identified and linked to clinical parameters. Further investigation is warranted...

  18. Myofascial low back pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Deepak; Rajkumar, Joshua Samuel; Mohandoss, Mathankumar; Ranganathan, Rameshkumar

    2014-09-01

    Myofascial pain is a common musculoskeletal problem, with the low back being one of the commonest affected regions. Several treatments have been used for myofascial low back pain through physical therapies, pharmacologic agents, injections, and other such therapies. This review will provide an update based on recently published literature in the field of myofascial low back pain along with a brief description of a sequenced, multidisciplinary treatment protocol called Skilled Hands-on Approach for the Release of myofascia, Articular, Neural and Soft tissue mobilization (SHARANS) protocol. A comprehensive multidisciplinary approach is recommended for the successful management of individuals with myofascial low back pain.

  19. Imaging in mechanical back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Brandt; Hansen, Philip; Carrino, John A;

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is common and relates to a variety of overlapping pathologies. Within the last few decades, almost every medical imaging modality has been applied in the evaluation of low back pain. Imaging of the spine has a high priority in the assessment of patients with low back pain, who seem...... and symptoms hampers the ability of clinicians to devise a specific treatment plan for the patient. Therefore, there is mounting interest in new imaging techniques of the lumbar spine that may increase the clinical correlation in low back pain. In this review, we will discuss the value and limitations...... to expect such procedures to be undertaken. However, the majority of conventional imaging techniques do not have adequate precision to identify the primary source of pain. Not only can this be frustrating to both clinicians and patients, but importantly, inadequate correlation between imaging findings...

  20. Prevention of occupational Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan T Al-Otaibi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews scientific research on occupational back pain and focuses on prevention of this problem. It discusses some of the challenges of translating the evidence of this multi-factorial condition into policy. Medical science is currently unable to clearly distinguish between back pain caused by work and that possibly due to other causes but which affects the individual′s capacity to work. Back pain affects the vast majority of people at some point in their lives and is very costly to both the health care system and the industry. Evidence suggests that heavy lifting, driving, and vibration of the whole body are linked to occupational back pain. Once the risk factors for occupational back pain are identified, an otherwise chronic and disabling condition can be prevented in the majority of patients. As explained in this article, three levels of prevention for occupational back pain have been reported as effective. Failure to implement preventive measures may lead to a high incidence of occupational back pain.

  1. Back pain - when you see the doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007494.htm Back pain - when you see the doctor To use the ... you first see your health care provider for back pain, you will be asked about your back pain, ...

  2. Chiropractic care for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000416.htm Chiropractic care for back pain To use the sharing ... discussed in your first session. What Conditions Does Chiropractic Treat Best? Chiropractic treatment is most effective for: ...

  3. Low back pain and yoga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is chronic low back pain, one of the most common reasons to visit one's primary care doctor. Complementary approaches, including yoga, will be addressed.

  4. Low Back Pain Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... day in a chair with inadequate back support. Mental health factors : Pre-existing mental health issues such as anxiety and depression can influence ... is particularly important for persons with skeletal irregularities. Health care ... benefits of yoga to ease chronic low back pain. Physical therapy ...

  5. Low back pain - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as scoliosis or kyphosis Medical problems, such as fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis Piriformis syndrome, a pain disorder ... used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed ...

  6. Back pain and sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... core strengthening. Ask your health care provider or physical therapist about these strengthening exercises. If you had a ... the stress off your back include: Ask your physical therapist about the best posture and technique for your ...

  7. Low Back Pain in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere, G D

    1987-01-01

    In brief: Low back pain in seasoned athletes is not common, but when present it can limit participation. While direct blows or hyperlor-dotic positions can cause low back pain in certain sports, the most common cause is overuse and resultant strains or sprains of the paravertebral muscles and ligaments. Such injuries cause acute pain and spasm, which sometimes do not appear for 24 hours or longer. Diagnosis is based on history, ruling out of systemic maladies, physical examination, and, if necessary, supplemental tests such as x-rays, myelograms, and bone scans. Treatment of low back pain due to overuse is, sequentially, bed rest and ice for 24 to 36 hours, heat and massage, analgesics as needed, and a lumbosacral support until flexion and strengthening exercises have returned the damaged part to normal.

  8. Facilitated pro-nociceptive pain mechanisms in radiating back pain compared with localized back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Facilitated pain mechanisms and impaired pain inhibition are often found in chronic pain patients. This study compared clinical pain profiles, pain sensitivity, as well as pro-nociceptive and anti-nociceptive mechanisms in patients with localized low back pain (n=18), localized neck pain (n=17......), low back and radiating leg pain (n=18), or neck and radiating arm pain (n=17). It was hypothesized that patients with radiating pain had facilitated pain mechanisms and impaired pain inhibition compared with localized pain patients. Cuff algometry was performed on the non-painful lower leg to assess...... pressure pain threshold (cPPT), tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations at cPTT intensity), and conditioning pain modulation (CPM: increase in cPPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection (HDT) and heat pain...

  9. Lower Back Pain Symptom Checker Flowchart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the back. Some causes and treatment of back pain are described in this chart.Our trusted Symptom ... Problems Hip Problems Knee Problems Leg Problems Lower Back Pain Menstrual Cycle Problems Mouth Problems Mouth Problems in ...

  10. Golf and low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    村田, 豊

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar spinal disease is one of the“locomotive syndrome”. Most common disease for advanced people is lumbar spinal canal stenosis(LSCS), on the other hand, most common disease for young adult people is lumbar disc herniation(LDH). Both LSCS and LDH can cause low back pain and severe sciatica of lower extremities. Golf is one of the most favorite sports for any generation worldwide. Sometimes golf can cause low back pain, however we can prevent the injuries of lumbar from playing golf. The ach...

  11. Coping with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindig, L. E.; Mrvos, S. R.

    Guidelines are offered for the prevention and relief of lower back pain. The structure of the spine is described, and the functions and composition of spinal disks are explained. A list is included of common causes of abnormalities of the spinal column, and injuries which may cause the fracture of the vertebrae are described. Factors causing low…

  12. Chiropractic management of back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, M

    1983-05-01

    The vast majority of those with back pain respond extremely well to chiropractic spinal manipulation. There are several hundred procedures available to a well trained chiropractor, including high velocity manipulation, mobilisation, soft tissue techniques and pressure point therapy, which may be used to eliminate the need for manipulation under anaesthesia or surgery.

  13. Forward-Thinking Tips for Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_163118.html Forward-Thinking Tips for Back Pain Certain behaviors can reduce your risk, doctor says ... 19, 2017 WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Back pain is common but not inevitable, an orthopedist says. ...

  14. Prevention: The Best Treatment for Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DO Video Library Prevention: The Best Treatment for Back Pain Page Content A n estimated 50 million Americans ... natural tendency toward self-healing. Tips to Minimize Back Pain Here are some tips for preventing or minimizing ...

  15. Low Back Pain Common Among Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163320.html Low Back Pain Common Among Kids Sports injuries are ... 30, 2017 MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Low back pain is common in school-age American ...

  16. Fast Facts: What Is Back Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Chinese 繁體中文 ) What Is Back Pain? (in Korean 한국어 ) What Is Back Pain? (in Vietnamese bằng ... type of back pain. Behavior Changes You can learn to lift, push, and pull with less stress ...

  17. Low back pain across the life course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunn, Kate M; Hestbæk, Lise; Cassidy, J David

    2013-01-01

    Back pain episodes are traditionally regarded as individual events, but this model is currently being challenged in favour of treating back pain as a long-term or lifelong condition. Back pain can be present throughout life, from childhood to older age, and evidence is mounting that pain experience...... is maintained over long periods: for example, people with pain continue to have it on and off for years, and people without pain do not suddenly develop long-term pain. A number of factors predict back pain presence in epidemiological studies, and these are often present, and predictive, at different life...... stages. There are also factors present at particular life stages, such as childhood or adolescence, which predict back pain in adulthood. However, there are little published data on long-term pain patterns or predictors over the life course. Such studies could improve our understanding of the development...

  18. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis;

    2006-01-01

    Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical....... Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients...

  19. Acute and chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Nathan; Emanski, Eric; Knaub, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common presenting complaint that occurs in upward of 80% of persons. Treatment of an acute episode of back pain includes relative rest, activity modification, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and physical therapy. Patient education is also imperative, as these patients are at risk for further future episodes of back pain. Chronic back pain (>6 months' duration) develops in a small percentage of patients. Clinicians' ability to diagnose the exact pathologic source of these symptoms is severely limited, making a cure unlikely. Treatment of these patients should be supportive, the goal being to improve pain and function.

  20. Space Adaptation Back Pain: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstman, E. L.; Scheuring, R. A.; Barnes, M. G.; DeKorse, T. B.; Saile, L. G.

    2008-01-01

    Back pain is frequently reported by astronauts during the early phase of space flight as they adapt to the microgravity environment. However, the epidemiology of space adaptation back pain has not been well defined. The purpose of this retrospective study was to develop a case definition of space adaptation back pain, determine the incidence of space adaptation back pain, and determine the effectiveness of available treatments. Medical records from the Mercury, Apollo, Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP), Skylab, Mir, International Space Station (ISS), and Shuttle programs were reviewed. All episodes of in-flight back pain that met the criteria for space adaptation back pain were recorded. Pain characteristics, including intensity, location, and duration of the pain were noted. The effectiveness of specific treatments also was recorded. The incidence of space adaptation back pain among astronauts was determined to be 53% (384/722). Most of the affected astronauts reported mild pain (85%). Moderate pain was reported by 11% of the affected astronauts and severe pain was reported by only 4% of the affected astronauts. The most effective treatments were fetal positioning (91% effective) and the use of analgesic medications (85% effective). This retrospective study aids in the development of a case definition of space adaptation back pain and examines the epidemiology of space adaptation back pain. Space adaptation back pain is usually mild and self-limited. However, there is a risk of functional impairment and mission impact in cases of moderate or severe pain that do not respond to currently available treatments. Therefore, the development of preventive measures and more effective treatments should be pursued.

  1. Yoga to treat nonspecific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Catherine; Stratton, Carol; Mallory, Debra

    2011-08-01

    Low back pain is common and poses a challenge for clinicians to find effective treatment to prevent it from becoming chronic. Chronic low back pain can have a significant impact on an employee's ability to remain an active and productive member of the work force due to increased absenteeism, duty restrictions, or physical limitations from pain. Low back pain is the most common cause of work-related disability among employees younger than 46 years. Advancing technology and less invasive surgical procedures have not improved outcomes for employees who suffer from low back pain. Most continue to experience some pain and dysfunction after conventional treatments such as injections and surgery. An alternative treatment that could reduce nonspecific chronic low back pain would benefit both employees and employers. Exercising and remaining active are part of most guidelines' routine care recommendations but are not well defined.

  2. The natural course of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemeunier, Nadège; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Gagey, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Most patients in the secondary care sector consulting for low back pain (LBP) seem to have a more or less constant course of pain during the ensuing year. Fewer patients with LBP in the primary care sector report continual pain over a one-year period. However, not much is known about the long...

  3. Neuropathic pain, back to the patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Seventer (Robert)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Pain can be classified in several ways. The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) recommends describing pain according to five categories or axes, namely its anatomical location (neck, lower back, etc.), the body system involved (gastrointestinal, nervo

  4. Investigational pharmacology for low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash K Bhandary

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Avinash K Bhandary1 , Gary P Chimes2, Gerard A Malanga3 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3New Jersey Sports Medicine Institute; Overlook Hospital; Mountainside Hospital; Rehabilitation Medicine and Electrodiagnosis, St Michael’s Medical Center; Horizon Healthcare Worker’s Compensation Services, Blue Cross and Blue Shield Worker’s Compensation, Summit, NJ, USAStudy design: Review and reinterpretation of existing literature.Objective: This review article summarizes the anatomy and pathogenesis of disease processes that contribute to low back pain, and discusses key issues in existing therapies for chronic low back pain. The article also explains the scientific rationale for investigational pharmacology and highlights emerging compounds in late development.Results/conclusion: While the diverse and complex nature of chronic low back pain continues to challenge clinicians, a growing understanding of chronic low back pain on a cellular level has refined our approach to managing chronic low back pain with pharmacology. Many emerging therapies with improved safety profiles are currently in the research pipeline and will contribute to a multimodal therapeutic algorithm in the near future. With the heterogeneity of the patient population suffering from chronic low back pain, the clinical challenge will be accurately stratifying the optimal pharmacologic approach for each patient.Keywords: low back pain, investigational, pharmacology, drugs

  5. Pregnancy-related low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katonis, P; Kampouroglou, A; Aggelopoulos, A; Kakavelakis, K; Lykoudis, S; Makrigiannakis, A; Alpantaki, K

    2011-07-01

    Pregnancy related low back pain is a common complaint among pregnant women. It can potentially have a negative impact on their quality of life. The aim of this article is to present a current review of the literature concerning this issue.By using PubMed database and low back pain, pelvic girdle pain, pregnancy as keywords, abstracts and original articles in English investigating the diagnosis treatment of back pain during pregnancy were searched and analyzedLow back pain could present as either a pelvic girdle pain between the posterior iliac crest and the gluteal fold or as a lumbar pain over and around the lumbar spine. The source of the pain should be diagnosed and differentiated early.The appropriate treatment aims to reduce the discomfort and the impact on the pregnant womans quality of life. This article reveals the most common risk factors, as well as treatment methods, which may help to alleviate the pain. Some suggestions for additional research are also discussed.

  6. Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000415.htm Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help many people deal with chronic ...

  7. Approach to low back pain - acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Carolyn

    2014-05-01

    This article forms part of our allied health series for 2014, which aims to provide information about the management approach of different allied health professionals, using the case example of uncomplicated, mechanical low back pain.

  8. TREATMENT FOR ACUTE NONSPECIFIC LOWER BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhail Lvovich Kukushkin

    2010-01-01

    The causes, manifestations, and principles of diagnosis of acute nonspecific lower back pain (nLBP) are considered. Symptoms and complaints, the emergence of which is associated with the presence of dangerous disease, are singled out in patients with back pain. Emphasis is placed on the treatment of nLBP with currently available unselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and myorelaxants. It is also noted that multimodality therapy in such patients should include therapeutic exercises, ...

  9. Mechanical therapy for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Donald Grant

    2012-09-01

    Physical therapy and manual medicine for low back pain encompass many different treatment modalities. There is a vast variety of techniques that physical therapists commonly use in the treatment of low back pain. Some of the therapies include, but are certainly not limited to, education, exercise, lumbar traction, manual manipulation, application of heat, cryotherapy, and ultrasonography. Many of these approaches are discussed specifically in this article.

  10. Myofascial Pain Syndrome in Chronic Back Pain Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizar, Abd Jalil

    2011-01-01

    Background Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a regional musculoskeletal pain disorder that is caused by myofascial trigger points. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of MPS among chronic back pain patients, as well as to identify risk factors and the outcome of this disorder. Methods This was a prospective observational study involving 126 patients who attended the Pain Management Unit for chronic back pain between 1st January 2009 and 31st December 2009. Data examined included demographic features of patients, duration of back pain, muscle(s) involved, primary diagnosis, treatment modality and response to treatment. Results The prevalence of MPS among chronic back pain patients was 63.5% (n = 80). Secondary MPS was more common than primary MPS, making up 81.3% of the total MPS. There was an association between female gender and risk of developing MPS (χ2 = 5.38, P = 0.02, O.R. = 2.4). Occupation, body mass index and duration of back pain were not significantly associated with MPS occurrence. Repeated measures analysis showed significant changes (P pain patients was significantly high, with female gender being a significant risk factor. With proper diagnosis and expert management, MPS has a favourable outcome. PMID:21716607

  11. Handout on Health: Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... form of arthritis that affects the spine, the sacroiliac joints, and sometimes the hips and shoulders. In severe ... to joint pain, inflammation, instability, and misshapen joints. Sacroiliac joints. The joints where the spine and pelvis attach. ...

  12. The quadratus lumborum and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Franca, G G; Levine, L J

    1991-02-01

    Two cases of low back pain from quadratus lumborum myofascial trigger points are presented. One of the patients suffered from an acute episode while the other had a chronic condition. This condition may be more common than previously believed. The quadratus lumborum should be examined in patients presenting with flank pain as well as low back, buttock and lateral hip pain. Thoracolumbar joint dysfunction may often coexist with quadratus lumborum myofascitis and must be treated for optimal results. Myofascial therapy directed at restoring muscle length and function, coupled with joint manipulation to related dysfunctional areas, was implemented. Diagnosis and treatment are outlined.

  13. [Physical therapy in low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muff, L; Stucki, G

    1996-09-10

    We report on physical measures in the treatment of patients with lower back pain due to mechanical factors. Acute low back pain improves mostly without specific measures. Intervention for this condition is useful for prevention of relapses. More demanding and difficult is the treatment of chronic lumbar back pain. After an exact diagnosis, information about the disease, the therapeutic procedure and the prognosis follow in order to agree on a common therapeutic goal. To this goal, a close cooperation between physician, physiotherapist, possibly a psychologist and a social worker, is optimal. The employer should be involved in the rehabilitation on the workplace. Patients should become mobilized inspite of pain, and the return to their workplace should be prepared step by step. The most important physiotherapeutic modalities are demonstrated.

  14. Challenges of the pregnant athlete and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Megan L; Hoch, Anne Z

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain during pregnancy is a common problem with a high prevalence among pregnant athletes. The etiology of pregnancy-related low back pain remains unclear, although more evidence is supporting a biomechanical/musculoskeletal origin. This article will review the causes of low back pain in athletes and pregnant women, differentiate low back from pelvic girdle pain, and discuss the treatment and prevention of pregnancy-related low back and pelvic girdle pain.

  15. Management of patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debarle, Michel; Aigron, Rémi; Depernet, Laure

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the level of consensus within the French chiropractic profession regarding management of clinical issues. A previous Swedish study showed that chiropractors agreed relatively well on the management strategy for nine low back pain scenarios. We wished to investigate...... whether those findings could be reproduced among French chiropractors.Objectives: 1. To assess the level of consensus among French chiropractors regarding management strategies for nine different scenarios of low back pain. 2. To assess whether the management choices of the French chiropractors appeared...... reasonable for the low back pain scenarios. 3. To compare French management patterns with those described in the previous survey of Swedish chiropractors. METHOD: A postal questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected sample of 167 French chiropractors in 2009. The questionnaire described a 40-year old man...

  16. [Low back pain in pregnant women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrzycki, Marian; Mrozikiewicz, Przemysław M; Kocur, Piotr; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Hoffmann, Marcin; Stryła, Wanda; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2010-11-01

    Pain of lumbosacral segment of the vertebral column and the pelvis concerns about 45% of all pregnant women. The change of the body posture during pregnancy is the result of gravity centre relocation, which affects the musculosceletal system. Development of the joint, ligament and myofascial dysfunctions, as well as the pain in the lumbosacral segment and the pelvis, are the most common reasons of spine pain. The aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge about lumbar spine pain in pregnant women with special focus on the pain connected with muscular, joint and ligament disorders. Pregnancy is a serious burden for the female osteo-skeletal system. Lumbar pain with different location and intensification is the negative consequence of the position changes during pregnancy. Pharmacotherapy could be useful only in cases of intensive low back pain, with possible application of small spectrum of drugs that are safe during pregnancy. Physical therapy including manual therapy exercises, massage and techniques of local anesthesia are alternative methods in case of low back pain in pregnant women.

  17. DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Askhatovich Altunbaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an update on the principles of diagnosis and medical and surgical treatments in patients with low back pain (LBP, by taking into account the clinical phenomenology of pain manifestations. It considers the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myorelaxants, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and other agents. The data of clinical trials of meloxicam used in LBP are presented. The currently available surgical treatments for LBP are described.

  18. Approach to low back pain. Chiropractic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simon; Werth, Peter; Walker, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Case study. A man aged 42 years, who works as a police officer, presented with severe lower back pain, which he had experienced for 24 hours after spending the previous day helping his brother to move house. He had difficulty ambulating and most movements aggravated the pain. There were no lower limb symptoms and no red flags present on history or examination. He was otherwise well and was not taking any regular medications.

  19. BACK PAIN SYNDROME: MODERN APPROACHES TO THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe management tactics in patients with back pain syndrome and to give recommendations for the choice of non-drug and drug treatments (with main drug groups and the duration of a treatment cycle. Materials and methods. The paper considers the basic mechanisms and causes of back pain syndromes (dorsalgias. It introduces the concept “dorsopathy” that characterizes the appearance of nonvisceral pain syndrome in the extremities and trunk, which is caused by degenerative processes in the vertebral motion segment. The authors provide a description of spondyloarthrosis, one of the main degenerative diseases of the spine, and give current principles of treatment for the major symptoms of the disease. Results. The main goal of treatment in patients with back pain is to relieve pain syndrome. Selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the medicaments of choice. Conclusion. This paper covers current approaches to managing patients with spondyloarthrosis and gives recommendations regarding the treatment of the major disease manifestation – pain syndrome. 

  20. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Jensen, Lone Donbæk

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered postural control has been observed in low back pain (LBP) patients. They seem to be more dependent on vision when standing. The objective of the study was to determine concurrent and predictive validity of measures of postural stability in LBP patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS......: Centre of Pressure (CoP) measurements were tested against pain, fear of pain, and physical function. Velocity, anterior-posterior displacement, and the Romberg Ratio obtained on a portable force platform were used as measures of postural stability. RESULTS: Baseline and 12-week follow-up results of 97....... CONCLUSION: This first study of concurrent and predictive validity of postural balance in LBP patients revealed no association between CoP measures and pain, fear of pain, and physical function....

  1. Physical therapy for patients with back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, R.W.A. van der; Dekker, J.; Baar, M.E. van

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the physical therapy diagnosis and treatment in patients with back pain. More specifically, the relationship between the duration of the complaint and the diagnosis and treatment was analysed. Data were used from a representative survey of physical therapeutic p

  2. Helicopter pilot back pain: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, D F; Reading, T E

    1984-02-01

    Because of the high prevalence of back pain experienced by U.S. Army helicopter pilots, a study was conducted to ascertain the feasibility of reproducing these symptoms in the laboratory. A mock-up of a UH-1H seat and control configuration was mounted to a multi-axis vibration simulator (MAVS). Eleven subjects were tested on the apparatus for two 120-min periods. During one period, the MAVS was programmed to reproduce vibrations recorded from a UH-1H in cruise flight. The subjects received no vibration during the other test period. All subjects reported back pain which they described as identical to the pain they experience during flight, during one or more of their test periods. There was no statistical difference between the vibration and nonvibration test conditions (p greater than 0.05) in terms of time of onset of pain or intensity of pain as measured by a visual analog scale. It appears the vibration at the frequencies and amplitudes tested plays little or no role in the etiology of the back symptoms reported by these pilots. It is proposed that the primary etiological factor for these symptoms is the poor posture pilots are obliged to assume for extended periods while operating helicopters.

  3. Chronic low back pain in housewives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bulut

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate low back pain of housewives and to deteremine relationships between psychological status, education and physical health in housewives.Materials and methods: Thirty premenopausal housewives aged 33-45 years with chronic low back pain were included and the control group consisted of 30 healthy premenopausal housewives. Physical examinations were performed. Age, height, weight, educational level, number of children, consumption of cigarettes and alcohol were recorded. The body mass index (BDI was measured. The severity of back pain was measured by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, psychological status was evaluated by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and muscle strength by manual technique.Results: There was no difference between demographic data of patients and controls. BDI scores of patients were significantly higher than the controls (p<0,01. Abdominal and dorsal muscle strength were higher in the control group but different was not significant. OBAS values in the patient group, were positively correlated with BDI and BMI (p= 0.011; p= 0.001, respectively, and negatively correlated with abdominal and dorsal muscle strength (p= 0.006 and p= 0.001. Significant correlations were found between abdominal and dorsal muscle strength and the BMI, ODI and BDI scores and high educational level positively affected the ODI and the BDI scores in patients.Conclusion: The housewives with chronic back pain and do not exercise regularly limit activities of daily living. Because of higher BDI scores of patients with chronic low back pain, these patients should also undergo psychiatric examination. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 295-298.

  4. Lombalgia ocupacional Occupational low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Helfenstein Junior

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A lombalgia ocupacional apresenta etiologia multifatorial, elevada prevalência e incidência. Caracterizada por quadro de dor de variada duração e intensidade, a dor lombar pode levar à incapacidade laborativa e à invalidez. A lombalgia acarreta sofrimento aos trabalhadores, custos às empresas, aos sistemas previdenciário e assistencial de saúde. Os autores, pela relevância do tema, elaboraram este artigo de revisão bibliográfica dando ênfase ao embasamento teorico-conceitual e à experiência de especialistas.The occupational low back pain presents multifactorial aetiology, important prevalence and incidence. Characterized by pain of varying duration and intensity, low back pain may lead to disability. Low back pain causes suffering to workers, implies costs to companies, to the social security and health assistance system. Because of the theme's relevance, the authors have elaborated this review of literature with emphasis on a theoretical and conceptual basis, as well as experience of experts.

  5. PROTOCOL OF TREATMENT IN LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Guimbala dos Santos Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain can be considered as one of the main factors that lead to decreased functional capacity of the human being. Being a frequent dysfunction in people, causing a decrease in quality of life, productivity and functional disability and is associated with important social and economic impact. Therefore the objective of the research was to assess the treatment protocols in low back pain. The study is characterized by being a literature of scientific articles, based on data published in PubMed, SciELO, BIREME and Cochrane from 2000 to 2012. We found eight scientific articles that addressed physical therapy methods in the treatment of low back pain, including a literature review. Related Articles show variation from one to 55 patients in groups, with a total of 185 patients studied. It was concluded then that it hasn’t met a specific treatment that is placed as the most effective for this pathology, although all include electrotherapy, manual therapy, exercise and RPG they show significant results in pain relief, quality of life thereby increasing functionality.

  6. [Treatment of low back pain (pain of locomotive organs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Hirotaka

    2009-09-01

    Several diseases, including the functional somatic syndromes (FSS), are characterized by pain involving locomotive structures. These disorders include low back pain, neck-shoulder-arm syndrome and fibromyalgia. FSS patients are convinced that their illness is not a psychosomatic disorder, being instead a bodily disease. Therefore, physicians such as orthopedic surgeons play an important role in supporting patients suffering from FSS with locomotive pain, because these patients expect their physicians to treat them for a physical, rather than a psychological disorder. The author investigated the patient-doctor relationship in the examination room of a hospital, and designated pain combined with a depressive state characterized by agitation and helplessness, a common complaint made by FSS and psychosomatic disorder patients, 'painful depression'. Pain and depression influence each other and trigger a vicious downward spiral termed the 'pain-depression deflation spiral'. Generally, orthopedic surgeons can achieve good relationships with FSS patients with locomotive structure pain, despite suspicion of psycho-social factors. It is concluded that physical examinations and treatments by orthopedic surgeons, conducting physical examinations only, can serve as a very good psychosomatic approach to painful depression/FSS patients.

  7. A patient with back pain: therapy possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Kamchatnov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common clinical syndromes associated with the high rate of temporary disability and sizable material costs. The choice of adequate therapy for LBP requires that primary diseases that can be responsible for the occurrence of pain should be excluded. While choosing an analgesic, there must be a balance between its efficacy and the possible risk for undesirable side effects. One of the drugs that have proven effective in treating patients with LBP is ketoprofen (ketonal, the diversity of whose formulations allows maximally individualized therapy.

  8. A Benefit of Back Pain Surgery: Better Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html A Benefit of Back Pain Surgery: Better Sex Operation often leads to more comfortable lovemaking, study ... Surgery for back pain can often improve patients' sex lives, researchers report. "The impetus behind our study ...

  9. Research methods for subgrouping low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Keating, Jennifer L; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable clinician and researcher interest in whether the outcomes for patients with low back pain, and the efficiency of the health systems that treat them, can be improved by 'subgrouping research'. Subgrouping research seeks to identify subgroups of people who have clinically impo...... the strengths and limitations of research methods suitable for the hypothesis-setting phase of subgroup studies.......There is considerable clinician and researcher interest in whether the outcomes for patients with low back pain, and the efficiency of the health systems that treat them, can be improved by 'subgrouping research'. Subgrouping research seeks to identify subgroups of people who have clinically...... important distinctions in their treatment needs or prognoses. Due to a proliferation of research methods and variability in how subgrouping results are interpreted, it is timely to open discussion regarding a conceptual framework for the research designs and statistical methods available for subgrouping...

  10. Improvement of chronic back pain or failed back surgery with vitamin D repletion: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews 6 selected cases of improvement/resolution of chronic back pain or failed back surgery after vitamin D repletion in a Canadian family practice setting. Pub Med was searched for articles on chronic back pain, failed back surgery, and vitamin D deficiency. Chronic low back pain and failed back surgery may improve with repletion of vitamin D from a state of deficiency/insufficiency to sufficiency. Vitamin D insufficiency is common; repletion of vitamin D to normal levels in patients who have chronic low back pain or have had failed back surgery may improve quality of life or, in some cases, result in complete resolution of symptoms.

  11. Low back pain and degenerative disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandrić Slavica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Various clinical conditions can cause low back pain, and in most cases it is of a degenerative origin. Degenerative disc disease is a common condition which affects young to middle-aged men and women equally. Changes in the mechanical properties of the disc lead to degenerative arthritis in the intervertebral joints, osteophytes, and narrowing the intervertebral foramen or the spinal canal. Pathophysiology. Degenerative cascade, described by Kirkaldy-Willis, is the widely accepted pathophysiologic model describing the degenerative process as it affects the lumbar spine in 3 phases. Diagnosis. There are two forms of low back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease: a lumbalgia and b lumbar radiculopathy. Limitation of movement, problems with balance, pain, loss of reflexes in the extremities, muscle weakness, loss of sensation or other signs of neurological damage can be found on physical examination. For accurate diagnosis, it is often necessary to combine clinical examination and sophisticated technology. Treatment. Coservative treatment consists of rest, physical therapy, pharmacological therapy and injection therapy. Physical rehabilitation with active patient participation is a key approach to treatment of patients with discogenic pain. Physical therapy, occupational therapy and kinesitherapy are important for improving muscle strength, endurance, and flexibility. Disc surgery is performed if surgical intervention is required. .

  12. The course of low back pain from adolescence to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study with 8-year follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To describe the evolution of low back pain from adolescence into adulthood. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: High prevalence rates of low back pain among children and adolescents have been demonstrated in several studies, and it has been...... questionnaires in 1994 and again in 2002. The questionnaires dealt with various aspects of general health, including the prevalence of low back pain, classified according to number of days affected (0, 1-7, 8-30, >30). RESULTS: Low back pain in adolescence was found to be a significant risk factor for low back...... than 30 days with low back pain during the follow-up year. This was true for only 9% of the rest of the sample. CONCLUSIONS: Our study clearly demonstrates correlations between low back pain in childhood/adolescence and low back pain in adulthood. This should lead to a change in focus from the adult...

  13. [Drug treatment and interventional pain therapy in back pain patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprott, Haiko; Klauke, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    The treatment of chronic, non-malignant low-back pain is based on the patients' history and the clinical examination. It can be assumed that half of the cases present with a neuropathic pain component which needs to be treated with antidepressive and antiepileptic drugs instead of "pure" analgesics. Opioids should be considered with extreme caution because of their toxicity. Chronic non-malignant back pain is the prototype for interdisciplinary treatment approaches and multi-modal interdisciplinary settings, including pain programmes. However, a personalised strategy has to be preferred in most cases. A quick relief of pain is important in order to improve function as well as to re-integrate the patient into professional life. Spinal infiltrations can be of both diagnostic as well as therapeutic benefits. Their indication must be considered carefully, especially if the invasive diagnostic intervention has no therapeutic consequences. The interventional procedures should only be used as part of a multimodal approach in patients without any psychological problem. The sole use of interventions supports the purely somatic orientation of many patients and thus leads us in the wrong direction.

  14. Low Back Pain and Pelvic Girdle Pain in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Danielle; Gugala, Zbigniew; Clark, Shannon M; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy has a profound effect on the human body, particularly the musculoskeletal system. Hormonal changes cause ligamentous joint laxity, weight gain, and a shift in the center of gravity that leads to lumbar spine hyperlordosis and anterior tilting of the pelvis. In addition, vascular changes may lead to compromised metabolic supply in the low back. The most common musculoskeletal complaints in pregnancy are low back pain and/or pelvic girdle pain. They can be diagnosed and differentiated from each other by history taking, clinical examination, provocative test maneuvers, and imaging. Management ranges from conservative and pharmacologic measures to surgical treatment. Depending on the situation, and given the unique challenges pregnancy places on the human body and the special consideration that must be given to the fetus, an orthopaedic surgeon and the obstetrician may have to develop a plan of care together regarding labor and delivery or when surgical interventions are indicated.

  15. Space Adaptation Back Pain: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstman, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Astronaut back pain is frequently reported in the early phase of space flight as they adapt to microgravity. The epidemiology of space adaptation back pain (SABP) has not been well established. This presentation seeks to determine the exact incidence of SABP among astronauts, develop a case definition of SABP, delineate the nature and pattern of SABP, review available treatments and their effectiveness in relieving SABP; and identify any operational impact of SABP. A retrospective review of all available mission medical records of astronauts in the U.S. space program was performed. It was revealed that the incidence of SABP has been determined to be 53% among astronauts in the U.S. space program; most cases of SABP are mild, self-limited, or respond to available treatment; there are no currently accepted preventive measures for SABP; it is difficult to predict who will develop SABP; the precise mechanism and spinal structures responsible for SABP are uncertain; there was no documented evidence of direction operational mission impact related to SABP; and, that there was the potential for mission impact related to uncontrolled pain, sleep disturbance, or the adverse side effects pf anti-inflammatory medications

  16. [Low back pain during pregnancy. Multidisciplinary approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Padilla, D; Gallo-Padilla, C; Gallo-Vallejo, F J; Gallo-Vallejo, J L

    2016-09-01

    After explaining that low back pain is considered the most common pregnancy complication, its pathogenesis, risk factors and the clinical characteristics of the very painful symptoms of this condition are described. As for its approach, it is stressed that it must be multidisciplinary, introducing very important preventive measures, including proper postural hygiene. For its treatment, the methods may be based on non-surgical or pharmacological interventions of a conservative non-invasive nature. Thus, physiotherapy, osteopathic manipulation, multimodal intervention (exercise and education), exercises performed in water environment, acupuncture, etc., have proven to be effective. Finally, it is emphasised that given the significant impact on their quality of life, different health professionals must be proactive and treat the lumbar disease in pregnant women.

  17. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jensen, Lone Donbæk

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (Co...... Ratio) might be of clinical interest. This study aimed to assess postural balance in LBP patients by analyzing intra-session reliability of CoP parameters on a portable force platform, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether CoP parameters and OLST measure identical...

  18. [Low back pain of unfavourable progression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña Parra, E; Calle Romero, Y; García Sánchez, V C; Sanz Pozo, B

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with chronic low back pain with an unfavourable progression despite the prescribed pharmacological treatment. The patient had symptoms associated with compression of the sciatic nerve in an atypical area. As it passed through the piriformis muscle, it was diagnosed as piriformis muscle syndrome. This diagnosis was based on the clinical signs and symptoms and the determination of the tests performed, with the imaging tests being absolutely normal. Treatment is basically with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants and stretching exercises of this muscle.

  19. Low back pain during labor and related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Ya-Ling; Su, Tsann-Juu

    2008-09-01

    A substantial proportion of women in labor suffer from low back pain, yet this issue has only been specifically evaluated in a few Western studies. The purpose of this research was to (1) describe the following characteristics of low back pain during labor: prevalence, anatomic region(s) affected, type, pattern, intensity trend, effective interventions, and exacerbating factors; (2) identify the factors relating to intrapartum low back pain in Taiwan women. A correlational design with repeated measures was used to conduct this investigation. Ninety-three low-risk women in labor were recruited from a medical center in central Taiwan. Low back pain was repeatedly measured during the latent phase (cervix dilated 2-4 cm), early active phase (cervix dilated 5-7 cm), and late active phase (cervix dilated 8-10 cm) of labor. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, repeated measurement ANOVA, and logistic regression. The results showed as many as 75.3% of the participants suffered episodes of low back pain during labor. The mean pain scores were 36.66-76.20 in the various stages of labor. Pain intensified as labor progressed. The location of the pain also changed with the progression of labor. The type of low back pain in 54.29% of women in labor was "muscle soreness and pain"; The pattern of pain in 45.71% women was continuous. Massage was chosen as the most effective intervention to alleviate low back pain by 65.3% of women. The women in labor who suffered from low back pain during pregnancy (OR = 3.23; p low back pain group. In conclusion, our study demonstrates low back pain intensified with the progression of labor, suggesting early prevention is necessary, especially in the case of women who had low back pain during pregnancy and heavier body weight when hospitalized.

  20. Low back pain: a twentieth century health care enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, G

    1996-12-15

    Despite greater knowledge, expertise, and health care resources for spinal pathologies, chronic disability resulting from nonspecific low back pain is rising exponentially in western society. Medical care certainly has not solved the everyday symptom of low back pain and even may be reinforcing and exacerbating the problem. An historic review shows that there is no change in the pathology or prevalence of low back pain: What has changed in our understanding and management. There are striking differences in health care for low back pain in the United States and the United Kingdom, although neither delivers the kind of care recommended by recent evidence-based guidelines. Medical care for low back pain in the United States is specialist-oriented, of high technology, and of high cost, but 40% of American patients seek chiropractic care for low back pain instead. National Health Service care for low back pain in the United Kingdom is underfunded, too little and too late, and 55% of British patients pay for private therapy instead. Despite the different health care systems, treatment availability, and costs, there seems to be little difference in clinical outcomes or the social impact of low back pain in the two countries. There is growing dissatisfaction with health care for low back pain on both sides of the Atlantic. Future health care for patients with nonspecific low back pain should be designed to meet their specific needs.

  1. Chiropractors and the treatment of back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, A C

    1977-02-01

    In a survey of British chiropractors and their practices, it was found that the majority of their patients attended for back pain. The average age of patients was 47 years, the sex ratio was equal, and most had had their complaints for longer than three months and had access to the chiropractor within a few days. They were largely housewives and persons from the executive and managerial occupations. The main investigative procedures used were static and motion palpation of the spine, and vital systems, orthopaedic, neurological, and radiological examination. Treatment was mostly manual and directed at the spinal column, and the benefit obtained, as assessed by the chiropractors, was comparable to that reported in other studies. Maximum benefit was usually recorded within seven attendances, although 39% of patients made further visits for maintenance treatment. The chiropractors are seen to be a young, growing, and largely male group, and their new patient numbers are at present likely to be at least one-twentieth that of hospital out-patient departments which deal with back pain.

  2. Medial branch neurotomy in low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masala, Salvatore; Mammucari, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Rome (Italy); Nano, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Rome (Italy); University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Marcia, Stefano [S. Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Cagliari (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency medial branch dorsal ramus neurotomy in patients with facet joint syndrome. From January 2008 to April 2010, 92 patients with facet joint syndrome diagnosed by strict inclusion criteria and controlled diagnostic blocks undergone medial branch neurotomy. We did not exclude patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Electrodes (20G) with 5-mm active tip were placed under fluoroscopy guide parallel to medial branch. Patients were followed up by physical examination and by Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index at 1, 6, and 12 months. In all cases, pain improvement was statistically significant and so quality of life. Three non-FBSS patients had to undergo a second neurotomy because of non-satisfactory pain decrease. Complications were reported in no case. Medial branch radiofrequency neurotomy has confirmed its well-established effectiveness in pain and quality of life improvement as long as strict inclusion criteria be fulfilled and nerve ablation be accomplished by parallel electrode positioning. This statement can be extended also to FBSS patients. (orig.)

  3. Electronic diary assessment of pain-related fear, attention to pain, and pain intensity in chronic low back pain patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J.; Peters, M.L.; Patijn, J.; Schouten, E.G.; Vlaeyen, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between pain-related fear, attention to pain, and pain intensity in daily life in patients with chronic low back pain. An experience sampling methodology was used in which electronic diary data were collected by means of palmtop computers from 40 chro

  4. Low back pain and lumbar angles in Turkish coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya, S.; Ozdolap, S.; Gumustas, S.; Koc, U. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine

    2007-02-15

    This study was designed to assess the incidence of low back pain among Turkish coal miners and to investigate the relationship between angles of the lumbar spine and low back pain in coal miners. Fifty underground workers (Group I) and 38 age-matched surface workers (Group II) were included in the study. All the subjects were asked about low back pain in the past 5 years. The prevalence of low back pain was higher in Group I than in Group II (78.0%, 32.4%, respectively, P {lt} 0.001). The results of the study showed that low back pain occurred in 78.0% of Turkish coal miners. Although the nature of the occupation may have influenced coal miners' lumbar spinal curvature, lumbar angles are not a determinant for low back pain in this population. Further extensive studies involving ergonomic measurements are needed to validate our results for Turkish coal mining industry.

  5. Is it all about a pain in the back?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Natvig, Bard; Ferreira, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Multisite musculoskeletal pain is common among people suffering from low back pain. Although the mechanisms behind co-occurrence of multiple somatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain are still unknown, patients with co-morbidities and co-occurring musculoskeletal symptoms tend to have worse...... and treatment of low back pain and other musculoskeletal disorders such as neck pain and lower limb osteoarthritis are very similar. In this chapter, we discuss the prevalence, consequences, and implications of commonalities between low back pain, pain in other sites and co-occurring pain. In addition, we...... functional status, a poorer prognosis and respond less favourably to treatment. Evidence also suggests that the more pain sites a patient reports, the more reduced their physical and mental function will be regardless of location of pain. At the same time, evidence suggests that strategies for diagnosis...

  6. Central sensitization in chronic low back pain: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzarello, Ilaria; Merlini, Luciano; Rosa, Michele Attilio; Perrone, Mariada; Frugiuele, Jacopo; Borghi, Raffaele; Faldini, Cesare

    2016-11-21

    Low back pain is one of the four most common disorders in all regions, and the greatest contributor to disability worldwide, adding 10.7% of total years lost due to this health state. The etiology of chronic low back pain is, in most of the cases (up to 85%), unknown or nonspecific, while the specific causes (specific spinal pathology and neuropathic/radicular disorders) are uncommon. Central sensitization has been recently recognized as a potential pathophysiological mechanism underlying a group of chronic pain conditions, and may be a contributory factor for a sub-group of patients with chronic low back pain. The purposes of this narrative review are twofold. First, to describe central sensitization and its symptoms and signs in patients with chronic pain disorders in order to allow its recognition in patients with nonspecific low back pain. Second, to provide general treatment principles of chronic low back pain with particular emphasis on pharmacotherapy targeting central sensitization.

  7. The Effects of Spiral Taping Treatment on Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jae-Ok

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate the effects of spiral taping treatment on low back pain. Methods : 420 low back pain patients were treated with spiral taping or spiral taping plus herbal medicine, and no other treatments such as acupuncture, herbal acupuncture, and chiropractic therapy were added. We evaluated the improvement by physical examination and pain. Results : 364 patients felt no pain or inconvenience of daily life and 43 patients showed improvement of pain or symptom after 1 month of treatment. 13 patients showed same pain with before treatment. Conclusions : These results suggest spiral taping treatments contribute to the improvement of low back pain. Further study is needed for the confirmation of this effect of spiral taping treatments on low back pain.

  8. Invasive and minimally invasive surgical techniques for back pain conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, William; Carl, Allen; Lavelle, Elizabeth Demers

    2007-12-01

    This article summarizes current issues related to invasive and minimally invasive surgical techniques for back pain conditions. It describes pain generators and explains theories about how discs fail. The article discusses techniques for treating painful sciatica, painful motion segments, and spinal stenosis. Problems related to current imaging are also presented. The article concludes with a discussion about physical therapy.

  9. MRI in patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Krüger; Manniche, Claus; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    MRI in LBP patients: good or bad? Background: The routine use of radiology is presently discouraged in patients with low back pain (LBP). MRI provides clinicians and patients with detailed knowledge of the spinal structures and has no known physical side effects. It is possible that detailed...... insight into the pathological changes in LBP patients may affect the management of patients. However, this has never been tested. Until June 2006, all patients at our specialized public out-patient clinic, were referred to MRI on the basis of clinical indications, economic constraints, and availability...... of MRI (the "old" group). As a new approach, all patients with certain criteria are now referred to MRI before the clinical examination (the "new" group).   Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate if the two different MRI approaches, the "old" and "new", resulted in differences in relation...

  10. Why and how back pain interventions work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansell, Gemma; Kamper, Steven J; Kent, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a useful research method that potentially allows identification of the mechanisms through which treatments affect patient outcomes. This chapter reviews the theoretical framework, research designs and statistical approaches used in mediation analysis. It describes what can...... be learnt from previous mediation research, much of which has investigated mediating factors of psychosocial interventions in other health conditions. It also summarises the few treatment-mediation studies of psychosocial interventions conducted in back pain. This chapter shows that there is emerging...... evidence about the role of some psychological factors as potential treatment mediators, such as self-efficacy and catastrophising. Mediation analysis can equally be applied to non-psychological factors. Pre-planned and appropriately conducted mediation analysis in adequately powered clinical trials would...

  11. Expectation of recovery from low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Vach, Werner; Axø, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. A prospective cohort study conducted in general practice (GP) and chiropractic practice (CP).Objectives. To explore which patient characteristics were associated with recovery expectations in low back pain (LBP) patients, whether expectations predicted 3-month outcome, and to what...... extent expectations were associated with empirical prognostic factors.Summary of Background Data. Patients' recovery expectations have been associated with prognosis, but it is largely unknown why patients expect what they do, and how expectations relate to other prognostic factors.Methods. 1169...... participants completed questionnaires at their first consultation due to LBP and 78% were followed for 3 months. At baseline, recovery expectations were measured on a 0-10 scale. Outcome measures were LBP intensity and Global Perceived Effect (GPE). Associations were tested in regression models...

  12. Psychological Distress in Acute Low Back Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, William S; Hartvigsen, Jan; Woiszwillo, Mary J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the measurement scales and levels of psychological distress reported among published studies of acute low back pain (LBP) in the scientific literature. DATA SOURCES: Peer-reviewed scientific literature found in 8 citation index search engines (CINAHL, Embase, MANTIS, Psyc......INFO, PubMed, Web of Science, AMED, and Academic Search Premier) for the period from January 1, 1966, to April 30, 2015, in English, Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish languages. STUDY SELECTION: Cross-sectional, case-control, cohort, or randomized controlled trials assessing psychological distress...... (study populations, definitions of LBP, distress measures) were systematically extracted and reviewed for risk of bias. Distress measures were described, and data were pooled in cases of identical measures. Reported levels of distress were contextualized using available population norms, clinical...

  13. Low Back Pain in Primary Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, Lise; Munck, Anders; Hartvigsen, Lisbeth;

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Baseline description of a multicenter cohort study. Objective. To describe patients with low back pain (LBP) in both chiropractic and general practice in Denmark. Background. To optimize standards of care in the primary healthcare sector, detailed knowledge of the patient populations...... in different settings is needed. In Denmark, most LBP-patients access primary healthcare through chiropractic or general practice. Methods. Chiropractors and general practitioners recruited adult patients seeking care for LBP. Extensive baseline questionnaires were obtained and descriptive analyses presented...... separately for general and chiropractic practice patients, Mann-Whitney rank sum test and Pearson's chi-square test, were used to test for differences between the two populations. Results. Questionnaires were returned from 934 patients in chiropractic practice and 319 patients from general practice. Four out...

  14. Prevalence and causes of back pain syndromes in children

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnova, A. A.; O.L. Lapochkin; M.A. Lobov; M.N. Borisova

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of literature devoted to epidemiology, and the nosological and syndromal structure of back pain in children. The data of our own study of school-aged children with back pain are presented. The structure of back pain syndromes in 105 children has been analyzed using the medical aid appealability data. The results of a comprehensive clinical and instrumental study demonstrated that the children mostly had lumbosacral pain (52.4% of cases); neck pain was observed in 29.5% of ...

  15. Reporting outcomes of back pain trials: A modified Delphi study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froud, Robert; Eldridge, Sandra; Kovacs, Francisco;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a common and expensive health complaint. Many low back pain trials have been conducted, but these are reported in a variety of ways and are often difficult to interpret. AIM: To facilitate consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for future low back pain...... commonly used in back pain trials, are reported using between-group mean differences (accompanied by minimally important difference (between-group/population-level) thresholds where these exist), the proportion of participants improving and deteriorating according to established and relevant minimally...... pain experts reached a high level of consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for patient-reported outcomes in future low back pain trials. The statement has the potential to increase interpretability and improve patient care....

  16. The effect of chronic low back pain on tactile suppression during back movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Stefaan; Van Hulle, Lore; Danneels, Lieven; Spence, Charles; Crombez, Geert

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether tactile suppression, the phenomenon whereby tactile perception is suppressed during movement, would occur in the context of back movements. Of particular interest, it was investigated if tactile suppression in the back would be attenuated in those suffering from chronic low back pain. Individuals with chronic low back pain (N = 30) and a matched control group (N = 24) detected tactile stimuli on three possible locations (back, arm, chest) while performing a back or arm movement, or no movement. We hypothesized that the movements would induce tactile suppression, and that this effect would be largest for low-intense stimuli on the moving body part. We further hypothesized that, during back movements, tactile suppression on the back would be less pronounced in the chronic low back pain group than in the control group. The results showed the expected general tactile suppression effects. The hypothesis of back-specific attenuation of tactile suppression in the chronic low back pain group was not supported. However, back-specific tactile suppression in the chronic low back pain group was less pronounced in those who performed the back movements more slowly.

  17. UBC researcher's back-pain studies focus on space travel.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, M

    1996-01-01

    Researchers at the University of British Columbia have been studying back pain that develops in astronauts in space. Their findings not only may help astronauts cope with future space travel, but also lead to new treatments for Earth-bound patients who experience back pain.

  18. Back pain and backpacks in children : Biomedical or biopsychosocial model?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reneman, M.F.; Poels, B.J.J.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2006-01-01

    Public press, professional organisations and journals have been sending alarming messages about the rising prevalence of back pain in school age children. Carrying backpacks has been suggested as one of the key factors contributing to back pain in children. The basic assumption based on the biomedic

  19. Back pain during different sequential treatment regimens of teriparatide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyritis, George; Marin, Fernando; Barker, Clare;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate changes in back pain in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis who received teriparatide for 24 months or switched at 12 months to raloxifene or no active treatment.......To investigate changes in back pain in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis who received teriparatide for 24 months or switched at 12 months to raloxifene or no active treatment....

  20. Back pain is a reason to think about osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vertkin, A.L.; Anton Vyacheslavovich Naumov; S R Shakirova; D M Zaichenko; N N Vladimirova; E. V. Adonina

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives information on osteoporosis (OP) as a cause of back pain. In OP the latter is stated to be induced by not only osteoporotic fractures, but also other pathological changes associated with bone mineral density loss. Data on the management of back pain due to OP are presented and the efficacies of alendronate and vitamin D3 are noted

  1. [Acupuncture and tuina clinical thoughts of "treating the back from abdomen" for low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinlong; Li, Rui

    2015-07-01

    In clinical treatment, it is found that certain patients always have some positive reaction points those are relevant with low back pain in the abdomen area. When the simple treatment on the low back is ineffective, the efficacy could be significantly improved if acupuncture or tuina is performed at the abdomen areas, which is called "regulating yin to treat yang", or "treating the back from abdomen". In this paper, with the diagnosis and treatment method of "treating the back from abdomen" for low back pain as principal line, the detailed manipulation is explained for low back pain that is induced by TCM meridian diseases or modern anatomy, which could open the methods for clinical treatment of low back pain and enrich the therapeutic options.

  2. Spinal manipulative therapy for acute low-back pain (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinstein, S.M.; Terwee, C. B.; Assendelft, W J J; Boer, M.R.M. de; van Tulder, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many therapies exist for the treatment of low-back pain including spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), which is a worldwide, extensively practised intervention. This report is an update of the earlier Cochrane review, first published in January 2004 with the last search for studies up to January 2000. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of SMT for acute low-back pain, which is defined as pain of less than six weeks duration. SEARCH METHODS: A comprehensive search was conducted on 31 ...

  3. Back and neck pain : factors of importance for the prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Back pain and neck pain are very common and among the most frequent causes of sick-leave and disability pension, thereby greatly affecting the individual and the community. This stresses the need for prognostic research regarding these conditions. Aim: The main aim of the present work was to study prognostic factors, including manual therapy, for back and neck pain. The specific aims were, to investigate the influence of regular leisure physical activity and the body mass index (BMI) on...

  4. "Low back pain"--下腰痛?腰痛?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗军; 夏群

    2005-01-01

    @@ "Low back pain"一词在国内绝大多数译文或译著中被译为"下腰痛",也有作者将其译为"下背痛".笔者认为这些译法不妥,曲解了"low back pain"的原意.此词翻译的关键在于对"low back"一词解剖部位的理解上.

  5. Influence of low back pain and prognostic value of MRI in sciatica patients in relation to back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. el Barzouhi (Abdelilah); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); G.J.L.A. Nijeholt (Geert J. Lycklama A); B.F.W. van der Kallen (Bas); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); B.W. Koes (Bart); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Patients with sciatica frequently complain about associated back pain. It is not known whether there are prognostic relevant differences in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings between sciatica patients with and without disabling back pain. Methods: The study population

  6. Do illness perceptions of people with chronic low back pain differ from people without chronic low back pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C. Paul; van Ittersum, Miriam W.; Kaptein, Ad A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine why some people develop chronic low back pain, and whether illness perceptions are an important risk factor in the transition from acute to chronic low back pain. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants Four hundred and two members of the general Dutch population, with and

  7. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study.

  8. Objective Measures for Pregnancy Related Low Back and Pelvic Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Groot (Mirthe)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractPain in the lumbar spine and pelvic region is a frequent complication of pregnancy and delivery. The prevalence of pregnancy related low back and pelvic pain (PLBP) varies between 14.2 and 56%. In 6 to 15% the pain is so severe that it impedes daily life activities. The symptoms of PL

  9. Pregnancy Related Low Back and Pelvic Pain: a surgical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.A. Zwienen

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMore than half of all pregnant women experience low back and/or pelvic pain of whom one-third has severe complaints. In most cases the pelvic pain disap­pears within a few months after delivery, either spontaneously or after con­servative treatment. In a minority of patients the pain per

  10. Nonspecific low back pain: Causes, clinical picture, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Isaikin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current biopsychosocial model of back pain, there are biological (anatomic sources of pain, psychological and social components that promote its occurrence and maintenance. Nonspecific (musculoskeletal, mechanical pain that is diagnosed, with a serious disease and radicular symptoms being ruled out, is encountered most commonly (in 85% of cases in clinical practice. A group of patients with nonspecific back pain is very heterogeneous and needs differential treatment. The most common sources of back pain are abnormally changed discs, facet and sacroiliac joints, and muscles; however, it is often difficult to determine the main source of pain. International guidelines for the management of acute and chronic back pain have been elaborated, which assign an important role to the clarification of the benign pattern of pain to patients; their training; and recommendations for the maintenance of day-to-day activity. Medical treatment involves both nonselective and selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and myorelaxants as the drugs of choice. Non-drug treatments are actively used; these are manual therapy for acute pain, cognitive behavioral therapy, manual therapy, therapeutic exercises, reflex therapy, and yoga exercises for subacute and chronic pain. Whether blockades, ablations, minimally invasive neurosurgery, which are aimed at eliminating the main source of pain, is discussed if the treatment is ineffective.

  11. Lumbar CT findings of patients with low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Kyun Sang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    Low back pain is probably the second most common disease entity to upper respiratory infection in developed country. We were missing at least 50% of the pathologic conditions by using conventional diagnostic modalities in low back pain. They did tell us nothing or little about facet abnormalities, lateral recesses, vertebral canal and soft tissue surrounding lumbar spines. High resolutional CT has been the biggest turning point in the diagnosis and management of low back pain. CT make a contribution to reducing the morbidity and probably the cost of evaluating patients with low back pain, and to increasing diagnostic accuracy. We observed 100 cases of lumbar CT using TCT 80A scanner for the evaluation of low back pain during the period from Apr. 1985 to Sept. 1985 at Chung-Ang University Hospital. Lumbar CT scan reveals high-positive findings (98%) in low back pain patients. Common low back disorders in CT are disc bulging (53%), herniated nucleus pulposus (32%), degenerative arthritis in posterior facet joints (27%), spinal stenosis (20%) and postoperative spines (15%). Uncommon low back disorders in CT are compression fracture of vertebral bodies, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis, tropism, transitional vertebra, Scheueman's disease, limbic fracture, transverse process or articular process fracture, sacroiliac joint subluxation, conjoined nerve root and meningocele.

  12. [Low Back Pain in Pregnancy: Diagnosis, Treatment Options and Outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlemann, Daniel; Mühlemann, Malin B

    2015-05-20

    Low back pain in pregnancy is a common occurrence and is mainly caused by hormonal and biomechanical changes. Patients with pregnancy-induced low back pain (PILBP) frequently complain of moderate to severe and disabling pain often restricting their daily activities. In these cases, a “watch and wait” approach cannot be the best solution. On the basis of anamnesis and examination PILBP can be divided into three subgroups: pregnancy-related low back pain (PLBP), pelvic girdle pain (PGP) and the combination of PLBP and PGP. The three entities ask for different diagnostic workups and therapeutic modalities. There are many possible treatments for PLBP, however, only a few are based on sound evidence. Information and advice, exercise and training programs, acupuncture, stabilizing belts and analgesic medication can have a positive impact on pain and disability. PGP und PLBP respond well to chiropractic interventions.

  13. Cumulative mechanical low-back load at work is a determinant of low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, P.; Kingma, I.; Boot, C.R.L.; Bongers, P.M.; Dieën, J.H. van

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Reported associations of physical exposures during work (eg, lifting, trunk flexion or rotation) and low-back pain (LBP) are rather inconsistent. Mechanical back loads (eg, moments on the low back) as a result of exposure to abovementioned risk factors have been suggested to be important

  14. Experience with the chondroprotector Arthra in patients with back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Vyacheslavovich Chebykin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presents his experience in managing 1430 patients (858 men and 572 women aged 22 to 65 years, mean age 61.3 years with back pain who used Arthra as a chondroprotector in addition to standard therapy (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myorelaxants, manual therapy, reflex therapy, therapeutic exercises. A comparison group consisted of 118 patients with back pain who received only standard therapy. It is noted that the incorporation of the chondroprotector Arthra into combination therapy can improve quality of life in patients with back pain.

  15. Effect of Iyengar yoga therapy for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kimberly Anne; Petronis, John; Smith, David; Goodrich, David; Wu, Juan; Ravi, Neelima; Doyle, Edward J; Gregory Juckett, R; Munoz Kolar, Maria; Gross, Richard; Steinberg, Lois

    2005-05-01

    Low back pain is a significant public health problem and one of the most commonly reported reasons for the use of Complementary Alternative Medicine. A randomized control trial was conducted in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain comparing Iyengar yoga therapy to an educational control group. Both programs were 16 weeks long. Subjects were primarily self-referred and screened by primary care physicians for study of inclusion/exclusion criteria. The primary outcome for the study was functional disability. Secondary outcomes including present pain intensity, pain medication usage, pain-related attitudes and behaviors, and spinal range of motion were measured before and after the interventions. Subjects had low back pain for 11.2+/-1.54 years and 48% used pain medication. Overall, subjects presented with less pain and lower functional disability than subjects in other published intervention studies for chronic low back pain. Of the 60 subjects enrolled, 42 (70%) completed the study. Multivariate analyses of outcomes in the categories of medical, functional, psychological and behavioral factors indicated that significant differences between groups existed in functional and medical outcomes but not for the psychological or behavioral outcomes. Univariate analyses of medical and functional outcomes revealed significant reductions in pain intensity (64%), functional disability (77%) and pain medication usage (88%) in the yoga group at the post and 3-month follow-up assessments. These preliminary data indicate that the majority of self-referred persons with mild chronic low back pain will comply to and report improvement on medical and functional pain-related outcomes from Iyengar yoga therapy.

  16. Prevalence and causes of back pain syndromes in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Smirnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of literature devoted to epidemiology, and the nosological and syndromal structure of back pain in children. The data of our own study of school-aged children with back pain are presented. The structure of back pain syndromes in 105 children has been analyzed using the medical aid appealability data. The results of a comprehensive clinical and instrumental study demonstrated that the children mostly had lumbosacral pain (52.4% of cases; neck pain was observed in 29.5% of cases; while thoracic pain syndromes were observed in 18.1% of cases. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was diagnosed in 16.19% of children; congenital abnormalities of the spine, in 15.2%; scoliosis (idiopathic and secondary, in 8.6%; and Scheuermann-Mau's disease, in 5.71%. The conclusion has been made about the high prevalence of back pain in schoolchildren. Muscular tonic syndromes were prevailing in the clinical structure in children; radicular syndromes were less frequent. Musculoskeletal disorders were the main causes of back pain. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was often observed, which was revealed as functional instability of the vertebral motor segment, spondylolisthesis due to weak ligaments, and disc protrusions. Congenital abnormalities of the spine, scoliosis, and Scheuermann-Mau' disease were observed less often. 

  17. Myofascial low back pain: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard A; Cruz Colon, Eduardo J

    2010-11-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is a common nonarticular local musculoskeletal pain syndrome caused by myofascial trigger points located at muscle, fascia, or tendinous insertions, affecting up to 95% of people with chronic pain disorders. Clinically, myofascial pain syndrome can present as painful restricted range of motion, stiffness, referred pain patterns, and autonomic dysfunction. The underlying cause is often related to muscular imbalances, and following a thorough physical examination the condition should be treated with a comprehensive rehabilitation program. Additional treatment options include pharmacologic, needling with or without anesthetic agents or nerve stimulation, and alternative medicine treatments such as massage or herbal medicines. Repeated trigger point injections should be avoided, and corticosteroids should not be injected into trigger points.

  18. Alkaptonuria, a rare cause for low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Muralidhar Haridas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Alkaptonuria is a very rare disease that can cause premature degenerative arthritis of the spine and peripheral large joints. I present here a case of middle-aged woman who developed low back pain secondary to alkaptonuria.

  19. Valium May Be Useless for Acute Lower Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in New York City. "Despite how common this complaint is, there has never been much agreement on ... Back Pain Medicines About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  20. Risk Factors for Restricting Back Pain in Older Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Una E.; Fraenkel, Liana; Han, Ling; Leo-Summers, Linda; Gill, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify risk factors for back pain leading to restricted activity (restricting back pain) in older persons. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Greater New Haven, Connecticut. Participants 731 men and women aged 70 years or older, who were community-living and non-disabled in essential activities of daily living at baseline. Measurements Candidate risk factors were ascertained every 18 months for 108 months during comprehensive home-based assessments. Restricting back pain was assessed during monthly telephone interviews for up to 126 months. Incident episodes of: (1) short-term (one episode lasting one month) restricting back pain; and (2) persistent (one episode lasting two or more months) or recurrent (two or more episodes of any duration) restricting back pain were determined during each 18-month interval. The associations between the candidate risk factors and short-term and persistent/recurrent restricting back pain, respectively, were evaluated using a multivariable Cox model. Results The cumulative incidence was 21.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 19.6%, 23.1%) for short-term restricting back pain and 20.6% (CI 18.6%, 22.9%) for persistent/recurrent restricting back pain over a median follow-up of 109 months. In a recurrent event multivariable analysis, female sex (HR 1.30; 1.07, 1.58), weak grip strength (HR 1.24; 1.01,1.52), and hip weakness (HR 1.19; 1.07,1.32) were independently associated with an increased likelihood of having short-term restricting back pain, while female sex (HR 1.48; CI 1.13,1.94), depressive symptoms (HR 1.57; 1.23, 2.00), 2 or more chronic conditions (HR 1.38; 1.08, 1.77), and arthritis (HR1.66; 1.31, 2.09) were independently associated with persistent/recurrent restricting back pain. Conclusion In this prospective study, several factors were independently associated with restricting back pain, including some that may be modifiable and therefore potential targets for interventions to reduce this common and

  1. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF BACK PAIN IN YOUNG POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiral

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low back pain in young patients represents an area of particular challenge and importance to referring physicians. Although plain radiography remains initial imaging tool, MRI due to its inherent high quality soft tissue contrast resolution, lack of ionizing radiation and rare requirement of contrast media remains invaluable modality to evaluate back pain in young patients. AIMS: The role of MRI in evaluation of various lesions of spine, inter vertebral discs and spinal canal in young patients (3–17 years of age. MATERIALS & METHODS: This was a prospective study done from on young patients (total 35 patients who presented with back pain are evaluated with MRI. Patients advised MRI spine for complaints other than back pain and uncooperative patients were excluded from the study. The study was performed using GE 1.5T and Siemen’s 3.0T MRI machines. RESULTS: Although significant number of children and adolescents who presented with back pain did not show any significant abnormality on MRI, the most common etiology in this study was disc disease and herniation. This was immediately followed by second most common cause as sacroilitis and spondylolysis with or without listhesis. Scoliosis, spinal trauma and infective etiologies were third most common cause of back pain in this study. Neoplastic conditions and congenital anomalies were found among the rare causes of back pain in children and adolescents in our study. CONCLUSION: Back pain is common in children and adolescents and its incidence increases with age. MRI remains main stay of spinal imaging to evaluate various pathologies of vertebrae, bone marrow, discs, ligaments, spinal cord and sacroiliac joints.

  2. Trunk flexion measurement for the assessment of low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    MILJKOVIC NADICA S.; BIJELIC GORAN S.; DJORDJEVIC OLIVERA C.; KONSTANTINOVIC LJUBICA M.; ZABALETA HARITZ R.; SEKARA TOMISLAV B.

    2015-01-01

    Low Back Pain (LBP) is one of the most common incidences all over the world. For the assessment of LBP, descriptive medical scores are widely used. Nevertheless, there is a need for the quantitative assessment of LBP by appropriate physiological and kinematic measurements. Quantitative assessment methods are of interest since they might provide reliable and repeatable measures related to low back pain in both everyday clinical practice and at home or work. In this paper, we proposed simple me...

  3. Effects of Exercise on Reducing Pain and Disability in Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Pordel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Back pain is one of the causes of disability in the adult population. Back pain may occur for various reasons. In addition to the movements of the trunk and spine, trunk plays an important role in maintaining a good condition and stabilizing the spine. Trunk muscle weakness leads to poor performance in spinal biomechanics and as the result unbalanced mechanical forces is entered to joints. Development of these conditions can cause back pain. Several studies have shown that back pain is associated with muscle weakness. The therapeutic component of this disease is benign and 90% of back pain can be treated by supportive therapy, so only 10 percent is dealt with surgery. One of the supportive therapies branches is movement therapy. Movement therapy with nervous system involvement of muscle torso causes constant effects on the body, in addition to relieving pain and increasing performance.

  4. Effects of active rehabilitation therapy on muscular back strength and subjective pain degree in chronic lower back pain patients

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hea-Kyung; Gwon, Hak-ju; Kim, Seon-Rye; Park, Chan-Seok; Cho, Byung-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study applied active rehabilitation therapy to muscular back strength and assessed the subjective pain degree in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: experimental (n=8) and control (n=8). The experimental group performed two types of rehabilitation therapy programs four times per week for eight weeks. The rehabilitation program was based on the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency’s program. There were seve...

  5. Catastrophising, pain, and disability in patients with nonspecific low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Attention has been drawn to examining the contributions of “catastrophising” to the prediction of pain and disability in individuals with low back pain (LBP). Objectives: This study investigated the proportion of patients with LBP who engaged in catastrophic thinking about pain and its association with pain intensity and disability. We also investigated the components of pain catastrophising that is predictive of disability. Methods: A total of 275 participants with nonspeci...

  6. Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Per; Wedderkopp, Niels; Korsholm, Lars;

    Background: It is generally acknowledged that low back pain (LBP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, not many studies have looked at the way LBP tracks over age and how common it is until early adulthood. Purposes: The purposes of this presentation are to show the prevalence...... as having had reported pain in the lower back within the past month. The prevalence estimates and the various patterns of LBP reporting over time are presented as percentages. Results: Of the 771 children sampled, 62%, 57%, and 58% participated in the three back surveys. The three prevalence estimates...

  7. Effects of active rehabilitation therapy on muscular back strength and subjective pain degree in chronic lower back pain patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hea-Kyung; Gwon, Hak-ju; Kim, Seon-Rye; Park, Chan-Seok; Cho, Byung-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study applied active rehabilitation therapy to muscular back strength and assessed the subjective pain degree in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: experimental (n=8) and control (n=8). The experimental group performed two types of rehabilitation therapy programs four times per week for eight weeks. The rehabilitation program was based on the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency’s program. There were several types of stretching and strengthening. Back strength was measured using the Back Muscle Dynamometer TKK-5402. The visual analog scale score, selected to measure degrees of subjective pain, was used to assess treatment efficacy. [Results] For the experimental group, muscular back strength increased from 133.90 ± 11.84 kg before exercise to 145.59 ± 14.49 kg after exercise. In the control group, muscular back strength decreased from 133.92 ± 3.84 kg before exercise to 133.90 ± 5.81 kg after exercise. In the experimental group, the visual analog scale score for subjective pain decreased from 6.63 ± 0.52 before exercise to 5.75 ± 0.46 after exercise; in the control group, it decreased from 5.61 ± 0.52 before exercise to 5.61 ± 0.52 after exercise. [Conclusion] Active rehabilitation therapy is a positive intervention that can provide relief from back pain. PMID:27821917

  8. Management of patients with back pain in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O N Gerasimova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied the efficiency of drug therapy using the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID meloxicam (Movalis for nonspecific back pain and radiculopathy in the outpatient practice (without physio-, reflex, and manual therapies. Examination of 156 patients revealed a specific cause of back pain only in 6 (3.8%. Drug therapy using Movalis in 150 patients with acute, subacute, chronic nonspecific back pain at various sites or radiculopathy resulted in a considerable reduction in pain (as high as 1-3 VAS scores and its complete regression in 97.3% of cases within 2-3 weeks of treatment. Movalis therapy was found to be well tolerated and caused a low frequency of side effects (1.7% as mild gastrointenstinal disorders; Movalis used in combination with antiepileptic agents (pregabalin and gabapentin, myorelaxants (Midocalm and Milgamma in some patents was ascertained to be also well tolerated.

  9. Low back pain post partum - A case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-23

    Sacral stress fracture is an unusual source of low back pain and can be easily confused with a number of other clinical conditions seen in physiotherapy clinics. The purpose of this case report is to describe the case of a patient presenting with low back pain post partum illustrating pertinent aspects of differential diagnosis and issues of management. A 31 year old female presented complaining of low back pain since the birth of her second child 11 months earlier. Subjective and objective examination led the Therapist to consider a diagnosis of sacral stress fracture. This diagnosis was confirmed by MRI. Three months after presenting to physiotherapy the patient was pain free and had returned to all aspects of her daily life without any difficulties. Clinicians must be aware of the less common pathologies in any hypotheses development. A careful history and physical examination and broad hypotheses generation will ensure that patients are accurately diagnosed and receive appropriate and effective treatments.

  10. Intensive interdisciplinary outpatient pain management program for chronic back pain: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Artner J; Kurz S; Cakir B; Reichel H; Lattig F

    2012-01-01

    Juraj Artner, Stephan Kurz, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, RKU, GermanyBackground: Chronic back pain is relatively resistant to unimodal therapy regimes. The aim of this study was to introduce and evaluate the short-term outcome of a three-week intensive multidisciplinary outpatient program for patients with back pain and sciatica, measured according to decrease of functional impairment and pain.Methods: The program was desi...

  11. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorenberg M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Miguel Gorenberg,1,2 Kobi Schwartz31Department of Nuclear Medicine, B'nai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, Israel; 2The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; 3Department of Physical Therapy, B'nai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study.Keywords: myofascial, noninvasive, electrical, impedance

  12. Short-term outcomes of a back school program for chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodselmans, AP; Jaegers, SM; Goeken, LN; Göeken, L.N.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the short-term outcome of a back school program for patients suffering from chronic, nonspecific low back pain (LBP). Design: Quasi-experimental cohort study with a waiting list control group. Setting: Dutch rehabilitation department. Participants: Experimental group (n = 14) pa

  13. Acknowledging the patient with back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup; Norlyk, Annelise

    2015-01-01

    of this literature review is to gain a better understanding of back patients’ illness experiences and to identify, systematise and integrate the findings of different qualitative studies that may elucidate barriers, consequences or focal points in connection with the care and treatment. Methods: The methodology......Rationale and aims: Research shows that back patients’ illness experiences affect their interaction with the healthcare system. It is important to examine the exact nature of these experiences in order to shed valuable light on how back patients perceive their illness and hospitalisation. The aim...... and translates into a certain way of perceiving and explaining illnesses and symptoms. Results: The thematic analysis shows that it is through experiences and memories that we create our identity and consciousness. Ignoring the illness experiences can therefore be seen as disregarding, the patient as a human...

  14. Comparison of pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life in patients with low back and neck pain

    OpenAIRE

    Uluğ, Naime; Yakut, Yavuz; Alemdaroğlu, İpek; Yılmaz, Öznur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare patients with low back and neck pain with respect to kinesiophobia, pain, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Three-hundred patients with low back (mean age 43.2±11 years) and 300 with neck pain (mean age 42.8±10.2 years) were included in this study. Pain severity was evaluated by using the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, which includes a Visual Analogue Scale, quality of life by the Nottingham Health Profile, and kinesiophobia ...

  15. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T.M. Enthoven (Wendy); P.D.D.M. Roelofs; R.A. Deyo (Richard); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chronic back pain is an important health problem. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used to treat people with low back pain, especially people with acute back pain. Short term NSAID use is also recommended for pain relief in people with chronic back pa

  16. A Personal Projects Analysis: examining adaptation to low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroman, Kerryellen; Chamberlain, Kerry; Warner, Rebecca

    2009-07-01

    Personal Projects Analysis (PPA) offers an alternative approach to studying adaptation to illnesses. This study investigated adaptation to low back pain using PPA to examine the relationship between participants' perceptions of pain, and their functioning and well-being. Participants appraised their five most important projects on 26 dimensions, such as project value, success and difficulty. Factor analyses of the project ratings yielded five dispositions (Integrity, Personal Agency, Social Visibility, Pain Salience and Stressfulness). In regression analysis all five dispositions significantly predicted Physical and Social Function, Disruption of Roles, and Well-being. ;Pain Salience' was the strongest predictor of functional outcomes, and ;Stressfulness' was the best predictor of well-being.

  17. Axial low back pain: one painful area--many perceptions and mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Förster

    Full Text Available Axial low back pain can be considered as a syndrome with both nociceptive and neuropathic pain components (mixed-pain. Especially neuropathic pain comprises a therapeutic challenge in practical experience and may explain why pharmacotherapy in back pain is often disappointing for both the patient and the therapist. This survey uses epidemiological and clinical data on the symptomatology of 1083 patients with axial low back pain from a cross sectional survey (painDETECT. Objectives were (1 to estimate whether neuropathic pain contributes to axial low back pain and if so to what extent. (2 To detect subgroups of patients with typical sensory symptom profiles and to analyse their demographic data and co-morbidities. (3 To compare patients with and without prior intervertebral disc surgery (IVD. Neuropathic pain components could be detected in 12% of the entire cohort. Cluster analyses of these patients revealed five distinct subgroups of patients showing a characteristic sensory profile, i.e. a typical constellation and combination of symptoms. All subgroups occurred in relevant numbers and some showed distinct neuropathic characteristics while others showed nociceptive features. Post-IVD-surgery patients showed a tendency to score more "neuropathic" than patients without surgery (not statistically significant. Axial low back pain has a high prevalence of co-morbidities with implication on therapeutic aspects. From these data it can be concluded that sensory profiles based on descriptor severity may serve as a better predictor for therapy assessment than pain intensity or sole diagnosis alone. Standardized phenotyping of pain symptoms with easy tools may help to develop an individualized therapy leading to a higher success rate in pharmacotherapy of axial low back pain.

  18. Core strength training for patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] Through core strength training, patients with chronic low back pain can strengthen their deep trunk muscles. However, independent training remains challenging, despite the existence of numerous core strength training strategies. Currently, no standardized system has been established analyzing and comparing the results of core strength training and typical resistance training. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the results of previous studies to explore the effectiveness of various core strength training strategies for patients with chronic low back pain. [Methods] We searched for relevant studies using electronic databases. Subsequently, we evaluated their quality by analyzing the reported data. [Results] We compared four methods of evaluating core strength training: trunk balance, stabilization, segmental stabilization, and motor control exercises. According to the results of various scales and evaluation instruments, core strength training is more effective than typical resistance training for alleviating chronic low back pain. [Conclusion] All of the core strength training strategies examined in this study assist in the alleviation of chronic low back pain; however, we recommend focusing on training the deep trunk muscles to alleviate chronic low back pain.

  19. Comparison between kinesiotherapy and back school in the treatment of low back pain in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Maria Marques Gomes Bertolini; Maria Lúcia Ziroldo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to compare the efficacy of physiotherapy treatment involving kinesiotherapy and back school in older adults’ lowback pain. Methods: study of the case-series type. The pain visual analog scale and the WHOQOL-bref were used for assessingquality of life, and the Timed Up and Go Test was used for testing agility. A total of 21 older adults, who had had low back painfor over three months, participated in the study. The sample was divided in two groups (kinesiotherapy and back school).Th...

  20. Back Pain at Work: Preventing Pain and Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... falling and injuring your back. Consider tai chi, yoga and weight-bearing exercises that challenge your balance. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 150 minutes ...

  1. Self-reported pain and disability outcomes from an endogenous model of muscular back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Steven Z

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to develop an induced musculoskeletal pain model of acute low back pain and examine the relationship among pain, disability and fear in this model. Methods Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in 52 healthy volunteers (23 women, 17 men; average age 22.4 years; average BMI 24.3 using fatiguing trunk extension exercise. Measures of pain intensity, unpleasantness, and location, and disability, were tracked for one week after exercise. Results Pain intensity ranged from 0 to 68 with 57.5% of participants reporting peak pain at 24 hours and 32.5% reporting this at 48 hours. The majority of participants reported pain in the low back with 33% also reporting pain in the legs. The ratio of unpleasantness to intensity indicated that the sensation was considered more unpleasant than intense. Statistical differences were noted in levels of reported disability between participants with and without leg pain. Pain intensity at 24 hours was correlated with pain unpleasantness, pain area and disability. Also, fear of pain was associated with pain intensity and unpleasantness. Disability was predicted by sex, presence of leg pain, and pain intensity; however, the largest amount of variance was explained by pain intensity (27% of a total 40%. The second model, predicting pain intensity only included fear of pain and explained less than 10% of the variance in pain intensity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a significant association between pain and disability in this model in young adults. However, the model is most applicable to patients with lower levels of pain and disability. Future work should include older adults to improve the external validity of this model.

  2. [Episacral lipoma: a treatable cause of low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Hatice Rana; Nacır, Barış; Özeri, Zuhal; Karagöz, Aynur

    2013-01-01

    Episacral lipoma is a small, tender subcutaneous nodule primarily occurring over the posterior iliac crest. Episacral lipoma is a significant and treatable cause of acute and chronic low back pain. Episacral lipoma occurs as a result of tears in the thoracodorsal fascia and subsequent herniation of a portion of the underlying dorsal fat pad through the tear. This clinical entity is common, and recognition is simple. The presence of a painful nodule with disappearance of pain after injection with anaesthetic, is diagnostic. Medication and physical therapy may not be effective. Local injection of the nodule with a solution of anaesthetic and steroid is effective in treating the episacral lipoma. Here we describe 2 patients with painful nodules over the posterior iliac crest. One patient complained of severe lower back pain radiating to the left lower extremity and this patient subsequently underwent disc operation. The other patient had been treated for greater trochanteric pain syndrome. In both patients, symptoms appeared to be relieved by local injection of anaesthetic and steroid. Episacral lipoma should be considered during diagnostic workup and in differential diagnosis of acute and chronic low back pain.

  3. Intensive interdisciplinary outpatient pain management program for chronic back pain: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Juraj Artner, Stephan Kurz, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, RKU, GermanyBackground: Chronic back pain is relatively resistant to unimodal therapy regimes. The aim of this study was to introduce and evaluate the short-term outcome of a three-week intensive multidisciplinary outpatient program for patients with back pain and sciatica, measured according to decrease of functional impairment and pain.Methods: The program was designed for patients suffering from chronic back pain to provide intensive interdisciplinary therapy in an outpatient setting, consisting of interventional injection techniques, medication, exercise therapy, back education, ergotherapy, traction, massage therapy, medical training, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, aquatraining, and relaxation.Results: Based on Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS scores, a significant improvement in pain intensity and functionality of 66.83% NRS and an ODI of 33.33% were achieved by our pain program within 3 weeks.Conclusion: This paper describes the organization and short-term outcome of an intensive multidisciplinary program for chronic back pain on an outpatient basis provided by our orthopedic department, with clinically significant results.Keywords: chronic back pain, intense, multidisciplinary, program, outpatient

  4. Limbus Vertebra Presenting with Inflammatory Low Back Pain: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Tuna, Serpil; Özdemir, Tayfun; Öz, Hande Ece

    2016-01-01

    Limbus vertebra is a condition characterized by marginal interosseous herniation of the nucleus pulposus, and causes non specific symptoms like low back pain, back pain, muscle spasms and radiculopathy. It is frequently confused with vertebral fracture, infection, schmorl nodule or tumour because it has not a spesific symptom. It usually causes mechanical low back pain rather than inflammatory low back pain. We reported a patient presented with inflammatory low back pain and diagnosed with an...

  5. Lumbar motion changes in chronic low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Rune M; Hartvigsen, Jan; Boyle, Eleanor;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Several therapies have been used in the treatment of chronic low back pain, including various exercise strategies and spinal manipulative therapy. A common belief is that spinal motion changes in particular ways in direct response to specific interventions, such as exercise....../SETTING: Secondary analysis of a subset of participants from a randomized clinical trial. PATIENT SAMPLE: 199 study participants with low back pain of more than six weeks' duration who had spinal motion measures obtained before and after the period of intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: Lumbar region spinal kinematics......, the motion parameters included in the analysis. The spinal manipulation group changed to a smoother motion pattern (reduced jerk index) while the exercise groups did not. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence that spinal motion changes can occur in chronic low back pain patients over a 12-week period...

  6. [Obesity and low back pain--biology, biomechanics and epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamme, C H

    2005-07-01

    Aim of the following paper is to describe the impact of obesity on low back pain. The mature disc is one of the most sparsely cellular tissues in the body, water content and concentration of proteoglycan decreases with increasing age. Both, static compressive loading and increased pressures, may result in damage of the integrity of the disc like tears of the anulus, followed by mechanical compression or chemical damage of the nerve roots. The intradiscal pressure is dependent on the body position and increases in the following order: prone, standing, upright sitting. In addition, bending and weight lifting increases the intradiscal pressure. For asymptomatic subjects, reported prevalences of disc degenerations in MRI studies are often quite high. Several studies report a significant association between body weight and low back pain, some do not. Recent research indicates that heredity has a dominant role in disc degeneration and low back pain, although the complex distributions and interactions of genetic factors are currently unknown.

  7. CORRELATION OF PAIN AND DISABILITY WITH MRI FINDINGS IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBAR DISCOGENIC BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra K. Wani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar disc prolapse is one of the common causes of low back pain seen in the working population. There are contradictorty reports regarding the clinical significance of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings observed in these patients. Purpose: The aim of the study was to determine the association of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings with intensity of pain and self reported disability among persons with lumbar discogenic back pain. Material And Methods: A consecutive series of patients aged between 20 – 50 years, who were investigated by MRI of lumbar spine because of LBP(Low Back Pain were selected.LBP intensity was measured by using Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS and functional disability by Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODI. Each MRI scan was assessed and graded by radiologist according to standardized protocol. Results: The Pearson’s correlation coefficient for pain intensity on NPRS (r value = -0.01614 and disability percentage ( r value =-0.5628 in discogenic back pain patients demonstrated negative correlation. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that there is no association of MRI findings in the lumbar spine with intensity of pain and disability among persons with lumbar discogenic back pain.

  8. Application of surface electromyography topography in low back pain rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Tse, Yuk-hang, Jessica; 謝毓衡

    2014-01-01

    The management of low back pain (LBP) has long been a challenge as it is a highly prevalent disease worldwide due to the lack of an apparent etiology and a conclusive therapeutic treatment. Heterogeneous groups of LBP patients with diverse medical backgrounds also complicate the problem. A clinical threshold is demanded to match the patients and treatments appropriately in order to maximize the treatment success rate. Besides, the assessments of disability and pain perception due to LBP made ...

  9. The scope of back pain in Navy helicopter pilots

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Andrea S.

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Human Systems Integration Report This thesis investigates issues such as long hours in the cockpit, ineffective seat padding, Night Vision Goggle (NVG) use, and the constant vibrations involved in flying rotary wing aircraft. Pain is subjective and severity is difficult to compare between individuals. Does back pain affect safety of flight? In the military helicopter aviator community, 60-80% of helicopter pilots are estimated ...

  10. Pancreatic cancer and chronic thoracic back pain: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yurkiw, Dennis J

    1995-01-01

    A male with persistent thoracic spine pain and clinical symptoms suggesting a more grave condition than mechanical back pain is presented. The patient had previously been attended to by a medical doctor and a chiropractor. The symptom picture and the ineffectiveness of previously administered chiropractic care suggests a medical referral with further investigation. The importance of history taking is emphasized. An accurate diagnosis and administration of the appropriate treatment is paramoun...

  11. Patients' interpretations of a counselling intervention for low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Sanne; Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Gonge, Birgitte Krøis

    2012-01-01

    persist. A Danish randomised controlled trial identified an effective counselling intervention on low back pain patients' physical function, bodily pain and sick leave. Counselling addressed experienced workplace barriers and physical activity. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to achieve...... of status interviews performed during the randomised controlled trial's intervention. ANALYSIS: Between two individual counselling sessions, all 110 participants were interviewed about their perspectives on adhering to their individual plans for reaching specific goals for adjustments at their workplace...

  12. [Back pain and dorsal kyphosis in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravo, Ana Rita; Tavares, Viviana; Canhão, Helena; da Silva, J Canas

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic osteoporosis (JIO) is a rare condition of unknown aetiology, with pre-pubertal onset and frequently spontaneous remission after puberty. We report a case of a 14 years old boy, which two years before began dorso-lumbar pain with dorsal kyphosis. At the age of 12, he was on percentil 25 for height and had no other symptoms or alterations on physical exam. He had multiple vertebral fractures, a low serum vitamin D, and a Z-score in lumbar spine of -5,3. Diagnosis of JIO was made after excluding other causes of juvenile osteoporosis. He was submitted to pamidronate therapy and after six months showed clinical and bone mineral density improvement. At the age of 14 he is asymptomatic. The authors present this clinical case because of is rarity and to point out that although many cases have spontaneous remission, without any therapy, some may persist and become more serious, with pain and multiple fractures, justifying therapeutic intervention.

  13. DNA methylation of SPARC and chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashwood Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extracellular matrix protein SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine has been linked to degeneration of the intervertebral discs and chronic low back pain (LBP. In humans, SPARC protein expression is decreased as a function of age and disc degeneration. In mice, inactivation of the SPARC gene results in the development of accelerated age-dependent disc degeneration concurrent with age-dependent behavioral signs of chronic LBP. DNA methylation is the covalent modification of DNA by addition of methyl moieties to cytosines in DNA. DNA methylation plays an important role in programming of gene expression, including in the dynamic regulation of changes in gene expression in response to aging and environmental signals. We tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation down-regulates SPARC expression in chronic LBP in pre-clinical models and in patients with chronic LBP. Results Our data shows that aging mice develop anatomical and behavioral signs of disc degeneration and back pain, decreased SPARC expression and increased methylation of the SPARC promoter. In parallel, we show that human subjects with back pain exhibit signs of disc degeneration and increased methylation of the SPARC promoter. Methylation of either the human or mouse SPARC promoter silences its activity in transient transfection assays. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that DNA methylation of a single gene plays a role in chronic pain in humans and animal models. This has important implications for understanding the mechanisms involved in chronic pain and for pain therapy.

  14. Physiotherapy in early phase of low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku Paatelma

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Markku PaatelmaDepartment of Education, Auron – OMT Center, Helsinki, FinlandAbstract: Low back pain (LBP is a substantial health problem and has subsequently attracted a considerable amount of research both in the early and chronic phases. Chronic, nonspecific LBP indicates limited effectiveness from most commonly applied interventions and approaches, but it seems to be opposite in the early phase. Intervention is more effective than advice on staying active in acute LBP, leading to more rapid improvement in function, mood, quality of life, and general health. We compared physiotherapy (PT that involved 3–7 treatment sessions based on subclassification in early phase LBP (acute and subacute LBP lasting <3 months to one session of PT that advised staying active, in 134 LBP patients. Low back and leg pain, disability, and days of sick-leave were evaluated. After 12 months, all groups had only minimal pain and disability. In the advice-only group, those patients who had radiating pain had less improvement compared with other groups, and increasing days of sick-leave because of LBP after 12 months. Compared with the advice-only group, orthopedic manual therapy and McKenzie methods seemed to be slightly more effective than one session of assessment in pain and disability.Keywords: OMT, advice, low back pain 

  15. [Effects of acupuncture therapy on low back pain and/or knee pain in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, M; Takasugi, S; Arai, Y

    2001-07-01

    In April 1999, 75 elderly patients (mean age: 79 years old) with low back pain and/or knee pain visited an acupuncture and physical therapy unit in a geriatric hospital. A cross-sectional study was carried out in order to evaluate the effects of acupuncture therapy on low back pain and/or knee pain in elderly patients. Among them, 60 patients answered that their pain diminished following their therapy. The proportion of patients who were treated with acupuncture therapy were higher in these 60 patients than the other 15 patients (55.5% vs. 26.7%, p = 0.05). The result suggests that acupuncture therapy may be able to relieve low back pain and/or knee pain in elderly patients. However, 46% of the patients with acupuncture therapy were also treated with other types of physical therapy. Further studies should be recommended to confirm the effects of acupuncture therapy on low back pain and/or knee pain.

  16. Yoga and pilates in the management of low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorosky, Susan; Stilp, Sonja; Akuthota, Venu

    2008-03-01

    Many interventions for the management of low back pain exist, however most have modest efficacy at best, and there are few with clearly demonstrated benefits once pain becomes chronic. Therapeutic exercise, on the other hand, does appear to have significant benefits for managing patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) in terms of decreasing pain and improving function. In addition, because chronic pain is complex and does not fit a simple model, there have also been numerous trials investigating and demonstrating the efficacy of multidisciplinary pain programs for CLBP. It follows that interventions that treat more than one aspect of LBP would have significant benefits for this patient population. Yoga and Pilates which have, both been gaining in popularity over the last decade are two mind-body exercise interventions that address both the physical and mental aspects of pain with core strengthening, flexibility, and relaxation. There has been a slow evolution of these nontraditional exercise regimens into treatment paradigms for LBP, although few studies examining their effects have been published. The following article will focus on the scientific and theoretical basis of using yoga and Pilates in the management of CLBP.

  17. Making Better Lives: Patient-Focused Care for Low Back Pain (LBP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Chronic Low Back Pain; Hip Ostearthritis; Myofascial Pain Syndrome; Fibromyalgia; Depression; Maladaptive Coping; Lumbar Spinal Stenosis; Insomnia; Sacroiliac Joint Pain; Lateral Hip and Thigh Pain; Anxiety; Dementia; Recent Leg Length Discrepancy

  18. Efficacy of Coblation Annuloplasty in Discogenic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liangliang; Hu, Xiangyu; Tang, Yuanzhang; Li, Xiuhua; Zheng, Shuyue; Ni, Jiaxiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In degenerative disc, the innervated outer annulus is confirmed to the major origin resulted in discogenic pain. To alleviate the discogenic pain, annuloplasty with electrothermal technology was proved to be effective, which mainly involves the thermal heating of the annulus to denature collagen fibers and denervate posterior annular nerve fibers. However, little is known that efficacy of annuloplasty with coblation technology in treating discogenic pain through directly interrupting nerves in outer annulus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of coblation annuloplasty for the treatment of discogenic low back pain. In a clinical prospective observational study, 17 consecutive patients with discogenic low back pain underwent coblation annuloplasty under local anesthesia. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, patient responses stating significant (≥50%) pain relief, and modified MacNab criteria were adopted to evaluate the pain intensity, degree of pain relief, and functional status after 6 months of follow-up. The preoperative pain VAS score was 6.5 ± 0.8(95% confidence interval [CI] 6.1–6.9) and the pain VAS score decreased to 2.9 ± 1.6 (95% CI 2.1–3.8), 2.9 ± 1.7 (95% CI 2.1–3.8), 3.2 ± 1.6 (95% CI 2.4–4.1), 3.2 ± 1.7 (95% CI 2.4–4.2) at 1 week and 1, 3 and 6 month postoperatively, respectively. 12 (70.6%), 11 (64.7%), 10 (58.8%) and 10 (58.8%) of patients reported significant pain relief at 1 week and 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. At 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively, the numbers of patients with “excellent” or “good” ratings were 13 (76.5%), 11 (64.7%), and 10 (58.8%) according to the modified MacNab criteria. No serious complications were observed. The finds show that coblation annuloplasty is an effective, safe, and less uncomfortable procedure in managing discogenic low back pain. PMID:25984672

  19. Active lifestyle protects against incident low back pain in seniors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Christensen, Kaare

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study of twins. OBJECTIVES: To investigate associations between physical activity, physical function, and incident low back pain (LBP) in an elderly population. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The relationship between an active lifestyle and LBP in seniors is unknown...

  20. Minimally invasive spine surgery in chronic low back pain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoor, A. B.; Oner, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 85%. The pathophysiology of LBP can be various depending on the underlying problem. Only in about 10% of the patients specific underlying disease processes can be identified. Patients with scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, herniated

  1. Spinal manipulative therapy for acute low-back pain (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubinstein, S.M.; Terwee, C.B.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Boer, M.R.M. de; Tulder, M.W. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many therapies exist for the treatment of low-back pain including spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), which is a worldwide, extensively practised intervention. This report is an update of the earlier Cochrane review, first published in January 2004 with the last search for studies up to J

  2. Low Back Pain in Microgravity and Bed Rest Studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Belavy, D.L.; Hides, J.A; Richardson, C.A.; Snijders, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: The prevalence of low back pain (LBP) for astronauts in space (68%) is higher than the 1-mo prevalence for the general population on Earth (39%). It is unclear whether differences occur between healthy subjects and astronauts with a history of LBP. Knowledge of this issue is imp

  3. Lumbar bone mass predicts low back pain in males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, M.J.M.; Koppes, L.L.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Dieën, J.H. van

    2012-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN.: Longitudinal study of lumbar bone mass as predictor of low back pain (LBP). OBJECTIVE.: To investigate whether low bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) values at the age of 36 years are associated with the prevalence of LBP at the age of 42 years among the study p

  4. Back to School Foot Pain (Flip-Flops)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increase in ankle injuries among young athletes. Football, soccer and basketball are the sports most likely to lead to sprains, broken... Foot of the Class After wearing flip-flops all summer, students head back to school with painful ... Soccer Season Prime time for foot and ankle injuries. ...

  5. Prevalence and tracking of back pain from childhood to adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Per; Wedderkopp, Niels; Korsholm, Lars

    2011-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that back pain (BP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, the development until early adulthood is not well understood and, in particular, not the individual tracking pattern. The objectives of this paper are to show the prevalence estimates of BP, low ...

  6. Meningoradiculitis due to borreliosis presenting as low back pain only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Crevits, I.; Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Casteels-Van Daele, M. [Department of Paediatrics, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-02-01

    We report a child with Borrelia burgdorferi meningoradiculitis. This entity, also known as Bannwarth syndrome, is rare and its presentation with low back pain only is even more unusual. The MRI findings can suggest the diagnosis. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 refs.

  7. Low Back Pain? Relax, Breathe and Try Yoga

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163537.html Low Back Pain? Relax, Breathe and Try Yoga Review of 12 studies found small improvements in ...

  8. Does magnetic resonance imaging predict future low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffens, D; Hancock, M J; Maher, C G;

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to identify pathology responsible for low back pain (LBP). However, the importance of findings on MRI remains controversial. We aimed to systematically review whether MRI findings of the lumbar spine predict future LBP in different samples...

  9. Low Back Pain in Microgravity and Bed Rest Studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.; Belavy, D.L.; Hides, J.A; Richardson, C.A.; Snijders, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    AbstractBACKGROUND:The prevalence of low back pain (LBP) for astronauts in space (68%) is higher than the 1-mo prevalence for the general population on Earth (39%). It is unclear whether differences occur between healthy subjects and astronauts with a history of LBP. Knowledge of this issue is impor

  10. Physical therapy management of low back pain has changed.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, J.J.; Swinkels, I.C.S.; Bakker, D. de; Dekker, J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2007-01-01

    Background: Since the 1990s, new insights in the physical therapy management of low back pain have been described in guidelines. Furthermore, insurance companies introduced a volume policy to control the costs for physical therapy. Objective: This study aims to establish if developments in knowledge

  11. Stress and back pain: who can escape?

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    On 28 April each year, the International Labour Organization and the World Health Organization organise a World Day for Safety and Health at Work.   For the third consecutive year, CERN will be celebrating the World Day through events and initiatives coordinated by the BE Safety Unit, the HSE Unit, the CERN Medical Service and finally the Fire Brigade. Two main themes that will be highlighted this year are: work stress and musculoskeletal disorders. These two frightening items actually refer to situations that we may all be experiencing. On the day of the event, you will be given information and tips on how to reduce daily stress. You will also be invited to follow a “back pain” course that will bring to light all the activities you can try out in order to fight this affliction and reduce its consequences. The Fire Brigade will also be present to show you how to use the “portoire” chair. Don’t know what a “portoire” chair ...

  12. Comparison between kinesiotherapy and back school in the treatment of low back pain in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Marques Gomes Bertolini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the efficacy of physiotherapy treatment involving kinesiotherapy and back school in older adults’ lowback pain. Methods: study of the case-series type. The pain visual analog scale and the WHOQOL-bref were used for assessingquality of life, and the Timed Up and Go Test was used for testing agility. A total of 21 older adults, who had had low back painfor over three months, participated in the study. The sample was divided in two groups (kinesiotherapy and back school.The older adults were assessed before and after the therapeutic interventions. Results: both groups obtained better scoresin all the variables analyzed in the post-test in relation to the pre-test, and as a result, in the inter-group comparison, theresults did not reveal statistically significant differences (p>0.05. Conclusion: back school and conventional kinesiotherapywere effective in improving the pain, quality-of-life and agility of older adults with low back pain.

  13. Diagnosis and management of low back pain and sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, A H

    1995-10-01

    Acute low back pain with associated sciatica is usually a benign, self-limited disorder. Appropriate medical treatment may include passive forms of physical therapy, including McKenzie exercises, manipulation, medication and therapeutic injections. After pain is controlled, the patient should be taught self-management techniques, including exercises and ergonomic protection of the spine. Evidence is increasing that exercise programs are effective, although the optimal regimen has yet to be defined and may vary from patient to patient. Chronic low back pain is a complex disorder that must be managed aggressively with a multidisciplinary approach that addresses physical, psychologic and socioeconomic aspects of the illness. Self-administered traction, corsets, medications and other treatment methods may prove to be useful adjuncts to an active program of exercise and education that promotes functional restoration.

  14. Individual development in Low Back Pain during Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Lars; Kjær, Per; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte;

    Background: It is generally acknowledged that low back pain (LBP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, not many studies have looked at the way LBP tracks over age and how common it is until early adulthood. The purposes of this presentation is to show how early LBP predicts later...... LBP. Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was carried out between 1997 and 2005, collecting interview data from children at age 10, 13, and 16. The children were sampled to be representative of Danish school children. LBP was defined as having had reported pain in the lower back within the past month....... The prevalence estimates are presented as percentages and the trend over time is tested by logistic regression. The risks from various patterns of LBP reporting over time are presented with odds ratios (ORs). Results: Of the 771 children sampled, 62%, 57%, and 58% participated in the three back surveys...

  15. Low Back Pain - Management Perspective Of A commonly Encountered Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parharaj S S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Low Back pain is a very common symptom affecting the general population, incurring a huge annual societal cost. In spite of this, it remains very commonly misdiagnosed and maltreated. The majority of benign chronic low back pain patients suffer from a combination of myofascial frozen back syndrome with or without an overly of psychosocioeconomic factors. Neural compression causes are less frequent. A though evaluation of the patient to select the most rational therapeutic approach is necessary. In majority of the patients, a well planned out rehabilitation programme is useful. Surgery is indicated in a minority with neural compression or spinal instability, motivation is essential as rehabilitation and surgery have a high failure rate in inadequately motivated patients with psychosocioeconomic dysfunction.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for acute low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Antunes Lopes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurement instruments of pain catastrophizing for middle-aged and elderly individuals are needed to understand its impact on low back pain. The goals were to cross-culturally adapt the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, assess the construct validity through Rasch analysis, and verify reliability and convergent validity of pain catastrophizing with psychosocial factors. 131 individuals aged 55 years and older with acute low back pain were interviewed . The intra-rater reliability was Kp = 0.80 and interrater Kp = 0.75. The Rasch analysis found adequate reliability coefficients (0.95 for items and 0.90 for individuals . The separation index for the elderly was 2.95 and 4.59 items. Of the 13 items, one did not fit the model, which was justified in the sample evaluated. The pain catastrophizing correlated with most psychosocial factors. The instrument proved to be clinically useful. Subsequent studies should carry out the same analysis in different populations.

  17. Does anterior trunk pain predict a different course of recovery in chronic low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagopoulos, John; Hancock, Mark J; Kongsted, Alice;

    2014-01-01

    Patient characteristics associated with the course and severity of low back pain (LBP) and disability have been the focus of extensive research, however, known characteristics do not explain much of the variance in outcomes. The relationship between anterior trunk pain (ATP) and LBP has not been ...

  18. Perspectives on physiotherapy guidelines for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berger

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of chronic low back pain presents a world widedilemma to patients, physiotherapists and clinicians. There is scant evidence for prevention and treatment however it is now acknowledged that the use of  physiotherapy in a multidimensional context has proved the more appropriate model as a vital component of the collaborative approach required for effective pain management. The following article reviews the current literature, evaluates and combines the guidelines that have been proposed from various international studies to provide a practical approach to the management of chronic back pain. This approach recognizes a broad biopsychosocial model of health and the positive role of activity in health and healing with emphasis on function, rather than impairment. Therefore the development of a patient-centred rehabilitative approach has emerged that emphasizes the restoration of normal movement and function with the addition of physical modalities where appropriate. Recent advances in neurophysiology, the modulation of pain and its perception and the fact that biological systems are known to be greatly affected by electrical treatment provide a clearer rationale for the use of physical agents for rehabilitation of patients with pain and relateddisability. The modalities used in conjunction with active exercises include thermal, massage, electrical stimulation, traction, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (Tens, myofascial release, dry needling, mobilization and acupuncture. An algorithm is provided with the intention of developing protocols for breaking the pain cycle in both nociceptive and neuropathic pain states and in reducing inflammation which is a component of both peripheral and central sensitization. Pain rehabilitation is a useful and cost-effective approach to chronic pain management and makes patients’ responsible partners in their own progress. It encourages planning, pacing of activities and activity related

  19. Determining the Pain-Affecting Factors of University Students with Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted on university students with nonspecific low back pain in order to determine the independent variables that affect their pain. [Methods] A total of 514 students were included in this study. Pain was evaluated using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A special form was prepared in order to evaluate the following independent variables: gender, weight, height, Body Mass Index (BMI), working periods sitting straight (television, computer, seminar, etc.), working peri...

  20. Diagnostic uncertainty and recall bias in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbic, Danijela; Pincus, Tamar

    2014-08-01

    Patients' beliefs about the origin of their pain and their cognitive processing of pain-related information have both been shown to be associated with poorer prognosis in low back pain (LBP), but the relationship between specific beliefs and specific cognitive processes is not known. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between diagnostic uncertainty and recall bias in 2 groups of chronic LBP patients, those who were certain about their diagnosis and those who believed that their pain was due to an undiagnosed problem. Patients (N=68) endorsed and subsequently recalled pain, illness, depression, and neutral stimuli. They also provided measures of pain, diagnostic status, mood, and disability. Both groups exhibited a recall bias for pain stimuli, but only the group with diagnostic uncertainty also displayed a recall bias for illness-related stimuli. This bias remained after controlling for depression and disability. Sensitivity analyses using grouping by diagnosis/explanation received supported these findings. Higher levels of depression and disability were found in the group with diagnostic uncertainty, but levels of pain intensity did not differ between the groups. Although the methodology does not provide information on causality, the results provide evidence for a relationship between diagnostic uncertainty and recall bias for negative health-related stimuli in chronic LBP patients.

  1. Naturopathic care for chronic low back pain: a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orest Szczurko

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic low back pain represents a substantial cost to employers through benefits coverage and days missed due to incapacity. We sought to explore the effectiveness of Naturopathic care on chronic low back pain. METHODS: This study was a randomized clinical trial. We randomized 75 postal employees with low back pain of longer than six weeks duration to receive Naturopathic care (n = 39 or standardized physiotherapy (n = 36 over a period of 12 weeks. The study was conducted in clinics on-site in postal outlets. Participants in the Naturopathic care group received dietary counseling, deep breathing relaxation techniques and acupuncture. The control intervention received education and instruction on physiotherapy exercises using an approved education booklet. We measured low back pain using the Oswestry disability questionnaire as the primary outcome measure, and quality of life using the SF-36 in addition to low back range of motion, weight loss, and Body Mass Index as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Sixty-nine participants (92% completed eight weeks or greater of the trial. Participants in the Naturopathic care group reported significantly lower back pain (-6.89, 95% CI. -9.23 to -3.54, p = <0.0001 as measured by the Oswestry questionnaire. Quality of life was also significantly improved in the group receiving Naturopathic care in all domains except for vitality. Differences for the aggregate physical component of the SF-36 was 8.47 (95% CI, 5.05 to 11.87, p = <0.0001 and for the aggregate mental component was 7.0 (95% CI, 2.25 to 11.75, p = 0.0045. All secondary outcomes were also significantly improved in the group receiving Naturopathic care: spinal flexion (p<0.0001, weight-loss (p = 0.0052 and Body Mass Index (-0.52, 95% CI, -0.96 to -0.08, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Naturopathic care provided significantly greater improvement than physiotherapy advice for patients with chronic low back pain. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled

  2. Back Pain in Poland and Germany: A Survey of Prevalence and Association with Demographic Characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Henn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Back pain is the most common form of pain and leads to high costs in all medical care systems. Objective. The present study examines the prevalence of back pain and its associations with some basic demographics. Methods. Two samples from Poland and Germany (about n=500 each were examined via Internet regarding back pain, gender, age, and body mass index (BMI. Results. Back pain is more common in women than in men (risk ratio about 1.7, and a high BMI constitutes an additional risk factor. Age was not related to back pain prevalence. Conclusion. Congruent results in two countries based on the same measure of back pain lead to the assumption that much of the variety found in estimates of back pain are due to inconsistent assessment. For future research, a definition of common criteria on how to assess back pain would be an asset.

  3. Back Pain and Endurance Training of Back Muscles: Justification for Further Study in Helicopter Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    clinical trial [see comments]. Spine 1990Dec;15(12):1317-1320. 17. Dul J, Hildebrandt VH. Ergonomie guidelines for the prevention of low back pain at...Congress 1962;XI Congress, Madrid: 145-151. 56. Singh R. Backache in Chetak Crew and Suggested Ergonomie Improvements in Aircraft Seat Design

  4. Low back pain: considerations for rotary-wing aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Steven John

    2012-09-01

    Low back pain remains a significant issue among helicopter aircrew. There is a considerable body of scientific literature devoted to the problem, including epidemiologic and experimental studies addressing prevalence, characteristics, primary etiology, and contributing factors. It is endemic and multinational, with a prevalence ranging from 50-92%. Archetypal pain begins with flight or within hours of flight, is mostly targeted in the low back/lumbar region and/or buttocks, is transient, and is commonly described as dull and achy. A minority develop chronic, persistent pain that is variously described with dissimilar characteristics. The pernicious effects of back pain or discomfort while piloting may affect flight performance and safety, including reduced operational effectiveness and lost duty time, occupational attrition, curtailed or cancelled missions, compromised emergency egress, and performance deficits during critical phases of flight. The majority of etiologic studies have focused on the pathophysical posture adopted by pilots for aircraft control and exposure to whole body vibration. With more evidence for the former, it remains likely that both, as well as other factors, may have a contributory and perhaps integrative or concerted role. Corrective and mitigation strategies have addressed lumbar support, seat and cockpit ergonomic redesign, and improved aircrew health. Flight surgeons should be familiar with this prevalent issue and future research must address longitudinal cohort studies with clear definitions, relevant and valid exposure data, dose-response detail, and control for contributing factors and confounders.

  5. Enhanced Brain Responses to Pain-Related Words in Chronic Back Pain Patients and Their Modulation by Current Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Puta, Christian; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Weiss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in healthy controls (HC) and pain-free migraine patients found activations to pain-related words in brain regions known to be activated while subjects experience pain. The aim of the present study was to identify neural activations induced by pain-related words in a sample of chronic back pain (CBP) patients experiencing current chronic pain compared to HC. In particular, we were interested in how current pain influences brain activations induced by pain-related adjectives. Subjects viewed pain-related, negative, positive, and neutral words; subjects were asked to generate mental images related to these words during fMRI scanning. Brain activation was compared between CBP patients and HC in response to the different word categories and examined in relation to current pain in CBP patients. Pain-related words vs. neutral words activated a network of brain regions including cingulate cortex and insula in subjects and patients. There was stronger activation in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior midcingulate cortex in CPB patients than in HC. The magnitude of activation for pain-related vs. negative words showed a negative linear relationship to CBP patients’ current pain. Our findings confirm earlier observations showing that pain-related words activate brain networks similar to noxious stimulation. Importantly, CBP patients show even stronger activation of these structures while merely processing pain-related words. Current pain directly influences on this activation. PMID:27517967

  6. Prevalence and associations of neuropathic pain in a cohort of multi-ethnic Asian low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Yueting; Tan, Cheng-Yin; Ng, Chong-Jing; Thang, Sue-Sien; Tan, Leong-Hooi; Khoo, Yvonne Khaii; Lim, Jun-Ni; Ng, Jia-Hui; Chan, Chris Yin-Wei; Kwan, Mun-Keong; Goh, Khean-Jin

    2017-04-01

    The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain differs in different ethnic populations. The aims of the study are to determine its frequency and associations in a multi-ethnic cohort of Asian low back pain patients. This was a cross-sectional study of low back patients seen at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Neuropathic low back pain patients were identified using the painDETECT questionnaire and compared with non-neuropathic (unclear or nociceptive) low back pain patients, in terms of socio-demographic and clinical factors, pain severity (numerical pain rating scale, NPRS), disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, RMDQ), as well as anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). Of 210 patients, 26 (12.4%) have neuropathic low back pain. Neuropathic pain is associated with non-Chinese ethnicity, higher body mass index and pain radiation below the knee. Patients with neuropathic pain have significantly higher NPRS and RMDQ scores, and there are more subjects with anxiety on HADS. However, there are no differences between the groups in age, gender, pain duration or underlying diagnosis of low back pain. The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain in a multi-ethnic Malaysian cohort is lower than previously reported in other populations with possible differences between ethnic groups. It is associated with greater pain severity, disability and anxiety.

  7. Massage application for occupational low back pain in nursing staff

    OpenAIRE

    Talita Pavarini Borges; Julia Maria D'Andrea Greve; Ana Paula Monteiro; Rodrigo Emmanuel Sabbag da Silva; Arlete Mazzini Miranda Giovani; Maria Júlia Paes da Silva

    2012-01-01

    This is a clinical trial which aims to evaluate the efficiency of massage in the reduction of occupational low back pain, and its influence on the performance of work and life activities for the nursing team. The sample consisted of 18 employees who received seven to eight sessions after their work period. From the Numerical Pain Rating Scale, significant improvements were found between the 3rd and 1st evaluations (p=0.000) and between the 3rd and 2nd (p=0.004), using the Wilcoxon test. Regar...

  8. Atypical low back pain: stiff-person syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallien, Philippe; Durufle, Aurélie; Petrilli, Sabine; Verin, Marc; Brissot, Régine; Robineau, Sandrine

    2002-03-01

    Stiff-person syndrome was diagnosed in a patient with chronic low back pain. The diagnosis of this rare neurological condition rests mainly on the clinical findings of axial and proximal limb rigidity, increased lumbar lordosis often accompanied with pain, and normal neurological findings apart from brisk deep tendon reflexes. Electromyography of the lumbar paraspinal muscles shows motor unit firing at rest with normal appearance of the motor unit potentials. Titers of antibody to glutamic acid decarboxylase are elevated. Diazepam is the treatment of reference. Physical therapy can substantially improve quality of life.

  9. The persistence of pain behaviors in patients with chronic back pain is independent of pain and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, M O; Thibault, P; Sullivan, M J L

    2010-11-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to examine the temporal stability of communicative and protective pain behaviors in patients with chronic back pain. The study also examined whether the stability of pain behaviors could be accounted for by patients' levels of pain severity, catastrophizing, or fear of movement. Patients (n=70) were filmed on two separate occasions (i.e., baseline, follow-up) while performing a standardized lifting task designed to elicit pain behaviors. Consistent with previous studies, the results provided evidence for the stability of pain behaviors in patients with chronic pain. The analyses indicated that communicative and protective pain behavior scores did not change significantly from baseline to follow-up. In addition, significant test-retest correlations were found between baseline and follow-up pain behavior scores. The results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses further showed that pain behaviors remained stable over time even when accounting for patients' levels of pain severity. Regression analyses also showed that pain behaviors remained stable when accounting for patients' levels of catastrophizing and fear of movement. Discussion addresses the potential contribution of central neural mechanisms and social environmental reinforcement contingencies to the stability of pain behaviors. The discussion also addresses how treatment interventions specifically aimed at targeting pain behaviors might help to augment the overall impact of pain and disability management programs.

  10. Combination of taping with Back School in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Tana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 70-85% of the general population suffers from back pain. Back School programs have being effective in the treatment of chronic low back pain. Taping may be useful in reducing pain and normalizing muscle function. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the combination of taping with Back School at short- and long-term. Methods: Randomized controlled clinical trial. The experimental group used tape and made Back Scholl and the control group only made Back School. At the beginning and the end of treatment, pain was evaluated with a visual analogue scale, the flexibility determined with the Modified Finger Tip-to-Floor Test and functionality was calculated with the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Depression was recorded with the Depression Beck Inventory just at the beginning. Results: 220 patients were enrolled, only 42 in the experimental group and 33 in the control group completed the treatment. The variation of pain between the first and the fifth session showed no differences between groups regardless of time (p = 0.329. There were no differences between groups in functionality (p = 0.75, flexibility (p = 0.20 and depression. Conclusion: The combination of taping and Back School compared with only Back School was not more effective in reducing pain, increasing functionality and flexibility in patients with chronic low back pain. Key words: Taping; chronic low back pain; spine school; therapy exercises; flexibility; depression.

  11. Prediction of low back pain with two expert systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Murat; Gulbandilar, Eyyup; Cimbiz, Ali

    2012-06-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the common problems encountered in medical applications. This paper proposes two expert systems (artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system) for the assessment of the LBP level objectively. The skin resistance and visual analog scale (VAS) values have been accepted as the input variables for the developed systems. The results showed that the expert systems behave very similar to real data and that use of the expert systems can be used to successfully diagnose the back pain intensity. The suggested systems were found to be advantageous approaches in addition to existing unbiased approaches. So far as the authors are aware, this is the first attempt of using the two expert systems achieving very good performance in a real application. In light of some of the limitations of this study, we also identify and discuss several areas that need continued investigation.

  12. Spinal supports and physical therapy in patients with low back pain: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Podichetty, Vinod K; Varley, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    The association of low back pain with physical workload in seated workstation related jobs has been debated and remains controversial. Clinical studies eliciting the natural history of the disease in this emerging population are insufficient to make definitive conclusions. We report four consecutive cases of patients suffering from low back pain presenting to a tertiary spine clinic with severe non-specific low back pain. Two patients as age-matched controls with persistent low back pain were...

  13. Alternative pop-up for surfers with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Roger L; Loubert, Peter V

    2010-02-01

    Surfing is enjoyed by many people around the world. A common problem in surfers is back pain during the "take-off," specifically the "pop-up." This article describes each part of the "take-off, and introduces an alternative to the "prone pop up" - called the "knee pop-up." This alternative is a suggested technique to alleviate the stress in the lumbar spine during surfing.

  14. Modic changes, possible causes and relation to low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Hanne Birgit; Kjær, Per; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2007-01-01

    In patients with low back pain (LBP) it is only possible to diagnose a small proportion, (approximately 20%), on a patho-anatomical basis. Therefore, the identification of relevant LBP subgroups, preferably on a patho-anatomical basis, is strongly needed. Signal changes on MRI in the vertebral body......-50% of patients with LBP and enable in the development of efficient treatments which might be antibiotics, special rehabilitation programmes, rest, stabilizing exercise, or surgical fixation, depending on the underlying cause for the MC....

  15. The Scope of Back Pain in Navy Helicopter Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    USMC fitness test. If the surgical treatment is more extensive, the grounding may last up to six months for cervical fusions or be permanent for...Ariens, G., Bouter, L. (2000). Flexion and rotation of the trunk and lifting at work are risk factors for low back pain. Spine 2000; 25:3087–92...Trade off between bottoming collective and avoiding excessive lumbar flexion . Unable to reach the backup instruments when locked into the harness

  16. Chronic Low Back Pain due to Retroperitoneal Cystic Lymphangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asieh Sadat Fattahi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal cystic lymphangioma is a rare benign neoplasm. Less than 1% of lymphangiomas is in the retroperitoneum. Lymphangioma is mostly asymptomatic. Chronic symptoms were reported in retroperitoneal type more than others. Acute symptoms due to complications like infection, cyst rupture or hemorrhage may occur. We report an 18-years-old girl with low back pain from 6 months ago with huge pelvic mass and diagnosis of retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma.

  17. Chronic Low Back Pain due to Retroperitoneal Cystic Lymphangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asieh Sadat Fattahi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available   Abdominal cystic lymphangioma is a rare benign neoplasm. Less than 1% of lymphangiomas is in the retroperitoneum. Lymphangioma is mostly asymptomatic. Chronic symptoms were reported in retroperitoneal type more than others. Acute symptoms due to complications like infection, cyst rupture or hemorrhage may occur. We report an 18-years-old girl with low back pain from 6 months ago with huge pelvic mass and diagnosis of retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma.

  18. Low back pain in military recruits in relation to social background and previous low back pain. A cross-sectional and prospective observational survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, L.; Larsen, K.; Weidich, F.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditionally, studies on the etiology of low back pain have been carried out in adult populations. However, since low back pain often appears early in life, more research on young populations is needed. This study focuses on the importance of social background factors and previous low...... on the development of low back pain, when persons are removed from their usual environment and submitted to a number of new stressors. In addition, the importance of the recruits' previous low back pain history in relation to low back pain during military service was studied. This was done by means of questionnaires...... to 1,711 recruits before and after this three-month period. RESULTS: Sedentary occupation was negatively associated with long-lasting low back pain (>30 days during the past year) at baseline with an odds ratios of 0.55 (95% CI: 0.33-0.90). This effect vanished during service. Having parents...

  19. Is back pain during childhood or adolescence associated with muscle strength, muscle endurance or aerobic capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lardon, Arnaud; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Le Scanff, Christine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Back pain is a common condition during childhood and adolescence. The causes of back pain are largely unknown but it seems plausible that some physical factors such as back muscle strength, back muscle endurance and aerobic capacity may play a role in its development, in particular...... in the early years. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review were to investigate in childhood and adolescence 1) if muscular strength in trunk extension is associated with back pain, 2) if muscular endurance in trunk extension is associated with back pain and 3) if aerobic capacity is associated with back...

  20. A novel tool for the assessment of pain: validation in low back pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Scholz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adequate pain assessment is critical for evaluating the efficacy of analgesic treatment in clinical practice and during the development of new therapies. Yet the currently used scores of global pain intensity fail to reflect the diversity of pain manifestations and the complexity of underlying biological mechanisms. We have developed a tool for a standardized assessment of pain-related symptoms and signs that differentiates pain phenotypes independent of etiology. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a structured interview (16 questions and a standardized bedside examination (23 tests, we prospectively assessed symptoms and signs in 130 patients with peripheral neuropathic pain caused by diabetic polyneuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, or radicular low back pain (LBP, and in 57 patients with non-neuropathic (axial LBP. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed distinct association patterns of symptoms and signs (pain subtypes that characterized six subgroups of patients with neuropathic pain and two subgroups of patients with non-neuropathic pain. Using a classification tree analysis, we identified the most discriminatory assessment items for the identification of pain subtypes. We combined these six interview questions and ten physical tests in a pain assessment tool that we named Standardized Evaluation of Pain (StEP. We validated StEP for the distinction between radicular and axial LBP in an independent group of 137 patients. StEP identified patients with radicular pain with high sensitivity (92%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 83%-97% and specificity (97%; 95% CI 89%-100%. The diagnostic accuracy of StEP exceeded that of a dedicated screening tool for neuropathic pain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, we were able to reproduce subtypes of radicular and axial LBP, underscoring the utility of StEP for discerning distinct constellations of symptoms and signs. CONCLUSIONS: We present a novel method of identifying pain subtypes

  1. Questionnaire for low back pain in the garment industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Supreet; Sinha, A G K; Benjamin, A I

    2013-05-01

    Low back pain affects up to 90% of the world's population at some point in their lives. Until date no questionnaire has been designed for back pain in the garment industry workers. Therefore, the objective of this study is to design a questionnaire to determine the prevalence, risk factors, impact, health care service utilization and back pain features in the garment industry workers and gain preliminary experience of its use. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire was established. Items showing acceptable internal consistency and moderate to high test re-test reliability were retained in the questionnaire. Items showing unacceptable internal consistency, low test re-test reliability or poor differentiation were reworded, redrafted and re-tested on the workers. It took 20 min to complete one interview schedule. Environmental factors such as the absence of the garment industry owner/supervisor or co-workers at the time of the interview and interview during leisure hours need to be standardized. Thus, final questionnaire is ready for use after necessary amendments and will be used on the larger sample size in the main study.

  2. Questionnaire for low back pain in the garment industry workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Bindra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain affects up to 90% of the world′s population at some point in their lives. Until date no questionnaire has been designed for back pain in the garment industry workers. Therefore, the objective of this study is to design a questionnaire to determine the prevalence, risk factors, impact, health care service utilization and back pain features in the garment industry workers and gain preliminary experience of its use. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire was established. Items showing acceptable internal consistency and moderate to high test re-test reliability were retained in the questionnaire. Items showing unacceptable internal consistency, low test re-test reliability or poor differentiation were reworded, redrafted and re-tested on the workers. It took 20 min to complete one interview schedule. Environmental factors such as the absence of the garment industry owner/supervisor or co-workers at the time of the interview and interview during leisure hours need to be standardized. Thus, final questionnaire is ready for use after necessary amendments and will be used on the larger sample size in the main study.

  3. The Use of Conservative and Alternative Therapy for Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chung Leung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain may have complex patho-physiological causes leading to chronicity that resists conventional managements. Complementary and alternative treatment options have, therefore, gained popularity. In this chapter, acupuncture, manual therapy, and natural healing for low back pain will be discussed. Special emphasis is given on the role of the individual in the control and prevention of low back pain.

  4. Mediators of Yoga and Stretching for Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Sherman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although yoga is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for its benefits. In a trial comparing yoga to intensive stretching and self-care, we explored whether physical (hours of back exercise/week, cognitive (fear avoidance, body awareness, and self-efficacy, affective (psychological distress, perceived stress, positive states of mind, and sleep, and physiological factors (cortisol, DHEA mediated the effects of yoga or stretching on back-related dysfunction (Roland-Morris Disability Scale (RDQ. For yoga, 36% of the effect on 12-week RDQ was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 18% by sleep disturbance, 9% by hours of back exercise, and 61% by the best combination of all possible mediators (6 mediators. For stretching, 23% of the effect was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 14% by days of back exercise, and 50% by the best combination of all possible mediators (7 mediators. In open-ended questions, ≥20% of participants noted the following treatment benefits: learning new exercises (both groups, relaxation, increased awareness, and the benefits of breathing (yoga, benefits of regular practice (stretching. Although both self-efficacy and hours of back exercise were the strongest mediators for each intervention, compared to self-care, qualitative data suggest that they may exert their benefits through partially distinct mechanisms.

  5. Mediators of yoga and stretching for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Karen J; Wellman, Robert D; Cook, Andrea J; Cherkin, Daniel C; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2013-01-01

    Although yoga is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for its benefits. In a trial comparing yoga to intensive stretching and self-care, we explored whether physical (hours of back exercise/week), cognitive (fear avoidance, body awareness, and self-efficacy), affective (psychological distress, perceived stress, positive states of mind, and sleep), and physiological factors (cortisol, DHEA) mediated the effects of yoga or stretching on back-related dysfunction (Roland-Morris Disability Scale (RDQ)). For yoga, 36% of the effect on 12-week RDQ was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 18% by sleep disturbance, 9% by hours of back exercise, and 61% by the best combination of all possible mediators (6 mediators). For stretching, 23% of the effect was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 14% by days of back exercise, and 50% by the best combination of all possible mediators (7 mediators). In open-ended questions, ≥20% of participants noted the following treatment benefits: learning new exercises (both groups), relaxation, increased awareness, and the benefits of breathing (yoga), benefits of regular practice (stretching). Although both self-efficacy and hours of back exercise were the strongest mediators for each intervention, compared to self-care, qualitative data suggest that they may exert their benefits through partially distinct mechanisms.

  6. Psychological and behavioral differences between low back pain populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eklund, A.; Bergstrom, G.; Bodin, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychological, behavioral and social factors have long been considered important in the development of persistent pain. Little is known about how chiropractic low back pain (LBP) patients compare to other LBP patients in terms of psychological/behavioral characteristics. Methods......: The data show statistically significant overall differences across samples for the subgroups based on psychological and behavioral characteristics. The cluster classifications placed (in terms of the proportions of the adaptive copers and dysfunctional subgroups) sample A between B and the two secondary...... care samples C and D. Conclusions: The chiropractic primary care sample was more affected by pain and worse off with regards to psychological and behavioral characteristics compared to the other primary care sample. Based on our findings from the MPI-S instrument the 4 samples may be considered...

  7. Spine school for patients with low back pain: interdisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Moreno Garcia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze and evaluate an interdisciplinary educational treatment - Spine School.METHODS: This study is a non-controlled clinical trial. Twenty one individuals (19 women aged 27-74 years diagnosed with chronic low back pain were enrolled and followed-up by a rheumatologist and an orthopedist. The evaluations used were SF36, Roland Morris, canadian occupational performance measure (COPM and visual analogue scale (VAS of pain that were performed before and after seven weeks of treatment.RESULTS: We found statistically significant improvements in vitality (mean 48.10 vs. 81.25 p=0.009 and limitations caused by physical aspects (mean 48.81 vs. 81.25 p=0.038 and perception of pain (mean 6.88 vs. 5.38 p=0.005. Although the results were suggestive of improvement, there were no statistical significant differences in the domains social aspects (average 70.82 vs. 92.86 p=0.078, emotional aspects (average 52.38 vs. 88.95 p=0.078, and the performance satisfaction (mean 4.94 vs. 8.24 p=0.074.CONCLUSION: The Interdisciplinary Spine School was useful for improvement in some domains of quality of life of people with low back pain.

  8. Acupuncture for back pain, knee pain and insomnia in transverse myelitis - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghela, Sonia A; Donnellan, Clare P

    2008-09-01

    This case report describes the use of acupuncture for back pain, knee pain and insomnia in a 49 year old woman with a recent diagnosis of transverse myelitis with paraplegia, sensory disturbance, and bladder and bowel dysfunction. She was receiving intensive in-patient multi-disciplinary rehabilitation but was struggling to participate fully due to pain and poor sleep quality. She received a course of acupuncture in addition to standard care and reported substantial benefits including reduction in pain, improved sleep and mood, and reduction in daytime fatigue. Effective symptom control allowed this patient to participate more fully in her rehabilitation programme. Reduction of knee pain and sleep disturbance was maintained until discharge, 15 weeks after the last acupuncture treatment. This case report suggests that acupuncture may be an option to consider for other patients with pain or sleep disturbance that is interfering with their rehabilitation programme.

  9. Try Drug-Free Options First for Low Back Pain, New Guidelines Say

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In general, the ACP said, people with low back pain should first try nondrug options. For pain that has lasted fewer than 12 weeks, research suggests heat wraps, massage, acupuncture and spinal manipulation may ease pain and restore ...

  10. The effect of cushioning insoles on back and lower extremity pain in an industrial setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, John R

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between low back pain and lower extremity pain in a group of factory workers and determine the effect of cushioning insoles on low back pain and lower extremity pain. Data were gathered via questionnaire from 306 employees of an aircraft engine assembly factory. A subset of 40 workers who had reported significant levels of back or lower extremity pain were sampled for four consecutive 12-hour shifts wearing their normal footwear and then a week later for four consecutive shifts wearing cushioning insoles. High levels of low back pain and lower extremity pain were reported by workers on the plant floor, but low back pain was poorly correlated to lower extremity pain (r = 0.371). The effect of insoles on the subset of 40 workers was to lower low back pain by 38%, foot pain by 37%, and knee pain by 38% (p < .001). The reduction in low back pain, however, was not correlated to the reduction in lower extremity pain; workers reporting a decrease in low back pain differed from those reporting less lower extremity pain.

  11. Usefulness of the Pain Tracking Technique in Acute Mechanical Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Acosta, Tania; Martín Cordero, Jorge E.; Hernández Tápanes, Solangel; Pedroso Morales, Isis; Fernández Cuesta, José Ignacio; Leyva Serrano, Maritza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of the pain tracking technique in acute mechanical low back pain. Method. We performed an experimental prospective (longitudinal) explanatory study between January 2011 and September 2012. The sample was randomly divided into two groups. Patients were assessed at the start and end of the treatment using the visual analogue scale and the Waddell test. Treatment consisted in applying the pain tracking technique to the study group and interferential current therapy to the control group. At the end of treatment, cryotherapy was applied for 10 minutes. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann Whitney test were used. They were performed with a predetermined significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results. Pain was triggered by prolonged static posture and intense physical labor and intensified through trunk movements and when sitting and standing. The greatest relief was reported in lateral decubitus position and in William's position. The majority of the patients had contracture. Pain and disability were modified with the rehabilitation treatment in both groups. Conclusions. Both the pain tracking and interferential current techniques combined with cryotherapy are useful treatments for acute mechanical low back pain. The onset of analgesia is faster when using the pain tracking technique. PMID:26240758

  12. Pain evaluation of patients with fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, and low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques Amélia Pasqual

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare pain as reported by outpatients with fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, and low back pain, in view of designing more adequate physical therapy treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A Portuguese version of the McGill Pain Questionnaire - where subjects are asked to choose, from lists of pre-categorized words, one or none that best describes what they feel - was used to assess pain intensity and quality of 64 patients, of which 24 had fibromyalgia, 22 had osteoarthritis, and 18 had low back pain. The pre-categorized words were organized into 4 major classes -- sensory, affective, evaluative, and miscellaneous. RESULTS: Patients with fibromyalgia reported, comparatively, more intense pain through their choice of pain descriptors, both sensory and affective; they also chose a higher number of words from these classes than patients in the other groups and were the only ones to choose specific affective descriptors such as "vicious", "wretched", "exhausting", "blinding". CONCLUSION: Assuming that each disease presents unique qualities of pain experience, and that these can be pointed out by means of this questionnaire by patients' choice of specific groups of words, the findings suggest that fibromyalgia include not only a physical component, but also a psycho-emotional component, indicating that they require both emotional/affective and physical care.

  13. Usefulness of the Pain Tracking Technique in Acute Mechanical Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Bravo Acosta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of the pain tracking technique in acute mechanical low back pain. Method. We performed an experimental prospective (longitudinal explanatory study between January 2011 and September 2012. The sample was randomly divided into two groups. Patients were assessed at the start and end of the treatment using the visual analogue scale and the Waddell test. Treatment consisted in applying the pain tracking technique to the study group and interferential current therapy to the control group. At the end of treatment, cryotherapy was applied for 10 minutes. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann Whitney test were used. They were performed with a predetermined significance level of p≤0.05. Results. Pain was triggered by prolonged static posture and intense physical labor and intensified through trunk movements and when sitting and standing. The greatest relief was reported in lateral decubitus position and in William’s position. The majority of the patients had contracture. Pain and disability were modified with the rehabilitation treatment in both groups. Conclusions. Both the pain tracking and interferential current techniques combined with cryotherapy are useful treatments for acute mechanical low back pain. The onset of analgesia is faster when using the pain tracking technique.

  14. Enhanced sensitivity to punctate painful stimuli in female patients with chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puta Christian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic low back pain (CLBP has been shown to be associated with various pathophysiological changes at several level of the sensorimotor system, pointing to a general hypersensitivity in CLBP patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate signs of generalized mechanical pain hypersensitivity in CLBP patients on the hand and on the painful site of the back. Methods Pinprick stimulation according to a validated standardized quantitative sensory testing protocol was used in 14 female CLBP patients and 14 healthy controls (HC matched for sex and age. Stimulus response functions to pinprick stimulation on the skin were examined at the affected back and reference sites (hand palmar and hand dorsum. Data from CLBP patients were compared with HC and with reference data from the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. Results We found significant differences in the stimulus response functions between CLBP patients and HC. Pain ratings to the pinpricks were increased for low and moderate pinprick stimuli in CLBP patients. Importantly, this kind of specific pinprick hyperalgesia was found not only for the affected body site (back, but also for the remote reference sites (hand dorsum and hand palmar. Conclusions We interpret our results as pointing to changes in the nociceptive processing in CLBP at higher levels of the neuraxis, possibly thalamus and/or attentional control, rather than changes of spinal processing. Alternatively, there might be a higher vulnerability to noxious stimulation in CLBP patients.

  15. Fear-avoidance beliefs and pain avoidance in low back pain--translating research into clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainville, James; Smeets, Rob J E M; Bendix, Tom;

    2011-01-01

    For patients with low back pain, fear-avoidance beliefs (FABs) represent cognitions and emotions that underpin concerns and fears about the potential for physical activities to produce pain and further harm to the spine. Excessive FABs result in heightened disability and are an obstacle...... for recovery from acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain....

  16. The Efficacy of Thermotherapy and Cryotherapy on Pain Relief in Patients with Acute Low Back Pain, A Clinical Trial Study

    OpenAIRE

    DEHGHAN, MORTEZA; Farahbod, Farinaz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute low back pain is one of the most common health problems especially in industrialized countries where 75 per cent of the population develop it at least once during their life. This study examined the efficacy of thermotherapy and cryotherapy, alongside a routine pharmacologic treatment, on pain relief in patients with acute low back pain referring an orthopedic clinic in Shahrekord, Iran.

  17. The effect of low back exercise on the pain condition of sedentary women who Suffering from low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Arıkan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 15 sedentary women were taken to study with the aim of to determine the effect of four week exercise at the middle aged women suffering from low back pain (age 27,933±3,104, height 163,266±5,573, body weight 59,466±9,905, BMI 21,933±3,127. Participants was informed about low back health and given exercise program. Exercises were put in to practice twice a day for four weeks. Exercise were started five times repeat in first week, ten times in second and it continued fifteen times in third and fourth weeks. Before and the after the exercise program Oswestry Each scale was applied to participants. First and the last tests were compared repeated t test, and the results were evaluated at the level of p<0,05. Decreasing the pain was determined after exercise program of ache, personal caring, heaving, walking, sitting, sleeping, wandering, sexual and social life. In conclusion the exercise program which was applied by the participants, were reduced their low back pain.

  18. Dose dependent effects of Jungsongouhyul Pharmacopuncture on Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Jin Jeong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The object of this study is to analyse about Low Back Pain's intensity according to dosage of Jungsongouhyul pharmacopuncture. Method: Three groups were made with 15 patients in Po-Hang Oriental Hospital, which is affiliates to Daegu Haany University. They were observed August 1st, 2010 to September 30th. 2010. Each group was treated by based on acupuncture, herb and other therapy and differential dosage of Jungsongouhyul pharmacopuncture 0,4, 0.8, and 1.2cc. We had measured pain threshold and Visual Analog Scale during first week of their admission. The statistical analysis was performed by using the oneway ANOVA and Tukey's test. Result: Change of VAS was not statistically significant. Change of pain threshold was statistically significant. Multiple comparisons of pain threshold between the group1,2 was not statistically significant. Multiple comparisons of pain threshold between the group1,3 and group2,3 was statistically significant. Conclusions: Jungsongouhyul Pharmacopuncture 1.2cc was more effective than 0.4 and 0.8cc.

  19. Does anterior trunk pain predict a different course of recovery in chronic low back pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, John; Hancock, Mark J; Kongsted, Alice; Hush, Julia; Kent, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Patient characteristics associated with the course and severity of low back pain (LBP) and disability have been the focus of extensive research, however, known characteristics do not explain much of the variance in outcomes. The relationship between anterior trunk pain (ATP) and LBP has not been explored, though mechanisms for visceral referred pain have been described. Study objectives were: (1) determine prevalence of ATP in chronic LBP patients, (2) determine whether ATP is associated with increased pain and disability in these patients, and (3) evaluate whether ATP predicts the course of pain and disability in these patients. In this study, spinal outpatient department patients mapped the distribution of their pain and patients describing pain in their chest, abdomen or groin were classified with ATP. Generalized estimating equations were performed to investigate the relationship between ATP and LBP outcomes. A total of 2974 patients were included and 19.6% of patients reported ATP. At all time points, there were significant differences in absolute pain intensity and disability in those with ATP compared with those without. The presence of ATP did not affect the clinical course of LBP outcomes. The results of this study suggest that patients who present with LBP and ATP have higher pain and disability levels than patients with localised LBP. Visceral referred pain mechanisms may help to explain some of this difference.

  20. Limbus Vertebra Presenting with Inflammatory Low Back Pain: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Serpil; Özdemir, Tayfun; Öz, Hande Ece

    2016-03-01

    Limbus vertebra is a condition characterized by marginal interosseous herniation of the nucleus pulposus, and causes non specific symptoms like low back pain, back pain, muscle spasms and radiculopathy. It is frequently confused with vertebral fracture, infection, schmorl nodule or tumour because it has not a spesific symptom. It usually causes mechanical low back pain rather than inflammatory low back pain. We reported a patient presented with inflammatory low back pain and diagnosed with anterior limbus vertebra because it is rare and the patient has atypical clinical presentation.

  1. Is active participation in specific sport activities linked with back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, A.M.; Gausel, AM; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2007-01-01

    specific kinds of sports and self-reported back problems. Back pain is a common complaint in young people and physical inactivity is generally thought to contribute to this. However, some specific sport activities may be detrimental or beneficial to the spine. Information was collected through a semi......-structured interview, a physical examination, and a questionnaire. Associations for back pain, low back pain, mid back pain and neck pain in the preceding month were investigated in relation to specific sports. Associations were controlled for body mass index, puberty stage and sex. There was no association between...

  2. Disability predictors in chronic low back pain after aquatic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Beato, Pedro Ángel; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel; Artero, Enrique G; Robles-Fuentes, Alejandro; Gatto-Cardia, María Claudia; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The physical and psychological factors associated with reduction of disability after aquatic exercise are not well understood. Sixty participants (30 men and 30 women; age, 50.60 [9.69] yrs; body mass index, 27.21 [5.20] kg/m²) with chronic low back pain were prospectively recruited. The 8-wk aquatic therapy program was carried out in an indoor pool sized 25 × 6 m, with 140-cm water depth and 30°C (1°C) of water temperature, where patients exercised for 2-5 days a week. Each aquatic exercise session lasted 55-60 mins (10 mins of warm-up, 20-25 mins of aerobic exercise, 15-20 mins of resistance exercise, and 10 mins of cooldown). Demographic information, disability (Oswestry Disability Index), back pain (visual analog scale), quality-of-life (Short Form 36), abdominal muscular endurance (curl-up), handgrip strength, trunk flexion and hamstring length (sit and reach), resting heart rate, and body mass index were outcomes variables. Significant correlations between change in disability and visual analog scale (at rest, flexion, and extension), curl-up and handgrip (r ranged between -0.353 and 0.582, all Ps < 0.01) were found. Changes in pain and abdominal muscular endurance were significant predictors of change in disability after therapy.

  3. Pain intensity, disability and depression in individuals with chronic back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia de Oliveira Sakamoto Silva Garbi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to measure the pain intensity, identify the disability and depression levels in people with chronic back pain and to correlate these variables. A cross-sectional, descriptive and exploratory study was undertaken at the Pain Treatment Clinic of the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto Hospital das Clínicas, between February and June 2012, after receiving approval from the Ethics Committee at the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing.METHOD: sixty subjects with chronic back pain participated. The instruments used were: the 11-point Numerical Category Scale, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. To analyze the data, the arithmetic means, standard deviations and Spearman's correlation coefficient were calculated.RESULTS: the findings show that the participants presented high pain, disability and depression levels. The correlation between pain intensity and disability and between pain intensity and depression was positive and weak and, between disability and depression, positive and moderate.CONCLUSION: the study variables showed moderate and weak indices and the mutual correlations were positive.

  4. Pain intensity, disability and depression in individuals with chronic back pain1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbi, Márcia de Oliveira Sakamoto Silva; Hortense, Priscilla; Gomez, Rodrigo Ramon Falconi; da Silva, Talita de Cássia Raminelli; Castanho, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Sousa, Fátima Aparecida Emm Faleiros

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to measure the pain intensity, identify the disability and depression levels in people with chronic back pain and to correlate these variables. A cross-sectional, descriptive and exploratory study was undertaken at the Pain Treatment Clinic of the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto Hospital das Clínicas, between February and June 2012, after receiving approval from the Ethics Committee at the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing. METHOD: sixty subjects with chronic back pain participated. The instruments used were: the 11-point Numerical Category Scale, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. To analyze the data, the arithmetic means, standard deviations and Spearman's correlation coefficient were calculated. RESULTS: the findings show that the participants presented high pain, disability and depression levels. The correlation between pain intensity and disability and between pain intensity and depression was positive and weak and, between disability and depression, positive and moderate. CONCLUSION: the study variables showed moderate and weak indices and the mutual correlations were positive. PMID:25296139

  5. Experimentally induced pain perception is acutely reduced by aerobic exercise in people with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Martin D; Shepanski, Melissa A; Mackenzie, Sean P; Clifford, Philip S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether subjects with chronic low back pain demonstrate exercise-induced analgesia to experimentally induced pressure pain. We employed a repeated measures design to study eight subjects with chronic low back pain (mean +/- standard deviation age = 40 +/- 10, duration of pain = 7 +/- 4 years). Pain ratings were measured immediately before and 2 minutes and 32 minutes after 25 minutes of cycle ergometry (5 minutes at 50% peak oxygen uptake, then 20 minutes at 70% peak oxygen uptake). We based the pain ratings on subject input on a visual analog scale at 10-second intervals during the 2-minute pressure pain stimulus to the nondominant index finger. Compared with preexercise values, pain ratings were significantly (p exercise at both 2 and 32 minutes postexercise. We conclude that pressure pain perception can be reduced for more than 30 minutes following aerobic exercise from leg cycling among people with chronic low back pain.

  6. Chronic low back pain patients with accompanying leg pain : The relationship between pain extent and pain intensity, disability and health status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Maarten R.; van der Wurff, Peter; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2013-01-01

    Accompanying leg pain is commonly observed in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and is assumed to be an indicator for the disorder severity. However, it is still unknown whether it is possible to estimate a patient's functional status by the extent of leg pain present. In a post rehabilitat

  7. Movement control tests of the low back; evaluation of the difference between patients with low back pain and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kool Jan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether there is a difference between patients with low back pain and healthy controls in a test battery score for movement control of the lumbar spine. Methods This was a case control study, carried out in five outpatient physiotherapy practices in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Twelve physiotherapists tested the ability of 210 subjects (108 patients with non-specific low back pain and 102 control subjects without back pain to control their movements in the lumbar spine using a set of six tests. We observed the number of positive tests out of six (mean, standard deviation and 95% confidence interval of the mean. The significance of the differences between the groups was calculated with Mann-Whitney U test and p was set on 0.8 was considered a large difference. Results On average, patients with low back pain had 2.21(95%CI 1.94–2.48 positive tests and the healthy controls 0.75 (95%CI 0.55–0.95. The effect size was d = 1.18 (p 0.7. Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating a significant difference between patients with low back pain and subjects without back pain regarding their ability to actively control the movements of the low back. The effect size between patients with low back pain and healthy controls in movement control is large.

  8. The effectiveness of calcitonin on chronic back pain and daily activities in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Papadokostakis, G.; Damilakis, J; Mantzouranis, E.; Katonis, P.; Hadjipavlou, A.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nasal calcitonin on chronic back pain and disability attributed to osteoporosis. The study design involved three groups of osteoporotic postmenopausal women suffering from chronic back pain. Group I consisted of 40 women with vertebral fractures, group II of 30 women with degenerative disorders and group III of 40 patients with non specific chronic back pain and without abnormality on plain X-rays. Pain intensity was measured using a nume...

  9. Effects of Pilates and Classical Kinesiotherapy on chronic low back pain: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro,Ivanna Avila; Oliveira,Tiago Damé de; Blois,Cleci Redin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction : Chronic low back pain (LBP) is characterized by daily lower back pain lasting more than three consecutive months. It may lead to functional disability and can be treated by several physical therapy techniques, including therapeutic exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pilates and classical kinesiotherapy on the treatment of pain and functional disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and methods : The study sample cons...

  10. Lumbar stimulation belt for therapy of low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Dejan B; Bijelić, Goran; Miler, Vera; Dosen, Strahinja; Popović, Mirjana B; Schwirtlich, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    We developed the STIMBELT, an electrical stimulation system that comprises a lumbar belt with up to eight pairs of embedded electrodes and an eight-channel electronic stimulator. The STIMBELT is an assistive system for the treatment of low-back pain (LBP). We describe here technical details of the system and summarize the results of its application in individuals with subacute and chronic LBP. The direct goals of the treatment were to relieve pain, reduce muscle spasms, increase strength and range of motion, and educate individuals with LBP in reducing the chances of its reoccurrence. The outcome measures include: a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Oswestry LBP Disability Questionnaire, the Short Form (SF)-12 health survey, and the Manual Muscle Test. The results indicate significant benefits for individuals who use the STIMBELT in addition to the conventional therapy as opposed to only the conventional therapy.

  11. POSSIBILITIES OF LOCAL THERAPY FOR LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Chugunov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common pain syndromes caused by musculoarticular pathology. Analgesics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, myorelaxants, and non-drug therapies are used to treat patients with LBP. The sufficient efficiency of this type of therapy is strongly supported by the results of clinical trials; its fundamentals have been embodied in a number of regional and international guidelines for the management of patients with LBP. Alongside the sufficient efficacy of NSAIDs, their use, their long-term use in particular, is associated with a wide range of adverse reactions. The increased efficiency of treatment in patients with LBP is frequently achieved by the application of topical dosage forms. Whether the new Russian drug Nanoplast forte may be used to treat patients with LBP is considered.

  12. Acupuncture for Low Back Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhou Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. As evidence of the effectiveness of acupuncture for low back pain (LBP is inconsistent, we aimed to critically appraise the evidence from relevant systematic reviews. Methods. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs concerning acupuncture and LBP were searched in seven databases. Internal validity and external validity of systematic reviews were assessed. Systematic reviews were categorized and high quality reviews assigned greater weightings. Conclusions were generated from a narrative synthesis of the outcomes of subgroup comparisons. Results. Sixteen systematic reviews were appraised. Overall, the methodological quality was low and external validity weak. For acute LBP, evidence that acupuncture has a more favorable effect than sham acupuncture in relieving pain was inconsistent; it had a similar effect on improving function. For chronic LBP, evidence consistently demonstrated that acupuncture provides short-term clinically relevant benefits for pain relief and functional improvement compared with no treatment or acupuncture plus another conventional intervention. Conclusion. Systematic reviews of variable quality showed that acupuncture, either used in isolation or as an adjunct to conventional therapy, provides short-term improvements in pain and function for chronic LBP. More efforts are needed to improve both internal and external validity of systematic reviews and RCTs in this area.

  13. Acupuncture for low back pain: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lizhou; Skinner, Margot; McDonough, Suzanne; Mabire, Leon; Baxter, George David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. As evidence of the effectiveness of acupuncture for low back pain (LBP) is inconsistent, we aimed to critically appraise the evidence from relevant systematic reviews. Methods. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning acupuncture and LBP were searched in seven databases. Internal validity and external validity of systematic reviews were assessed. Systematic reviews were categorized and high quality reviews assigned greater weightings. Conclusions were generated from a narrative synthesis of the outcomes of subgroup comparisons. Results. Sixteen systematic reviews were appraised. Overall, the methodological quality was low and external validity weak. For acute LBP, evidence that acupuncture has a more favorable effect than sham acupuncture in relieving pain was inconsistent; it had a similar effect on improving function. For chronic LBP, evidence consistently demonstrated that acupuncture provides short-term clinically relevant benefits for pain relief and functional improvement compared with no treatment or acupuncture plus another conventional intervention. Conclusion. Systematic reviews of variable quality showed that acupuncture, either used in isolation or as an adjunct to conventional therapy, provides short-term improvements in pain and function for chronic LBP. More efforts are needed to improve both internal and external validity of systematic reviews and RCTs in this area.

  14. Clinical examination findings as prognostic factors in low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Kongsted, Alice; Hestbaek, Lise

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a strong tradition of performing a clinical examination of low back pain (LBP) patients and this is generally recommended in guidelines. However, establishing a pathoanatomic diagnosis does not seem possible in most LBP patients and clinical tests may potentially be more...... been investigated in confirmatory studies and study quality is generally low. There is a need for hypothesis testing studies designed specifically to investigate the prognostic value of the clinical tests, and a need for standardization of the performance and interpretation of tests....

  15. Dose dependent effects of Jungsongouhyul Pharmacopuncture on Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Man-Jin Jeong; O-Gon Kwon; Chang-Hoon Woo; Hee-Duk An

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The object of this study is to analyse about Low Back Pain's intensity according to dosage of Jungsongouhyul pharmacopuncture. Method: Three groups were made with 15 patients in Po-Hang Oriental Hospital, which is affiliates to Daegu Haany University. They were observed August 1st, 2010 to September 30th. 2010. Each group was treated by based on acupuncture, herb and other therapy and differential dosage of Jungsongouhyul pharmacopuncture 0,4, 0.8, and 1.2cc. We had measured pa...

  16. Effectiveness of mindfulness meditation on pain and quality of life of patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Banth; Maryam Didehdar Ardebil

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Recovery of patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) is depended on several physical and psychological factors. Therefore, the authors aimed to examine the efficacy of mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) as a mind-body intervention on quality of life and pain severity of female patients with nonspecific chronic LBP (NSCLBP). Effectiveness of mindfulness meditation on pain and quality of life of patients with chronic low back pain Eighty-eight patients diagnosed a...

  17. Effect of Yoga on Pain, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, and Serotonin in Premenopausal Women with Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Moseon Lee; Woongjoon Moon; Jaehee Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background. Serotonin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are known to be modulators of nociception. However, pain-related connection between yoga and those neuromodulators has not been investigated. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of yoga on pain, BDNF, and serotonin. Methods. Premenopausal women with chronic low back pain practiced yoga three times a week for 12 weeks. At baseline and after 12 weeks, back pain intensity was measured using visual analogue scale (VAS), and...

  18. Back pain reporting in young girls appears to be puberty-related

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froberg Karsten

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a large increase in back pain reporting in the early teens. In no previous study has the prevalence of low back pain been investigated in relation to the onset of puberty. The objective of this study was to establish whether the onset of puberty is associated with back pain reporting in young girls. Methods A subsample of 254 girls aged 8–10 years and 165 girls aged 14–16 years from a cross-sectional survey of 481 children aged 8–10 years and 325 adolescents aged 14–16 years of both sexes. Main outcome measures were back pain defined as low back pain, mid back pain, and/or neck pain in the past month. Other variables of interest were Puberty (five different stages, age, body mass index, and smoking. Independent information on onset of puberty was obtained through a physical examination and on back pain through an individual structured interview. The association was studied between onset of puberty and the outcome variable (the one month period prevalence of back pain, controlling for overweight, and smoking. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to describe bivariate associations, logistic regression with robust standard errors was used for multivariate analyses. Results There is a highly significant trend for increased back pain reporting with increasing level of puberty until maturity is reached. The biggest leap appears between the second level (beginning of puberty and the third level (mid puberty and the findings remain after controlling for the covariates. These results emanate from the low back, whereas pain in the mid back and neck do not seem to be linked with pubertal stage. Conclusion In girls, the reporting of low back pain increases in frequency during puberty until maturity, regardless of age. Why some girls are susceptible to back pain in the early stage of puberty is unknown.

  19. Acupuncture for Improving Chronic Back Pain, Osteoarthritis and Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Karen J; Coeytaux, Remy R

    2009-05-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a critical review of the literature on acupuncture for chronic back pain, osteoarthritis and headache. METHODS: Review of meta-analyses, systematic reviews and some well-conducted, recent studies. RESULTS: Overall, acupuncture appears superior to no treatment or usual care for persons with chronic back pain, osteoarthritis, or headache. However, these findings vary depending on the specific outcome and the follow-up period. The magnitude of the effect varies, but is consistent with a small to moderate effect size in most cases. Moreover, acupuncture is not clearly superior to sham acupuncture, although the latter is a controversial control group. Acupuncture has a favorable safety profile, with relatively few side effects and serious ones quite rare. Limited evidence suggests that acupuncture is a cost effective treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence suggests that acupuncture is a reasonable therapeutic option, but not the clear therapy of choice for any of these conditions. Acupuncture may be especially valuable for patients who prefer it to other options or are concerned about using analgesic medications.

  20. Diagnosis and Characters of Non-Specific Low Back Pain in Japan: The Yamaguchi Low Back Pain Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Imajo, Yasuaki; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nishida, Norihiro; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional data from the Yamaguchi low back pain study conducted in Yamaguchi prefecture, Japan, was used for this analysis. Methods A total of 320 patients were recruited from walk-in orthopedic clinics in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. Patients visited the clinics primarily for low back pain (LBP) and sought treatment between April and May 2015. A self-questionnaire was completed by patients, while radiographic testing and neurological and physical examination was performed by the orthopedist in each hospital. The cause and characters of LBP was determined following examination of the data, regional anesthesia and block injection. Results ‘Specific LBP’ was diagnosed in 250 (78%) patients and non-diagnosable, ‘non-specific LBP’ in 70 (22%) patients. The VAS scores of patients were: LBP, 5.8±0.18; leg pain, 2.9±0.18 and the intensity of leg numbness was 1.9±0.16. Item scores for SF-8 were: general health, 46.6±0.40; physical function, 43.5±0.51; physical limitations, 42.8±0.53; body pain, 42.1±0.52; vitality, 48.4±0.37; social function, 46.9±0.53; emotional problems, 48.9±0.43; mental health, 46.9±0.43. Conclusions The incidence of non-specific LBP in Japan was lower than previous reports from western countries, presumably because of variation in the diagnosis of LBP between different health care systems. In Japan, 78% of cases were classified as ‘specific LBP’ by orthopedists. Identification of the definitive cause of LBP should help to improve the quality of LBP treatment. PMID:27548658

  1. Spinal cord stimulation with hybrid lead relieves pain in low back and legs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de Cecile C.; Dijkstra, Cindy; Lenders, Mathieu W.P.M.; Holsheimer, Jan; Levy, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common chronic pain syndrome. Whereas it is relatively easy to achieve pain relief in the lower limbs of FBSS patients with spinal cord stimulation (SCS), it is difficult to manage low back pain with SCS. The performance of a paddle-shap

  2. BACK PAIN ASSOCIATED WITH OSTEOPOROSIS — TREATMENT PATTERNS, APPROACHES TO THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights current approaches to diagnosis and treatment of back pain, associated with osteoporosis. An algorithm for management of patients with vertebral compression fracture, complicated by pain, the main approaches to drug treatment of back pain and osteoporosis are described.

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casazza, Brian A

    2012-02-15

    Acute low back pain is one of the most common reasons for adults to see a family physician. Although most patients recover quickly with minimal treatment, proper evaluation is imperative to identify rare cases of serious underlying pathology. Certain red flags should prompt aggressive treatment or referral to a spine specialist, whereas others are less concerning. Serious red flags include significant trauma related to age (i.e., injury related to a fall from a height or motor vehicle crash in a young patient, or from a minor fall or heavy lifting in a patient with osteoporosis or possible osteoporosis), major or progressive motor or sensory deficit, new-onset bowel or bladder incontinence or urinary retention, loss of anal sphincter tone, saddle anesthesia, history of cancer metastatic to bone, and suspected spinal infection. Without clinical signs of serious pathology, diagnostic imaging and laboratory testing often are not required. Although there are numerous treatments for nonspecific acute low back pain, most have little evidence of benefit. Patient education and medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and muscle relaxants are beneficial. Bed rest should be avoided if possible. Exercises directed by a physical therapist, such as the McKenzie method and spine stabilization exercises, may decrease recurrent pain and need for health care services. Spinal manipulation and chiropractic techniques are no more effective than established medical treatments, and adding them to established treatments does not improve outcomes. No substantial benefit has been shown with oral steroids, acupuncture, massage, traction, lumbar supports, or regular exercise programs.

  4. Stress and back pain: we’re all concerned!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    Yesterday (18 April), CERN celebrated the World Day for Safety and Health at Work. This event was organised by the Safety Unit of the BE Department, the HSE Unit, the Medical Service and the Fire Brigade for the third year running.     The yellow mannequin demonstrates how different positions require different effort to carry the same load: the first by curving the back (which places more strain on the spine), and the other by bending the knees (a good technique to reduce strain). Information stands on the themes of stress and back pain were set up in each of CERN’s three restaurants and attracted more than 260 people, including CERN’s Director-General. Stress self-evaluation, anti-stress techniques, tips for avoiding and managing back pain… all aspects of these everyday afflictions were addressed. The participants, most of whom were directly affected by these problems, had their many questions answered at the stands....

  5. Long-term experience with implanted intrathecal drug administration systems for failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treharne GJ

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous intrathecal drug delivery has been shown in open studies to improve pain and quality of life in those with intractable back pain who have had spinal surgery. There is limited data on long term effects and and even less for patients with mechanical back pain without prior spinal surgery. Methods We have investigated spinal drug administration systems for patients with failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain by patient questionnaire study of the efficacy of this therapy and a case notes review. Results 36 patients (97% of 37 approached completed questionnaires, 24 with failed back syndrome and 12 with chronic mechanical low back pain. Recalled pre-treatment levels with current post-treatment levels of pain and a range of quality of life measures (recorded on 11-point numerical rating scales were compared. Pain improved significantly in both groups (Wilcoxan signed ranks test, p 0.005, Wilcoxan signed ranks test with Bonferroni correction. Diamorphine was used in all 37 patients, bupivacaine in 32, clonidine in 27 and baclofen in 3. The mean dose of diamorphine increased for the first 2 years but did not change 2–6 years post implant, averaging 4.5 mg/day. Revision surgery was required in 24% of cases, but reduced to 12% in the later years of our experience. Conclusions We conclude that spinal drug administration systems appear to be of benefit in alleviating pain in the failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain but need to be examined prospectively.

  6. Pelvic girdle pain and low back pain in pregnancy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermani, Era; Mittal, Rajnish; Weeks, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain (PGP) and pregnancy-related low back pain (PLBP) are common problems with significant physical, psychological, and socioeconomic implications. There are several management options that are underutilized because of lack of comprehensive knowledge by health-care professionals and fear of harmful effects of treatment on the developing fetus. Interventions such as patient education, the use of pelvic belts, acupuncture, and aquatic and tailored postpartum exercises can be of some benefit to these patients. This article will focus on the diagnosis and management of PGP and PLBP, with discussion of terminology, epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and prognosis.

  7. Prevalence of back pain and joint problems in a manufacturing company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchfiel, C M; Boice, J A; Stafford, B A; Bond, G G

    1992-02-01

    To estimate prevalence of back pain and joint problems in employees of a chemical manufacturing company, a questionnaire was administered during medical surveillance examinations between 1987 and 1989. Among 5903 employees completing the questionnaire 35.4% reported back or joint pain during the past year. Back pain lasting 30 days or more occurred in 5.3% of employees, while joint pain and/or swelling occurred in 19.3% of employees. A physician visit was involved for 10.5% and 11.1% of employees reporting back pain and joint problems respectively. A trend of increasing prevalence with increasing age was significant (P less than .001) for all musculoskeletal outcomes. Unadjusted prevalence of back pain and joint problems was significantly higher among men and among whites. After adjusting for age, race, and occupation using logistic regression, the difference in prevalence for the two sexes was diminished or reversed. Similarly, differences in race were diminished when other variables were controlled. Differences in prevalence by occupation were attenuated after adjustment for age, gender, and race. Back pain tended to be reported more frequently for managers, back pain and joint problems for technicians, and back pain requiring physician visit for craftsmen. Self-reported back pain and joint problems during the previous year vary more by age and occupation and less by gender and race in this employed population.

  8. Is there significant correlation between self-reported low back pain visual analogue scores and low back pain scores determined by pressure pain induction matching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, David A; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether self-reported visual analogue scale (VAS) low back pain (LBP) scores are valid against matched psychophysically induced pressure pain scores. Two hundred thirty-six chronic LBP patients (some with neck pain) reported their LBP and neck pain scores on a VAS immediately before psychophysical pressure pain induction used to determine pain threshold (PTHRE), pain tolerance (PTOL), and a psychophysical pressure pain score which matched (PMAT) their current LBP. Pearson Product-Moment correlation coefficients were calculated between reported VAS neck scores, reported VAS LBP scores, and the psychophysically determined LBP PMAT scores. The PMAT scores were calculated utilizing PTOL only and both PTOL and PTHRE. There was a significant correlation between the LBP PMAT scores and the reported LBP VAS scores for both types of psychophysical LBP PMAT score calculations; however, there were insignificant correlations between the LBP PMAT scores and reported neck VAS scores. Chronic LBP patients can match their self-reported VAS LBP scores to psychophysically determined LBP PMAT scores. As such, self-reported VAS chronic LBP scores appear to be valid against one type of psychophysical measurement.

  9. [Vibration, back pain and physical exercise in high-risk professionals: a cross-sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, M; Prosperini, V; Falzano, P; Hendel, M; Raimondi, P

    2004-01-01

    Repeated loads and vibration stress in professional settings are relevant risk factors for back pain. Aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate: a) the prevalence of back pain in two high-risk professional samples (helicopter pilots and bus drivers); b) the association between physical/sports exercise and back pain subjective perception across age. Prevalence of back pain is 94% in helicopter pilots and 74% in bus drivers; prevalence of back pain significantly increases with age. The positive effect of regular physical/sports exercise on subjective back pain significantly decreases with age. Physical or sports exercise adapted to structural characteristic of patients can result effective in diminishing personal impairment in subjects at professional risk.

  10. Treatment-Based Classification versus Usual Care for Management of Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Back Pain PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Daniel Rhon RECIPIENT: The Geneva Foundation Tacoma, WA 98402-4437 REPORT DATE: August 2015 TYPE OF...DATES COVERED 1Aug2014 - 31Jul2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treatment-Based Classification versus Usual Care for Management of Low Back Pain 5a. CONTRACT...the effectiveness of two management strategies for patients with a recent onset of low back pain . One is based on usual care and the other is based on

  11. Workers’ characteristics associated with the type of healthcare provider first seen for occupational back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchette, Marc-André; Rivard, Michèle; Dionne, Clermont E.; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Steenstra,Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have compared the factors that drive patients’ decision to choose a chiropractor, physician or physiotherapist as their first healthcare provider for occupational back pain. The purpose of this study is to identify characteristics associated with the choice of first healthcare provider seen for acute uncomplicated occupational back pain. Methods We analyzed data collected by the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board from a cohort of workers with compensated back pain in ...

  12. Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    physiotherapists, general prac- titioners, chiropractors ) for acute low back pain . At the initial consul- tation clinicians recorded responses to 25...TITLE: Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military: A Randomized Clinical Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven Z. George PT, Ph.D...Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military: 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0564 A Randomized Clinical Trial 5b. GRANT NUMBER PR054098 5c

  13. Pregnancy related back pain, is it related to aerobic fitness? A longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorell Eva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain with onset during pregnancy is common and approximately one out of three women have disabling pain. The pathogenesis of the pain condition is uncertain and there is no information on the role of physical fitness. Whether poorer physical conditioning is a cause or effect of back pain is also disputed and information from prospective studies needed. Methods A cohort of pregnant women, recruited from maternal health care centers in central Sweden, were examined regarding estimated peak oxygen uptake by cycle ergometer test in early pregnancy, reported physical activity prior to pregnancy, basic characteristics, back pain during pregnancy and back pain postpartum. Results Back pain during the current pregnancy was reported by nearly 80% of the women. At the postpartum appointment this prevalence was 40%. No association was displayed between estimated peak oxygen uptake and incidence of back pain during and after pregnancy, adjusted for physical activity, back pain before present pregnancy, previous deliveries, age and weight. A significant inverse association was found between estimated peak oxygen uptake and back pain intensity during pregnancy and a direct association post partum, in a fully adjusted multiple linear regression analysis. Conclusions Estimated peak oxygen uptake and reported physical activity in early pregnancy displayed no influence on the onset of subsequent back pain during or after pregnancy, where the time sequence support the hypothesis that poorer physical deconditioning is not a cause but a consequence of the back pain condition. The mechanism for the attenuating effect of increased oxygen uptake on back pain intensity is uncertain.

  14. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Low Back Pain and CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... massage might be useful for low back pain. Yoga is more effective than a self-care book for improving function and reducing pain. The benefits persist for at least several months. Recently, the ...

  15. Economic burden of back and neck pain: effect of a neuropathic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Nathan; Patel, Aarti A; Benson, Carmela; Macario, Alex; Kim, Myoung; Biondi, David M

    2014-08-01

    This was a retrospective database analysis (2001-2009) of employees' medical, prescription drug, and absence costs and days from sick leave, short- and long-term disability, and workers' compensation. Employees with an ICD-9 diagnostic code for back or neck pain and an ICD-9 for a back- or neck-related neuropathic condition (eg, myelopathy, compression of the spinal cord, neuritis, radiculitis) or radiculopathy were considered to have nociceptive back or neck pain with a neuropathic component. Employees with an ICD-9 for back pain or neck pain and no ICD-9 for a back- or neck-related neuropathic condition or radiculopathy were defined to have nociceptive back or neck pain. Patients with nociceptive back or neck pain with a neuropathic component were classified as having or not having prior nociceptive pain. Annual costs (medical and prescription drug costs and absence costs) and days from sick leave, short- and long-term disability, and workers' compensation were evaluated. Mean annual total costs were highest ($8512) for nociceptive pain with a neuropathic component with prior nociceptive pain (n=9162 employees), $7126 for nociceptive pain with a neuropathic component with no prior nociceptive pain (n=5172), $5574 for nociceptive pain only (n=35,347), and $3017 for control employees with no back or neck pain diagnosis (n=226,683). Medical, short-term disability, and prescription drugs yielded the highest incremental costs compared to controls. Mean total absence days/year were 8.26, 7.86, 5.70, and 3.44, respectively. The economic burden of back pain or neck pain is increased when associated with a neuropathic component.

  16. Are self-reported pain characteristics, classified using the PainDETECT questionnaire, predictive of outcome in people with low back pain and associated leg pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Kent, Peter M; Albert, Hanne B

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the PainDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ) classification was predictive of outcomes at 3 and 12 months follow-up in low back pain (LBP) patients with associated leg pain. Identification of clinically important subgroups and targeted treatment is believed to...... to be important in LBP care. The PD-Q is designed to classify whether a person has neuropathic pain, based on their self-reported pain characteristics. However, it is unknown whether this classification is a prognostic factor or predicts treatment response....

  17. Prediction of outcome in patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Andersen, Cathrine Hedegaard; Hansen, Martin Mørk;

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course of low back pain (LBP) cannot be accurately predicted by existing prediction tools. Therefore clinicians rely largely on their experience and clinical judgement. The objectives of this study were to investigate 1) which patient characteristics were associated with chiropractors...... at baseline and related to all outcomes. The accuracies of predictions made by clinicians (AUC .58-.63) and the SBT (AUC .50-.61) were comparable and low. No substantial increase in the predictive capability was achieved by combining clinicians' expectations and the SBT. In conclusion, chiropractors......' predictions were associated with well-established prognostic factors but not simply a product of these. Chiropractors were able to predict differences in outcome on a group level, but prediction of individual patients' outcomes were inaccurate and not substantially improved by the SBT. It is worth...

  18. The Influence of Ergonomic Training on Low Back and Neck Pains in Female Hospital Personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Saeidi

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevalence of low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP) in workers, especially in nurses is high, but their knowledge of ergonomics is not enough. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ergonomic training on low back pain and neck pain, posture, and function in female hospital personnel of Najaf-Abad, Iran. Patients and Methods In this queasy experim...

  19. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nandini D; Broderick, Daniel F; Burns, Judah; Deshmukh, Tejaswini K; Fries, Ian Blair; Harvey, H Benjamin; Holly, Langston; Hunt, Christopher H; Jagadeesan, Bharathi D; Kennedy, Tabassum A; O'Toole, John E; Perlmutter, Joel S; Policeni, Bruno; Rosenow, Joshua M; Schroeder, Jason W; Whitehead, Matthew T; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Corey, Amanda S

    2016-09-01

    Most patients presenting with uncomplicated acute low back pain (LBP) and/or radiculopathy do not require imaging. Imaging is considered in those patients who have had up to 6 weeks of medical management and physical therapy that resulted in little or no improvement in their back pain. It is also considered for those patients presenting with red flags raising suspicion for serious underlying conditions, such as cauda equina syndrome, malignancy, fracture, and infection. Many imaging modalities are available to clinicians and radiologists for evaluating LBP. Application of these modalities depends largely on the working diagnosis, the urgency of the clinical problem, and comorbidities of the patient. When there is concern for fracture of the lumbar spine, multidetector CT is recommended. Those deemed to be interventional candidates, with LBP lasting for > 6 weeks having completed conservative management with persistent radiculopathic symptoms, may seek MRI. Patients with severe or progressive neurologic deficit on presentation and red flags should be evaluated with MRI. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

  20. Spinal manipulation as a valid treatment for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, L F

    1996-03-01

    The practice of chiropractic has been regulated in the State of Delaware since 1937. Since that time, the battle lines in the state between medicine and chiropractic have been drawn. This war has existed on both the political and clinical fronts, and although it has always been believed by the chiropractic profession that once the "scientific evidence" of the benefit of chiropractic was proven, the war would end. This has not occurred to the extent believed. Even with its 1980 victory over the AMA, chiropractic has still been unable to achieve full acceptance as a clinical discipline among other professions. Many hospitals in this country have opened their doors to DCs. This by and large, has solely been for economic reasons and not as a recognition of the clinical benefit of manipulation. There is, however, a growing population of primary care physicians and researchers suggesting the benefit of manipulation for low back pain as well as suggesting that increased cooperation between MDs and DCs could be of extreme benefit to the patient population at large. This group continues to be in the minority. However, with increased knowledge of the benefits of spinal manipulation and the scientific evidence that now exists to support its efficacy, it is now believed that this interprofessional referral pattern will increase. In addition, many managed care programs now require primary care physicians to determine the necessity for referral to a chiropractor, thus causing a need for the primary physician to have some knowledge of spinal manipulation. This paper is presented to inform the physician community of Delaware of some of the evidence pointing to the efficacy of spinal manipulation as a treatment for low back pain.

  1. Case Study: The Use of Massage Therapy to Relieve Chronic Low-Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study the effects of massage on chronic low-back pain in a patient with four different diagnoses: osteoarthritis, scoliosis, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc disease. The patient’s goal was to cut down on the amount of pain medication he takes. Methods A 63-year-old man with chronic back pain received four massages across a twenty-day period. Progress was recorded using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale, as he self-reported on levels of pain and interference with his activi...

  2. Reorganized trunk muscle activity during multidirectional floor perturbations after experimental low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    each perturbation was extracted and averaged across perturbations. The difference (ΔRMS-EMG) and absolute difference (absolute ΔRMS-EMG) RMS from baseline conditions were extracted for each muscle during pain conditions and averaged bilaterally for back and abdominal muscle groups. Bilateral compared...... with unilateral pain induced higher VAS scores (P muscle activity during unilateral (P abdominal...... (P muscles during bilateral and decreased in the back (P abdominal (P muscles during unilateral pain. Bilateral pain caused greater absolute ΔRMS-EMG changes in the back (P abdominal (P muscle groups than unilateral pain. PERSPECTIVE: This study provided...

  3. EFFICACY OF YOGA ON LOW BACK PAIN AND DISABILITY IN PRIMI GRAVIDAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Kumar B N

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain is the most undesirable phase of women. Every pregnant woman would suffer from low back pain with mild or severe intensity. Various methods and forms of treatment have been practised to relive low back pain during child bearing phase without causing any harm to the developing foetus. This study has focussed on yoga to relieve the pain and disabilities due to low back pain in primi gravida women. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of yoga postures in reducing the low back pain and disability due to low back pain in second trimester of prima gravidas. Methods: Primi gravida women with low back pain were randomised to 2 groups, group-1 and group-2. The study was conducted for 8weeks and included 70 patients with 35 in group-1 and 30 in group-2. There were 5 drop outs. The selection criteria were based on patients suffering from low back pain which was further restricting their normal daily activities. The pain was assessed with VAS score of 0-10 with mean of 5.6 and 6.2 respectively in experimental and control group respectively before the treatment and disabilities were assessed with MODI with mean score 52% and 57 % respectively before treatment. The Group-1 was treated with yoga postures and group-2 by gynaecologists’ advice with acetaminophen, external topical gel and moist heat modalities. Results: The study concluded that there was significant reduction of pain on VAS score (p<0.001 and reduced disabilities on MODI (p<0.001 in both the groups. The statistical analysis showed there was significance within the interventional group and also within control group. Whereas the analysis done between the groups showed high significance of the interventional group having better recovery than the control group at the end of 8 weeks. Conclusion: Yoga postures had higher benefits in alleviating the low back pain and reducing disabilities related to low back pain in primi gravidas.

  4. Precision control of trunk movement in low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willigenburg, Nienke W; Kingma, Idsart; Hoozemans, Marco J M; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-02-01

    Motor control is challenged in tasks with high precision demands. In such tasks, signal-dependent neuromuscular noise causes errors and proprioceptive feedback is required for optimal performance. Pain may affect proprioception, muscle activation patterns and resulting kinematics. Therefore, we investigated precision control of trunk movement in 18 low back pain (LBP) patients and 13 healthy control subjects. The subjects performed a spiral-tracking task requiring precise trunk movements, in conditions with and without disturbance of proprioception by lumbar muscle vibration. Tracking task performance and trunk muscle electromyography were recorded. In conditions without lumbar muscle vibration, tracking errors were 27.1% larger in LBP patients compared to healthy controls. Vibration caused tracking errors to increase by 10.5% in healthy controls, but not in LBP patients. These results suggest that reduced precision in LBP patients might be explained by proprioceptive deficits. Ratios of antagonistic over agonistic muscle activation were similar between groups. Tracking errors increased trunk inclination, but no significant relation between tracking error and agonistic muscle activation was found. Tracking errors did not decrease when antagonistic muscle activation increased, so, neither healthy subjects nor LBP patients appear to counteract trunk movement errors by increasing co-contraction.

  5. Profile of sexuality in Moroccan chronic low back pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahouq Hanane

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual life had an important role in preserving the good quality of life for patients and for their partner. Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP as other musculoskeletal diseases may affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning. The purpose of this study is to describe the impact of CLBP on the sexual life of patients and to identify the factors that affect their Sexual Quality of Life (SQOL. Methods One hundred CLBP sexually active patients were included. Patients and disease Characteristics were collected. Impact on sexual life (sexual intercourse and SQOL was also assessed. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to analyze significant determinants associated with the SQOL disturbance. Results Eighty one percent of our patients complained about sexual difficulties related to CLBP. Libido decrease and painful intercourse position were reported respectively in 14.8 and 97.5% of cases. The most pain generating position was supine. Mean of sexual intercourse frequency decrease was at −10.4 ± 4.8 per month. SQOL score mean was at 44.6 ± 17.4%. Men suffered more than women from sexual problems (respectively 90% vs. 72%; p = 0.02. Men had worse SQOL than women (respectively 38.9 ± 17.2 vs. 50.3 ± 15.7%; p = 0.001. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that advanced age (p = 0.009, poor functional status (p = 0.03, male gender (p = 0.03 and sexual intercourse frequency decrease (p = 0.005 were the independent variables associated with the SQOL disturbance. Conclusion Our study suggests that sexuality is profoundly disturbed in CLBP patients; both their sexual intercourse and SQOL were affected. This disturbance seems to be associated with patient and disease characteristics. Sexuality should be taken into account in managing CLBP patients.

  6. Some topical problems in the diagnosis and treatment of back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B M Doronin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Back pain is a topical problem for both a general practitioner and a neurologist because of not only the high rate of this syndrome, but also its differential diagnosis problems. As any clinical syndrome, back pain should be differentiated from very many other diseases. This is primarily determined by the tactics of the management and treatment of a patient with neck-and-chest or low back pain. Today the diagnosis of spinal osteochondrosis may be rather common as that of exclusion. A meticulous neurological examination is of importance when diagnosing back pain. A premium is also placed upon X-ray and neuroimaging studies. When back pain is treated, it is necessary to take into account the intensity of pain syndrome, its proneness to chronicity, the individual personality traits, and concomitant visceral involvement and to use both drug and non-drug treatments, among which remedial exercises and psychotherapy are considered most effective.

  7. Yoga for low back pain: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Paul; Ernst, Edzard

    2011-09-01

    It has been suggested that yoga has a positive effect on low back pain and function. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a treatment option for low back pain. Seven databases were searched from their inception to March 2011. Randomized clinical trials were considered if they investigated yoga in patients with low back pain and if they assessed pain as an outcome measure. The selection of studies, data extraction and validation were performed independently by two reviewers. Seven randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality ranged between 2 and 4 on the Jadad scale. Five RCTs suggested that yoga leads to a significantly greater reduction in low back pain than usual care, education or conventional therapeutic exercises. Two RCTs showed no between-group differences. It is concluded that yoga has the potential to alleviate low back pain. However, any definitive claims should be treated with caution.

  8. Patterns of health care utilization for low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart WF

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Walter F Stewart,1 Xiaowei Yan,1 Joseph A Boscarino,1 Daniel D Maeng,1 Jack Mardekian,2 Robert J Sanchez,3 Michael R Von Korff41Geisinger Center for Health Research, 2Pfizer, Inc., 3Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 4Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine if primary care patients with low back pain (LBP cluster into definable care utilization subgroups that can be explained by patient and provider characteristics.Materials and methods: Adult primary care patients with an incident LBP encounter were identified from Geisinger Clinic electronic health records over 5 years. Two-thirds of the cohort had only one to two encounters. Principal component analysis was applied to the data from the remaining one-third on use of ambulatory, inpatient, emergency department, and surgery care and use of magnetic resonance imaging, injections, and opioids in 12 months following the incident encounter. Groups were compared on demographics, health behaviors, chronic and symptomatic disease burden, and a measure of physician efficiency.Results: Six factors with eigenvalues >1.5 explained 71% of the utilization variance. Patient subgroups were defined as: 1–2 LBP encounters; 2+ surgeries; one surgery; specialty care without primary care; 3+ opioid prescriptions; laboratory dominant care; and others. The surgery and 3+ opioid subgroups, while accounting for only 10.4% of the cohort, had used disproportionately more magnetic resonance imaging, emergency department, inpatient, and injectable resources. The specialty care subgroup was characterized by heavy use of inpatient care and the lowest use of injectables. Anxiety disorder and depression were not more prevalent among the surgery patients than in the others. Surgery patients had features in common with specialty care patients, but were older, had higher prevalence of Fibromyalgia, and were associated primary care physicians with worse efficiency

  9. Acupuncture for pelvic and back pain in pregnancy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Carolyn C; Manheimer, Eric; Pirotta, Marie V; White, Adrian R

    2008-03-01

    The objective of our study was to review the effectiveness of needle acupuncture in treating the common and disabling problem of pelvic and back pain in pregnancy. Two small trials on mixed pelvic/back pain and 1 large high-quality trial on pelvic pain met the inclusion criteria. Acupuncture, as an adjunct to standard treatment, was superior to standard treatment alone and physiotherapy in relieving mixed pelvic/back pain. Women with well-defined pelvic pain had greater relief of pain with a combination of acupuncture and standard treatment, compared to standard treatment alone or stabilizing exercises and standard treatment. We used a narrative synthesis due to significant clinical heterogeneity between trials. Few and minor adverse events were reported. We conclude that limited evidence supports acupuncture use in treating pregnancy-related pelvic and back pain. Additional high-quality trials are needed to test the existing promising evidence for this relatively safe and popular complementary therapy.

  10. Effect of thoracic movement-mediated training on back pain and trunk range of motion in a patient with lower back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We explored the effect of thoracic movement-mediated training (TMMT) on back pain and trunk range of motion (ROM) in a lower back pain (LBP) patient with lumbar flexion rotation syndrome. [Subject] A 55-year-old male LBP patient with lumbar flexion rotation syndrome. [Methods] The subject underwent TMMT, consisting of two thoracic stretching exercises and three thoracic muscle-strengthening exercises, supervised by a physical therapist. [Results] After training, trunk ROM increased ...

  11. Effect of yoga on pain, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and serotonin in premenopausal women with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moseon; Moon, Woongjoon; Kim, Jaehee

    2014-01-01

    Background. Serotonin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are known to be modulators of nociception. However, pain-related connection between yoga and those neuromodulators has not been investigated. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of yoga on pain, BDNF, and serotonin. Methods. Premenopausal women with chronic low back pain practiced yoga three times a week for 12 weeks. At baseline and after 12 weeks, back pain intensity was measured using visual analogue scale (VAS), and serum BDNF and serotonin levels were evaluated. Additionally, back flexibility and level of depression were assessed. Results. After 12-week yoga, VAS decreased in the yoga group (P yoga group (P yoga group (P yoga group, while it reduced (P yoga group, whereas it tended to increase in the control group (P = 0.07). Conclusions. We propose that BDNF may be one of the key factors mediating beneficial effects of yoga on chronic low back pain.

  12. Discriminative ability of reflex receptive fields to distinguish patients with acute and chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Monika; Biurrun Manresa, José A; Treichel, Fabienne; Agten, Christoph A; Heini, Paul; Andersen, Ole K; Curatolo, Michele; Jüni, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Low back pain has a life time prevalence of 70% to 85%. Approximately 10% to 20% of all patients experience recurrent episodes or develop chronic low back pain. Sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics explain the transition from acute to chronic low back pain only to a limited extent. Altered central pain processing may be a contributing mechanism. The measurement of reflex receptive fields (RRF) is a novel method to assess altered central pain processing. The RRF area denotes the area of the foot sole from which spinal nociceptive reflexes can be elicited. It was shown to be enlarged in patients with acute and chronic low back pain compared with pain-free individuals. The aim of the study was to explore the discriminative ability of the RRF to distinguish patients with acute and chronic low back pain with the hypothesis that enlarged RRF are associated with chronic low back pain. We included 214 patients with either acute or chronic low back pain and compared RRF between groups in both univariable and multivariable analyses adjusted for different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics possibly associated with the transition to chronic pain. We found a mean difference between patients with acute and chronic low back pain of -0.01 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.06 to 0.04) in the crude, -0.02 (95% CI, -0.08 to 0.04) in the age and sex adjusted, and -0.02 (95% CI, -0.09 to 0.05) in the fully adjusted model. Our results suggest that the enlargement of RRF area may not be associated with the transition from acute to chronic low back pain.

  13. Prevalence of neuropathic features of back pain in clinical populations: implications for the diagnostic triage paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hush, Julia M; Marcuzzi, Anna

    2012-07-01

    SUMMARY Contemporary clinical assessment of back pain is based on the diagnostic triage paradigm. The most common diagnostic classification is nonspecific back pain, considered to be of nociceptive etiology. A small proportion are diagnosed with radicular pain, of neuropathic origin. In this study we review the body of literature on the prevalence of neuropathic features of back pain, revealing that the point prevalence is 17% in primary care, 34% in mixed clinical settings and 53% in tertiary care. There is evidence that neuropathic features of back pain are not restricted to typical clinical radicular pain phenotypes and may be under-recognized, particularly in primary care. The consequence of this is that in the clinic, diagnostic triage may erroneously classify patients with nonspecific back pain or radicular pain. A promising alternative is the development of mechanism-based pain phenotyping in patients with back pain. Timely identification of contributory pain mechanisms may enable greater opportunity to select appropriate therapeutic targets and improve patient outcomes.

  14. Pain relief is associated with decreasing postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, A.; Fejer, René; Walker, B.

    2012-01-01

    is maintained if pain levels change in adults with non-specific low back pain. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Postural sway was measured by three identical static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed......Background: Increased postural sway is well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby a linear relationship between higher pain intensities and increasing postural sway has been described. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate whether this relationship...... in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS 11). The patients received three manual interventions (e. g. manipulation, mobilization or soft tissue techniques) at 3-4 day intervals, postural sway measures were obtained at each occasion. Results...

  15. The Nordic back pain subpopulation program--individual patterns of low back pain established by means of text messaging: a longitudinal pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Non-specific low back pain (LBP) is known to be a fluctuating condition and there is a growing realisation that it consists of different subgroups of patients. The detailed course of pain is not known since traditional methods of data collection do not allow very frequent follow-ups. This is a li...

  16. Cross sectional study of low back pain among merchant seafarers at a medical centre in Singapore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, Ravindran; Jensen, Olaf Chresten; Gómez Muñiz, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low back pain [LBP] either acute or chronic is the most common musculoskeletal complaint seen in a clinic. Majority of them are involved with manual handling of heavy objects. Objectives: To explore prevalence characteristics of low back pain syndrome among seafarers from merchant shi...

  17. MANIPULATIVE THERAPY AND CLINICAL PREDICTION CRITERIA IN TREATMENT OF ACUTE NONSPECIFIC LOW BACK PAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallegraeff, H. J. M.; de Greef, Mathieu; Winters, Jan C.; Lucas, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Manipulative therapy as part of a multidimensional approach may be more effective than standard physical therapy in treating Acute Nonspecific Low Back Pain. 64 participants, 29 women and 35 men, with Acute Nonspecific Low Back Pain and a mean age of 40 yr. (SD = 9.6) were randomly assigned to two g

  18. The clinical and psychological features of back pain in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Yu Anisimova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and ninety-two schoolchildren (41.1% boys and 58.9% girls aged 6—17 years were examined by psychometric methods. Back pain was diagnosed in 29.1% of cases. The findings permitted the detection of certain characteriological personality traits in schoolchildren with back pain.

  19. [Interpretation of Clinical Practice Guideline for Low Back Pain Treated with Acupuncture and Moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Liu, Zhishun; Xie, Limin; Zhu, Yuan; Li, Sinuo

    2015-10-01

    Based on entire literature retrieval about low back pain treated with acupuncture and moxibustion, Clinical Practice Guideline for Low Back Pain Treated with Acupuncture and Moxibustion was drafted according to method of evidence quality and recommended intensity grading system(GRADE). This article specificly introduces the aim and available diseases of the guideline. The principle and recommended plans are also detailedly explained.

  20. Factors associated with choosing a chiropractor for episodes of back pain care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekelle, P G; Markovich, M; Louie, R

    1995-08-01

    Back pain is a common illness and chiropractors provide a large proportion of back pain care in the United States. This is the first study to systematically compare chiropractic patients with those who saw other providers for back pain. The authors analyzed data from the RAND Health Insurance Experiment, a community-based study of the use of health services. Insurance claims forms were examined for all visits specified by the patient as occurring for back pain. Visits were grouped into episodes using decision rules and clinical judgment. The primary provider of back pain care was defined as the provider who delivered most of the services. Sociodemographic and health status and attitudes variables of patients were examined for association with the choice of chiropractor. Multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to calculate adjusted odds ratios for independent predictors. There were 1020 episodes of back pain care made by 686 different persons and encompassing 8825 visits. Results indicated that chiropractors were the primary provider for 40% of episodes, and retained as primary provider a greater percentage of their patients (92%) who had a second episode of back pain care than did medical doctors. Health insurance experiment site, white race, male sex, and high school education were independent predictors of choosing a chiropractor. Conclusions suggested that chiropractors were the choice of one third of all patients who sought back pain care, and provided care for 40% of all episodes of care. Geographic site, education, gender, and income were independent patient factors predicting chiropractic use.

  1. Core Stability Exercise Versus General Exercise for Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombe, Brian J; Games, Kenneth E; Neil, Elizabeth R; Eberman, Lindsey E

    2017-01-01

    Reference: Wang XQ, Zheng JJ, Yu ZW, et al. A meta-analysis of core stability exercise versus general exercise for chronic low back pain. PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e52082. Clinical Questions: Is core stability exercise more effective than general exercise in the treatment of patients with nonspecific low back pain (LBP)?

  2. Prognostic factors related to recurrent low-back pain and sickness absence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S.G. van den; Ariëns, G.A.M.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Hoogendoorn, W.E.; Bongers, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the prognostic factors related to the recurrence of low-back pain and future sickness absence due to low-back pain. Data were used from a prospective cohort study in a working population with a three year follow-up period. They were collected with annual questionnaire

  3. Is puberty a risk factor for back pain in the young? a systematic critical literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lardon, A.; Leboeuf-Yde, C.; Le Scanff, C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Back pain is a common condition that starts early in life and seems to increase markedly during puberty. A systematic review was performed in order to investigate the link between puberty and back pain, using some Bradford Hill criteria for causality. OBJECTIVES: We sought to obtain...

  4. Course and prognosis of older back pain patients in general practice: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Jantine; Enthoven, Wendy T M; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Peul, Wilco C; van Tulder, Maurits W; Bohnen, Arthur M; Berger, Marjolein Y; Koes, Bart W; Luijsterburg, Pim A J

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the course of back pain in older patients and identify prognostic factors for non-recovery at 3 months' follow-up. We conducted a prospective cohort study (the BACE study) of patients aged >55 years visiting a general practitioner (GP) with a new episode of back pain in the Netherlands. The course of back pain was described in terms of self-perceived recovery, pain severity, disability, pain medication, and GP visits at 6 weeks' and 3 months' follow-up. Prognostic factors for non-recovery at 3 months' follow-up were derived from the baseline questionnaire and physical examination. Variables with a prognostic value were identified with multivariable logistic regression analysis (method backward), and an area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was calculated for the prognostic model. A total of 675 back pain patients (mean age 66.4 (SD 7.6) years) participated in the BACE cohort study. At 6 weeks' follow-up 64% of the patients reported non-recovery from back pain. At 3 months' follow-up 61% still reported non-recovery, but only 26% of these patients had revisited the GP. Longer duration of the back pain, severity of back pain, history of back pain, absence of radiating pain in the leg below the knee, number of comorbidities, patients' expectation of non-recovery, and a longer duration of the timed 'Up and Go' test were significantly associated with non-recovery in a multiple regression model (AUC 0.79). This information can help GPs identify older back pain patients at risk for non-recovery.

  5. Effects of the CORE Exercise Program on Pain and Active Range of Motion in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwi-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Junesun

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify the effects of the CORE exercise program on pain and active range of motion (AROM) in patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups: the CORE group (n = 15) and the control group (n = 15). The CORE group performed the CORE exercise program for 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week, for 4 weeks, while the control group did not perform any exercise. The visual analog scale (VAS) and an algometer were used to measure pain, and pain-free AROM in the trunk was measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The CORE group showed significantly decreased VAS scores at rest and during movement and had a significantly increased pressure pain threshold in the quadratus lumborum and AROM in the trunk compared with those in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that the CORE exercise program is effective in decreasing pain and increasing AROM in patients with chronic low back pain. Thus, the CORE exercise program can be used to manage pain and AROM in patients with chronic low back pain.

  6. Low back pain associated with internal snapping hip syndrome in a competitive cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, T L; Mansoor, J

    2008-04-01

    Low back pain is a common complaint among cyclists. Here we present the case of a competitive master cyclist with low back pain and whose symptoms ultimately resolved when he was treated for internal snapping hip syndrome. Internal snapping hip syndrome is a painful lesion of the iliopsoas caused by snapping of the tendon over the iliopectineal eminence or anterior femoral head when the femur is extended from a flexed position. This is the first published report that we are aware of that describes this syndrome as a potential cause of low back pain in a competitive cyclist.

  7. Use of medications in the treatment of acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard A; Dennis, Robin L

    2006-01-01

    The prescription of medications continues to be one of the mainstays of treatment of acute low back pain episodes. The goals of the pharmacologic treatment for acute low back are reduction of pain and return of normal function. Often, nociception is a result of secondary inflammation and muscle spasm after acute injury of a structure of the spine, which may include muscle, tendon, ligament, disc, or bone. An understanding of the appropriate use of medications to address the underlying pain generator and the current evidence for using these medications is essential for any physician who sees and treats patients with acute low back pain.

  8. Pilot data: association between gluteus medius weakness and low back pain during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewyer, Kathryn J; Bewyer, Dennis C; Messenger, Dana; Kennedy, Colleen M

    2009-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examines whether there is an association between gluteus medius weakness in the presence of low back pain in pregnant women at any stage of gestation. Prevalence of low back pain during pregnancy is high, and identifying potential etiologies and targeted interventions is lacking. Thus, identification of an association between specific muscle weakness and pain would have clinical relevance. Initial pilot data suggests that weakness of the gluteus medius is strongly associated with the presence of low back pain during pregnancy.

  9. Chiropractic treatment of low back pain: a prospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfort, G

    1986-06-01

    The clinical course of low back pain (LBP) during chiropractic treatment has not previously been reported on the basis of a prospective survey. The prospective survey is based on patient questionnaires filled in before treatment was started, as well as 1, 3, 6 and 12 months later. Clinical examination was performed at entry and also 1 month later. Two hundred ninety-eight patients with acute or chronic LBP from ten different chiropractic clinics were selected sequentially for this study. At the time of first contact between these patients and the clinics, the current episode of LBP had lasted less than 1 wk in 30% of the patients and for more than 4 wk in 51%. Sixty-five percent had radiating pain into the lower extremity, and 38% were unable to work. Fifty-three percent of the patients had consulted a medical doctor or had received other types of treatment due to the current episode. Nineteen percent were referred by a medical doctor to the chiropractor. After each period of registration, approximately 75% of the patients reported being free of symptoms or feeling much better. The present study was designed to be compared to a similar investigation carried out in a general medical practice. A clear indication of a more favorable outcome was found in those patients receiving chiropractic treatment when compared to those receiving medical treatment, especially concerning such factors as ability to work, bedrest and use of medication. Only a randomized controlled clinical trial is suited for a direct comparison of the effect and cost of chiropractic and medical treatment of LBP.

  10. The role of physiotherapy in the management of non-specific back pain and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, J; McLean, S

    2006-04-01

    This paper provides an overview of best practice for the role of physiotherapy in managing back pain and neck pain, based mainly on evidence-based guidelines and systematic reviews. More up-to-date relevant primary research is also highlighted. A stepped approach is recommended in which the physiotherapist initially takes a history and carries out a physical examination to exclude any potentially serious pathology and identify any particular functional deficits. Initially, advice providing simple messages of explanation and reassurance will form the basis of a patient education package. Self-management is emphasized throughout. A return to normal activities is encouraged. For the patient who is not recovering after a few weeks, a short course of physiotherapy may be offered. This should be based on an active management approach, such as exercise therapy. Manual therapy should also be considered. Any passive treatment should only be used if required to relieve pain and assist in helping patients get moving. Barriers to recovery need to be explored. Those few patients who have persistent pain and disability that interferes with their daily lives and work need more intensive treatment or a different approach. A multidisciplinary approach may then be optimal, although it is not widely available. Liaison with the workplace and/or social services may be important. Getting all players on side is crucial, especially at this stage.

  11. Does going to an amusement park alleviate low back pain? A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakakibara T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Toshihiko Sakakibara, Zhuo Wang, Yuichi KasaiDepartment of Spinal Surgery and Medical Engineering, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu City, Mie Prefecture, JapanBackground: Low back pain is often called nonspecific pain. In this type of low back pain, various emotions and stress are known to strongly affect pain perception. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the degree of low back pain changes in people with chronic mild low back pain when they are inside and outside of an amusement park where people are supposed to have physical and psychological enjoyment.Methods: The subjects were 23 volunteers (13 males and 10 females aged 18 to 46 years old with a mean age of 24.0 years who had chronic low back pain. Visual analog scale (VAS scores of low back pain and salivary amylase levels (kIU/L of all subjects were measured at five time points: immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park; 10 minutes, 1 hour (immediately after boarding the roller coaster, and 3 hours (immediately after exiting the haunted house after arriving at the amusement park; and immediately before getting off the bus returning from the park.Results: The three VAS values in the amusement park (10 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours after arriving at the amusement park measured were significantly lower (P < 0.05 when compared with the other two values measured immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park and immediately before getting off the return bus. In salivary amylase levels, there were no statistically significant differences among the values measured at the five time points.Conclusion: Low back pain was significantly alleviated when the subjects were in the amusement park, which demonstrated that enjoyable activities, though temporarily, alleviated their low back pain.Keywords: low back pain, emotion, salivary alpha-amylase activity, enjoyment activities, psychological stress

  12. Effect of thoracic movement-mediated training on back pain and trunk range of motion in a patient with lower back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] We explored the effect of thoracic movement-mediated training (TMMT) on back pain and trunk range of motion (ROM) in a lower back pain (LBP) patient with lumbar flexion rotation syndrome. [Subject] A 55-year-old male LBP patient with lumbar flexion rotation syndrome. [Methods] The subject underwent TMMT, consisting of two thoracic stretching exercises and three thoracic muscle-strengthening exercises, supervised by a physical therapist. [Results] After training, trunk ROM increased and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of back pain decreased. [Conclusion] Therapists should consider substituting thoracic spine movements for lumbar spine movements to prevent excessive lumbar movement and pain in LBP patients with lumbar flexion rotation syndrome.

  13. Training frequency and intensity in the rehabilitation of chronic nonspecific low back pain: an exploratory review

    OpenAIRE

    Verbrugghe, Jonas; Agten, Anouk; Smeets, Wout; Eijnde, Bert O.; Vandenabeele, Frank; Timmermans, Annick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain is one of the most frequently occurring musculoskeletal disorders1 and it causes the highest global disability rates compared to any other condition1. Exercise therapy can improve pain and disability in persons with nonspecific chronic low back pain (CNSLBP), however optimal training frequency and intensity for rehabilitation settings are not known2. Purpose/Aim The purpose of this review is 1) to inventory training frequencies and intensities that are us...

  14. Hypovitaminosis D in female patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ahmed; Abdel-Nasser, Ahmed M; Hamdy, Ahmed; Omran, Ahmed A; El-Rehany, Mahmoud A

    2007-11-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is an extremely common problem in practice, where it is often labeled idiopathic. No sufficient studies have been conducted to analyze the contribution of hypovitaminosis D to the etiology of chronic LBP in populations wherein vitamin D deficiency is endemic. The present study was, therefore, carried out to examine hypovitaminosis D and its determinants in female patients with chronic LBP during the childbearing period. Sixty female patients complaining of LBP lasting more than 3 months were clinically studied rheumatologically and neurologically. Questionnaires and indices quantifying risk factors associated with vitamin D deficiency were utilized. Biochemical assays of serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), parathormone (PTH), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25 OHD) were performed and compared to those of 20 matched healthy controls. The determinants of vitamin D levels in patients were examined by stepwise regression. Patients with LBP had significantly lower 25 OHD levels (p vitamin D levels in patients, only limited duration of sun exposure, contributing 55% to the variance of 25 OHD, limited areas of skin exposed (13%), and increased number of pregnancies (2%), were significant determinants of vitamin D levels in patients. Despite the sunny climate, hypovitaminosis D is prevalent among Egyptian women in the childbearing period, especially those presenting with chronic LBP, where it is associated with hyperphosphatasia and hyperparathyroidism, without alterations in serum calcium. The major determinant of hypovitaminosis D in our patients is limited sun exposure.

  15. Physiotherapy management of low back pain - a review of surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Basson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is an increasingly debilitating and costly problem. One of the research focuses in LBP is an attempt to improve patient outcomes. It is believed that the promotion of evidence based practice (EBP should improve patient outcomes and also reduce the cost of care. There seems to be a need to establish how physiotherapists manage LBP and whether management is in accordance with best practice based on published research evidence. The aim of this study was to determine what management strategies physiotherapists employ in the management of LBP by performing a review of the literature and to compare this with recent guidelines Fourteen studies were included for the review.  The treatments most frequently reported as being used for the management of LBP were education/ advice, exercise, spinal mobilisation and electrotherapy. Over a 14 year period there were no major changes in the way physiotherapists manage LBP. Physiotherapist use interventions that are evidence based as well as interventions with little evidence in the management of LBP.

  16. Back pain prevalence and associated factors in children and adolescents: an epidemiological population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Noll

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify the prevalence of back pain among Brazilian school children and the factors associated with this pain. METHODS All 1,720 schoolchildren from the fifth to the eight grade attending schools from the city of Teutonia, RS, Southern Brazil, were invited to participate in the study. From these, 1,597 children participated. We applied the Back Pain and Body Posture Evaluation Instrument. The dependent variable was back pain, while the independent one were demographic, socioeconomic, behavior and heredity data. The prevalence ratio was estimated by multivariate analysis using the Poisson regression model (α = 0.05. RESULTS The prevalence of back pain in the last three months was 55.7% (n = 802. The multivariate analysis showed that back pain is associated with the variables: sex, parents with back pain, weekly frequency of physical activity, daily time spent watching television, studying in bed, sitting posture to write and use the computer, and way of carrying the backpack. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of back pain in schoolchildren is high and it is associated with demographic, behavior and heredity aspects.

  17. Back pain prevalence and associated factors in children and adolescents: an epidemiological population study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Matias; Candotti, Cláudia Tarragô; da Rosa, Bruna Nichele; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify the prevalence of back pain among Brazilian school children and the factors associated with this pain. METHODS All 1,720 schoolchildren from the fifth to the eight grade attending schools from the city of Teutonia, RS, Southern Brazil, were invited to participate in the study. From these, 1,597 children participated. We applied the Back Pain and Body Posture Evaluation Instrument. The dependent variable was back pain, while the independent one were demographic, socioeconomic, behavior and heredity data. The prevalence ratio was estimated by multivariate analysis using the Poisson regression model (α = 0.05). RESULTS The prevalence of back pain in the last three months was 55.7% (n = 802). The multivariate analysis showed that back pain is associated with the variables: sex, parents with back pain, weekly frequency of physical activity, daily time spent watching television, studying in bed, sitting posture to write and use the computer, and way of carrying the backpack. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of back pain in schoolchildren is high and it is associated with demographic, behavior and heredity aspects. PMID:27305406

  18. Back pain improvement after decompression without fusion or stabilization in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and clinically significant preoperative back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Charles H; Glassman, Steven D; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Knightly, John J; Asher, Anthony L

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE The relief of leg symptoms by surgical decompression for lumbar stenosis is well supported by the literature. Less is known about the effect on back pain. Some surgeons believe that the relief of back pain should not be an expected outcome of decompression and that substantial back pain may be a contraindication to decompression only; therefore, stabilization may be recommended for patients with substantial preoperative back pain even in the absence of well-accepted indications for stabilization such as spondylolisthesis, scoliosis, or sagittal malalignment. The purpose of this study is to determine if patients with lumbar stenosis and substantial back pain-in the absence of spondylolisthesis, scoliosis, or sagittal malalignment-can obtain significant improvement after decompression without fusion or stabilization. METHODS Analysis of the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD) identified 726 patients with lumbar stenosis (without spondylolisthesis or scoliosis) and a baseline back pain score ≥ 5 of 10 who underwent surgical decompression only. No patient was reported to have significant spondylolisthesis, scoliosis, or sagittal malalignment. Standard demographic and surgical variables were collected, as well as patient outcomes including back and leg pain scores, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and EuroQoL 5D (EQ-5D) at baseline and 3 and 12 months postoperatively. RESULTS The mean age of the cohort was 65.6 years, and 407 (56%) patients were male. The mean body mass index was 30.2 kg/m(2), and 40% of patients had 2-level decompression, 29% had 3-level decompression, 24% had 1-level decompression, and 6% had 4-level decompression. The mean estimated blood loss was 130 ml. The mean operative time was 100.85 minutes. The vast majority of discharges (88%) were routine home discharges. At 3 and 12 months postoperatively, there were significant improvements from baseline for back pain (7.62 to 3.19 to 3.66), leg pain (7.23 to 2.85 to

  19. Managing Low-Back Pain: Steps To Optimize Function and Hasten Return to Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezner, Jonathan A.; Herring, Stanley A.

    2001-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) in active people is common and recurrent. This paper describes: the natural history and clinical course of LBP; anatomy and biomechanics of LBP; what causes pain; diagnosis; initial treatment (e.g., pain and inflammation control, bed rest, and exercises); rehabilitation (e.g., lumbar stabilization exercises, conditioning, and…

  20. Is there a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhe, A.; Fejer, R.; Walker, B.

    2011-01-01

    pain intensity and postural sway in adults (aged 50 or less) with non-specific low back pain. Methods: Seventy-seven patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Center of pressure parameters were measured by three static bipedal standing tasks of 90...... compared to healthy controls. In addition, regression analysis revealed a significant and linear increase in postural sway with higher pain ratings for all included COP parameters. Statistically significant changes in mean sway velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction and sway area were......Background: Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby the altered postural sway includes both higher mean sway velocities and larger sway area. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate a relationship between...

  1. Back Pain During 6 deg Head-Down Tilt Approximates That During Actual Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Karen J.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Murthy, Gita; Convertino, Victor A.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts often experience back pain during spaceflight. It was found that during spaceflight, 14 of 19 Shuttle crewmembers experienced back pain, which they described as dull (62%), localized to the lower back (500/6), and with an intensity of 2 on a 5-point scale. Further, the spine lengthens 4-7 cm in microgravity. Our objective was to compare back pain and spinal lengthening (body height increase) during simulated microgravity (6 deg head-down tilt, HDT) with the some parameters during actual microgravity. Eight male subjects completed a modified McGill pain questionnaire with intensity graded from zero (no pain) to five (intense and incapacitating gain) each day at 7.-OO pm during 2 d pre-HDT control, 16 d HDT, and I d post-HDT recovery periods. Only 2 subjects reported any pain after day 9 of HDT and during recov- ery. Heights increased 2.1 t 0.5 cm by day 3 of HDT and re- mained at that level until the end of the HDT period. Although spinal lengthening in space is greater than that during HDT, the HDT model approximates the level, type, distribution, and time course of back pain associated with actual microgrovity. In the HDT model, pain subsides in intensity when spinal lengthening stops. Therefore, back pain in actual and simulated microgravity may result from stretching of spinal andlor paraspinal tissues until a new spinal length is reached.

  2. Efficacy of coblation technology in treating cervical discogenic upper back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liangliang; Tang, Yuanzhang; Li, Xiuliang; Li, Na; Ni, Jiaxiang; He, Liangliang

    2015-05-01

    Upper back pain originating from the cervical disk itself is defined as cervical discogenic upper back pain. Coblation procedures can provide therapeutic effects for neck and radicular pain related to contained cervical disk herniation. However, no studies have reported the performance of coblation procedures, particularly for treating cervical discogenic upper back pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of coblation procedures in treating cervical discogenic upper back pain.In a prospective, clinical, observational study, 28 consecutive patients with discogenic upper back pain underwent coblation procedures on the cervical disk with a percutaneous anterior approach. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, patient responses stating significant (≥50%) pain relief, significant (≥50%) reduction in pain medicine intake and Modified MacNab criteria were adopted to evaluate the pain intensity, degree of pain relief, and functional status after 12 months of follow-up.The preoperative pain VAS score was 6.5 ± 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.085-6.915), and the pain VAS score significantly decreased to 2.4 ± 1.3 (95% CI 1.929-2.928), 2.5 ± 1.5 (95% CI 1.963-3.109), 2.7 ± 1.4 (95% CI 2.157-3.271), 3.1 ± 1.6 (95% CI 2.457-3.686), and 3.1 ± 1.6 (95% CI 2.471-3.743) at 1 week and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, respectively (P coblation is an effective, safe, minimally invasive, and less uncomfortable procedure for the treatment of discogenic upper back pain.

  3. COMPARISON BETWEEN POSTERIOR TO ANTERIOR MOBILIZATION AND TRACTION SLR ON PAIN AND NEURODYNAMIC MOBILITY IN PATIENTS OF LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Varun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background : Low back pain is one of the most prevalent condition . According to the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons about 80 percent of people will have at least one bout with back pain during their lifetime . Various treatments methods have been used like traction SLR , posterior to anterior mobilization etc, but no study was done to compare the effects of posterior to anterior mobilization and traction SLR technique in reducing pain and increasing neurodynamic mobility in patients of low back pain. Purpose of study : To find out the effectiveness of traction SLR and posterior to Anterior mobilization in decreasing pain and increasing neurodynamic mobility of low back pain patients. Method : 20 subjects were taken as per selection criteria which included both male and female between the age of 25 to 45 years. They were randomly divided into two groups, group A (n=10 subjects received traction SLR and group B (n=10 received posterior to anterior mobilization. Range Of Motion and VAS were taken as outcome measurement parameters. Result: Comparison was made between pre and post reading within group using related t – test and between groups by using unrelated t-test for statistical analysis. Result showed statistically significant improvement between pre and post intervention VAS score for both group A and B. Result showed a statistically significant improvement between pre and post intervention ROM in for both Group A and B. Result shows statistically non significant difference between Group A and B in ROM and VAS scores. Conclusion: Traction SLR and posterior to anterior mobilization are effective in improving ROM and pain in patients suffering from low back pain. However there was no statistically significant difference between Traction SLR and posterior to anterior mobilization in improving Pain and ROM in patients suffering from low back pain.

  4. AN ANALYSIS ON KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE OF SHIPPING PORT WORKERS TOWARD NONSPECIFIC BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izham Zain

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nonspecific back pain can be defined as pain and discomfort, localized over below the costal margin and above the inferior gluteal folds. Such disorder are known to be a major cause of reduced work capabilities and causing substantial financial consequences and poor productivity. Occupational related nonspecific back pain is the common disorder affecting those workers performing high physical demanding task. The shipping port workers were exposed to hazardous working nature and known to be affected. Numerous study indicate that knowledge and attitude towards safety were contributing factors to occupational related back pain. Currently no study was conducted to determine the relationship between knowledge, attitude and occupational related back pain among them. The objective of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of nonspecific back pain and determine the difference between knowledge and attitude toward such incident. Methods: The respondents were workers known to have nonspecific back pain. The data collection is carry out through a set of questionnaire consists of knowledge, attitudes and Nordic questionnaire on area of back pain. Results: Majority of respondents (n=70 involve in driving and maneuver terminal crane cargo. The mean of knowledge score is 7.49 (±1.20, attitude score is 5.72 (±1.33 and were ranked in good and moderate respectively. There is no statistical difference between knowledge, attitudes with workers job nature, academic qualification and years of working experience. Conclusion: A preventive intervention should be introduced to enhance workers attitudes and curb the nonspecific back pain incidents. Employee positive involvement, strongly supported by employer and active engagement of healthcare provider able to curb occupational related back pain at work place.

  5. Predictive factors for the outcome of multidisciplinary treatments in chronic low back pain at the first multidisciplinary pain center of Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Arai, Young-Chang P.; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Nishihara, Makoto; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Hirakawa, Tomoe; Matsuo, Shingo; Kobayashi, Mami; Haruta, Midori; Kawabata, Yuka; Togo, Hiroki; Noguchi, Taiji; Hase, Toshiyuki; Hatano, Genki; Ushida, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Multidisciplinary treatments are recommended for treatment of chronic low back pain. The aim of this study was to show the associations among multidisciplinary treatment outcomes, pretreatment psychological factors, self-reported pain levels, and history of pain in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 221 chronic low back pain patients were chosen for the study. The pretreatment scores for the 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression ...

  6. Process evaluation of a participatory ergonomics programme to prevent low back pain and neck pain among workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.T.; Proper, K.I.; Anema, J.R.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: Both low back pain (LBP) and neck pain (NP) are major occupational health problems. In the workplace, participatory ergonomics (PE) is frequently used on musculoskeletal disorders. However, evidence on the effectiveness of PE to prevent LBP and NP obtained from randomised controlled tria

  7. Fear-avoidance beliefs and pain avoidance in low back pain--translating research into clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainville, James; Smeets, Rob J E M; Bendix, Tom;

    2011-01-01

    For patients with low back pain, fear-avoidance beliefs (FABs) represent cognitions and emotions that underpin concerns and fears about the potential for physical activities to produce pain and further harm to the spine. Excessive FABs result in heightened disability and are an obstacle...

  8. Do work-related factors affect care-seeking in general practice for back pain or upper extremity pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J. C.; Haahr, J. P.; Frost, P.

    2012-01-01

    . Repetitive work and psychosocial factors did not have any statistically significant impact on care-seeking for neither back pain nor upper extremity pain. CONCLUSION: Work-related factors such as heavy lifting do, to some extent, contribute to care-seeking with MP. We suggest that asking the patient about...

  9. The effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on lumbosacral alignment and the low back pain disability index in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seong-Dae; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine the effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (group A) and a lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise group (group B). Group B did 15 min of lumbar stabilization exercises and 15 min of thoracic extension exercises, while group A did 30 min of lumbar stabilization exercises five times a week for 4 weeks. For assessing lumbosacral alignment, the lordotic angle, lumbosacral angle, and sacral angle were evaluated. The Oswestry disability index was used for assessment of disability due to low back pain. [Results] Both groups showed improvement in lumbosacral alignment and in the disability index. Group B showed greater changes in the lordotic angle and in the Oswestry disability index than group A, although the differences were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise can be recommended for improvement of chronic low back pain, although the improvements seen in lumbosacral alignment and low back pain disability index in this study did not achieve statistical significance.

  10. Prevalence of Low Back Pain and its Risk Factors among School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul I.A. Samad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of low back pain and the associated risk factors among primary school teachers in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. Approach: A cross sectional study was conducted in nine primary schools in the Klang Valley. The schools were selected randomly from a list obtained from the Ministry of Education. Two hundred and seventy two respondents who fulfilled the study criteria volunteered to participate in the study. A questionnaire was used to determine the demographic and occupational information. Information on low back pain was assessed using a Nordic Questionnaire, while the General Health Questionnaire was used to determine the mental health status. Results: The prevalence of low back pain was 40.4% among respondents. Lifting load (28.0% was ranked as the main factor which contributed to low back pain, followed by prolonged sitting (25.2%. Poor mental health (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.06-1.15 was the risk factor to low back pain. Conclusion: The prevalence of low back pain was 40.4% among primary school teachers in Klang Valley. Teachers with poor mental health status had higher risk of developing low back pain.

  11. An epidemiological study of low back pain in professional drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenzi, Massimo; Rui, Francesca; Negro, Corrado; D'Agostin, Flavia; Angotzi, Giuliano; Bianchi, Sandra; Bramanti, Lucia; Festa, GianLuca; Gatti, Silvana; Pinto, Iole; Rondina, Livia; Stacchini, Nicola

    2006-12-01

    The prevalence of low back pain (LBP) was investigated in 598 Italian professional drivers exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV) and ergonomic risk factors (drivers of earth moving machines, fork-lift truck drivers, truck drivers, bus drivers). The control group consisted of a small sample of 30 fire inspectors not exposed to WBV. Personal, occupational and health histories were collected by means of a structured questionnaire. Vibration measurements were performed on representative samples of the machines and vehicles used by the driver groups. From the vibration magnitudes and exposure durations, alternative measures of vibration dose were estimated for each subject. Daily vibration exposure, expressed in terms of 8-h energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration, A(8), averaged 0.28-0.61 (range 0.10-1.18) m s -2 rms in the driver groups. Duration of exposure to WBV ranged between 1 and 41 years. The 7-day and 12-month prevalence of LBP was greater in the driver groups than in the controls. In the professional drivers, the occurrence of 12-month LBP, high intensity of LBP (Von Korff pain scale score ⩾5), and LBP disability (Roland & Morris disability scale score ⩾12) significantly increased with increasing cumulative vibration exposure. Even though several alternative measures of vibration exposure were associated with LBP outcomes, nevertheless a more regular trend of association with LBP was found for vibration dose expressed as ∑ a vit i (m s -2 h), in which the frequency-weighted acceleration, a v, and lifetime exposure duration, t, were given equal weight. In multivariate data analysis, individual characteristics (e.g. age, body mass index) and a physical load index (derived from combining manual materials handling and awkward postures) were significantly associated with LBP outcomes, while psychosocial work factors (e.g. job decision, job support) showed a marginal relation to LBP. This study tends to confirm that professional driving in industry

  12. The effectiveness of calcitonin on chronic back pain and daily activities in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadokostakis, G; Damilakis, J; Mantzouranis, E; Katonis, P; Hadjipavlou, A

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nasal calcitonin on chronic back pain and disability attributed to osteoporosis. The study design involved three groups of osteoporotic postmenopausal women suffering from chronic back pain. Group I consisted of 40 women with vertebral fractures, group II of 30 women with degenerative disorders and group III of 40 patients with non specific chronic back pain and without abnormality on plain X-rays. Pain intensity was measured using a numerical rating scale (NRS) and disability due to back pain was measured using the Oswestry disability questionnaire. The patients were randomly assigned to receive, for three months, either 200 IU intranasal salmon calcitonin and 1,000 mg of oral calcium daily (groups IA, IIA, IIIA) or 1,000 mg of oral calcium daily (groups IB, IIB, IIIB). Repeated measures ANOVA showed that there were no significant time, group or interaction effects for pain intensity and disability in any of the groups studied. Mean Oswestry and NRS scores were reduced during the follow-up period in the groups IA, IIIA, but the differences between the two time points were not statistically significant. Intranasal calcitonin has no effect on chronic back pain intensity and functional capacity of osteoporotic women regardless of the presence of fractures, degenerative disorders or chronic back pain of non-specific etiology.

  13. Effect of back school protocol on the referral rate of patients with low back pain to an industrial physiotherapy clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Odebiyi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Back schools are educational programmes originally developed in a work place (Volvo factory in Sweden for patients with back pain, to enable them to manage their own back problems better. ‘Back school’ was originally aimed at modifying the behaviours of patients with low back pain (LBP, with the view to prevent relapses. In an effort to encourage and stimulate the use of ‘back school’ among health workers in Nigeria, this study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a back school protocol in a Soap Making Industry in Lagos, Nigeria. One hundred and ten (110 workers of a Soap Making Industry in Lagos, Nigeria,  participated in this study. A pre-test, post-test experimental design was employed. The participants were divided into two groups - office workers and factory workers for the purpose of the training in the content of the back school protocol. The ‘back school’ consisted of classroom teaching and the use of two videotapes titled “lifting technique” and “back pain”. Data on demographic information, knowledge of back structures and back care were collected using a questionnaire with closed ended questions, which was completed before, immediately after and 8 weeks after the administrations of the contents of the back school protocol (Akinpelu and Odebiyi, 2004. The records of the factory’s clinic were also reviewed for the 12-months before and 12 months after the study. The mean values of the participants’ age, height, weight and body mass index (BMI were 36.60 ± 9.10 years, 1.65 ± 0.10 m,69.13 ± 7.70 kg and 25.40 ± 3.30 kg/m2 respectively. The results showed that the 12-months prevalence of low back pain (LBP among the workers was 71%. The result also showed that over 50% of the participants never had any  information or lesson on back care, and those that had some form of information obtained it by chance. There was 23% reduction in referral for care of back pain 12 months after the administration of the back

  14. Does going to an amusement park alleviate low back pain? A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Wang, Zhuo; Kasai, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Background Low back pain is often called nonspecific pain. In this type of low back pain, various emotions and stress are known to strongly affect pain perception. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the degree of low back pain changes in people with chronic mild low back pain when they are inside and outside of an amusement park where people are supposed to have physical and psychological enjoyment. Methods The subjects were 23 volunteers (13 males and 10 females) aged 18 to 46 years old with a mean age of 24.0 years who had chronic low back pain. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores of low back pain and salivary amylase levels (kIU/L) of all subjects were measured at five time points: immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park; 10 minutes, 1 hour (immediately after boarding the roller coaster), and 3 hours (immediately after exiting the haunted house) after arriving at the amusement park; and immediately before getting off the bus returning from the park. Results The three VAS values in the amusement park (10 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours after arriving at the amusement park) measured were significantly lower (P amusement park and immediately before getting off the return bus. In salivary amylase levels, there were no statistically significant differences among the values measured at the five time points. Conclusion Low back pain was significantly alleviated when the subjects were in the amusement park, which demonstrated that enjoyable activities, though temporarily, alleviated their low back pain. PMID:23118550

  15. Treatment of degenerative chronic low back pain with fluoroscopically guided epidural procaine-corticosteroid injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćulafić Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Low back pain is one of the most common painful conditions in the modern age. Therefore, it is very important to establish the most effective protocol for the treatment of this condition. The aim of this study was to find out if fluoroscopically, guided epidural procainecorticosteroid injection is effective in the treatment of degenerative chronic low back pain. Methods. This prospective cohort study was performed in the Military Medical Academy from September 2005 to June 2006 and included 60 patients of both sexes, 34-85 years of age. Degenerative changes of lumbosacral spine were determined by magnetic resonance imaging. The intensity of low back pain was evaluated by subjective (Roland's scale and objective parameter (Lazarevic sign. Epidural procaine-corticosteroid injection was applied in the patients with low back pain not responding to conservative therapy. After the application of injection, effects of the therapy were followed up. Results. In 92% of the patients there was a reduction of pain intensity for three months, in 4.8% a reduction for a month, but after another injection they felt pain reduction for the next three months. One patient (2.3% had pain reduction for one month. Conclusion. In the treatment of degenerative chronic low back pain, not responding to conservative therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, epidural procaine-corticosteroid injection have a satisfactory short-term as well as a long-term analgesic effect.

  16. Acupuncture for Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Pain: A Case Series Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture in treating chronic non-specific low back pain. Methods: Ten patients with chronic low back pain were selected to receive 9 acupuncture treatments over a three-week period with point selection based on syndrome differentiation in Chinese medicine. The BROM Instrument for assessment of back range of motion; subjective evaluation with Visual Analog Scale of Pain (VASP) ratings, Oswestry Disability ratings, objective measurements including Algometry, and Flexion and Extension ratings to investigate the range of motion were used for comparing the large, medium and small effect sizes of baseline, treatment and follow-up phases. Results: Clinical significance of pain relief was shown in all parameters assessed. A large effect size was detected in VASP, Oswestry and Algometry. A small effect size was demonstrated in Flexion/Extension. Needling over short period time (3 weeks) could relieve the pain, but the muscular-skeletal function measured by BROM persists. To treat patients exclusively by needling for statistical purposes can not be justified, because by merely relieving pain, permanent improvement in function may not be achieved. Conclusion: Acupuncture offers an effective alternative for the clinical management of chronic low back pain, significant improvement in most of the parameters evaluated, but the functional improvement was not as satisfactory as pain relieving. Further study with larger sample size focuses on long-term efficacy and functional improvement for chronic low back pain is recommended.

  17. AMELOTEX IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC BACK PAIN SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Yuryevna Suvorova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a considerable increase in the number of patients with lingering recurrent and chronic pain syndromes of various origin. Forty-one patients with dorsopathies were examined. Two types of pain were identified; these were vertebrogenic and nonvertebrogenic pains. The appropriateness of this identification was confirmed by instrumental studies. Treatment was performed using a selective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (Amelotex. Pain syndrome relief was noted during the therapy

  18. Effects of obesity and chronic low back pain on gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galli Manuela

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is often associated with low back pain (LBP. Despite empirical evidence that LBP induces gait abnormalities, there is a lack of quantitative analysis of the combined effect of obesity and LBP on gait. The aim of our study was to quantify the gait pattern of obese subjects with and without LBP and normal-mass controls by using Gait Analysis (GA, in order to investigate the cumulative effects of obesity and LBP on gait. Methods Eight obese females with chronic LBP (OLG; age: 40.5 ± 10.1 years; BMI: 42.39 ± 5.47 Kg/m2, 10 obese females (OG; age: 33.6 ± 5.2 years; BMI: 39.26 ± 2.39 Kg/m2 and 10 healthy female subjects (CG; age: 33.4 ± 9.6 years; BMI: 22.8 ± 3.2 Kg/m2, were enrolled in this study and assessed with video recording and GA. Results and Discussion OLG showed longer stance duration and shorter step length when compared to OG and CG. They also had a low pelvis and hip ROM on the frontal plane, a low knee flexion in the swing phase and knee range of motion, a low dorsiflexion in stance and swing as compared to OG. No statistically significant differences were found in ankle power generation at push-off between OLG and OG, which appeared lower if compared to CG. At hip level, both OLG and OG exhibited high power generation levels during stance, with OLG showing the highest values. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the association of obesity and LBP affects more the gait pattern than obesity alone. OLG were in fact characterised by an altered knee and ankle strategy during gait as compared to OG and CG. These elements may help optimizing rehabilitation planning and treatment in these patients.

  19. Generic Preference-based Measures for Low Back Pain

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    Finch, Aureliano Paolo; Dritsaki, Melina; Jommi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. Systematic review. Objective. This systematic review examines validity and responsiveness of three generic preference-based measures in patients with low back pain (LBP). Summary of Background Data. LBP is a very common incapacitating disease with a significant impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Health state utility values can be derived from various preference-based HRQoL instruments, and among them the most widely ones are EuroQol 5 dimensions (EQ-5D), Short Form 6 Dimensions (SF-6D), and Health Utilities Index 3 (HUI III). The ability of these instruments to reflect HRQoL has been tested in various contexts, but never for LBP populations. Methods. A systematic search on electronic literature databases was undertaken to identify studies of patients with LBP where health state utility values were reported. Records were screened using a set of predefined eligibility criteria. Data on validity (correlations and known group methods) and responsiveness (effect sizes, standardized response means, tests of statistical significance) of instruments were extracted using a customized extraction template, and assessed using predefined criteria. Results. There were substantial variations in the 37 included papers identified in relation to study design and outcome measures used. EQ-5D demonstrated good convergent validity, as it was able to distinguish between known groups. EQ-5D was also able to capture changes of health states as results of different interventions. Evidence for SF-6D and HUI III was limited to allow an appropriate evaluation. Conclusion. EQ-5D performs well in LBP population and its scores seem to be suitable for economic evaluation of LBP interventions. However, the paucity of information on the other instruments makes it impossible to determine its relative validity and responsiveness compared with them. Level of Evidence: 2 PMID:26583478

  20. Is there a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain?

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    Fejer René

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased center of pressure excursions are well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby the altered postural sway includes both higher mean sway velocities and larger sway area. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate a relationship between pain intensity and postural sway in adults (aged 50 or less with non-specific low back pain. Methods Seventy-seven patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Center of pressure parameters were measured by three static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS-11, an equal number of patients (n = 11 was enrolled per pain score. Results Generally, our results confirmed increased postural instability in pain sufferers compared to healthy controls. In addition, regression analysis revealed a significant and linear increase in postural sway with higher pain ratings for all included COP parameters. Statistically significant changes in mean sway velocity in antero-posterior and medio-lateral direction and sway area were reached with an incremental change in NRS scores of two to three points. Conclusions COP mean velocity and sway area are closely related to self-reported pain scores. This relationship may be of clinical use as an objective monitoring tool for patients under treatment or rehabilitation.

  1. Back pain during 6 degrees head-down tilt approximates that during actual microgravity

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    Hutchinson, K. J.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Murthy, G.; Convertino, V. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts often experience back pain during spaceflight. Retrospectively, Wing et al. (14) found that during spaceflight, 14 of 19 Shuttle crewmembers experienced back pain, which they described as dull (62%), localized to the lower back (50%), and with an intensity of 2 on a 5-point scale. Further, the spine lengthens 4-7 cm in microgravity. Our objective was to compare back pain and spinal lengthening (body height increase) during simulated microgravity (6 degrees head-down tilt, HDT) with the same parameters during actual microgravity. Eight male subjects completed a modified McGill pain questionnaire with intensity graded from zero (no pain) to five (intense and incapacitating pain) each day at 7:00 pm during 2 d pre-HDT control, 16 d HDT, and 1 d post-HDT recovery periods. Also, the subjects' heights were measured each day while supine (control and recovery) and during HDT. Back pain increased from zero (pre-tilt control period) to 2.3 +/- 0.4 at days 1 to 3 of HDT, and was categorized as dull and/or burning pain in subjects' lower backs. Only 2 subjects reported any pain after day 9 of HDT and during recovery. Heights increased 2.1 +/- 0.5 cm by day 3 of HDT and remained at that level until the end of the HDT period. Although spinal lengthening in space is greater than that during HDT, the HDT model approximates the level, type, distribution, and time course of back pain associated with actual microgravity. In the HDT model, pain subsides in intensity when spinal lengthening stops.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Core Outcome Sets and Multidimensional Assessment Tools for Harmonizing Outcome Measure in Chronic Pain and Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ulrike; Neustadt, Katrin; Kopkow, Christian; Schmitt, Jochen; Sabatowski, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Core Outcome Sets (COSs) are a set of domains and measurement instruments recommended for application in any clinical trial to ensure comparable outcome assessment (both domains and instruments). COSs are not exclusively recommended for clinical trials, but also for daily record keeping in routine care. There are several COS recommendations considering clinical trials as well as multidimensional assessment tools to support daily record keeping in low back pain. In this article, relevant initiatives will be described, and implications for research in COS development in chronic pain and back pain will be discussed. PMID:27589816

  3. Core Outcome Sets and Multidimensional Assessment Tools for Harmonizing Outcome Measure in Chronic Pain and Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Kaiser

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Core Outcome Sets (COSs are a set of domains and measurement instruments recommended for application in any clinical trial to ensure comparable outcome assessment (both domains and instruments. COSs are not exclusively recommended for clinical trials, but also for daily record keeping in routine care. There are several COS recommendations considering clinical trials as well as multidimensional assessment tools to support daily record keeping in low back pain. In this article, relevant initiatives will be described, and implications for research in COS development in chronic pain and back pain will be discussed.

  4. Post-Flight Back Pain Following International Space Station Missions: Evaluation of Spaceflight Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Back pain during spaceflight has often been attributed to the lengthening of the spinal column due to the absence of gravity during both short and long-duration missions. Upon landing and re-adaptation to gravity, the spinal column reverts back to its original length thereby causing some individuals to experience pain and muscular spasms, while others experience no ill effects. With International Space Station (ISS) missions, cases of back pain and injury are more common post-flight, but little is known about the potential risk factors.

  5. The Efficacy of a Perceptive Rehabilitation on Postural Control in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Teresa; Fusco, Augusto; Iosa, Marco; Grasso, Maria R.; Spadini, Ennio; Paolucci, Stefano; Saraceni, Vincenzo M.; Morone, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain have a worse posture, probably related to poor control of the back muscles and altered perception of the trunk midline. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a perceptive rehabilitation in terms of stability and pain relief in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients were…

  6. Are chronic low back pain outcomes improved with co-management of concurrent depression?

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    Pollard Henry

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To discuss the role of depression in chronic lower back pain and comment on appropriate methods of screening and co-management. Data Sources The current scientific literature was investigated using the online web databases CINAHL, Medline/PUBMED, Proquest, Meditext and from manual library searches. Data Extraction Databases were searched from 1980 to the present (2005. Articles were searched with the key words "depression" and "low back pain". Over three hundred articles were sourced and articles were then selected on their relevance to the chronic spinal pain states that present to manual therapy practitioners. Data synthesis Pain is a subjective awareness of peripheral nociceptive stimulation, projected from the thalamus to the cerebral cortex with each individual's pain experience being mediated by his or her psychological state. Thus a psychological component will often be associated with any painful experience. A number of studies suggest (among other things that the incidence of depression predicts chronicity in lower back pain syndromes but that chronic lower back pain does not have the reciprocal action to predict depression. Conclusion The aetiology of chronic pain is multifactorial. There is sufficient evidence in the literature to demonstrate a requirement to draw treatment options from many sources in order to achieve a favourable pain relief outcome. The treatment should be multimodal, including mental and emotional support, counseling and herbal advice. While a strong correlation between depression and chronic low back pain can be demonstrated, an apparent paucity of literature that specifically addresses the patient response to chiropractic treatment and concurrent psychotherapy identifies the need for prospective studies of this nature to be undertaken. It is likely that multimodal/multidisciplinary treatment approaches should be encouraged to deal with these chronic lower back pain syndromes.

  7. [Deficits in the psychological care of low back pain patients--Comments on the expertise of the expert committee for the health care system regarding low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, H D

    2002-06-01

    A committee of health specialists examined the demand characteristics and efficiency of German health care services and published an expertise on the misallocation of services that among other subjects also covered the area of low back pain. Although we agree with their principal statements, we like to underscore that the objectives mentioned in the report cannot be achieved without the participation of psychologists. The process of chronicity is determined in a significant way by psychological mechanisms. Psychologists investigated these mechanisms, developed interventions for the prevention and treatment of low back pain on the basis of the results, and tested their efficacy in trials with a high methodological standard. Incorporation of psychological expertise does not only optimise prevention and treatment of low back pain and helps to prevent unnecessary suffering of the afflicted, in addition, it offers a contribution a cost containment.

  8. [The multimodal interdisciplinary therapeutic program in chronic back pain. A new treatment strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casser, H; Riedel, T; Schrembs, C; Ingenhorst, A; Kühnau, D

    1999-11-01

    The epidemic-like rise in chronic low back pain in western industrial nations is less an expression of a medical than a psychosocial phenomenon. Differentiation between acute, chronic or chronifying pain is of crucial importance for therapeutic procedures. Pain syndromes in the muscular-skeletal system tend to become chronic to a far larger extent than expected. More than 80 % of low back pain represents a functional pain syndrome and does not show any pathoanatomical correlate. Pain existing independently seems to be predestined by a somatic and psychosocial deconditioning syndrome. Those at risk of chronifying pain or those whose pain is already chronic should be given an interdisciplinary, multimodal therapeutic program. A pilot study was carried out in our clinic: multidisciplinary treatment was given to our patients (of which over 90 % belonged to stages II and III on the Gerbershagen scale) and the result was significant improvement in the measurements of pain intensity, sensoric and affective pain perception, their list of complaints, the common scale of depression and the pain disability index. Taking previously published studies into consideration, it is safe to say that a multidisciplinary, multimodal program of therapy even after stay in hospital results in considerable relief of pain and improvement in the ability to cope with the pain for patients with chronified pain syndromes in the muscular-skeletal system which are resistant to treatment on an outpatient basis.

  9. New therapeutic strategy for chronifying back pain. The multimodal, interdisciplinary therapeutic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casser, H-R; Riedel, T; Schrembs, C; Ingenhorst, A; Kühnau, D

    1999-11-01

    The epidemic-like rise in chronic low back pain in western industrial nations is less an expression of a medical than a psychosocial phenomenon. Differentiation between acute, chronic or chronifying pain is of crucial importance for therapeutic procedures. Pain syndromes in the muscular-skeletal system tend to become chronic to a far larger extent than expected. More than 80 % of low back pain represents a functional pain syndrome and does not show any pathoanatomical correlate. Pain existing independently seems to be predestined by a somatic and psychosocial deconditioning syndrome. Those at risk of chronifying pain or those whose pain is already chronic should be given an interdisciplinary, multimodal therapeutic program. A pilot study was carried out in our clinic: multidisciplinary treatment was given to our patients (of which over 90 % belonged to stages II and III on the Gerbershagen scale) and the result was significant improvement in the measurements of pain intensity, sensoric and affective pain perception, their list of complaints, the common scale of depression and the pain disability index. Taking previously published studies into consideration, it is safe to say that a multidisciplinary, multimodal program of therapy even after stay in hospital results in considerable relief of pain and improvement in the ability to cope with the pain for patients with chronified pain syndromes in the muscular-skeletal system which are resistant to treatment on an outpatient basis.

  10. Effect of intravenous tropisetron on modulation of pain and central hypersensitivity in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neziri, Alban Y; Dickenmann, Martina; Scaramozzino, Pasquale; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Dickenson, Anthony H; Curatolo, Michele

    2012-02-01

    The activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT-3) receptors in spinal cord can enhance intrinsic spinal mechanisms of central hypersensitivity, possibly leading to exaggerated pain responses. Clinical studies suggest that 5-HT-3 receptor antagonists may have an analgesic effect. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study tested the hypothesis that the 5-HT-3 receptor antagonist tropisetron attenuates pain and central hypersensitivity in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty patients with chronic low back pain, 15 of whom were women (aged 53 ± 14 years) and 15 men (aged 48 ± 14 years), were studied. A single intravenous injection of 0.9% saline solution, tropisetron 2mg, and tropisetron 5mg was administrated in 3 different sessions, in a double-blind crossover manner. The main outcome was the visual analogue scale (VAS) score of spontaneous low back pain before, and 15, 30, 60, and 90 minutes after drug administration. Secondary outcomes were nociceptive withdrawal reflexes to single and repeated electrical stimulation, area of reflex receptive fields, pressure pain detection and tolerance thresholds, conditioned pain modulation, and area of clinical pain. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and panel multiple regressions. All 3 treatments reduced VAS scores. However, there was no statistically significant difference between tropisetron and placebo in VAS scores. Compared to placebo, tropisetron produced a statistically significant increase in pain threshold after single electrical stimulation, but no difference in all other secondary outcomes was found. A single-dose intravenous administration of tropisetron in patients with chronic low back pain had no significant specific effect on intensity of pain and most parameters of central hypersensitivity.

  11. Distinct quantitative sensory testing profiles in nonspecific chronic back pain subjects with and without psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesarz, Jonas; Gerhardt, Andreas; Leisner, Sabine; Janke, Susanne; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Eich, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Psychological trauma is associated with an increased risk for chronification of nonspecific chronic back pain (nsCLBP) independent of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the mechanisms underlying the role of psychological trauma in nsCLBP are less clear than in PTSD. Therefore, this study considered whether psychological trauma exposure (TE) is accompanied by specific alterations in pain perception. The study included 56 participants with nsCLBP and TE (nsCLBP-TE), 93 participants with nsCLBP without TE (nsCLBP-W-TE), and 31 pain-free controls. All participants underwent a thorough clinical evaluation. The standardized quantitative sensory testing protocol of the "German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain" was used to obtain comprehensive profiles on somatosensory functions in painful (back) and non-painful areas (hand). The protocol consisted of thermal and mechanical detection as well as pain thresholds, vibration thresholds, and pain sensitivity to sharp and blunt mechanical stimuli. Psychological trauma was validated by structured clinical interview. Trauma-associated symptom severity, anxiety, and depressive symptomatology were assessed by self-report questionnaires. Differences in somatosensory function were seen only for pressure pain thresholds. Compared with controls, nsCLBP-TE revealed hyperalgesia generalized in space with lower thresholds in painful and non-painful areas, whereas nsCLBP-W-TE demonstrated localized alterations with decreased thresholds only in the pain-affected area of the back (P ≤ 0.006). Our findings suggest an augmented central pain processing in nsCLBP-TE (alterations in painful and non-painful areas), whereas nsCLBP-W-TE show only local changes (alterations only in the painful area) suggesting regional sensitization processes. This finding might explain why TE without PTSD is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic pain.

  12. Neck and Back Pain Prevalence in Workers of Iranian Steel industries at 2015

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    Mohammad Hassan Nassir- Kashani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs are considered as the main cause of occupational complications and disability in developing countries. In Iranian steel companies, workers commonly are directly involved in the production process and physical activities such as manual material handling and awkward postures. Present study was performed for assessment of neck and back pain prevalence among workers of four Iranian steel industries. Study participants in our cross sectional study, were randomly selected from workers of four Iranian steel industries. Data of neck and back pain were gathered by Nordic questionnaire. Logistic regression was used for controlling confounding variables and determining independent predictors of neck and back pain among study workers. Among study workers, prevalence of neck and back pain in a recent year were 18.40% and 13.90% respectively. Age (p≤0.02 and job experience (p≤0.00 had significant association with neck pain. Age, sex, BMI, and job duration were not known as an independent predictor of neck or back pain. Neck and back pain prevalence in steel industries were happened whit higher rate compared to most of other countries. Next studies will suggest for determining work related risk factors of WMSDs in workers and designing preventive strategies.

  13. Yoga attitudes in chronic low back pain: Roles of catastrophizing and fear of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Martha A; Thorn, Beverly E

    2015-08-01

    Chronic low back pain is a significant public health problem and, although underused, yoga may be an effective complementary treatment. The current study examined associations of pain catastrophizing and fear of movement with attitudes toward yoga in adults with chronic low back pain. Participants completed three quantitative questionnaires assessing specific constructs: beliefs about yoga, fear of movement, and pain catastrophizing. A semi-structured in-person interview was then conducted to obtain specific pain-related information. Hierarchical regression and mediational analyses were used to test hypotheses. Consistent with the fear-avoidance model of chronic pain, catastrophizing and fear of movement were negatively associated with yoga attitudes. Specifically, fear of movement was a mediator between catastrophizing and attitudes toward yoga. Individuals with higher levels of catastrophizing and fear of movement may be less likely to consider a pain treatment involving physical movement.

  14. Low back pain characterized by muscle resistance and occupational factors associated with nursing

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    Rafael de Souza Petersen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the occupational factors associated with low back pain using a surveillance tool and to characterize the low back pain by the resistance of the extensor muscles of the vertebral column among nursing professionals at an Intensive Care Unit.METHODS: Cross-sectional study. The workers answered a questionnaire about occupational factors and participated in a resistance test of the extensor muscles of the vertebral column. Associations were established through Student's T-test or Mann-Whitney's U-test and correlations using Pearson's test.RESULTS: Out of 48 participants, 32 (67% suffered from low pain. For the resistance test, the subjects suffering from low back pain endured less time in comparison with asymptomatic subjects, but without significant differences (p=0.147. The duration of the pain episode showed a significant negative correlation (p=0.016 with the results of the resistance test though. The main factors identified as causes of low back pain were biomechanical and postural elements, conditions of the muscle structure and physical and organizational conditions.CONCLUSIONS: the main occupational factors associated with the low back pain were the posture and the characteristics of the physical and organizational conditions. In addition, the extensor muscles of the column showed a trend towards lesser resistance for workers in pain. This evidence is important when considering prevention and treatment strategies.

  15. Mechanisms of low back pain: a guide for diagnosis and therapy [version 2; referees: 3 approved

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    Massimo Allegri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (CLBP is a chronic pain syndrome in the lower back region, lasting for at least 3 months. CLBP represents the second leading cause of disability worldwide being a major welfare and economic problem. The prevalence of CLBP in adults has increased more than 100% in the last decade and continues to increase dramatically in the aging population, affecting both men and women in all ethnic groups, with a significant impact on functional capacity and occupational activities. It can also be influenced by psychological factors, such as stress, depression and/or anxiety. Given this complexity, the diagnostic evaluation of patients with CLBP can be very challenging and requires complex clinical decision-making. Answering the question “what is the pain generator” among the several structures potentially involved in CLBP is a key factor in the management of these patients, since a mis-diagnosis can generate therapeutical mistakes. Traditionally, the notion that the etiology of 80% to 90% of LBP cases is unknown has been mistaken perpetuated across decades. In most cases, low back pain can be attributed to specific pain generator, with its own characteristics and with different therapeutical opportunity. Here we discuss about radicular pain, facet Joint pain, sacro-iliac pain, pain related to lumbar stenosis, discogenic pain. Our article aims to offer to the clinicians a simple guidance to identify pain generators in a safer and faster way, relying a correct diagnosis and further therapeutical approach.

  16. Evaluation of low back pain risks in a beef skinning operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, B; Sengupta, A K

    2000-01-01

    The low back pain risks in a beef skinning operation at a high stand kill floor workstation was evaluated. The increases in compressive forces at lower back (L5/S1) between normal slump (back angle 25 degrees, measured in the sagittal plane) and severe (45 degrees ) and between normal slump and very severe (70 degrees ) bent back postures were 387 N or 28% and 616 N or 45%, respectively. The high spine load coupled with high level of repetition can have a high probability of fatigue failure in the spine structural members. Non-neutral back posture for a large portion of the total work time can be a low back pain risk factor. The videotape analysis showed that the times involved during the task performance for the bent back (more than 25 degrees ) and severe bent back (more than 45 degrees ) were 48.4 and 33.5% of the total cycle time, respectively. The upper limit from OWAS (Ovako Working Posture Analysis System) for bent back posture is 30% of the total cycle time. The bent and twisted back posture (both more than 25 degrees ) time was 10.4% compared to OWAS limit of 5%. This indicated that actions are needed in the near future to alleviate the risk of low back pain. Ergonomics redesign of the workstation was recommended for the operation.

  17. Fluoroscopic caudal epidural injections in managing chronic axial low back pain without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain

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    Manchikanti L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati11Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USABackground: Chronic low back pain without disc herniation is common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing this condition, including epidural injections. However, there is continued debate on the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections.Methods: A randomized, double-blind, actively controlled trial was conducted. The objective was to evaluate the ability to assess the effectiveness of caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joints, or sacroiliac joints. A total of 120 patients were randomized to two groups; one group did not receive steroids (group 1 and the other group did (group 2. There were 60 patients in each group. The primary outcome measure was at least 50% improvement in Numeric Rating Scale and Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome measures were employment status and opioid intake. These measures were assessed at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment.Results: Significant pain relief and functional status improvement (primary outcome defined as a 50% or more reduction in scores from baseline, were observed in 54% of patients in group 1 and 60% of patients in group 2 at 24 months. In contrast, 84% of patients in group 1 and 73% in group 2 saw significant pain relief and functional status improvement in the successful groups at 24 months.Conclusion: Caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids are effective in patients with chronic axial low back pain of discogenic origin without facet joint pain, disc herniation, and

  18. Journey of a Hero--Working with Chronic Back Pain: The Case of Peter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reap, Thomas Gerard, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a case study of a young adult male suffering from chronic back pain who, because of that disability, has been unable to work for the past several years. Reviews the client's physical problems, family situation, and employment history. (NB)

  19. Effects of an exercise program in individuals with chronic low back pain

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    Maurice Zanini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low back pain is a major cause of medical appointments, work disability and hospitalization. Aim: To measure changes in back pain scores and spinal functional capacity in individuals with low back pain after an exercise program. Methods: Non-randomized controlled trial of 40 participants (20 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group. Patients from both groups were evaluated before and after the program. The program consisted of flexibility training using joint mobilization and stretching exercises for the upper and lower limbs and back, as well as strength training for the abdominal muscles and hamstrings. Participants in the control group did not receive any exercise-related interventions, only medical care. Results: the experimental group showed significant improvements in pain score (P

  20. Psychological Disturbance and Life Event Differences Among Patients With Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Frank; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Results of this study emphasized the importance of considering psychological disturbance in assessing functional components of low back pain. Psychologically disturbed patients had higher life-event scores regardless of organic pathology. (Author/BEF)

  1. The RESOLVE Trial for people with chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomised clinical trial

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    Matthew K Bagg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low back pain is the leading worldwide cause of disability, and results in significant personal hardship. Most available treatments, when tested in high-quality randomised, controlled trials

  2. Back pain in adults living in quilombola territories of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil

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    Luis Rogério Cosme Silva Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the factors associated with back pain in adults who live in quilombola territories. METHODS A population-based survey was performed on quilombola communities of Vitória da Conquista, state of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. The sample (n = 750 was established via a raffle of residences. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to investigate sociodemographics and employment characteristics, lifestyle, and health conditions. The outcome was analyzed as a dichotomous variable (Poisson regression. RESULTS The prevalence of back pain was of 39.3%. Age ≥ 30 years and being a smoker were associated with the outcome. The employment status was not related to back pain. CONCLUSIONS The survey identified a high prevalence of back pain in adults. It is suggested to support the restructuring of the local public service in order to outline programs and access to healthy practices, assistance, diagnosis, and treatment of spine problems.

  3. Back pain in adults living in quilombola territories of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luis Rogério Cosme Silva; Assunção, Ada Ávila; Lima, Eduardo de Paula

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the factors associated with back pain in adults who live in quilombola territories. METHODS A population-based survey was performed on quilombola communities of Vitória da Conquista, state of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. The sample (n = 750) was established via a raffle of residences. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to investigate sociodemographics and employment characteristics, lifestyle, and health conditions. The outcome was analyzed as a dichotomous variable (Poisson regression). RESULTS The prevalence of back pain was of 39.3%. Age ≥ 30 years and being a smoker were associated with the outcome. The employment status was not related to back pain. CONCLUSIONS The survey identified a high prevalence of back pain in adults. It is suggested to support the restructuring of the local public service in order to outline programs and access to healthy practices, assistance, diagnosis, and treatment of spine problems. PMID:25372165

  4. The role of exercise and alternative treatments for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Kevin A; Rittenberg, Joshua D

    2010-11-01

    The determination of whether a patient should pursue an active or passive treatment program is often made by medical practitioners. Knowledge about all forms of treatment, including complementary and alternative (CAM) treatments, is essential in the treatment of low back pain. Medical practitioner-directed active treatments that have been shown to be effective for the treatment of low back pain include physical therapy-directed exercise programs such as core stabilization and mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT). Based on the current literature, it appears that yoga is the most effective nonphysician-directed active treatment approach to nonspecific low back pain when comparing other CAM treatments. Acupuncture is a medical practitioner-directed passive treatment that has been shown to be a good adjunct treatment. More randomized controlled studies are needed to support both CAM treatments and exercise in the treatment of low back pain.

  5. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 2 of 3: symptoms and signs of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'peripheral neuropathic pain\\' (PNP) refers to pain arising from a primary lesion or dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system. Symptoms and signs associated with an assumed dominance of PNP in patients attending for physiotherapy have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of PNP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist specifying the presence or absence of various clinical criteria. A binary logistic regression analysis with Bayesian model averaging identified a cluster of two symptoms and one sign predictive of PNP, including: \\'Pain referred in a dermatomal or cutaneous distribution\\

  6. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 3 of 3: symptoms and signs of nociceptive pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'nociceptive pain\\' (NP) refers to pain attributable to the activation of the peripheral receptive terminals of primary afferent neurones in response to noxious chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. The symptoms and signs associated with clinical classifications of NP have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of NP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol after which their pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist indicating the presence\\/absence of various symptoms and signs. A regression analysis identified a cluster of seven clinical criteria predictive of NP, including: \\'Pain localised to the area of injury\\/dysfunction\\

  7. EFFECT OF MYOFASCIAL RELEASE THERAPY ON PAIN RELATED DISABILITY, QUALITY OF SLEEP AND DEPRESSION IN OLDER ADULTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. B.Arun, MPT, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain was experienced by 50% of older adults that has threatened to quality of life. The economic cost of low back pain is more in older adults. Various literatures found that there is strong relationships exist between the low back pain and the psychosocial factors like sleep disturbances, depression, mood sway and chronic illness. Studies has found that depression is one of the commonest psychological problem faced by older adults which relates to other factors like pain, sleep dist...

  8. Effect of Yoga on Pain, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, and Serotonin in Premenopausal Women with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moseon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Serotonin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF are known to be modulators of nociception. However, pain-related connection between yoga and those neuromodulators has not been investigated. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of yoga on pain, BDNF, and serotonin. Methods. Premenopausal women with chronic low back pain practiced yoga three times a week for 12 weeks. At baseline and after 12 weeks, back pain intensity was measured using visual analogue scale (VAS, and serum BDNF and serotonin levels were evaluated. Additionally, back flexibility and level of depression were assessed. Results. After 12-week yoga, VAS decreased in the yoga group (P<0.001, whereas it increased (P<0.05 in the control group. Back flexibility was improved in the yoga group (P<0.01. Serum BDNF increased in the yoga group (P<0.01, whereas it tended to decrease in the control group (P=0.05. Serum serotonin maintained in the yoga group, while it reduced (P<0.01 in the control group. The depression level maintained in the yoga group, whereas it tended to increase in the control group (P=0.07. Conclusions. We propose that BDNF may be one of the key factors mediating beneficial effects of yoga on chronic low back pain.

  9. Assessment of Vitamin D status In Patients of Chronic Low Back Pain of Unknown Etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Lodh, Moushumi; Goswami, Binita; Mahajan, Rajni Dawar; Sen, Dipankar; Jajodia, Nirmal; Roy, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain is very disabling and dispiriting because of the physical impediment it causes and its psychological effects. Innumerable factors have been implicated in its etiology. In spite of improvements in diagnostic modalities, a considerable number of such cases fall in the ambiguous zone of unknown etiology or ‘idiopathic.’Early diagnosis of low back pain will allow effective prevention and treatment to be offered. This study was conducted to assess the contribution of vitamin D levels...

  10. The Pilates® Method in the treatment of lower back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Vasconcellos,Marcelo Henrique Oliveira de; Silva,Ramon Diego Santana da; Santos,Sheila Maria Bispo dos; Merlo,José Reynaldo de Carvalho; Conceição,Tatiana Maíta Alves

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Pilates® method incorporates a number of the guidelines recommended for therapeutic exercises considered to be effective in the treatment of chronic lower back pain, such as the contraction of the transversus abdominis and multifidus muscles, associated with breathing, while taking into account the individual characteristics of patients. Objective To assess the effects of the Pilates® method on the treatment of lower back pain. Method This systematic review includes...

  11. Differential diagnosis of a patient with low back and toe pain

    OpenAIRE

    Wahl, Elizabeth Cooper; Smith, David; Sesto, Mary; Boissonnault, William

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain is one of the most commonly treated conditions by outpatient orthopedic physical therapists. The management of low back pain is also responsible for a large economic burden in the United States and internationally, which highlights one of the many reasons why appropriate medical screening and referral is important in the physical therapy setting. The purpose of this case report is to describe the successful physical therapist screening and subsequent medical differential diagnos...

  12. Hip fracture presenting as mechanical low back pain subsequent to a fall: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Gleberzon, Brian; Hyde, David

    2006-01-01

    This case chronicles the assessment and clinical management of a 54 year old female patient who presented with post traumatic lower back, hip and lower extremity pain, initially attributed to mechanical low back pain but ultimately diagnosed as a hip fracture. This case study illustrates a number of important issues germane to chiropractic care. These are; the importance of using different assessment procedures, combined with clinical experience, in order to differentiate between those patien...

  13. Are chronic low back pain outcomes improved with co-management of concurrent depression?

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard Henry; Middleton Peter

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss the role of depression in chronic lower back pain and comment on appropriate methods of screening and co-management. Data Sources The current scientific literature was investigated using the online web databases CINAHL, Medline/PUBMED, Proquest, Meditext and from manual library searches. Data Extraction Databases were searched from 1980 to the present (2005). Articles were searched with the key words "depression" and "low back pain". Over three hundred articles w...

  14. McKenzie treatment versus mulligan sustained natural apophyseal glides for chronic mechanical low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Waqqar, Saira; Shakil-ur-Rehman, Syed; Ahmad, Shakeel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Chronic mechanical low back pain is common among different age groups and genders. Different manual therapy techniques combined with exercise therapy and electrotherapy modalities play an important role in its management. Our objective was to compare the effects of McKenzie extension exercisesprogram (EEP) versus Mulligan Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glides (SNAGs) for chronic mechanical low back pain (CMLBP). Methods: This randomized control trial (RCT) was conducte...

  15. Standardized versus Individualized Acupuncture for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Pach; Xiaoli Yang-Strobel; Rainer Lüdtke; Stephanie Roll; Katja Icke; Benno Brinkhaus; Witt, Claudia M.

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of standardized and individualized acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic low back pain. A single-center randomized controlled single-blind trial was performed in a general medical practice in Germany run by a Chinese-born medical doctor trained in western and Chinese medicine. One hundred and fifty outpatients with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups (78 standardized and 72 individualized acupuncture). Patients received ei...

  16. Development of disease-specific quality indicators for danish chiropractic patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Line P; Krog, Birgitte R; Kongsted, Alice;

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop disease-specific quality indicators for Danish chiropractic patients with low back pain (LBP) as an initial effort to include chiropractors in the Danish Health Care Quality Programme.......The purpose of this study is to develop disease-specific quality indicators for Danish chiropractic patients with low back pain (LBP) as an initial effort to include chiropractors in the Danish Health Care Quality Programme....

  17. A 35-year trend analysis for back pain in Austria: the role of obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Großschädl

    Full Text Available The prevalence of back pain is constantly increasing and a public health problem of high priority. In Austria there is a lack of empirical evidence for the development of back pain and its related factors. The present study aims to investigate trends in the prevalence of back pain across different subpopulations (sex, age, obesity.A secondary data analysis based on five nationally representative cross-sectional health surveys (1973-2007 was carried out. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in private homes in Austria. Subjects aged 20 years and older were included in the study sample (n = 178,818. Obesity was defined as BMI≥30 kg/m2 and adjusted for self-report bias. Back pain was measured as the self-reported presence of the disorder.The age-standardized prevalence of back pain was 32.9% in 2007; it was higher among women than men (p<0.001, higher in older than younger subjects (p<0.001 and higher in obese than non-obese individuals (p<0.001. During the investigation period the absolute change in the prevalence of back pain was +19.4%. Among all subpopulations the prevalence steadily increased. Obese men showed the highest increase of and the greatest risk for back pain.These results help to understand the development of back pain in Austria and can be used to plan controlled promotion programs. Further monitoring is recommended in order to control risk groups and plan target group-specific prevention strategies. In Austria particular emphasis should be on obese individuals. We recommend conducting prospective studies to confirm our results and investigate causal relationships.

  18. Orthotic insoles do not prevent physical stress-induced low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Ville M; Sillanpää, Petri; Salo, Tuula; Laine, Heikki-Jussi; Mäenpää, Heikki; Pihlajamäki, Harri

    2011-01-01

    Orthotic insoles are suggested to prevent low back pain. This randomized controlled study assessed if customised orthotic insoles prevent low back pain. Healthy military conscripts (n = 228; mean age 19 years, range 18-29) were randomly assigned to use either customised orthotic insoles (treatment group, n = 73) or nothing (control group, n = 147). The main outcome measure was low back pain requiring a physician visit and resulting in minimum 1 day suspension from military duty. Twenty-four (33%) treated subjects and 42 (27%) control subjects were suspended from duty due to low back pain (p = 0.37; risk difference 4.3%; 95% CI: -8.7 to 17.3%). Mean suspension duration was 2 days (range 1-7) in both groups. Four (5%) treated subjects and eight (5%) control subjects were released from duty due to persistent low back pain (p = 0.92; risk difference 0%; 95% CI: -6 to 6%). Use of orthotic insoles is therefore not recommended to prevent physical stress-related low back pain.

  19. Work Posture and Back Pain Evaluation in a Malaysian Food Manufacturing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba M. Deros

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A cross-sectional study was conducted among workers at a processed food manufacturer in Malaysia. The main objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of back pain among workers who perform manual material handling. In addition, the study also investigated the effectiveness of the interventions provided by the employer to reduce the risk of back pain. Approach: A total of 60 workers had participated in the study. Socio-demographic information and back pain symptoms were obtained using Standardized Nordic Questionnaire (SNQ for analysis of musculoskeletal Symptoms. WinOWAS software was used to identify the respondent's working posture. Results: Study results showed that lifting posture contributed the highest percentage of upper extremities back pain (45% and lower extremities back pain (80%. There was a significant relationship at level p≤0.05 for posture working repeatedly and lifting weight above head level. The interventions provided by the employer showed 82% of the respondents gave a positive feedback for training provided. As for personal protective equipment and mechanical aid, both showed positive results at 84.61 and 100% respectively. Chi-square analysis results showed, respondents' age has significant effect on standing posture for 10 min (pConclusion: The study suggested that all manual handling activities should be replaced with mechanical aids to reduce prevalence of back pain.

  20. Low back pain in adolescent and associated factors: A cross sectional study with schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica R. O. G. C. M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of low back pain nonspecific and associated factors in schoolchildren. Method: This cross-sectional study investigated 343 adolescents, aged between 12 and 15 years, of both sexes of public schools. The questionnaire included questions regarding sociodemographic characteristics, type of school transportation, body mass index and low back pain. The outcome was defined as discomfort localized below the costal margin and above the inferior gluteal folds in the last 12 months. Results : The prevalence of low back pain in the last year was 57% (n=195 among participants, with no significant difference between the sexes (OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.37. Advancing age and body mass index were associated with the presence of low back pain in the bivariate analysis. The remaining seated at school in usual days was considered one of the main activities that trigger symptoms that lasted up to seven days for the majority (80% of adolescents. Conclusions: The high prevalence of low back pain presented, indicating that it is a common condition among these adolescents. There was no difference between the sexes, but had influence of age and body mass index. Our results point to the need for the development epidemiological studies of low back pain among children and adolescents.

  1. Effects of long-term corset wearing on chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoto; Sekiguchi, Miho; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Shishido, Hiroaki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Konno, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    There are few studies of the therapeutic effects of long-term corset wearing in patients with chronic low back pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term corset wearing on chronic low back pain and to examine the myoelectrical activities of the paravertebral muscles. Forty subjects with chronic low back pain were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups: a group wearing corsets for 6 months (CW) group and a group not wearing corsets (NW). The treatment effects were measured using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Muscle endurance was evaluated during the Biering-Sorensen test (S-test), and the degree of muscle fatigue was evaluated by the change in percent mean power frequency (%MPF) of the paravertebral muscles. Corset treatment for chronic low back pain improved low back pain and increased muscle endurance for a short period of time. Paravertebral muscle fatigue was not increased by long-term corset wearing for chronic low back pain, and weakening of the paravertebral muscles was not observed up to 6 months after the start of corset wearing.

  2. Back pain and exposure to whole body vibration in helicopter pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, P M; Hulshof, C T; Dijkstra, L; Boshuizen, H C; Groenhout, H J; Valken, E

    1990-08-01

    In a questionnaire survey the prevalence of back pain in 163 helicopter pilots was compared to that in a control group of 297 non-flying air force officers who underwent the same pre-employment medical examination. Since pilots document their hours of flight in a personal flight log, an accurate estimate of the duration of exposure could be made. In addition, vibration levels of the helicopters were measured and an accumulative vibration dose was calculated for each pilot. 'Transient' back pain of a short duration was more frequent amongst the pilots compared to the control group, and the prevalence of 'chronic' back pain of a persistent nature was also higher amongst the helicopter pilots. Transient back pain seemed to be most strongly related to the average hours of flight per day, whereas chronic back pain was more closely related to total hours of flight or the accumulative vibration dose. A significant higher prevalence of this chronic back pain was observed only after 2000 hours of flight or a vibration dose of 400 m2h/s4. The observed health effects may be due to vibration or constrained posture but are most likely due to concomitant exposure to both factors.

  3. Minimally Invasive Microendoscopic Resection of the Transverse Process for Treatment of Low Back Pain with Bertolotti's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Goda, Yuichiro; Mineta, Kazuaki; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome is characterized by anomalous enlargement of the transverse process of the most caudal lumbar segment, causing chronic and persistent low back pain or sciatica. We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with left sciatic pain and low back pain due to a recurrent lumbar disc herniation at L4-5 with Bertolotti's syndrome. Selective L5 nerve root block and local injection of lidocaine into the articulation between the transverse process and sacral ala temporarily relieved the left sciatic pain and low back pain, respectively. To confirm the effect of local injection on low back pain, we gave a second local injection, which once again relieved the low back pain. Microendoscopic resection of the pseudoarticulation region and discectomy successfully relieved all symptoms. This report illustrates the effectiveness of minimally invasive resection of the transverse process for the treatment of low back pain with Bertolotti's syndrome. PMID:25045566

  4. Minimally Invasive Microendoscopic Resection of the Transverse Process for Treatment of Low Back Pain with Bertolotti’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Takata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bertolotti’s syndrome is characterized by anomalous enlargement of the transverse process of the most caudal lumbar segment, causing chronic and persistent low back pain or sciatica. We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with left sciatic pain and low back pain due to a recurrent lumbar disc herniation at L4-5 with Bertolotti’s syndrome. Selective L5 nerve root block and local injection of lidocaine into the articulation between the transverse process and sacral ala temporarily relieved the left sciatic pain and low back pain, respectively. To confirm the effect of local injection on low back pain, we gave a second local injection, which once again relieved the low back pain. Microendoscopic resection of the pseudoarticulation region and discectomy successfully relieved all symptoms. This report illustrates the effectiveness of minimally invasive resection of the transverse process for the treatment of low back pain with Bertolotti’s syndrome.

  5. Back pain and social isolation: Cross-sectional validation of the Friendship Scale for use in studies of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawthorne, G.; de Morton, N.; Kent, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) is common, and social isolation is both a risk factor for poor recovery and a consequence. However, no studies seem to have validated social isolation measures in LBP populations. Aims: This study assessed the validity of the Friendship Scale (FS), a brief measure...

  6. The Nordic back pain subpopulation program: can low back pain patterns be predicted from the first consultation with a chiropractor? A longitudinal pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that non-specific low back pain (LBP) consists of a number of subgroups which should be identified in order to improve treatment effects. In order to identify subgroups, patient characteristics that relate to different outcomes are searched for. However, LBP is often fluctua...

  7. The Nordic back pain subpopulation program: course patterns established through weekly follow-ups in patients treated for low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is known to have a fluctuating course. In clinical studies, when deciding on duration of treatment and time for follow-up, it is important to know at what point in time a definite pattern of recovery becomes apparent and at what time a possible recurrence is likely to occur. A...

  8. Does raloxifene treatment influence back pain and disability among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadokostakis, Georgios; Katonis, Pavlos; Damilakis, John; Hadjipavlou, Alexander

    2005-12-01

    Clinical studies have suggested that postmenopausal women on estrogen replacement treatment are more likely to experience back pain and related disability compared to women who do not take estrogens. Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator has estrogen-like effects on bone tissue, and antagonize the action of estrogens on endometrium and breast tissue. It is unknown if the treatment of osteoporosis with raloxifene has estrogen-like or opposite effects on back pain and functional capacity among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. A total of 120 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and chronic back pain were randomized to receive raloxifene 60 mg with 1,000 mg calcium, and 800 IU vitamin D daily or 1,000 mg calcium and 800 IU vitamin D daily. Pain intensity and pain-related disability were measured before treatment at 6 months and after 1 year. Repeated measures of ANOVA, did not reveal statistically significant differences over time, on pain intensity and disability scores, between groups studied. There was a trend in pain intensity changes during the follow-up period, but the differences between the groups were not statistically significant. It seems that treatment with raloxifene does not influence back pain and disability among postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Raloxifene may have estrogenic agonist effects on nociceptive processing in the central nervous system.

  9. Effectiveness of Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judith A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Evaluated effects of group behavioral therapy including aerobic exercise, behavioral therapy alone, and aerobic exercise alone on pain and physical and psychological disability among mildly disabled chronic low-back-pain patients (n=96). The combined behavioral therapy and exercise group improved significantly more pretreatment to posttreatment…

  10. Prognostic Factors for Recovery in Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, K.; Luijsterburg, P.A.J.; Miedema, H.S.; Pool - Goudzwaard, A.; Koes, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Few data are available on predictors for a favorable outcome in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNLBP). Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess prognostic factors for pain intensity, disability, return to work, quality of life, and global perceived effect in patient

  11. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhangen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Aertgeerts, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care c

  12. Yoga for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Holtzman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of yoga as an intervention for chronic low back pain (CLBP using a meta-analytical approach. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs that examined pain and/or functional disability as treatment outcomes were included. Post-treatment and follow-up outcomes were assessed.

  13. Adding chiropractic to standard medical therapy for nonspecific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Long, Cynthia R; Hondras, Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Randomized controlled trial.Objective. To assess changes in pain levels and physical functioning in response to standard medical care (SMC) versus SMC plus chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) for the treatment of low back pain (LBP) among 18 to 35-year-old active-duty military...

  14. National survey of back & neck pain amongst consultant ophthalmologists in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Jonathan N; Lee, Richard M; Chowdhury, Haziq R; Smith, Henry B; Dhital, Anish; Khandwala, Mona

    2015-12-01

    Repetitive tasks, awkward or prolonged working postures, and high cognitive load are risk factors for occupational musculoskeletal disorders. Ophthalmologists may be vulnerable given that they are exposed to a combination of these factors. This national study assesses the prevalence, severity and associations of back and neck pain amongst UK consultant ophthalmologists. A postal survey was conducted using addresses supplied by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson correlation coefficient, two-tailed probability testing, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Dunn's multiple comparison test. 518 responses were received (50.3 % response rate). Back and neck pain were reported by 50.6 % (262/518) and 31.8 % (165/518) of respondents, respectively, with 62.4 % (323/518) reporting one or both. 33.6 % (174/518) reported pain whilst operating, of whom 78.7 % (137/174) found operating exacerbated their pain. 31.7 % (164/518) reported pain when using the slit lamp, of whom 71.3 % (117/164) found it exacerbated their pain. Individual subspecialties showed a significant relative risk of back or neck pain in some circumstances, when compared to ophthalmologists as a whole. Occupational back and neck pain remains a problem amongst ophthalmologists. Recommendations are made for modifications to the working environment, and consideration should be given to improving education for trainees.

  15. Bridging osteophyte of the anterosuperior sacroiliac joint as a cause of lumbar back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, K A; Solomon, M; Loefler, A; Dalton, S

    2004-12-01

    A case report is presented of a patient with an anterosuperior osteophytic bone bridge of the sacroiliac joint causing lumbar back pain. After prolonged physiotherapy, the bone bridge was excised, with complete resolution of the symptoms. Excision should only be considered in cases of symptomatic sacroiliac joint pain that does not respond to rehabilitation programmes and conservative treatment.

  16. Physical capacity in relation to low back, neck, or shoulder pain in a working population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg - Reenen, H.H. van; Ariëns, G.A.M.; Blatter, B.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Mechelen, W. van; Bongers, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the longitudinal relation between physical capacity (isokinetic lifting strength, static endurance of the back, neck, and shoulder muscles, and mobility of the spine) and low back, neck, and shoulder pain. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, 1789 Dutch workers participate

  17. Assessment of Vitamin D status In Patients of Chronic Low Back Pain of Unknown Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodh, Moushumi; Goswami, Binita; Mahajan, Rajni Dawar; Sen, Dipankar; Jajodia, Nirmal; Roy, Abhishek

    2015-04-01

    Low back pain is very disabling and dispiriting because of the physical impediment it causes and its psychological effects. Innumerable factors have been implicated in its etiology. In spite of improvements in diagnostic modalities, a considerable number of such cases fall in the ambiguous zone of unknown etiology or 'idiopathic.'Early diagnosis of low back pain will allow effective prevention and treatment to be offered. This study was conducted to assess the contribution of vitamin D levels and other biochemical factors to chronic low back pain in such cases. All patients attending the orthopedics OPD for low back pain in whom a precise anatomical cause could not be localized, were prospectively enrolled in this study. We measured serum levels of glucose, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, rheumatoid factor, C reactive protein, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, albumin and 25 (OH) D concentrations in 200 cases and 200 control samples. The patients showed significantly lower vitamin D levels compared to controls with p value back pain patients were in the age group of 31-50 years (42 %).The average BMI was 23.27 ± 5.17 kg/sq m, 73 % of total patient population were females and 27 % were known case of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Calcium, alkaline phosphatase, was positively correlated with vitamin D and glucose showed a negative correlation with vitamin D in the patient population. The problem of low back pain provides a challenge to health care providers. The problem in developing countries is compounded by ignorance to report for early treatment and occupational compulsions in rural areas and sedentary lifestyle in urban youth. The authors strongly recommend early frequent screening for vitamin D along with glucose, protein, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, CRP as part of general health checkup for non-specific body pain, especially low back pain.

  18. Effectiveness of mindfulness meditation (Vipassana) in the management of chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sangram G Patil

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is challenging to treat with its significant psychological and cognitive behavioural element involved. Mindfulness meditation helps alter the behavioural response in chronic pain situations. Significant body of research in the filed of mindfulness meditation comes from the work of Dr Kabat-Zinn. The current evidence in the field, though not grade one, shows that there is a place for mindfulness meditation in managing chronic pain conditions including CLBP....

  19. Harpgophytum procumbens for osteoarthritis and low back pain: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Chrubasik Sigrun; Gagnier Joel J; Manheimer Eric

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of Harpagophytum procumbens preparations in the treatment of various forms of musculoskeletal pain. Methods Several databases and other sources were searched to identify randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized controlled trials, and controlled clinical trials testing Harpagophytum preparations in adults suffering from pain due to osteoarthritis or low back pain. Results Given the clinical heterogeneity a...

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE NATIONAL CENTRE FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES OF BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, Lynton G. F.; Walker, Bruce F

    1996-01-01

    Spinal pain of mechanical origin, with or without referred pain, is a serious health problem suffered by many Australians. In order to help patients with this ailment, and to investigate this costly and debilitating condition, the National Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies of Back Pain was established at Townsville General Hospital as a joint venture between James Cook University of North Queensland and the Northern Regional Health Authority. The Centre has a multidisciplinary clinical tea...

  1. Immediate effect of Fu's subcutaneous needling for low back pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhong-hua; CHEN Xin-yuan; LU Li-juan; LIN Jian; XU Jian-guo

    2006-01-01

    @@ The traditional Chinese acupuncture has been reported to alleviate pain and is widely accepted as a complement therapy for pain relief in the world.1In 1996, a novel acupuncture strategy, Fu's subcutaneous needling (FSN), was developed from the traditional Chinese acupuncture, but quite different from it.2 In FSN, needles are penetrated and swayed in the subcutaneous layer, but not the muscular layer. The choosing of its insertion points doesn't obey the principles of traditional Chinese medicine. To date, FSN has been widely used by clinicians in China for its good job in pain management though the systemic and rigorous studies are still lack.

  2. Study protocol: The back pain outcomes using longitudinal data (BOLD registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvik Jeffrey G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain is one of the most important causes of functional limitation, disability, and utilization of health care resources for adults of all ages, but especially among older adults. Despite the high prevalence of back pain in this population, important questions remain unanswered regarding the comparative effectiveness of commonly used diagnostic tests and treatments in the elderly. The overall goal of the Back pain Outcomes using Longitudinal Data (BOLD project is to establish a rich, sustainable registry to describe the natural history and evaluate prospectively the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of interventions for patients 65 and older with back pain. Methods/design BOLD is enrolling 5,000 patients ≥ 65 years old who present to a primary care physician with a new episode of back pain. We are recruiting study participants from three integrated health systems (Kaiser-Permanente Northern California, Henry Ford Health System in Detroit and Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates/ Harvard Pilgrim Health Care in Boston. Registry patients complete validated, standardized measures of pain, back pain-related disability, and health-related quality of life at enrollment and 3, 6 and 12 months later. We also have available for analysis the clinical and administrative data in the participating health systems’ electronic medical records. Using registry data, we will conduct an observational cohort study of early imaging compared to no early imaging among patients with new episodes of back pain. The aims are to: 1 identify predictors of early imaging and; 2 compare pain, functional outcomes, diagnostic testing and treatment utilization of patients who receive early imaging versus patients who do not receive early imaging. In terms of predictors, we will examine patient factors as well as physician factors. Discussion By establishing the BOLD registry, we are creating a resource that contains patient

  3. The effects of whole body vibration on static balance, spinal curvature, pain, and disability of patients with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinmo; Seo, Dongkwon

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of whole body vibration (WBV) on static balance, spinal curvature, pain, and the disability of patients with chronic lower back pain. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were of 40 patients, who were randomly assigned to WBV and control groups. Twenty-five minutes of lumbar stability training and 5 minutes of WBV were conducted for the WBV group, and 30 minutes of lumbar stability training was conducted for the control group. The training was conducted three times per week for a total of 6 weeks. Static balance, spinal curvature, pain, and disability were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] After the intervention, the WBV group showed a significant differences in static balance, spinal curvature, pain, and disability. The control group presented significant differences in pain, and disability. In the comparison of the two groups, the WBV group showed more significant improvements in the fall index and pain. [Conclusion] WBV can be recommended for the improvement of the balance ability and pain of chronic lower back pain patients.

  4. Does weather affect daily pain intensity levels in patients with acute low back pain? A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Vicky; Maher, Chris G; Steffens, Daniel; Li, Qiang; Hancock, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various weather parameters on pain intensity levels in patients with acute low back pain (LBP). We performed a secondary analysis using data from the PACE trial that evaluated paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the treatment of acute LBP. Data on 1604 patients with LBP were included in the analysis. Weather parameters (precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and air pressure) were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Pain intensity was assessed daily on a 0-10 numerical pain rating scale over a 2-week period. A generalised estimating equation analysis was used to examine the relationship between daily pain intensity levels and weather in three different time epochs (current day, previous day, and change between previous and current days). A second model was adjusted for important back pain prognostic factors. The analysis did not show any association between weather and pain intensity levels in patients with acute LBP in each of the time epochs. There was no change in strength of association after the model was adjusted for prognostic factors. Contrary to common belief, the results demonstrated that the weather parameters of precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and air pressure did not influence the intensity of pain reported by patients during an episode of acute LBP.

  5. Effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in treating spinal (back and neck) pain: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Edith Meszaros; Jeannot, Emilien; Trewhela, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain. Recent studies have shown positive outcome of yoga in general on reducing pain and functional disability of the spine. The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the existing research within Iyengar yoga method and its effectiveness on relieving back and neck pain (defined as spinal pain). Database research form the following sources (Cochrane library, NCBI PubMed, the Clinical Trial Registry of the Indian Council of Medical Research, Google Scholar, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO) demonstrated inclusion and exclusion criteria that selected only Iyengar yoga interventions, which in turn, identified six randomized control trials dedicated to compare the effectiveness of yoga for back and neck pain versus other care. The difference between the groups on the postintervention pain or functional disability intensity assessment was, in all six studies, favoring the yoga group, which projected a decrease in back and neck pain. Overall six studies with 570 patients showed, that Iyengar yoga is an effective means for both back and neck pain in comparison to control groups. This systematic review found strong evidence for short-term effectiveness, but little evidence for long-term effectiveness of yoga for chronic spine pain in the patient-centered outcomes.

  6. Effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in treating spinal (back and neck pain: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Meszaros Crow

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain. Recent studies have shown positive outcome of yoga in general on reducing pain and functional disability of the spine. The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the existing research within Iyengar yoga method and its effectiveness on relieving back and neck pain (defined as spinal pain. Database research form the following sources (Cochrane library, NCBI PubMed, the Clinical Trial Registry of the Indian Council of Medical Research, Google Scholar, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO demonstrated inclusion and exclusion criteria that selected only Iyengar yoga interventions, which in turn, identified six randomized control trials dedicated to compare the effectiveness of yoga for back and neck pain versus other care. The difference between the groups on the postintervention pain or functional disability intensity assessment was, in all six studies, favoring the yoga group, which projected a decrease in back and neck pain. Overall six studies with 570 patients showed, that Iyengar yoga is an effective means for both back and neck pain in comparison to control groups. This systematic review found strong evidence for short-term effectiveness, but little evidence for long-term effectiveness of yoga for chronic spine pain in the patient-centered outcomes.

  7. THE EFFECT OF KINESIO TAPING IN CHRONIC NON-SPECIFIC LOW BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Makeeva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to find out the effect of Kinesio taping on patients with low back pain (LBP). LBP is the most common musculoskeletal disease affecting all human beings. It effects on activities of daily living (ADL). The aim of this thesis is to determine the effect of Kinesio taping on pain and ADL. The research subject will be adults from the “Satakunnan Selkäyhdistys” Back Pain Association with chronic LBP. All participants will be interviewed during the first meeting. Th...

  8. Complex muscular adaptation to perturbations after induction of experimental low back pain in healthy participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    RMSabs) in the RMS-EMG from the baseline of the day were calculated and averaged among back and abdominal muscles. Results VAS scores during fatigue and DOMS were significantly higher compared with day-1 (Pmuscle RMS-EMG decreased and abdominal muscle RMS-EMG increased during DOMS, compared with pain......-free conditions (Pabdominal muscles day 1 (Pmuscles day 2 (Pmuscle groups compared to baseline (P...Background and aims Spine stability is affected in low back (LB) pain and potentially by muscle fatigue and soreness. This study assessed motor control responses to unexpected surface perturbations during stance during experimental LB muscle pain combined with fatigue and muscle soreness. Methods...

  9. Anthropometric characteristics, passive hip flexion, and spinal mobility in relation to back pain in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swärd, L; Eriksson, B; Peterson, L

    1990-05-01

    Anthropometric characteristics, passive hip flexion, and spinal mobility were examined and back pain was registered in 116 top Swedish male athletes representing four different sports (wrestling, gymnastics, soccer, tennis). Differences in stature, body weight, passive hip flexion, mobility of the spine in forward flexion, and asymmetry of the back were found when each group of athletes was compared with the rest of the athletes. These differences could be explained by a natural selection of individuals with the physical constitution required for the sport concerned, but they may also be a long-term effect of training. A small sacral inclination, defined as the sacrohorizontal angle, correlated significantly with back pain.

  10. Fluoroscopic caudal epidural injections in managing chronic axial low back pain without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain

    OpenAIRE

    Manchikanti L; Cash KA; McManus CD; Pampati V

    2012-01-01

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati11Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USABackground: Chronic low back pain without disc herniation is common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing this condition, including epidural injections. However, there is continued debate on the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of ...

  11. Ignoring the sacroiliac joint in chronic low back pain is costly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polly DW

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available David W Polly,1,2 Daniel Cher3 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA Background: Increasing evidence supports minimally invasive sacroiliac joint (SIJ fusion as a safe and effective treatment for SIJ dysfunction. Failure to include the SIJ in the diagnostic evaluation of low back pain could result in unnecessary health care expenses. Design: Decision analytic cost model. Methods: A decision analytic model calculating 2-year direct health care costs in patients with chronic low back pain considering lumbar fusion surgery was used. Results: The strategy of including the SIJ in the preoperative diagnostic workup of chronic low back pain saves an expected US$3,100 per patient over 2 years. Cost savings were robust to reasonable ranges for costs and probabilities, such as the probability of diagnosis and the probability of successful surgical treatment. Conclusion: Including the SIJ as part of the diagnostic strategy in preoperative patients with chronic low back pain is likely to be cost saving in the short term. Keywords: chronic low back pain, lumbar fusion, sacroiliac joint pain, sacroiliac joint fusion, healthcare costs, decision modeling

  12. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on pain, disability, and depression of chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyeonjee; Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Jeon, Chunbae; Kim, Taehoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on pain, disability, and depression of chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects] In this study, 30 chronic low back pain patients were divided into an extracorporeal shock wave therapy group (ESWTG, n=15) and a conservative physical therapy group (CPTG, n=15). [Methods] The ESWTG received extracorporeal shock wave therapy and the CPTG received general conservative physical therapy two times per week for six weeks. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), the degree of disability of the patients was assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and their degree of depression was measured using the Beck depression index (BDI). [Results] In intra-group comparisons, ESWTG and CPTG showed significant decreases in VAS, ODI, and BDI scores. Intergroup comparisons revealed that these decreases in VAS, ODI, and BDI scores were significantly larger in ESWTG than in CPTG. [Conclusion] Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is an effective intervention for the treatment of pain, disability, and depression in chronic low back pain patients.

  13. [Feasibilities and bounds of diagnostic radiology in case of back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennekamp, W; Rduch, G; Nicolas, V

    2005-04-01

    Chronic monotone back pain is no pressing indication for radiographic procedures, but chronic progressive or symptomatic back pain should be investigated by radiographic means. Beneath conventional radiology and computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a more method of standard in these cases. The radiographic investigation of back pain is shown in cases of discal and vertebral degeneration and spondylitis. Typical signs and differential diagnosis are demonstrated. After demonstration of radiological means. After introduction and valuation of radiological means, as conventional radiography, CT, MRI, myelography and scintigraphy, it is entered into degenerative changes and degenerative diseases of vertebra endplates and vertebra bodies as a reason of pain. Reasons of spinal stenosis are discussed. In case of inflammatory changes, bacterial inflammation of vertebrae and intervertebral joints are represented. Changes of spondylodiscitis/spondylitis are opposed to inflammatory changes of Morbus Bechterew and Morbus Scheuermann.

  14. Cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma as a possible cause of chronic lower back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, David O; Fiorentino, Lisa M; Bunting, Michael W

    2013-10-11

    Uterine fibroids having the distinct pathological and immunohistochemical features of cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma have been reported infrequently. We describe a postmenopausal woman with an incidental finding of an abdominopelvic mass arising from the uterine fundus on routine radiological imaging of the lumbar spine. The imaging was performed for the investigation of chronic radicular lower back pain refractory to usual pain management. However, the woman did not manifest any gynaecological symptoms. Intraoperatively, the pelvic mass appeared malignant and a frozen section suggested uterine sarcoma. As such, the mass was radically resected, resulting in significant resolution of the back pain. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma presenting solely as chronic lower back pain, and also the first report of this fibroid variant in Australasia. We discuss the diagnostic and operative challenges, emphasising the role of radiological imaging and immunohistopathology in such cases and review current literature.

  15. Post-partum low-back pain of an uncommon origin: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Valerio; McCleery, Jocelyn; Bonora, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Low-back pain is a common complaint during pregnancy and the post-partum period, and it may be due to a variety of conditions. Among these, a frequently overlooked cause is a sacral fracture. We report the case of a 37 year old woman, suffering from post-partum low-back pain which had not responded to treatment. Though rare, a sacral stress fracture must be considered in cases of prolonged low-back or sacral pain in pregnant or post-partum women. Plain radiographs are frequently inconclusive and MRI is the imaging technique of choice. Capacitive coupling electric fields (CCEF) seemed to be effective in treating pain and in reducing the patient's recovery time.

  16. A rare cause of postpartum low back pain: pregnancy- and lactation-associated osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Rabia; Terzi, Hasan; Özer, Tülay; Kale, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy- and lactation-associated osteoporosis (PLO) is a rare form of osteoporosis. It results in severe low back pain in the last trimester of pregnancy and in the postpartum period, decreases in height, and fragility fractures, particularly in the vertebra. The current case report presents a 32-year-old patient who presented with back and low back pain that began in the last trimester of the pregnancy and worsened at two months postpartum and who was diagnosed with pregnancy- and lactation-associated osteoporosis after exclusion of other causes; the findings are discussed in view of the current literature. PLO is a rare clinical condition causing significant disability. PLO must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with low back pain during or after pregnancy. The patients must be evaluated for the risk factors of PLO, and an appropriate therapy must be initiated.

  17. A Rare Cause of Postpartum Low Back Pain: Pregnancy- and Lactation-Associated Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Terzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy- and lactation-associated osteoporosis (PLO is a rare form of osteoporosis. It results in severe low back pain in the last trimester of pregnancy and in the postpartum period, decreases in height, and fragility fractures, particularly in the vertebra. The current case report presents a 32-year-old patient who presented with back and low back pain that began in the last trimester of the pregnancy and worsened at two months postpartum and who was diagnosed with pregnancy- and lactation-associated osteoporosis after exclusion of other causes; the findings are discussed in view of the current literature. PLO is a rare clinical condition causing significant disability. PLO must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with low back pain during or after pregnancy. The patients must be evaluated for the risk factors of PLO, and an appropriate therapy must be initiated.

  18. Back and neck pain are related to mental health problems in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Sullivan Peter B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a high prevalence of mental health problems amongst adolescents. In addition there is a high prevalence of spinal pain in this population. Evidence suggests that these conditions are related. This study sought to extend earlier findings by examining the relationship between mental health problems as measured by the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL and the experience of back and neck pain in adolescents. Methods One thousand five hundred and eighty participants (mean age 14.1 years from the Western Australian Pregnancy (Raine Study provided cross-sectional spinal pain and CBCL data. Results As predicted, there was a high prevalence of back and neck pain in this cohort. On the whole, females reported more mental health difficulties than males. There were strong relationships between the majority of symptom scales of the CBCL and back and neck pain. Scores on the CBCL were associated with higher odds of comorbid back and neck pain. Conclusions These findings strongly support the need to consider both psychological and pain symptoms when providing assessments and treatment for adolescents. Further research is required to inform causal models.

  19. Harpgophytum procumbens for osteoarthritis and low back pain: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrubasik Sigrun

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of Harpagophytum procumbens preparations in the treatment of various forms of musculoskeletal pain. Methods Several databases and other sources were searched to identify randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized controlled trials, and controlled clinical trials testing Harpagophytum preparations in adults suffering from pain due to osteoarthritis or low back pain. Results Given the clinical heterogeneity and insufficient data for statistical pooling, trials were described in a narrative way, taking into consideration methodological quality scores. Twelve trials were included with six investigating osteoarthritis (two were identical trials, four low back pain, and three mixed-pain conditions. Conclusions There is limited evidence for an ethanolic Harpagophytum extract containing less than Harpagophytum powder at 60 mg harpagoside in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the spine, hip and knee; (2 the use of an aqueous Harpagophytum extract at a daily dose of 100 mg harpagoside in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic non-specific low back pain; and (3 the use of an aqueous extract of Harpagophytum procumbens at 60 mg harpagoside being non-inferior to 12.5 mg rofecoxib per day for chronic non-specific low-back pain (NSLBP in the short term. Strong evidence exists for the use of an aqueous Harpagophytum extract at a daily dose equivalent of 50 mg harpagoside in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic NSLBP.

  20. Prevalence of low back pain in non working rural housewives of Kanpur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Gupta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Housewives are nucleus of families but as the working, living, and social architecture in the rural areas significantly differ from developed or urban area, the results of urban population cannot be generalized. Hence the purpose of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of low back pain in non working rural housewives. Also an attempt has been made to determine the impact of social burden on low back pain (LBP. Material and Methods: A sample of 301 non working rural housewives of Kanpur, aged between 30–70 years was selected. Hindi version of 3 appropriate scales Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire, Oswestry disability index and Zarit burden interview measuring musculoskeletal discomfort, low back disability and social burden were given to all the housewives. Results: Analysis of data reveals that both recent and yearly prevalence of LBP in rural housewives is 83%. More than 50% housewives have severe disability due to their LBP. Correlational analysis has shown that there is a significant impact of social burden on their disability due to low back pain. Conclusions: The findings of the present study suggest that 83% of the non working rural housewives have low back pain and activity restriction due to their pain. They have significant impact of social burden on their low back pain. High prevalence (83% of low back pain among rural housewives is an alarming sign for our society. Better health-care measures to enhance rural housewives education about good posture, ergonomic measures, health schemes, health awareness, and activity pacing could help rural housewives.

  1. A risk prediction model of the incidence of occupational low back pain among mining workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikry Effendi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low Back Pain (LBP is the most frequently reported musculoskeletal disorder in workers. This study was aimed to develop risk prediction model of low back pain that can be used to prevent the recurring low back pain attack.Methods: The study was case-control design based on the industrial community by using ergonomical approach. Total samples were 91 workers for cases and 91 workers for controls. Workers suffering for low back pain in the last 6 months served as cases, and those from the same age group and receiving the same amount of exposure without any symptoms of low back pain served as controls. Risk factors include socio-demographic factors, socio-ocupational factors, physical working environmental factors, non-physical environmental factors, and biomechanics factors. Receiver Operating Characreistics (ROC was used to describe relationship between true positive value (in vertical axis and false positive value (in horizontal axis in order to discover a risk predictive value of LBP.Results: The determinant risk factors for low back pain (LBP were bending work postures, waist rotation movement, manual lifting, unnatural work postures, those who had worked for more than 18 years, and irregular sport activities. By using ROC with 91.20% senstivity and 87.90% spesifi city, the calculated prediction value was 0.35. This is the cut-off point to discriminate workers with and without LBP. The risk predictors value of work-induced LBP calculated by linear equation of logistic regression varied between 0-11.25.Conclusion: The prediction model of work-induced LBP can be used for early detection of LBP to reduce the risk and prevent the recurrence of LBP. (Med J Indones. 2011; 20:212-6Keywords: Ergonomy, low back pain, prediction model, work-induced LBP

  2. Acupuncture for chronic low back pain: protocol for a multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Im

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of acupuncture has widely increased in patients with chronic low back pain. However, the evidence supporting its efficacy remains unclear. In this article, we report the design and the protocol of a multi-center randomized sham-controlled trial to treat chronic low back pain. Our goal is to verify the effect of acupuncture on chronic low back pain. Methods/Design This study is a multi-center randomized sham-controlled trial with 2 parallel arms. Participants included in the study met the following criteria: 1 low back pain lasting for at least the last 3 months, 2 a documented ≥ 5 points on a 10 cm visual analog scale for bothersomeness of low back pain at the time of screening and 3 between 18 and 65 years of age. Participants were blinded to the real and sham acupuncture treatments. The real acupuncture treatment group received real acupuncture 2 times a week, during a total of 12 sessions over 6 weeks. The control group received sham acupuncture during the same period. In order to assess the primary and secondary outcome measures, the participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire at the baseline and 6, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after starting the treatments. The primary outcome was measured using the visual analog scale for bothersomeness of low back pain at 8 weeks after the initiation of treatments. Discussion The result of this trial (which will be available in 2010 will demonstrate the efficacy of using acupuncture to treat chronic low back pain. Trial registration This study is registered with the U.S. National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials registry: NCT00815529

  3. Randomized controlled pilot study: pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds in patients with neck and low back pain before and after traditional East Asian "gua sha" therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Wübbeling, Klaus; Lüdtke, Rainer; Cramer, Holger; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Michalsen, Andreas; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav J

    2012-01-01

    Gua Sha is a traditional East Asian healing technique where the body surface is "press-stroked" with a smooth-edged instrument to raise therapeutic petechiae that last 2-5 days. The technique is traditionally used in the treatment of both acute and chronic neck and back pain. This study aimed to measure the effects of Gua Sha therapy on the pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds of patients with chronic neck pain (CNP) and chronic low back pain (CLBP). A total of 40 patients with either CNP or CLBP (mean age 49.23 ± 10.96 years) were randomized to either a treatment group (TG) or a waiting list control group (WLC). At baseline assessment (T1), all patients rated their pain on a 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). Patients' pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at a site of maximal pain (pain-maximum) and an adjacent (pain-adjacent) site were also established. The treatment group then received a single Gua Sha treatment. Post-intervention measurements were taken for both groups at T2, seven days after baseline assessment (T1), using the same VAS and PPT measurements in precisely the same locations as at T1. Final analysis were conducted with 21 patients with CNP and 18 patients with CLBP. The study groups were equally distributed with regard to randomization. Patients in both the CNP and the CLBP treatment groups reported pain reduction (p treatment, as compared to the waiting list group. Pain sensitivity improved in the TG in CNP, but not in CLBP patients, possibly due to higher pressure sensitivity in the neck area. No adverse events were reported. These results suggest that Gua Sha may be an effective treatment for patients with chronic neck and low back pain. Further study of Gua Sha is warranted.

  4. How you evaluate treatment results in low back pain patients depends on who the patient is

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    2009-01-01

    Background The choice of an evaluative instrument in back pain patients is complicated because of lack of head-to-head comparisons of clinimetric properties of the various instruments. In addition, little is known about instrument behaviour in clinical subgroups. The objective of this study...... was to concurrently compare responsiveness and minimal clinically important differences (MCID) for commonly used pain scales and functional instruments in four subpopulations of LBP patients. Methods The Danish versions of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the 23-item Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ......), the physical function and bodily pain subscales of the SF36, the Low Back Pain Rating Scale (LBPRS) and a numerical rating scale for pain (0-10) were completed by 191 patients from the primary and secondary sectors of the Danish health care system. Clinical change was estimated using a 7-point transition...

  5. Chronic back pain: integrating psychological and physical therapy--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, S J

    1994-01-01

    Chronic back pain is a major consumer of costly healthcare resources in the Western world. Patients' suffering affects their families and associates, leads to diminished self-confidence, and prevents their effective participation in the workplace. Although medical treatments and analgesics are generally successful in treating acute back pain, and some patients recover spontaneously, conventional approaches are less successful in dealing with chronic pain and may be contraindicated. In the first of two articles, the author offers an overview of research on cognitive-behavioral programs, using operant activity and relaxation training, that have led to reductions in patients' pain and to increases in their activity levels. Part 2 provides a step-by-step description of how to incorporate basic psychological techniques and physical therapy procedures for chronic pain sufferers. Patient and therapist cooperate in operant activities, with the patient monitoring progress and carrying out regular home-work assignments as he or she seeks to perform target activities; applied relaxation encourages the patient to cope with pain by disrupting the connection between anxiety, despair, and pain. The techniques outlined are suitable for dealing with other musculoskeletal conditions as well as with chronic back pain.

  6. Effect of aerobic dance on pain, functional disability and quality of life on patients with chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.A.C. Okafor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is often an indication of pathologicalcondition of the intervertebral discs, vertebral bodies or supporting soft tissuesof the lower vertebral region. Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP presents withenormous consequence on the general performance of the sufferer, exerting ahuge cost on the individual, the family and the society. Dance therapy is arelatively new approach in the management of low back pain. This study wastherefore designed to investigate the effect of dance therapy on pain, functionaldisability and quality of life in patients with chronic low back pain.Thirty subjects diagnosed with non-specific CLBP particpated in the study.They were randomly divided into 2 groups, A and B, each comprising 15 subjects.In addition to conventional physiotherapy programme given to both groups,subjects in Group A also received aerobic dance, which comprised a four stage protocol. The entire treatment routinewas administered in a group session three times weekly consecutively for six weeks. Data as obtained in the copies ofcompleted questionnaires (Roland Morris Diability questionnaires and Nottingham Health Profile questionnaires andother measurements were summarized using mean, standard deviation and frequency tables. Student T-test was used toanalyze the data at 95 % confidence interval.There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05 between the pre- and post- intervention scores for painintensity, functional disability and quality of life within the groups. There was also a statistically significant difference(p<0.05 in the mean change (pre/post intervention scores between Group A and Group B for pain intensity,functional disability and quality of life. Also the opinions and testimonies given by participants formed part of theevidence-based data.Whereas both conventional physiotherapy and aerobic dance showed significant effects in the pre/post-interventionscores, the aerobic dance group reported more significant effect in all

  7. Surgical management of symptomatic low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent and young adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevski Svetoslav

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present retrospective study is to draw attention to symptomatic low back pain in adolescent patients, in order to encourage earlier diagnosis and surgical treatment. The study assessed the radiological, clinical features and surgical outcomes of 13of this kind of patient. Materials and Methods: Out of a series of 983 consecutive cases (1999-2011 of lumbar disc excisions from our neurosurgical institution, 13-1,32% of the patients were between the ages of 15 and 20 mean 17,84. Fifteen operations, including two reoperations, were performed on this patient group, by a conventional microsurgical procedure. The indications for surgery were failure of conservative treatment, intractable pain and/or progressive neurological impairment. Results: Low back pain and monoradicular sciatica were the main complaints in 77%, but findings of neurological deficits were rare - 1 case. The surgical findings revealed a protruding disc in eleven cases, one lateral recess stenosis and one lumbar synovial cyst. Initially, all patients were treated conservatively by their physicians more than 3 months without success. On the day of discharge, Kirkaldy-Willis criteria results were excellent or good in 92% of patients. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years with an average of 1 year and 2 months. The results were excellent in 10 patients and good in 3 patients. Discussion: We demonstrate that the cause of low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent patients may not only be a cause of herniated lumbar disc or lateral recess narrowing. Very rarely these symptoms may be caused by lumbar synovial cysts. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of adolescent patients is able to relieve the clinical symptoms quickly. Clinical symptoms such as low back pain and leg pain and the neurologic deficit disappear within 3 months after surgery.

  8. Reliability of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory and stability of the MPI classification system in chronic back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verra Martin L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This cross validation study examined the reliability of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI and the stability of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory Classification System of the empirically derived subgroup classification obtained by cluster analysis in chronic musculoskeletal pain. Reliability of the German Multidimensional Pain Inventory was only examined once in the past in a small sample. Previous international studies mainly involving fibromyalgia patients showed that retest resulted in 33–38% of patients being assigned to a different Multidimensional Pain Inventory subgroup classification. Methods Participants were 204 persons with chronic musculoskeletal pain (82% chronic non-specific back pain. Subgroup classification was conducted by cluster analysis at 4 weeks before entry (=test and at entry into the pain management program (=retest using Multidimensional Pain Inventory scale scores. No therapeutic interventions in this period were conducted. Reliability was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC and stability by kappa coefficients (κ. Results Reliability of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory scales was least with ICC = 0.57 for the scale life control and further ranged from ICC = 0.72 (negative mood to 0.87 (solicitous responses in the other scales. At retest, 82% of the patients in the Multidimensional Pain Inventory cluster interpersonally distressed (κ = 0.69, 80% of the adaptive copers (κ = 0.58, and 75% of the dysfunctional patients (κ = 0.70 did not change classification. In total, 22% of the patients changed Multidimensional Pain Inventory cluster group, mainly into the adaptive copers subgroup. Conclusion Test-retest reliability of the German Multidimensional Pain Inventory was moderate to good and comparable to other language versions. Multidimensional Pain Inventory subgroup classification is substantially stable in chronic back pain patients when compared

  9. Changes in the incidence of occupational disability as a result of back and neck pain in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenstra, I.A.; Verbeek, J.H.; Prinsze, F.J.; Knol, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Back pain ( including neck pain) is one of the most prevalent health problems for which physicians are consulted. Back pain can decrease the quality of life considerably during a great part of the lives of those who suffer from it. At the same time it has an enormous economic impact, mai

  10. Patients with low back pain differ from those who also have leg pain or signs of nerve root involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Kent, Peter; Albert, Hanne;

    2012-01-01

    the concurrent validity of the Quebec Task Force Classification. However, the small size of many between-subgroup differences amid the large variability in this sample of cross-sectional data also underlines that the heterogeneity of patients with LBP is more complex than that which can be explained by leg pain......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Leg pain associated with low back pain (LBP) is recognized as a risk factor for a poor prognosis, and is included as a component in most LBP classification systems. The location of leg pain relative to the knee and the presence of a positive straight leg raise test have been...... suggested to have clinical implications. To understand differences between such leg pain subgroups, and whether differences include potentially modifiable characteristics, the purpose of this paper was to describe characteristics of patients classified into the Quebec Task Force (QTF) subgroups of: 1) LBP...

  11. Knee Pain and Low Back Pain Additively Disturb Sleep in the General Population: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Nagahama Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiko Murase

    Full Text Available Association of knee and low back pain with sleep disturbance is poorly understood. We aimed to clarify the independent and combined effects of these orthopedic symptoms on sleep in a large-scale general population.Cross-sectional data about sleep and knee/low back pain were collected for 9,611 community residents (53±14 years old by a structured questionnaire. Sleep duration less than 6 h/d was defined as short sleep. Sleep quality and the presence of knee and low back pain were evaluated by dichotomous questions. Subjects who complained about knee or low back pains were graded by tertiles of a numerical response scale (NRS score and a Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RDQ score respectively. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine the correlates of short sleep duration and poor sleep quality.Frequency of participants who complained of the orthopedic symptoms was as follows; knee pain, 29.0%; low back pain, 42.0% and both knee and low back pain 17.6%. Both knee and low back pain were significantly and independently associated with short sleep duration (knee pain: odds ratio (OR = 1.19, p<0.01; low back pain: OR = 1.13, p = 0.01 and poor sleep quality (knee pain: OR = 1.22, p<0.01; low back pain; OR = 1.57, p<0.01. The group in the highest tertile of the NRS or RDQ score had the highest risk for short sleep duration and poor sleep quality except for the relationship between the highest tertile of the RDQ score and short sleep duration.(the highest tertile of the NRS: OR for short sleep duration = 1.31, p<0.01; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.47, p<0.01; the highest tertile of the RDQ: OR for short sleep duration = 1.11, p = 0.12; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.81, p<0.01 Further, coincident knee and low back pain raised the odds ratios for short sleep duration (either of knee or low back pain: OR = 1.10, p = 0.06; both knee and low back pain: OR = 1.40, p<0.01 and poor sleep quality (either of knee or low back pain: OR

  12. Discriminative ability of reflex receptive fields to distinguish patients with acute and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Monika; Biurrun Manresa, José; Treichel, Fabienne;

    2016-01-01

    central pain processing may be a contributing mechanism. The measurement of Reflex Receptive Fields (RRF) is a novel method to assess altered central pain processing. The RRF area denotes the area of the foot sole from which spinal nociceptive reflexes can be elicited. It was shown to be enlarged...... included 214 patients with either acute or chronic low back pain and compared RRF between groups in both uni- and multivariable analyses adjusted for different socio-demographic and clinical characteristics possibly associated with the transition to chronic pain. We found a mean difference between patients...

  13. Effect of Individual Strengthening Exercises for Anterior Pelvic Tilt Muscles on Back Pain, Pelvic Angle, and Lumbar ROMs of a LBP Patient with Flat Back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of individual strengthening exercises for the anterior pelvic tilt muscles on back pain, pelvic tilt angle, and lumbar ROM of a low back pain (LBP) patient with flat back. [Subject] A 37 year-old male, who complained of LBP pain at L3-5 levels with flat back, participated. [Methods] He performed the individual strengthening exercises for anterior pelvic tilt muscles (erector spinae,iliopsoas, rectus femoris). [Results] Pelvic tilt angles of the right and left sides were recovered to normal ranges. His lumbar ROMs increased, and low back pain decreased. [Conclusion] We suggest that individual resistance exercises are a necessary approach for effective and fast strengthening of pelvic anterior tilt muscles in LBP with flat back.

  14. EFFECTIVENESS OF MC KENZIE EXERCISES IN REDUCING NECK AND BACK PAIN AMONG MADRASSA STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Aziz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this advanced era, neck and back pain has become a common musculoskeletal problem. These symptoms have a high prevalence in the community and now they are affecting even our adolescents leaving a major impact on youth’s functional and educational activities. Nevertheless, the burden of these musculoskeletal pains, which relates not only to its prevalence but also to increase in physiological and psychological stress among them, distressing their creativity. Madrassa students have a daily exposure to neck and back pain due to poor posture. The McKenzie method is a popular treatment for back and neck pain among physical therapists. So, the intention of this study is to test the effectiveness of McKenzie exercises in neck and back pain, because hardly any data is available on McKenzie technique and its outcome in Pakistan. The objective of the study is to determine the effectiveness of McKenzie exercises in reducing neck and back pain among madrassa students. Methods: The students were recruited from Madrassa Darul Akram (Baldia town and Jamia Ashraf-ul-madrassa (Gulshan-e-Iqbal Karachi. One sixty three students aged between 12–18 years of both genders who were fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected from Madrassa Darul Akram (Baldia town and Jamia Ashraf-ul-madrassa (Gulshane-Iqbal. The participants received McKenzie exercises programs intervention for three consecutive weeks. Outcome Measure: Neck Disability Index (NDI, Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index (ODI and Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS Results: The present study showed significant results in all three scales in both genders (p<0.001.Among sections, the Hafiz students revealed greater score in all 3 scales before treatment as compared to ‘Alim/Alima’ and ‘Nazra’ students and after treatment showed significant results in all 3 domains (p<0.001. Conclusion: Findings of this study revealed that madrassa students were more prone to develop neck

  15. Psychological predictors of substantial pain reduction after minimally invasive radiofrequency and injection treatments for chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Roelof M. A. W.; Geurts, Jos W. M.; Lousberg, Richel; Wynne, Herman J.; Hammink, Edwin; Knape, Johannes T. A.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. In this post hoc observational study, we investigated psychological predictors of outcome after radiofrequency and injection treatments, commonly performed in the management of chronic low back pain (CLBP). Design & Setting. Data, comprising 161 patients (29 eventually lost to follow-up),

  16. The effect of experimental low back pain on lumbar muscle activity in people with a history of clinical low back pain: a muscle functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danneels, Lieven; Cagnie, Barbara; D'hooge, Roseline; De Deene, Yves; Crombez, Geert; Vanderstraeten, Guy; Parlevliet, Thierry; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    In people with a history of low back pain (LBP), structural and functional alterations have been observed at several peripheral and central levels of the sensorimotor pathway. These existing alterations might interact with the way the sensorimotor system responds to pain. We examined this assumption by evaluating the lumbar motor responses to experimental nociceptive input of 15 participants during remission of unilateral recurrent LBP. Quantitative T2 images (muscle functional MRI) were taken bilaterally of multifidus, erector spinae, and psoas at several segmental levels (L3 upper and L4 upper and lower endplate) and during several conditions: 1) at rest, 2) upon trunk-extension exercise without pain, and 3) upon trunk-extension exercise with experimental induced pain at the clinical pain-side (1.5-ml intramuscular hypertonic saline injections in erector spinae). Following experimental pain induction, muscle activity levels similarly reduced for all three muscles, on both painful and nonpainful sides, and at multiple segmental levels (P = 0.038). Pain intensity and localization from experimental LBP were similar as during recalled clinical LBP episodes. In conclusion, unilateral and unisegmental experimental LBP exerts a generalized and widespread decrease in lumbar muscle activity during remission of recurrent LBP. This muscle response is consistent with previous observed patterns in healthy people subjected to the same experimental pain paradigm. It is striking that similar inhibitory patterns in response to pain could be observed, despite the presence of preexisting alterations in the lumbar musculature during remission of recurrent LBP. These results suggest that motor output can modify along the course of recurrent LBP.

  17. Neuropathic Pain in Elderly Patients with Chronic Low Back Painand Effects of Pregabalin: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenyu; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Sadayuki; Harada, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Preliminary study. Purpose To assess the association of neuropathic pain with chronic low back pain (LBP) and the effect of pregabalin on neuropathic pain in the elderly. Overview of Literature Of those with chronic LBP, 37% were predominantly presenting with neuropathic pain in young adults. Pregabalin is effective for pain in patients with diabetic neuropathy and peripheral neuralgia. No study has reported on the effects of pregabalin for chronic LBP in elderly patients yet. Methods Pregabalin was administered to 32 patients (age, ≥65 years) with chronic LBP for 4 weeks. Pain and activities of daily living were assessed using the Neuropathic Pain Screening Questionnaire (NePSQ), the pain DETECT questionnaire, visual analog scale, the Japanese Orthopedic Association score, the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Modic change and spinal canal stenosis were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Altogether, 43.3% of patients had neuropathic pain according to the NePSQ and 15.6% patients had pain according to the pain DETECT. The efficacy rate of pregabalin was 73.3%. A significant effect was observed in patients with neuropathic pain after 4 weeks of administration. Conclusions Neuropathic pain was slightly less frequently associated with chronic LBP in the elderly. Pregabalin was effective in reducing pain in patients with chronic LBP accompanied with neuropathic pain. Lumbar spinal stenosis and lower limb symptoms were observed in patients with neuropathic pain. We recommend the use of pregabalin for patients after evaluating a screening score, clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:25901238

  18. The Comparison of Effectiveness between Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom Therapy on Low back pain with Radiating pain

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    Lee Tae-ho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The aim of this study is to investigate if Sweet Bee Venom therapy has the equal effect in comparison with Bee Venom Therapy on Low back pain with Radiation pain. Methods : Clinical studies were done 24 patients who were treated low back pain with radiation pain to Dept. of Acupuncture & Moxibusition, of Oriental Medicine Se-Myung University from April 1, 2007 to September 30, 2007. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups ; Bee Venom treated group(Group A, n=10, Sweet Bee Venom treatred group(Group B, n=14. In Bee Venom treated group(Group A, we treated patients with dry needle acupuncture and Bee Venom therapy. In Sweet Bee Venom treatred group(Group B, we treated patients with dry needle acupuncture and Sweet Bee Venom therapy. All process of treatment were performed by double blinding method. To estimate the efficacy of controlling pain. we checked Visual Analog Scale(VAS. For evaluating functional change of patients, Straight Leg Raising Test(S.L.R.T was measured. Results :1. In controlling pain, Sweet Bee Venom treatred group(Group B had similar ability in comparison with Bee Venom treated group(Group A. 2. In promoting function, Sweet Bee Venom treatred group(Group B had similar ability in comparison with Bee Venom treated group(Group A. Conclusions : It may be equal effects as compared with using Bee Venom to treat low back pain with radiation pain using Sweet Bee Venom. We can try to treat other disease known to have effect with Bee Venom.

  19. Lumbopelvic motor control and low back pain in elite soccer players: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosdent, Stéphanie; Demoulin, Christophe; Rodriguez de La Cruz, Carlos; Giop, Romain; Tomasella, Marco; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Vanderthommen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the history of low back pain and quality of lumbopelvic motor control in soccer players. Forty-three male elite soccer players (mean age, 18.2 ± 1.4 years) filled in questionnaires related to low back pain and attended a session to assess lumbopelvic motor control by means of five tests (the bent knee fall out test, the knee lift abdominal test, the sitting knee extension test, the waiter's bow and the transversus abdominis test). A physiotherapist, blinded to the medical history of the participants, scored (0 = failed, 1 = correct) the performance of the players for each of the tests resulting in a lumbopelvic motor control score ranging from 0 to 5. Forty-seven per cent of the soccer players reported a disabling low back pain episode lasting at least two consecutive days in the previous year. These players scored worse lumbopelvic motor control than players without a history of low back pain (lumbopelvic motor control score of 1.8 vs. 3.3, P motor control. Further research should examine whether lumbopelvic motor control is etiologically involved in low back pain episodes in soccer players.

  20. Fostering change in back pain beliefs and behaviors: when public education is not enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Douglas P; Deshpande, Sameer; Werner, Erik L; Reneman, Michiel F; Miciak, Maxi A; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-11-01

    Mass media campaigns designed to alter societal views and individual behaviors about back pain have been undertaken and evaluated in multiple countries. In contrast to the original Australian campaign, subsequent campaigns have been less successful, with improvements observed in beliefs without the corresponding changes in related behaviors. This article summarizes the results of a literature review, expert panel, and workshop held at the Melbourne International Forum XI: Primary Care Research on Low Back Pain in March 2011 on the role and interplay of various social behavior change strategies, including public education, law and legislation, healthy public policy, and social marketing in achieving a sustained reduction in the societal burden of back pain. Given the complexities inherent to health-related behaviors change, the Rothschild framework is applied in which behavior change strategies are viewed on a continuum from public education at one end through law and health policy at the other. Educational endeavors should likely be augmented with social marketing endeavors and supportive laws and health policy to foster sustained change in outcomes such as work disability and health utilization. Practical suggestions are provided for future interventions aimed at changing back pain-related behaviors. Evaluation of previous back pain mass media campaigns reveals that education alone is unlikely to foster positive and persisting behavioral change without concomitant strategies.

  1. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT on Decreasing Pain, Depression and Anxiety of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abdolghadery

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: The results support the effectiveness of MBCT and CBT in decreasing pain, depression and anxiety. Therefore, taking account of these two therapeutic methods is very important for patients with chronic low back pain.

  2. Differences in outcome of a multidisciplinary treatment between subgroups of chronic low back pain patients defined using two multiaxial assessment instruments: the Multidimensional Pain Inventory and lumbar dynamometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M.R.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Wever, Daniel; Gorter, Michiel; Rinket, Joost; IJzerman, Maarten J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of a multidisciplinary back school programme (Roessingh Back Rehabilitation Programme, RRP) compared with usual care, as well as differences in treatment outcome between subgroups defined using two multiaxial assessment instruments: the Multidimensional Pain Inv

  3. Daily Practice Clinic of Scientific Evidence in the Physiotherapy Management of Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Constanza Trillos Chacón

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 80 % of adults experience back pain at least once in their life. Back pain is the third leading cause of consultation in the emergency room, the fourth in general practice, the second of disability pension and the first job relocation. Objective: To compare the criteria that guide decision making of a group of physiotherapists in Bogota Colombia for the management of chronic nonspecific low back pain management criteria contained in the guide COST B13 (European Guidelines For The Management Of Chronic Non- specific Low Back Pain, 2004. Material and methods: This was a descriptive study, for which clinical practice guideline COST B13 for the management of chronic nonspecific low back pain through the AGREE tool is selected and a survey was applied to 50 physiotherapists through a convenience sample with to compare the clinical practices that are performed with the recommendations given guidance. Results: 56 % of respondents had some type of training for the management of chronic nonspecific low back pain (DLCI. 94 % of patients with DLCI served range in age from 40 to 59, with female predominance. In 80 % of respondents stated that physiotherapists diagnostic help with counting for the management of patients is the radiological image. 80 % of physiotherapists evaluated variable lumbar pain experienced by the patient and 54 % stance. Other aspects were reported in lower percentage. In the treatment of DLCI, physiotherapists reported use of stretching in 80 % of cases, the superficial thermotherapy in 70 % and isometric muscle strength in 70 %, all with favorable results.Conclusion: There are differences between clinical practice of physiotherapists and guidelines contained in the recommendations of the guide in the cost DLCI B13. Mainly in the processes of physiotherapy assessment of the surveyed population as they are often focused on observation and not always in the rigorous measurement, which makes it difficult to establish

  4. Use of osteopathic or chiropractic services among people with back pain: a UK population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Chi-Keong; Doll, Helen; Bodeker, Gerard; Stewart-Brown, Sarah

    2004-05-01

    Questionnaires covering health and the use of complementary, alternative and conventional health services were mailed to a random sample of 14 868 adults aged 18-64 years living in four counties of England in 1997. The present study examined the use of osteopathy/chiropractic among the 15% (n = 1377) of respondents reporting back pain. Osteopaths/chiropractors were seen by 13.4% (n = 184) of respondents with back pain during the past 3 months compared with 9.8% (n = 135) who consulted physiotherapists. The presence of back pain and non-manual social class were the strongest predictors of consultation with both types of practitioner. Women, older respondents, non-smokers and those who exercised for 30 minutes at least once a week were more likely to use osteopathy/chiropractic. The only other significant predictor of physiotherapy use was desire for more physical exercise. While those reporting back pain had Short-Form 36 (SF-36) scores suggesting very significant levels ofdisability, respondents with back pain who consulted osteopaths/chiropractors reported better health in all dimensions of the SF-36 than those using physiotherapy services. Although they reported worse pain scores than people not consulting any practitioners, their mental health, physical functioning, energy and health perception were better. It is impossible to disentangle cause and effect in this cross-sectional study, but the data suggest that people who can afford to pay are more likely to choose osteopath/chiropractor treatments than physiotherapy. The possibility that osteopath/chiropractor treatment has a generalised positive effect on health, allowing people with back pain to function better than those not receiving such treatment, warrants further investigation.

  5. Living with chronic low back pain: a metasynthesis of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Sherrill; Liossi, Christina

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this qualitative metasynthesis is to articulate the knowledge gained from a review of qualitative studies of patients' experiences of chronic low back pain. METHODS Meta-ethnographic methodology guided the review of 33 articles representing 28 studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2012. A systematic comparison of the main themes from each study was conducted and 'synthesised' to create superordinate themes. RESULTS Three overarching interrelated themes were identified: the impact of chronic low back pain on self; relationships with significant others that incorporated two streams - health professionals and the organisation of care and relationships with family and friends; coping with chronic low back pain. Coping strategies were predominantly physical therapies, medication and avoidance behaviours with very few successful strategies reported. Professional and family support, self-efficacy, motivation, work conditions and exercise opportunities influenced pain experiences. Review authors' recommendations included psychological therapies, education, the facilitation of self-management strategies and support groups. DISCUSSION The review substantiates chronic low back pain as complex, dynamic and multidimensional, underpinned by experiences of persistent distressing pain, loss, and lowered self-worth, stigma, depression, premature aging, fear of the future. Future research should address the paucity of longitudinal studies, loss and issues of ethnicity, gender, ageing.

  6. Biospectral analysis of the bladder channel point in chronic low back pain patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Alberto Espinosa; Nava, Juan José Godina; Segura, Miguel Ángel Rodriguez; Bastida, Albino Villegas

    2012-10-01

    Chronic pain is the main cause of disability in the productive age people and is a public health problem that affects both the patient and society. On the other hand, there isn't any instrument to measure it; this is only estimated using subjective variables. The healthy cells generate a known membrane potential which is part of a network of biologically closed electric circuits still unstudied. It is proposed a biospectral analysis of a bladder channel point as a diagnosis method for chronic low back pain patients. Materials and methods: We employed a study group with chronic low back pain patients and a control group without low back pain patients. The visual analog scale (VAS) to determine the level of pain was applied. Bioelectric variables were measured for 10 seconds and the respective biostatistical analyses were made. Results: Biospectral analysis on frequency domain shows a depression in the 60-300 Hz frequency range proportional to the chronicity of low back pain compared against healthy patients.

  7. Low Back Pain in Diabetes Mellitus and Importance of Preventive Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Abadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal pain is known to be a common problem in diabetic patients. Inspite of this fact, there is little information about epidemiology aspect of Low Back Pain (LBPand necessity of taking preventive approach in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to determinethe prevalence of LBP in diabetic patients and its comparison with non-diabetic subjects.Methods: Low back pain frequency was examined among 317 diabetic patients referred to endocrineclinic, Sina Hospital, Tabriz city, Iran during 3 months interval. The control group included100 participants who were parents of students of Tabriz University. All participants were asked tofill out a questionnaire including Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ and Face PainScale (FPS.Result: Of the 317 diabetic patients, 63.4% (201 reported LBP while in non-diabetic group was47% (47.The average functional disability in diabetic group was 9 while in control group was 7.Inter-correlation between low back pain intensity scale and functional disability were significant(r=0.52, P<0.01.Discussion: Low back pain is a common problem in diabetic patients in terms of intensity, frequencyand functional level of disability.

  8. The Effects of BU Herbal Acupuncture on Low Back Pain of Sprain

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    Seo Bo-myung

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was designed to estimate the effects of BU herbal acupuncture theraphy on low back pain of sprain patients by using Visual Analogue Scale(VAS and pressure algometer. Methods : 13 volunteers were applied to BU herbal acupuncture stimulation on the BL23, BL24, BL25 and BL26 acupoints. The degree of improvement of low back pain of sprain was evaluated by VAS and pain pressure threshold(at the points of BL23 and BL24 before treatment, before 3rd treatment(after herbal acupuncture. Results : In VAS scores, there were significant differences between before and after herbal acupuncture stimulation. But there was no significant difference between before and after herbal acupuncture stimulation in pain threshold. Conclusions : The effectiveness of BU herbal acupuncture theraphy on low back pain of sprain was shown through VAS and pressure algometer. These imply that BU herbal acupuncture theraphy may be useful for low back pain of sprain. Further study is needed about BU herbal acupuncture.

  9. Targeted treatment in primary care for low back pain: the treatment system and clinical training programmes used in the IMPaCT Back study (ISRCTN 55174281)

    OpenAIRE

    Sowden, Gail; Hill, Jonathan C.; Konstantinou, Kika; Khanna, Meenee; Main, Chris J.; Salmon, Paula; Somerville, Simon; Wathall, Simon; Foster, Nadine E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The IMPaCT Back study (IMplementation to improve Patient Care through Targeted treatment for Back pain) is a quality improvement study which aims to investigate the effects of introducing and supporting a subgrouping for targeted treatment system for patients with low back pain (LBP) in primary care. This paper details the subgrouping for targeted treatment system and the clinical training and mentoring programmes aimed at equipping clinicians to deliver it. The subgrouping and ta...

  10. Impact on quality of life and physical ability of pregnancy-related back pain in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Ayden; Arslan, Gülsah Gürol; Colakfakioglu, Arzu; Sirlan, Aygül

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of pregnancy-related back pain on quality of life and physical ability in the third trimester of pregnancy. One hundred women in the 28th-40th week of pregnancy were asked to fill out questionnaires including: general questions about background factors, the Katz's Activity's Daily Living Index (ADL), and Short Form of WHO Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF). Back pain intensity was assessed by visual analog scale (VAS), and functional limitation was measured by Oswestry Low Back Disability Questionnaire (OSW). It was found that, in the third trimester, pregnant women with back pain (PBP) with low pain intensity and moderate functional limitation did not have an impact on quality of life but decreased physical ability when compared to pregnant women with no back pain (NBP). As the back pain intensity of pregnant women increases, physical ability decreases.

  11. Current evidence for a modulation of low back pain by human genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegeder, Irmgard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2009-08-01

    The manifestation of chronic back pain depends on structural, psychosocial, occupational and genetic influences. Heritability estimates for back pain range from 30% to 45%. Genetic influences are caused by genes affecting intervertebral disc degeneration or the immune response and genes involved in pain perception, signalling and psychological processing. This inter-individual variability which is partly due to genetic differences would require an individualized pain management to prevent the transition from acute to chronic back pain or improve the outcome. The genetic profile may help to define patients at high risk for chronic pain. We summarize genetic factors that (i) impact on intervertebral disc stability, namely Collagen IX, COL9A3, COL11A1, COL11A2, COL1A1, aggrecan (AGAN), cartilage intermediate layer protein, vitamin D receptor, metalloproteinsase-3 (MMP3), MMP9, and thrombospondin-2, (ii) modify inflammation, namely interleukin-1 (IL-1) locus genes and IL-6 and (iii) and pain signalling namely guanine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase 1, catechol-O-methyltransferase, mu opioid receptor (OPMR1), melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), transient receptor potential channel A1 and fatty acid amide hydrolase and analgesic drug metabolism (cytochrome P450 [CYP]2D6, CYP2C9).

  12. Standardized versus Individualized Acupuncture for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pach, Daniel; Yang-Strobel, Xiaoli; Lüdtke, Rainer; Roll, Stephanie; Icke, Katja; Brinkhaus, Benno; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of standardized and individualized acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic low back pain. A single-center randomized controlled single-blind trial was performed in a general medical practice in Germany run by a Chinese-born medical doctor trained in western and Chinese medicine. One hundred and fifty outpatients with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups (78 standardized and 72 individualized acupuncture). Patients received either standardized acupuncture or individualized acupuncture. Treatment encompassed between 10 and 15 treatments based on individual symptoms with two treatments per week. The main outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC) summarizing eight weeks of daily rated pain severity measured with a visual analogue scale (0 mm = no pain, 100 mm = worst imaginable pain). No significant differences between groups were observed for the AUC (individualized acupuncture mean: 1768.7 (95% CI, 1460.4; 2077.1); standardized acupuncture 1482.9 (1177.2; 1788.7); group difference, 285.8 (-33.9; 605.5) P = 0.080). In this single-center trial, individualized acupuncture was not superior to standardized acupuncture for patients suffering from chronic pain. As a next step, a multicenter noninferiority study should be performed to investigate whether standardised acupuncture treatment for chronic low back pain might be applicable in a broader usual care setting. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00758017.

  13. Standardized versus Individualized Acupuncture for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare the effectiveness of standardized and individualized acupuncture treatment in patients with chronic low back pain. A single-center randomized controlled single-blind trial was performed in a general medical practice in Germany run by a Chinese-born medical doctor trained in western and Chinese medicine. One hundred and fifty outpatients with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups (78 standardized and 72 individualized acupuncture. Patients received either standardized acupuncture or individualized acupuncture. Treatment encompassed between 10 and 15 treatments based on individual symptoms with two treatments per week. The main outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC summarizing eight weeks of daily rated pain severity measured with a visual analogue scale (0 mm = no pain, 100 mm = worst imaginable pain. No significant differences between groups were observed for the AUC (individualized acupuncture mean: 1768.7 (95% CI, 1460.4; 2077.1; standardized acupuncture 1482.9 (1177.2; 1788.7; group difference, 285.8 (−33.9; 605.5 P=0.080. In this single-center trial, individualized acupuncture was not superior to standardized acupuncture for patients suffering from chronic pain. As a next step, a multicenter noninferiority study should be performed to investigate whether standardised acupuncture treatment for chronic low back pain might be applicable in a broader usual care setting. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00758017.

  14. Nordic Walking and chronic low back pain: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartvigsen Jan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical activity provide similar benefits. Nordic Walking is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe. Initial studies have demonstrated that persons performing Nordic Walking are able to exercise longer and harder compared to normal walking thereby increasing their cardiovascular metabolism. Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients when compared to unsupervised Nordic Walking and advice to stay active. In addition we investigate whether there is an increase in the cardiovascular metabolism in persons performing supervised Nordic Walking compared to persons who are advised to stay active. Finally, we investigate whether there is a difference in compliance between persons receiving supervised Nordic Walking and persons doing unsupervised Nordic Walking. Methods One hundred and fifty patients with low back pain for at least eight weeks and referred to a specialized secondary sector outpatient back pain clinic are included in the study. After completion of the standard back centre treatment patients are randomized into one of three groups: A Nordic Walking twice a week for eight weeks under supervision of a specially trained instructor; B Unsupervised Nordic Walking for eight weeks after one training session with an instructor; C A one hour motivational talk including advice to stay active. Outcome measures are pain, function, overall health, cardiovascular ability and

  15. TREATMENT FOR ACUTE NONSPECIFIC BACK PAIN IN OUTPATIENT PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O N Gerasimova

    2009-01-01

    to 1,14± 0,95 visual analogue scores, the routine activity reached the baseline level as had been before pain occurrence; the duration of the disease being less than 2 weeks (mean 11 days. Adverse reactions caused by therapy were observed in sporadic cases; these were mild and transient. Case histories of 2 patients in whom movalis therapy was effective when the use of other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs failed are presented.

  16. An algorithmic approach for clinical management of low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Ramesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: SPECT imaging is helpful in diagnosing sacroiliac joint syndrome and facetal syndrome. Epidural injections were a better choice in cases of low backache, where clinically, the patient had no signs of sacroiliac joint syndrome and facetal syndrome. Spinal injections with steroid and local anaesthetic had better relief. Radiotracer uptake at the pain generating area is a good predictor of outcome. Image guided spinal injection improves the accuracy of the injection.

  17. A Comparison of the Effects of Pilates and McKenzie Training on Pain and General Health in Men with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour-Dehkordi, Ali; Dehghani, Arman; Solati, Kamal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Today, chronic low back pain is one of the special challenges in healthcare. There is no unique approach to treat chronic low back pain. A variety of methods are used for the treatment of low back pain, but the effects of these methods have not yet been investigated adequately. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Pilates and McKenzie training on pain and general health of men with chronic low back pain. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients with chronic low back pain were chosen voluntarily and assigned to three groups of 12 each: McKenzie group, Pilates group, and control group. The Pilates group participated in 1-h exercise sessions, three sessions a week for 6 weeks. McKenzie group performed workouts 1 h a day for 20 days. The control group underwent no treatment. The general health of all participants was measured by the General Health Questionnaire 28 and pain by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Results: After therapeutic exercises, there was no significant difference between Pilates and McKenzie groups in pain relief (P = 0.327). Neither of the two methods was superior over the other for pain relief. However, there was a significant difference in general health indexes between Pilates and McKenzie groups. Conclusion: Pilates and McKenzie training reduced pain in patients with chronic low back pain, but the Pilates training was more effective to improve general health. PMID:28216860

  18. A comparison of the effects of pilates and mckenzie training on pain and general health in men with chronic low back pain: A randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hasanpour-Dehkordi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, chronic low back pain is one of the special challenges in healthcare. There is no unique approach to treat chronic low back pain. A variety of methods are used for the treatment of low back pain, but the effects of these methods have not yet been investigated adequately. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Pilates and McKenzie training on pain and general health of men with chronic low back pain. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients with chronic low back pain were chosen voluntarily and assigned to three groups of 12 each: McKenzie group, Pilates group, and control group. The Pilates group participated in 1-h exercise sessions, three sessions a week for 6 weeks. McKenzie group performed workouts 1 h a day for 20 days. The control group underwent no treatment. The general health of all participants was measured by the General Health Questionnaire 28 and pain by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Results: After therapeutic exercises, there was no significant difference between Pilates and McKenzie groups in pain relief (P = 0.327. Neither of the two methods was superior over the other for pain relief. However, there was a significant difference in general health indexes between Pilates and McKenzie groups. Conclusion: Pilates and McKenzie training reduced pain in patients with chronic low back pain, but the Pilates training was more effective to improve general health.

  19. The Nordic back pain subpopulation program: Can low back pain patterns be predicted from the first consultation with a chiropractor? A longitudinal pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Leboeuf-Yde Charlotte; Kongsted Alice

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background It is widely believed that non-specific low back pain (LBP) consists of a number of subgroups which should be identified in order to improve treatment effects. In order to identify subgroups, patient characteristics that relate to different outcomes are searched for. However, LBP is often fluctuating or recurring rather than clearly limited in time. Therefore it would be relevant to consider outcome after completed treatment from a longitudinal perspective (describing "cou...

  20. A Rare Cause of Back Pain after Pregnancy: Postpartum Osteoporosis and Treatment Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer İlhan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy associated osteoporosis (PAO is a rare disease characterized by multiple vertebral compression fractures, limitation of movement and severe back pain. A positive family history of PAO, decreased body mass index, sedentary life style, smoking, malnutrition and low calcium intake are among the risk factors of this disease. PAO should be considered in patients with back pain during pregnancy and postpartum period. As a specified therapy option is lack for PAO, discontinuation of lactation and the supplementation of calcium and vitamin D are the main steps of the treatment in patients who are planning to become pregnant in the future. The current data show that bisphosphonates should be avoided and teriparatide may be a treatment option in patients who are planning to become pregnant. In this case report, it was aimed to highlight the diagnosis and treatment approaches of PAO in a patient with back pain during postpartum period.

  1. Radiological and scintigraphic findings in patients with a clinical history of chronic inflammatory back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goei The, H S; Lemmens, A J; Goedhard, G; Lokkerbol, H; Rahmy, A; Steven, M M; van der Linden, S M; Cats, A

    1985-01-01

    The prevalence of radiological abnormalities of the sacroiliac joints, the manubriosternal joint, and the lumbar spine were assessed, and quantitative sacroiliac scintigraphy was performed in 151 patients with a history of chronic inflammatory back pain and in 31 controls with non-inflammatory back pain. Sacroiliitis was found in 124 patients (82%), manubriosternal lesions in 84 patients (56%), and lesions of the lumbar spine in 58 patients (38%). In 19 patients (13%), manubriosternal lesions provided the sole radiological abnormality and in five patients (3%) no radiological abnormality could be demonstrated at any of these sites. Quantitative sacroiliac scintigraphy showed increased values in 69 of 137 patients examined (50%), but also in 10 out of 12 control patients with disc degeneration (83%) and is, therefore, nonspecific for inflammatory lesions. Radiological examination of the manubriosternal joint is recommended in patients with inflammatory back pain without radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis.

  2. Radiological and scintigraphic findings in patients with a clinical history of chronic inflammatory back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goei The, H.S.; Lemmens, A.J.; Goedhard, G.; Lokkerbol, H.; Rahmy, A.; Linden, S.M. van der; Cats, A.; Steven, M.M.

    1985-10-01

    The prevalence of radiological abnormalities of the sacroiliac joints, the manubriosternal joint, and the lumbar spine were assessed, and quantitative sacroiliac scintigraphy was performed in 151 patients with a history of chronic inflammatory back pain and in 31 controls with non-inflammatory back pain. Sacroiliitis was found in 124 patients (82%), manubriosternal lesions in 84 patients (56%), and lesions of the lumbar spine in 58 patients (38%). In 19 patients (13%), manubriosternal lesions provided the sole radiological abnormality and in five patients (3%) no radiological abnormality could be demonstrated at any of these sites. Quantitative sacroiliac scintigraphy showed increased values in 69 of 137 patients examined (50%), but also in 10 out of 12 control patients with disc degeneration (83%) and is, therefore, nonspecific for inflammatory lesions. Radiological examination of the manubriosternal joint is recommended in patients with inflammatory back pain without radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis. (orig.).

  3. Prevention of low back pain and its consequences among nurses' aides in elderly care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Charlotte Diana; Holtermann, Andreas; Mortensen, Ole Steen;

    2013-01-01

    intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training and cognitive behavioral training can prevent low back pain and its consequences among nurses' aides. External resources for the participating workplace and a strong commitment from the management and the organization support...... periods three months apart. The intervention lasts three months and integrates participatory ergonomics, physical training and cognitive behavioral training tailored to the target group. Local physiotherapists and occupational therapists conduct the intervention after having received standardized training......A high prevalence of low back pain has persisted over the years despite extensive primary prevention initiatives among nurses' aides. Many single-faceted interventions addressing just one aspect of low back pain have been carried out at workplaces, but with low success rate. This may be due...

  4. A multifaceted workplace intervention for low back pain in nurses' aides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard Rasmussen, Charlotte Diana; Holtermann, Andreas; Bay, Hans;

    2015-01-01

    The present study established the effectiveness of a workplace multi-faceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training and cognitive behavioural training for low back pain. Between November 2012 and May 2014, we conducted a pragmatic stepped-wedge cluster......) and participatory ergonomics (5 sessions)). Low back pain was the outcome and was measured as days, intensity (worst pain on a 0-10 numeric rank scale) and bothersomeness (days) by monthly text messages. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the intervention effect. Analyses were performed according.......60 to -0.26) and bothersomeness days of -0.5 (95% confidence interval -0.85 to -0.13) after the intervention compared to the control group. This study shows that a multi-faceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training and cognitive behavioural training can reduce low back...

  5. Physiotherapy for sleep disturbance in chronic low back pain: a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Deirdre A

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is becoming increasingly recognised as a clinically important symptom in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP, low back pain >12 weeks), associated with physical inactivity and depression. Current research and international clinical guidelines recommend people with CLBP assume a physically active role in their recovery to prevent chronicity, but the high prevalence of sleep disturbance in this population may be unknowingly limiting their ability to participate in exercise-based rehabilitation programmes and contributing to poor outcomes. There is currently no knowledge concerning the effectiveness of physiotherapy on sleep disturbance in people with chronic low back pain and no evidence of the feasibility of conducting randomized controlled trials that comprehensively evaluate sleep as an outcome measure in this population.

  6. Participatory ergonomic intervention for prevention of low back pain: assembly line redesign case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, João Marcos; Wanderck, Claudia; Moro, Antônio Renato Pereira

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a participatory ergonomic intervention aimed at reducing low back pain cases in the dispatch department of a catalogue and e-commerce retail company. Based on the findings of the ergonomic analysis and design committee, the company's own employees redesigned the assembly line's layout. As a result of these changes two job tasks that involved manual material handling of boxes, identified by the revised NIOSH equation as posing an increased risk for lifting-related low back pain, were totally eliminated, and the employees responsible for moving boxes from the end of the assembly line to pallets on the ground were given more control over their jobs, and these jobs were also enriched with a new, less heavy task. These results demonstrate that participatory ergonomic interventions are a viable and effective strategy to reduce the exposure to work-related physical and psychosocial risk factors for low back pain.

  7. Lifting index of the niosh lifting equation and low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Remor Teixeira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship of the Lifting Index obtained through the application of the NIOSH Lifting Equation and the incidence of low back pain among forty-eight workers involved in manual lifting tasks. It was applied the equation in eleven tasks and the workers were interviewed. The most unfavorable conditions presented themselves in the lifting destination. The variables that most contributed to the inadequate values of the Lifting Index were: the horizontal location, the lifting frequency and the vertical distance, beyond the high weight of the load. The incidence of low back pain in the last twelve months was 19%, whereas the incidence of work-related low back pain in the same period was 10%. In 72.7% of the tasks evaluated the Composite Lifting Index was more than three, which are considered as high ergonomic risk.

  8. Clinical Observation on Comprehensive Treatment on Cutaneous Region for Low Back Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Feng; Liu Shu-tian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effects of comprehensive treatmenton cutaneous region for low back pain. Methods: One hundred and twenty outpatients with low back pain who met the diagnostic criteria were randomly divided into a cutaneous region group or a medication group, 60 cases in each group. The cases in the cutaneous region group were treated by Nie-pinching up the skin of the lumbosacral region, cupping and acupuncture. Those in the medication group were treated by oral administration of Celecoxib capsule. The visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were used to assess the therapeutic effects. Results: After treatment, the VAS scores of both groups were different from those before treatment, showing statistical significances (allP Conclusion: Both comprehensive treatment on the cutaneous region and Celecoxib capsule can obviously relieve low back pain. But comprehensive treatment on the cutaneous region is better than Celecoxib capsule in the therapeutic effects.

  9. Untangling nociceptive, neuropathic and neuroplastic mechanisms underlying the biological domain of back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hush, Julia M; Stanton, Tasha R; Siddall, Philip; Marcuzzi, Anna; Attal, Nadine

    2013-05-01

    SUMMARY Current clinical practice guidelines advocate a model of diagnostic triage for back pain, underpinned by the biopsychosocial paradigm. However, limitations of this clinical model have become apparent: it can be difficult to classify patients into the diagnostic triage categories; patients with 'nonspecific back pain' are clearly not a homogenous group; and mean effects of treatments based on this approach are small. In this article, it is proposed that the biological domain of the biopsychosocial model needs to be reconceptualized using a neurobiological mechanism-based approach. Recent evidence about nociceptive and neuropathic contributors to back pain is outlined in the context of maladaptive neuroplastic changes of the somatosensory system. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed.

  10. Neural correlates of fear of movement in patients with chronic low back pain versus pain-free individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lukas Meier

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fear of movement (FOM can be acquired by a direct aversive experience such as pain or by social learning through observation and instruction. Excessive FOM results in heightened disability and is an obstacle for recovery from acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain (cLBP. FOM has further been identified as a significant explanatory factor in the Fear Avoidance (FA model of cLBP that describes how individuals experiencing acute back pain may become trapped into a vicious circle of chronic disability and suffering. Despite a wealth of evidence emphasizing the importance of FOM in cLBP, to date, no related neural correlates in patients were found and this therefore has initiated a debate about the precise contribution of fear in the FA model. In the current fMRI study, we applied a novel approach encompassing 1 video clips of potentially harmful activities for the back as FOM inducing stimuli and 2 the assessment of FOM in both, cLBP patients (N = 20 and age- and gender-matched pain-free subjects (N = 20. Derived from the FA model, we hypothesized that FOM differentially affects brain regions involved in fear processing in patients with cLBP compared to pain-free individuals due to the recurrent pain and subsequent avoidance behaviour. The results of the whole brain voxel-wise regression analysis revealed that 1 FOM positively correlated with brain activity in fear-related brain regions such as the amygdala and the insula and 2 Differential effects of FOM between patients with cLBP and pain-free subjects were found in the extended amygdala and in its connectivity to the anterior insula. Current findings support the FOM component of the FA model in cLBP.

  11. Differences in performance on the functional movement screen between chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Min-Joo; Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Differences in scores on the Functional Movement Screen between patients with chronic lower back pain and healthy control subjects were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] In all, 20 chronic lower back pain patients and 20 healthy control subjects were recruited. Chronic lower back pain patients and healthy controls performed the Functional Movement Screen (deep squat, hurdle step, inline lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg raise, trunk stability pushup, and rotary stabil...

  12. Acupuncture or Low Frequency Infrared Treatment for Low Back Pain in Chinese Patients: A Discrete Choice Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Chia Chen; Li-Jen Cheng; Yan Zhang; Xin He; Knaggs, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is a popular but controversial treatment option for low back pain. In China, it is practised as traditional Chinese medicine; other treatment strategies for low back pain are commonly practised as Western medicine. Research on patient preference for low back-pain treatment options has been mainly conducted in Western countries and is limited to a willingness-to-pay approach. A stated-preference, discrete choice experiment was conducted to determine Chinese patient preferences and ...

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapies for Chronic Low Back Pain: What Treatments are Patients Willing to Try?

    OpenAIRE

    Erro Janet; Connelly Maureen T; Cherkin Daniel C; Sherman Karen J; Savetsky Jacqueline B; Davis Roger B; Eisenberg David M

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Although back pain is the most common reason patients use complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies, little is known about the willingness of primary care back pain patients to try these therapies. As part of an effort to refine recruitment strategies for clinical trials, we sought to determine if back pain patients are willing to try acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, meditation, and t'ai chi and to learn about their knowledge of, experience with, and percept...

  14. The value of SPECT in the detection of stress injury to the pars interarticularis in patients with low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Grant Frederick D; Curtis Christine; Zukotynski Katherine; Micheli Lyle; Treves S Ted

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The medical cost associated with back pain in the United States is considerable and growing. Although the differential diagnosis of back pain is broad, epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between adult and adolescent complaints. Injury of the pars interarticularis is one of the most common identifiable causes of ongoing low back pain in adolescent athletes. It constitutes a spectrum of disease ranging from bone stress to spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. Bone stress may ...

  15. A pragmatic multi-centred randomised controlled trial of yoga for chronic low back pain: Trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Helen; Tilbrook, Helen; Aplin, John; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Hewitt, Catherine; Jayakody, Shalmini; Semlyen, Anna; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David; Trewhela, Alison; Watt, Ian; Worthy, Gill

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is...

  16. The treatment experience of patients with low back pain during pregnancy and their chiropractors: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Sadr Shabnam; Pourkiani-Allah-Abad Neda; Stuber Kent

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chiropractors regularly treat pregnant patients for low back pain during their pregnancy. An increasing amount of literature on this topic supports this form of treatment; however the experience of the pregnant patient with low back pain and their chiropractor has not yet been explored. The objective of this study is to explore the experience of chiropractic treatment for pregnant women with low back pain, and their chiropractors. Methods This qualitative study employed se...

  17. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by mid-age women with back pain: a national cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broom Alex F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has increased significantly in Australia over the past decade. Back pain represents a common context for CAM use, with increasing utilisation of a wide range of therapies provided within and outside conventional medical facilities. We examine the relationship between back pain and use of CAM and conventional medicine in a national cohort of mid-aged Australian women. Methods Data is taken from a cross-sectional survey (n = 10492 of the mid-aged cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, surveyed in 2007. The main outcome measures were: incidence of back pain the previous 12 months, and frequency of use of conventional or CAM treatments in the previous 12 months. Results Back pain was experienced by 77% (n = 8063 of the cohort in the previous twelve month period. The majority of women with back pain only consulted with a conventional care provider (51.3%, 44.2% of women with back pain consulted with both a conventional care provider and a CAM practitioner. Women with more frequent back pain were more likely to consult a CAM practitioner, as well as seek conventional care. The most commonly utilised CAM practitioners were massage therapy (26.5% of those with back pain and chiropractic (16.1% of those with back pain. Only 1.7% of women with back pain consulted with a CAM practitioner exclusively. Conclusions Mid-aged women with back pain utilise a range of conventional and CAM treatments. Consultation with CAM practitioners or self-prescribed CAM was predominantly in addition to, rather than a replacement for, conventional care. It is important that health professionals are aware of potential multiple practitioner usage in the context of back pain and are prepared to discuss such behaviours and practices with their patients.

  18. Retrospective cost comparison of chiropractic versus medical treatment of back pain in a typical South African mechanised underground mining environment

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    M. Tech. It is well known internationally that the high prevalence of back pain costs the economies of the world many billions of dollars annually. This has prompted a great deal of research abroad into means of reducing the deleterious economic effects of back pain. One of the results of this research is the realisation that Chiropractic treatment of back pain offers an efficacious and cost effective alternative to the conventional medical treatments currently employed in most countries. ...

  19. Validation and reliability of the German version of the Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire in primary care back pain patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Bernhard W.; Hallner, Dirk; Schaub, Claudia; Willburger, Roland; Hasenbring, Monika

    2004-01-01

    In 1992 Von Korff and his co-workers developed a simple, brief questionnaire to assess the severity of chronic pain problems, the Chronic Pain Grade (CPG). The present study was conducted to analyse the psychometric properties of the translated German version of the CPG within a population of primary care back pain patients (n=130). Factor analysis yielded two factors which accounted for 72% of the variance of the questionnaire. The first factor 'Disability Score' (53.56% of the variance) revealed a good internal consistency (alpha=.88), the internal consistency of the second factor 'Characteristic Pain Intensity' was moderate (alpha=.68). The reliability of the whole instrument was good (alpha=.82). The CPG and its subscales show moderate to high relations with other instruments assessing the patient's disability (FFbH-R, Pain Disability Index PDI). Additionally weak to moderate but significant correlations were found between the CPG and other measures of grading and staging chronic pain (MPSS, RGS). Further, positive correlations between the CPG and both, the frequency of doctor visits and the frequent use of pain medication have been seen. The reported findings suggest, that the German version of the CPG is a reliable, valid and useful instrument if a brief, simple method of grading the severity of chronic pain is needed. The German version leads to a better comparability between German and English language studies and facilitates an international collaboration in this field of research. PMID:19742049

  20. Delineating inflammatory and mechanical sub-types of low back pain: a pilot survey of fifty low back pain patients in a chiropractic setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riksman Janine S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An instrument known as the Mechanical and Inflammatory Low Back Pain (MAIL Scale was drafted using the results of a previous expert opinion study. A pilot survey was conducted to test the feasibility of a larger study designed to determine the MAIL Scale's ability to distinguish two potential subgroups of low back pain: inflammatory and mechanical. Methods Patients with a primary complaint of low back pain (LBP presenting to chiropractic clinics in Perth, Western Australia were asked to fill out the MAIL Scale questionnaire. The instrument's ability to separate patients into inflammatory and mechanical subgroups of LBP was examined using the mean score of each notional subgroup as an arbitrary cut-off point. Results Data were collected from 50 patients. The MAIL Scale did not appear to separate cases of LBP into the two notionally distinct groups of inflammatory (n = 6 or mechanical (n = 5. A larger "mixed symptom" group (n = 39 was revealed. Conclusions In this pilot study the MAIL Scale was unable to clearly discriminate between what is thought to be mechanical and inflammatory LBP in 50 cases seen in a chiropractic setting. However, the small sample size means any conclusions must be viewed with caution. Further research within a larger study population may be warranted and feasible.

  1. Neuromuscular adaptations predict functional disability independently of clinical pain and psychological factors in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Abboud, Jacques; St-Pierre, Charles; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain exhibit characteristics such as clinical pain, psychological symptoms and neuromuscular adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine the independent contribution of clinical pain, psychological factors and neuromuscular adaptations to disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Clinical pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, anxiety, neuromuscular adaptations to chronic pain and neuromuscular responses to experimental pain were assessed in 52 patients with chronic low back pain. Lumbar muscle electromyographic activity was assessed during a flexion-extension task (flexion relaxation phenomenon) to assess both chronic neuromuscular adaptations and neuromuscular responses to experimental pain during the task. Multiple regressions showed that independent predictors of disability included neuromuscular adaptations to chronic pain (β=0.25, p=0.006, sr(2)=0.06), neuromuscular responses to experimental pain (β=-0.24, p=0.011, sr(2)=0.05), clinical pain intensity (β=0.28, p=0.002, sr(2)=0.08) and psychological factors (β=0.58, ppain intensity and psychological factors, and contribute to inter-individual differences in patients' disability. This suggests that disability, in chronic low back pain patients, is determined by a combination of factors, including clinical pain, psychological factors and neuromuscular adaptations.

  2. Low Back Pain in 17 Countries, a Rasch Analysis of the ICF Core Set for Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Cecilie; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Cieza, Alarcos

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that a worldwide measurement tool may be developed based on the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for chronic conditions. The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility of constructing a cross-cultural measurement of functioning for patients with low back pain…

  3. Clustering patients on the basis of their individual course of low back pain over a six month period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axén, Iben; Bodin, Lennart; Bergström, Gunnar;

    2011-01-01

    Several researchers have searched for subgroups in the heterogeneous population of patients with non-specific low back pain (LBP). To date, subgroups have been identified based on psychological profiles and the variation of pain....

  4. Description of a clinical stream of back-pain patients based on electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aickin, Mikel; McCaffery, Anne; Pugh, Guy; Tick, Heather; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Hicks, Paul; Pelletier, Kenneth R; Cao, Jennifer; Himick, Dan; Monahan, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Back pain consists of a spectrum of conditions, with no common etiology and therefore no dominant method of treatment. The purpose of this study is to describe the complexity of a collection of 8000 back pain patients who appeared in an integrative medicine clinic, as a prelude to conducing comparative effectiveness research on CAM alternatives to conventional therapy. Approximately 23% of all clinic patients were diagnosed at some time with back pain. Nearly half had treatment periods of less than one month, while more than 25% were treated for back pain for more than two years. Women were represented more than twice as often as men. The initial diagnosis categories that occurred most frequently were lumbar symptoms, cervical symptoms, and a general category, with smaller numbers having lumbar anatomic, thoracic symptom, brachial neuritis, or sciatica diagnoses. There were few strong relationships between initial diagnosis pattern and length of back pain treatment period. While 77% of back pain patients presented with diagnoses in only a single category, there were many composite categories each of which was sparsely represented. Between 50% and 75% of patients used some CAM service, depending on their initial diagnosis pattern. Patients with complex initial diagnosis patterns strongly tended to chose CAM, and among CAM-users those with complex diagnoses tended toward chiropractic, as opposed to acupuncture or bodywork. The CAM usage patterns of men and women were highly similar. Again among CAM users, 82% used only a single type of CAM service, and multiple service uses tend to be combined at random. Between two-thirds and three-quarters of multiple CAM service users had very simple temporal patterns of use, dominated by use of one type of CAM at a time.

  5. Back and neck pain among school teachers in Poland and its correlations with physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Rottermund

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Back pain represents one of the most common diseases across various populations of workers worldwide. This study analyzes the prevalence and severity of back pain, based on selected demographic variables, and the relationship with physical activity among school teachers. Material and Methods: The study included 998 professionally active teachers (840 females and 158 males from the southern part of Poland. Validated psychometric tools, namely: 1 for evaluation of disability due to back pain – a Polish version of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Neck Disability Index (NDI, 2 for physical activity assessment – the Subjective Experience of Work Load (SEWL as well as the authors’ supplementary questionnaire, addressing demographic and anthropometric variables were used. Results: There was no correlation between age and the NDI scores in females (r = 0.027, in contrast to males (r = 0.202; p ≤ 0.05. Statistically significant correlations (p ≤ 0.05 were reported between: age and the ODI, in both females (r = 0.219 and males (r = 0.180. No associations between the body mass index (BMI-ODI, and BMI-NDI were found. In the case of women, disability related to low back pain (LBP had a negative impact on the indicators of their activity during work, sports, and leisure time. In the case of men, the NDI and ODI scores did not differ, based on activity indicators. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that back pain represents a serious concern among teachers. Age appears to be a prognostic factor, while no association between the BMI and LBP has been revealed. The limitation of physical activity leads to more frequent back pain. Med Pr 2015;66(6:771–778

  6. MANAGEMENT OF POSTURAL LOW BACK PAIN AMONG THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROFESSIONALS: A MULTIPLE THERAPUETIC INTERVENTION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahul Hameed Pakkir Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to find out the effectiveness of multiple therapeutic intervention combinations to manage Postural Low back pain among the Information Technology [IT] Professionals. Study design: The randomized control study design. Materials and Methods: All the subjects (N=90 were randomized into three groups which consists of one control and two experimental groups. The subjects in the Experimental group I were given Motor Control Training and Ergonomic Training whereas the Experimental group II were given Myofascial Release, Motor Control Training and Ergonomic Training was given for a period of 6 weeks that includes first 3 weeks of Myofascial Release along with Motor Control Training and Ergonomic Training, further the Motor Control Training and Ergonomic Training was continued for the period of 4 to 6 weeks duration. The subjects in the control group were not given any therapeutic modalities throughout the study. The effectiveness of the therapeutic interventions were measured through three outcome parameters such as Back pain intensity, Back pain disability and Transversus Abdominis muscle strength. The Analysis of Covariance and Scheffe’s post hoc tests were applied to study the treatment effectiveness. The effectiveness of the therapeutic intervention at three different time intervals was also analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and if found significant, a Newman Keul’s post hoc tests was employed to study the significance between two time intervals. Results & Conclusion: The results of this study concluded that the Experimental group-II is found to be better than Experimental group-I and Control group in the reduction of Low Back pain intensity, Back pain disability and Transversus Abdominis muscle strength of the Software professionals with Postural low back pain.

  7. Study on Factors Associated With Chronic Low Back Pain in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikki J Parikh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low back pain is a leading cause of disability. It occurs in similar proportions in all cultures, interferes with quality of life and work performance, and is the most common reason for medical consultations. Few cases of back pain are due to specific causes; most cases are non-specific. Acute back pain is the most common presentation and is usually self-limiting, lasting less than three months regardless of treatment. Chronic back pain is a more difficult problem, which often has strong psychological overlay: work dissatisfaction, boredom, and a generous compensation system contribute to it. Methodology: This is a retrospective study. The study was conducted in private multispecialty hospital of Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Data from April 2014 to March 2015 was analyzed. Permission was taken from the hospital authority to conduct the study and stringent confidentiality of data was maintained at all levels of the project. Result: We have analyzed data of 210 patients diagnosed with chronic low back pain. People between age of 36 years to 40 years were most common culprits. Among these, 82 (39.05% were male and 128 (60.95% were female. Among males, 65 (79.27 were overweight (BMI >= 25.00 and among females, 95 (74.22% were overweight. Disc prolapse was most common diagnosis in both males and females. It was followed by fractures and Lumber spondylosis. Conclusion: Females were more affected by Lower back pain. People in age group of 36 years to 40 years were commonly affected. Disc prolapsed was most common the most common diagnosis. [Natl J Med Res 2016; 6(2.000: 140-142

  8. [Preventing chronic back pain at the workplace: action-research at the workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begué-Simon, Anne-Marie; Chaperon, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    An intervention to prevent chronic back pain and muscular-skeletal disorder (MSD) was implemented in the second half of 2003 at an automobile factory targeting employees from the cable construction division who were redeployed internally to a another division of the plant. This action-research consisted of exploring the benefits of establishing specialized gym classes for back exercises and re-education at the workplace to help prevent chronic lower back pain. Employees who had previously reported lower back pain that was either slightly disabling to none incapacitating and those who were in-line to be redeployed to another division were all offered the opportunity to undertake a medical exam and physical therapy check-up and to respond to a self-administered questionnaire in order to assess the functional state of of each employee, his perception of pain, and the manifestation and impact of this in daily life. Employees were oriented to appropriate gym and physical therapy classes for re-educating and improving back strength under the supervision of a physical therapist. As a follow-up to this, in between sessions, the workers were invited to redo the assessment tests in order to assess and appraise the value of the effects of the exercises. The action-research carried out in the workplace shows a positive contribution of the gym classes specialized for back exercises and re-education training to the improvement of the status of those persons suffering from lower back pain. In addition, placing employees in new professional positions following their completion of these gym and physicals therapy sessions proves to be essential for validating the acquisition of knowledge gained and the commitment to adjusting to the job position.

  9. Multifactorial assistive device intervention to prevent low back pain among caregivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Bjørnskov; Brandt, Åse

    2011-01-01

    Caregivers are among those professionals who experience the highest incidence of low back pain and low back injuries, and one of the most frequently described reasons for this is person transfers. This paper reports on a controlled intervention study in two Danish municipalities with perceived...... strain during person transfer, self reported low back pain and low back injuries as main outcomes. The intervention was implemented in one municipality consisting of maximum use of assistive devices for person transfer combined with organizational changes. The other municipality served as control group....... The study population consisted of all permanently employed caregivers in the two municipalities, and data was collected by means of a questionnaire at baseline and after 10 months of follow-up. At follow-up the caregivers in the intervention group reported lower perceived strain during person transfer...

  10. Dorsal root ganglion compression as an animal model of sciatica and low back pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Lin; Jing Yang; Hui-Ming Li; San-Jue Hu; Jun-Ling Xing

    2012-01-01

    As sciatica and low back pain are among the most common medical complaints,many studies have duplicated these conditions in animals.Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) is one of these models.The surgery is simple:after exposing the L4/L5 intervertebral foramina,stainless steel rods are implanted unilaterally,one rod for each vertebra,to chronically compress the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG).Then,CCD can be used to simulate the clinical conditions caused by stenosis,such as a laterally herniated disc or foraminal stenosis.As the intraforaminal implantation of a rod results in neuronal somal hyperexcitability and spontaneous action potentials associated with hyperalgesia,spontaneous pain,and mechanical allodynia,CCD provides an animal model that mimics radicular pain in humans.This review concerns the mechanisms of neuronal hyperexcitability,focusing on various patterns of spontaneous discharge including one possible pain signal for mechanical allodynia-evoked bursting.Also,new data regarding its significant property of maintaining peripheral input are also discussed.Investigations using this animal model will enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms for low back pain and sciatica.Furthermore,the peripheral location of the DRG facilitates its use as a locus for controlling pain with minimal central effects,in the hope of ultimately uncovering analgesics that block neuropathic pain without influencing physiological pain.

  11. [Postural hygiene and ergonomic advices for low back pain: rethinking our practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, D; Cedraschi, C; Genevay, S

    2012-03-14

    In recent years, scientific understanding of low back pain has increased considerably, sometimes shoving concepts thought to be unshakable. If we consider postural hygiene,whose techniques were conceptualized in the 70's and are still widely used, not only some axioms were not confirmed but some evidences suggest that it may sometimes have deleterious effects. After reviewing these elements it appears that there is no simple formula applicable to all patients with low back pain. Instead we offer food for thought so that every therapist can adapt his practice on an individual basis.

  12. Effects of gyrokinesis exercise on the gait pattern of female patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Kook-Eun; Park, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to use kinematic variables to identify the effects of 8/weeks’ performance of a gyrokinesis exercise on the gait pattern of females with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects of the present study were females in their late 20s to mid 30s who were chronic back pain patients. [Methods] A 3-D motion analysis system was used to measure the changes in their gait patterns between pre and post-gyrokintic exercise. The SPSS 21.0 statistics progr...

  13. Sacral insufficiency fractures: an easily overlooked cause of back pain in the ED.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, John G

    2011-03-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures are an important and treatable cause of severe back pain. Despite publication of several case reports since its original description in 1982, awareness of these injuries remains inadequate in emergency medicine. Most patients are elderly women presenting with intractable lower back pain. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most significant risk factor. Marked sacral tenderness is common. Neurologic impairment is rarely detectable. Routine radiography of the spine and pelvis is usually inconclusive. Computed tomography remains the diagnostic modality of choice. Treatment is usually conservative.

  14. Brodie's abscess of the posterior ilium: a rare cause for low back pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Gopisankar; Thimmaiah, Sreenivas; Menon, Jagdish

    2014-05-09

    Brodie's abscess of the pelvis is very rare in healthy children. It can be missed because of its varied presentation. We present an 11-year-old boy who presented with low back pain. Investigations revealed a well-defined lesion in the posterior ilium. He underwent open biopsy and debridement. At the end of the final follow-up, he was asymptomatic and there was no recurrence. We present this case for the rare site of Brodie's abscess and for its unusual presentation as low back pain.

  15. Acknowledging the patient with back pain: A systematic review based on thematic synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    Abstract NOF 2014 Acknowledging the back patient. A thematic synthesis of qualitative research. A systematic literature review. Introduction: Back conditions and back pain rank among the most common causes of reduced working capacity and lengthy, challenging and costly illness trajectories and ar...... a question of adopting certain norms as binding; to be bound by obligation or loyalty. Thus, the literature review argues for a more process-oriented patient approach that incorporates patients' narratives as an integral and ethical part of the care and treatment.......Abstract NOF 2014 Acknowledging the back patient. A thematic synthesis of qualitative research. A systematic literature review. Introduction: Back conditions and back pain rank among the most common causes of reduced working capacity and lengthy, challenging and costly illness trajectories...... and are associated with heavy personal costs and hospitalisations. Thus, it has been the aim of this qualitative literature review to investigate what it feels like to be a back patient and what back patients consider important when dealing with the healthcare system. Methods: The thematic synthesis aims...

  16. [Sacroiliac joint dysfunction presented with acute low back pain: three case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamauchi, Shuji; Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Sugawara, Atsushi; Kim, Kyongsong; Shimoda, Yusuke; Motegi, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Isobe, Masanori

    2010-07-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) can cause low back pain when its joint capsule and ligamentous tissue are damaged. We report our experience in treating three SIJ dysfunction patients presenting with acute low back pain (a 38 year-old male, a 24 year-old male, and a 32 year-old female). SIJ dysfunction was diagnosed using the one-finger test, the modified Newton test, and SIJ injection. In all three patients, lumbar MRI demonstrated slightly degenerated lumbar lesions (lumbar canal stenosis, lumbar disc hernia). Two patients had paresthesia or pain in the leg and all three patients showed iliac muscle tenderness in the groin, which was thought to be a referred symptom because of improvement after SIJ injection. The two male patients returned to work and the problems have not recurred. Although our female patient resumed daily life as a housewife, her condition recurred at intervals of 2-3 months and she required regular SIJ injections. The prevalence of SIJ dysfunction of low back pain is about 10%, so it should be considered as a differential diagnosis when treating low back pain and designing treatment for lumbar spinal disorders.

  17. [Is Qi Gong suitable for the prevention of low back pain?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauner-Dungl, Andrea

    2004-12-01

    Low back pain is one of the main problems of health care, and has many causes. To prevent low back pain daily activities are highly important--static work as well as dynamic movement--carried out in an ergonomic and economical way. Studies have shown that the compliance of patients with regard to exercise training and ergonomic recommendations is not very high. The main posture of Qi Gong training is similar to the recommended posture by low back schools. Qi gong exercises respect basic physiological and ergonomic principles of movement in every way. Qi Gong fulfils the most important criteria for the prevention and therapy of idiopathic low back pain. Qi Gong training requires no special equipment. It is simple and can be undertaken everywhere. A growing number of people have become interested in Qi Gong, and train regularly and effectively. Low back pain rarely occurs in such people, and therefore Qi Gong should be considered as one of the most effective means of prevention.

  18. Back and neck pain are related to mental health problems in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There is a high prevalence of mental health problems amongst adolescents. In addition there is a high prevalence of spinal pain in this population. Evidence suggests that these conditions are related. This study sought to extend earlier findings by examining the relationship between mental health problems as measured by the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL) and the experience of back and neck pain in adolescents. Methods One thousand five hundred and eighty participants (m...

  19. Electromagnetic fields in the treatment of chronic lower back pain in patients with degenerative disc disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arneja, Amarjit S; Kotowich, Alan; Staley, Doug; Summers, Randy; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To examine the effects of low-amplitude, low frequency electromagnetic field therapy (EMF) therapy in patients with persistent chronic lower back pain associated with degenerative disc disease. Design: Double-blind, randomized and placebo controlled. Intervention: EMF using a medical device resonator; control group underwent same procedures, except the device was turned off. Outcome measures: Pain reduction and mobility. Results: Improvements in overall physical health, social functionin...

  20. Prevalence and Management of Back Pain in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Théroux

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Back pain (BP has often been associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS, which is a three-dimensional deviation of the vertebral column. In adolescents, chronic pain appears to be a predictor of health care utilization and has a negative impact on physical, psychological and family well-being. In this population, BP tends to be persistent and may be a predictor of BP in adulthood.

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in the US Adult Low Back Pain Population

    OpenAIRE

    Ghildayal, Neha; Johnson, Pamela Jo; Evans, Roni L; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many people suffering from low back pain (LBP) have found conventional medical treatments to be ineffective for managing their LBP and are increasingly turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to find pain relief. A comprehensive picture of CAM use in the LBP population, including all of the most commonly used modalities, is needed. Study Objective: To examine prevalence and perceived benefit of CAM use within the US LBP population by limiting vs nonlimiting LBP and...

  2. Effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in treating spinal (back and neck) pain: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Edith Meszaros Crow; Emilien Jeannot; Alison Trewhela

    2015-01-01

    Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain. Recent st...

  3. Yoga as a treatment for chronic low back pain: A systematic review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Douglas G.; Holt, Jacquelyn A.; Sklar, Marisa; Groessl, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic low back pain (CLBP) affects millions of people worldwide, and appears to be increasing in prevalence. It is associated not only with pain, but also with increased disability, psychological symptoms, and reduced quality of life. There are various treatment options for CLBP, but no single therapy stands out as being the most effective. In the past 10 years, yoga interventions have been studied as a CLBP treatment approach. The objective of this paper is to review the current...

  4. Entropy measures of back muscles EMG for subjects with and without pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurcher, Ulrich; Kaufman, Miron; Vyhnalek, Bryan; Sung, Paul

    2007-10-01

    We have previously reported that the time-dependent entropy S(t) calculated from electromyography time series of low back muscles exhibit plateau-like behavior for intermediate times [50 ,ms low back pain [J. Rehab. Res. Dev. 44, 599 (2007)]. We report results of a larger study, and compare the entropies for the left -and right thoracic and left- and right lumbar muscles. We also compare entropies from muscles before and after physical therapy intervention.

  5. The Beliefs of Third-Level Healthcare Students towards Low-Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    peer-reviewed Objectives. Beliefs held by healthcare providers are part of the complex recovery of a patient with low-back pain (LBP).The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes and beliefs of Irish university healthcare students towards LBP. Methods. Physiotherapy (???? = 107), medicine (???? = 63), nursing, and midwifery (???? = 101) students completed the survey. Demographic data, LBP related beliefs [Back Beliefs Questionnaire (BBQ) and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Qu...

  6. Effects of neural mobilization on pain, straight leg raise test and disability in patients with radicular low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Čolaković

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radicular low back pain is a disorder involving the dysfunction of the lumbosacral nerve roots. Clinical rehabilitation approaches for low back pain include kinesiotherapy, and physical therapyprocedures: ice , rest , heat, ultrasound, TENS, but evidences regarding their effectiveness are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if nerve mobilization brings better improvements in pain, SLR testand functional disability in patients with radicular low back pain compared to standard physical therapy.Methods: The study was conducted on a 60 patients with Radicular low back pain, treated in Regional medical center "Dr Safet Mujić", Mostar, during the period from 01.04.2010 untill 31.04.2011. Patientswere divided into two groups. First group (n=30 received a 4-week rehabilitation program including neural mobilization and lumbar stabilization program. Second group (n=30 received a 4-week rehabilitation program including active range of motion (ROM exercises and lumbar stabilization program.Results: At the beginning, the two groups were not signifi cantly different in terms of score or SLR. After therapy there was statistically signifi cant improvement between groups in both VAS scores[Group A: 1.16±1.5; Group B: 2.25±2.2] and SLR [Group A: 80.9±17.4; Group B: 65.9±16.4]. ]. After the treatment, in group A, 46.6% (14 participants had been rated with 4, but in Group B: 33.3% (10 participants had been rated with 3.Conclusions: Patients treated with neural mobilization and lumbar stabilization showed better VAS scores and Straight Leg Test scores compared to patients treated with active range of motion exercises and lumbar stabilization. Further research to investigate their long term effi cacy is warranted, with emphasis on greater number of participants.

  7. The effects of strength exercise and walking on lumbar function, pain level, and body composition in chronic back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Seok; Kang, Suh-Jung

    2016-10-01

    The beneficial effects of a strength exercise program and a combined exercise program of strength training plus walking were examined in overweight with chronic back pain patients. The participants were randomly placed in the strength exercise group (SEG, n=15), combined exercise group (CEG, n=15), and control group (CG, n=6). All subjects performed exercise twice per week, 50 min per session with a professional instructors for 12 weeks. In order to evaluate exercise intervention effects, lumbar function was measured by back strength and flexibility. Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ) and visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to evaluate pain level. Fat and muscle mass were measured to compare body composition changes. All measurements were performed before and after 12 weeks of exercise program. Lumbar function: Back strength was significantly different over time, and significant time×group differences were found between SEG and CG and, CEG and CG. Pain disorder degree: VAS showed a significant group difference, and significant time×group differences were shown between SEG and CG, and CEG and CG. Also, RMDG showed a significant difference between CEG and CG. Body composition: Fat mass was significantly different over time×group between SEG and CG. In conclusion, participating in strength and walking exercises were beneficial to improve lumbar function. Also, the combined exercise program was more effective for reducing pain levels than the strength exercise. Finally, fat mass was reduced in this study and this may play a possible role in the improvement of lumbar function and reduction in low back pain.

  8. The Nordic back pain subpopulation program: Can low back pain patterns be predicted from the first consultation with a chiropractor? A longitudinal pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboeuf-Yde Charlotte

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is widely believed that non-specific low back pain (LBP consists of a number of subgroups which should be identified in order to improve treatment effects. In order to identify subgroups, patient characteristics that relate to different outcomes are searched for. However, LBP is often fluctuating or recurring rather than clearly limited in time. Therefore it would be relevant to consider outcome after completed treatment from a longitudinal perspective (describing "course patterns" instead of defining it from an arbitrarily selected end-point. Aims The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the interobserver reliability of a diagnostic classification system and to evaluate whether diagnostic classes or other baseline characteristics are associated with the LBP course pattern over a period of 18 weeks. Methods Patients visiting one of 7 chiropractors because of LBP were classified according to a diagnostic classification system, which includes end-range loading, SI-joint pain provocation tests, neurological examination and tests for muscle tenderness and abnormal nerve tension. In addition, age, gender, duration of pain and presence of leg pain were registered in the patient's file. By weekly SMS-messages on their mobile phones, patients were asked how many days they had LBP the preceding week, and these answers were transformed into pain course patterns and the total number of LBP days. Results A total of 110 patients were included and 76 (69% completed follow-up. Thirty-five patients were examined by two chiropractors. The agreement regarding diagnostic classes was 83% (95% CI: 70 - 96. The diagnostic classes were associated with the pain course patterns and number of LBP days. Patients with disc pain had the highest number of LBP days and patients with muscular pain reported the fewest (35 vs. 12 days, p Conclusions The study indicated that there is a clinically meaningful relationship between diagnostic

  9. PREVALENCE OF WORK RELATED LOW BACK PAIN IN PHYSICAL THERAPIST PROFESSIONAL FROM THE CITY OF TAIF, KSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad T. Ahmed

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical therapy often is used in the management of work-related low back pain (LBP. Little information, however, is known about work related low back pain that may occur in physical therapy experts themselves. Work related low back agony speaks to one of the real wellbeing issues that happen in well-beings experts. The point of this study is to examine the pervasiveness of work related low back pain in physical therapy experts, and its connection to the way of work. Methods: One hundred and seven physical therapy experts working at general hospitals at Taif, KSA took part in this study, their age ranged from 25 to 60 years, and they were complaining from low back pain for more than 3 months and their current pain for at least three or more weeks. Every subject was requested to finish the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index Questionnaires that comprised of 15 close-ended inquiries. Results: We analyzed Data by utilizing descriptive statistics to gauge the predominance of low back pain in physical therapy experts and to explore connection between back pain and hospital facility work. Out of two hundred thirty physical therapist advisor, one hundred and ten (47.8% physical specialists finished/gave back the surveys. three polls were rejected from investigation since members had missed a few things in filling the survey. In this manner, just information from 107 members was utilized to figure the predominance rates. It was found that the commonness of work related low back pain in physical therapy expert is equivalent 72%. It was found that a connection between the works related low back pain and age, proficient rank, and specialty. Conclusion: There is a higher occurrence of work related back pain among physiotherapist expert and this may be impacted by age, proficient rank and specialty.

  10. Effective physical treatment for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, C G

    2004-01-01

    It is now feasible to adopt an evidence-based approach when providing physical treatment for patients with chronic LBP. A summary of the efficacy of a range of physical treatments is provided in Table 1. The evidence-based primary care options are exercise, laser, massage, and spinal manipulation; however, the latter three have small or transient effects that limit their value as therapies for chronic LBP. In contrast, exercise produces large reductions in pain and disability, a feature that suggests that exercise should play a major role in the management of chronic LBP. Physical treatments, such as acupuncture, backschool, hydrotherapy, lumbar supports, magnets, TENS, traction, ultrasound, Pilates therapy, Feldenkrais therapy, Alexander technique, and craniosacral therapy are either of unknown value or ineffective and so should not be considered. Outside of primary care, multidisciplinary treatment or functional restoration is effective; however, the high cost probably means that these programs should be reserved for patients who do not respond to cheaper treatment options for chronic LBP. Although there are now effective treatment options for chronic LBP, it needs to be acknowledged that the problem of chronic LBP is far from solved. Though treatments can provide marked improvements in the patient's condition, the available evidence suggests that the typical chronic LBP patient is left with some residual pain and disability. Developing new, more powerful treatments and refining the current group of known effective treatments is the challenge for the future.

  11. [Chiropractic in general and in low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhrvold, K

    1999-05-30

    The practice of chiropractic was for many years regulated by "The Quack Act" in Norway, and the numbers of chiropractors decreased year by year. They are now authorized health care practitioners with academic training; most Norwegian students attending courses in chiropractic or clinical biomechanics go to European universities. An international council ensures reciprocity and a quality assured academic programme in all recognized colleges of chiropractic. Recent research have broadened our understanding of the biomechanical interrelationship between the nervous system, the musculature and the skeletal articulations. In the early 1990s, several studies documented favourable effect of chiropractic treatment of low back disorders. These studies are now substantiated by new studies, especially concerning cost-effectiveness. Several reports also give evidence that chiropractic manipulation is beneficial especially in combination with light exercise. There are conflicting results concerning the efficacy of varying types of exercise programmes. Patients may benefit from increased cooperation between medical doctors and chiropractors. Most acute low back syndromes should be assessed by the chiropractor in order to prevent chronic illness.

  12. The Influence of Ergonomic Training on Low Back and Neck Pains in Female Hospital Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeidi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Prevalence of low back pain (LBP and neck pain (NP in workers, especially in nurses is high, but their knowledge of ergonomics is not enough. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ergonomic training on low back pain and neck pain, posture, and function in female hospital personnel of Najaf-Abad, Iran. Patients and Methods In this queasy experimental study, 47 female staffs with LBP or NP were selected through a simple consecutive sampling method. The subjects completed a questionnaire on LBP and NP and were evaluated for posture, back tests, and cost of related treatments. Afterward, they participated in an ergonomic training program, including face to face and group education sessions on ergonomic risk factors for LBP and NP, in the work place. After six months of follow up, all the tests and data collection were repeated and data was analyzed using paired t-test and regression analysis. Results Prevalence of LBP and NP were 87% and 45.7%, respectively. Repetitive motions were the most frequent cause of pain (67%. Pain intensity, posture, risk of musculoskeletal disorders, weight, waist circumference, sick leaves, and the costs of treatments reduced significantly after intervention (P < 0.05. Conclusions With regards to the influence of ergonomic training on improving LBP and NP and decreasing the treatment costs, this intervention beside others can be useful for controlling musculoskeletal disorders in hospital personnel.

  13. EFFECT OF MYOFASCIAL RELEASE THERAPY ON PAIN RELATED DISABILITY, QUALITY OF SLEEP AND DEPRESSION IN OLDER ADULTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. B.Arun, MPT, PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain was experienced by 50% of older adults that has threatened to quality of life. The economic cost of low back pain is more in older adults. Various literatures found that there is strong relationships exist between the low back pain and the psychosocial factors like sleep disturbances, depression, mood sway and chronic illness. Studies has found that depression is one of the commonest psychological problem faced by older adults which relates to other factors like pain, sleep disturbances ect.. Physiotherapy has been shown very effective in the management of chronic low back pain. Various approaches in physiotherapy play a major role in rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. This study estimates to find out the effect of myofascial release therapy on pain related disability, quality of sleep and depression in older adults with chronic low back pain. Study is a single group pre test and post test design. 37 Patients with chronic low back pain were selected from a community setup. Selected subjects were undergone 6 weeks of myofascial release therapy along with moist heat therapy. At the end the outcome measured are pain related disability using pain disability index, Quality of sleep using Insomnia severity index and depression using beck depression inventory. The paired ‘t’ test was used to find out the differences between variables. The result showed that there was a significant improvement in the pre test and post test variables. The beck depression inventory was 21.3 (p<0.05%, and the pain disability index was 24.9 (p<0.05%. The study concludes that the myofascial release therapy is very effective in reducing the pain related disability, quality of sleep and depression on older adults with chronic low back pain.

  14. A comparison between pulsed radiofrequency and electro-acupuncture for relieving pain in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Lien; Lin, Mu-Hung; Fen, Jun-Jeng; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Chen, Po-Quang

    2010-01-01

    Many treatment options for chronic low back pain are available, including varied forms of electric stimulation. But little is known about the electricity effect between electro-acupuncture and pulsed radiofrequency. The objective of this study is to assess the difference in effectiveness of pain relief between pulsed radiofrequency and electro-acupuncture. Visual analog score (VAS) pain score, the Oswestry disability index (ODI) to measure a patient's permanent functional disability, and Short form 36 (SF-36) which is a survey used in health assessment to determine the cost-effectiveness of a health treatment, were used as rating systems to measure the pain relief and functional improvement effect of pulsed radiofrequency and electro-acupuncture, based on the methodological quality of the randomized controlled trials, the relevance between the study groups, and the consistency of the outcome evaluation. First, the baseline status before therapy shows no age and gender influence in the SF-36 and VAS score but it is significant in the ODI questionnaire. From ANOVA analyses, it is apparent that radiofrequency therapy is a significant improvement over electro-acupuncture therapy after one month. But electro-acupuncture also showed functional improvement in the lumbar spine from the ODI. This study provides sufficient evidence of the superiority of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) therapy for low back pain relief compared with both electro-acupuncture (EA) therapy and the control group. But the functional improvement of the lumbar spine was proved under EA therapy only. Both therapies are related to electricity effects.

  15. McTimoney chiropractic: a gentle way with back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartlidge, S

    1997-10-01

    There are 1080 chiropractors in the UK today, and almost one-third of these are McTimoney chiropractors. This article outlines the development of McTimoney Chiropractic, which is a particular branch of the chiropractic profession in the UK, taught at the McTimoney Chiropractic College in Abingdon, near Oxford. The McTimoney method is distinguished by its gentle, whole body approach. It aims to correct the alignment of the bones of the spine and other joints of the body, to restore nerve function, to alleviate pain, and to promote natural health. The technique is suitable for the very young as well as the old and frail. In this paper, several nurses-turned-chiropractor offer their personal views. Reference is also made to the McTimoney-Corley technique, which is a similar chiropractic method taught at the Oxford School of Chiropractic, UK.

  16. Assessing the role of cognitive behavioral therapy in the management of chronic nonspecific back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveinsdottir V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Vigdis Sveinsdottir,1 Hege R Eriksen,1,2 Silje Endresen Reme1,31Uni Health, Uni Research, Bergen, Norway; 2Department of Health Promotion and Development, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 3Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USAPurpose: The aim of this study is to provide a narrative review of the current state of knowledge of the role of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in the management of chronic nonspecific back pain.Methods: A literature search on all studies published up until July 2012 (PubMed and PsycINFO was performed. The search string consisted of 4 steps: cognitive behavioral therapy/treatment/management/modification/intervention, chronic, back pain (MeSH term or low back pain (MeSH term, and randomized controlled trial (MeSH term. The conclusions are based on the results from randomized controlled trials (RCTs and reviews of RCTs. Interventions were not required to be pure CBT interventions, but were required to include both cognitive and behavioral components.Results: The search yielded 108 studies, with 46 included in the analysis. Eligible intervention studies were categorized as CBT compared to wait-list controls/treatment as usual, physical treatments/exercise, information/education, biofeedback, operant behavioral treatment, lumbar spinal fusion surgery, and relaxation training. The results showed that CBT is a beneficial treatment for chronic back pain on a wide range of relevant variables, especially when compared to wait-list controls/treatment as usual. With regards to the other comparison treatments, results were mixed and inconclusive.Conclusion: The results of this review suggest that CBT is a beneficial treatment for chronic nonspecific back pain, leading to improvements in a wide range of relevant cognitive, behavioral and physical variables. This is especially evident when CBT is compared to treatment as usual or wait-list controls, but mixed and inconclusive when

  17. Reduced task-induced variations in the distribution of activity across back muscle regions in individuals with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falla, Deborah; Gizzi, Leonardo; Tschapek, Marika; Erlenwein, Joachim; Petzke, Frank

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated change in the distribution of lumbar erector spinae muscle activity and pressure pain sensitivity across the low back in individuals with low back pain (LBP) and healthy controls. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from multiple locations over the lumbar erector spinae muscle with a 13×5 grid of electrodes from 19 people with chronic nonspecific LBP and 17 control subjects as they performed a repetitive lifting task. The EMG root mean square (RMS) was computed for each location of the grid to form a map of the EMG amplitude distribution. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded before and after the lifting task over a similar area of the back. For the control subjects, the EMG RMS progressively increased more in the caudal region of the lumbar erector spinae during the repetitive task, resulting in a shift in the distribution of muscle activity. In contrast, the distribution of muscle activity remained unaltered in the LBP group despite an overall increase in EMG amplitude. PPT was lower in the LBP group after completion of the repetitive task compared to baseline (average across all locations: pre: 268.0±165.9 kPa; post: 242.0±166.7 kPa), whereas no change in PPT over time was observed for the control group (320.1±162.1 kPa; post: 322.0±179.5 kPa). The results demonstrate that LBP alters the normal adaptation of lumbar erector spinae muscle activity to exercise, which occurs in the presence of exercise-induced hyperalgesia. Reduced variability of muscle activity may have important implications for the provocation and recurrence of LBP due to repetitive tasks.

  18. EFFICACY OF ADDUCTOR PULL BACK EXERCISE ON PAIN AND FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY FOR SACROILIAC JOINT DYSFUNCTION

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    Sai Kumar .N

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SIJD is a common problem that causes pain and disability. Adductor pull back exercise is widely used for treating sacroiliac joint dysfunction. No yet research has been directly examined the efficacy of adductor pull back exercise for sacroiliac joint dysfunction. The purpose of the study to find the efficacy of adductor pull back exercise on pain and functional disability for subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Methods: An experimental study design, 40 subjects with unilateral Sacroiliac joint dysfunction were randomized into two groups: study group (n=20, and control group (n=20. Subjects in study group received adductor pull back exercise along with conventional exercise and Subjects in control group received conventional exercise. The duration of treatment was given for two weeks, three times a day, total six days per week. Outcome measures such as pain was measured using Visual analog scale (VAS, and functional disability was measured using Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire (ODI before and after 2 weeks of the treatment in both the groups. Results: When means were analyzed using Independent ‘t’ test as a parametric and Mann Whitney U test as a non-parametric test, there is a statistically significant improvements in means of VAS, and ODI within the groups. When means were compared using Independent ‘t’ and Mann Whitney U test, there is a significant difference in post-means of VAS and ODI between the groups. Conclusion: The present study concludes that the 2 weeks of adductor pull back exercise along with conventional exercise found statistically and clinically significant effect on improving pain, functional disability for subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Adductors pull back exercise along with conventional exercise techniques shown to have greater percentage of improvement in improving pain and functional disability for subjects with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

  19. Effectiveness of mindfulness meditation (Vipassana in the management of chronic low back pain

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    Sangram G Patil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (CLBP is challenging to treat with its significant psychological and cognitive behavioural element involved. Mindfulness meditation helps alter the behavioural response in chronic pain situations. Significant body of research in the filed of mindfulness meditation comes from the work of Dr Kabat-Zinn. The current evidence in the field, though not grade one, shows that there is a place for mindfulness meditation in managing chronic pain conditions including CLBP. Further research to test the usefulness of mindfulness in CLBP should involve good quality randomized controlled trials of pure mindfulness based technique in matched subjects.

  20. Lumbar Mechanics in Tennis Groundstrokes: Differences in Elite Adolescent Players With and Without Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Amity; Straker, Leon; Whiteside, David; O'Sullivan, Peter; Elliott, Bruce; Reid, Machar

    2016-02-01

    Adolescent tennis players are at risk for low back pain (LBP). Recent research has demonstrated a potential mechanical etiology during serves; however, groundstrokes have also been suggested to load this region. Therefore, this study compared lumbar mechanics between players with and without a history of LBP during open and square stance tennis forehands and backhands. Nineteen elite, adolescent, male tennis players participated, 7 with a history of recurrent disabling LBP and 12 without. Differences in three-dimensional lumbar kinetics and kinematics were compared between pain/no pain groups and groundstrokes using linear mixed models (P tennis players.