WorldWideScience

Sample records for back injuries

  1. Back Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  2. Isolated Ureter Injury After Abduction the Lower Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birdal Gullupinar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the anatomical structures the ureters are well protected and they%u2019re exposed to trauma rarely. The most common cause of ureteral injuries is iatrogenic. Early clinical diagnosis of ureteral injuries are quiet and clinical suspicion is often essential. Delayed diagnosis of ureteral injuries may cause mortality and morbidity. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is used as a method of imaging. Treatment is done according to the localization of trauma. On our article we present a rare isolated ureter injury after abduction the lower back of a woman as a case report.

  3. The Ergonomic Analysis and Back Injuries in Flexible Production System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Castillo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Back injuries identification and diagnoses in the transition of the Taylor model to the flexiblemodelof production organization, demands a parallel intervention of prevention actorsat work. This study uses simultaneously three intervention models (structured action analysis, muscle skeletal symptoms questionnaires and muscle skeletal assessment for work activitiesin a packaging plant. In this study seventy and two (72 operative workers participated (28 workers with muscle skeletal evaluation. In an intervention period of 10 months, the physical, cognitive, organizational components and productiveprocess dynamics were evaluated from the muscle skeletal demands issues. The differencesestablished between objective exposure at risk, back injury risk perception, appreciation and a vertebral spine evaluation, in prior and post intervention, determines the structure for a muscle skeletal risk management system. This study explains that back injury symptoms can be more efficiently reduced among operative workers combining measures registered and the adjustment between dynamics, the changes at work and efficient gestures development.Relevance: the results of this study can be used to prevent back injuries in workers of flexibleproduction processes.

  4. Back injury prevention: a lift team success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefti, Kelly S; Farnham, Richard J; Docken, Lisa; Bentaas, Ruth; Bossman, Sharon; Schaefer, Jill

    2003-06-01

    Work related back injuries among hospital personnel account for high volume, high cost workers' compensation claims. These injuries can be life altering experiences, affecting both the personal and professional lives of injured workers. Lifting must be viewed as a skill involving specialized training and mandated use of mechanical equipment, rather than as a random task performed by numerous health care providers. The use of a lift team specially trained in body mechanics, lifting techniques, and the use of mandated mechanical equipment can significantly affect injury data, financial outcomes, and employee satisfaction. The benefits of a lift team extend beyond the effect on injury and financial outcomes--they can be used for recruitment and retention strategies, and team members serve as mentors to others by demonstrating safe lifting techniques. Ultimately, a lift team helps protect a valuable resource--the health care worker.

  5. Corning Corporation back injury prevention project :the effects of an exercise program on self-reported back discomfort

    OpenAIRE

    Lienesch, Jane M.

    1994-01-01

    A back injury prevention program was developed, implemented and evaluated for employees at Corning Corporation. Subjects included 38 manufacturing employees; 21 in the intervention group and 17 in the control group. The subjects included slightly more males (62%) than females (37%), significantly more whites (87%) than African Americans or other minorities (13%), and an average age of 30-39 years. The intervention involved frequent stretching exercises done throughout ...

  6. Back Pain at Work: Preventing Pain and Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... falling and injuring your back. Consider tai chi, yoga and weight-bearing exercises that challenge your balance. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 150 minutes ...

  7. Reduction of Risk for Low Back Injury in Theater of Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    significant effects of group (p < 0.001), angle of measurement (p < 0.001), and group X angle of measurement interaction (p = 0.001) were observed...1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0170 TITLE: Reduction of Risk for Low Back Injury in Theater of Operations Principal Investigator: William S. Quillen...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reduction of Risk for Low Back Injury in Theater of Operations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0170 Operations 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  8. Prevention of disabling back injuries in nurses by the use of mechanical patient lift systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Hudson, Mary Anne; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2004-01-01

    Occupational back pain in nurses (OBPN) constitutes a major source of morbidity in the health care environment. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), occupational back injury is the second leading occupational injury in the United States. Among health care personnel, nurses have the highest rate of back pain, with an annual prevalence of 40-50% and a lifetime prevalence of 35-80%. The American Nursing Association believes that manual patient handling is unsafe and is directly responsible for musculoskeletal disorders encountered in nurses. It has been well documented that patient handling can be done safely with the use of assistive equipment and devices that eliminate these hazards to nurses that invite serious back injuries. The benefit of assistive patient handling equipment is characterized by the simultaneous reduction of the risk of musculoskeletal injury to the nursing staff and improvement in the quality of care for patient populations. To understand the cause of disabling injuries in health care workers, several factors must be considered, including the following: (1) anatomy/physiology of the back, (2) risk factors, (3) medical legal implications, and (4) prevention. Among nurses, back, neck, and shoulder injuries are commonly noted as the most prevalent and debilitating. While mostly associated with dependant patient care, the risk for musculoskeletal injury secondary to manual patient handling crosses all specialty areas of nursing. The skeletal defects of an abnormal back make the back more susceptible to occupational injury, even under normal stress conditions. Workers compensation guidelines for occupational back injury differ in public and private health care sectors from state to state. Nursing personnel should be reminded that the development of back pain following occupational activities in the hospital should be reported immediately to the Occupational Health Department. A nurse's failure to report OBPN

  9. Differences in lumbopelvic control and occupational behaviours in female nurses with and without a recent history of low back pain due to back injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiolakis, Corinne S; Kuk, Jennifer L; Drake, Janessa D M

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is highly prevalent in nurses. This study aimed to determine which physical fitness, physical activity (PA) and biomechanical characteristics most clearly distinguish between nurses with [recently injured (RInj)] and without [not recently injured (NRInj)] a recent back injury. Twenty-seven (8 RInj, 19 NRInj) female nurses completed questionnaires (pain, work, PA), physical fitness, biomechanical and low back discomfort measures, and wore an accelerometer for one work shift. Relative to NRInj nurses, RInj nurses exhibited reduced lumbopelvic control (41.4% more displayed a moderate loss of frontal plane position), less active occupational behaviours (less moderate PA; less patient lifts performed alone; more sitting and less standing time) and more than two times higher low back discomfort scores. Despite no physical fitness differences, the lumbopelvic control, occupational behaviours and discomfort measures differed between nurses with and without recent back injuries. It is unclear whether poor lumbopelvic control is causal or adaptive in RInj nurses and may require further investigation. Practitioner Summary: It is unclear which personal modifiable factors are most clearly associated with low back pain in nurses. Lumbopelvic control was the only performance-based measure to distinguish between nurses with and without recent back injuries. Future research may investigate whether reduced lumbopelvic control is causal or adaptive in recently injured nurses.

  10. TREATMENT OF 120 CASES OF SOFT-TISSUE INJURY OF THE SHOULDER-BACK REGION WITH FLOATING NEEDLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-ping; WANG Ke-hong; WANG Xiu-juan

    2005-01-01

    @@ In recent several years, the authors of the present paper employed floating needle to treat 120 cases of soft tissue injury of the shoulder-back region and achieved a good therapeutic effect. Following is the report.

  11. Evaluation of Histological Changes in Back Muscle Injuries in Rats over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inage, Kazuhide; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Animal model study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histological variation in the injured muscle and production of calcitonin gene-related peptide in rats over time. Overview of Literature Vertebral surgery has been reported to cause atrophy of the back muscles, which may result in pain. However, few reports have described the time series histological variation in the injured muscle and changes in the dominant nerve. Methods We used 30 male, 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The right and left sides of the paravertebral muscle were considered as the injured and uninjured sides, respectively. A 115 g weight was dropped from a height of 1 m on the right paravertebral muscle. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of the muscle was performed 1–3 weeks after injury for histological evaluation. Fluoro-Gold (FG) was injected into the paravertebral muscle. The L2 dorsal root ganglia on both sides were resected 1, 2, and 3 weeks after injury, and immunohistochemical staining for calcitonin gene-related peptide was performed. Results H&E staining of the paravertebral muscle showed infiltration of inflammatory cells and the presence of granulation tissue in the injured part on the ipsilateral side 1 week after injury. Muscle atrophy occurred 3 weeks after injury, but was repaired via spontaneous replacement of muscle cells/fibers. In contrast, compared with the uninjured side, the percentage of cells double-labeled with FG and calcitonin gene-related peptide in FG-positive cells in the dorsal root ganglia of the injured side was significantly increased at each time point throughout the study period. Conclusions These results suggest that sensitization of the dominant nerve in the dorsal root ganglia, which may be caused by cicatrix formation, can protract injured muscle pain. This information may be helpful in elucidating the underlying mechanism of persistent pain after back muscle injury.

  12. Fear of movement/(re)injury and muscular reactivity in chronic low back pain patients : an experimental investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaeyen, Johan W.S.; Seelen, HAM; Peters, Madelon L.; de Jong, Peter; Aretz, E; Beisiegel, E; Weber, WEJ

    1999-01-01

    This experiment was set up to test the hypothesis that confrontation with feared movements would lead to symptom-specific muscular reactivity in chronic low back pain patients who report high fear of movement/(re)injury. Thirty-one chronic low back pain patients were asked to watch a neutral nature

  13. The value of SPECT in the detection of stress injury to the pars interarticularis in patients with low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Grant Frederick D; Curtis Christine; Zukotynski Katherine; Micheli Lyle; Treves S Ted

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The medical cost associated with back pain in the United States is considerable and growing. Although the differential diagnosis of back pain is broad, epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between adult and adolescent complaints. Injury of the pars interarticularis is one of the most common identifiable causes of ongoing low back pain in adolescent athletes. It constitutes a spectrum of disease ranging from bone stress to spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. Bone stress may ...

  14. Can fitness and movement quality prevent back injury in elite task force police officers? A 5-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Stuart; Frost, David; Lam, Thomas; Finlay, Tim; Darby, Kevin; Cannon, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Elite police work has bursts of intense physically demanding work requiring high levels of fitness, or capacity, and movement competency; which are assumed to increase one's injury resilience. The purpose of this study was to follow members of an elite police force (N = 53) to test whether back injuries (N = 14) could be predicted from measures of fitness and movement quality. Measures of torso endurance, relative and absolute strength, hip ROM and movement quality using the Functional Movement Screen(TM) and other dynamic movement tests were obtained from every officer at baseline. When variables were grouped and considered holistically, rather than individually, back injury could be predicted. Seven variables best predicted those who would suffer a back injury (64% sensitivity and 95% specificity for an overall concordance of 87%). Overall, the ability to predict back injury was not high, suggesting that there is more complexity to this relationship than is explained with the variables tested here. Practitioner Summary: Members of elite police forces have exposure to intense physically demanding work. Increased levels of fitness and movement competency have been assumed to increase injury resilience. However, complexity in the interactions between exposure, movement competency, training, fitness and injury may occlude the true relationship between these variables.

  15. Course Setting as a Prevention Measure for Overuse Injuries of the Back in Alpine Ski Racing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Fasel, Benedikt; Aminian, Kamiar; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Background: A combination of frontal bending, lateral bending, and torsion in the loaded trunk has been suggested to be a mechanism leading to overuse injuries of the back in Alpine ski racing. However, there is limited knowledge about the effect of course setting on the aforementioned back-loading patterns. Purpose: To investigate the effect of increased gate offset on the skier’s overall trunk kinematics and the occurring ground-reaction forces and to compare these variables between the competition disciplines giant slalom (GS) and slalom (SL). Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten top-level athletes were divided into GS and SL groups. Both groups performed a total of 240 GS and 240 SL turns at 2 different course settings. The overall trunk movement components (frontal bending, lateral bending, and torsion angle) were measured using 2 inertial measurement units fixed on the sacrum and sternum. Total ground-reaction forces were measured by pressure insoles. Results: In SL, ground-reaction force peaks were significantly lower when the gate offset was increased, while in GS, no differences between course settings were observed. During the turn phase in which the highest spinal disc loading is expected to occur, the back-loading patterns in both GS and SL included a combination of frontal bending, lateral bending, and torsion in the loaded trunk. SL was characterized by shorter turns, lower frontal and lateral bending angles after gate passage, and a trend toward greater total ground-reaction force peaks compared with GS. Conclusion: Course setting is a reasonable measure to reduce the skier’s overall back loading in SL but not in GS. The distinct differences observed between GS and SL should be taken into account when defining discipline-specific prevention measures for back overuse injuries. Clinical Relevance: To reduce the magnitude of the overall back loading, in SL, minimal gate offsets should be avoided. Prevention measures in GS might

  16. Muscle activation imbalance and low-back injury in varsity athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, N Peter; Cholewicki, Jacek; Silfies, Sheri P

    2006-06-01

    There are conflicting findings in the literature regarding erector spinae activation imbalance in people with low-back pain (LBP). Some studies have found asymmetric recruitment between muscle pairs in people with LBP, whilst other studies have not; some reported people with LBP recruit more lumbar muscles whilst other have reported greater thoracic activity. Using 242 varsity athletes, EMG activity of thoracic and lumbar erector spinae pairs was recorded during an isometric trunk extension. Activation imbalance among muscle pairs and levels was compared between athletes with and without a history of low-back injury (HxLBI). There were no group differences in the imbalance between sides, but the HxLBI group had greater activation imbalance between lumbar and thoracic levels than the No HxLBI group. Activation imbalance between levels was similar for individuals with No HxLBI and those who sustained first time injury suggesting that imbalance does not cause LBI. There was no difference between the athletes with single and multiple episode LBI, nor between short and long symptom duration suggesting that the presence of imbalance is not an impairment. Interestingly, activation imbalance occurred in both directions, meaning more thoracic activity for some, and more lumbar activity for others, which might be a functional adaptation related to pathology.

  17. Back pain in space and post-flight spine injury: Mechanisms and countermeasure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayson, Jojo V.; Lotz, Jeffrey; Parazynski, Scott; Hargens, Alan R.

    2013-05-01

    During spaceflight many astronauts experience moderate to severe lumbar pain and deconditioning of paraspinal muscles. There is also a significant incidence of herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in astronauts post-flight being most prevalent in cervical discs. Relief of in-flight lumbar back pain is facilitated by assuming a knee-to-chest position. The pathogenesis of lumbar back pain during spaceflight is most likely discogenic and somatic referred (from the sinuvertebral nerves) due to supra-physiologic swelling of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs) due to removal of gravitational compressive loads in microgravity. The knee-to-chest position may reduce lumbar back pain by redistributing stresses through compressive loading to the IVDs, possibly reducing disc volume by fluid outflow across IVD endplates. IVD stress redistribution may reduce Type IV mechanoreceptor nerve impulse propagation in the annulus fibrosus and vertebral endplate resulting in centrally mediated pain inhibition during spinal flexion. Countermeasures for lumbar back pain may include in-flight use of: (1) an axial compression harness to prevent excessive IVD expansion and spinal column elongation; (2) the use of an adjustable pulley exercise developed to prevent atrophy of spine muscle stabilisers; and (3) other exercises that provide Earth-like annular stress with low-load repetitive active spine rotation movements. The overall objective of these countermeasures is to promote IVD health and to prevent degenerative changes that may lead to HNPs post-flight. In response to "NASA's Critical Path Roadmap Risks and Questions" regarding disc injury and higher incidence of HNPs after space flight (Integrated Research Plan Gap-B4), future studies will incorporate pre- and post-flight imaging of International Space Station long-duration crew members to investigate mechanisms of lumbar back pain as well as degeneration and damage to spinal structures. Quantitative results on morphological, biochemical

  18. [Socioeconomic incidences and prognostic factors of low back pain caused by occupational injuries among the hospital personnel of Grenoble University Hospital Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troussier, B; Lamalle, Y; Charruel, C; Rachidi, Y; Jiguet, M; Vidal, F; Kern, A; De Gaudemaris, R; Phelip, X

    1993-02-01

    Low back pain is generally believed to be common among hospital employees. This cross-sectional, retrospective study was carried out to determine the annual incidence of low back pain ascribable to occupational injuries in hospital employees and to evaluate factors influencing the prognosis of these injuries. In 1989, 70 employees working at the Grenoble Teaching Hospital (GTH) reported an occupational injury responsible for low back pain. Each of these employees filled out an epidemiological questionnaire during a routine evaluation by a rheumatologist. Overall annual incidence of occupational injuries with subsequent low back pain was 1.9% among GTH employees. Higher incidences were seen among employees whose occupations involved patient transfer, as well as among nursing assistants. Activities associated with an increased risk of low back pain included handling of patients or objects and work requiring prolonged periods in uncomfortable positions or in the standing position. A previous history of low back disease and a longer period of time in the current work were also associated with an increased risk of low back pain. Characteristic clinical profiles of patients with low back pain subsequent to occupational injury were determined by occupation and type of hospital department. The analysis of long-duration absence from work and long-term consequences on career confirmed the significant adverse socioeconomic impact of these injuries.

  19. The value of SPECT in the detection of stress injury to the pars interarticularis in patients with low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Frederick D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The medical cost associated with back pain in the United States is considerable and growing. Although the differential diagnosis of back pain is broad, epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between adult and adolescent complaints. Injury of the pars interarticularis is one of the most common identifiable causes of ongoing low back pain in adolescent athletes. It constitutes a spectrum of disease ranging from bone stress to spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. Bone stress may be the earliest sign of disease. Repetitive bone stress causes bone remodeling and may result in spondylolysis, a non-displaced fracture of the pars interarticularis. A fracture of the pars interarticularis may ultimately become unstable leading to spondylolisthesis. Results in the literature support the use of bone scintigraphy to diagnose bone stress in patients with suspected spondylolysis. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT provides more contrast than planar bone scintigraphy, increases the sensitivity and improves anatomic localization of skeletal lesions without exposing the patient to additional radiation. It also provides an opportunity for better correlation with other imaging modalities, when necessary. As such, the addition of SPECT to standard planar bone scintigraphy can result in a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for efficient patient care. It is our expectation that by improving our ability to correctly diagnose bone stress in patients with suspected injury of the posterior elements, the long-term cost of managing this condition will be lowered.

  20. The value of SPECT in the detection of stress injury to the pars interarticularis in patients with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukotynski, Katherine; Curtis, Christine; Grant, Frederick D; Micheli, Lyle; Treves, S Ted

    2010-03-03

    The medical cost associated with back pain in the United States is considerable and growing. Although the differential diagnosis of back pain is broad, epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between adult and adolescent complaints. Injury of the pars interarticularis is one of the most common identifiable causes of ongoing low back pain in adolescent athletes. It constitutes a spectrum of disease ranging from bone stress to spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. Bone stress may be the earliest sign of disease. Repetitive bone stress causes bone remodeling and may result in spondylolysis, a non-displaced fracture of the pars interarticularis. A fracture of the pars interarticularis may ultimately become unstable leading to spondylolisthesis. Results in the literature support the use of bone scintigraphy to diagnose bone stress in patients with suspected spondylolysis. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides more contrast than planar bone scintigraphy, increases the sensitivity and improves anatomic localization of skeletal lesions without exposing the patient to additional radiation. It also provides an opportunity for better correlation with other imaging modalities, when necessary. As such, the addition of SPECT to standard planar bone scintigraphy can result in a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for efficient patient care. It is our expectation that by improving our ability to correctly diagnose bone stress in patients with suspected injury of the posterior elements, the long-term cost of managing this condition will be lowered.

  1. Switching Back to Normal Diet Following High-Fat Diet Feeding Reduces Cardiac Vulnerability to Ischaemia and Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Littlejohns; Hua Lin; Gianni D Angelini; Halestrap, Andrew P.; M. Saadeh Suleiman

    2014-01-01

    Background: We have recently shown that hearts of mice fed high-fat diet exhibit increased vulnerability to ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) in parallel to changes in catalase protein expression, mitochondrial morphology and intracellular diastolic Ca2+. Aims: To determine whether switching from high-fat back to normal diet alters vulnerability to I/R and to investigate cardiac cellular remodelling in relation to the mechanism(s) underlying I/R injury. Methods and Results: Male C57BL/6J mice w...

  2. Additional Effects of Back-Shu Electroacupuncture and Moxibustion in Cardioprotection of Rat Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Min Kathy Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many preclinical studies show that electroacupuncture (EA on PC6 and ST36 can reduce infarct size after ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury. Yet studies to enhance the treatment effect size are limited. The purpose of this study was to explore whether EA has additional myocardial protective effects on an ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury rat model when back-shu EA and moxibustion are added. SD rats were divided into several groups and treated with either EA only, EA + back-shu EA (B, or EA + B + moxibustion (M for 5 consecutive days. Transthoracic echocardiography and molecular and immunohistochemical evaluations were performed. It was found that although myocardial infarct areas were significantly lower and cardiac function was also significantly preserved in the three treatment groups compared to the placebo group, there were no additional differences between the three treatment groups. In addition, HSP20 and HSP27 were expressed significantly more in the treatment groups. The results suggest that adding several treatments does not necessarily increase protection. Our study corroborates previous findings that more treatment, such as prolonging EA duration or increasing EA intensity, does not always lead to better results. Other methods of increasing treatment effect size should be explored.

  3. Blood transfusion : Transfusion-related acute lung injury: back to basics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening disease affecting the lungs. TRALI can develop within 6 hours after transfusion and almost all patients with TRALI require mechanical ventilation at the intensive care department. Nevertheless up to 40% of patients do not recover fr

  4. Low back injury risks during construction with prefabricated (panelised) walls: effects of task and design factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunwook; Nussbaum, Maury A; Jia, Bochen

    2011-01-01

    New technology designed to increase productivity in residential construction may exacerbate the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among residential construction workers. Of interest here are panelised (prefabricated) wall systems (or panels) and facilitating an ongoing effort to provide proactive control of ergonomic exposures and risks among workers using panels. This study, which included 24 participants, estimated WMSD risks using five methods during common panel erection tasks and the influences of panel mass (sheathed vs. unsheathed) and size (wall length). WMSD risks were fairly high overall; e.g. 34% and 77% of trials exceeded the 'action limits' for spinal compressive and shear forces, respectively. Heavier (sheathed) panels significantly increased risks, although the magnitude of this effect differed with panel size and between tasks. Higher levels of risk were found in tasks originating from ground vs. knuckle height. Several practical recommendations based on the results are discussed. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Panelised wall systems have the potential to increase productivity in residential construction, but may result in increased worker injury risks. Results from this study can be used to generate future panel design and construction processes that can proactively address WMSD risks.

  5. The Effect of the Number of Carries on Injury Risk and Subsequent Season’s Performance Among Running Backs in the National Football League

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J.; Belk, John W.; McCarty, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In recent years, several studies have correlated pitch count with an increased risk for injury among baseball pitchers. However, no studies have attempted to draw a similar conclusion based on number of carries by running backs (RBs) in football. Purpose: To determine whether there is a correlation between number of carries by RBs in the National Football League (NFL) and risk of injury or worsened performance in the subsequent season. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: The ESPN NFL statistics archives were searched from the 2004 through 2014 regular seasons. During each season, data were collected on RBs with 150 to 250 carries (group A) and 300+ carries (group B). The following data were collected for each player and compared between groups: number of carries and mean yards per carry during the regular season of interest and the subsequent season, number of games missed due to injury during the season of interest and the subsequent season, and the specific injuries resulting in missed playing time during the subsequent season. Matched-pair t tests were used to compare changes within each group from one season to the next in terms of number of carries, mean yards per carry, and games missed due to injury. Results: During the seasons studied, a total of 275 RBs were included (group A, 212; group B, 63). In group A, 140 RBs (66%) missed at least 1 game the subsequent season due to injury, compared with 31 RBs (49%) in group B (P = .016). In fact, players in group B missed significantly fewer games due to injury during the season of interest (P injury or worsened performance during the subsequent season. These RBs may be generally less injury prone compared with other NFL RBs. PMID:28321427

  6. Army Back Complaint Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-13

    pain as there are doctors, 4 from chiropractic approaches through hypnotism and acupuncture . In the vast majority of cases, low back pain will disappear...initiatives to dispel fears and amc .!ticns about back pain , prmpt recognition and medical zwvaemet of affected aployees, and reduclM back complaints through...installation of ABC Programs. It is designed to be an educational tool to prevent injuries to the back, shoulder, or neck areas primarily as a result of

  7. Risk factors for frequent work-related burn and cut injuries and low back pain among commercial kitchen workers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Shigeru; Muto, Takashi; Matsuzuki, Hiroe; Haruyama, Yasuo; Ito, Akiyoshi; Muto, Shigeki; Haratani, Takashi; Seo, Akihiko; Ayabe, Makoto; Katamoto, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated risk factors for frequent work-related burn and cut injuries and low back pain (LBP) among kitchen workers including personal, work-related and environmental factors. Subjects were 991 kitchen workers in 103 schools, 17 hospitals and nursing homes, and 6 restaurants in central Japan. A cross-sectional survey was carried out using a structured self-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between frequent injuries/LBP and risk factors. The effective response rate was 75.1% (n=744), the mean age was 40.7 (SD 11.7) and 77.2% were female. Burn injury was associated with a smaller kitchen (OR 1.94; 95%CI, 1.13-3.33), and gas kitchens rather than electric kitchens (OR 2.30; 95%CI, 1.17-4.52). LBP was associated with female gender (OR 2.46; 95%CI, 1.37-4.43), high body height (>160 cm) (OR 2.03; 95%CI, 1.22-3.36), and large number of meals produced per person (≥ 150 meals) (OR 1.83; 95%CI, 1.12-3.00). The results of this study suggest that securing adequate work space and introducing electric kitchen systems may reduce the risk to kitchen workers, as well as the importance of adequate height of cooking equipment and selecting an appropriate volume of meals to produce per person to prevent LBP in kitchen workers.

  8. Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  9. Low Back Pain Common Among Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163320.html Low Back Pain Common Among Kids Sports injuries are ... 30, 2017 MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Low back pain is common in school-age American ...

  10. Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can increase your flexibility, strengthen your back and abdominal muscles, and improve your posture. Regular use of these ... best for you. Build muscle strength and flexibility. Abdominal and back muscle exercises (core-strengthening exercises) help condition these muscles ...

  11. Low back pain - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that ...

  12. Coping with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindig, L. E.; Mrvos, S. R.

    Guidelines are offered for the prevention and relief of lower back pain. The structure of the spine is described, and the functions and composition of spinal disks are explained. A list is included of common causes of abnormalities of the spinal column, and injuries which may cause the fracture of the vertebrae are described. Factors causing low…

  13. 射频热凝对腰脊神经后支损伤性腰痛症患者的疗效观察%The clinical effect of radiofrequency on low back pain resulting from lumbar nerve branch injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄建平; 卢斌; 俞武良

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical effects of radiofrequency on low back pain that results from lumbar nerve branch injury.Method 60 cases of low back pain resulting from lumbar nerve branch injury patients were divided into a control group( n=31 ) and an experimental group ( n=29 ) .The two groups were first subjected to treatment with digital subtraction angiography ( DSA) .Then, the control group were treated with conventional therapy while the experimental group were treated with radiofrequency.The waist activities and pain situations of both groups as observed before and after treatment were then compared.Findings As compared with before treatment,the pain as suffered by the patients due to the injury was significantly alleviated in both groups(P<0.05).The rate of successful treatment on waist activity and low back pain was as high as 86.21% (25/29),significantly higher than that of the control group, which was 70.97%.The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).Negative side effects were not found in both groups.Conclusion The therapy of radiofrequency for treating low back pain resulting from lumbar nerve branch injury can effectively improve the patient's waist activity and reduce pain.%目的:采用射频热凝治疗腰脊神经后支损伤性腰痛症患者,观察其临床治疗效果。方法按照治疗方法不同将60例腰脊神经后支损伤性腰痛症患者分为对照组31例与观察组29例。2组患者均于数字减影血管造影( Digital subtraction angiography,DSA)下进行治疗,对照组采用腰脊神经后支常规治疗,观察组采用腰脊神经后射频热凝治疗。比较2组患者治疗前后腰部活动度、疼痛情况。结果2组患者治疗后临床疼痛症状均较治疗前显著改善,且观察组改善更显著(P<0.05);观察组腰部活动度及压痛治疗优良率为86.21%(25/29),显著高于对照组(70.97%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。2组

  14. Who will have Sustainable Employment After a Back Injury? The Development of a Clinical Prediction Model in a Cohort of Injured Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Heather M; Côté, Pierre; Boyle, Eleanor; Hayden, Jill A; Frank, John; Johnson, William G

    2016-11-02

    Purpose Our objective was to develop a clinical prediction model to identify workers with sustainable employment following an episode of work-related low back pain (LBP). Methods We used data from a cohort study of injured workers with incident LBP claims in the USA to predict employment patterns 1 and 6 months following a workers' compensation claim. We developed three sequential models to determine the contribution of three domains of variables: (1) basic demographic/clinical variables; (2) health-related variables; and (3) work-related factors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to develop the predictive models. We constructed receiver operator curves and used the c-index to measure predictive accuracy. Results Seventy-nine percent and 77 % of workers had sustainable employment at 1 and 6 months, respectively. Sustainable employment at 1 month was predicted by initial back pain intensity, mental health-related quality of life, claim litigation and employer type (c-index = 0.77). At 6 months, sustainable employment was predicted by physical and mental health-related quality of life, claim litigation and employer type (c-index = 0.77). Adding health-related and work-related variables to models improved predictive accuracy by 8.5 and 10 % at 1 and 6 months respectively. Conclusion We developed clinically-relevant models to predict sustainable employment in injured workers who made a workers' compensation claim for LBP. Inquiring about back pain intensity, physical and mental health-related quality of life, claim litigation and employer type may be beneficial in developing programs of care. Our models need to be validated in other populations.

  15. 散打后鞭腿训练导致腰方肌损伤的康复对策%Rehabilitation Strategies for Quadratus Lumborum Injury Induced by Back Round Kick Technical Training of Sanda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋宪强; 郝晓光; 张俊刚

    2011-01-01

    During the back round kick technical training,some athletes' quadratus lumborum are injured.With sinusoidal modulated current and protective clothing therapy for fourteen days,the pains of athletes' quadratus lumborum can got over basically.The usual training conditions of those athletes are recovered.Base on the case,the sinusoidal modulated current and protective clothing therapy are a kind of active rehabilitation strategies for quadratus lumborum injury induced by back round kick technical training of Sanda.%文章旨在针对散打后鞭腿训练中出现的队员腰方肌损伤,探讨有效的康复对策。研究方法:采用中频调制电流配合护具等措施,对受伤队员进行2周的康复治疗。研究结果:受伤队员的局部痛感基本消失,恢复了正常的训练。研究结论:对于散打后鞭腿训练中出现的腰方肌损伤,中频调制电流配合护具是有效的康复措施。

  16. Isolation and characterization of two kinds of stem cells from the same human skin back sample with therapeutic potential in spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowen Zong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS AND OBJECTIVE: Spinal cord injury remains to be a challenge to clinicians and it is attractive to employ autologous adult stem cell transplantation in its treatment, however, how to harvest cells with therapeutic potential easily and how to get enough number of cells for transplantation are challenging issues. In the present study, we aimed to isolate skin-derived precursors (SKPs and dermal multipotent stem cells (dMSCs simultaneously from single human skin samples from patients with paraplegia. METHODS: Dissociated cells were initially generated from the dermal layer of skin samples from patients with paraplegia and cultured in SKPs proliferation medium. Four hours later, many cells adhered to the base of the flask. The suspended cells were then transferred to another flask for further culture as SKPs, while the adherent cells were cultured in dMSCs proliferation medium. Twenty-four hours later, the adherent cells were harvested and single-cell colonies were generated using serial dilution method. [(3H]thymidine incorporation assay, microchemotaxis Transwell chambers assay, RT-PCR and fluorescent immunocytochemistry were employed to examine the characterizations of the isolated cells. RESULTS: SKPs and dMSCs were isolated simultaneously from a single skin sample. SKPs and dMSCs differed in several respects, including in terms of intermediate protein expression, proliferation capacities, and differentiation tendencies towards mesodermal and neural progenies. However, both SKPs and dMSCs showed high rates of differentiation into neurons and Schwann cells under appropriate inducing conditions. dMSCs isolated by this method showed no overt differences from dMSCs isolated by routine methods. CONCLUSIONS: Two kinds of stem cells, namely SKPs and dMSCs, can be isolated simultaneously from individual human skin sample from paraplegia patients. Both of them show ability to differentiate into neural cells under proper inducing conditions

  17. Golf and low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    村田, 豊

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar spinal disease is one of the“locomotive syndrome”. Most common disease for advanced people is lumbar spinal canal stenosis(LSCS), on the other hand, most common disease for young adult people is lumbar disc herniation(LDH). Both LSCS and LDH can cause low back pain and severe sciatica of lower extremities. Golf is one of the most favorite sports for any generation worldwide. Sometimes golf can cause low back pain, however we can prevent the injuries of lumbar from playing golf. The ach...

  18. Prevent Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and prevent back pain: Do back-strengthening and stretching exercises at least 2 or 3 times a ... risk of back pain. Do back-strengthening and stretching exercises [PDF - 244 KB] at least 2 or ...

  19. Low Back Pain in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere, G D

    1987-01-01

    In brief: Low back pain in seasoned athletes is not common, but when present it can limit participation. While direct blows or hyperlor-dotic positions can cause low back pain in certain sports, the most common cause is overuse and resultant strains or sprains of the paravertebral muscles and ligaments. Such injuries cause acute pain and spasm, which sometimes do not appear for 24 hours or longer. Diagnosis is based on history, ruling out of systemic maladies, physical examination, and, if necessary, supplemental tests such as x-rays, myelograms, and bone scans. Treatment of low back pain due to overuse is, sequentially, bed rest and ice for 24 to 36 hours, heat and massage, analgesics as needed, and a lumbosacral support until flexion and strengthening exercises have returned the damaged part to normal.

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Go New to Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer ...

  1. Returning to sports after a back injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to return to the sport with your doctor, physical therapist, or other health care providers? Have you been ... a contact sport, talk to your provider and physical therapist about whether you can do this safely. Contact ...

  2. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hurting your back when you exercise. How can pregnancy hormones contribute to back pain? To prepare for the ... of the baby through the birth canal, a hormone relaxes the ligaments in the ... back pain during pregnancy? To help prevent back pain, be aware of ...

  3. The effect of a sports chiropractic manual therapy intervention on the prevention of back pain, hamstring and lower limb injuries in semi-elite Australian Rules footballers: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard Henry; Hoskins Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Hamstring injuries are the most common injury in Australian Rules football. It was the aims to investigate whether a sports chiropractic manual therapy intervention protocol provided in addition to the current best practice management could prevent the occurrence of and weeks missed due to hamstring and other lower-limb injuries at the semi-elite level of Australian football. Methods Sixty male subjects were assessed for eligibility with 59 meeting entry requirements and r...

  4. Back to School Foot Pain (Flip-Flops)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increase in ankle injuries among young athletes. Football, soccer and basketball are the sports most likely to lead to sprains, broken... Foot of the Class After wearing flip-flops all summer, students head back to school with painful ... Soccer Season Prime time for foot and ankle injuries. ...

  5. Medications for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back pain often goes away on its own over several weeks. In some people, back pain persists. It may not go away completely or ... at times. Medicines can also help with your back pain. OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS Over-the-counter ...

  6. Nephrolithiasis in "back-to-back" kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Zachary; King, Ray S; King, Sherita A; Bates, William B; Madi, Rabii

    2013-12-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with a 1-week history of left lower quadrant pain and nausea and vomiting. Computed tomography without contrast demonstrated a left 2.3-cm calculus at the ureteropelvic junction and a 6-mm lower pole calculus. The kidneys were in the pelvis and oriented "back-to-back," with the lateral portions of the kidneys fused in the midline. To our knowledge, this is the first description of this renal fusion anomaly. The patient underwent robotic pyelolithotomy of the ureteropelvic junction calculus and subsequent flexible ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy of the lower pole calculus and ureteral stent placement through the assistant working port.

  7. Back Pain in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadi Kayiran ; Sinan Mahir Kayiran;

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to popular knowledge, back pain is quite frequently seen in children. While very rare in the pre-school age group, frequency reaches 30% in the adolescent period. In many cases, the causes of back pain in childhood cannot be exactly determined and the pain disappears by itself in a short time. It should be remembered that back pain that persists for more than two weeks may be associated with organic causes. Whether or not there have been disruptions in neurological functions should be definitely probed in the medical history. Keeping in mind that back pain could be a part of a systemic disease, a systemic examination should be carried out in cases where there has been long-term back pain. The complaint of childhood back pain should be assessed with a thorough history, a careful physical examination and advanced testing tools. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(1.000: 115-118

  8. Low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitto, Anthony; George, Steven Z; Van Dillen, Linda R; Whitman, Julie M; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Shekelle, Paul; Denninger, Thomas R; Godges, Joseph J

    2012-04-01

    The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has an ongoing effort to create evidence-based practice guidelines for orthopaedic physical therapy management of patients with musculoskeletal impairments described in the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The purpose of these low back pain clinical practice guidelines, in particular, is to describe the peer-reviewed literature and make recommendations related to (1) treatment matched to low back pain subgroup responder categories, (2) treatments that have evidence to prevent recurrence of low back pain, and (3) treatments that have evidence to influence the progression from acute to chronic low back pain and disability.

  9. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Francisco José; de la Cuadra, Crótida; Guillén, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite overuse injuries being previously described as the most frequent in ballet, there are no studies on professional dancers providing the specific clinical diagnoses or type of injury based on the discipline. Hypothesis Overuse injuries are the most frequent injuries in ballet, with differences in the type and frequency of injuries based on discipline. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study performed between January 1, 2005, and October 10, 2010, on injuries occurring in professional dancers from leading Spanish dance companies who practiced disciplines such as classical, neoclassical, contemporary, and Spanish ballet. Data, including type of injury, were obtained from specialized medical services at the Trauma Service, Fremap, Madrid, Spain. Results A total of 486 injuries were evaluated, a significant number of which were overuse disorders (P < .0001), especially in the most technically demanding discipline of classical ballet (82.60%). Injuries were more frequent among female dancers (75.90%) and classical ballet (83.60%). A statistically significant prevalence of patellofemoral pain syndrome was found in the classical discipline (P = .007). Injuries of the adductor muscles of the thigh (P = .001) and of the low back facet (P = .02) in the Spanish ballet discipline and lateral snapping hip (P = .02) in classical and Spanish ballet disciplines were significant. Conclusion Overuse injuries were the most frequent injuries among the professional dancers included in this study. The prevalence of injuries was greater for the most technically demanding discipline (classical ballet) as well as for women. Patellofemoral pain syndrome was the most prevalent overuse injury, followed by Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy, and mechanical low back pain. Clinical Relevance Specific clinical diagnoses and injury-based differences between the disciplines are a key factor in ballet

  10. Injuries from Combat Explosions in Iraq: Injury Type, Location, and Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    caused by explosions will assist in the mitigation, treatment , and rehabilitation of the effects of these injuries . 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...column injury except for cervical vertebral column, trunk, back and buttocks, upper extremity unspecified, hip, upper leg and thigh, knee, other... injuries due to explosions will improve themitigation, treatment , and rehabilitation of combat explosion consequences in survivors. This comprehensive

  11. Back pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed.

  12. Acknowledging the back patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    the back patient the narrative must be complemented by a different perspective that includes the issue of ethical responsibility. It is therefore also a question of adopting certain norms as binding; to be bound by obligation or loyalty. Thus, the literature review argues for a more process......Introduction: A thorough review of qualitative studies has revealed that telling about experiences and perceptions is important for back patients in order to feel accepted and acknowledged. Thus, it has been the aim of this qualitative literature review to investigate what it feels like...... to be a back patient and what back patients consider important when dealing with the healthcare system. Methods: The method draws on James Thomas' and Angela Hardens approach in "Methods for the thematic synthesis of qualitative research in systematic reviews" (2008). The thematic synthesis aims to systematise...

  13. Back pain and sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... core strengthening. Ask your health care provider or physical therapist about these strengthening exercises. If you had a ... the stress off your back include: Ask your physical therapist about the best posture and technique for your ...

  14. Back pain and parenthood.

    OpenAIRE

    Finkelstein, M M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that reports of back pain in a working population are associated with parenthood. METHODS--A questionnaire survey of back pain in municipal fire fighters and police officers in a municipality in Ontario, Canada. The questionnaire was distributed to current employees of fire and police departments. The survey was completed by 129 fire fighters (68% of the active force) and 346 police officers (74% of the force). RESULTS--36% of the respondents complained of a ...

  15. Epidural injections for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... be pregnant What medicines you are taking, including herbs, supplements, and other drugs you bought without a ...

  16. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  17. A Research on Neck Movement and Injury After Driver Backs to Seat in the Later Stage of Frontal Crash%正面碰撞后期驾驶员复位后颈部运动与伤害的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪亮; 葛如海

    2015-01-01

    In view of the present situation of the lack of research on the neck injury in the later stage of crash process after driver backs to seat with his waist pressing against seat back under the actions of air bag reaction force and the constraint force of seat belt, the movement states of driver’s upper and lower necks is studied to ana-lyze the effects of seat parameters on neck injuries. To this end, based on the related dimension of passenger com-partment and performance parameters of a car, a simulation model for the constraint system of driver is built with crash simulation software MADYMO and a simulation is conducted and verified by tests. The results indicate that the peak stretch bending moment of upper neck decreases with the reduction of headrest stiffness while decreasing the stiffness of upper seat back and the rotational stiffness of seatback recliner can significantly reduce the peak stretch bending moments of both upper and lower neck and neck injury indicators Nkm and Nij . Reasonably increasing the forward inclination of headrest can greatly reduce the peak stretch bending moment of lower neck, but over doing may lead to the increase of neck injury indicators.%针对目前国内外对正面碰撞后期,驾驶员在安全气囊反弹力与安全带约束力作用下,向后复位运动,其腰部与座椅靠背接触后的颈部伤害研究很少的现状,进行了驾驶员上、下颈部运动状态研究,并分析座椅特征参数对颈部伤害的影响。为此以某型轿车乘员室相关尺寸和性能参数为依据,采用碰撞仿真软件 MADYMO 建立了驾驶员约束系统仿真模型,并进行仿真与试验验证。结果表明:减小座椅头枕刚度,可降低上颈部伸张弯矩峰值;减小靠背上部刚度与靠背倾角调节器转动刚度,可显著降低上、下颈部伸张弯矩峰值和颈部伤害指标 Nkm与 Nij;增加头枕前倾角,可大幅降低下颈部伸张弯矩峰值,但过大的头

  18. Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  19. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  20. Acknowledging the back patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup Jørgensen, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    the back patient the narrative must be complemented by a different perspective that includes the issue of ethical responsibility. It is therefore also a question of adopting certain norms as binding; to be bound by obligation or loyalty. Thus, the literature review argue for a more process-oriented patient......#296 Acknowledging The Back Patient. A Thematic Synthesis Of Qualitative Research. A Systematic Literature Review. Janne Brammer Damsgaard1, Lene Bastrup Jørgensen1, Annelise Norlyk2, Regner Birkelund3 1. Health, Section for Nursing, Aarhus University & Research Unit, Elective Surgery Centre......, Silkeborg Regional Hospital, Regional Hospital Central Jutland, Silkeborg, Denmark 2. Health, Section for Nursing, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark 3. University of Southern Denmark & Vejle Sygehus, Vejle, Denmark keywords:Back Patient, Narrative, Biomedical, Marginalisation, Self-Identity, Ethical...

  1. Myofascial low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsook, Ryan R; Malanga, Gerard A

    2012-10-01

    Low back pain is a common condition that is encountered by both primary care physicians as well as various specialists, which include: orthopedic surgeons, physical medicine and rehabilitation specialists, neurologists, rheumatologists, and pain management specialists. Associated muscular pain is very common and often a reactive response from nociception from other structures. Myofascial pain may arise, which is characterized by the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) that are located in fascia, tendons, and/or muscle. This article reviews the current evidence regarding the pathophysiology, assessment, and recommended treatment options for myofascial low back pain.

  2. Decontamination: back to basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Susan J; Sjorgen, Geoff

    2008-07-01

    My invitation from this Journal's Editor, Felicia Cox, to provide a paper for this themed issue, included the sentence 'I was wondering if you or a colleague would like to contribute a back to basics article on the relevant standards and guidelines for decontamination, including what is compliance?'. The reason it is so interesting to me is that the term 'back to basics' implies reverting to a simpler time in life - when by just sticking to the rules, life became easier. However, with decontamination this is not actually true.

  3. Injury Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certification Import Safety International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury ...

  4. Acknowledging the back patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise;

    and reluctant to speak out. Therefore, telling about experiences and perceptions is important for back patients in order to feel accepted and acknowledged. The health professionals must incorporate the patients’ narratives as an integral part of the care and treatment. Conclusions: In order to acknowledge...

  5. Rect-O-Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Garg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This document presents an approach towards developing an electronics device and a software application to maintain the correct body posture which is a mobile solution to keep our back strong and healthy. It presents the designing and functioning of equipment and software.

  6. Back to Normal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Xinjiang officials speed up the investigation of July 5 riot suspects and restore social order Life in Urumqi has gone back to normal one month after the July 5 riot that killed nearly 200 people in the capital city of China’s northwestern

  7. Hartford's gun buy-back program: are we on target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Laura W; Thaker, Shefali; Borrup, Kevin; Shapiro, David S; Bentley, George C; Saleheen, Hassan; Lapidus, Garry; Campbell, Brendan T

    2013-09-01

    Gunbuy-backprograms have been proposed as away to remove unwanted firearms from circulation, but remain controversial because their ability to prevent firearm injuries remains unproven. The purpose of this study is to describe the demographics of individuals participating in Connecticut's gun buy-backprogram in the context of annual gun sales and the epidemiology of firearm violence in the state. Over four years the buy-back program collected 464 firearms, including 232 handguns. In contrast, 91,602 firearms were sold in Connecticut during 2009 alone. The incidence of gun-related deaths was unchanged in the two years following the inception of the buy-back program. Suicide was associated with older age (mean = 51 +/- 18years) and Caucasian race (n = 539, 90%). Homicide was associated with younger age (mean = 30 +/- 12 years) and minority race (n = 425, 81%). A gun buy-back program alone is not likely to produce a measurable decrease in firearm injuries and deaths.

  8. Visceral injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, D H; Blaisdell, F W

    1992-06-01

    Abdominal visceral injuries are encountered by every surgeon who deals with trauma. It is simple and useful to divide abdominal visceral injuries into those caused by penetrating mechanisms of injury and those due to blunt mechanisms. Determination of the need for operative intervention is generally easier after penetrating trauma. Gunshot wounds to the abdomen should be explored, as should stab wounds to the anterior abdomen that penetrate the fascia. A midline incision is the standard approach to abdominal visceral injuries because of its ease and versatility. Abdominal exploration should be consistent and systemic so as not to miss significant injuries. Hollow viscus injury is most common after penetrating injury, while blunt injury most often results in injury to solid viscera. Diagnostic and operative aspects of the treatment of specific visceral injuries are reviewed.

  9. Backed up and gone...

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    Remember how easy it is to lose your passwords for web applications (“Don’t let Chrome expose your passwords”)? This time we go bigger and discuss how easy it is to lose the passwords for every wireless access point you’ve visited. You just need to be running Android on your smartphone…   Apparently, Google was already capturing wireless access points during its Streetview campaign but was forced to stop this after complaints from data protection advocates. It was done “mistakenly”. With Google’s Android now dominating the smartphone market, they’re back to their old tricks. As a useful feature, Android (version 2.2 and higher) stores the identifiers (“SSIDs”) of wireless access points and credentials by default, so that you do not have to reissue them on every connection. The interesting part happens when the smartphone is automatically backed up to Google'...

  10. /Au Back Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Naba R.; Compaan, Alvin D.; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of CdTe thin-film solar cells with Cu-free MoO3- x /Au back contacts. CdTe solar cells with sputtered CdTe absorbers of thicknesses from 0.5 to 1.75 μm were fabricated on Pilkington SnO2:F/SnO2-coated soda-lime glasses coated with a 60- to 80-nm sputtered CdS layer. The MoO3- x /Au back contact layers were deposited by thermal evaporation. The incorporation of MoO3- x layer was found to improve the open circuit voltage ( V OC) but reduce the fill factor of the ultrathin CdTe cells. The V OC was found to increase as the CdTe thickness increased.

  11. Back to School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Osmond

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Back to School of the title refers to post- school or second chance education in America. Mike Rose’s focus is on adult remedial (sic and occupational education.  However, although he writes about America, it is hard not to read this little book without a constant alternative reading of second chance learning or Technical and Further Education in the Australian context.

  12. Incidence of injury in kickboxing participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaine, Linda J; Davis, Shala E; Casebolt, Kevin; Harrison, Kelly A

    2003-08-01

    Cardio kickboxing classes have become a popular form of exercise to enhance fitness. This study surveyed kickboxing participants and instructors to ascertain the severity, type, and incidence of injuries sustained while performing cardio kickboxing exercise. The respondents consisted of 77.4% instructors and 29.3% participants with a mean age of 32.29 years (+/-8.98 years). Injury from kickboxing exercise was reported by 29.3% of the respondents, 31% of the instructors, and 15.5% of the participants. The most common site of injury for instructors was the back, followed by the knee, hip, and shoulder. The most common site of injury for participants was the back, knee, and ankle. Strains were the most common type of injury reported, followed by sprains and tendinitis. More than half of the injuries reported were new injuries (64%), with almost 59% of the total injuries reported causing a disruption of the normal exercise routine or an alteration of normal daily activities. Instructors who reported using music speeds greater than 140 beats per minute had a higher incidence of injury, compared with instructors who used music between 125 and 139 beats per minute. The wrist and elbow had the highest percentage of new injuries reported. This study suggests that kickboxing exercise can be a safe form of exercise for fitness purposes. Keeping music speeds below 140 beats per minute and limiting the number of kickboxing sessions per week may help to reduce injury rates.

  13. Biomechanics of front and back squat exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidot, A. A.; Brusa, M. H.; Lestussi, F. E.; Parera, G. P.

    2007-11-01

    Squat constitutes one of the most popular exercises to strengthen the muscles of the lower limbs. It is considered one of the most widely spread exercises for muscle sport training and is part of the competition movements comprised within olympic weight-lifting. In physical rehabilitation, squats are used for muscular recovery after different injuries of the lower limbs, especially the knee. In previous anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the mini-squats are generally used, in a knee flexion motion range from 0° to 50° because in this range the shear forces, the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compression forces decrease related to greater flexion angles. The aim of this work is to make a comparative bidimensional study of the kinematic and dynamic variables of the excecution of the parallel squat exercise with the front and back bar. It is observed in the knee a better development of energy with the front bar, allowing a better muscular exercise with the same load. The mean power absorbed by the hip with the back bar is considerably greater, associated to the speed of the gesture.

  14. Biomechanics of front and back squat exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braidot, A A [Laboratorio de Biomecanica FI-UNER. Ruta 11 Km 10 Oro Verde Entre Rios (Argentina); Brusa, M H [Laboratorio de Biomecanica FI-UNER. Ruta 11 Km 10 Oro Verde Entre Rios (Argentina); Lestussi, F E [Laboratorio de Biomecanica FI-UNER. Ruta 11 Km 10 Oro Verde Entre Rios (Argentina); Parera, G P [Licenciatura en KinesiologIa y FisiatrIa Universidad Abierta Interamericana. Sede Regional Rosario (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Squat constitutes one of the most popular exercises to strengthen the muscles of the lower limbs. It is considered one of the most widely spread exercises for muscle sport training and is part of the competition movements comprised within olympic weight-lifting. In physical rehabilitation, squats are used for muscular recovery after different injuries of the lower limbs, especially the knee. In previous anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the mini-squats are generally used, in a knee flexion motion range from 0 deg. to 50 deg. because in this range the shear forces, the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compression forces decrease related to greater flexion angles. The aim of this work is to make a comparative bidimensional study of the kinematic and dynamic variables of the excecution of the parallel squat exercise with the front and back bar. It is observed in the knee a better development of energy with the front bar, allowing a better muscular exercise with the same load. The mean power absorbed by the hip with the back bar is considerably greater, associated to the speed of the gesture.

  15. [Aiming at the chest, but hitting the back].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Axmann, Stefan; Siegenthaler, Lea; Kneubühl, Beat; Thali, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Gunshot injuries in the back may suggest the unjustified use of firearms. A wound in the back inflicted by a firearm should not automatically imply that the shooter aimed at the back. A previous study demonstrated that it is possible for men to turn their trunk faster than it takes for a shooter to fire or throw a hand-operated weapon. With a high speed motion camera the authors were able to demonstrate that it is also possible for women to turn their trunk fast enough, so that a shot in the back could have been aimed at the front of the body. This conclusion is also likely to apply to hand-operated or thrown weapons, since the velocity of their projectiles is considerably lower than that of firearms.

  16. Radiographic Assessment for Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiographic Assessment for Back Pain What are Radiographic Assessments? When Should I get an X-ray for Low Back Pain? Other Reasons for Having an X-ray What ... What are Radiographic Assessments? Radiographic assessments for low back pain involve the use of X-rays to determine ...

  17. Back complaints in older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Scheele (Jantine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWith the aging of the Dutch population, the number of older aged back pain patients is also expected to increase. However, information on the course and prognosis of older patients with back pain in general practice is very scarce. Back pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, also in

  18. Back to basics audio

    CERN Document Server

    Nathan, Julian

    1998-01-01

    Back to Basics Audio is a thorough, yet approachable handbook on audio electronics theory and equipment. The first part of the book discusses electrical and audio principles. Those principles form a basis for understanding the operation of equipment and systems, covered in the second section. Finally, the author addresses planning and installation of a home audio system.Julian Nathan joined the audio service and manufacturing industry in 1954 and moved into motion picture engineering and production in 1960. He installed and operated recording theaters in Sydney, Austra

  19. Paschen is Partially Back

    CERN Document Server

    Stift, M J

    2008-01-01

    We present a discussion of the partial Paschen-Back (PB) effect in magnetic Ap stars. An overview of the theory is illustrated with examples of how splittings deviate non-linearly from the simple Zeeman picture; normally forbidden ``ghost lines'' appear in strong fields. Resulting asymmetric stellar Stokes profiles for a dipolar magnetic geometry are shown for the FeII 6149 line and it is established that PB lines may be subject to wavelength shifts. Modelling of Stokes profiles in the PB regime opens exciting new diagnostics.

  20. Paschen is Partially Back

    OpenAIRE

    Stift, M. J.; Leone, F.

    2008-01-01

    We present a discussion of the partial Paschen-Back (PB) effect in magnetic Ap stars. An overview of the theory is illustrated with examples of how splittings deviate non-linearly from the simple Zeeman picture; normally forbidden ``ghost lines'' appear in strong fields. Resulting asymmetric stellar Stokes profiles for a dipolar magnetic geometry are shown for the FeII 6149 line and it is established that PB lines may be subject to wavelength shifts. Modelling of Stokes profiles in the PB reg...

  1. Paschen is partially Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stift, M. J.; Leone, F.

    2008-04-01

    We present a discussion of the partial Paschen-Back (PB) effect in magnetic Ap stars. An overview of the theory is illustrated with examples of how splittings deviate non-linearly from the simple Zeeman picture; normally forbidden "ghost lines" appear in strong fields. Resulting asymmetric stellar Stokes profiles for a dipolar magnetic geometry are shown for the FeI λ6149 line and it is established that PB lines may be subject to wavelength shifts. Modelling of Stokes profiles in the PB regime opens exciting new diagnostics.

  2. Back Pain and Modic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manniche, Claus; jordan, alan; mikkelsen, connie

    . Many of these patients will become free of pain and disability! This book provides readers with a thorough review of the latest information regarding Modic changes that the Danish research group was primarily responsible for after 10 years of intensive research. The book explains what the research...... results can mean for back pain patients and information is provided as to how Modic changes take place and develop as well developments that took place such that we are now able to provide effective treatment for more than 50% of patients that have been diagnosed with Modic changes type 1. Readers...

  3. The Poster Strikes Back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusses fundamental issues in relation to placing graphic design in locations such as museums of decorative arts and living history museums. Based on my Ph.D. project on British commercial posters of the interwar years and approached from a combined perspective of museology, semiotics...... and design history, I argue that the poster during the interwar years inhabits a new active position. By exploiting and challenging the commercial and aesthetic paradox out of which it arose, the poster ‘strikes back' as a museologized, exhibited object. Rather than being absorbed into the city swirl...

  4. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATV) Safety Balance Disorders Knowing Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: Baseball Concussions Concussions: Getting Better Sports and Concussions Dealing ...

  5. Ear Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ...

  6. Genital injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... each side of a bar, such as a monkey bar or the middle of a bicycle Symptoms ... Names Scrotal trauma; Straddle injury; Toilet seat injury Images Female reproductive anatomy Male reproductive anatomy Normal female ...

  7. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bursitis . Symptoms of bursitis in the knee include warmth, tenderness, swelling, and pain on the front of ... injury without the aid of a television screen. Physical Therapy Depending on the type of knee injury ...

  8. Injuries in elite Taekwondo Poomsae athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mohsen; Ingar, Anas; Jaffery, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Poomsae is the only non-contact and no opponent form of Taekwondo. The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the type and rate of injuries in elite Canadian Poomsae athletes. Strain and joint dysfunction were the most common types of injuries in Poomsae. Lower limb and back were the most common area of injury in females and males respectively. Females with a lower rank in experience level (DAN≤ 3) were more likely to suffer from chronic overuse injuries compared to their male counterparts, who reported more acute injuries. Athletes ≤40 years of age were more prone to acute injuries compared to athletes over 40. As result of reflection on this study a Poomsae Injury Report Form was developed. PMID:28065994

  9. Orienteering injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering.

  10. Spine injuries in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschlich, Laura M; Young, Craig C

    2011-01-01

    Care of a dancer calls for a unique balance between athlete and artist. The physician must familiarize himself or herself with dance terminology, common moves, correct technique, and dancer's mentality. The goal is to work intimately with the dancer to care for the injury and, if possible, continue to participate in portions of dance class to limit anxiety and increase compliance to treatment. The spine is the second most injured area of the body in dancers, and many issues stem from poor technique and muscle imbalance. This often leads to hyperlordosis, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, lumbar facet sprain, discogenic back pain, and muscle spasm and piriformis syndrome. This article reviews these causes of low back pain with a focus on dance-related presentation and treatment issues.

  11. Back from Sestriere

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Jean-Yves Le Meur during the Special Slalom at the Paralympic Winter Games on 19 March. (Photo credit: G. Place and B. Loyseau) CERN's Olympian, Jean-Yves Le Meur (IT Department), is back from Sestriere after competing in the Paralympic Winter Games in the sitting skiing competition. Ranked 14th after his first run in the Special Slalom, Jean-Yves had an excellent second run which brought him right up the field. He eventually finished ninth, 11 seconds off the gold medal place. In the Giant Slalom, he unfortunately fell in the final gates of his second run, having reached 10th position in his first run. With about 50 top athletes from all the competing nations contesting each event, the competition was stiff, and our warmest congratulations go to Jean-Yves for his participation and great performance!

  12. Bicycling injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  13. The epidemiology of schoolboy rugby injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, C E; Goedeke, R; Visser, G R; van Zyl, W A; Noakes, T D

    1987-03-07

    During one 18-week season, in which players from 26 high schools played 3,350 rugby matches, 495 injuries prevented players from participating in rugby for at least 1 week; 71% occurred during matches and 29% during practices. Injury was more common during the first 4 weeks of the season and again in the same time period after the mid-season vacation. At all ages, A-team players suffered the greatest number of injuries. The safest playing positions were tight-forward and scrum-half; the most dangerous loose-forward and in the back-line excluding the scrum-half. Overall, eightmen were the most often injured players. Of all injuries 55% occurred while the player was tackling or being tackled and 18% during the loose scrum/maul. The lower limb (37%), the head and neck (29%) and the upper limb (20%) were most commonly injured, and fractures (27%), ligament/tendon injuries (25%) and muscle injuries (17%) were commonest. However, concussion injuries were underreported in 19 of the 26 schools. This study shows: that monitoring rugby injuries through correspondence results in underreporting of injuries; that rugby injuries show specific trends with age, team level, playing position, time of the season and phase of play; and that players in the different positions suffer specific injuries in predictable phases of the game. Speed of play may be the most important aetiological factor in the majority of rugby injuries.

  14. Prevalence of Injury in Ultra Trail Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliaropoulos Nikolaos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the study was to find the rate of musculoskeletal injuries in ultra-trail runners, investigate the most sensitive anatomical areas, and discover associated predicting factors to aid in the effective prevention and rapid rehabilitation of trail running injuries. Methods. Forty ultra trail runners responded to an epidemiological questionnaire. Results. At least one running injury was reported by 90% of the sample, with a total of 135 injuries were reported (111 overuse injuries, 24 appeared during competing. Lower back pain was the most common source of injury (42.5%. Running in the mountains (p = 0.0004 and following a personalized training schedule (p = 0.0995 were found to be protective factors. Runners involved in physical labor are associated with more injuries (p = 0.058. Higher-level runners are associated with more injuries than lower-level cohorts (p = 0.067, with symptoms most commonly arising in the lower back (p = 0.091, hip joint (p = 0.083, and the plantar surface of the foot (p = 0.054. Experienced runners (> 6 years are at greater risk of developing injuries (p = 0.001, especially in the lower back (p = 0.012, tibia (p = 0.049, and the plantar surface of the foot (p = 0 .028. Double training sessions could cause hip joint injury (p = 0.060. Conclusions. In order to avoid injury, it is recommended to train mostly on mountain trails and have a training program designed by professionals.

  15. Injury - kidney and ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney damage; Toxic injury of the kidney; Kidney injury; Traumatic injury of the kidney; Fractured kidney; Inflammatory injury of the kidney; Bruised kidney; Ureteral injury; Pre-renal failure - injury, ...

  16. Trajectories of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axén, Iben; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain is not a self-limiting problem, but rather a recurrent and sometimes persistent disorder. To understand the course over time, detailed investigation, preferably using repeated measurements over extended periods of time, is needed. New knowledge concerning short-term trajectories...... indicates that the low back pain 'episode' is short lived, at least in the primary care setting, with most patients improving. Nevertheless, in the long term, low back pain often runs a persistent course with around two-thirds of patients estimated to be in pain after 12 months. Some individuals never have...... low back pain, but most have it on and off or persistently. Thus, the low back pain 'condition' is usually a lifelong experience. However, subgroups of patients with different back pain trajectories have been identified and linked to clinical parameters. Further investigation is warranted...

  17. Back pain during growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Carol C

    2013-01-08

    It is wrong to believe that back pain only burdens adults: the yearly incidence during growth ranges from 10-20%, continuously increasing from childhood to adolescence. Rapid growth-related muscular dysbalance and insufficiency, poor physical condition in an increasingly sedentary adolescent community or - vice versa - high level sports activities, account for the most prevalent functional pain syndromes. In contrast to adults the correlation of radiographic findings with pain is high: the younger the patient, the higher the probability to establish a rare morphologic cause such as benign or malignant tumours, congenital malformations and infections. In children younger than 5 years old, the likelihood is more than 50%. The following red flags should lower the threshold for a quick in-depth analysis of the problem: Age of the patient 4 weeks, history of tumour, exposition to tuberculosis, night pain and fever. High level sport equals a biomechanical field test which reveals the biologic individual response of the growing spine to the sports-related forces. Symptomatic or asymptomatic inhibitory or stimulatory growth disturbances like Scheuermann disease, scoliosis or fatigue fractures represent the most frequent pathomorphologies. They usually occur at the disk-growth plate compound: intraspongious disk herniation, diminuition of anterior growth with vertebral wedging and apophyseal ring fractures often occur when the biomechanical impacts exceed the mechanical resistance of the cartilaginous endplates. Spondylolysis is a benign condition which rarely becomes symptomatic and responds well to conservative measures. Associated slippage of L5 on S1 is frequent but rarely progresses. The pubertal spinal growth spurt is the main risk factor for further slippage, whereas sports activity - even at a high level - is not. Therefore, the athlete should only be precluded from training if pain persists or in case of high grade slips. Perturbance of the sagittal profile with

  18. Myofascial low back pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Deepak; Rajkumar, Joshua Samuel; Mohandoss, Mathankumar; Ranganathan, Rameshkumar

    2014-09-01

    Myofascial pain is a common musculoskeletal problem, with the low back being one of the commonest affected regions. Several treatments have been used for myofascial low back pain through physical therapies, pharmacologic agents, injections, and other such therapies. This review will provide an update based on recently published literature in the field of myofascial low back pain along with a brief description of a sequenced, multidisciplinary treatment protocol called Skilled Hands-on Approach for the Release of myofascia, Articular, Neural and Soft tissue mobilization (SHARANS) protocol. A comprehensive multidisciplinary approach is recommended for the successful management of individuals with myofascial low back pain.

  19. Physics Back in TIME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunsky, Boris

    2014-03-01

    Recently, I came into possession of an unusual item: a collection of 1928 TIME magazines. I began flipping through the pages out of sheer curiosity—and was soon astonished by the scale and the depth of their physics coverage. Back then, TIME had a special "Science" section in almost every issue and devoted quite a bit of space to the events that would hardly be mentioned in any popular magazine these days. Some of them were fleeting and merely curious, some truly timeless. Many of the articles and notes were devoted to physics: the people, the discoveries, the inventions, the conventions. I found the reading both entertaining and enlightening and would like to offer a sampler here. I hope that these little tidbits of history will lighten up the classroom discussions and help inspire your students by reminding them that physics is a dynamic, ever-changing field to which they may well contribute one day. I have found that my own students love it when a little bit of history is brought up; it always generates interesting questions and seems to spark the students' interest in the topic.

  20. Predictors of Back Injury Among Women Military Recruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    infection (by history, physical, or laboratory examination) 4. Ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis or other rheumatoid or connective tissue...Force recruits: a multimillion-dollar epidemic. Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism. 1993;22(4):275-279. 8. Fiymoyer J., Mooney V. Current concepts...pain. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins. 1989. 46. Kendall P, Jenkins J. Exercises for backache: A double-blind controlled trial. Physiotherapy . 1968;54

  1. Paragliding injuries.

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Pförringer, W

    1991-01-01

    Regulations controlling the sport of paragliding were issued in April 1987 by the German Department of Transportation. The growing popularity of this sport has led to a steady increase in the number of associated injuries. This study presents the incidence, localization and degree of injuries associated with paragliding documented in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The 283 injuries suffered by 218 paragliders were documented in the period 1987-1989: 181 occurred during landing, 28 during st...

  2. Gymnastics injuries and imaging in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Marc S

    2009-12-01

    Injuries of children participating in gymnastics are seen less often than in more popular sports. Patterns of injury are predictable based upon sex, age and level of intensity of training and competition. More injuries are seen in girls than in boys, and the great majority of early adolescents who compete have wrist pain. Some otherwise quiescent congenital spine anomalies may be uncovered by the stress of gymnastics maneuvers and present with low back pain. In addition to diagnosis of injuries, imaging can be used to guide analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapy in some injured athletes. Parents whose children wish to participate in gymnastics should understand that fewer injuries occur in the child enjoying recreational gymnastics than in competing gymnasts. More gymnastics injuries are found in very competitive athletes training at higher levels.

  3. Gymnastics injuries and imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Marc S. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Injuries of children participating in gymnastics are seen less often than in more popular sports. Patterns of injury are predictable based upon sex, age and level of intensity of training and competition. More injuries are seen in girls than in boys, and the great majority of early adolescents who compete have wrist pain. Some otherwise quiescent congenital spine anomalies may be uncovered by the stress of gymnastics maneuvers and present with low back pain. In addition to diagnosis of injuries, imaging can be used to guide analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapy in some injured athletes. Parents whose children wish to participate in gymnastics should understand that fewer injuries occur in the child enjoying recreational gymnastics than in competing gymnasts. More gymnastics injuries are found in very competitive athletes training at higher levels. (orig.)

  4. Paragliding injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Pförringer, W

    1991-06-01

    Regulations controlling the sport of paragliding were issued in April 1987 by the German Department of Transportation. The growing popularity of this sport has led to a steady increase in the number of associated injuries. This study presents the incidence, localization and degree of injuries associated with paragliding documented in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The 283 injuries suffered by 218 paragliders were documented in the period 1987-1989: 181 occurred during landing, 28 during starting procedures and nine during flight. The mean patient age was 29.6 years. There were 34.9% spinal injuries, 13.4% upper extremity injuries and 41.3% lower limb injuries. Over half of these injuries were treated surgically and in 54 instances permanent disability remained. In paragliding the lower extremities are at greatest risk of injury during landing. Proper equipment, especially sturdy footwear, exact training in landing techniques as well as improved instruction in procedures during aborted or crash landings is required to reduce the frequency of these injuries.

  5. Back Facts: A Training Workbook to Prevent Back Injuries in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on chair). Footrest releases (avoids hazards from tripping, scraping and extra leaning to transfer resident). Wheelchairs Removable ... Website You are exiting the Department of Labor's Web server. The Department of Labor does not endorse, ...

  6. Low Back Pain Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... day in a chair with inadequate back support. Mental health factors : Pre-existing mental health issues such as anxiety and depression can influence ... is particularly important for persons with skeletal irregularities. Health care ... benefits of yoga to ease chronic low back pain. Physical therapy ...

  7. Going back to Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchfield, R

    1985-01-01

    decline in the death rate, especially in infant mortality, and an increase in life expectancy have meant a rise in annual overall growth back to the present 1.9-2.2%. Despite the present disappointment, Indonesia's government-sponsored family planning campaigns have shown how village culture can be harnessed to promote change.

  8. Peeling Back the Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image of the rock target named 'Mazatzal' on sol 77 (March 22, 2004). It is a close-up look at the rock face and the targets that will be brushed and ground by the rock abrasion tool in upcoming sols. Mazatzal, like most rocks on Earth and Mars, has layers of material near its surface that provide clues about the history of the rock. Scientists believe that the top layer of Mazatzal is actually a coating of dust and possibly even salts. Under this light coating may be a more solid portion of the rock that has been chemically altered by weathering. Past this layer is the unaltered rock, which may give scientists the best information about how Mazatzal was formed. Because each layer reveals information about the formation and subsequent history of Mazatzal, it is important that scientists get a look at each of them. For this reason, they have developed a multi-part strategy to use the rock abrasion tool to systematically peel back Mazatzal's layers and analyze what's underneath with the rover's microscopic imager, and its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers. The strategy began on sol 77 when scientists used the microscopic imager to get a closer look at targets on Mazatzal named 'New York,' 'Illinois' and 'Arizona.' These rock areas were targeted because they posed the best opportunity for successfully using the rock abrasion tool; Arizona also allowed for a close-up look at a range of tones. On sol 78, Spirit's rock abrasion tool will do a light brushing on the Illinois target to preserve some of the surface layers. Then, a brushing of the New York target should remove the top coating of any dust and salts and perhaps reveal the chemically altered rock underneath. Finally, on sol 79, the rock abrasion tool will be commanded to grind into the New York target, which will give scientists the best chance of observing Mazatzal's interior. The Mazatzal targets were named after the home states of

  9. Whiplash injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard; Peter, Jason

    2005-10-01

    Whiplash injuries are very common and usually are associated with rear-end collisions. However, a whiplash injury can be caused by any event that results in hyperextension and flexion of the cervical spine. These injuries are of serious concern to all consumers due to escalating cost of diagnosis, treatment, insurance, and litigation. Most acute whiplash injury cases respond well to conservative treatments, which result in resolution of symptoms usually within weeks to a few months after the injury occurred. Chronic whiplash injuries often are harder to diagnose and treat and often result in poor outcomes. Current research shows that various structures in the cervical spine receive nociceptive innervation and potentially may be the cause of chronic pain symptoms. One potential pain generator showing promise is the facet or zygapophyseal joints. Various researchers have proven that these joints are injured during whiplash injuries and that diagnosis and temporary pain relief can be obtained with facet joint injections. The initial evaluation of any patient should follow an organized and stepwise approach, and more serious causes of neck pain must first be ruled out through the history, physical examination, and diagnostic testing. Treatment regimens should be evidence-based, focusing on treatments that have proven to be effective in treating acute and chronic whiplash injuries.

  10. Ocular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye and face protection is essential to prevent injuries. Sports such as hockey, baseball, racquet ball, squash, and shooting require protective goggles or full face mask wear at all times. Do fireworks still cause eye injuries? Each year hundreds of individuals (often children) sustain ...

  11. Injury profile in junior tennis players: a prospective two year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, Nina; Werner, Suzanne; Renstrom, Per

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively make a survey of injuries in junior players from a Swedish local tennis club during a 2-year period in relation to gender, anatomic location, month of the year when injured, injury type and injury severity. All 12-18 years old members in a tennis club playing more than twice weekly were asked to participate. Fifty-five junior tennis players, 35 boys and 20 girls accepted to participate. All tennis-related injuries were prospectively registered and evaluated. Time of exposure for playing tennis was recorded. Thirty-nine players sustained 100 injuries, 73 in boys and 27 in girls. Injury incidence for boys was 1.7 injuries/1000 h of tennis playing time and for girls 0.6 injuries/1000 h. Ankle sprains, low back pain and knee injuries were the most common ones. Sixty-five percent were new injuries, and the majority of these injuries were located at the knee joint followed by the ankle joint, while most of the recurrent injuries were found in the lumbar spine. Boys suffered mainly from low back pain and ankle injuries and girls from low back pain and knee injuries. Forty-three percent of the injuries caused absence from tennis for more than 4 weeks and 31% more than 1 week.

  12. Prevention of occupational Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan T Al-Otaibi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews scientific research on occupational back pain and focuses on prevention of this problem. It discusses some of the challenges of translating the evidence of this multi-factorial condition into policy. Medical science is currently unable to clearly distinguish between back pain caused by work and that possibly due to other causes but which affects the individual′s capacity to work. Back pain affects the vast majority of people at some point in their lives and is very costly to both the health care system and the industry. Evidence suggests that heavy lifting, driving, and vibration of the whole body are linked to occupational back pain. Once the risk factors for occupational back pain are identified, an otherwise chronic and disabling condition can be prevented in the majority of patients. As explained in this article, three levels of prevention for occupational back pain have been reported as effective. Failure to implement preventive measures may lead to a high incidence of occupational back pain.

  13. Rigorously Assessing Whether the Data Backs the Back School

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A rigorous between-subjects methodology employing independent random samples and having broad clinical applicability was designed and implemented to evaluate the effectiveness of back safety and patient transfer training interventions for both hospital nurses and nursing assistants. Effects upon self-efficacy, cognitive, and affective measures are assessed for each of three back safety procedures. The design solves the problem of obtaining randomly assigned independent controls where all expe...

  14. Retrospective Injury Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Injury in CrossFit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo, Alicia M.; Shaefer, Hilary; Rodriguez, Belinda; Li, Tan; Epnere, Katrina; Myer, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine injury epidemiology and risk factors for injury in CrossFit athletes. A survey was administered to athletes at four owner-operated facilities in South Florida. Respondents reported number, location of injury, and training exposure from the preceding six months and answered questions regarding potential risk factors for injury. Fifty out of 191 athletes sustained 62 injuries during CrossFit participation in the preceding six months. The most frequently injured locations were the shoulder, knee, and lower back. Injury incidence was 2.3/1000 athlete training hours. Competitors were more likely to be injured (40% v 19%, p = 0.002) and had greater weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 7.0 v 4.9 ± 2.9, p gymnastics and powerlifting. While being a competitor was related to injury, increased exposure and length of participation in CrossFit likely underlied this association. Specifically, increased exposure to training in the form of greater weekly athlete training hours and weekly participations may contribute to injury. Increased height and body mass were also related to injury which is likely reflective of increased load utilized during training. Further research is warranted to determine if biomechanical factors associated with greater height and ability to lift greater loads are modifiable factors that can be adapted to reduce the increase risk of injury during CrossFit. Key points The overall rate of injury in CrossFit athletes was 2.3/1000 athlete training hours. The shoulder, knee, and lower back were the most frequently reported locations of injury. In adjusted models, length of participation in CrossFit, physical activity outside of CrossFit, weekly athlete-exposures to CrossFit, and height were associated with injury in CrossFit athletes. PMID:28344451

  15. Multifactorial assistive device intervention to prevent low back pain among caregivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Bjørnskov; Brandt, Åse

    2011-01-01

    Caregivers are among those professionals who experience the highest incidence of low back pain and low back injuries, and one of the most frequently described reasons for this is person transfers. This paper reports on a controlled intervention study in two Danish municipalities with perceived...... strain during person transfer, self reported low back pain and low back injuries as main outcomes. The intervention was implemented in one municipality consisting of maximum use of assistive devices for person transfer combined with organizational changes. The other municipality served as control group....... The study population consisted of all permanently employed caregivers in the two municipalities, and data was collected by means of a questionnaire at baseline and after 10 months of follow-up. At follow-up the caregivers in the intervention group reported lower perceived strain during person transfer...

  16. Back Bay Wilderness area description

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a description of the lands located within the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Within these lands, it designates which area is suitable for...

  17. The Limits to Giving Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade S. Sasser

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this thematic section, authors consider the limitations on giving back that they faced in field research, or saw others face. For some authors, their attempts at giving back were severely limited by the scope of their projects, or their understandings of local cultures or histories. For others, very specific circumstances and historical interventions of foreigners in certain places can limit how and to what extent a researcher is able to have a reciprocal relationship with the participating community. Some authors, by virtue of their lesser positions of power relative to those that they were studying, simply decided not to give back to those communities. In each article it becomes apparent that how and in what ways people give back is unique (and limited both to their personal values and the contexts in which they do research.

  18. Imaging in mechanical back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Brandt; Hansen, Philip; Carrino, John A;

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is common and relates to a variety of overlapping pathologies. Within the last few decades, almost every medical imaging modality has been applied in the evaluation of low back pain. Imaging of the spine has a high priority in the assessment of patients with low back pain, who seem...... and symptoms hampers the ability of clinicians to devise a specific treatment plan for the patient. Therefore, there is mounting interest in new imaging techniques of the lumbar spine that may increase the clinical correlation in low back pain. In this review, we will discuss the value and limitations...... to expect such procedures to be undertaken. However, the majority of conventional imaging techniques do not have adequate precision to identify the primary source of pain. Not only can this be frustrating to both clinicians and patients, but importantly, inadequate correlation between imaging findings...

  19. Chiropractic care for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000416.htm Chiropractic care for back pain To use the sharing ... discussed in your first session. What Conditions Does Chiropractic Treat Best? Chiropractic treatment is most effective for: ...

  20. Back pain - when you see the doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007494.htm Back pain - when you see the doctor To use the ... you first see your health care provider for back pain, you will be asked about your back pain, ...

  1. Lower Back Pain Symptom Checker Flowchart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the back. Some causes and treatment of back pain are described in this chart.Our trusted Symptom ... Problems Hip Problems Knee Problems Leg Problems Lower Back Pain Menstrual Cycle Problems Mouth Problems Mouth Problems in ...

  2. Complete Localization of HVDC Back-to-Back Project Realized

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xinqiang; Liang Xuming; Wang Zuli; Ye Qing

    2006-01-01

    The first completely localized DC back-to-back project for asynchronous interconnection between Northwest and Central China plays an important role in realizing national power grid interconnection, spurring indigenous manufacturing industries and promoting DC transmission equipment. Insisting on the principle of autonomous innovation, this project was based on domestic forces in every aspect, from engineering organization, system design, equipment completion, engineering design, equipment manufacturing and procurement to construction and debugging. By passing through strict quality control, intermediate supervision and acceptance test and assessment, the project has been proved up to world advanced level.

  3. The impact of drywall handling tools on the low back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jennifer A; Kincl, Laurel D; Davis, Kermit

    2010-03-01

    Carpenters and other construction workers who install drywall have high rates of strains and sprains to the low back and shoulder. Drywall is heavy and awkward to handle resulting in increased risk of injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate several low-cost coupling tools that have the potential to reduce awkward postures in drywall installers. Five coupling tools were evaluated using the Lumbar Motion Monitor that measures trunk kinematics and predicts probability of low back disorder group membership risk (LBD risk). Workers answered surveys about their comfort while using each tool. The results indicate that use of the 2-person manual lift and the J-handle provide the best reduction in awkward postures, motions, low back sagittal moment, and LBD risk. The two-person manual lift appears to be the safest method of lifting and moving drywall, though using the two-person J-handle also significantly reduces injury risk. Given that carpenters are skeptical about using equipment that can get in the way or get lost, a practical recommendation is promotion of two-person manual lifting. For single-person lifts, the Old Man tool is a viable option to decrease risk of MSDs.

  4. Spine injuries in the sport of gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, David; Lemmen, Brooke

    2009-01-01

    Injury in gymnastics is not an uncommon occurrence, and an injury of the spine frequently is a source of pain in a gymnast. Because of the unique demands of this sport, which repetitively place significant forces across the spine, it becomes clear why the spine commonly is injured. Potential causes of back pain in a gymnast include spondylolysis, Scheuermann's disease, intervertebral disc pathology, and mechanical sources of pain. Much of the diagnostic workup and management of spondylolysis lesions remains controversial, but a successful management strategy can be developed for the safe return of a gymnast to the mat. Mechanical sources of pain are common and should be addressed. Psychosocial etiologies of back pain also exist in these athletes. Rehabilitation strategies should focus on improvement in the strength and function of the trunk and lumbar spine and the correction of biomechanical deficits with a goal of pain-free transition back to gymnastic-specific activities.

  5. Use of medications in the treatment of acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard A; Dennis, Robin L

    2006-01-01

    The prescription of medications continues to be one of the mainstays of treatment of acute low back pain episodes. The goals of the pharmacologic treatment for acute low back are reduction of pain and return of normal function. Often, nociception is a result of secondary inflammation and muscle spasm after acute injury of a structure of the spine, which may include muscle, tendon, ligament, disc, or bone. An understanding of the appropriate use of medications to address the underlying pain generator and the current evidence for using these medications is essential for any physician who sees and treats patients with acute low back pain.

  6. Post-Flight Back Pain Following International Space Station Missions: Evaluation of Spaceflight Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Back pain during spaceflight has often been attributed to the lengthening of the spinal column due to the absence of gravity during both short and long-duration missions. Upon landing and re-adaptation to gravity, the spinal column reverts back to its original length thereby causing some individuals to experience pain and muscular spasms, while others experience no ill effects. With International Space Station (ISS) missions, cases of back pain and injury are more common post-flight, but little is known about the potential risk factors.

  7. Injury risk factors in junior tennis players: a prospective 2-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, N; Werner, S; Renstrom, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim was to investigate injury risk factors in junior tennis players. Fifty-five players, 35 boys and 20 girls, answered a questionnaire about training habits, time of exposure, previous injuries and equipment factors. A battery of clinical tests and functional performance tests were also carried out. All tennis-related injuries that occurred during a 2-year period were identified and recorded. An injury was defined as an injury if it was impossible to participate in regular tennis training or playing matches during at least one occasion, a time loss injury. Potential injury risk factors were tested in a forward stepwise logistic regression model for injury. Thirty-nine players sustained totally 100 new and recurrent injuries. Injuries to the lower extremity were the most common ones (51%) followed by the upper extremity (24%) and the trunk (24%). Injured players performed more singles per week (P<0.0001) and played more tennis hours per year (P=0.016) than the uninjured players. Playing tennis more than 6 h/week was found to be a risk factor for back pain. A previous injury regardless of location was identified as an injury risk factor, and a previous injury to the back was a risk factor for back pain.

  8. Initial Back-to-Back Fission Chamber Testing in ATRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin Chase; Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe

    2014-06-01

    Development and testing of in-pile, real-time neutron sensors for use in Materials Test Reactor experiments is an ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility has sponsored a series of projects to evaluate neutron detector options in the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC). Special hardware was designed and fabricated to enable testing of the detectors in the ATRC. Initial testing of Self-Powered Neutron Detectors and miniature fission chambers produced promising results. Follow-on testing required more experiment hardware to be developed. The follow-on testing used a Back-to-Back fission chamber with the intent to provide calibration data, and a means of measuring spectral indices. As indicated within this document, this is the first time in decades that BTB fission chambers have been used in INL facilities. Results from these fission chamber measurements provide a baseline reference for future measurements with Back-to-Back fission chambers.

  9. Laid Back Avant-Garde

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn Johansson, Troels

    2010-01-01

    This paper seeks to discuss in serious terms a statement made in the late 1980ies by Danish film director Lars von Trier—that Danish pop-duo Laid Back for him, at the time, should be considered a prominent example of contemporary avant-garde art. At the time, von Triers’ statement was deliberately...... controversial. Whereas Laid Back has been one of the largest commercial successes of the Danish music industry due to the success of a handful of pop hits (in Germany, mainly), the duo has never been recognized for its artistic contribution. A few years after his public statement, von Trier directed...

  10. The Impact of Obesity on Back and Core Muscular Endurance in Firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Mayer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between obesity and measures of back and core muscular endurance in firefighters. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted in career firefighters without low back pain. Obesity measures included body mass index (BMI and body fat percentage assessed with air displacement plethysmography. Muscular endurance was assessed with the Modified Biering Sorensen (back and Plank (core tests. Relationships were explored using t-tests and regression analyses. Results. Of the 83 participants enrolled, 24 (29% were obese (BMI ≥ 30. Back and core muscular endurance was 27% lower for obese participants. Significant negative correlations were observed for BMI and body fat percentage with back and core endurance (r = −0.42 to −0.52. Stepwise regression models including one obesity measure (BMI, body fat percentage, and fat mass/fat-free mass, along with age and self-reported physical exercise, accounted for 17–19% of the variance in back muscular endurance and 29–37% of the variance in core muscular endurance. Conclusions. Obesity is associated with reduced back and core muscular endurance in firefighters, which may increase the risk of musculoskeletal injuries. Obesity should be considered along with back and core muscular endurance when designing exercise programs for back pain prevention in firefighters.

  11. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Patient Health Information News media interested in ... should receive immediate medical attention. Prevention Of Facial Sports Injuries The best way to treat facial sports injuries ...

  12. Back office to box office

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haigh, Matthew

    sees a mounting unsecured debt where its members see practical value. Between the two, a steward who may not profit from its office delegates it to back-office agents whose fiduciary management is engendered by box office-sized bonuses. Standard theorisation has foundered. The architecture...

  13. Chiropractic management of back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, M

    1983-05-01

    The vast majority of those with back pain respond extremely well to chiropractic spinal manipulation. There are several hundred procedures available to a well trained chiropractor, including high velocity manipulation, mobilisation, soft tissue techniques and pressure point therapy, which may be used to eliminate the need for manipulation under anaesthesia or surgery.

  14. Low back pain and yoga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is chronic low back pain, one of the most common reasons to visit one's primary care doctor. Complementary approaches, including yoga, will be addressed.

  15. Birth Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Commentary Recent News Scientists Working on Solar-Powered Prosthetic Limbs Exercise a Great Prescription to Help Older Hearts Bavencio Approved for Rare Skin Cancer Older Mothers May Raise Better-Behaved Kids, Study ... lying in an abnormal position in the uterus before birth. Overall, the rate of birth injuries is much lower now than in previous decades because of improved ...

  16. Correlations in back-to-back hadron production in SIDIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakian, Harut [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pisano, Silvia [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LNF)

    2016-08-01

    The Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) proved to be a great tool in testing of the theory of strong in- teractions. Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS), with detection of an additional hadron allowed first stud- ies of 3D structure of the nucleon, moving the main focus from testing the QCD to understanding of strong interactions and quark gluon dynamics to address a number of puzzles accumulated in recent years. Detection of two hadrons in SIDIS, which is even more complicated, provides ac- cess to details of quark gluon interactions inaccessible in single-hadron SIDIS, providing a new avenue to study the complex nucleon structure. Large acceptance of the CLAS detector at Jef- ferson Lab, allowing detection of two hadrons, produced back-to-back (b2b) in the current and target fragmentation regions, provides a unique possibility to study the nucleon structure in target fragmentation region, and correlations of target and current fragmentation regions

  17. Injury rates and injury risk factors among federal bureau of investigation new agent trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knapik Joseph J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A one-year prospective examination of injury rates and injury risk factors was conducted in Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI new agent training. Methods Injury incidents were obtained from medical records and injury compensation forms. Potential injury risk factors were acquired from a lifestyle questionnaire and existing data at the FBI Academy. Results A total of 426 men and 105 women participated in the project. Thirty-five percent of men and 42% of women experienced one or more injuries during training. The injury incidence rate was 2.5 and 3.2 injuries/1,000 person-days for men and women, respectively (risk ratio (women/men = 1.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.9-1.7. The activities most commonly associated with injuries (% of total were defensive tactics training (58%, physical fitness training (20%, physical fitness testing (5%, and firearms training (3%. Among the men, higher injury risk was associated with older age, slower 300-meter sprint time, slower 1.5-mile run time, lower total points on the physical fitness test (PFT, lower self-rated physical activity, lower frequency of aerobic exercise, a prior upper or lower limb injury, and prior foot or knee pain that limited activity. Among the women higher injury risk was associated with slower 300-meter sprint time, slower 1.5-mile run time, lower total points on the PFT, and prior back pain that limited activity. Conclusion The results of this investigation supported those of a previous retrospective investigation emphasizing that lower fitness and self-reported pain limiting activity were associated with higher injury risk among FBI new agents.

  18. Cross-border firing and injury patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nital Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cross-border firing are increasingly being common in the modern era. The injuries resulting from these low intensity conflicts are a source of anxiety among treating physicians and their respective governments. The provisions are required to minimise the suffering of the victims viz. Mode of injuries, mortality patterns, adequacy of treatment at pre-hospital and tertiary care hospital and provisions to decrease morbidity and mortality for the people living in these areas. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in GMCH, Jammu who suffered injuries due to cross border firing in the month of October, 2014. 68 patients were reported in the causality wing. All the patients were referred from level 2 trauma centre. There were 51 males and 17 females out of which 5 were children. The cause of injury, involvement of organ system, cause of mortality and morbidity and loopholes in prehospital management were identified. Results: Sharpnel were the most common cause of injury followed by indirect trauma. The common cause of mortality was abdominal and thoracic injuries. There were 4 deaths at hospital 2 of which were brought dead and 2 died during the course of treatment. There were twenty patients with extremity injuries, fourteen with chest trauma, eleven with abdomen including parineal injuries, three with head injuries, eight with ENT injuries, three with eye injuries and nine with splinters in the back out of which two were in the spinal canal. Conclusion: Prehospital stabilisation, early transport, in-transit resuscitation, immediate surgery if required and implementation of triage model and ATLS protocol has been the key to reduce mortality and morbidity.

  19. Some observations on whiplash injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R W

    1992-11-01

    Motor vehicle accidents with a whiplash mechanism of injury are one of the most common causes of neck injuries, with an incidence of perhaps 1 million per year in the United States. Proper adjustment of head restraints can reduce the incidence of neck pain in rear-end collisions by 24%. Persistent neck pain is more common in women by a ratio of 70:30. Whiplash injuries usually result in neck pain owing to myofascial trauma, which has been documented in both animal and human studies. Headaches, reported in 82% of patients acutely, are usually of the muscle contraction type, often associated with greater occipital neuralgia and less often temporomandibular joint syndrome. Occasionally migraine headaches can be precipitated. Dizziness often occurs and can result from vestibular, central, and cervical injury. More than one third of patients acutely complain of paresthesias, which frequently are caused by trigger points and thoracic outlet syndrome and less commonly by cervical radiculopathy. Some studies have indicated that a postconcussion syndrome can develop from a whiplash injury. Interscapular and low back pain are other frequent complaints. Although most patients recover within 3 months after the accident, persistent neck pain and headaches after 2 years are reported by more than 30% and 10% of patients. Risk factors for a less favorable recovery include older age, the presence of interscapular or upper back pain, occipital headache, multiple symptoms or paresthesias at presentation, reduced range of movement of the cervical spine, the presence of an objective neurologic deficit, preexisting degenerative osteoarthritic changes; and the upper middle occupational category. There is only a minimal association of a poor prognosis with the speed or severity of the collision and the extent of vehicle damage. Whiplash injuries result in long-term disability with upward of 6% of patients not returning to work after 1 year. Although litigation is very common and always

  20. Nutrition, illness, and injury in aquatic sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, David B; Verhagen, Evert A; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    In this review, we outline key principles for prevention of injury and illness in aquatic sports, detail the epidemiology of injury and illness in aquatic athletes at major international competitions and in training, and examine the relevant scientific evidence on nutrients for reducing the risk of illness and injury. Aquatic athletes are encouraged to consume a well-planned diet with sufficient calories, macronutrients (particularly carbohydrate and protein), and micronutrients (particularly iron, zinc, and vitamins A, D, E, B6, and B12) to maintain health and performance. Ingesting carbohydrate via sports drinks, gels, or sports foods during prolonged training sessions is beneficial in maintaining energy availability. Studies of foods or supplements containing plant polyphenols and selected strains of probiotic species are promising, but further research is required. In terms of injury, intake of vitamin D, protein, and total caloric intake, in combination with treatment and resistance training, promotes recovery back to full health and training.

  1. Dancers' perceptions of pain and injury: positive and negative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Helen; Tarr, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Two hundred and four dance students, professionals, and former dancers in the UK completed questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, and a body scanning and mapping process aimed at gaining an increased understanding of how dancers interpret pain and its relationship to injury in the context of their careers. The research was targeted at modern and contemporary dancers, as they are an underrepresented group in the dance-injury literature. Results from the questionnaires were compared with other studies of dance injury, drawing on qualitative data where relevant. Findings indicated that 90% of the sample had experienced an injury (now or in the past), and that the lower back and knee were among the most common sites of current pain and injury. Qualitative descriptions of pain and injury indicated that dancers tend to define injury as something that stops them from dancing or from moving normally. Dance injury rates do not appear to be decreasing significantly, despite greater awareness and the promotion of the "healthier dancer" in dance training schools, universities and among professionals in the UK. There is evidence to show that as dancers age they are likely to be more aware of the warning signs of injury and to take steps to prevent it. Data indicated that dancers may under report injuries on surveys, suggesting that such self-reported survey data should be treated with caution. Further qualitative research on dance injuries may provide more useful understanding of dancers' interpretations and treatment of pain and injury.

  2. Interdigitated back contact solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, M. S.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1980-08-01

    The interdigitated back contact solar cell (IBC cell) was shown to possess a number of advantages for silicon solar cells, which operate at high concentration. A detailed discussion of the factors which need to be considered in the analysis of semiconducting devices which utilize heavily doped regions such as those which are found in solar cells in both the emitter and in the back surface field regions is given. This discussion covers the questions of: how to handle degeneracy, how to compute carrier concentrations in the absence of knowledge of the details of the band structure under heavily doped conditions, and how to reconcile the usual interpretation of heavy doping as a rigid shift of the bands with the band tailing and impurity level conduction models. It also discusses the reasons for the observed discrepancies between various experimental measurements of bandgap narrowing.

  3. [Back ache in helicopter pilots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, S; Jovelić, S; Manojlović, J

    1992-01-01

    Due to low back pain (LBP) and harmful effects of flying, questionnaires were sent to 71 helicopter pilots of the experimental group, 22 mechanics helicopter flyers and to the control group of 28 air-traffic controllers. The prevalence of LBP was the highest in helicopter pilots, then in helicomechanics and air-traffic controllers (53%, 50% and 36%). Effects of exposure to vibration, body posture and working load have not contributed significantly to the occurrence of LBP. LBP has not lead to an important difference in the strength of the back musculature, body mass index and spondylosis, that is, scoliosis. The necessity of further study of LBP and maintaining of specific preventive measures are indicated.

  4. Overuse Injury: How to Prevent Training Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Sports_Injuries/sports_injuries_ff.asp. Accessed Dec. 21, 2015. Tips for ... cfm?topic=A00132. Accessed Dec. 21, 2015. Overuse injury. The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/overuse-injury.aspx. ...

  5. Improvement of chronic back pain or failed back surgery with vitamin D repletion: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews 6 selected cases of improvement/resolution of chronic back pain or failed back surgery after vitamin D repletion in a Canadian family practice setting. Pub Med was searched for articles on chronic back pain, failed back surgery, and vitamin D deficiency. Chronic low back pain and failed back surgery may improve with repletion of vitamin D from a state of deficiency/insufficiency to sufficiency. Vitamin D insufficiency is common; repletion of vitamin D to normal levels in patients who have chronic low back pain or have had failed back surgery may improve quality of life or, in some cases, result in complete resolution of symptoms.

  6. Retrospective Injury Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Injury in CrossFit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo, Alicia M; Shaefer, Hilary; Rodriguez, Belinda; Li, Tan; Epnere, Katrina; Myer, Gregory D

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the study is to examine injury epidemiology and risk factors for injury in CrossFit athletes. A survey was administered to athletes at four owner-operated facilities in South Florida. Respondents reported number, location of injury, and training exposure from the preceding six months and answered questions regarding potential risk factors for injury. Fifty out of 191 athletes sustained 62 injuries during CrossFit participation in the preceding six months. The most frequently injured locations were the shoulder, knee, and lower back. Injury incidence was 2.3/1000 athlete training hours. Competitors were more likely to be injured (40% v 19%, p = 0.002) and had greater weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 7.0 v 4.9 ± 2.9, p CrossFit and location of injuries were similar to those previously reported. Injury incidence was similar to related sports, including gymnastics and powerlifting. While being a competitor was related to injury, increased exposure and length of participation in CrossFit likely underlied this association. Specifically, increased exposure to training in the form of greater weekly athlete training hours and weekly participations may contribute to injury. Increased height and body mass were also related to injury which is likely reflective of increased load utilized during training. Further research is warranted to determine if biomechanical factors associated with greater height and ability to lift greater loads are modifiable factors that can be adapted to reduce the increase risk of injury during CrossFit.

  7. Forward-Thinking Tips for Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_163118.html Forward-Thinking Tips for Back Pain Certain behaviors can reduce your risk, doctor says ... 19, 2017 WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Back pain is common but not inevitable, an orthopedist says. ...

  8. Prevention: The Best Treatment for Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DO Video Library Prevention: The Best Treatment for Back Pain Page Content A n estimated 50 million Americans ... natural tendency toward self-healing. Tips to Minimize Back Pain Here are some tips for preventing or minimizing ...

  9. Injuries in students of three different dance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echegoyen, Soledad; Acuña, Eugenia; Rodríguez, Cristina

    2010-06-01

    As with any athlete, the dancer has a high risk for injury. Most studies carried out relate to classical and modern dance; however, there is a lack of reports on injuries involving other dance techniques. This study is an attempt to determine the differences in the incidence, the exposure-related rates, and the kind of injuries in three different dance techniques. A prospective study about dance injuries was carried out between 2004 and 2007 on students of modern, Mexican folkloric, and Spanish dance at the Escuela Nacional de Danza. A total of 1,168 injuries were registered in 444 students; the injury rate was 4 injuries/student for modern dance and 2 injuries/student for Mexican folkloric and Spanish dance. The rate per training hours was 4 for modern, 1.8 for Mexican folkloric, and 1.5 injuries/1,000 hr of training for Spanish dance. The lower extremity is the most frequent structure injured (70.47%), and overuse injuries comprised 29% of the total. The most frequent injuries were strain, sprain, back pain, and patellofemoral pain. This study has a consistent medical diagnosis of the injuries and is the first attempt in Mexico to compare the incidence of injuries in different dance techniques. To decrease the frequency of student injury, it is important to incorporate prevention programs into dance program curricula. More studies are necessary to define causes and mechanisms of injury, as well as an analysis of training methodology, to decrease the incidence of the muscle imbalances resulting in injury.

  10. [Pattern of injuries and prophylaxis in paragliding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, W; Hesse, B; Blatter, G; Schmidtler, B; Muhr, G

    2000-06-01

    This study will present trends and recommendations to increase active and passive safety in paragliding on the basis of current state-of-the-art equipment and typical patterns of injury. This German-Swiss teamwork presents data of 55 male and 9 female patients treated after paragliding accidents between 1994 to 1998 respectively 1996 to 1998. 43.7% of the pilots presented with multiple injuries, 62.5% suffered spinal fractures and 18.8% pelvic fractures. 28.4% of the injured pilots were admitted with injuries of the lower extremities mainly affecting the tarsus or the ankle joint. Only three patients with single injuries could be treated in an ambulatory setting. 54.0% of the injuries left the patients with lasting functional residues and complaints. Main causes of accidents were either pilot error in handling the paraglider or general lack of awareness about potential risk factors. 46.0% of injuries occurred during landing, 42.9% of injuries during the flight and another 11.1% of injuries during starting procedures. With noticeable enhanced performance sails of the beginners and intermediate level are increasingly popular. Protective helmets and sturdy footwear reaching above the ankle joint are indispensable pieces of equipment. The use of protective gloves is highly recommended. Back protection devices of the new generation provide the best passive prophylaxis for the pilot against pelvic and spinal cord injuries. This area hold the most promise for increasing safety and reducing risk of injury in future, apart from using beginners and intermediate wings. After acquisition of the pilot license performance and security training provide the best preparing to master unforeseeable situations.

  11. Fast Facts: What Is Back Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Chinese 繁體中文 ) What Is Back Pain? (in Korean 한국어 ) What Is Back Pain? (in Vietnamese bằng ... type of back pain. Behavior Changes You can learn to lift, push, and pull with less stress ...

  12. [My Back is Still Hurting!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Jäckel, Kristian; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph A; Öhlschlegel, Christian

    2015-05-20

    We present the case of a 39-year-old man who reported to the primary care physician for low back pain. Pain persisted despite extensive assessment and therapy. During the course, bilateral femoral neck fractures occurred and due to multiple enrichments in scintigraphy chronic multifocal (sterile) osteomyelitis was suspected. In the further follow-up the appropriate diagnosis of osteomalacia was established in bone biopsy and adequate treatment with Vitamin D was initiated. During therapy, the patient was free of pain or discomfort.

  13. LHC Report: Back in operation

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With the machine back in their hands since Friday, 4 March, the LHC operators are now performing the powering tests on the magnets. This is a crucial step before receiving the first beams and restarting Run 2 for physics.   A Distribution Feed-Box (DFB) brings power to the LHC magnets and maintains the stability of the current in the superconducting circuits. The LHC was the last machine to be handed back to operators after the completion of maintenance work carried out during the Year-End Technical Stop (YETS) that had started on 14 December 2015. During the eleven weeks of scheduled maintenance activities, several operations took place in all the accelerators and beam lines. They included the maintenance in several points of the cryogenic system, the replacement of 18 magnets in the Super Proton Synchrotron; an extensive campaign to identify and remove thousands of obsolete cables; the replacement of the LHC beam absorbers for injection (TDIs) that are used to absorb the SPS b...

  14. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis;

    2006-01-01

    Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical....... Until now no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether supervised Nordic Walking can reduce pain and improve function in a population of chronic low back pain patients...

  15. Physical Mechanisms of Soft Tissue Injury from Penetrating Ballistic Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    2008; 64(6):1420-1426. 18. Gryth D, Rocksen D, Persson JK, Arborelius UP, Drobin D, Bursell J, Olsson LG, Kjellstrom BT. Severe lung contusion and...elastic tissues such as lungs and muscle, where the tissue tends to spring back into place with little damage from temporary stretch, most tissue...in a study comparing penetrating thoracic wounds caused by stab injuries to those caused by gunshot injuries, the occurrence of lung

  16. Brain injury - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and caregivers. Biausa.org. www.biausa.org/brain-injury-family-caregivers.htm#Manage the Home . Accessed December 8, 2016. ... Caregiver Alliance; National Center on Caregiving. Traumatic brain injury. ... www.caregiver.org/traumatic-brain-injury . Accessed ...

  17. Growth Plate Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Growth Plate Injuries? Key Words Information Box The Salter-Harris Classification of Growth Plate Injuries What Is ... of Growth Plate Injuries? Since the 1960s, the Salter-Harris classification, which divides most growth plate fractures ...

  18. Dealing with Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for falling accidents, such as horseback riding and gymnastics. Head injuries include fractures, concussions , contusions (bruises), and ... hockey, or in weightlifting, rowing, golf, figure skating, gymnastics, and dancing. Sex Organ Injuries Injuries to the ...

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  20. "Floating shoulder" injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kenneth

    2016-12-01

    "Floating shoulder" is a rare injury complex resulting from high-energy blunt force trauma to the shoulder, resulting in scapulothoracic dissociation. It is commonly associated with catastrophic neurovascular injury. Two cases of motorcyclists with floating shoulder injuries are described.

  1. Eye Injuries in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Sports Which sports cause the most eye injuries?Sports cause more than 40,000 eye injuries each ... and racquet sports.When it comes to eye injuries, sports can be classified as low risk, high risk ...

  2. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes ... this PDF Share this page: WHAT ARE COMMON KNEE INJURIES? Pain Syndromes One of the most common ...

  3. Injuries in orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, F

    1986-09-01

    In a one-year prospective study of 42 elite orienteers, 73 recent injuries (1.7 per runner per year) were found. Acute injuries totalled 52% and 48% were due to overuse. Ankle sprains made up 37% of acute injuries while the remaining were mainly contusions caused by falls or bumps against branches or rocks. Medial shin pain, Achilles peritendinitis, peroneal tenosynovitis and iliotibial band friction syndrome were the most frequent overuse injuries. All overuse injuries were located in the lower extremity while 18% of acute injuries was located elsewhere. Acute injuries were most frequent in the competitive season while overuse injuries occurred most often during the continuous training period.

  4. Sports injuries of the ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, G A

    1972-07-01

    The author describes common sports injuries involving the ear. Such injuries include hematoma, lacerations, foreign bodies (tattoo), and thermal injuries. Ear canal injuries include swimmer's ear and penetrating injuries. Tympanum injuries include tympanic membrane perforations, ossicular discontinuity, eustachian tube dysfunction, temporal bone fractures and traumatic facial nerve palsy. Inner ear injuries include traumatic sensorineural deafness. The author emphasizes the management of these injuries.

  5. Sacral insufficiency fractures: an easily overlooked cause of back pain in the ED.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, John G

    2011-03-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures are an important and treatable cause of severe back pain. Despite publication of several case reports since its original description in 1982, awareness of these injuries remains inadequate in emergency medicine. Most patients are elderly women presenting with intractable lower back pain. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most significant risk factor. Marked sacral tenderness is common. Neurologic impairment is rarely detectable. Routine radiography of the spine and pelvis is usually inconclusive. Computed tomography remains the diagnostic modality of choice. Treatment is usually conservative.

  6. DBMSs Should Talk Back Too

    CERN Document Server

    Simitsis, Alkis

    2009-01-01

    Natural language user interfaces to database systems have been studied for several decades now. They have mainly focused on parsing and interpreting natural language queries to generate them in a formal database language. We envision the reverse functionality, where the system would be able to take the internal result of that translation, say in SQL form, translate it back into natural language, and show it to the initiator of the query for verification. Likewise, information extraction has received considerable attention in the past ten years or so, identifying structured information in free text so that it may then be stored appropriately and queried. Validation of the records stored with a backward translation into text would again be very powerful. Verification and validation of query and data input of a database system correspond to just one example of the many important applications that would benefit greatly from having mature techniques for translating such database constructs into free-flowing text. ...

  7. Back to the 80s

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2010-01-01

    The fitness club is organizing a “Back to the 80s Party” in aid of the Haiti earthquake appeal on Saturday 26.06.2010 in the Pump Room.   There’s an 80s theme, so our pro DJ will be spinning 80s tunes (all tastes catered for), Morpho will be powering the visuals and the car club will be cooking-up a bbq in case you’re peckish. Fancy dress 1980s style is welcome, though not obligatory and it kicks off just after 'music on the lawn' finishes at 20.30. Its open to anyone working at CERN, friends and family. There’s a limited number of tickets and it’s entrance by ticket only, we are selling them on Thurs lunchtimes in R1 12.15 – 13.30 for 5CHF. For more information contact fitness.club@cern.ch.

  8. Overuse injuries in classical ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, K; Brown, J; Way, S; Vass, N; Crichton, K; Alexander, R; Baxter, A; Butler, M; Wark, J

    1995-05-01

    Successful management of classical ballet dancers with overuse injuries requires an understanding of the art form, precise knowledge of anatomy and awareness of certain conditions. Turnout is the single most fundamental physical attribute in classical ballet and 'forcing turnout' frequently contributes to overuse injuries. Common presenting conditions arising from the foot and ankle include problems at the first metatarsophalangeal joint, second metatarsal stress fractures, flexor hallucis longus tendinitis and anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes. Persistent shin pain in dancers is often due to chronic compartment syndrome, stress fracture of the posteromedial or anterior tibia. Knee pain can arise from patellofemoral syndrome, patellar tendon insertional pathologies, or a combination of both. Hip and back problems are also prevalent in dancers. To speed injury recovery of dancers, it is important for the sports medicine team to cooperate fully. This permits the dancer to benefit from accurate diagnosis, technique correction where necessary, the full range of manual therapies to joint and soft tissue, appropriate strengthening programmes and maintenance of dance fitness during any time out of class with Pilates-based exercises and nutrition advice. Most overuse ballet conditions respond well to a combination of conservative therapies. Those dancers that do require surgical management still depend heavily on ballet-specific rehabilitation for a complete recovery.

  9. When looking back to nothing goes back to nothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wantz, Andrea L; Martarelli, Corinna S; Mast, Fred W

    2016-02-01

    Previous research showed that the eyes revisit the location in which the stimulus has been encoded when visual or verbal information is retrieved from memory. A recent study showed that this behavior still occurs 1 week after encoding, suggesting that visual, spatial and linguistic information is tightly associated with the oculomotor trace and stored as an integrated memory representation. However, it is yet unclear whether looking behavior simply remains stable between encoding and recall or whether it changes over time in a more fine-tuned manner. Here, we investigate the time course of looking behavior during recall in multiple sessions across 1 week. Participants encoded visual objects presented in one of the four locations on the computer screen. In five sessions during the week after encoding, they performed on a visual memory recall task. During retrieval, participants looked back to the encoding location, but only in the recall sessions within 1 day of encoding. We discuss different explanations for the temporal dynamics of looking behavior during recall, searching for the role of eye movements in memory.

  10. The effect of chronic low back pain on tactile suppression during back movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Stefaan; Van Hulle, Lore; Danneels, Lieven; Spence, Charles; Crombez, Geert

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether tactile suppression, the phenomenon whereby tactile perception is suppressed during movement, would occur in the context of back movements. Of particular interest, it was investigated if tactile suppression in the back would be attenuated in those suffering from chronic low back pain. Individuals with chronic low back pain (N = 30) and a matched control group (N = 24) detected tactile stimuli on three possible locations (back, arm, chest) while performing a back or arm movement, or no movement. We hypothesized that the movements would induce tactile suppression, and that this effect would be largest for low-intense stimuli on the moving body part. We further hypothesized that, during back movements, tactile suppression on the back would be less pronounced in the chronic low back pain group than in the control group. The results showed the expected general tactile suppression effects. The hypothesis of back-specific attenuation of tactile suppression in the chronic low back pain group was not supported. However, back-specific tactile suppression in the chronic low back pain group was less pronounced in those who performed the back movements more slowly.

  11. The Practical Realities of Giving Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashton Bree Wesner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this thematic section, authors consider practical ways of giving back to the communities in which they conduct research. Each author discusses their evolving thoughts on how to give back in these practical ways. Some of these authors discuss giving back by giving money, food, rides, parties, and water bottles. In other cases, authors discuss giving back by creating jobs in the short or long term, grant writing, advocacy, and education. Story-telling is also a theme that many of the authors in this section discuss. For some authors, non-material forms of giving back are critical—simply maintaining social ties to the communities in which they worked, or sharing humor. The authors consider the utility of their attempts at giving back, and in some cases present their personal philosophy or guidelines on the subject.

  12. Managing iatrogenic tracheal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Goonasekera C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present three cases of iatrogenic tracheal injury. Two patients suffered acute tracheal injuries during anesthesia/surgery, one was managed surgically and the other conservatively. The third case is a delayed tracheal injury presenting as a fistula. The reasons for surgical vs conservative management of tracheal injuries and preventive measures are discussed.

  13. Patterns of work injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, Flemming; Nielsen, Kent Jacob; Rasmussen, Kurt;

    2014-01-01

    To compare work injuries treated in an emergency department (ED) and injuries reported to the Danish Working Environment Authority (DWEA).......To compare work injuries treated in an emergency department (ED) and injuries reported to the Danish Working Environment Authority (DWEA)....

  14. A population-based, incidence cohort study of mid-back pain after traffic collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, M S; Boyle, E; Hartvigsen, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    data from a population-based inception cohort of all traffic injuries occurring in Saskatchewan, Canada, during a 2-year period were used. Annual overall and age-sex-specific incidence rates were calculated, the course of recovery was described using the Kaplan-Meier technique, and associations between...... participant characteristics and time-to-self-reported recovery were explored in 3496 MBP cases using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: The yearly incidence rate was 236 per 100,000 population during the study period, and was highest in women and in young persons. The median time-to-first reported......BACKGROUND: Traffic collisions often result in a wide range of symptoms included in the umbrella term whiplash-associated disorders. Mid-back pain (MBP) is one of these symptoms. The incidence and prognosis of different traffic injuries and their related conditions (e.g. neck pain, low back pain...

  15. A population-based, incidence cohort study of mid-back pain after traffic collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, M S; Boyle, E; Hartvigsen, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traffic collisions often result in a wide range of symptoms included in the umbrella term whiplash-associated disorders. Mid-back pain (MBP) is one of these symptoms. The incidence and prognosis of different traffic injuries and their related conditions (e.g. neck pain, low back pain......, depression or others) has been investigated previously; however, knowledge about traffic collision-related MBP is lacking. The study objectives were to describe the incidence, course of recovery and prognosis of MBP after traffic collisions, in terms of global self-reported recovery. METHODS: Longitudinal...... recovery was 101 days (95% CI: 99-104) and about 23% were still not recovered after 1 year. Participant's expectation for recovery, general health, extent of severely affecting comorbidities and having experienced a previous traffic injury were some of the prognostic factors identified. CONCLUSIONS...

  16. Acute and chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Nathan; Emanski, Eric; Knaub, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common presenting complaint that occurs in upward of 80% of persons. Treatment of an acute episode of back pain includes relative rest, activity modification, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and physical therapy. Patient education is also imperative, as these patients are at risk for further future episodes of back pain. Chronic back pain (>6 months' duration) develops in a small percentage of patients. Clinicians' ability to diagnose the exact pathologic source of these symptoms is severely limited, making a cure unlikely. Treatment of these patients should be supportive, the goal being to improve pain and function.

  17. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter DA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available David A Porter, Ryan R Jaggers, Adam Fitzgerald Barnes, Angela M Rund Methodist Sports Medicine/The Orthopedic Specialists, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains, and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on

  18. Back to school at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Education Group is expanding its courses for teachers: over 700 secondary school teachers will be going back to school at CERN this year. Thirty-seven teachers from various countries participated in the High School Teachers at CERN programme, with Rolf Landua, the head of the Education Group, Mick Storr, the Education Group’s programme coordinator and Robert Aymar, the CERN Director-General.From 3 to 8 July, CERN hosted the runners-up from the finals of the British Physics Olympiad, the prize for the winners being a trip to the International Physics Olympiad in Iran. The five students were invited to visit CERN to attend the summer student programme for three days. "This gives us an opportunity to study new subjects that are not necessarily part of the school curriculum. Even though I’ve heard about the various types of research, it is a real plus to be able to attend these lectures", explains Oliver Mac Farlane, a young stu...

  19. A bad back needs help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotway MB

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Case Presentation History of Present Illness A 61-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with a 2 month complaint of atraumatic back pain, worsening over the previous two weeks. The patient described his pain as sharp, 10/10 in intensity, radiating to his ribs, right hip, and right groin, and aggravated by coughing, weight lifting, and movement. His pain was worse in the supine and prone positions, with some relief provided by sitting, and relieved with high doses of pain medications, topical lidocaine, menthol-containing skin ointments, and chiropractic adjustments. Over the 2 days prior to admission, the patient became increasingly desperate as a result of his pain, and drank several pints of vodka.Past Medical and Social HistoryThe patient is a retired machinist whose medical history includes fibromyalgia and binge drinking. He smokes three-quarters of a pack of cigarettes per day.Physical ExaminationPhysical examination showed normal vital signs and …

  20. Overuse in volleyball training/practice: A review on shoulder and spine-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminati, Elena; Minetti, Alberto Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Overuse injuries are predominant in sports involving the repetition of similar movements patterns, such as in volleyball or beach volleyball, and they may represent as much a problem as do acute injuries. This review discusses the prevalence of two of the most common overuse-related injuries in volleyball: shoulder and back/spine injuries. Risk factors and the aetiology of these injuries are illustrated in order to make possible to initiate preventive programme or post-injuries solutions. Data collected from literature showed a moderately higher injury rate for overuse shoulder injuries compared to the back/spine (19.0 ± 11.2% and 16.8 ± 9.7%, respectively). These data could be underestimated, and future epidemiological studies should consider overuse injuries separately from the others, with new methodological approaches. In addition to age, biomechanical and anatomical features of a volleyball technique utilised in game and the amount of hours played are considered as the main risk factors for overuse upper limb injuries, both for professional and recreational athletes. Together with post-injuries solutions, great importance has to be placed on preventive programmes, such as preventive rehabilitation, stretching, adequate warm up, strength-power exercises, etc. Furthermore, it is particularly suggested that coaches and players work together in order to develop new game/training techniques that minimise stresses and range of motion of the principal anatomical structures involved, while maintaining athletes performance.

  1. Injuries in professional modern dancers: incidence, risk factors, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Selina; Weiss, David S; Burchette, Raoul J

    2012-03-01

    Modern (or contemporary) dance has become increasingly popular, yet little has been reported with respect to modern dance injuries and their consequences. The purpose of this study is to define the incidence, risk factors, and management of musculoskeletal injuries in professional modern dancers. A total of 184 dancers in the United States completed an anonymous 17-page questionnaire on their injuries, including extensive details regarding the two most severe injuries that had occurred in the prior 12 months. According to their self-reports, a total of 82% of the dancers had suffered between one and seven injuries. The foot and ankle (40%) was the most common site of injury, followed by the lower back (17%) and the knee (16%). The rate of injuries was 0.59 per 1,000 hours of class and rehearsal. Injured male dancers returned to full dancing after a median of 21 days, while females returned after a median of 18 days. Most dancers missed no performances due to injury. Of the medical consultations sought by dancers for their injuries, 47% were made to physicians, 41% to physical therapists, and 34% to chiropractors. The majority of dancers adhered to the advice given them by consultants (87% of males and 78% of females for the most severe injury). While the majority of injuries were considered work-related (61% of the most severe injury and 69% of the second most severe), few were covered by Workers' Compensation insurance (12% and 5% respectively). These professional modern dancers suffer from a rate of injury similar to other groups of professional dancers. Most dancers return to a partial level of dancing several weeks before attempting full-capacity dancing.

  2. Retrospective Injury Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Injury in CrossFit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Montalvo, Hilary Shaefer, Belinda Rodriguez, Tan Li, Katrina Epnere, Gregory D. Myer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to examine injury epidemiology and risk factors for injury in CrossFit athletes. A survey was administered to athletes at four owner-operated facilities in South Florida. Respondents reported number, location of injury, and training exposure from the preceding six months and answered questions regarding potential risk factors for injury. Fifty out of 191 athletes sustained 62 injuries during CrossFit participation in the preceding six months. The most frequently injured locations were the shoulder, knee, and lower back. Injury incidence was 2.3/1000 athlete training hours. Competitors were more likely to be injured (40% v 19%, p = 0.002 and had greater weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 7.0 v 4.9 ± 2.9, p < 0.001 than non-competitors. Athletes who reported injury also reported significantly higher values for the following risk factors: years of participation (2.7 ± 1.8 v 1.8 ± 1.5, p = 0.001, weekly athlete training hours (7.3 ± 3.8 v 4.9 ± 2.1, p = 0.020, weekly athlete-exposures (6.4 ± 3.8 v 4.7 ± 2.1, p = 0.003, height (1.72 ± 0.09 m v 1.68 ± 0.01 m, p = 0.011, and body mass (78.24 ± 16.86 kg v 72.91 ± 14.77 kg, p = 0.037. Injury rates during CrossFit and location of injuries were similar to those previously reported. Injury incidence was similar to related sports, including gymnastics and powerlifting. While being a competitor was related to injury, increased exposure and length of participation in CrossFit likely underlied this association. Specifically, increased exposure to training in the form of greater weekly athlete training hours and weekly participations may contribute to injury. Increased height and body mass were also related to injury which is likely reflective of increased load utilized during training. Further research is warranted to determine if biomechanical factors associated with greater height and ability to lift greater loads are modifiable factors that can be adapted to reduce

  3. Musculoskeletal injuries and pain in dancers: a systematic review update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Craig L; Hincapié, Cesar A; Cassidy, J David

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assemble and synthesize the best available literature from 2004 to 2008 on musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. MEDLINE and CINAHL were the primary sources of data. Indexed terms such as dance, dancer, dancing, athletic injuries, occupational injuries, sprains and strains, musculoskeletal diseases, bone density, menstruation disturbances, and eating disorders were used to search the databases. Citations were screened for relevance using a priori criteria, and relevant studies were critically reviewed for scientific merit by the best-evidence synthesis method. After screening, 19 articles were found to be scientifically admissible. Data from accepted studies were abstracted into evidence tables relating to: prevalence and associated factors; incidence and risk factors; intervention; and injury characteristics and prognosis of musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. Principal findings included: a high prevalence and incidence of lower extremity, hip and back injuries; preliminary evidence that psychosocial and psychological issues such as stress and coping strategies affect injury frequency and duration; history of a previous lateral ankle sprain is associated with an increased risk of ankle sprain in the contralateral ankle in dance students; fatigue may play a role in ACL injury in dancers; acute hamstring strains in dancers affect tendon more than muscle tissue, often resulting in prolonged absence from dance. It is concluded that, while there are positive developments in the literature on the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of MSK injuries and pain in dancers, much room for improvement remains. Suggestions for future research are offered.

  4. Screen printed interdigitated back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, C. R.; Mazaris, G. A.; Chai, A. T.

    1984-10-01

    Interdigitated back contact solar cells are made by screen printing dopant materials onto the back surface of a semiconductor substrate in a pair of interdigitated patterns. These dopant materials are then diffused into the substrate to form junctions having configurations corresponding to these patterns. Contacts having configurations which match the patterns are then applied over the junctions.

  5. Screen printed interdigitated back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, C. R.; Mazaris, G. A.; Chai, A. T. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Interdigitated back contact solar cells are made by screen printing dopant materials onto the back surface of a semiconductor substrate in a pair of interdigitated patterns. These dopant materials are then diffused into the substrate to form junctions having configurations corresponding to these patterns. Contacts having configurations which match the patterns are then applied over the junctions.

  6. Put It Back in the Hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A little boy and his grandfather are raking (用耙子耙) leaves in the yard.The little boy finds an earthworm (蚯蚓) trying to get back into its hole.He says,"Grandpa,I bet I can put that worm back in that hole."

  7. Drain Back, Low Flow Solar Combi Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perers, Bengt; Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Drain Back systems with ETC collectors are tested and analyzed in a Danish - Chinese cooperation project. Experiences from early work at DTU, with drain back, low flow systems, was used to design two systems: 1) One laboratory system at DTU and 2) One demonstration system in a single family house...

  8. Get the Monkey off Your Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciabattini, David; Custer, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Monkeys are the problems that need solutions, the tasks that need to be accomplished, the decisions that need to be made, and the actions that need to be taken. According to a theory, people carry monkeys around on their backs until they can successfully shift their burden to someone else and the monkey leaps from one back to the next. Managers…

  9. Back Channelling, Repair, Pausing, and Private Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ron

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on differences in back channelling, repair, repetition, pausing, and private speech among Japanese and American study participants, based on sales negotiations. Findings indicate that differences in the deployment of such features as back channelling and pausing can result in pragma-linguistic breakdown, which is linked to culturally…

  10. Cumulative mechanical low-back load at work is a determinant of low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, P.; Kingma, I.; Boot, C.R.L.; Bongers, P.M.; Dieën, J.H. van

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Reported associations of physical exposures during work (eg, lifting, trunk flexion or rotation) and low-back pain (LBP) are rather inconsistent. Mechanical back loads (eg, moments on the low back) as a result of exposure to abovementioned risk factors have been suggested to be important

  11. Low back pain across the life course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunn, Kate M; Hestbæk, Lise; Cassidy, J David

    2013-01-01

    Back pain episodes are traditionally regarded as individual events, but this model is currently being challenged in favour of treating back pain as a long-term or lifelong condition. Back pain can be present throughout life, from childhood to older age, and evidence is mounting that pain experience...... is maintained over long periods: for example, people with pain continue to have it on and off for years, and people without pain do not suddenly develop long-term pain. A number of factors predict back pain presence in epidemiological studies, and these are often present, and predictive, at different life...... stages. There are also factors present at particular life stages, such as childhood or adolescence, which predict back pain in adulthood. However, there are little published data on long-term pain patterns or predictors over the life course. Such studies could improve our understanding of the development...

  12. Yoga to treat nonspecific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Catherine; Stratton, Carol; Mallory, Debra

    2011-08-01

    Low back pain is common and poses a challenge for clinicians to find effective treatment to prevent it from becoming chronic. Chronic low back pain can have a significant impact on an employee's ability to remain an active and productive member of the work force due to increased absenteeism, duty restrictions, or physical limitations from pain. Low back pain is the most common cause of work-related disability among employees younger than 46 years. Advancing technology and less invasive surgical procedures have not improved outcomes for employees who suffer from low back pain. Most continue to experience some pain and dysfunction after conventional treatments such as injections and surgery. An alternative treatment that could reduce nonspecific chronic low back pain would benefit both employees and employers. Exercising and remaining active are part of most guidelines' routine care recommendations but are not well defined.

  13. Injury in rugby league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, W; Pollard, H; Hough, K; Tully, C

    2006-05-01

    It was the purpose of this review to document the range, incidence, location and mechanism of injury occurring in the sport of rugby league. Rugby league is a collision sport played in Europe and the Pacific regions including Australia. The sport is well established and has competitions ranging from junior to elite professional. Due to the contact nature of the game, injury is relatively common. The most common injuries are musculotendinous in nature and afflict the lower limb more frequently than elsewhere. Despite the high incidence of minor (sprains/strains) to moderate musculoskeletal injury (fracture, ligament and joint injury) and minor head injuries such as lacerations, nasal fractures and concussions, rare more serious spinal cord and other injuries causing death have also been recorded. The literature on rugby league injury is small but growing and suffers from a lack of consistent definition of what an injury is, thereby causing variability in the nature and incidence/prevalence of injury. Information is lacking on the injury profiles of different age groups. Importantly, there has been little attempt to establish a coordinated injury surveillance program in rugby league in the junior or professional levels. The implementation of such programs would require a universal definition of injury and a focus on important events and competitions. The implementation could provide important information in the identification and prevention of risk factors for injury.

  14. Space Adaptation Back Pain: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstman, E. L.; Scheuring, R. A.; Barnes, M. G.; DeKorse, T. B.; Saile, L. G.

    2008-01-01

    Back pain is frequently reported by astronauts during the early phase of space flight as they adapt to the microgravity environment. However, the epidemiology of space adaptation back pain has not been well defined. The purpose of this retrospective study was to develop a case definition of space adaptation back pain, determine the incidence of space adaptation back pain, and determine the effectiveness of available treatments. Medical records from the Mercury, Apollo, Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP), Skylab, Mir, International Space Station (ISS), and Shuttle programs were reviewed. All episodes of in-flight back pain that met the criteria for space adaptation back pain were recorded. Pain characteristics, including intensity, location, and duration of the pain were noted. The effectiveness of specific treatments also was recorded. The incidence of space adaptation back pain among astronauts was determined to be 53% (384/722). Most of the affected astronauts reported mild pain (85%). Moderate pain was reported by 11% of the affected astronauts and severe pain was reported by only 4% of the affected astronauts. The most effective treatments were fetal positioning (91% effective) and the use of analgesic medications (85% effective). This retrospective study aids in the development of a case definition of space adaptation back pain and examines the epidemiology of space adaptation back pain. Space adaptation back pain is usually mild and self-limited. However, there is a risk of functional impairment and mission impact in cases of moderate or severe pain that do not respond to currently available treatments. Therefore, the development of preventive measures and more effective treatments should be pursued.

  15. Rehabilitation of basketball injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard A; Chimes, Gary P

    2006-08-01

    Basketball is one of the most popular sports in the United States and throughout the world, and therefore represents one of the most common sources of sports-related injuries. Basketball injuries should be managed by the same general rehabilitation principles as other sports injuries. Additionally, the clinician should be aware not only of general sports injuries but of those injuries most commonly seen in basketball players. By maintaining knowledge of the most common basketball injuries as well as their diagnosis and treatment, the clinician can help to optimize the athlete's return to play and enjoyment of the sport.

  16. Maxillofacial injuries in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echlin, Paul; McKeag, Douglas B

    2004-02-01

    Maxillofacial injuries occur in contact and noncontact sports. Despite advancements in protective equipment and rule changes, there is still an unacceptably high rate of maxillofacial injuries. These injuries are clinically challenging. The significant morbidity, deformity, and disability associated with these injuries can be avoided by their prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. It is important for the sports medicine professional to be competent in the correct diagnosis and management of maxillofacial injuries. This article reviews some of the major maxillofacial injuries, along with their emergent examinations and treatments.

  17. Bodygraphic Injury Surveillance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Toshiki; Kitamura, Koji; Nishida, Yoshihumi; Motomura, Yoichi; Takano, Tachio; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiro; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi

    This paper proposes a new technology,``a bodygraphic injury surveillance system (BISS)'' that not only accumulates accident situation data but also represents injury data based on a human body coordinate system in a standardized and multilayered way. Standardized and multilayered representation of injury enables accumulation, retrieval, sharing, statistical analysis, and modeling causalities of injury across different fields such as medicine, engineering, and industry. To confirm the effectiveness of the developed system, the authors collected 3,685 children's injury data in cooperation with a hospital. As new analyses based on the developed BISS, this paper shows bodygraphically statistical analysis and childhood injury modeling using the developed BISS and Bayesian network technology.

  18. Lisfranc Joint Injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisa Chinn

    2009-01-01

    @@ The ankle and foot are the most common sites for athletic injuries.[1]Midfoot,or Lisfranc,injuries are the second most common foot injury and have a high in cidence in particular sports.They account for 4% of all football injuries per year,occurring frequently in linemen.[2]They are also common in equestrians,surfers,and windsurfers.[2]Lisfranc injuries are often misdiagnosed and if not treated properly can have lingering symptoms.It is estimated that Lisfranc joint injuries occur in 1 in every 55,000 persons every year.[3,4

  19. Investigational pharmacology for low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash K Bhandary

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Avinash K Bhandary1 , Gary P Chimes2, Gerard A Malanga3 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3New Jersey Sports Medicine Institute; Overlook Hospital; Mountainside Hospital; Rehabilitation Medicine and Electrodiagnosis, St Michael’s Medical Center; Horizon Healthcare Worker’s Compensation Services, Blue Cross and Blue Shield Worker’s Compensation, Summit, NJ, USAStudy design: Review and reinterpretation of existing literature.Objective: This review article summarizes the anatomy and pathogenesis of disease processes that contribute to low back pain, and discusses key issues in existing therapies for chronic low back pain. The article also explains the scientific rationale for investigational pharmacology and highlights emerging compounds in late development.Results/conclusion: While the diverse and complex nature of chronic low back pain continues to challenge clinicians, a growing understanding of chronic low back pain on a cellular level has refined our approach to managing chronic low back pain with pharmacology. Many emerging therapies with improved safety profiles are currently in the research pipeline and will contribute to a multimodal therapeutic algorithm in the near future. With the heterogeneity of the patient population suffering from chronic low back pain, the clinical challenge will be accurately stratifying the optimal pharmacologic approach for each patient.Keywords: low back pain, investigational, pharmacology, drugs

  20. Sex-specific differences in injury types among basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito E

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Eri Ito, Jun Iwamoto, Koichiro Azuma, Hideo MatsumotoInstitute for Integrated Sports Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The purpose of the present study was to investigate sex-specific differences in injury types among basketball players. According to our database, during the 20-year period between October 1991 and June 2011, 1,219 basketball players (640 males and 579 females consulted our sports medicine clinic; in total, 1,414 injuries in basketball players (729 injuries in males and 685 injuries in females were recorded. The mean age of patients was 19.6 years. The most common injury site was the knee, followed by the foot and ankle, lower back, and upper extremities. There was a higher proportion of female players presenting with a knee injury, compared with male players (50.4% vs 41.7%, and a lower proportion of female players presenting with an upper extremity injury (5.1% vs 9.7%. The proportion of anterior cruciate ligament injury in the 10–19-year-old age group was higher among female players than among male players (45.9% vs 22.1%, while the proportions of Osgood–Schlatter disease in the 10–19-year-old age group and jumper's knee (patellar and femoral tendinopathy in the 20–29-year-old age group were higher among male players than among female players (12.5% vs 1.8% and 14.6% vs 3.7%, respectively. However, the proportions of other injuries did not differ significantly between male and female players. The present observational study, which was performed using a retrospective case-series design, showed the existence of sex-specific differences in knee injuries sustained while participating in basketball.Keywords: sports injury, sex, anterior cruciate ligament injury, Osgood–Schlatter disease, basketball

  1. [Acupuncture and tuina clinical thoughts of "treating the back from abdomen" for low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinlong; Li, Rui

    2015-07-01

    In clinical treatment, it is found that certain patients always have some positive reaction points those are relevant with low back pain in the abdomen area. When the simple treatment on the low back is ineffective, the efficacy could be significantly improved if acupuncture or tuina is performed at the abdomen areas, which is called "regulating yin to treat yang", or "treating the back from abdomen". In this paper, with the diagnosis and treatment method of "treating the back from abdomen" for low back pain as principal line, the detailed manipulation is explained for low back pain that is induced by TCM meridian diseases or modern anatomy, which could open the methods for clinical treatment of low back pain and enrich the therapeutic options.

  2. Back Work Ratio of Brayton Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaver de la Fuente M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analizes the existing relation between temperatures, back work ratio and net work of Brayton cycle, a cycle that describes gas turbine engines performance. The application of computational soft ware helps to show the influence of back work ratio or coupling ratio, compressor and turbine in let temperatures in an ideal thermodynamical cycle. The results lead to deduce that the maximum value reached in back work ratio will depend on the ranges of maximum and minimal temperatures of Brayton cycle.

  3. Injuries at a Canadian National Taekwondo Championships: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Willy

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the injury rates in male and female adult Canadian Taekwondo athletes relative to total number of injuries, type and body part injured. Methods Subjects (219 males, 99 females participated in the 1997 Canadian National Taekwondo Championships in Toronto, Canada. Injuries were recorded on an injury form to documents any injury seen and treatment provided by the health care team. These data were later used for this study. The injury form describes the athlete and nature, site, severity and mechanism of the injury. Results The overall rate of injuries was 62.9/1,000 athlete-exposures (A-E. The males (79.9/1,000 A-E sustained significantly more injuries than the females (25.3/1,000 A-E. The lower extremities were the most commonly injured body region in the men (32.0 /1,000 A-E, followed by the head and neck (18.3/1,000 A-E. Injuries to the spine (neck, upper back, low back and coccyx were the third most often injured body region in males (13.8/1,000 A-E. All injuries to the women were sustained to the lower extremities. The most common type of injury in women was the contusion (15.2/1,000 A-E. However, men's most common type of injury was the sprain (22.8/1,000 A-E followed by joint dysfunction (13.7/1,000A-E. Concussions were only reported in males (6.9/1,000 A-E. Compared to international counterparts, the Canadian men and women recorded lower total injury rates. However, the males incurred more cerebral concussions than their American colleagues (4.7/1,000 A-E. Conclusions Similar to what was found in previous studies, the current investigation seems to suggest that areas of particular concern for preventive measures involve the head and neck as well as the lower extremities. This is the first paper to identify spinal joint dysfunction.

  4. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos mild Traumatic Brain Injury 94447 reads Please Log in You must be logged in to access ... Brain Injury (DCoE) to promote the processes of building resilience, facilitating recovery and supporting reintegration of returning ...

  5. Preventing Children's Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... might not be possible to return to the sport without risking further injury. Because overuse injuries are characterized by swelling, a doctor may prescribe rest, medicines to ease inflammation, and physical therapy. When recovery is complete, your child's technique or ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indicated by a total lack of sensory and motor function below the level of injury. People who survive a spinal cord injury will most likely have medical complications such as chronic pain and bladder and bowel ...

  7. What Are Sports Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 06:02 Size: 11.7 MB November 2014 What Are Sports Injuries? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Research Is Being Done on Treating Sports Injuries? What’s the Difference Between an Acute and a Chronic ...

  8. Preventing eye injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daksha Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge in developing a strategy to prevent eye injuries is that there are so many different causes and situations that can lead to eye injuries, each requiring a different approach.

  9. Effect of static stretching on prevention of injuries for military recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Masatoshi; Oda, Takaaki; Masuoka, Kazunori; Yokoi, Hiromichi; Campisi, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    This prospective study was designed to evaluate whether static stretching can prevent training-related injuries in Japan Ground Self-Defense Force military recruits. A total of 901 recruits between 1996 and 1998 were divided into two groups. Of which, 518 recruits were assigned to the stretching group and practiced static stretching before and after each physical training session. The control subjects (383 recruits in the nonstretching group) did not stretch statically prior to exercise. The static stretching consisted of 18 exercises. We collected injury data from medical records and assessed the incidence and the location of injury. The total injury rate was almost the same between two groups; however, the incidences of muscle/tendon injury and low back pain were significantly lower in the stretching group (p stretching decreased the incidence of muscle-related injuries but did not prevent bone or joint injuries.

  10. NEUROENDOCRINE DISTURBANCES FOLLOWING HEAD INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the main causes of death and disability in young adults, with consequences ranging from physical disabilities to long - term cognitive, behavioural, psychological and social defects. Recently, c linical evidence has demonstrated that TBI may frequently cause hypothalamic – pituitary dysfunction, probably contributing to a delayed or hampered recovery from TBI. CASE REPORT: 32 year s old female presented with a history of fall from two wheeler on back hitting the head on occipital region with no history of vomiting, loss of consciousness, ENT bleed. Her GCS was 15/15. Patient was asymptomatic and was discharged from hospital on fifth day. Seven days after discharge patient again presented with heavine ss in her both breasts associated with pain and whitish discharge from both the nipples and mild fever since last two days. CONCLUSION: TBI is a public health problem that requires more effective strategies to improve the outcome and minimize disability of the affected patients. Changes in pituitary hormone secretion may be observed during the acute phase post - TBI, representing part of the acute adaptive response to the injury. Neuroendocrine disturbances, caused by damage to the pituitary and/or hypothalam us, is a frequent complication of TBI and may occur at any time after the acute event. Pituitary dysfunction presents more frequently as an isolated, and more rarely as a complete, deficiency.

  11. [Acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, D.; Kooman, J.P.; Lance, M.D.; Heurn, L.W. van; Snoeijs, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    - 'Acute kidney injury' is modern terminology for a sudden decline in kidney function, and is defined by the RIFLE classification (RIFLE is an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease).- Acute kidney injury occurs as a result of the combination of reduced perfusion in the

  12. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  13. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  14. HAND INJURIES IN VOLLEYBALL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BHAIRO, NH; NIJSTEN, MWN; VANDALEN, KC; TENDUIS, HJ

    1992-01-01

    We studied the long-term sequelae of hand injuries as a result of playing volleyball. In a retrospective study, 226 patients with injuries of the hand who were seen over a 5-year period at our Trauma Department, were investigated. Females accounted for 66 % of all injuries. The mean age was 26 years

  15. Pre-competition habits and injuries in Taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Choung Young

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade, there has been heightened interest in injury rates sustained by martial arts athletes, and more specifically, Taekwondo athletes. Despite this interest, there is a paucity of research on pre-competition habits and training of these athletes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess training characteristics, competition preparation habits, and injury profiles of Taekwondo athletes. Methods A retrospective survey of Canadian male and female Taekwondo athletes competing in a national tournament was conducted. Competitors at a Canadian national level tournament were given a comprehensive survey prior to competition. Items on training characteristics, diet, and injuries sustained during training and competition were included. Questionnaires were distributed to 60 athletes. Results A response rate of 46.7% was achieved. Of those that responded, 54% dieted prior to competition, and 36% dieted and exercised pre-competition. Sixty-four percent of the athletes practised between 4–6 times per week, with 54% practicing 2 hours per session. Lower limb injuries were the most common (46.5%, followed by upper extremity (18%, back (10%, and head (3.6%. The majority of injuries consisted of sprains/strains (45%, followed by contusions, fractures, and concussions. More injuries occurred during training, including 59% of first injuries. Conclusion More research needs to be conducted to further illustrate the need for appropriate regulations on weight cycling and injury prevention.

  16. Common cycling injuries. Management and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellion, M B

    1991-01-01

    as medical management. Neck and back pain are extremely common in cyclists, occurring in up to 60% of riders. Ulnar neuropathy, characterised by tingling, numbness and weakness in the hands is common in serious cyclists after several days of riding. Managing saddle-related injuries or irritations may also involve adjusting seat height, angle and fore and aft position in addition to changing the saddle. Padding in the saddle and shorts play an important part in saddle problems. Saddle-related problems include chafing, perineal folliculitis and furuncles, subcutaneous perineal nodules, pudendal neuropathy, male impotence, traumatic urethritis and a variety of vulva trauma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  17. Back Bay Wilderness study : Public hearing analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is an analysis of the public hearing that took place on May 15th, 1974 which discussed the Back Bay Wilderness. The analysis shows that there is...

  18. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Hunting Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for the administration of hunting activity and for the development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and guidelines on Back...

  19. Back Bay Stormwater Monitoring Project Final Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this project was to assess the influx of nutrients and solid material into Back Bay and its tributaries during and immediately following such storm...

  20. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge regulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a collection of regulations pertaining to the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Most of the regulations concern motor vehicle use on the refuge.

  1. Back Bay Wilderness study : Proposed recommendations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a list of recommendations for the proposed wilderness area on the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The recommendations come as a result of the...

  2. Acne, vulgaris on the back (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acne frequently occurs on the back. Here, there are 2 to 6 millimeter wide erythematous (red) pustules ... Permanent scarring may follow a severe case of acne. Men are more often affected on their shoulders ...

  3. Herniated Disk in the Lower Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... two components: Healthy intervertebral disk (cross- section view). • Annulus fibrosus. This is the tough, flexible outer ring ... the Lower Back cont. Surgical Treatment Only a small percentage of patients with lumbar disk herniations require ...

  4. Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000415.htm Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help many people deal with chronic ...

  5. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Master Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located in the city of Virginia Beach, Virginia, comprises 4,608 acres of barrier beach, fresh and brackish marsh, small...

  6. Turning Back the Aging Clock -- in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 164250.html Turning Back the Aging Clock -- in Mice Elderly rodents treated with cellular therapy regained lost fur, became ... 2017 THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Aging mice became more youthful following a new cellular therapy ...

  7. Approach to low back pain - acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Carolyn

    2014-05-01

    This article forms part of our allied health series for 2014, which aims to provide information about the management approach of different allied health professionals, using the case example of uncomplicated, mechanical low back pain.

  8. Interaction analysis of back-to-back mechanically stabilized earth walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadok Benmebarek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Back-to-back mechanically stabilized earth walls (BBMSEWs are encountered in bridge approaches, ramp ways, rockfall protection systems, earth dams, levees and noise barriers. However, available design guidelines for BBMSEWs are limited and not applicable to numerical modeling when back-to-back walls interact with each other. The objective of this paper is to investigate, using PLAXIS code, the effects of the reduction in the distance between BBMSEW, the reinforcement length, the quality of backfill material and the connection of reinforcements in the middle, when the back-to-back walls are close. The results indicate that each of the BBMSEWs behaves independently if the width of the embankment between mechanically stabilized earth walls is greater than that of the active zone. This is in good agreement with the result of FHWA design guideline. However, the results show that the FHWA design guideline underestimates the lateral earth pressure when back-to-back walls interact with each other. Moreover, for closer BBMSEWs, FHWA design guideline strongly overestimates the maximum tensile force in the reinforcement. The investigation of the quality of backfill material shows that the minor increase in embankment cohesion can lead to significant reductions in both the lateral earth pressure and the maximum tensile force in geosynthetic. When the distance between the two earth walls is close to zero, the connection of reinforcement between back-to-back walls significantly improves the factor of safety.

  9. Interaction analysis of back-to-back mechanically stabilized earth walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sadok Benmebarek; Samir Attallaoui; Naïma Benmebarek

    2016-01-01

    Back-to-back mechanically stabilized earth walls (BBMSEWs) are encountered in bridge approaches, ramp ways, rockfall protection systems, earth dams, levees and noise barriers. However, available design guidelines for BBMSEWs are limited and not applicable to numerical modeling when back-to-back walls interact with each other. The objective of this paper is to investigate, using PLAXIS code, the effects of the reduction in the distance between BBMSEW, the reinforcement length, the quality of backfill material and the connection of reinforcements in the middle, when the back-to-back walls are close. The results indicate that each of the BBMSEWs behaves independently if the width of the embankment between mechanically stabilized earth walls is greater than that of the active zone. This is in good agreement with the result of FHWA design guideline. However, the results show that the FHWA design guideline un-derestimates the lateral earth pressure when back-to-back walls interact with each other. Moreover, for closer BBMSEWs, FHWA design guideline strongly overestimates the maximum tensile force in the reinforcement. The investigation of the quality of backfill material shows that the minor increase in embankment cohesion can lead to significant reductions in both the lateral earth pressure and the maximum tensile force in geosynthetic. When the distance between the two earth walls is close to zero, the connection of reinforcement between back-to-back walls significantly improves the factor of safety.

  10. Back to Back: A Focus on Reducing the Logistics Costs and Tax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério João Lunkes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to identify the main aspects related to the operation of Back to Back set out in international trade, which enables reduction of logistics costs and taxes. The operation of Back to Back is an excellent opportunity to increase foreign exchange gain and offer greater flexibility to commercial operations that the business requires. The methodology used in preparing this study was qualitative research according to the characteristics and nature of the problem. From the use of descriptive research study aims to demonstrate the main theoretical aspects underlying the subject in reference. This study aimed to identify the main aspects related to the operation of Back to Back set out in international trade and tax effects in an organization and logistics of industrial electronics segment of the State of Santa Catarina. The study demonstrated that the benefits of the operation of Back to Back is of paramount importance for companies having a positive impact in financial terms by reducing the need for tax payments and logistics costs which affect the processes of import and export. The results presented showed that the company studied the operation of Back to Back is essential for international negotiations.

  11. TREATMENT FOR ACUTE NONSPECIFIC LOWER BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhail Lvovich Kukushkin

    2010-01-01

    The causes, manifestations, and principles of diagnosis of acute nonspecific lower back pain (nLBP) are considered. Symptoms and complaints, the emergence of which is associated with the presence of dangerous disease, are singled out in patients with back pain. Emphasis is placed on the treatment of nLBP with currently available unselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and myorelaxants. It is also noted that multimodality therapy in such patients should include therapeutic exercises, ...

  12. Low Back Pain≠下腰痛

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周秉文

    2005-01-01

    近来在医学杂志上频频出现“下腰痛(low back pain)”的字样,给读者的印象是:low back pain即等于下腰痛,仔细推敲起来,其中有不同语言文字的误解。为此笔者进行了一些考察。

  13. Mechanical therapy for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Donald Grant

    2012-09-01

    Physical therapy and manual medicine for low back pain encompass many different treatment modalities. There is a vast variety of techniques that physical therapists commonly use in the treatment of low back pain. Some of the therapies include, but are certainly not limited to, education, exercise, lumbar traction, manual manipulation, application of heat, cryotherapy, and ultrasonography. Many of these approaches are discussed specifically in this article.

  14. Unassisted childbirth or homicide--different appraisals of severe injuries in a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehb, Iris; Rittner, Christian; Püschel, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    A case of a 24-year-old woman who gave birth to a mature newborn is reported. Many injuries at the head, neck and shoulders, back, mouth and throat which at least partly indicated unassisted childbirth were observed during autopsy. Some injuries, especially the different scull fractures were discussed controversially on trial. One expert postulated a coaction of unassisted childbirth and blunt head trauma to be responsible for the exitus. The other expert considered it possible that all injuries could originate from unassisted childbirth. The court consented to the opinion that all injuries could be the consequence of unassisted childbirth and the woman was exculpated from the accusation of manslaughter.

  15. Surgical treatment of acute and chronic anterior and posterior cruciate ligament and medial-side injuries of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Mark G; Stannard, James P

    2011-06-01

    KD-IIIM knee injuries are challenging injuries that can do well when anatomic reconstruction techniques are used. This article describes the authors preferred reconstructions, timing of surgery, and rehabilitation techniques. The reconstructions are generally initiated 3 or 4 weeks after the injury when the local soft tissue injury allows and associated fractures have already been stabilized. The posterior cruciate ligament, posteromedial corner, and meniscus injuries are addressed in the initial operation. The corresponding author prefers to come back 6 weeks later and reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament and assure that acceptable progress has been made regarding knee motion.

  16. Spring-back deformation in tube bending

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-xin E; Hua-hui He; Xiao-yi Liu; Ru-xin Ning

    2009-01-01

    The spring-back of a bending metal tube was studied through extensive experiments and finite element method (FEM) analysis. An approximate equation for the spring-back angle of bending was deduced. It is noted that the mechanical properties of the material (in a tubular form) are quite different from those found in the standard tensile tests (when the materials are in bar forms). This is one of the major reasons that result in the discrepancies in the outcomes of experimental study, FEM calculations, and spring-back analysis. It is therefore of crucial importance to study the mechanical properties of the materials in their tubular forms. The experiments and FEM simulations prove that the spring-back angle is significantly affected by the mechanical properties of the materials. The angle decreases accordingly with plastic modulus, but changes inversely with the hardening index and elastic modulus. The spring-back angle is also affected by the conditions of tube deformation: it increases accordingly with the relative bending radius but changes inversely with the relative wall thickness. In addition, the spring-back angle increases nonlinearly with the bending an-gle.

  17. [Trampoline injuries in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Antila, Eeva; Korhonen, Jussi; Rättyä, Johanna; Serlo, Willy

    2012-01-01

    Trampolines for home use have become common in Finland during the past ten years, being especially favored by children. Trampoline jumping is beneficial and constructive physical exercise, but poses a significant risk for injuries. The most common injuries include sprains and strains. During summertime, trampoline injuries account for as many as 13% of children's accidents requiring hospital care. Fractures are by far the most common trampoline injuries requiring hospital care. Injuries can be prevented by using safety nets. Only one child at a time is allowed to jump on the trampoline.

  18. Screen-printed back-to-back electroanalytical sensors: heavy metal ion sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruas de Souza, Ana P; Foster, Christopher W; Kolliopoulos, Athanasios V; Bertotti, Mauro; Banks, Craig E

    2015-06-21

    Screen-printed back-to-back microband electroanalytical sensors are applied to the quantification of lead(II) ions for the first time. In this configuration the electrodes are positioned back-to-back with a common electrical connection to the two working electrodes with the counter and reference electrodes for each connected in the same manner as a normal "traditional" screen-printed sensor. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated for the electroanalytical sensing of lead(II) ions utilising square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry where an increase in the electroanalytical sensitivity is observed by a factor of 5 with the back-to-back microband configuration at a fixed lead(II) ion concentration of 5 μg L(-1) utilising a deposition potential and time of -1.2 V and 30 seconds respectively, compared to a conventional (single) microband electrode. The back-to-back microband configuration allows for the sensing of lead(II) ions with a linear range from 5 to 110 μg L(-1) with a limit of detection (based on 3σ) corresponding to 3.7 μg L(-1). The back-to-back microband configuration is demonstrated to quantify the levels of lead(II) ions within drinking water corresponding to a level of 2.8 (±0.3) μg L(-1). Independent validation was performed using ICP-OES with the levels of lead(II) ions found to correspond to 2.5 (±0.1) μg L(-1); the excellent agreement between the two methods validates the electroanalytical procedure for the quantification of lead(II) ions in drinking water. This back-to-back configuration exhibits an excellent validated analytical performance for the determination of lead(II) ions within drinking water at World Health Organisation levels (limited to 10 μg L(-1) within drinking water).

  19. Epidemiology, Treatment, and Prevention of Lumbar Spine Injuries in Major League Baseball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Christopher L; Conti, Matthew S; Sgroi, Terrance; Cammisa, Frank P; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, increased attention has been paid to injuries occurring in Major League Baseball (MLB) players. Although most of the current orthopedic literature regarding baseball injuries pertains to the shoulder and elbow, lumbar spine injuries are another common reason for time out of play. Back and core injuries may represent as many as 12% of all injuries that result in time out of play from MLB. This high rate of injury is likely related to the critical role that the spine plays in every major baseball-related movement. Linking the upper extremities to the hips and lower extremities, a healthy, strong, and stable spine and core is a prerequisite for performance in all levels of baseball. It has been well documented that baseball players with poor spinal control and stabilization are at increased risk for future injury. Common etiologies of lumbar injuries include stress fractures, muscle injury, annular tears with or without disc herniation, facet joint pain, sacroiliac joint pain, and stenosis. This review discusses the epidemiology of spinal injuries in baseball. Special attention is paid to the role of the spine in baseball-related activities, common injuries, tips for making the correct diagnosis, treatment options, outcomes, rehabilitation, and injury prevention.

  20. Infrared thermography evaluation from the back region of healthy horses in controlled temperature room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Pavelski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The infrared thermography is a diagnostic imaging tool, which measures the surface temperature of an object through its heat emission. It is a non-invasive method, painless, with no involvement of radiation. Horses have elevated incidence of back injuries which causes decrease in their performance. A rapid and accurate diagnostic is essential to start the treatment. The aim of this paper was to establish the ideal time to the animal stay e inside a controlled room to balance their temperature and in the second time verify the thermographic temperature of specific back regions. It was studied fifteen healthy horses, being performed thermography of thoracic, lumbar and pelvic regions in four different times. There was a significant difference between the thermography performed outside and inside of the controlled temperature room. It was concluded that the ideal time to the horse stay into the controlled temperature room was thirty minutes and the mean thermographic temperatures of back regions, were obtained and can be used as parameters to identify injuries in other horses.

  1. Biomechanics of whiplash injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hai-bin; King H YANG; WANG Zheng-guo

    2009-01-01

    Despite a large number of rear-end collisions on the road and a high frequency of whiplash injuries reported, the mechanism of whiplash injuries is not completely understood. One of the reasons is that the injury is not necessarily accompanied by obvious tissue damage detectable by X-ray or MRI. An extensive series of biomechanics studies, including injury epidemiology, neck kinematics,facet capsule ligament mechanics, injury mechanisms and injury criteria, were undertaken to help elucidate these whiplash injury mechanisms and gain a better understanding of cervical facet pain. These studies provide the following evidences to help explain the mechanisms of the whiplash injury: (1) Whiplash injuries are generally considered to be a soft tissue injury of the neck with symptoms such as neck pain and stiffness, shoulder weakness, dizziness, headache and memory loss, etc. (2) Based on kinematical studies on the cadaver and volunteers, there are three distinct periods that have the potential to cause injury to the neck. In the first stage, flexural deformation of the neck is observed along with a loss of cervical lordosis; in the second stage, the cervical spine assumes an S-shaped curve as the lower vertebrae begin to extend and gradually cause the upper vertebrae to extend; during the final stage, the entire neck is extended due to the extension moments at both ends. (3)The in vivo environment afforded by rodent models of injury offers particular utility for linking mechanics, nociception and behavioral outcomes. Experimental findings have examined strains across the facet joint as a mechanism of whiplash injury, and suggested a capsular strain threshold or a vertebral distraction threshold for whiplash-related injury,potentially producing neck pain. (4) Injuries to the facet capsule region of the neck are a major source of post-crash pain. There are several hypotheses on how whiplash-associated injury may occur and three of these injuries are related to strains within

  2. Biomechanics of whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-bin; Yang, King H; Wang, Zheng-guo

    2009-10-01

    Despite a large number of rear-end collisions on the road and a high frequency of whiplash injuries reported, the mechanism of whiplash injuries is not completely understood. One of the reasons is that the injury is not necessarily accompanied by obvious tissue damage detectable by X-ray or MRI. An extensive series of biomechanics studies, including injury epidemiology, neck kinematics, facet capsule ligament mechanics, injury mechanisms and injury criteria, were undertaken to help elucidate these whiplash injury mechanisms and gain a better understanding of cervical facet pain. These studies provide the following evidences to help explain the mechanisms of the whiplash injury: (1) Whiplash injuries are generally considered to be a soft tissue injury of the neck with symptoms such as neck pain and stiffness, shoulder weakness, dizziness, headache and memory loss, etc. (2) Based on kinematical studies on the cadaver and volunteers, there are three distinct periods that have the potential to cause injury to the neck. In the first stage, flexural deformation of the neck is observed along with a loss of cervical lordosis; in the second stage, the cervical spine assumes an S-shaped curve as the lower vertebrae begin to extend and gradually cause the upper vertebrae to extend; during the final stage, the entire neck is extended due to the extension moments at both ends. (3) The in vivo environment afforded by rodent models of injury offers particular utility for linking mechanics, nociception and behavioral outcomes. Experimental findings have examined strains across the facet joint as a mechanism of whiplash injury, and suggested a capsular strain threshold or a vertebral distraction threshold for whiplash-related injury, potentially producing neck pain. (4) Injuries to the facet capsule region of the neck are a major source of post-crash pain. There are several hypotheses on how whiplash-associated injury may occur and three of these injuries are related to strains

  3. Injuries in Irish dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Cynthia J; Tyson, Kesley D; Johnson, Victor M; Popoli, David M; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A; Micheli, Lyle J

    2013-12-01

    Irish dance is growing in popularity and competitiveness; however, very little research has focused specifically on this genre of dance. The purpose of this study was to analyze the types of dance injuries incurred by Irish dancers. A chart review was performed to identify all injuries associated with Irish dance seen in the sports medicine or orthopaedic clinics at the investigators' hospital over an 11-year period. "Injury" was defined as any dance-related pain or disorder that led to evaluation in the clinics. Survey data were also collected from study participants. Ultimately, 255 patients from over 30 different schools of dance were seen with injuries directly related (726 clinic visits) or partially related (199 visits) to Irish dance. Participants ranged in age from 4 to 47, with 95% (243/255) under the age of 19. These 255 patients received 437 diagnoses. Almost 80% of the injuries (348/437) were attributable to overuse, and 20.4% were acute and traumatic injuries (89/437). Ninety-five percent (95.9%) of injuries involved the hip or lower extremity. The most common sites were the foot (33.2%), ankle (22.7%), knee (19.7%), and hip (14.4%). Typical diagnoses were tendon injury (13.3%), apophysitis (11.4%), patellofemoral pain and instability (10.8%), stress injury (10.1%), and muscle injury (7.8%). The majority of traumatic injuries were seen in clinic within 3 weeks, but less than a quarter of overuse injuries were seen that quickly. The most common treatment, prescribed to 84.3% of patients, was physical therapy and home exercises, and the majority of dancers (64.3%) were able to return to full dance activity after injury.

  4. The rodeo athlete: injuries - Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Michael C; Laurent, C Matthew

    2010-10-01

    A previous instalment to this review focused on the sport science for rodeo, the history behind the sport and what is currently known about the physical and physiological status, coronary risk profile, strength and power levels, event-specific kinesiological and biomechanical aspects, nutritional habits and psychological indices associated with the rodeo athlete. In regards to injury, rodeo is well known for its high-velocity, high-impact atmosphere where athletes compete against the clock and uncooperative livestock. Considered by many to be a dangerous sport with high vulnerability towards trauma and frequent injuries, animal/human contact events comprise ∼80% of reported injuries. Severe trauma includes fractures, dislocations, subluxations, concussions, ligament ruptures, pneumothorax and various neurapraxias. Head and neck trauma account for 10-29% of total trauma and up to 63% of upper body injuries, with concussion incidence rates of 3.4 per 1000 competitive exposures. The incidence of thoracic, back and abdominal injuries comprise 11-84% of trauma, while shoulder injuries, involving anterior/posterior arthralgia, inflammation, instability and increasing weakness, account for 8-15% of upper extremity cases. Lower extremity trauma accounts for 26-34% of cases, with the majority involving the knee. Many believe that the incidence of trauma is underestimated, with studies hampered by numerous limitations such as a lack of injury awareness, missing data, poor injury recall, an array of reporting sources, delays in subject response and treatment, no uniform definition of injury or reporting system and predisposing factors prior to injury. Primary mechanisms of injuries are attributed to physical immaturity, fatigue, age and experience, behaviour, the violent nature of the sport and lack of adequate medical intervention. Although there is limited adherence to organized conditioning programmes, when properly planned, sport-specific conditioning may enhance

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casazza, Brian A

    2012-02-15

    Acute low back pain is one of the most common reasons for adults to see a family physician. Although most patients recover quickly with minimal treatment, proper evaluation is imperative to identify rare cases of serious underlying pathology. Certain red flags should prompt aggressive treatment or referral to a spine specialist, whereas others are less concerning. Serious red flags include significant trauma related to age (i.e., injury related to a fall from a height or motor vehicle crash in a young patient, or from a minor fall or heavy lifting in a patient with osteoporosis or possible osteoporosis), major or progressive motor or sensory deficit, new-onset bowel or bladder incontinence or urinary retention, loss of anal sphincter tone, saddle anesthesia, history of cancer metastatic to bone, and suspected spinal infection. Without clinical signs of serious pathology, diagnostic imaging and laboratory testing often are not required. Although there are numerous treatments for nonspecific acute low back pain, most have little evidence of benefit. Patient education and medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and muscle relaxants are beneficial. Bed rest should be avoided if possible. Exercises directed by a physical therapist, such as the McKenzie method and spine stabilization exercises, may decrease recurrent pain and need for health care services. Spinal manipulation and chiropractic techniques are no more effective than established medical treatments, and adding them to established treatments does not improve outcomes. No substantial benefit has been shown with oral steroids, acupuncture, massage, traction, lumbar supports, or regular exercise programs.

  6. Acknowledging the patient with back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup; Norlyk, Annelise

    2015-01-01

    of this literature review is to gain a better understanding of back patients’ illness experiences and to identify, systematise and integrate the findings of different qualitative studies that may elucidate barriers, consequences or focal points in connection with the care and treatment. Methods: The methodology......Rationale and aims: Research shows that back patients’ illness experiences affect their interaction with the healthcare system. It is important to examine the exact nature of these experiences in order to shed valuable light on how back patients perceive their illness and hospitalisation. The aim...... and translates into a certain way of perceiving and explaining illnesses and symptoms. Results: The thematic analysis shows that it is through experiences and memories that we create our identity and consciousness. Ignoring the illness experiences can therefore be seen as disregarding, the patient as a human...

  7. [Physical therapy in low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muff, L; Stucki, G

    1996-09-10

    We report on physical measures in the treatment of patients with lower back pain due to mechanical factors. Acute low back pain improves mostly without specific measures. Intervention for this condition is useful for prevention of relapses. More demanding and difficult is the treatment of chronic lumbar back pain. After an exact diagnosis, information about the disease, the therapeutic procedure and the prognosis follow in order to agree on a common therapeutic goal. To this goal, a close cooperation between physician, physiotherapist, possibly a psychologist and a social worker, is optimal. The employer should be involved in the rehabilitation on the workplace. Patients should become mobilized inspite of pain, and the return to their workplace should be prepared step by step. The most important physiotherapeutic modalities are demonstrated.

  8. Management of patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debarle, Michel; Aigron, Rémi; Depernet, Laure

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the level of consensus within the French chiropractic profession regarding management of clinical issues. A previous Swedish study showed that chiropractors agreed relatively well on the management strategy for nine low back pain scenarios. We wished to investigate...... whether those findings could be reproduced among French chiropractors.Objectives: 1. To assess the level of consensus among French chiropractors regarding management strategies for nine different scenarios of low back pain. 2. To assess whether the management choices of the French chiropractors appeared...... reasonable for the low back pain scenarios. 3. To compare French management patterns with those described in the previous survey of Swedish chiropractors. METHOD: A postal questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected sample of 167 French chiropractors in 2009. The questionnaire described a 40-year old man...

  9. Epidemiology of golf related musculo-skeletal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhillon Mandeep

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Golfing has become an increasingly popular sport enjoyed by both men and women. Although the game is not viewed as hazardous, golfers do sustain injuries connected with the game. However, golf injuries have received little attention in the literature and there is no study from Asia. Methods : A prospective study was undertaken to analyze the incidence, cause and type of injury among amateur golfers. Open ended questionnaires were sent to 1000 golfers; 240 responded (Av age 51 years, 200 males and 40 females. The respondents played an average of 2 rounds per week. Results : One hundered and ten (46% responders had sustained one or more orthopaedic injuries. Both among men and women, the lower back was the most common site of injury followed by shoulder and dorsal spine. There was a difference in the injury pattern in skilled and relatively unskilled players. Lack of warm up, excessive practice and improper swing mechanics were the most common causes. Conclusion : Golf injuries perhaps could be prevented or reduced by proper technique, controlled practice routines, physical conditioning and pre-play stretching exercises. The most important factor in this playing population seems to be prevention.

  10. Sources and mitigation of interharmonics in back-to-back controllable drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Hamid; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede;

    2014-01-01

    The theme here is to identify the sources of interharmonics that can affect back-to-back controllable drives and make non-characteristic interharmonic components in the grid side currents when the motor currents are unbalanced. A new control methodology then is formulated and proposed to compensa...

  11. Short-term outcomes of a back school program for chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodselmans, AP; Jaegers, SM; Goeken, LN; Göeken, L.N.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the short-term outcome of a back school program for patients suffering from chronic, nonspecific low back pain (LBP). Design: Quasi-experimental cohort study with a waiting list control group. Setting: Dutch rehabilitation department. Participants: Experimental group (n = 14) pa

  12. Back care instructions in physical therapy: a trend analysis of individualized back care programs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Sluijs, E.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Knibbe, H.J.J.; Hermans, I.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The treatment of people with low back pain often includes giving a variety of instructions about back care. The objective of our study was to explore the content and sequence of these instructions. Subjects: Our database contained information on 1,151 therapy sessions for 132

  13. Work injuries and disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tüchsen, Finn; Christensen, Karl Bang; Feveile, Helene

    2009-01-01

    PROBLEM: This study estimated the hazard ratio for disability pension retirement (DPR) for persons who have experienced a work injury causing absence lasting at least one day after the accidental injury occurred and to estimate the fraction of DPR attributable to work injuries. METHODS: A total...... of 4,217 male and 4,105 female employees from a national survey were followed up for subsequent DPR. RESULTS AND IMPACT ON INDUSTRY AND GOVERNMENT: Having had a work injury was a strong predictor of DPR among men. After control for age, smoking, body mass index, body postures, and physical demands......, the hazard ratio (HR) among those employees who had ever experienced a work injury was 1.80 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20-2.68). No association was found among women. SUMMARY: Having had a reportable work injury is a strong predictor of subsequent DPR for men....

  14. Soccer injuries in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Anne [Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, Radiology Department, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with FIFA recognising more than 265 million amateur players. Despite the fact that soccer is a contact sport, it is perceived to be relatively safe to play, a factor that has contributed to its status as the fastest growing team sport in the USA. Acute and minor injuries predominate in the statistics, with contusions and abrasions being the most commonly recorded. As would be expected, the majority of soccer injuries are to the lower limbs, with serious truncal and spinal trauma being rare. This article examines the type and anatomic location of injuries sustained by children and adolescents who play soccer, and the main mechanisms whereby such injuries occur. The risk factors underpinning injury occurrence are considered, along with injury avoidance tactics. (orig.)

  15. Injuries in women's basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojian, Thomas H; Ragle, Rosemary B

    2008-03-01

    Women's basketball has changed over time. It is a faster paced game than it was 30 years ago. Greatplayers, like Anne Meyers,who was the first, and only, woman to be signed to an NBA contract, would agree today's game is different. The game is played mostly "below the rim" but with players like Candice Parker, Sylvia Fowles and Maya Moore able to dunk the ball, the game is still changing. The one thing that remains constant in basketball, especially women's basketball, is injury. The majority of injuries in women's basketball are similar to those in men's basketball. Studies at the high school and college level show similar injury rates between women and men. ACL injuries are one exception, with female athletes having atwo to four times higher rate ofACL injuries. In this article, we review the common injuries in women's basketball. We discuss treatment issues and possible preventive measures.

  16. Soccer injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Anne

    2009-12-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with FIFA recognising more than 265 million amateur players. Despite the fact that soccer is a contact sport, it is perceived to be relatively safe to play, a factor that has contributed to its status as the fastest growing team sport in the USA. Acute and minor injuries predominate in the statistics, with contusions and abrasions being the most commonly recorded. As would be expected, the majority of soccer injuries are to the lower limbs, with serious truncal and spinal trauma being rare. This article examines the type and anatomic location of injuries sustained by children and adolescents who play soccer, and the main mechanisms whereby such injuries occur. The risk factors underpinning injury occurrence are considered, along with injury avoidance tactics.

  17. Costs of traffic injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie

    2015-01-01

    assessed using Danish national healthcare registers. Productivity costs were computed using duration analysis (Cox regression models). In a subanalysis, cost per severe traffic injury was computed for the 12 995 individuals that experienced a severe injury. RESULTS: The socioeconomic cost of a traffic......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse the socioeconomic costs of traffic injuries in Denmark, notably the healthcare costs and the productivity costs related to traffic injuries, in a bottom-up, register-based perspective. METHOD: Traffic injury victims were identified using national...... emergency room data and police records. Victims were matched with five controls per case by means of propensity score, nearest-neighbour matching. In the cohort, consisting of the 52 526 individuals that experienced a traffic injury in 2000 and 262 630 matched controls, attributable healthcare costs were...

  18. The quadratus lumborum and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Franca, G G; Levine, L J

    1991-02-01

    Two cases of low back pain from quadratus lumborum myofascial trigger points are presented. One of the patients suffered from an acute episode while the other had a chronic condition. This condition may be more common than previously believed. The quadratus lumborum should be examined in patients presenting with flank pain as well as low back, buttock and lateral hip pain. Thoracolumbar joint dysfunction may often coexist with quadratus lumborum myofascitis and must be treated for optimal results. Myofascial therapy directed at restoring muscle length and function, coupled with joint manipulation to related dysfunctional areas, was implemented. Diagnosis and treatment are outlined.

  19. Physical injury assessment of male versus female chiropractic students when learning and performing various adjustive techniques: a preliminary investigative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Laura L

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports of musculoskeletal injuries that some chiropractic students experienced while in the role of adjustor became increasingly evident and developed into the basis of this study. The main objective of this study was to survey a select student population and identify, by gender, the specific types of musculoskeletal injuries they experienced when learning adjustive techniques in the classroom, and performing them in the clinical setting. Methods A survey was developed to record musculoskeletal injuries that students reported to have sustained while practicing chiropractic adjustment set-ups and while delivering adjustments. The survey was modeled from similar instruments used in the university's clinic as well as those used in professional practice. Stratified sampling was used to obtain participants for the study. Data reported the anatomical areas of injury, adjustive technique utilized, the type of injury received, and the recovery time from sustained injuries. The survey also inquired as to the type and area of any past physical injuries as well as the mechanism(s of injury. Results Data obtained from the study identified injuries of the shoulder, wrist, elbow, neck, low back, and mid-back. The low back was the most common injury site reported by females, and the neck was the most common site reported by males. The reported wrist injuries in both genders were 1% male complaints and 17% female complaints. A total of 13% of female respondents reported shoulder injuries, whereas less than 1% of male respondents indicated similar complaints. Conclusion The data collected from the project indicated that obtaining further information on the subject would be worthwhile, and could provide an integral step toward developing methods of behavior modification in an attempt to reduce and/or prevent the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries.

  20. Injury Patterns in Youth Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Presents statistics on injury patterns in youth sports, recommending that physicians who care for young athletes understand the kinds of injuries likely to be sustained. Awareness of injury patterns helps medical professionals identify variables associated with injury, anticipate or prevent injuries, plan medical coverage, and compare individual…

  1. Karate and karate injuries.

    OpenAIRE

    McLatchie, G

    1981-01-01

    The origins of karate and its evolution as a sport are described. Karate injuries tend to occur in three main areas: the head and neck, the viscera, and the limbs. Effective legislation controlling karate, which could help prevent injuries, is lacking at the moment and should be established. Recommendations for the prevention of injury include the introduction of weight classes, mandatory provision of protective equipment such as padded flooring, and the outlawing of certain uncontrollable m...

  2. Acute injuries in Taekwondo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter-Brust, K; Leistenschneider, P; Dargel, J; Springorum, H P; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2011-08-01

    Although Taekwondo is becoming an increasingly popular sport, there is a lack of reliable epidemiologic data on Taekwondo injuries. To perform an epidemiologic study on the variety of types of injury in professional and amateur Taekwondo athletes and to find a relation between Taekwondo style, skill level, weight-class and warm-up routine and the occurrence of injuries, we analysed the injury data using a 7-page questionnaire from a total of 356 Taekwondo athletes who were randomly selected. Overall, we registered a total of 2,164 injuries in 356 athletes. Most traumas were contusions and sprains in the lower extremities. Professional Taekwondo athletes have an increased risk of injury in comparison to recreational athletes. Taekwondo style, weight class and tournament frequency have an influence on the athlete's injury profile. Warm-up routines were found to have a positive effect on injury rates. Overall, Taekwondo may be considered a rather benign activity, if injuries during Taekwondo tournaments can be avoided. If not, Taekwondo can result in serious musculoskeletal problems.

  3. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2011-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best "treatment".

  4. Lawnmower injuries in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Nora

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Power lawnmowers can pose significant danger of injury to both the operator and the bystander, from direct contact with the rotary blades or missile injury. Our objective was to review our experience with paediatric lawnmower-associated trauma, and the safety recommendations available to operators of power lawnmowers. METHODS: The patient cohort comprised paediatric (<16 years of age) patients treated for lawnmower-associated trauma, by the plastic surgery service, between 1996 and 2003. These patients were identified retrospectively. Age at the time of injury, location and extent of bony and soft tissue injuries sustained, treatment instituted and clinical outcome were recorded. Brochures and instruction manuals of six lawnmower manufacturers were reviewed, and safety recommendations noted. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were identified. The majority of injuries occurred from direct contact with the rotary blades (93%); the remaining child sustained a burn injury. Fourteen children (93%) required operative intervention. Seven patients (46%) sustained injuries resulting in amputation, two of whom had major limb amputations. All children, except the burns patient, underwent wound debridement and received antibiotic therapy. Reconstructive methods ranged from primary closure to free tissue transfer. Many patients required multiple procedures. In all instruction manuals, instructions to keep children and pets indoors or out of the yard when mowing were found. CONCLUSIONS: Lawnmower injuries can be devastating, particularly in children. Many victims have lasting deformities as a result of their injuries. Awareness of and stringent adherence to safety precautions during use of power lawnmowers can prevent many of these accidents.

  5. Low back pain among residential carpenters: ergonomic evaluation using OWAS and 2D compression estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkey, David P; Keefe, Thomas J; Bigelow, Philip L; Herron, Robin E; Duvall, Kirby; Hautaluoma, Jacob E; Rosecrance, John S; Sesek, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Occupational low back pain (LBP) remains a leading safety and health challenge. This cross-sectional investigation measured the prevalence of LBP in residential carpenters and investigated ergonomic risk factors. Ninety-four carpenters were investigated for LBP presence and associated risk factors. Ten representative job-tasks were evaluated using the Ovako Working Posture Analysis System (OWAS) and ErgoMaster 2D software to measure elements of posture, stress, and risk. Job-tasks were found to differ significantly for total lumbar compression and shear at peak loading (p OWAS indicated that slight risk for injury was found in 10 job-tasks while distinct risk was found in 7 of the 10 job-tasks. Seven of the 10 job-tasks exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) action limit of 3 400 N for low back loading. The point prevalence for LBP was 14% while the annual prevalence was 38%.

  6. Lumbar spine MRI in the elite-level female gymnast with low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, D. Lee [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Colleges of Human Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine, East Lansing, MI (United States); Nassar, Lawrence [Department of Sports Medicine and Kinesiology, Michigan State University, College of Osteopathic Medicine, East Lansing, MI (United States); DeLano, Mark C. [Department of Radiology, Michigan State University, Colleges of Human Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Previous studies have shown increased degenerative disk changes and spine injuries in the competitive female gymnast. However, it has also been shown that many of these findings are found in asymptomatic athletic people of the same age. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies evaluating the gymnastic spine have not made a distinction between symptomatic and asymptomatic athletes. Our hypothesis is that MRI will demonstrate the same types of abnormalities in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic gymnasts. Olympic-level female gymnasts received prospectively an MRI exam of the lumbar spine. Each of the gymnasts underwent a physical exam by a sports medicine physician just prior to the MRI for documentation of low back pain. Each MRI exam was evaluated for anterior apophyseal ring avulsion injury, compression deformity of the vertebral body, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, degenerative disease, focal disk protrusion/extrusion, muscle strain, epidural mass, and bone-marrow edema. Nineteen Olympic-level female gymnasts (age 12-20 years) were evaluated prospectively in this study. All of these gymnasts were evaluated while attending a specific training camp. Anterior ring apophyseal injuries (9/19) and degenerative disk disease (12/19) were common. Spondylolysis (3/19) and spondylolisthesis (3/19) were found. Focal bone-marrow edema was found in both L3 pedicles in one gymnast. History and physical exam revealed four gymnasts with current low back pain at the time of imaging. There were findings confined to those athletes with current low back pain: spondylolisthesis, spondylolysis, bilateral pedicle bone-marrow edema, and muscle strain. (orig.)

  7. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part iii: outcomes research utilising the biosychosocial model: psychosocial outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of low back pain (LBPhas evolved that necessitates the use of a biopsychosocial model, focusing on illness rather than disease and incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects that are important to understand and to study LBP in its chronic form. Traditional outcome measures that measure elements within the biological component are limited to assess the spectrum of impacts caused by chronic low back pain (CLBP and the validity, reliability and sensitivity of some of these measures has been questioned.Few physiologic tests of spine function are clinically meaningful to patients, objective physical findings can be absent, and in CLBP disability and activity intolerance are often disproportional to the original injury. Biological outcomes should be complemented by outcomes of the psychosocial aspects of back pain that measure the considerable functional and emotional impact on the quality of life of patients experiencing low back dysfunction. Outcomes research is an analysis of clinical practice as it actually occurs and can  make a valuable contribution to understanding the multidimensional impact of LBP. Psychosocial aspects of the biopsychosocial model for outcomes research are discussed in part III: functional status/disability, psychological impairment, patient satisfaction, health related quality of life

  8. Paschen-Back Effect in Dyonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, David

    1987-05-01

    A formulation of the Pashen-Back effect in dyonium is discussed to explain the recent evidence for a magnetic monopole of mass 2397 MeV and Dirac charge g=(137/2) e. The masses for isospin I=0 mesons are estimated and compared with experiment.

  9. Winning Students Back from McDonald's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hean, Lim Lee; Tin, Low Guat

    1996-01-01

    Describes a Singapore principal's turnaround strategy to improve his secondary students' academic performance and study habits. Principal Tong Pak Goh won students back from McDonald's and other distractions by creating an atmosphere of care and casual comfort, holding afterschool tutoring sessions for problem and latchkey kids, and counseling…

  10. Computer Programming Goes Back to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Burke, Quinn

    2013-01-01

    We are witnessing a remarkable comeback of programming. Current initiatives to promote computational thinking and to broaden participation in computing signal a renewed interest to bring programming back into K-12 schools and help develop children as producers and not simply consumers of digital media. This essay explores the re-emergence of…

  11. Turkey's two elections : The AKP comes back

    OpenAIRE

    Öniş, Şakir Ziya

    2016-01-01

    In power since 2002, the Justice and Development Party (AKP) of Recep Tayyip Erdoğan seemed as if it might be losing its hold when Turkish voters went to the polls in June 2015. Yet that “hung election” gave way to another contest in November, and the AKP came roaring back.

  12. Back to Sleep, Tummy to Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... create a safe sleep environment in your home, family child care home, or child care center: Always place babies on their backs to sleep, even for short naps. Place babies on a firm sleep surface that meets current safety standards. For ...

  13. Solar cell with back side contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Clews, Peggy J

    2013-12-24

    A III-V solar cell is described herein that includes all back side contacts. Additionally, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact compoud semiconductor layers of the solar cell other than the absorbing layer of the solar cell. That is, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact passivating layers of the solar cell.

  14. Ginzburg deserved Nobel prize 50 years back

    CERN Multimedia

    Golovchansky, V

    2003-01-01

    "Vitali Ginzburg deserved a Nobel prize fifty years back, Leonid Keldysh, academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, who was Ginzburg's disciple, told Tass. "The Ginzburg-Landau phenomenal theory of superconductivity deserved a Nobel prize right upon being produced. It was a work of intransient importance" (1/2 page).

  15. The natural course of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemeunier, Nadège; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Gagey, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Most patients in the secondary care sector consulting for low back pain (LBP) seem to have a more or less constant course of pain during the ensuing year. Fewer patients with LBP in the primary care sector report continual pain over a one-year period. However, not much is known about the long...

  16. Welcoming Grammar Back into the Writing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devet, Bonnie

    2002-01-01

    Describes three approaches with which grammar may be welcomed back into the composition classroom. Considers how the teaching of grammar is making a comeback, with scholars acknowledging that the objections raised by process theories were valid but also investigating how to use grammar in writing classrooms, how to answer old process objections,…

  17. Neuropathic pain, back to the patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Seventer (Robert)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Pain can be classified in several ways. The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) recommends describing pain according to five categories or axes, namely its anatomical location (neck, lower back, etc.), the body system involved (gastrointestinal, nervo

  18. Pregnancy-related low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katonis, P; Kampouroglou, A; Aggelopoulos, A; Kakavelakis, K; Lykoudis, S; Makrigiannakis, A; Alpantaki, K

    2011-07-01

    Pregnancy related low back pain is a common complaint among pregnant women. It can potentially have a negative impact on their quality of life. The aim of this article is to present a current review of the literature concerning this issue.By using PubMed database and low back pain, pelvic girdle pain, pregnancy as keywords, abstracts and original articles in English investigating the diagnosis treatment of back pain during pregnancy were searched and analyzedLow back pain could present as either a pelvic girdle pain between the posterior iliac crest and the gluteal fold or as a lumbar pain over and around the lumbar spine. The source of the pain should be diagnosed and differentiated early.The appropriate treatment aims to reduce the discomfort and the impact on the pregnant womans quality of life. This article reveals the most common risk factors, as well as treatment methods, which may help to alleviate the pain. Some suggestions for additional research are also discussed.

  19. Physical therapy for patients with back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, R.W.A. van der; Dekker, J.; Baar, M.E. van

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the physical therapy diagnosis and treatment in patients with back pain. More specifically, the relationship between the duration of the complaint and the diagnosis and treatment was analysed. Data were used from a representative survey of physical therapeutic p

  20. Hand injuries as an indicator of other associated severe injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossoughi, Faranak; Krantz, Brent; Fann, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of disabling or life-threatening injuries in patients with hand injuries. Retrospective data were collected from a level 1 trauma center registry. A total of 472 patients with hand injuries were admitted to the trauma unit between January 2000 and March 2004. Forty-four per cent of patients with hand injuries had life-threatening injuries. Fifty-one per cent of them had motor vehicle crash-related injuries. Motorcycle crashes were the next most common cause followed by explosions, falls, gunshots, machinery, stabs, bites, crushes, and so on. Frequency of associated injuries was as follows: head injuries, 31 per cent, including skull fractures, 22 per cent; spine injuries, 18 per cent, including spine fractures 18 per cent; chest injuries, 36 per cent, including rib fractures, 15 per cent; and abdominal injuries, 13 per cent. The authors focused on the incidence of disabling or life-threatening injuries in patients with hand injuries. Motor vehicle crashes were most common cause of hand injuries. The most common organs to be injured were chest and head. The most common head injury was skull fracture. Other injuries in decreasing order were spine and rib fractures. These data may be helpful in assessing ambulatory patients in the emergency room, in those hand injuries maybe indicative of other simultaneous life-threatening or disabling injuries.

  1. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Unintentional Nonfatal Injury Among the United States Air Force Active Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    resulting from repetitive, cumulative microtrauma (e.g., tendonitis, stress fractures, patellofemoral syndrome )" (DoD Injury Surveillance and 10...chronic injuries such as low back pain and repetitive trauma disorders among the US military and civilian populations are a function of physical and...sufficient biomechanical stress on their lumbar region to cause enough physical pain to warrant a medical visit. Sub-hypothesis 3 It was not anticipated

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) ... and Recovery Coping With an ACL Injury About ACL Injuries A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is ...

  3. Maxillofacial injuries in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Richard; Martin, Tim

    2013-04-01

    Over a 2-year period we reviewed patients who presented to a UK maxillofacial unit with facial injuries sustained at work. We looked at links between the mechanism, injury, and characteristics of such injuries.

  4. Challenges of the pregnant athlete and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Megan L; Hoch, Anne Z

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain during pregnancy is a common problem with a high prevalence among pregnant athletes. The etiology of pregnancy-related low back pain remains unclear, although more evidence is supporting a biomechanical/musculoskeletal origin. This article will review the causes of low back pain in athletes and pregnant women, differentiate low back from pelvic girdle pain, and discuss the treatment and prevention of pregnancy-related low back and pelvic girdle pain.

  5. A Prospective Study of Factors Affecting Recovery from Musculoskeletal Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    back pain and disability. Pain. 1993;52:157–68. 37. Scheier MF, Carver CS, Bridges MW. Distinguishing optimism from neuroticism (and trait anxiety, self...characteristic that may play a role in injury recovery is dispositional optimism. Disposi- tional optimism is a global personality characteristic... personal information sheet on which they provided their contact information (phone numbers, e-mail addresses, and mailing address). Follow-up Data

  6. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The ACT 3 pilot study , designed to refine the strength and balance testing procedures in participants with low back pain, launched at the Palmer...re-injury • Tested and refined programs and procedures for evaluating strength and balance during the pilot phase of the study • Moved the long...delivered within a multidisciplinary frame- work of care, rather than as a single system of care, the study is focused on the comparative effectiveness

  7. Alopecia and dermatopathy of the lower back following pelvic fractures in three cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Jan

    2004-02-01

    An alopecia and dermatopathy following pelvic fractures associated with vehicular trauma is reported in three cats. The animals presented 3-4 weeks post injury with acute hair loss, glistening appearance of the skin and erosions involving the lower back. Histological examination revealed atrophy of the hair follicles and adnexal structures and follicular telogenization, dermal fibroplasia and mild lymphocytic infiltrate, fibroplasia and inflammation in the panniculus. Vascular damage secondary to the external trauma to blood vessels supplying the skin over the lumbar region and subsequent ischaemia may represent the pathomechanism of this type of alopecia. Focal permanent hair loss can be expected.

  8. Chronic low back pain in housewives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bulut

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate low back pain of housewives and to deteremine relationships between psychological status, education and physical health in housewives.Materials and methods: Thirty premenopausal housewives aged 33-45 years with chronic low back pain were included and the control group consisted of 30 healthy premenopausal housewives. Physical examinations were performed. Age, height, weight, educational level, number of children, consumption of cigarettes and alcohol were recorded. The body mass index (BDI was measured. The severity of back pain was measured by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, psychological status was evaluated by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and muscle strength by manual technique.Results: There was no difference between demographic data of patients and controls. BDI scores of patients were significantly higher than the controls (p<0,01. Abdominal and dorsal muscle strength were higher in the control group but different was not significant. OBAS values in the patient group, were positively correlated with BDI and BMI (p= 0.011; p= 0.001, respectively, and negatively correlated with abdominal and dorsal muscle strength (p= 0.006 and p= 0.001. Significant correlations were found between abdominal and dorsal muscle strength and the BMI, ODI and BDI scores and high educational level positively affected the ODI and the BDI scores in patients.Conclusion: The housewives with chronic back pain and do not exercise regularly limit activities of daily living. Because of higher BDI scores of patients with chronic low back pain, these patients should also undergo psychiatric examination. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 295-298.

  9. Acute kidney injury during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hook, James W

    2014-12-01

    Acute kidney injury complicates the care of a relatively small number of pregnant and postpartum women. Several pregnancy-related disorders such as preeclampsia and thrombotic microangiopathies may produce acute kidney injury. Prerenal azotemia is another common cause of acute kidney injury in pregnancy. This manuscript will review pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury from a renal functional perspective. Pathophysiology of acute kidney injury will be reviewed. Specific conditions causing acute kidney injury and treatments will be compared.

  10. Comparison between kinesiotherapy and back school in the treatment of low back pain in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Maria Marques Gomes Bertolini; Maria Lúcia Ziroldo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to compare the efficacy of physiotherapy treatment involving kinesiotherapy and back school in older adults’ lowback pain. Methods: study of the case-series type. The pain visual analog scale and the WHOQOL-bref were used for assessingquality of life, and the Timed Up and Go Test was used for testing agility. A total of 21 older adults, who had had low back painfor over three months, participated in the study. The sample was divided in two groups (kinesiotherapy and back school).Th...

  11. Strangulation injuries in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sep, D.Ph.; Thies, K.C.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we present a case of fatal strangulation with playground equipment in a 4-year-old child and a review of the literature. Playground injuries are a major cause of injury in children but fatalities are rare. However, strangulation is the cause of death in more than 50% of all playgroun

  12. CAUSES OF OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KINGMA, J

    1994-01-01

    The causes of occupational injuries (N = 2,365) were investigated. Accidents with machinery and hand tools were the two main causes (49.9%). 89% of the patients with occupational injuries were male. The highest risk group were in the age category of 19 years or less (51.9%). This age group also show

  13. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head, sports injuries, and even listening to loud music can cause ear damage, which can affect hearing and balance. That's because the ear not ... Hearing Loss or Balance Problems Ear injuries can affect kids differently. ... sounds or music notes hearing only certain or muffled sounds ringing ...

  14. Putting a Vocational Focus Back into Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gregory C.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, rehabilitation has been closely associated with vocational potential and return to work post-injury, or the maintenance of work attendance following the onset of chronic disease. Indeed, so close was the association that the terms "rehabilitation" and "vocational rehabilitation" were virtually synonymous. Over…

  15. Mole gun injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistré, V; Rezzouk, J

    2013-09-01

    A mole gun is a weapon, which is used to trap and kill moles. This report provides an overview of the state of knowledge of mole gun injuries, comparable to blast injuries caused by fireworks, explosive or gunshot. Over a 2-year period, the authors reported their experience with ten hand injuries caused by mole gun. Radial side of the hand was often concerned, particularly the thumb. The authors explain their choices in the management of such lesions. Surgery was performed primarily and a large debridement currently seemed to offer the best outcome for the patient. Blast, crush, burns and lacerations may explain the higher rate of amputation to the digits. A long period of physiotherapy, specifically of the hand, was needed before the patient could return to work. This ballistic hand trauma encountered by surgeons requires knowledge and understanding of these injuries. It should be in accordance with firearms law because of severe injuries encountered and possible lethal wounds.

  16. Prevention of running injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Karl B; Sykes, Jeannie C; Walker, Katherine M; Jackson, Jonathan C

    2010-01-01

    Evidence for preventive strategies to lessen running injuries is needed as these occur in 40%-50% of runners on an annual basis. Many factors influence running injuries, but strong evidence for prevention only exists for training modification primarily by reducing weekly mileage. Two anatomical factors - cavus feet and leg length inequality - demonstrate a link to injury. Weak evidence suggests that orthotics may lessen risk of stress fracture, but no clear evidence proves they will reduce the risk of those athletes with leg length inequality or cavus feet. This article reviews other potential injury variables, including strength, biomechanics, stretching, warm-up, nutrition, psychological factors, and shoes. Additional research is needed to determine whether interventions to address any of these will help prevent running injury.

  17. An Unusual Laryngeal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kohli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt injuries to the anterior neck are most commonly due to road traffic accidents but the incidence of such types of injuries are decreasing probably due to stricter laws pertaining to seat belts and drunken driving. Experience in managing such injuries is limited due to their rarity. The mainstay of management revolves around establishing and maintaining a patent airway and integrity of the spine. Here we document a case of a 25 year old male who met with a Road traffic accident while driving a motorbike and sustained a clear cut linear wound on the right side of the neck with minimal airleak due to the helmet clip. On exploration, he was found to have massive epiglottic edema, mucosal abrasions, lacerations and a thyroid cartilage fracture. The mechanism of injury was probably a combination of penetrating and blunt trauma neck. This case highlights the mechanism of laryngeal injury, its presentation and management

  18. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  19. Sports related ocular injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Avinash; Verma, Ashok K

    2012-07-01

    Every year > 600,000 sports and recreation related eye injuries occur, out of which roughly 13,500 of these result in permanent loss of sight. Up to 90% of these sports related eye injuries are preventable by using adequate eye protection equipment. Protective eyewear is made of polycarbonate, a highly impact-resistant plastic which is now easily available as prescription and non-prescription eyewear and all players should be encouraged to use them. The medical officers by educating their patients regarding the risks of eye injuries in various sports and the confirmed benefits of using protective equipment have the potential to prevent injury to over thousands of eyes every year. The medical fraternity can also play a very important role in educating the coaches, parents, and children and thus put an end to unnecessary blindness and vision loss from sports related ocular injuries, therefore ensuring a lifetime of healthy vision.

  20. Tooth injury in anaesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Brandão Ribeiro de Sousa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Dental injury is the most common complication of general anaesthesia and has significant physical, economic and forensic consequences. The aim of this study is to review on the characteristics of dental injury associated with anaesthesiology and existing methods of prevention. CONTENTS: In this review, the time of anaesthesia in which the dental injury occurs, the affected teeth, the most frequent type of injury, established risk factors, prevention strategies, protection devices and medico-legal implications inherent to its occurrence are approached. CONCLUSIONS: Before initiating any medical procedure that requires the use of classic laryngoscopy, a thorough and detailed pre-aesthetic evaluation of the dental status of the patient is imperative, in order to identify teeth at risk, analyze the presence of factors associated with difficult intubation and outline a prevention strategy that is tailored to the risk of dental injury of each patient.

  1. Population-based, inception cohort study of the incidence, course, and prognosis of mild traumatic brain injury after motor vehicle collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassidy, John David; Boyle, Eleanor; Carroll, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    problems, having headaches, having low back pain, and having thoracic back pain. Loss of consciousness and posttraumatic amnesia were not associated with recovery. CONCLUSIONS: MTBI affects almost a quarter of persons reporting an injury after a traffic collision. The median time to recovery is 100 days...

  2. Quantifying relationships between selected work-related risk factors and back pain: a systematic review of objective biomechanical measures and cost-related health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nancy A; Hughes, Richard E

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to use published literature to demonstrate that specific changes in workplace biomechanical exposure levels can predict reductions in back injuries. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify epidemiologic studies which could be used to quantify relationships between several well-recognized biomechanical measures of back stress and economically relevant outcome measures. Eighteen publications, describing 15 research studies, which fulfilled search criteria were found. Quantitative associations were observed between back injuries and measures of spinal compression, lifting, lifting ratios, postures, and combinations thereof. Results were intended to provide safety practitioners with information that could be applied to their own work situations to estimate costs and benefits of ergonomic intervention strategies before they are implemented.

  3. 银质针灸治疗下腰部软组织疼痛%An investigation of treatment with silver acupuncture for pain of chronic soft tissue lesions in low back

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    虞乐华; 吴南顺; 张宽平

    2002-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of a modern silver acupuncture(MSA) on chronic soft tissue lesion in low back.Methods 89 patients suffering severe low back pain from soft tissue lesions(conversion of acute injuries,chronic overuse injuries,fibromyositis or myogelosis) were treated by MSA.The silver needles of MSA to be inserted into a series of abnormal points (local tension," trigger points" and tenderness,stiffness and muscle spasms etc.) mainly located in the connective tissue between bones and muscles in low back , should go through all soft tissues to reach the lesions along the sides of bones, lighting moxibustion fixed on the tails of the needles produced heat effect on the lesions.Treatment period might be one time to five times, 7~ 10 days interval between twice.Results The effective percents of conversion of acute injuries(72% ) or chronic overuse injuries(64% ) were significant higher than that of fibromyositis or myogelosis(29% ), P < 0.01, P< 0.05 respectively. Conclusion MSA is an effective treatment, especially for the soft tissue lesions from conversion of acute injuries and chronic overuse injuries in low back.

  4. Power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Kandula, Rajendra Prasad; Prasai, Anish

    2016-03-08

    A power flow controller with a fractionally rated back-to-back (BTB) converter is provided. The power flow controller provide dynamic control of both active and reactive power of a power system. The power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources at the same frequency; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between the two AC sources. A transformer may be augmented with a fractionally rated bi-directional Back to Back (BTB) converter. The fractionally rated BTB converter comprises a transformer side converter (TSC), a direct-current (DC) link, and a line side converter (LSC). By controlling the switches of the BTB converter, the effective phase angle between the two AC source voltages may be regulated, and the amplitude of the voltage inserted by the power flow controller may be adjusted with respect to the AC source voltages.

  5. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James H; Fox, James R; Maple, Rhonda; Loretan, Caitlin; Badger, Gary J; Henry, Sharon M; Vizzard, Margaret A; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of back pain following acute back "sprains" is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP) have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a "hobble" device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain) during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble). Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007) and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027). Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024). The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted.

  6. Muscle strain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries among wakeboarders: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Tetsuya; Mori, Atsushi; Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iizawa, Norishige; Takeda, Tomomichi; Hattori, Mikihiko; Ito, Hiromoto

    2004-02-01

    No previous cases of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries sustained during wake-boarding have been reported. We report on a case involving an ACL injury sustained during wakeboarding. A 27-year-old man sustained an injury while attempting a wakeboarding maneuver(a heel-side back roll, consisting of a jump and simultaneous roll toward the heel side). He failed to complete his roll before landing, striking the water with his right shoulder foremost, then plunging underwater. When his wakeboard struck the water, his left knee was sprained by the rotational force exerted by the board. The patient was diagnosed with an isolated ACL injury and underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstructive surgery. The board used in wakeboarding is wider and subject to greater water resistance than that used in water skiing. The feet of the wakeboarder are firmly attached by binding boots to a board, laterally with respect to the direction of motion, impeding easy separation of the board from the feet in the event of a fall. Thus, wakeboarding conditions would appear to put wakeboarders at particular risk for ACL injuries. These conditions need be assessed from a medical perspective in order to devise ways to minimize the risk of such injuries.

  8. PREVALENCE AND TYPES OF SPORTS INJURIES PRESENTING TO EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT SUEZ CANAL UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Hamed Elbaih

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inroduction: regular physical activity is essential for the prevention of various diseases and reduces the risk of premature mortality in general and coronary heart disease, hypertension, colon cancer, obesity and diabetes mellitus in particular. Aim of this study was to assess the most common sports causing injuries and to assess the types and mechanisms of these injuries. Patients and methods: The researcher examined 250 patients attending emergency departmentl. Results: The study showed that the most common type of sports involved in injury was football .The ankle was the most common affected part in the whole body . Chest contusion and back contusion were the most common types of sports injuries in head, neck and trunk. Fracture scaphoid and fissure radius were the most common sport injuries. Ankle sprain was the most common injury. The study showed that (62.7% of the studied patients who were playing football had injuries in the lower limbs. Ankle sprain was the most common sport injury that was associated with wearing football shoes . Conclusion: Ankle sprain was the most common sport injury associated with artificial grass court . Wrist sprain was the common sport injury in the upper limbs associated with artificial grass court .

  9. Research methods for subgrouping low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Keating, Jennifer L; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable clinician and researcher interest in whether the outcomes for patients with low back pain, and the efficiency of the health systems that treat them, can be improved by 'subgrouping research'. Subgrouping research seeks to identify subgroups of people who have clinically impo...... the strengths and limitations of research methods suitable for the hypothesis-setting phase of subgroup studies.......There is considerable clinician and researcher interest in whether the outcomes for patients with low back pain, and the efficiency of the health systems that treat them, can be improved by 'subgrouping research'. Subgrouping research seeks to identify subgroups of people who have clinically...... important distinctions in their treatment needs or prognoses. Due to a proliferation of research methods and variability in how subgrouping results are interpreted, it is timely to open discussion regarding a conceptual framework for the research designs and statistical methods available for subgrouping...

  10. ["Round back" in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoflid, N; Fragnière, B; Dutoit, M

    2000-10-01

    The hyper-kyphosis or "the postural round back" is one of the most common complaints in orthopedic practice. In the majority of cases, the thoracic kyphosis are painless and flexible. The vertebral bodies are normal on radiograms. This is "the kyphotic attitude" or postural round-back. A medical treatment is not the necessary rule. Life hygiene, sports and simple supervision are needed. Nevertheless, there are still pathological fixed kyphosis, induced in the majority of cases by Scheuermann's disease. The other possible etiologies (congenital, paralytic, post-traumatic, Pott's disease, postradiation, or metabolic origin) are a lot rare ones and will be excluded by clinical examination and imaging studies. The structural hyper-kyphosis require treatment. We will approach successively steps of the diagnosis and treatment of the hyper-kyphosis of the adolescent.

  11. Universal quantum back-action evasion

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang, Mankei

    2012-01-01

    Quantum mechanics is potentially advantageous for certain information-processing tasks, but its probabilistic nature and requirement of measurement back action often limit the precision of conventional classical information-processing devices, such as sensors and atomic clocks. Here we show that by engineering the dynamics of coupled quantum systems, it is possible to construct a subsystem that evades the measurement back action of quantum mechanics, at all times of interest, and obeys any classical dynamics, linear or nonlinear, that we choose. We call such a system a quantum-mechanics-free subsystem (QMFS). All of the observables of a QMFS are quantum-nondemolition (QND) observables; moreover, they are dynamical QND observables, thus demolishing the widely held belief that QND observables are constants of motion. QMFSs point to a new strategy for designing classical information-processing devices in regimes where quantum noise is detrimental. Potential applications include gravitational-wave detection, opto...

  12. Triathlon related musculoskeletal injuries: the status of injury prevention knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Cameron McR; Gabbe, Belinda J; Forbes, Andrew B

    2008-07-01

    Triathlon is a popular participation sport that combines swimming, cycling and running into a single event. A number of studies have investigated the incidence of injury, profile of injuries sustained and factors contributing to triathlon injury. This paper summarises the published literature in the context of the evidence base for the prevention of triathlon related injuries. Relevant articles on triathlon injuries were sourced from peer-reviewed English language journals and assessed using the Translating Research into Injury Prevention Practice (TRIPP) framework. This review highlights the significant knowledge gap that exists in the published literature describing the incidence of injury, the profile of injuries sustained and evidence for the prevention of injury in triathlon. Despite the number of studies undertaken to address TRIPP Stages 1 and 2 (injury surveillance, aetiology and mechanism of injury), most triathlon studies have been limited by retrospective designs with substantial, and unvalidated, recall periods, inconsistency in the definitions used for a reportable injury and exposure to injury, or a failure to capture exposure data at all. Overall, the paucity of quality, prospective studies investigating the incidence of injury in triathlon and factors contributing to their occurrence has led to an inability to adequately inform the development of injury prevention strategies (TRIPP Stages 3-6) for this sport, a situation that must be rectified if gains are to be made in reducing the burden of triathlon related injury.

  13. VALUING AGRICULTURAL MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes, Jeffrey R.; Brinch, Brian M.

    2001-01-01

    A model to value Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (Farmer Mac) agricultural mortgage-backed securities (AMBS) is developed and numerically solved. The results suggest prepayment penalties currently being used by Farmer Mac reduce yields on AMBS considerably. Even with prepayment penalties, it can be advantageous for profit maximizing mortgagors to optimally prepay or even default on agricultural mortgages. The model is used to quantify prepayment and default risk by valuing the embed...

  14. The hyperfine Paschen-Back Faraday effect

    OpenAIRE

    Zentile, Mark A.; Andrews, Rebecca; Weller, Lee; Knappe, Svenja; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G

    2014-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the Faraday effect in an atomic medium in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime, where the Zeeman interaction is larger than the hyperfine splitting. We use a small permanent magnet and a micro-fabricated vapour cell, giving magnetic fields of the order of a Tesla. We show that for low absorption and small rotation angles, the refractive index is well approximated by the Faraday rotation signal, giving a simple way to measure the atomic refractive i...

  15. Looking Back on the Stock Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Looking back at the ups and downs of China's stock market in 2007,it is clear that it has developed far beyond people's expectation. While the stock index constantly reaches new highs and the size of the market becomes larger and larger, the Chinese financial market has also reintegrated. A multi-level revolution occurred in 2007, involving changes in stock structure, the variety of core composition, chip cost of the capital market, investor makeup, as well as trade rules and operational methods.

  16. DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Askhatovich Altunbaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an update on the principles of diagnosis and medical and surgical treatments in patients with low back pain (LBP, by taking into account the clinical phenomenology of pain manifestations. It considers the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myorelaxants, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and other agents. The data of clinical trials of meloxicam used in LBP are presented. The currently available surgical treatments for LBP are described.

  17. BackTrack testing wireless network security

    CERN Document Server

    Cardwell, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Written in an easy-to-follow step-by-step format, you will be able to get started in next to no time with minimal effort and zero fuss.BackTrack: Testing Wireless Network Security is for anyone who has an interest in security and who wants to know more about wireless networks.All you need is some experience with networks and computers and you will be ready to go.

  18. SINOPEC TO BUY BACK FOUR LISTED SUBSIDIARIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Sinopec will buy back its four listed subsidiaries - Sinopec Qilu Petrochemical Co, Sinopec Yangzi Petrochemical Co, Sinopec Zhongyuan Petroleum Co, and Sinopec Shengli Oilfield Dynamic Group Co - at a cash offer of 14.3 billion yuan (US$1.78 billion), the company announced in mid-February. This transaction is a move made by Sinopec to deliver their promises at IPO in 2000 which include restructuring its assets in order to strengthen the competence of its core business.

  19. Back to Basics: Preventing Surgical Fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    When fires occur in the OR, they are devastating and potentially fatal to both patients and health care workers. Fires can be prevented by understanding the fire triangle and methods of reducing fire risk, conducting fire risk assessments, and knowing how to respond if a fire occurs. This Back to Basics article addresses the basics of fire prevention and the steps that can be taken to prevent fires from occurring.

  20. Approach to low back pain. Chiropractic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simon; Werth, Peter; Walker, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Case study. A man aged 42 years, who works as a police officer, presented with severe lower back pain, which he had experienced for 24 hours after spending the previous day helping his brother to move house. He had difficulty ambulating and most movements aggravated the pain. There were no lower limb symptoms and no red flags present on history or examination. He was otherwise well and was not taking any regular medications.

  1. Prevalence, patterns, and correlates of equestrian injuries in Malaysia: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeedkutty, Nizar A.; Khairulanuar, Nor A.B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Equestrian sport carries with it an implicit risk of injury. Despite the frequency of injuries in equestrian sports, there is no published study on injuries of equestrian athletes in Malaysia. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of injuries and its correlates among horseback riders. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A web-based standardized questionnaire was used to collect data for this cross-sectional survey. Horseback riders aged 18 years and above were included in the study. Out of 169 participants, 93 were females and 76 were males. The correlation of injuries to gender, age, level of experience, exercise habits, use of safety measures, and type of equestrian sport were determined. Chi-square test was performed to test for statistical significance. RESULTS: The prevalence was high with 85.8% of the participants reporting symptoms and characteristics of injuries in the past 12 months. The most frequently perceived symptoms reported were in the upper extremities (43.4%) followed by lower extremities (40.7%), head injury (8.3%) and injuries of upper and lower back (3.4%). There was a higher prevalence of injury among female participants (55.03%) than males (42.60%). A significant correlation was found between gender and prevalence of injuries. About 70% of the riders sustained soft tissue injuries. Fifty-five percent of the injured were involved in recreational riding. The most common mechanism of injury was a fall from a horse. Sixty percent of the injured riders did not seek medical attention after being injured, and physiotherapy consultation was even lower with 10.3%. CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of injuries and low rate of medical consultation emphasize the need for education programs on safety in Malaysia. Sessions should be held to improve coaching for riders and instructors, and their knowledge of the nature of the horse, mechanisms of injuries, horse handling, and riding skills to help them host safe equestrian

  2. Prevalence, patterns, and correlates of equestrian injuries in Malaysia: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizar A Majeedkutty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Equestrian sport carries with it an implicit risk of injury. Despite the frequency of injuries in equestrian sports, there is no published study on injuries of equestrian athletes in Malaysia. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of injuries and its correlates among horseback riders. Subjects And Methods: A web-based standardized questionnaire was used to collect data for this cross-sectional survey. Horseback riders aged 18 years and above were included in the study. Out of 169 participants, 93 were females and 76 were males. The correlation of injuries to gender, age, level of experience, exercise habits, use of safety measures, and type of equestrian sport were determined. Chi-square test was performed to test for statistical significance. Results: The prevalence was high with 85.8% of the participants reporting symptoms and characteristics of injuries in the past 12 months. The most frequently perceived symptoms reported were in the upper extremities (43.4% followed by lower extremities (40.7%, head injury (8.3% and injuries of upper and lower back (3.4%. There was a higher prevalence of injury among female participants (55.03% than males (42.60%. A significant correlation was found between gender and prevalence of injuries. About 70% of the riders sustained soft tissue injuries. Fifty-five percent of the injured were involved in recreational riding. The most common mechanism of injury was a fall from a horse. Sixty percent of the injured riders did not seek medical attention after being injured, and physiotherapy consultation was even lower with 10.3%. Conclusions: The high prevalence of injuries and low rate of medical consultation emphasize the need for education programs on safety in Malaysia. Sessions should be held to improve coaching for riders and instructors, and their knowledge of the nature of the horse, mechanisms of injuries, horse handling, and riding skills to help them host safe

  3. Childhood sledding injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, N A; Mooney, D P; Harmon, B J

    1999-01-01

    Sledding is only rarely thought of as a potentially dangerous childhood activity. However, serious injuries and occasional deaths do occur. A review of patients 18 years old and younger admitted to a pediatric trauma center following a sledding accident from 1991 to 1997 was conducted. By design this study was expected to identify the most seriously injured patients. Twenty-five patients were identified, all but four younger than 13. Seventeen were boys. The mechanisms of injury were: collision with stationary object, 15; sled-sled collision, 1; struck by sled, 2; going off jump, 3; foot caught under sled or on ground, 3; fall off sled being towed by snowmobile, 1. The average pediatric trauma score was 10.5, and the average injury severity score 10.6. There were no deaths. The injuries were: head, 11; long bone/extremity, all lower, 10; abdomen, 5; chest, 1; facial, 2; spinal, 1. Five patients sustained multiple injuries. A surprisingly high number, 5, had pre-existing neurological conditions that could have played a contributory role in the accident. Sledding is predominantly an activity of children, and occasional serious injuries occur. Most are preventable. Obeying the simple caveat that sledding should only be done in clear areas away from stationary objects would eliminate the great majority of serious injuries.

  4. Back to work for the PS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On 22 June, the PS's rotating machine started turning again for the first time since its enforced shutdown one month ago (see Bulletin No. 23-24/2006) - and the PS was back in operation the very next day! A team from Siemens worked their socks off, 6 days a week for one month (including public holidays), to repair the electrical power supply in collaboration with the AB/PO Group's Main Power Converters (MPC) Section. The generator's faulty rotor was dismantled and replaced by the renovated spare rotor. The multitude of electrical and mechanical connections together with the sheer weight of the rotor (80 tonnes) made this an extremely complex job. The AB/PO Group used the shutdown to test a back-up solution for the PS power supply. The accelerator was directly wired up to the 18 kV electrical network via a 13 MVA transformer, installed at the end of the 1970s but never used. This solution succeeded in bringing the PS back into operation but at limited energy and frequency. Just 14 GeV could be achieved, whic...

  5. BACK PAIN SYNDROME: MODERN APPROACHES TO THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe management tactics in patients with back pain syndrome and to give recommendations for the choice of non-drug and drug treatments (with main drug groups and the duration of a treatment cycle. Materials and methods. The paper considers the basic mechanisms and causes of back pain syndromes (dorsalgias. It introduces the concept “dorsopathy” that characterizes the appearance of nonvisceral pain syndrome in the extremities and trunk, which is caused by degenerative processes in the vertebral motion segment. The authors provide a description of spondyloarthrosis, one of the main degenerative diseases of the spine, and give current principles of treatment for the major symptoms of the disease. Results. The main goal of treatment in patients with back pain is to relieve pain syndrome. Selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the medicaments of choice. Conclusion. This paper covers current approaches to managing patients with spondyloarthrosis and gives recommendations regarding the treatment of the major disease manifestation – pain syndrome. 

  6. Lombalgia ocupacional Occupational low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Helfenstein Junior

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A lombalgia ocupacional apresenta etiologia multifatorial, elevada prevalência e incidência. Caracterizada por quadro de dor de variada duração e intensidade, a dor lombar pode levar à incapacidade laborativa e à invalidez. A lombalgia acarreta sofrimento aos trabalhadores, custos às empresas, aos sistemas previdenciário e assistencial de saúde. Os autores, pela relevância do tema, elaboraram este artigo de revisão bibliográfica dando ênfase ao embasamento teorico-conceitual e à experiência de especialistas.The occupational low back pain presents multifactorial aetiology, important prevalence and incidence. Characterized by pain of varying duration and intensity, low back pain may lead to disability. Low back pain causes suffering to workers, implies costs to companies, to the social security and health assistance system. Because of the theme's relevance, the authors have elaborated this review of literature with emphasis on a theoretical and conceptual basis, as well as experience of experts.

  7. Analysis Of Scoliosis By Back Shape Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Smith, Alan R.; Harris, John D.

    1983-07-01

    The use of surface topography for the assessment of scoliotic deformity in the clinic depends firstly on the quality of measures which reliably characterise deformity of the back, and secondly on the ease and speed with which these measures can be applied. A method of analysis of back shape measurements is presented which can be applied to any topographic measurement system. Measures presented are substantially independent of minor changes in the patient's posture in rotation and flexion from one clinic to the next, and yet sensitive enough to indicate significant improvement or degeneration of the disease. The presentation shows (1) horizontal cross-sections at ten levels up the back from sacrum to vertebra prominens, (2) angles of rotation of the surface over a small region about the spine, (3) three vertical profiles following the line of the spine, and (4) measures of maximum kyphosis and lordosis. Dependence on the operator has been reduced to a minimum. Extreme care in positioning the patient is unnecessary and those spinous processes which are easily palpable, the vertebra prominens and the two dimples over the posterior superior iliac spines are marked. Analysis proceeds entirely automatically once the basic shape data have been supplied. Applications of the technique to indirect moire topography and a television topographic measurement system are described.

  8. Helicopter pilot back pain: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, D F; Reading, T E

    1984-02-01

    Because of the high prevalence of back pain experienced by U.S. Army helicopter pilots, a study was conducted to ascertain the feasibility of reproducing these symptoms in the laboratory. A mock-up of a UH-1H seat and control configuration was mounted to a multi-axis vibration simulator (MAVS). Eleven subjects were tested on the apparatus for two 120-min periods. During one period, the MAVS was programmed to reproduce vibrations recorded from a UH-1H in cruise flight. The subjects received no vibration during the other test period. All subjects reported back pain which they described as identical to the pain they experience during flight, during one or more of their test periods. There was no statistical difference between the vibration and nonvibration test conditions (p greater than 0.05) in terms of time of onset of pain or intensity of pain as measured by a visual analog scale. It appears the vibration at the frequencies and amplitudes tested plays little or no role in the etiology of the back symptoms reported by these pilots. It is proposed that the primary etiological factor for these symptoms is the poor posture pilots are obliged to assume for extended periods while operating helicopters.

  9. PROTOCOL OF TREATMENT IN LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Guimbala dos Santos Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain can be considered as one of the main factors that lead to decreased functional capacity of the human being. Being a frequent dysfunction in people, causing a decrease in quality of life, productivity and functional disability and is associated with important social and economic impact. Therefore the objective of the research was to assess the treatment protocols in low back pain. The study is characterized by being a literature of scientific articles, based on data published in PubMed, SciELO, BIREME and Cochrane from 2000 to 2012. We found eight scientific articles that addressed physical therapy methods in the treatment of low back pain, including a literature review. Related Articles show variation from one to 55 patients in groups, with a total of 185 patients studied. It was concluded then that it hasn’t met a specific treatment that is placed as the most effective for this pathology, although all include electrotherapy, manual therapy, exercise and RPG they show significant results in pain relief, quality of life thereby increasing functionality.

  10. Sports injuries Lesiones deportivas

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Stress generated by sports practice has increased the probability that athletes suffer from acute and chronic injuries. Worldwide, there have been many different investigations concerning the incidence of sport injuries. The different ways in which results have been presented makes it difficult to compare among them. Rates of sports injuries vary between 1.7 and 53 per 1.000 hours of sports practice; 0.8 and 90.9 per 1.000 hours of training; 3.1 and 54.8 per 1.000 hours of competition, and 6....

  11. [LOW BACK PAIN AT NEW WORKING AMBIENT IN ERA OF NEW ECONOMY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW ABOUT OCCUPATIONAL RISK FACTORS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranjić, Nurka; Maleš-Bilić, Ljiljana

    2015-03-01

    Low back pain is the second most common symptom-related reason for physician visits and the first reason of working disability. Low back pain is a ubiquitous complaint, with particularly high prevalence among people in their working years (67%). For many individuals, episodes of back pain are self-limited and resolve without specific therapy. For others, however, back pain is recurrent or chronic, causing significant pain that interferes with employment and quality of life. Many occupations have been anecdotally linked to certain low back pain syndrome. However, the relationship between the work environment and the patient's symptoms, though clearly perceived by the patient to be causative, may be less certain. The injury model of an occupational disorder proposes that specific work activities are the cause of the patient's pain. The injury model for low back pain; implicating a causal connection with specific work activities, is complex and controversial. Determining whether a patient's low back pain is a consequence of his or her occupational activity, and how best to treat symptoms to maximize functionality and potential for a return to full employment capacity, can be challenging. In this systematic review which included patients/employees with low back pain, the following databases were searched: Pub Med, Embase, Medline and Web of science. The role of occupational mechanical exposure e.g. lifting as a risk factors for low back surgery has been debated for several decades. Diagnostic uncertainty exists even for those with back symptoms and well-described findings on scan, as these findings are common even in subjects without back pain, and may be unrelated to the symptoms. As an example, herniated disks can be identified in significant numbers of CT or MRI low back studies in subjects with no back pain. In further analysis, lifestyle factors and occupational psychosocial exposures will be addressed. Many physicians, including those practicing in primary care

  12. Effectiveness of powered hospital bed movers for reducing physiological strain and back muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, Nathan; Merrett, Simon; Paul, Gunther

    2014-07-01

    Battery powered bed movers are becoming increasingly common within the hospital setting. The use of powered bed movers is believed to result in reduced physical efforts required by health care workers, which may be associated with a decreased risk of occupation related injuries. However, little work has been conducted assessing how powered bed movers impact on levels of physiological strain and muscle activation for the user. The muscular efforts associated with moving hospital beds using three different methods; powered StaminaLift Bed Mover (PBM1), powered Gzunda Bed Mover (PBM2) and manual pushing were measured on six male subjects. Fourteen muscles were assessed moving a weighted hospital bed along a standardized route in an Australian hospital environment. Trunk inclination and upper spine acceleration were also quantified. Powered bed movers exhibited significantly lower muscle activation levels than manual pushing for the majority of muscles. When using the PBM1, users adopted a more upright posture which was maintained while performing different tasks (e.g. turning a corner, entering a lift), while trunk inclination varied considerably for manual pushing and the PBM2. The reduction in lower back muscular activation levels may result in lower incidence of lower back injury.

  13. Pediatric head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  14. Toe Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... severe arthritis, can cause toe problems and pain. Gout often causes pain in the big toe. Common toe problems include Corns and bunions Ingrown toenails Sprains and dislocations Fractures Treatments for toe injuries and disorders vary. They might ...

  15. Injuries in classical ballet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo Guimarães

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to elucidate what injuries are most likely to occur due to classical ballet practice. The research used national and international bibliography. The bibliography analysis indicated that technical and esthetical demands lead to a practice of non-anatomical movements, causing the ballet dancer to suffer from a number of associated lesions. Most of the injuries are caused by technical mistakes and wrong training. Troubles in children are usually due to trying to force external rotation at hip level and to undue use of point ballet slippers. The commonest lesions are in feet and ankles, followed by knees and hips. The rarest ones are in the upper limbs. These injuries are caused by exercise excess, by repetitions always in the same side and by wrong and early use of point slippers. The study reached the conclusion that incorrect application of classical ballet technique predisposes the dancers to characteristic injuries.

  16. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  17. Genital injuries in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Catherine

    2013-02-01

    The examination of the rape victim should focus on the therapeutic, forensic and psychological needs of the individual patient. One aspect will be an examination for ano-genital injuries. From a medical perspective, they tend to be minor and require little in the way of treatment. They must be considered when assessing the risk of blood-borne viruses and the need for prophylaxis. From a forensic perspective, an understanding of genital injury rates, type of injury, site and healing may assist the clinician to interpret the findings in the context of the allegations that have been made. There are many myths and misunderstandings about ano-genital injuries and rape. The clinician has a duty to dispel these.

  18. Home Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fax mgfa@myasthenia.org • www.myasthenia.org HOME INJURY PREVENTION Home Injur y Prevention A helpful guide for patients and their caregivers. www.myasthenia.org General cont’d. •Be alert ...

  19. Injury prophylaxis in paragliding

    OpenAIRE

    SCHULZE, W.; J. Richter; Schulze, B; Esenwein, S; Buttner-Janz, K

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To show trends in paragliding injuries and derive recommendations for safety precautions for paraglider pilots on the basis of accident statistics, interviews, questionnaires, medical reports, and current stage of development of paragliding equipment.

  20. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or upper arms. Muscle strain or tension often causes neck pain. The problem is usually overuse, such as from ... or accidents, including car accidents, are another common cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, ...

  1. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) National Rehabilitation Information ... is a network of nerves that conducts signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to ...

  2. Photobiomodulation on sports injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Li, Cheng-Zhang; Xu, Xiao-Yang

    2003-12-01

    Sports injuries healing has long been an important field in sports medicine. The stimulatory effects of Low intensity laser (LIL) irradiation have been investigated in several medical fields, such as cultured cell response, wound healing, hormonal or neural stimulation, pain relief and others. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether LIL irradiation can accelerate sports injuries healing. Some experimental and clinical studies have shown the laser stimulation effects on soft tissues and cartilage, however, controversy still exists regarding the role of LIL when used as a therapeutic device. Summarizing the data of cell studies and animal experiments and clinic trials by using the biological information model of photobiomodulation, we conclude that LIL irradiation is a valuable treatment for superficial and localized sports injuries and that the injuries healing effects of the therapy depend on the dosage of LIL irradiation.

  3. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injury. Limited mobility may lead to a more sedentary lifestyle, placing you at risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease ... belt or use an age- and weight-appropriate child safety seat. To protect them from air bag ...

  4. A technique to prevent Ender nail back-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, V; Marya, K M

    2003-12-01

    Ender nails are advantageous in the treatment of certain fractures; however, inadequate fixation and back-out are frequent complications. This article presents a simple looping technique that prevents Ender nail back-out.

  5. Fishery Management Program Progress Report: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memorandum containing summary of fishery biologist's visit to Back Bay to remove carp from impoundments at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

  6. Effect of Temperature Set-Back on Heat Pump Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    This report documents an analysis which shows that energy savings and corresponding cost savings could be realized by employing set-back strategies dependent on location, heat pump capacity and amount of set-back. (Author)

  7. The course of low back pain from adolescence to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study with 8-year follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To describe the evolution of low back pain from adolescence into adulthood. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: High prevalence rates of low back pain among children and adolescents have been demonstrated in several studies, and it has been...... questionnaires in 1994 and again in 2002. The questionnaires dealt with various aspects of general health, including the prevalence of low back pain, classified according to number of days affected (0, 1-7, 8-30, >30). RESULTS: Low back pain in adolescence was found to be a significant risk factor for low back...... than 30 days with low back pain during the follow-up year. This was true for only 9% of the rest of the sample. CONCLUSIONS: Our study clearly demonstrates correlations between low back pain in childhood/adolescence and low back pain in adulthood. This should lead to a change in focus from the adult...

  8. Back belts in occupational setting: what are the evidences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Marcos Bernardes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although, widely used the mechanisms of action and the effectiveness of back belts in the prevention of occupational low back disorders remains uncertain, generating controversy about its use. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to do a critical literature review about back belts use in the prevention of occupational low back pain in the occupational setting. In order to do that, a bibliographic research in the following data basis: Medline, SciELO and LILACS was conducted. There is evidence that back belts use reduces spine range of motion, however the studies about intra-abdominal pressure and muscle activity presented contradictory results, as the epidemiologic studies, not allowing the recommendation of its use in the prevention of occupational low back pain. Based on this literature review it is suggested therefore, the implementation of new studies, to confirm or not the effectiveness of back belts as personal protective equipment, in the prevention of occupational low back disorders.

  9. A Benefit of Back Pain Surgery: Better Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html A Benefit of Back Pain Surgery: Better Sex Operation often leads to more comfortable lovemaking, study ... Surgery for back pain can often improve patients' sex lives, researchers report. "The impetus behind our study ...

  10. Nonfatal Occupational Injury Rates and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Housekeeping Employees of a Hospital in Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtigandha Salwe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in hospital cleaners. Methods. Injury data on all hospital employees were extracted from occupational health records and compared. Additionally an interview-based modified Nordic Questionnaire (response rate 98.14% was conducted. Results. The mean total injury rate for cleaners was 35.9 per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE, while that for other employees was 13.64 per 100 FTE. Slips/trips/falls and MMH contributed 4.39 and 2.37 per 100 FTE among cleaners and rest of the hospital employees, respectively. The most common type of injury was strain while the most common cause of injury was a striking object. Conclusion. The cleaners have higher injury rates and morbidity as compared to other employees of the hospital. The lower back was most commonly affected.

  11. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Sports Injuries in an Austere Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Adriane E; Falconi, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    For sports injuries in an austere environment, narcotic pain medications are often unavailable or have limiting side effects like sedation or constipation. Meanwhile, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications are frequently associated with gastrointestinal side effects and acetaminophen liver toxicity. A trained physician can rapidly use certain acupuncture techniques in an austere environment with potentially fewer side effects. Current medical literature notes low to moderate quality evidence for the use of acupuncture in lower back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee. There is emerging evidence for the use of acupuncture in traumatic brain injury. The U.S. military uses acupuncture in deployed settings to treat battlefield injuries with promising results. This article reviews the military's current use of acupuncture to treat injuries in a deployed setting and how this may translate to the care of a sports injury in an austere environment.

  12. Characterizing Injury among Battlefield Airmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    career fields, BA as a whole, and Security Forces as a control group. From 2006 to 2012, injuries to the lower extremities and vertebral column ... vertebral column .” The most expensive injury was to the vertebral column , with a $615 median cost per incident injury. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Warfighter...2006 to 2012, injuries to the lower extremities and vertebral column accounted for 75% of all injuries in BA. BA and Security Forces had similar

  13. Reducing slide sheet injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varcin-Coad, Lynn

    2008-12-01

    Slide sheets are often stated to be the cause of hand and forearm injuries. While there are many other possible reasons injuries to nursing staff, carer and client occur, the most important linking factors relating to musculoskeletal disorders and manual handling of people is the ongoing inappropriateness or lack of suitably designed and equipped work areas. As physiotherapist Lynn Varcin-Coad writes, staff are bearing the brunt of inefficiencies of design and lack of high order risk control.

  14. Acute local radiation injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongora, R. (Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France)); Jammet, H. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, ISPN, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France))

    1983-01-01

    Local acute radiation injuries do not occur very often. Their origin is generally accidental. They show specific anatomo-clinical features. The clinical evolution and therapeutic behaviour are dependent on the dose level and topographical distribution. The dosimetric assessment requires physical methods and paraclinical investigations. From a study of 60 cases followed by the International Center of Radiopathology, the clinical symptomatology is described and the problems raised to the radiopathologist physician by local acute radiation injuries are stated.

  15. Injuries in paragliding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, T; Billing, A; Lob, G

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective study, 376 paragliding accidents have been analysed. Leg injuries were most common, but a large number of spinal injuries also occurred. The causes were either misjudgement by the pilot or the influence of weather and terrain. Improvements in the instructor's knowledge and the pilot's training could have prevented most of the accidents. Analysis of the mechanisms of the crashes and the pattern of trauma help to produce an efficient approach to diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Spinal cord injury caused by direct damage by local anaesthetic infiltration needle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Absalom, AR; Martinelli, G; Scott, NB

    2001-01-01

    We describe a case of spinal cord injury caused by direct trauma from a local anaesthetic infiltration needle. During local anaesthetic infiltration before placement of an epidural catheter, the patient suddenly rolled over onto her back, causing the infiltrating needle to advance all the way to its

  17. Rehabilitation of Football Players with Lumbar Spine Injury. (Part 2 of 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saal, Jeffrey A.

    1988-01-01

    The training phase of a rehabilitation program for football players who have sustained lower back injuries proceeds after the pain-control phase, and seeks to minimize risk of reinjury. This phase emphasizes movement training and exercise for strengthening abdominal muscles to stabilize the lumbar spine. A removable exercise guide is included.…

  18. Establishing a Reproducible Hypertrophic Scar following Thermal Injury: A Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Rapp, MD

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: Deep partial-thickness thermal injury to the back of domestic swine produces an immature hypertrophic scar by 10 weeks following burn with thickness appearing to coincide with the location along the dorsal axis. With minimal pig to pig variation, we describe our technique to provide a testable immature scar model.

  19. Comparison between kinesiotherapy and back school in the treatment of low back pain in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Marques Gomes Bertolini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare the efficacy of physiotherapy treatment involving kinesiotherapy and back school in older adults’ lowback pain. Methods: study of the case-series type. The pain visual analog scale and the WHOQOL-bref were used for assessingquality of life, and the Timed Up and Go Test was used for testing agility. A total of 21 older adults, who had had low back painfor over three months, participated in the study. The sample was divided in two groups (kinesiotherapy and back school.The older adults were assessed before and after the therapeutic interventions. Results: both groups obtained better scoresin all the variables analyzed in the post-test in relation to the pre-test, and as a result, in the inter-group comparison, theresults did not reveal statistically significant differences (p>0.05. Conclusion: back school and conventional kinesiotherapywere effective in improving the pain, quality-of-life and agility of older adults with low back pain.

  20. Ocular injury in hurling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, T H

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical characteristics of ocular injuries sustained in hurling in the south of Ireland and to investigate reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear. METHODS: Retrospective review of the case notes of 310 patients who attended Cork University Hospital or Waterford Regional Hospital between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2002 with ocular injuries sustained during a hurling match. A confidential questionnaire on reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear was completed by 130 players. RESULTS: Hurling related eye injuries occurred most commonly in young men. Fifty two patients (17%) required hospital admission, with hyphaema accounting for 71% of admissions. Ten injuries required intraocular surgical INTERVENTION: retinal detachment repair (5); macular hole surgery (1); repair of partial thickness corneal laceration (1); repair of globe perforation (1); enucleation (1); trabeculectomy for post-traumatic glaucoma (1). Fourteen eyes (4.5%) had a final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of <6\\/12 and six (2%) had BCVA <3\\/60. In the survey, 63 players (48.5%) reported wearing no protective facemask while playing hurling. Impairment of vision was the most common reason cited for non-use. CONCLUSIONS: Hurling related injury is a significant, and preventable, cause of ocular morbidity in young men in Ireland. The routine use of appropriate protective headgear and faceguards would result in a dramatic reduction in the incidence and severity of these injuries, and should be mandatory.

  1. Quadriceps tendon injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of study was to analyze risk factors, mechanisms of injury, symptoms and time that elapsed from injury until operation of complete quadriceps tendon ruptures. Material and Methods. This retrospective multicenter study included 30 patients operated for this injury, of whom 28 (93.3% were men. The average age was 53.7 years (18-73. Twenty-six patients had reconstruction of unilateral rupture and four of bilateral one. Results. Eighty percent of them had some risk factors for rupture of the tendon with degenerative changes. Eight patients had diabetes, seven patients were on renal dialysis, two patients had secondary hyperparathyroidism, five patients were obese and two patients had former knee operations. These injuries occurred in 80% following minor trauma caused by falls on stairs, on flat surfaces and squatting. The most frequent symptoms were: pain, swelling, lack of extension of knee and defect above patella, and three cases were initially misdiagnosed. During the first 10 days after injury, acute and chronic ruptures were reconstructed in 22 (73.3% and 8 patients, respectively. Conclusion. Quadriceps tendon injuries most often happen to male patients with predisposing conditions in their fifth and sixth decade of life due to trivial trauma. Patients on renal dialysis are the most vulnerable population group.

  2. Cluster bomb ocular injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M Mansour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present the visual outcomes and ocular sequelae of victims of cluster bombs. Materials and Methods: This retrospective, multicenter case series of ocular injury due to cluster bombs was conducted for 3 years after the war in South Lebanon (July 2006. Data were gathered from the reports to the Information Management System for Mine Action. Results: There were 308 victims of clusters bombs; 36 individuals were killed, of which 2 received ocular lacerations and; 272 individuals were injured with 18 receiving ocular injury. These 18 surviving individuals were assessed by the authors. Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% (20/308 of cluster bomb victims. Trauma to multiple organs occurred in 12 of 18 cases (67% with ocular injury. Ocular findings included corneal or scleral lacerations (16 eyes, corneal foreign bodies (9 eyes, corneal decompensation (2 eyes, ruptured cataract (6 eyes, and intravitreal foreign bodies (10 eyes. The corneas of one patient had extreme attenuation of the endothelium. Conclusions: Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% of cluster bomb victims and 67% of the patients with ocular injury sustained trauma to multiple organs. Visual morbidity in civilians is an additional reason for a global ban on the use of cluster bombs.

  3. Injuries to children riding BMX bikes.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    One hundred children presented over 40 days with BMX bike injuries, 40 of which had been sustained while trying to perform stunts. Injuries in this series were compared with previously reported injuries from accidents on ordinary bicycles. BMX bike injuries differed little from ordinary bike injuries except in the greater proportion of injuries due to stunts and the smaller incidence of head injuries.

  4. Assessment of postural load on the back in occupational epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Burdorf (Alex)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractLow-back pain is a common symptom among workers, nearly everyone will be affected by low-back pain at some point in life. This opening line may sound deceptive since low-back pain is usually a self-limiting condition, where recovery without a physician's consultation can be demonstrated

  5. Investigation of military training injuries in a special force corps in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang ZHAO

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the incidence, related influencing factors and predilection sites of training injuries in a special force corps for providing a basis of effective prevention of the injuries. Methods Four hundred and sixty-four officers and soldiers were randomly selected by lottery method from a special force corps in May 2011, and the training injuries as well as their related information was investigated by a questionnaire method. The medical records of the 464 subjects from May 2010 to May 2011 were reviewed. The collected data were statistically analyzed using SPSS 19.0 software. Results Of the 464 subjects, 165(35.6% never experienced injuries, and 299(64.4% were injured due to training in the last one year. A total of 505 person-time injuries occurred in 464 subjects, and the incidence of injury was 109 per 100 person-year. The major risk factors for training injuries included above average age, fondness of multiple sports, greater labor force, or higher frequency of sport exercises before enlistment, poor sleep or diet caused by training burden, and higher SCL-90 somatization score. The major protective factors comprised of higher military rank, lower-intensity training, higher education level, higher labor frequency before enlistment, higher SCL-90 phobic anxiety score, higher SCL-90 depression score, SCL-90 spirit score, and higher satisfaction degree on training program. The major sites of training injuries were lower extremities and lower back (accounting for 73.0%. Most injuries occurred below the knee (accounting for 49.0%, including the foot (6.5%, ankle (13.6%, leg(7.3% and knee (21.6%, followed by the lower back (accounting for 20.7%. Conclusions The risk factors of military training injuries involve various aspects, and continuous high intensive and highly difficult training items are the main reason of training injuries, and the lower extremities and lower back are the major locations. Psychological factors are

  6. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jensen, Lone Donbæk

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (Co...... Ratio) might be of clinical interest. This study aimed to assess postural balance in LBP patients by analyzing intra-session reliability of CoP parameters on a portable force platform, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether CoP parameters and OLST measure identical...

  7. Einstein wrote back my life in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Moffat, John W

    2012-01-01

    John W. Moffat was a poor student of math and science. That is, until he read Einstein's famous paper on general relativity. Realizing instantly that he had an unusual and unexplained aptitude for understanding the complex physics described in the paper, Moffat wrote a letter to Einstein that would change the course of his life. Einstein Wrote Back tells the story of Moffat's unusual entry into the world of academia and documents his career at the frontlines of twentieth-century physics as he worked and associated with some of the greatest minds in scientific history, including Niels Bohr,

  8. A patient with back pain: therapy possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Kamchatnov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common clinical syndromes associated with the high rate of temporary disability and sizable material costs. The choice of adequate therapy for LBP requires that primary diseases that can be responsible for the occurrence of pain should be excluded. While choosing an analgesic, there must be a balance between its efficacy and the possible risk for undesirable side effects. One of the drugs that have proven effective in treating patients with LBP is ketoprofen (ketonal, the diversity of whose formulations allows maximally individualized therapy.

  9. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  10. [Low back pain of unfavourable progression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña Parra, E; Calle Romero, Y; García Sánchez, V C; Sanz Pozo, B

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with chronic low back pain with an unfavourable progression despite the prescribed pharmacological treatment. The patient had symptoms associated with compression of the sciatic nerve in an atypical area. As it passed through the piriformis muscle, it was diagnosed as piriformis muscle syndrome. This diagnosis was based on the clinical signs and symptoms and the determination of the tests performed, with the imaging tests being absolutely normal. Treatment is basically with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants and stretching exercises of this muscle.

  11. Alternative backing up pump for turbomolecular pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2003-04-22

    As an alternative to the use of a mechanical backing pump in the application of wide range turbomolecular pumps in ultra-high and extra high vacuum applications, palladium oxide is used to convert hydrogen present in the evacuation stream and related volumes to water with the water then being cryo-pumped to a low pressure of below about 1.e.sup.-3 Torr at 150.degree. K. Cryo-pumping is achieved using a low cost Kleemenco cycle cryocooler, a somewhat more expensive thermoelectric cooler, a Venturi cooler or a similar device to achieve the required minimization of hydrogen partial pressure.

  12. Adiabatic Quantum Computation: Coherent Control Back Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    Though attractive from scalability aspects, optical approaches to quantum computing are highly prone to decoherence and rapid population loss due to nonradiative processes such as vibrational redistribution. We show that such effects can be reduced by adiabatic coherent control, in which quantum interference between multiple excitation pathways is used to cancel coupling to the unwanted, non-radiative channels. We focus on experimentally demonstrated adiabatic controlled population transfer experiments wherein the details on the coherence aspects are yet to be explored theoretically but are important for quantum computation. Such quantum computing schemes also form a back-action connection to coherent control developments. PMID:23788822

  13. A new fabrication technique for back-to-back varactor diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Peter; Choudhury, Debabani; Martin, Suzanne; Frerking, Margaret A.; Liu, John K.; Grunthaner, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    A new varactor diode process has been developed in which much of the processing is done from the back of an extremely thin semiconductor wafer laminated to a low-dielectric substrate. Back-to-back BNN diodes were fabricated with this technique; excellent DC and low-frequency capacitance measurements were obtained. Advantages of the new technique relative to other techniques include greatly reduced frontside wafer damage from exposure to process chemicals, improved capability to integrate devices (e.g. for antenna patterns, transmission lines, or wafer-scale grids), and higher line yield. BNN diodes fabricated with this technique exhibit approximately the expected capacitance-voltage characteristics while showing leakage currents under 10 mA at voltages three times that needed to deplete the varactor. This leakage is many orders of magnitude better than comparable Schottky diodes.

  14. Open-Switch Fault Detection Method of a Back-to-Back Converter Using NPC Topology for Wind Turbine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, June-Seok; Lee, Kyo_Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    In wind turbine generation (WTG) systems, a back-to-back converter with a neutral-point-clamped (NPC) topology is widely used because this topology has more advantages than a conventional two-level topology, particularly when operating at high power. There are 12 switches in the NPC topology...... system can break down in the worst case scenario. To improve the reliability of WTG systems, an open-switch fault detection method for back-to-back converters using the NPC topology is required. This study analyzes effects of inner and outer open-switch faults of the NPC rectifier and inverter....... An open-switch fault in the NPC rectifier of the back-to-back converter leads to the distortion of the input current and torque vibration in the system. Additionally, an open-switch fault in the NPC inverter of the back-to-back converter causes the distortion of the output current. Furthermore, the WTG...

  15. Economics of head injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Manmohan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Head injuries account for significant proportion of neurosurgical admissions and bed occupancy. Patients with head injuries also consume significant proportions of neurosurgical resources. A prospective 6-month study has been carried out to evaluate the expenditure incurred on head injury patients in a modern neurosurgical center equipped with state of the art infrastructure. Costing areas included wages / salaries of health care personnel, cost of medicines / surgical items / crystalloids, general store items, stationary, all investigation charges, equipment cost, overhead building cost, maintenance cost, electricity and water charges and cost of medical gases, air conditioning and operation theatre expenses. Expenditure in each area was calculated and apportioned to each bed. The statistical analysis was done using X2 test. The cost of stay in ward was found to be Rs. 1062 / bed / day and in neurosurgical ICU Rs. 3082 / bed / day. The operation theatre cost for each surgery was Rs. 11948. The cost of hospital stay per day for minor, moderate and severe head injury group was found to be Rs. 1921, Rs. 2569 and Rs. 2713 respectively. The patients who developed complications, the cost of stay per day in the hospital were Rs. 2867. In the operative group, the cost of hospital stay per day was Rs. 3804. The total expenditure in minor head injury was Rs. 7800 per patient, in moderate head injury was Rs. 22172 per patient, whereas in severe head injury, it was found to be Rs. 32852 per patient. Patients who underwent surgery, the total cost incurred was Rs. 33100 per operated patient.

  16. Method for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael Eugene (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for growing a back surface contact on an imaging detector used in conjunction with back illumination. In operation, an imaging detector is provided. Additionally, a back surface contact (e.g. a delta-doped layer, etc.) is grown on the imaging detector utilizing a process that is performed at a temperature less than 450 degrees Celsius.

  17. Low back pain and degenerative disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandrić Slavica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Various clinical conditions can cause low back pain, and in most cases it is of a degenerative origin. Degenerative disc disease is a common condition which affects young to middle-aged men and women equally. Changes in the mechanical properties of the disc lead to degenerative arthritis in the intervertebral joints, osteophytes, and narrowing the intervertebral foramen or the spinal canal. Pathophysiology. Degenerative cascade, described by Kirkaldy-Willis, is the widely accepted pathophysiologic model describing the degenerative process as it affects the lumbar spine in 3 phases. Diagnosis. There are two forms of low back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease: a lumbalgia and b lumbar radiculopathy. Limitation of movement, problems with balance, pain, loss of reflexes in the extremities, muscle weakness, loss of sensation or other signs of neurological damage can be found on physical examination. For accurate diagnosis, it is often necessary to combine clinical examination and sophisticated technology. Treatment. Coservative treatment consists of rest, physical therapy, pharmacological therapy and injection therapy. Physical rehabilitation with active patient participation is a key approach to treatment of patients with discogenic pain. Physical therapy, occupational therapy and kinesitherapy are important for improving muscle strength, endurance, and flexibility. Disc surgery is performed if surgical intervention is required. .

  18. Space Adaptation Back Pain: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstman, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Astronaut back pain is frequently reported in the early phase of space flight as they adapt to microgravity. The epidemiology of space adaptation back pain (SABP) has not been well established. This presentation seeks to determine the exact incidence of SABP among astronauts, develop a case definition of SABP, delineate the nature and pattern of SABP, review available treatments and their effectiveness in relieving SABP; and identify any operational impact of SABP. A retrospective review of all available mission medical records of astronauts in the U.S. space program was performed. It was revealed that the incidence of SABP has been determined to be 53% among astronauts in the U.S. space program; most cases of SABP are mild, self-limited, or respond to available treatment; there are no currently accepted preventive measures for SABP; it is difficult to predict who will develop SABP; the precise mechanism and spinal structures responsible for SABP are uncertain; there was no documented evidence of direction operational mission impact related to SABP; and, that there was the potential for mission impact related to uncontrolled pain, sleep disturbance, or the adverse side effects pf anti-inflammatory medications

  19. Color back projection for fruit maturity evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    In general, fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes and dates are harvested before they fully ripen. After harvesting, they continue to ripen and their color changes. Color is a good indicator of fruit maturity. For example, tomatoes change color from dark green to light green and then pink, light red, and dark red. Assessing tomato maturity helps maximize its shelf life. Color is used to determine the length of time the tomatoes can be transported. Medjool dates change color from green to yellow, and the orange, light red and dark red. Assessing date maturity helps determine the length of drying process to help ripen the dates. Color evaluation is an important step in the processing and inventory control of fruits and vegetables that directly affects profitability. This paper presents an efficient color back projection and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time maturity evaluation of fruits. This color processing method requires very simple training procedure to obtain the frequencies of colors that appear in each maturity stage. This color statistics is used to back project colors to predefined color indexes. Fruit maturity is then evaluated by analyzing the reprojected color indexes. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production.

  20. Chiropractors and the treatment of back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, A C

    1977-02-01

    In a survey of British chiropractors and their practices, it was found that the majority of their patients attended for back pain. The average age of patients was 47 years, the sex ratio was equal, and most had had their complaints for longer than three months and had access to the chiropractor within a few days. They were largely housewives and persons from the executive and managerial occupations. The main investigative procedures used were static and motion palpation of the spine, and vital systems, orthopaedic, neurological, and radiological examination. Treatment was mostly manual and directed at the spinal column, and the benefit obtained, as assessed by the chiropractors, was comparable to that reported in other studies. Maximum benefit was usually recorded within seven attendances, although 39% of patients made further visits for maintenance treatment. The chiropractors are seen to be a young, growing, and largely male group, and their new patient numbers are at present likely to be at least one-twentieth that of hospital out-patient departments which deal with back pain.

  1. [Low back pain in pregnant women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrzycki, Marian; Mrozikiewicz, Przemysław M; Kocur, Piotr; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Hoffmann, Marcin; Stryła, Wanda; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2010-11-01

    Pain of lumbosacral segment of the vertebral column and the pelvis concerns about 45% of all pregnant women. The change of the body posture during pregnancy is the result of gravity centre relocation, which affects the musculosceletal system. Development of the joint, ligament and myofascial dysfunctions, as well as the pain in the lumbosacral segment and the pelvis, are the most common reasons of spine pain. The aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge about lumbar spine pain in pregnant women with special focus on the pain connected with muscular, joint and ligament disorders. Pregnancy is a serious burden for the female osteo-skeletal system. Lumbar pain with different location and intensification is the negative consequence of the position changes during pregnancy. Pharmacotherapy could be useful only in cases of intensive low back pain, with possible application of small spectrum of drugs that are safe during pregnancy. Physical therapy including manual therapy exercises, massage and techniques of local anesthesia are alternative methods in case of low back pain in pregnant women.

  2. LS1 Report: PS beams are back!

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony & Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    For the first time in over 15 months, there are beams back in the PS. Making their first tour of the accelerator today, 20 June, their injection marks the end of weeks of cold checkouts and hardware commissioning in the PS.   The CERN Control Centre (CCC) is back in business: people gather to restart the LHC injectors, today the PS. Since hardware commissioning was wrapped up on 23 May, the Operations Group (BE-OP) has been conducting cold checkouts on the PS. This involves switching on all of the machine's systems, verifying that they respond to commands by OP and ensuring they are calibrated to beam timings. "These verifications were done, in part, during the hardware commissioning dry runs," says Rende Steerenberg, PS section leader. "But the cold checkouts are on a much larger scale, as we act as if there is beam in the whole machine. We placed a full load on the controls system, cooling, networks, etc. in order to setup the accelerator in the most realis...

  3. Back-action evasion as an alternative to impedance matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurke, B

    1991-04-26

    Back-action evasion is a measurement technique originally devised to overcome certain limits imposed by quantum mechanics on the sensitivity of gravitational radiation detectors. The technique is, however, more generally applicable and can be used to improve the sensitivity of instrumentation with noise floors much greater than the quantum noise floor. The principle of back-action evasion is described here by means of a simple example. A comparison of back-action evasion with impedance matching is made to clarify when back-action evasion may be useful. Back-action evasion allows one to achieve a sensitivity comparable to that achieved by impedance matching.

  4. Scapular fractures and concomitant injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akaraborworn Osaree

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: The association of scapular fractures with other life-threatening injuries including blunt thoracic aortic injury is widely recognized. Few studies have investigated this presumed association. In this study, we investigated the incidence of significant associated injuries with scapular fracture and their outcomes. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted from 2005 to 2009 in a level I trauma center in Thailand. All blunt trauma patients were identified. Patients’ demographics, injury mechanism, associated injuries, Injury Severity Score (ISS, and survival outcomes were recorded. The manage-ment of associated injuries with scapular fracture was reviewed, and the risk factors for mortality were identified. Results: Among the 7 345 trauma patients admitted, scapular fractures occurred in 84 cases (1.1%. The mean age was (37.98±15.21 years. Motorcycle crash was the most fre-quent mechanism of injury, occurring in 51 cases (60.7%. Seventy-four patients (88.1% suffering from scapular frac-tures had associated injuries: 5 (6.0% had significant chest injuries, but none of them had blunt thoracic aortic injury. Two patients (2.4% with scapular fractures died. Factors determining the likelihood of mortality were: (1 ISS>25 (LR=8.5, P<0.05; (2 significant associated chest injury (AIS>3, LR=5.3, P<0.05 and (3 significant associated ab-dominal injury (AIS>3, LR=5.3, P<0.05. Conclusion: A blunt scapular fracture may not accom-pany a blunt thoracic aortic injury but it is strongly related to other injuries like chest injury, extremity injury, head injury, etc. If a scapular fracture is found with a high ISS score, high chest or abdomen AIS score, the patient would have a high risk of mortality. Key words: Aortic rupture; Shoulder fractures; Mul-tiple trauma; Mortality

  5. Scapular fractures and concomitant injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osaree Akaraborworn; Burapat Sangthong; Komet Thongkhao; Prattana Chiniramol; Khanitta Kaewsaengrueang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The association of scapular fractures with other life-threatening injuries including blunt thoracic aortic injury is widely recognized.Few studies have investigated this presumed association.In this study,wc investigated the incidence of significant associated injuries with scapular fracture and their outcomes.Methods: A retrospective study was conducted from 2005 to 2009 in a level I trauma center in Thailand.All blunt trauma patients were identified.Patients' demographics,injury mechanism,associated injuries,Injury Severity Score (ISS),and survival outcomes were recorded.The management of associated injuries with scapular fracture was reviewed,and the risk factors for mortality were identified.Results: Among the 7 345 trauma patients admitted,scapular fractures occurred in 84 cases (1.1%).The mean age was (37.98±15.21) years.Motorcycle crash was the most frequent mechanism of injury,occurring in 51 cases (60.7%).Seventy-four patients (88.1%) suffering from scapular fractures had associated injuries:5 (6.0%) had significant chest injuries,but none of them had blunt thoracic aortic injury.Two patients (2.4%) with scapular fractures died.Factors determining the likelihood of mortality were:(1) ISS>25(LR=8.5,P<0.05); (2) significant associated chest injury (AIS>3,LR=5.3,P<0.05) and (3) significant associated abdominal injury (AIS>3,LR=5.3,P<0.05).Conclusion: A blunt scapular fracture may not accompany a blunt thoracic aortic injury but it is strongly related to other injuries like chest injury,extremity injury,head injury,etc.If a scapular fracture is found with a high ISS score,high chest or abdomen AIS score,the patient would have a high risk of mortality.

  6. Study on the Back Rest System of Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈革; 毛立民; 周亚勤; 袁立新

    2004-01-01

    Periodic variations of warp tension during a weaving cycle result in corresponding change of back rest position, and the oscillation of back rest affects the fluctuation of warp yarn in return. A mechanical model of back rest system of looms is presented on basis of auto control theory, and the factors affecting the dynamic performance of the back rest are analyzed. In the model, warp yarn is regarded as a viscoelastic medium, and the adjustable parameters and the adjusting range of the back rest system are increased, so the ioom's applicability for the fabric's variety is enlanced.Finally, the methods of designing and adjusting the back rest are discussed, and a trend of back rest system development is given.

  7. Rationalizing vaccine injury compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Michelle M

    2008-01-01

    Legislation recently adopted by the United States Congress provides producers of pandemic vaccines with near-total immunity from civil lawsuits without making individuals injured by those vaccines eligible for compensation through the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. The unusual decision not to provide an alternative mechanism for compensation is indicative of a broader problem of inconsistency in the American approach to vaccine-injury compensation policy. Compensation policies have tended to reflect political pressures and economic considerations more than any cognizable set of principles. This article identifies a set of ethical principles bearing on the circumstances in which vaccine injuries should be compensated, both inside and outside public health emergencies. A series of possible bases for compensation rules, some grounded in utilitarianism and some nonconsequentialist, are discussed and evaluated. Principles of fairness and reasonableness are found to constitute the strongest bases. An ethically defensible compensation policy grounded in these principles would make a compensation fund available to all individuals with severe injuries and to individuals with less-severe injuries whenever the vaccination was required by law or professional duty.

  8. Back-to-back tunable ferroelectric resonator filters on flexible organic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courrèges, Stanis; Lacroix, Benjamin; Amadjikpe, Arnaud; Phillips, Stan; Zhao, Zhiyong; Choi, Kwang; Hunt, Andrew; Papapolymerou, John

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the design and the fabrication of two low-loss X-band back-to-back tunable ferroelectric resonator filters on flexible liquid crystal polymer substrates using wire-bonded BST capacitors as analog tuning elements. The back-to-back topology consists of three resonators on both sides of the substrate coupled by apertures in their common ground plane, allowing the overall size of the filter to be reduced. BST varactors made on a sapphire substrate are easily diced and mounted on the polymer substrates to achieve the desired tuning. Both 3-pole tunable filters show a 1-dB bandwidth of 8 to 10%, low insertion loss (3.6 to 1.95 dB for the best one) with bias voltages from 0 to 35 V, a better compactness compared with classical tunable structures (reduced footprint area by 30% for the best filter) and a frequency tuning of about 11 to 13% at 8 GHz. The demonstrated feasibility opens interesting prospects for the fabrication of compact tunable filters with more resonators.

  9. Who's Not Going Back to School? How Sequestration Is Scaling Back Early Childhood Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Unfortunately, in many communities across the country, some children will not be showing up for school this year (2013). Classrooms will shut down and teachers will look for other employment opportunities. This school year, approximately 57,000 of our youngest children in the Head Start program will not be going back to school. The cuts are the…

  10. Back Pain and Endurance Training of Back Muscles: Justification for Further Study in Helicopter Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    clinical trial [see comments]. Spine 1990Dec;15(12):1317-1320. 17. Dul J, Hildebrandt VH. Ergonomie guidelines for the prevention of low back pain at...Congress 1962;XI Congress, Madrid: 145-151. 56. Singh R. Backache in Chetak Crew and Suggested Ergonomie Improvements in Aircraft Seat Design

  11. The Role of Front-Back Features in Children's 'Front', 'Back', and 'Beside' Placements of Objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lauren; Strommen, Ellen

    1970-01-01

    In a study of spatial orientation, 40 boys and 40 girls from kindergarten and first grade placed a series of objects in front, behind, and beside themselves, and in front, behind, and beside other objects. Some objects had distinguishable front and back sides; others lacked such features. Placements were highly consistent within and across…

  12. Bicycle-spoke injuries of the foot and ankle: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HK Gupta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Bicycle spoke wheel injuries can be as simple as minor abrasions and lacerations even to amputation of toes and heel injuries. The purpose of this study was to assess the severity of soft tissue damage and skeletal injuries in such injuries. Methods This prospective observational study included all the cases with spoke wheel injuries presenting between October 2012 to September 2013 in the College of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur. Demographic information was collected from each patient including age, sex, injured side, position at the time of injury, and characteristic of injury. The soft tissue injury was classified according to Oestern and Tscherne classification and managed accordingly. Results A total of 50 cases were included in the study with 29 males ( 58% and 21 females (42% . Their age ranged from 6 yrs to 12 yrs (mean 9 yrs.. The mean interval from injury to presentation in hospital was 5 hrs (range 1-22 hrs. Majority had injury to right ankle and foot. Fore foot and mid foot injuries were more common when the feet got entrapped in front wheel. 36 cases had sustained injury while riding as pillion on the back seat and their injury was on posterior ankle (n=20 and posterolateral aspect of ankle and foot (n=16. Majority of cases were of grade 0 and 1 injury. Two patients had grade 3 injury, one with great toe amputation another with partial heel avulsion and exposed tendoachilles. All cases were managed with wound care, tetanus prophylaxis and splintage of the foot. Conclusion In our study we found that these spoke wheel related injuries were more common in children and are important cause of temporary loss of daily activities. Although all injuries healed properly, risk of severe injuries like amputations and heel pad loss and tendoachilles transaction and fractures of foot and ankle still prevails where bicycle is a common mode of transportation. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9

  13. Use of Therapeutic Neuroscience Education to address psychosocial factors associated with acute low back pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimney, Kory; Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2014-04-01

    Acute low back pain (LBP) from injuries is prevalent in the work place. It has been shown that patients with psychosocial factors often progress with persistent pain and lead to significant workers compensation costs. Therapeutic Neuroscience Education (TNE) has been shown to be beneficial in changing a patient's cognition regarding their pain state, which may result in decrease fear, anxiety and catastrophization. A 19-year-old female who developed LBP from a work injury was the patient for this case report. A physical examination, Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NRPS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), Keele STarT Back Screening Tool (Keele SBST) and Acute Low Back Pain Screening (ALBPS) Questionnaires were assessed during initial physical therapy visit and discharge. Treatment consisted of use of TNE, manual therapy and exercises. She attended five total visits over a 2-week period prior to full discharge. During the initial visit the patient reported NRPS = 3/10, ODI = 36%, FABQ-PA = 23, FABQ-W = 30, Keele SBST = 4/9, ALBPS = 101. At discharge the patient reported a 0 on all outcome questionnaires with ability to return to full work and no pain complaints.

  14. Putting the 'care' back into aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadnell, Cathy

    2006-04-01

    Aged care is well and truly back on the political agenda in Australia. While the mainstream media has recently exposed a number of horrific cases of alleged abuse in aged care facilities it has done little to highlight the failings of social policy over time or to foster debate on how to improve the care of older Australians. What are the barriers to providing safe and quality aged care to a growing number of our citizens and how do we overcome them? If you relied on the recent media coverage for your impression of aged care you could be forgiven for thinking it is all bad news. But there are facilities providing high quality care and stories of nurses working wonders in the face of adversity. Cathy Beadnell considers some of the broader cultural and workforce issues in aged care.

  15. [Low back pain during pregnancy. Multidisciplinary approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Padilla, D; Gallo-Padilla, C; Gallo-Vallejo, F J; Gallo-Vallejo, J L

    2016-09-01

    After explaining that low back pain is considered the most common pregnancy complication, its pathogenesis, risk factors and the clinical characteristics of the very painful symptoms of this condition are described. As for its approach, it is stressed that it must be multidisciplinary, introducing very important preventive measures, including proper postural hygiene. For its treatment, the methods may be based on non-surgical or pharmacological interventions of a conservative non-invasive nature. Thus, physiotherapy, osteopathic manipulation, multimodal intervention (exercise and education), exercises performed in water environment, acupuncture, etc., have proven to be effective. Finally, it is emphasised that given the significant impact on their quality of life, different health professionals must be proactive and treat the lumbar disease in pregnant women.

  16. The Molecular Paschen-Back Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Fluri, D. M.; Solanki, S. K.

    2006-12-01

    The molecular Paschen-Back effect (PBE) lacks a detailed description since the problem was first addressed by Hill in 1929. However, many diatomic molecules exhibit the PBE at field strengths typical of sunspots and active cool stars. Recently we have presented a complete theoretical description of the molecular PBE in Hund's cases (a), (b), and all intermediate cases. This description allows us to compute the splitting of levels of any multiplicity and the transitions between them. We find that in the partial PBE regime strongly asymmetric Stokes profiles are produced, whose strengths and asymmetries depend sensitively on the magnetic field. Also, the strength of the forbidden and satellite transitions increases rapidly with field strength, while the strength of the main branch transitions decreases. These signatures hold promise to form the basis of new diagnostics of solar and stellar magnetic fields.

  17. The hyperfine Paschen-Back Faraday effect

    CERN Document Server

    Zentile, Mark A; Weller, Lee; Knappe, Svenja; Adams, Charles S; Hughes, Ifan G

    2014-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the Faraday effect in an atomic medium in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime, where the Zeeman interaction is larger than the hyperfine splitting. We use a small permanent magnet and a micro-fabricated vapour cell, giving magnetic fields of the order of a Tesla. We show that for low absorption and small rotation angles, the refractive index is well approximated by the Faraday rotation signal, giving a simple way to measure the atomic refractive index. Fitting to the atomic spectra, we achieve magnetic field sensitivity at the $10^{-4}$ level. Finally we note that the Faraday signal shows zero crossings which can be used as temperature insensitive error signals for laser frequency stabilisation at large detuning. The theoretical sensitivity for $^{87}$Rb is found to be $\\sim 40$ kHz/$^\\circ$C.

  18. The hyperfine Paschen-Back Faraday effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentile, Mark A.; Andrews, Rebecca; Weller, Lee; Knappe, Svenja; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the Faraday effect in an atomic medium in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime, where the Zeeman interaction is larger than the hyperfine splitting. We use a small permanent magnet and a micro-fabricated vapour cell, giving magnetic fields of the order of a tesla. We show that for low absorption and small rotation angles, the refractive index is well approximated by the Faraday rotation signal, giving a simple way to measure the atomic refractive index. Fitting to the atomic spectra, we achieve magnetic field sensitivity at the 10-4 level. Finally we note that the Faraday signal shows zero crossings which can be used as temperature insensitive error signals for laser frequency stabilization at large detuning. The theoretical sensitivity for 87Rb is found to be ˜40 kHz °C-1.

  19. From nature to computing and back

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke TANG; Xin YAO

    2009-01-01

    @@ Nature has been the source of inspiration for many computational algorithms and promoted the emergence of an interdisciplinary research field called nature inspired computation, which studies computational systems and methodologies that are inspired by and/or borrow ideas from natural systems. In the past decades, scientific research in nature inspired computation has evolved substantially and diverse field of research topics have arisen.On one hand, a variety of novel computational techniques haven been developed via mimicking the behaviors of natural systems, e.g., evolutionary computation, neural computation, swarm intelligence, etc. On the other hand,the developments of these computational techniques result in powerful tools for understanding the nature, and thus benefit the advance of related fields, such as biology, chemistry and material science. This special section aims at bringing together some of the latest results that have been obtained in both directions, i.e., from nature to computing and back.

  20. Topical tar: Back to the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paghdal, K.V.; Schwartz, R.A. [University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The use of medicinal tar for dermatologic disorders dates back to the ancient times. Although coal tar is utilized more frequently in modern dermatology, wood tars have also been widely employed. Tar is used mainly in the treatment of chronic stable plaque psoriasis, scalp psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis, either alone or in combination therapy with other medications, phototherapy, or both. Many modifications have been made to tar preparations to increase their acceptability, as some dislike its odor, messy application, and staining of clothing. One should consider a tried and true treatment with tar that has led to clearing of lesions and prolonged remission times. Occupational studies have demonstrated the carcinogenicity of tar; however, epidemiologic studies do not confirm similar outcomes when used topically. This article will review the pharmacology, formulations, efficacy, and adverse effects of crude coal tar and other tars in the treatment of selected dermatologic conditions.

  1. CERN firefighters have got your back covered

    CERN Multimedia

    The Fire Brigade

    2011-01-01

    There’s not much room in the centre of a detector. Ensuring the safety of technicians who have to work on components close to the collision point is an absolute priority. With this firmly in mind, the Fire Brigade has recently acquired a back immobilisation device known as a spine splint.   CERN firefighters show off their new spine splint. Conscious of the potential safety hazards for personnel working on ALICE’s inner detectors, the collaboration’s GLIMOS, Fernando Pedrosa, asked the Fire Brigade to organise an exercise in March to simulate the emergency evacuation of a person from the centre of the detector. Despite the exceptionally limited space available in the centre of ALICE, the Fire Brigade successfully met the challenge. However, although specially designed for emergency evacuations, the cumbersome dimensions of the stretcher used in this first exercise caused many problems.   Following the exercise, the Fire Brigade therefore inves...

  2. From pertussis to meningococcal disease and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    From pertussis to meningococcal disease and back represents nearly 30 years of research at Porton, first at the Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research and latterly as part of the Health Protection Agency. I joined the group lead by Andy Robinson developing an acellular pertussis vaccine and was part of an exciting period that encompassed basic antigen characterisation and pathogenesis studies with the development of an acellular vaccine containing fimbriae. Research then changed to focus on serogroup B meningococcal disease, studying the vaccine potential of iron-regulated proteins and then Neisseria lactamica. The resurgence of pertussis seen in some countries alerted me to the lack of understanding of protective immune responses to Bordetella pertussis infection and disease and this is now an active area of research.

  3. MRI in patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Krüger; Manniche, Claus; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    MRI in LBP patients: good or bad? Background: The routine use of radiology is presently discouraged in patients with low back pain (LBP). MRI provides clinicians and patients with detailed knowledge of the spinal structures and has no known physical side effects. It is possible that detailed...... insight into the pathological changes in LBP patients may affect the management of patients. However, this has never been tested. Until June 2006, all patients at our specialized public out-patient clinic, were referred to MRI on the basis of clinical indications, economic constraints, and availability...... of MRI (the "old" group). As a new approach, all patients with certain criteria are now referred to MRI before the clinical examination (the "new" group).   Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate if the two different MRI approaches, the "old" and "new", resulted in differences in relation...

  4. Turned Back: Mad Men as Intermedial Melodrama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rooney

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay draws on definitions of gesture (Giorgio Agamben and Peter Brooks and catachresis (Peter Brooks, Jacques Derrida to examine the primacy of non-verbal signifiers as communicators of meaning in AMC’s Mad Men. Beginning with an analysis of Mad Men’s credit sequence, it draws attention to Mad Men’s use of gesture and catachresis in relation to melodrama’s privileging of non-verbal and naturalistic expression and its persistence as an intermedial mode that has moved back and forth between various media (theatre, novel, cinema, television and now digital formats. It argues that Mad Men’s melodramatic aesthetic is one that obliquely, and via a gestural and rhetorical ‘turned back’, communicates its relation to the past and the present.

  5. Being back home after intermediate care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bente; Harder, Ingegerd; Norlyk, Annelise

    2015-01-01

    Older people may face many challenges and experience insecurity after discharge from hospital to home. To bridge the potential gap between general hospital and home, the concept ‘Intermediate Care’ (IC) was developed at the beginning of 2000. IC aims to safeguard older people from being discharged....... Transcripts were analysed using a phenomenological approach. The essential meaning of being back home after a stay in an IC unit was characterised by ‘uncertainty’. Four constituents emerged: ‘in a state of shock about coming home’, ‘dependence on informal helpers’, ‘a sense of isolation’, and ‘fear of losing...... functional ability permanently’. Key words: intermediate care, older people, discharge, interview, phenomenology...

  6. Why and how back pain interventions work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansell, Gemma; Kamper, Steven J; Kent, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a useful research method that potentially allows identification of the mechanisms through which treatments affect patient outcomes. This chapter reviews the theoretical framework, research designs and statistical approaches used in mediation analysis. It describes what can...... be learnt from previous mediation research, much of which has investigated mediating factors of psychosocial interventions in other health conditions. It also summarises the few treatment-mediation studies of psychosocial interventions conducted in back pain. This chapter shows that there is emerging...... evidence about the role of some psychological factors as potential treatment mediators, such as self-efficacy and catastrophising. Mediation analysis can equally be applied to non-psychological factors. Pre-planned and appropriately conducted mediation analysis in adequately powered clinical trials would...

  7. Expectation of recovery from low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Vach, Werner; Axø, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. A prospective cohort study conducted in general practice (GP) and chiropractic practice (CP).Objectives. To explore which patient characteristics were associated with recovery expectations in low back pain (LBP) patients, whether expectations predicted 3-month outcome, and to what...... extent expectations were associated with empirical prognostic factors.Summary of Background Data. Patients' recovery expectations have been associated with prognosis, but it is largely unknown why patients expect what they do, and how expectations relate to other prognostic factors.Methods. 1169...... participants completed questionnaires at their first consultation due to LBP and 78% were followed for 3 months. At baseline, recovery expectations were measured on a 0-10 scale. Outcome measures were LBP intensity and Global Perceived Effect (GPE). Associations were tested in regression models...

  8. Psychological Distress in Acute Low Back Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, William S; Hartvigsen, Jan; Woiszwillo, Mary J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the measurement scales and levels of psychological distress reported among published studies of acute low back pain (LBP) in the scientific literature. DATA SOURCES: Peer-reviewed scientific literature found in 8 citation index search engines (CINAHL, Embase, MANTIS, Psyc......INFO, PubMed, Web of Science, AMED, and Academic Search Premier) for the period from January 1, 1966, to April 30, 2015, in English, Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish languages. STUDY SELECTION: Cross-sectional, case-control, cohort, or randomized controlled trials assessing psychological distress...... (study populations, definitions of LBP, distress measures) were systematically extracted and reviewed for risk of bias. Distress measures were described, and data were pooled in cases of identical measures. Reported levels of distress were contextualized using available population norms, clinical...

  9. Low Back Pain in Primary Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, Lise; Munck, Anders; Hartvigsen, Lisbeth;

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Baseline description of a multicenter cohort study. Objective. To describe patients with low back pain (LBP) in both chiropractic and general practice in Denmark. Background. To optimize standards of care in the primary healthcare sector, detailed knowledge of the patient populations...... in different settings is needed. In Denmark, most LBP-patients access primary healthcare through chiropractic or general practice. Methods. Chiropractors and general practitioners recruited adult patients seeking care for LBP. Extensive baseline questionnaires were obtained and descriptive analyses presented...... separately for general and chiropractic practice patients, Mann-Whitney rank sum test and Pearson's chi-square test, were used to test for differences between the two populations. Results. Questionnaires were returned from 934 patients in chiropractic practice and 319 patients from general practice. Four out...

  10. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Jensen, Lone Donbæk

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered postural control has been observed in low back pain (LBP) patients. They seem to be more dependent on vision when standing. The objective of the study was to determine concurrent and predictive validity of measures of postural stability in LBP patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS......: Centre of Pressure (CoP) measurements were tested against pain, fear of pain, and physical function. Velocity, anterior-posterior displacement, and the Romberg Ratio obtained on a portable force platform were used as measures of postural stability. RESULTS: Baseline and 12-week follow-up results of 97....... CONCLUSION: This first study of concurrent and predictive validity of postural balance in LBP patients revealed no association between CoP measures and pain, fear of pain, and physical function....

  11. Getting Context Back in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders; Bucciarelli, Louis

    2013-01-01

    engineering education. In this paper we will discuss issues of curriculum, pedagogics and - most importantly learning - in engineering education. We tend to agree with the critics that there is a need to broaden engineering education. We also suggest that this broadening of the curriculum should be backed up...... and it is in fact counterproductive to let tight disciplinary framings- and strict 'object world' perspectives - be the only avenue to 'problem solving'. By introducing cases from engineering and scientific practice we will illustrate how the perspectives of the Humanities and Social Sciences can be brought to bear......History reveals a number academically inclined engineers and others who have found engineering education lacking. The critics support their claim with diverse arguments and propose different reform initiatives (Buch 2012). Though the motivation varies the critics seems to agree on broadening...

  12. Road traffic injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng-guo 王正国

    2003-01-01

    @@ The appearance of cars has raised materialistic civilization and living standard to an unprecedented level. Today, it is hard to imagine how we human beings can live without cars.Yet, motor vehicles can cause a great number of deaths and injuries as well as considerable economic losses, which have constituted the global burden. Understanding of the occurrence and development of road traffic injuries will contribute to the prevention and control of crash and to the implementation of "everybody has the right to enjoy health" proposed by WHO.

  13. Back diffusion from thin low permeability zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minjune; Annable, Michael D; Jawitz, James W

    2015-01-06

    Aquitards can serve as long-term contaminant sources to aquifers when contaminant mass diffuses from the aquitard following aquifer source mass depletion. This study describes analytical and experimental approaches to understand reactive and nonreactive solute transport in a thin aquitard bounded by an adjacent aquifer. A series of well-controlled laboratory experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional flow chamber to quantify solute diffusion from a high-permeability sand into and subsequently out of kaolinite clay layers of vertical thickness 15 mm, 20 mm, and 60 mm. One-dimensional analytical solutions were developed for diffusion in a finite aquitard with mass exchange with an adjacent aquifer using the method of images. The analytical solutions showed very good agreement with measured breakthrough curves and aquitard concentration distributions measured in situ by light reflection visualization. Solutes with low retardation accumulated more stored mass with greater penetration distance in the aquitard compared to high-retardation solutes. However, because the duration of aquitard mass release was much longer, high-retardation solutes have a greater long-term back diffusion risk. The error associated with applying a semi-infinite domain analytical solution to a finite diffusion domain increases as a function of the system relative diffusion length scale, suggesting that the solutions using image sources should be applied in cases with rapid solute diffusion and/or thin clay layers. The solutions presented here can be extended to multilayer aquifer/low-permeability systems to assess the significance of back diffusion from thin layers.

  14. Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Concussion Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents Children ... body, may have a concussion or more serious brain injury. Concussion Signs Observed Can't recall events prior ...

  15. Management of blunt pulmonary injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, John J

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic injuries account for 25% of all civilian deaths. Blunt force injuries are a subset of thoracic injuries and include injuries of the tracheobronchial tree, pleural space, and lung parenchyma. Early identification of these injuries during initial assessment and resuscitation is essential to reduce associated morbidity and mortality rates. Management of airway injuries includes definitive airway control with identification and repair of tracheobronchial injuries. Management of pneumothorax and hemothorax includes pleural space drainage and control of ongoing hemorrhage, along with monitoring for complications such as empyema and chylothorax. Injuries of the lung parenchyma, such as pulmonary contusion, may require support of oxygenation and ventilation through both conventional and nonconventional mechanical ventilation strategies. General strategies to improve pulmonary function and gas exchange include balanced fluid resuscitation to targeted volume-based resuscitation end points, positioning therapy, and pain management.

  16. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... THIS TOPIC Jumper's Knee Safety Tips: Basketball Knee Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  17. Low back pain: a twentieth century health care enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, G

    1996-12-15

    Despite greater knowledge, expertise, and health care resources for spinal pathologies, chronic disability resulting from nonspecific low back pain is rising exponentially in western society. Medical care certainly has not solved the everyday symptom of low back pain and even may be reinforcing and exacerbating the problem. An historic review shows that there is no change in the pathology or prevalence of low back pain: What has changed in our understanding and management. There are striking differences in health care for low back pain in the United States and the United Kingdom, although neither delivers the kind of care recommended by recent evidence-based guidelines. Medical care for low back pain in the United States is specialist-oriented, of high technology, and of high cost, but 40% of American patients seek chiropractic care for low back pain instead. National Health Service care for low back pain in the United Kingdom is underfunded, too little and too late, and 55% of British patients pay for private therapy instead. Despite the different health care systems, treatment availability, and costs, there seems to be little difference in clinical outcomes or the social impact of low back pain in the two countries. There is growing dissatisfaction with health care for low back pain on both sides of the Atlantic. Future health care for patients with nonspecific low back pain should be designed to meet their specific needs.

  18. Complaints of low back pain among private farmers exposed to whole body vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek Solecki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Work-related lower back disorders , which involve the lumbo-sacral region, as well as injuries of the lumbar section of the spine, are a serious and constantly growing problem in Europe. Whole body vibration is one of the major hazardous factors suspected of the development of back pain. Material and Methods: The study covered a selected group of males, 98 farmers (aged 55.3±10.1 from the area of 7 communes in the Lublin Region, engaged in the mixed agricultural production (plant-animal. The control group consisted of 40 academic workers (university and research institute employees aged 48.9±9.6 years. A questionnaire concerning low back pain (in the lumbar region designed by the researchers of the Institute of Rural Health in Lublin was used as a major research tool. The degree of farmers' exposure to whole body vibration was evaluated based on the parameter known as a cumulative vibration dose (d (years×m2×s-4. Results: The measurements showed that the cumulative vibration dose for the selected group of farmers (98 remained within the range of 2.90-9.68 (years×m2×s-4, in the time interval between 15-50 years of work in conditions of exposure to vibration. The survey confirmed that private farmers exposed to whole body vibration considerably more frequently complained of back pain (92 farmers, 94% of the total number of respondents, than academic workers (control group not exposed to whole body vibration (25 researchers, 63%; p < 0.0001. Also the frequency of back pain in all the three time intervals of employment (15-25, 26-35, 36-50 years is significantly higher in the group of farmers than in the control group (p < 0.05. Conclusions: The frequency of back pains experienced by farmers during the entire period of occupational activity increases with a growing dose of whole body vibration (p = 0.005. In the incidence of chronic pain an upward tendency was observed (statistically insignificant. Med Pr 2014;65(1:55–64

  19. “Floating shoulder” injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Heng, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    “Floating shoulder” is a rare injury complex resulting from high-energy blunt force trauma to the shoulder, resulting in scapulothoracic dissociation. It is commonly associated with catastrophic neurovascular injury. Two cases of motorcyclists with floating shoulder injuries are described.

  20. Musculoskeletal Injury in Professional Dancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Craig L; Cassidy, J David; Côté, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with injury in professional ballet and modern dancers, and assess if dancers are reporting their injuries and explore reasons for not reporting injuries. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Participants...

  1. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  2. Multiple Ligament Knee Injury: Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Manske, Robert C; Hosseinzadeh, Pooya; Giangarra, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Non-operative and operative complications are common following multiple ligament knee injuries. This article will describe common complications seen by the surgeon and physical therapist following this complex injury. Complications include fractures, infections, vascular and neurologic complications following injury and surgery, compartment syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, deep venous thrombosis, loss of motion and persistent laxity issues. A brief description of these complications ...

  3. Injury prevention and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Sleet

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Injuries are one of the most under-recognized public health problems facing the world today. With more than 5 million deaths every year, violence and injuries account for 9% of global mortality, as many deaths as from HIV, Malaria and Tuberculosis combined. Eight of the 15 leading causes of death for people ages 15 to 29 years are injury-related: road traffic injuries, suicides, homicides, drowning, burns, war injuries, poisonings and falls. For every death due to war, there are three deaths due to homicide and five deaths due to suicide. However, most violence happens to people behind closed doors and results not in death, but often in years of physical and emotional suffering [1]. Injuries can be classified by intent: unintentional or intentional. Traffic injuries, fire-related injuries, falls, drowning, and poisonings are most often classified as unintentional injuries; injuries due to assault, selfinflicted violence such as suicide, and war are classified as intentional injuries, or violence. Worldwide, governments and public and private partners are increasingly aware of the strains that unintentional injuries and violence place on societies. In response they are strengthening data collection systems, improving services for victims and survivors, and increasing prevention efforts [1].

  4. Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Frank C., III; and Others

    The majority of shoulder injuries occurring in throwing sports involve the soft tissue structures. Injuries often occur when the unit is overstretched to a point near its greatest length, involving the elastic tissues. The other injury mechanism involves the contractural unit of the muscle, which occurs near the midpoint of contractions, involving…

  5. Clinical trials in head injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narayan, RK; Michel, ME

    2002-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health problem globally. In the United States the incidence of closed head injuries admitted to hospitals is conservatively estimated to be 200 per 100,000 population, and the incidence of penetrating head injury is estimated to be 12 per 100,000,

  6. Brain Injury Association of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Only) 1-800-444-6443 Welcome to the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) Brain injury is not an event or an outcome. ... misunderstood, under-funded neurological disease. People who sustain brain injuries must have timely access to expert trauma ...

  7. PERSONALITY CHANGES IN BRAIN INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Patricia Gracia; Mielke, Michelle M.; Rosenberg, Paul; Bergey, Alyssa; Rao, Vani

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently complicated by alterations in mood and behaviour and changes in personality. We report mild personality changes post-TBI as a possible indicator of traumatic brain injury, but not of injury severity or psychiatric complications.

  8. Diagnosis of Acute Groin Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, Andreas; Tol, Johannes L; Jomaah, Nabil;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute groin injuries are common in high-intensity sports, but there are insufficient data on injury characteristics such as injury mechanisms and clinical and radiological findings. PURPOSE: To describe these characteristics in a cohort of athletes. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study...

  9. No injuries, but plenty of pain? On the methodology for recording overuse symptoms in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, R

    2009-12-01

    Overuse injuries may represent as much of a problem as do acute injuries in many sports. This paper reviews key concepts related to the methodology for recording overuse symptoms. Results from the FIVB Volleyball Injury Study were used to compare two different recording methods. The aim of this paper was to provide recommendations on how standardised methodology can be developed to quantify overuse injuries in surveillance studies. Using beach volleyball data, a "traditional" cohort study approach using a time-loss injury definition suggested that injury risk was very low. In contrast, the data from a survey of past and present pain problems in the shoulder, knees and low back demonstrated that these were prevalent. The following recommendations are made: (1) studies should be prospective, with continuous or serial measurements of symptoms; (2) valid and sensitive scoring instruments need to be developed to measure pain and other relevant symptoms; (3) prevalence and not incidence should be used to report injury risk; (4) severity should be measured based on functional level and not time loss from sports. In conclusion, new approaches are needed to develop more appropriate methodology to quantify overuse injuries in studies.

  10. Injuries of football referees: a representative survey of Swiss referees officiating at all levels of play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzini, M; Junge, A; Bahr, R; Dvorak, J

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and characteristics of injury and musculo-skeletal complaints in Swiss football referees of all levels. A representative sample of 489 Swiss referees was interviewed regarding their socio-demographic characteristics, refereeing qualifications, time spent in training and in matches, history of injuries and musculo-skeletal complaints caused by training or refereeing, and other medical problems. A total of 110 referees (22.5%) reported having suffered at least one injury related to officiating, and 126 referees (25.8%) at least one refereeing-related musculo-skeletal complaint. Thigh strains and ankle sprains were the most frequent injuries, with the most frequent locations of complaints being the knee and lower back. The incidence of match injuries in the last 12 months was on average 2.06 per 1000 match hours; the incidence of training injuries was substantially lower (0.09 per 1000 training hours). The injury rates were similar for referees officiating at an adult level, but lower at a junior level. In comparison with elite football referees, the incidence of training injuries and the prevalence of musculo-skeletal complaints were lower in amateur referees. Nevertheless, preventive programs are indicated for referees at all levels, especially when considering the length of a referee's career.

  11. Chilling injury in mangoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, L.A.E.T.

    2005-01-01

    At present, the value and production quantity of mango fruits are increasing worldwide. Many studies emphasize how chilling injury phenomena affect the quality of tropical fruits, such as mango, during postharvest handling, transport, and storage. Since mango is one of the most favored and popular f

  12. Shoulder injuries in archery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, D L; Littke, N

    1989-06-01

    Twenty-one elite-calibre archers (M = 12, F = 9) were investigated concerning all past and present archery-related shoulder injuries, using a questionnaire and physical examination. The questionnaire revealed that 11 of 21 archers had complained of significant shoulder injuries either currently or during their careers. While 9/12 men never had shoulder problems during an average of 13.5 years, only 4/9 women escaped injury during a mean 10.9 year competitive career. Deficits in training programs were noted, including lack of training and non-specific exercises. Clinical examination demonstrated shoulder asymmetry and decreased flexibility in the drawing arm (DA) shoulder. Functional testing revealed a positive impingement sign in 6/21 DA shoulders. Supraspinatus testing showed abnormalities in 4/21 DA shoulders. Pain was referred posteriorly with the impingement maneuver in 5/21 DA shoulders and abnormal external rotation testing was observed in 8/21 DA shoulders. Generally, the females had proportionally more signs and symptoms of shoulder injury than the men, especially involving the DA shoulder. Testing implicated supraspinatus impingement/tendonitis and infraspinatus/teres minor traction tendonitis. These clinical findings correlated with cadaver prosection observations.

  13. Basketball injuries in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaca, Ana Maria [Duke University Health Systems, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); McGovern-Davison Children' s Health Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Basketball is a popular, worldwide sport played outdoors and indoors year-round. Patterns of injury are related to abrupt changes in the athlete's direction, jumping, contact between athletes, the hard playing surface and paucity of protective equipment. Intensity of play and training in the quest of scholarships and professional careers is believed to contribute to an increasing occurrence of injury. Radiologists' appreciation of the breadth of injury and its relation to imaging and clinical findings should enhance the care of these children. Some of the patterns of injury are well known to radiologists but vary due to age- and size-related changes; the growing skeleton is affected by differing susceptibilities from biomechanical stresses at different sizes. Beyond screening radiographs, the accuracy of MRI and CT has improved diagnosis and treatment plans in this realm. Investigations to detect symptoms and signs in an attempt to prevent the tragedy of sudden cardiac death in basketball players may lead to MRI and CTA studies that compel radiologists to evaluate cardiac function along with myocardial and coronary artery anatomy. Worthy of mention also is the female athlete triad of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis that is observed in some young women participating in this and other sports. (orig.)

  14. Injury Prevention Research

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    Research provides the knowledge that we need to understand what is possible, what is not, and the best way to proceed in our intervention efforts.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 9/1/2009.

  15. Splenic injury after colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, C.R.; Adamsen, S.; Gocht-Jensen, P.;

    2008-01-01

    Splenic injury is a rare and serious complication of colonoscopy. The most likely mechanism is tension on the splenocolic ligament and adhesions. Eight cases were identified among claims for compensation submitted to the Danish Patient Insurance Association during the period 1992-2006, seven of w...

  16. Lightning Injury: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    depression . Of course, these effects may cause significant vocational and interpersonal difficulty [63], and early neuropsychiatric inter- vention is... tinnitus , basilar skull fracture, and burns to the external auditory canal [69]. A wide variety of eye injuries can be caused by lightning strike. The

  17. Combination of taping with Back School in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Tana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 70-85% of the general population suffers from back pain. Back School programs have being effective in the treatment of chronic low back pain. Taping may be useful in reducing pain and normalizing muscle function. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the combination of taping with Back School at short- and long-term. Methods: Randomized controlled clinical trial. The experimental group used tape and made Back Scholl and the control group only made Back School. At the beginning and the end of treatment, pain was evaluated with a visual analogue scale, the flexibility determined with the Modified Finger Tip-to-Floor Test and functionality was calculated with the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Depression was recorded with the Depression Beck Inventory just at the beginning. Results: 220 patients were enrolled, only 42 in the experimental group and 33 in the control group completed the treatment. The variation of pain between the first and the fifth session showed no differences between groups regardless of time (p = 0.329. There were no differences between groups in functionality (p = 0.75, flexibility (p = 0.20 and depression. Conclusion: The combination of taping and Back School compared with only Back School was not more effective in reducing pain, increasing functionality and flexibility in patients with chronic low back pain. Key words: Taping; chronic low back pain; spine school; therapy exercises; flexibility; depression.

  18. Low back pain and lumbar angles in Turkish coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya, S.; Ozdolap, S.; Gumustas, S.; Koc, U. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine

    2007-02-15

    This study was designed to assess the incidence of low back pain among Turkish coal miners and to investigate the relationship between angles of the lumbar spine and low back pain in coal miners. Fifty underground workers (Group I) and 38 age-matched surface workers (Group II) were included in the study. All the subjects were asked about low back pain in the past 5 years. The prevalence of low back pain was higher in Group I than in Group II (78.0%, 32.4%, respectively, P {lt} 0.001). The results of the study showed that low back pain occurred in 78.0% of Turkish coal miners. Although the nature of the occupation may have influenced coal miners' lumbar spinal curvature, lumbar angles are not a determinant for low back pain in this population. Further extensive studies involving ergonomic measurements are needed to validate our results for Turkish coal mining industry.

  19. Injury incidence, mechanism and diagnosis in top-level teamgym: a prospective study conducted over one season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harringe, M L; Renström, P; Werner, S

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate injury incidence, mechanism and diagnosis in Swedish teamgym. Sixteen male and 26 female gymnasts with international experience were prospectively followed during one season of training and competition. Injuries leading to a modified participation or total absence from gymnastics during 1 week or more were registered. Twenty-seven of the 42 gymnasts sustained 42 injuries. The injury incidence was 2.2/1000 gymnastics hours. No gender differences were found. Sixty-two percent of the injuries were located to the lower extremity, 28.5% to the back and 9.5% to the upper extremity. The most common injury was ankle sprain and the most frequent mechanisms were joint compression and joint rotation. The majority of the injuries occurred in the landing phase of the gymnastics skills and 50% of the injuries were reported at the end of the training session. Eighteen injuries occurred while the gymnasts were in a negative state of mood such as stressed or afraid. Injury prevention programs should be developed with respect to these findings. Special emphasis must be placed on the landing phase of the gymnastics skills as this phase seems to be critical.

  20. Facilitated pro-nociceptive pain mechanisms in radiating back pain compared with localized back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Facilitated pain mechanisms and impaired pain inhibition are often found in chronic pain patients. This study compared clinical pain profiles, pain sensitivity, as well as pro-nociceptive and anti-nociceptive mechanisms in patients with localized low back pain (n=18), localized neck pain (n=17......), low back and radiating leg pain (n=18), or neck and radiating arm pain (n=17). It was hypothesized that patients with radiating pain had facilitated pain mechanisms and impaired pain inhibition compared with localized pain patients. Cuff algometry was performed on the non-painful lower leg to assess...... pressure pain threshold (cPPT), tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations at cPTT intensity), and conditioning pain modulation (CPM: increase in cPPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection (HDT) and heat pain...

  1. Studies of the nucleon structure in back-to-back SIDIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakian, Harut [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) proved to be a great tool in testing of the theory of strong interactions, which was a major focus in last decades. Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS), with detection of an additional hadron allowed first studies of 3D structure of the nucleon, moving the main focus from testing the QCD to understanding of strong interactions and quark gluon dynamics to address a number of puzzles accumulated in recent years. Detection of two hadrons in SIDIS, which is even more complicated, provides access to details of quark gluon interactions inaccessible in single-hadron SIDIS, providing a new avenue to study the complex nucleon structure. Large acceptance of the Electron Ion Collider, allowing detection of two hadrons, produced back-to-back in the current and target fragmentation regions, combined with clear separation of two regions, would provide a unique possibility to study the nucleon structure in target fragmentation region, and correlations of target and current fragmentation regions.

  2. Advanced Control Strategy of Back-to-Back PWM Converters in PMSG Wind Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Luong Van

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a control scheme of back-to-back PWM converters for the permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG wind turbine system. The DC-link voltage can be controlled at the machine-side converter (MSC, while the grid-side converter (GSC controls the grid active power for a maximum power point tracking (MPPT. At the grid fault condition, the DC-link voltage controller is designed using a feedback linearization (FL theory. For the MPPT, a proportional control loop is added to the torque control to reduce the influence of the inertia moment in the wind turbines, which can improve its dynamic performance. The validity of this control algorithm has been verified by the simulation of the 2-MW PMSG wind turbine system.

  3. Dynamic Performance of a Back-to-Back HVDC Station Based on Voltage Source Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatir, Mohamed; Zidi, Sid-Ahmed; Hadjeri, Samir; Fellah, Mohammed-Karim

    2010-01-01

    The recent developments in semiconductors and control equipment have made the voltage source converter based high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC) feasible. This new DC transmission is known as "HVDC Light or "HVDC Plus by leading vendors. Due to the use of VSC technology and pulse width modulation (PWM) the VSC-HVDC has a number of potential advantages as compared with classic HVDC. In this paper, the scenario of back-to-back VSC-HVDC link connecting two adjacent asynchronous AC networks is studied. Control strategy is implemented and its dynamic performances during disturbances are investigated in MATLAB/Simulink program. The simulation results have shown good performance of the proposed system under balanced and unbalanced fault conditions.

  4. Back seeding of picosecond supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moselund, Peter M.; Frosz, Michael Henoch; Thomsen, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    with picosecond pumping in photonic crystal fibers with two closely spaced zero dispersion wavelengths. We couple parts of the output spectrum of the supercontinuum source back to the input in order to produce a gain of over 15 dB at some wavelengths. We use a variable time delay to optimize the overlap between...... the pump and the back seeded pulses and investigate how the delay and spectrum of the back seeded pulse affects the resulting supercontinuum spectrum....

  5. "Low back pain"--下腰痛?腰痛?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗军; 夏群

    2005-01-01

    @@ "Low back pain"一词在国内绝大多数译文或译著中被译为"下腰痛",也有作者将其译为"下背痛".笔者认为这些译法不妥,曲解了"low back pain"的原意.此词翻译的关键在于对"low back"一词解剖部位的理解上.

  6. A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN ERGONOMIC ADVICES VERSUS ERGONOMIC PLUS PHYSIOTHERAPY INTERVENTION IN LOW BACK PAIN AMONG FARMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipkumar. Parekh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In most countries, agriculture is recognized as one of the most hazardous industries. There is a host of injuries and illnesses in agriculture that have been consistently identified through epidemiological and community-based studies as in need for controlling due to their high reporting rates among agricultural workers. Low-back pain is a common and important clinical and public health problem. Low back problems affect the spines flexibility, stability, and strength, which can cause pain discomfort and stiffness. The prevalence of occupational low-back pain varies between industries and occupations and there is an association with heavy physical work, static work postures such as prolonged sitting, vibration and psychosocial factors such as work dissatisfaction. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of such an ergonomic and ergonomic plus physiotherapy treatment on functional and symptomatic parameters of moderately disabled farmers with chronic low back pain. Study Design: Experimental design. Methods: 30 patients (farmers were selected randomly from the population using simple random sampling procedure (Lottery Method and were divided into two equal groups. Both Group A &B were given ergonomic intervention for 4 weeks. And Group B was given Physiotherapy intervention for 2session/week, up to 4 weeks. Outcome measures: VAS(Visual Analogue Scale, Oswestry low back pain disability. Results: In Group-A (Ergonomic and Group-B (Physiotherapy plus ergonomic, all data was expressed as mean ± , SDand was statistically analysed using paired ‘t’ test and independent ‘t’ test to determine the statistical difference among the parameters at 0.5% level of significance. Statistical data of SPADI showed that, Group-B is significantly different from Group-A with p<0.05; i.e 95% of significance. Conclusion: In this study conclude that Physiotherapy plus ergonomic intervention to give greater improvement in pain, and functional

  7. Hyperfine interaction versus strong laser field-optical Back-Goudsmit (Paschen-Back) effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Wojciech

    1991-08-01

    Strong laser perturbation of an atom with fine or hyperfine structure is analyzed in the context of a level-crossing experiment. The effect of sufficiently powerful, detuned, and/or spectrally broad light is to produce ``hyperfine uncoupling,'' which can be regarded as the optical Back-Goudsmit effect. It is easily understood in terms of an analogy between the level-crossing effect and double-slit experiment.

  8. Comparative Analysis for NN-Based Adaptive Back-stepping Controller and Back-stepping Controller

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Gjonaj; BetimÇiço; ArnisaMyrtellari

    2016-01-01

    This work primarily addresses the design and implementation of a neural network based controller for the trajectory tracking of a differential drive mobile robot. The proposed control algorithm is an NN-based adaptive controller which tunes the gains of the back-stepping controller online according to the robot reference trajectory and its initial posture. In this method, a neural network is needed to learn the characteristics of the plant dynamics and make use of it to determine the future i...

  9. Disaster: would your community bounce back?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-12

    What makes some communities or organizations able to quickly bounce back from a disaster, while others take a long time to recover? This question has become very important for emergency planners in federal, state, and local government - particularly since the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina, which nearly destroyed New Orleans five years ago. These events have made people aware that we can't always prevent disasters, but might be able to improve the ability of communities and regions to respond to and bounce back from major disruptions. Social scientists have found that most communities are, in fact, quite resilient to most disasters. People tend to work together, overcome divisions, identify problems, and develop improvised solutions. This often leads to a greater sense of community and a sense of personal accomplishment. Long-term recovery can be harder, but rebuilding can create jobs and stimulate economies. Communities may even end up better than they were before. But there are some disturbing exceptions to this trend, including Hurricane Katrina. The hurricane killed many people, the federal and local emergency response was not effective, people who could not evacuate were housed in the Superdome and Convention Center in terrible conditions, crime was prevalent, and local government did not appear to have control over the situation. A significant portion of the population was eventually evacuated to other cities. Even five years later, many people have not returned, and large parts of the city have not been rebuilt. Clearly, New Orleans lacked sufficient resilience to overcome a disaster of the magnitude of Katrina. There are four factors that social scientists are beginning to agree are important for community resilience: (1) A strong, diverse economy - Stable jobs, good incomes, diversity of industries, personal savings; (2) Robust social networks - Community members know each other, help each other, and have connections outside the community; (3

  10. Assessment of postural load on the back in occupational epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Burdorf, Alex

    1992-01-01

    textabstractLow-back pain is a common symptom among workers, nearly everyone will be affected by low-back pain at some point in life. This opening line may sound deceptive since low-back pain is usually a self-limiting condition, where recovery without a physician's consultation can be demonstrated in the vast majority of all episodes. Yet, there is ample evidence that the symptom of back pain is recurrent, with one-year recurrence rates reported of more than 60%. In many industrial populatio...

  11. Fluorinated tin oxide back contact for AZTSSe photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershon, Talia S.; Gunawan, Oki; Haight, Richard A.; Lee, Yun Seog

    2017-03-28

    A photovoltaic device includes a substrate, a back contact comprising a stable low-work function material, a photovoltaic absorber material layer comprising Ag.sub.2ZnSn(S,Se).sub.4 (AZTSSe) on a side of the back contact opposite the substrate, wherein the back contact forms an Ohmic contact with the photovoltaic absorber material layer, a buffer layer or Schottky contact layer on a side of the absorber layer opposite the back contact, and a top electrode on a side of the buffer layer opposite the absorber layer.

  12. Sonography and MRI of latissimus dorsi strain injury in four elite athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedret, Carles [Unitat Medicina Esportiva Consorci Sanitari del Garraf, Barcelona (Spain); Centre Diagnostic per Imatge de Tarragona, Tarragona (Spain); Balius, Ramon [Generalitat of Catalonia, Sports Catalan Council, Catalonia (Spain); Idoate, Fernando [Clinica San Miguel, Department of Radiology, Pamplona (Spain)

    2011-05-15

    The objective of this study was to describe the MR and sonographic findings in latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle strain in athletes, and to review the most common injuries described in the literature, most of which are humeral avulsions. Four injuries and two reinjuries of the myotendinous junction of the LD were followed from the day of injury until the return to play. Sonography (US) and MR imaging were performed in each case to confirm the diagnosis and to monitor the healing process. All cases had acute and isolated pain in the back of the shoulder while performing an eccentric maneuver of the arm and the shoulder. US and MR images demonstrated that injuries were located in the middle and cranial portion of the latissimus dorsi surrounding the myotendinous junction. After rehabilitation, all players played at high level again. Isolated lesions of LD are very rare. They can be demonstrated by US and MR images. (orig.)

  13. Turco's injury: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ana Paula Simões; Shimba, Leandro Girardi; Ribas, Luiz Henrique Boraschi Vieira; de Almeida, Alexandre Simmonds; Naves, Vinicius; Duarte Júnior, Aires

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to alert doctors to the existence of Turco's injury and discus the existing treatments that have been described in the worldwide literature. A bibliographic survey of Lisfranc's injury and Turco's injury covering from 1985 to 2013 was conducted in the SciELO and PubMed databases. Among the 193 articles, those relating to bone-ligament injuries of the Lisfranc joint and high-energy trauma were excluded, as were the case reports. The patients selected were professional or amateur athletes who solely presented a ligament injury to the Lisfranc joint (Turco's injury), which was diagnosed from the history, physical examination, radiographs and magnetic resonance images. Non-athletic patients and those with associated bone injuries were excluded (10). According to the injury classification, the patients were treated by means of either an open or a closed procedure and then a standard rehabilitation protocol. Out of the 10 patients, five underwent conservative treatment and five underwent surgical treatment using different techniques and synthesis materials. We obtained two poor results, one satisfactory, five good and two excellent. We conclude that the correct diagnosis has a direct influence on the treatment and on the final result obtained, and that lack of knowledge of this injury is the main factor responsible for underdiagnosing Turco's injury. There is a need for randomized prospective studies comparing the types of synthesis and evolution of treated cases, in order to define the best treatment for this injury.

  14. The Back 2 Activity Trial: education and advice versus education and advice plus a structured walking programme for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradbury Ian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current evidence supports the use of exercise-based treatment for chronic low back pain that encourages the patient to assume an active role in their recovery. Walking has been shown it to be an acceptable type of exercise with a low risk of injury. However, it is not known whether structured physical activity programmes are any more effective than giving advice to remain active. Methods/Design The proposed study will test the feasibility of using a pedometer-driven walking programme, as an adjunct to a standard education and advice session in participants with chronic low back pain. Fifty adult participants will be recruited via a number of different sources. Baseline outcome measures including self reported function; objective physical activity levels; fear-avoidance beliefs and health-related quality of life will be recorded. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated under strict, double blind conditions to one of two treatments groups. Participants in group A will receive a single education and advice session with a physiotherapist based on the content of the 'Back Book'. Participants in group B will receive the same education and advice session. In addition, they will also receive a graded pedometer-driven walking programme prescribed by the physiotherapist. Follow up outcomes will be recorded by the same researcher, who will remain blinded to group allocation, at eight weeks and six months post randomisation. A qualitative exploration of participants' perception of walking will also be examined by use of focus groups at the end of the intervention. As a feasibility study, treatment effects will be represented by point estimates and confidence intervals. The assessment of participant satisfaction will be tabulated, as will adherence levels and any recorded difficulties or adverse events experienced by the participants or therapists. This information will be used to modify the planned interventions to be used in a

  15. Stress and back pain: who can escape?

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    On 28 April each year, the International Labour Organization and the World Health Organization organise a World Day for Safety and Health at Work.   For the third consecutive year, CERN will be celebrating the World Day through events and initiatives coordinated by the BE Safety Unit, the HSE Unit, the CERN Medical Service and finally the Fire Brigade. Two main themes that will be highlighted this year are: work stress and musculoskeletal disorders. These two frightening items actually refer to situations that we may all be experiencing. On the day of the event, you will be given information and tips on how to reduce daily stress. You will also be invited to follow a “back pain” course that will bring to light all the activities you can try out in order to fight this affliction and reduce its consequences. The Fire Brigade will also be present to show you how to use the “portoire” chair. Don’t know what a “portoire” chair ...

  16. Classical Pendulum Feels Quantum Back-Action

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Hayase, Gen; Aso, Yoichi; Tsubono, Kimio

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics, which has agreed with every experimental test, predicts superposition of position states even for macroscopic objects. Because of the massiveness, such states might have a key to investigate both quantum measurement problem and quantum gravity. Recently, the use of quasi-freely suspended mirror combined with a laser field was proposed to prepare such states. One of the key milestones for the quantum-optomechanical effects such as the generation of the entanglement state and a squeezed state of light is the observation of quantum back-action, which identifies the connection between the objects and quantumness of the light. Until now, this effect has been observed below the meso-scopic mass scale. However, it has not been observed yet in the macroscopic scale beyond Planck mass. This is partially due to a technical limitation-the radiation pressure of light will expose a free mass to instability such as anti-torsional spring effect. Also, there is the fundamental compromise between tolerance ...

  17. LHC Report: Back to record performance

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC Team

    2012-01-01

    The technical issues that caused a rocky re-start after the technical stop and a relatively low performance of the machine have been tackled and resolved in the past days. The LHC is back to record collision rates and matching the 2011 data set now seems within reach for the summer conferences.   The technical stop at the end of April was followed by a period in which increased beam losses were observed before the beams were brought into collision, causing reduced peak luminosities. This issue was tackled by optimising the beams in the injector chain, making a fine adjustment of the orbit during the energy ramp-up and ensuring precise bunch collisions in ATLAS and CMS. These measures brought the peak luminosity at the beginning of a fill up to record levels of 6 x1033 cm-2s-1, but the fills were short as there were still sudden losses of some bunches that triggered the beam dump. The lost bunches were identified as bunches that only collide in LHCb. These bunches see fewer collisions, so the &am...

  18. Curcumin: getting back to the roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Shishir; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2005-11-01

    The use of turmeric, derived from the root of the plant Curcuma longa, for treatment of different inflammatory diseases has been described in Ayurveda and in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. The active component of turmeric responsible for this activity, curcumin, was identified almost two centuries ago. Modern science has revealed that curcumin mediates its effects by modulation of several important molecular targets, including transcription factors (e.g., NF-kappaB, AP-1, Egr-1, beta-catenin, and PPAR-gamma), enzymes (e.g., COX2, 5-LOX, iNOS, and hemeoxygenase-1), cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1 and p21), cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1, IL-6, and chemokines), receptors (e.g., EGFR and HER2), and cell surface adhesion molecules. Because it can modulate the expression of these targets, curcumin is now being used to treat cancer, arthritis, diabetes, Crohn's disease, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease, psoriasis, and other pathologies. Interestingly, 6-gingerol, a natural analog of curcumin derived from the root of ginger (Zingiber officinalis), exhibits a biologic activity profile similar to that of curcumin. The efficacy, pharmacologic safety, and cost effectiveness of curcuminoids prompt us to "get back to our roots."

  19. Medial branch neurotomy in low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masala, Salvatore; Mammucari, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Rome (Italy); Nano, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Rome (Italy); University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Marcia, Stefano [S. Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Cagliari (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency medial branch dorsal ramus neurotomy in patients with facet joint syndrome. From January 2008 to April 2010, 92 patients with facet joint syndrome diagnosed by strict inclusion criteria and controlled diagnostic blocks undergone medial branch neurotomy. We did not exclude patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Electrodes (20G) with 5-mm active tip were placed under fluoroscopy guide parallel to medial branch. Patients were followed up by physical examination and by Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index at 1, 6, and 12 months. In all cases, pain improvement was statistically significant and so quality of life. Three non-FBSS patients had to undergo a second neurotomy because of non-satisfactory pain decrease. Complications were reported in no case. Medial branch radiofrequency neurotomy has confirmed its well-established effectiveness in pain and quality of life improvement as long as strict inclusion criteria be fulfilled and nerve ablation be accomplished by parallel electrode positioning. This statement can be extended also to FBSS patients. (orig.)

  20. Prevention of low back pain in female eldercare workers: randomized controlled work site trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Gonge, Henrik Gjesing; Jørs, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Randomized controlled trial. Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of an ergonomic and psychosocial intervention in reducing low back pain (LBP) among health care workers. Summary of Background Data. LBP and injuries are reported frequently among health care workers worldwide......, stress management, or reference arm. A total of 163 individuals (79% of the source population) participated in both baseline and follow-up after 2 years. Outcome was intra-individual change in rating of LBP during the past 3 and 12 months. Results. We found no difference in LBP in any of the intervention...... arms over the study period. Conclusion. The study showed no effect of a transfer technique or stress management program targeting LBP. Thus, there is a need for discussing other priorities in the prevention of LBP among health care workers....

  1. Management of Extensor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Extensor tendon injuries are very common injuries, which inappropriately treated can cause severe lasting impairment for the patient. Assessment and management of flexor tendon injuries has been widely reviewed, unlike extensor injuries. It is clear from the literature that extensor tendon repair should be undertaken immediately but the exact approach depends on the extensor zone. Zone I injuries otherwise known as mallet injuries are often closed and treated with immobilisaton and conservative management where possible. Zone II injuries are again conservatively managed with splinting. Closed Zone III or ‘boutonniere’ injuries are managed conservatively unless there is evidence of displaced avulsion fractures at the base of the middle phalanx, axial and lateral instability of the PIPJ associated with loss of active or passive extension of the joint or failed non-operative treatment. Open zone III injuries are often treated surgically unless splinting enable the tendons to come together. Zone V injuries, are human bites until proven otherwise requires primary tendon repair after irrigation. Zone VI injuries are close to the thin paratendon and thin subcutaneous tissue which strong core type sutures and then splinting should be placed in extension for 4-6 weeks. Complete lacerations to zone IV and VII involve surgical primary repair followed by 6 weeks of splinting in extension. Zone VIII require multiple figure of eight sutures to repair the muscle bellies and static immobilisation of the wrist in 45 degrees of extension. To date there is little literature documenting the quality of repairing extensor tendon injuries however loss of flexion due to extensor tendon shortening, loss of flexion and extension resulting from adhesions and weakened grip can occur after surgery. This review aims to provide a systematic examination method for assessing extensor injuries, presentation and management of all type of extensor tendon injuries as well as guidance on

  2. Injury count model for quantification of risk of occupational injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanzode, Vivek V; Maiti, J; Ray, P K

    2011-06-01

    Reduction of risk of occupational injuries is one of the most challenging problems faced by industry. Assessing and comparing risks involved in different jobs is one of the important steps towards reducing injury risk. In this study, a comprehensive scheme is given for assessing and comparing injury risks with the development of injury count model, injury risk model and derived statistics. The hazards present in a work system and the nature of the job carried out by workers are perceived as important drivers of injury potential of a work system. A loglinear model is used to quantify injury counts and the event-tree approach with joint, marginal and conditional probabilities is used to quantify injury risk. A case study was carried out in an underground coal mine. Finally a number of indices are proposed for the case study mine to capture risk of injury in different jobs. The findings of this study will help in designing injury intervention strategies for the mine studied. The job-wise risk profiles will be used to prioritise the jobs for redesign. The absolute indices can be applied for benchmarking job-wise risks and the relative indices can be used for comparing job-wise risks across work systems.

  3. A cross-sectional study of self-reported back and neck pain among English schoolchildren and associated physical and psychological risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sam; Buckle, Peter; Stubbs, David

    2007-11-01

    This study set out to identify the associations between ergonomics and other factors with back and neck pain among schoolchildren. Self-reported questionnaires were used to record health outcomes and potential risk factors in state schools. Six hundred and seventy-nine schoolchildren from Surrey in the United Kingdom aged 11-14 years took part. Twenty-seven percent of children reported having neck pain, 18% reported having upper back pain, and 22% reported having low back pain. A forward stepwise logistic regression was performed with pain categories the dependent variables. Neck pain was significantly associated with school furniture features, emotional and conduct problems, family history of low back pain and previous treatment for musculoskeletal disorders. Upper back pain was associated with school bag weight (3.4-4.45 kg), school furniture features, emotional problems and previous treatment for musculoskeletal disorders. Low back pain was associated with school furniture features, emotional problems, family history and previous injury or accident. It is important to recognise the influence of physical, psychological and family factors in children's pain.

  4. Long term outcome and follow up of electrical injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Karimi; Mahnoush Momeni; Mahtab Vasigh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of electrical burn on a patient's life performance and the disability induced by this type of injury.Methods:This study is a prospective 6 years descriptive study. The injured patients admitted to our center between 2006 and 2008 were followed for 6 years to estimate the ability of their life and job performance after the injury.Results:In the patients, 96.8% were male. The mean age of patients was 27.9 years. 73.9% of those injuries were occupational injuries. 86.5% were pure electrical injuries. 81% of patients went back to their previous job within a 5-6 year period. Only 5% had the ability to perform their usual daily activities-these patients needed financial support from family, insurance companies and government. Unfortunately 6.3% were totally disabled and needed complete help even for their minor natural needs. These patients are young and probably have a long-term life expectancy and would have a huge financial impact on the government and society. The mean length of hospital stay was 17.7 d. The mean total body surface area burned was 13.3%±11.5%. We could see an association between high voltage burns and falling down (P=0.005). High voltage burns needed longer periods away from work (197 d) in comparison with low voltage injuries (145.8 d) (P=0.003). Conclusions: High voltage electrical burns are severe, needing more flap repairs and/or amputations and cause longer periods away from work.

  5. Low back pain during labor and related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Ya-Ling; Su, Tsann-Juu

    2008-09-01

    A substantial proportion of women in labor suffer from low back pain, yet this issue has only been specifically evaluated in a few Western studies. The purpose of this research was to (1) describe the following characteristics of low back pain during labor: prevalence, anatomic region(s) affected, type, pattern, intensity trend, effective interventions, and exacerbating factors; (2) identify the factors relating to intrapartum low back pain in Taiwan women. A correlational design with repeated measures was used to conduct this investigation. Ninety-three low-risk women in labor were recruited from a medical center in central Taiwan. Low back pain was repeatedly measured during the latent phase (cervix dilated 2-4 cm), early active phase (cervix dilated 5-7 cm), and late active phase (cervix dilated 8-10 cm) of labor. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, repeated measurement ANOVA, and logistic regression. The results showed as many as 75.3% of the participants suffered episodes of low back pain during labor. The mean pain scores were 36.66-76.20 in the various stages of labor. Pain intensified as labor progressed. The location of the pain also changed with the progression of labor. The type of low back pain in 54.29% of women in labor was "muscle soreness and pain"; The pattern of pain in 45.71% women was continuous. Massage was chosen as the most effective intervention to alleviate low back pain by 65.3% of women. The women in labor who suffered from low back pain during pregnancy (OR = 3.23; p low back pain group. In conclusion, our study demonstrates low back pain intensified with the progression of labor, suggesting early prevention is necessary, especially in the case of women who had low back pain during pregnancy and heavier body weight when hospitalized.

  6. Use of the contrast-enhanced CT enema in the management of penetrating trauma to the flank and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T; Sclafani, S J; Goldstein, A; Scalea, T; Panetta, T; Shaftan, G

    1986-07-01

    There have been few innovations in the management of penetrating trauma of the flank and back since that reported by Peck and Berne in 1981. During 1984-1985 our Trauma Service treated 119 patients with injuries in these areas. In 56 patients management was based on the results of the contrast-enhanced CT enema (CECTE), a computerized tomographic technique designed to delineate all of the retroperitoneal viscera by simultaneously opacifying the small bowel, duodenum, colon, GU tract, and major vessels. Specific radiographic findings were present on 44 scans. Twelve scans were negative. Six scans were considered indications for angiography because of the proximity of the identified missile wounds or their hematomas to major vascular structures. One of these arteriograms revealed a renal artery pseudoaneurysm which would otherwise have remained undiagnosed. In 30 cases the penetrating wounds were well delineated by CECTE, and their nature and location were considered appropriate for nonoperative management. None required subsequent exploration. In eight cases CECTE demonstrated that the wounds were located so as to place specific viscera at risk for significant injury, but no definite injury was identified. Five of these patients were successfully managed by further evaluation and close observation, two were explored, and one signed out of the hospital. No scan demonstrated extravasation from a hollow viscus. Overall, 52 of our 56 patients (92%) were successfully managed nonoperatively on the basis of the interpretation of their CECTE findings. CECTE can be useful in the management of stable patients with penetrating trauma to the back and flank by identifying the nature and location of the resulting retroperitoneal injuries.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Obstetric anal sphincter injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remon Keriakos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric anal sphincter injuries can be associated with significant short and long term consequences causing devastating impacts on the quality of lives of young, otherwise healthy women. The major consequence is anal incontinence which may be short or long term and vary in severity. The other consequences include pain, infection, dyspareunia and sexual dysfunction. This may in turn result in considerable economic burden to health care providers and patients. It also has an implication on future deliveries. Although it can never be eliminated, it can be reduced by improving practice, training and provision of high quality multidisciplinary care in order to reduce long-term morbidity. Obstetric anal sphincter injuries are also a source of litigation which can be distressing to both patients and clinicians. The aim of this review article is to explore the available evidence on epidemiology, strategies for preventions, prognosis and also how to deal with governance issues.

  8. Meniscal injury: II. Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greis, Patrick E; Holmstrom, Michael C; Bardana, Davide D; Burks, Robert T

    2002-01-01

    Meniscal repair is a viable alternative to resection in many clinical situations. Repair techniques traditionally have utilized a variety of suture methods, including inside-out and outside-in techniques. Bioabsorbable implants permit all-inside arthroscopic repairs. The success of meniscal repair depends on appropriate meniscal bed preparation and surgical technique and is also influenced by biologic factors such as tear rim width and associated ligamentous injury. Successful repair in >80% of cases has been reported in conjunction with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Success rates are lower for isolated repairs. Complications related to repair include neurologic injury, postoperative loss of motion, recurrence of the tear, and infection. Meniscal allograft transplantation may provide a treatment option when meniscus salvage is not possible or when a previous total meniscectomy has been done.

  9. Obstetric anal sphincter injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Remon Keriakos; Deepa Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric anal sphincter injuries can be associated with significant short and long term consequences causing devastating impacts on the quality of lives of young, otherwise healthy women. The major consequence is anal incontinence which may be short or long term and vary in severity. The other consequences include pain, infection, dyspareunia and sexual dysfunction. This may in turn result in considerable economic burden to health care providers and patients. It also has an implication on future deliveries. Although it can never be eliminated, it can be reduced by improving practice, training and provision of high quality multidisciplinary care in order to reduce long-term morbidity. Obstetric anal sphincter injuries are also a source of litigation which can be distressing to both patients and clinicians. The aim of this review article is to explore the available evidence on epidemiology, strategies for preventions, prognosis and also how to deal with governance issues.

  10. [Dento-alveolar injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorsmit, R A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M

    1992-11-01

    Most dento-alveolar traumas can be managed by the dentist-general practitioner. Still, there are some specific injuries which should be treated by dental specialists. Some specific guidelines are given for the combined surgical-orthodontic treatment of fracture of the coronal part of the root, intrusive luxation, abnormal position of the permanent tooth due to traumatic displacement of the deciduous tooth, ankylosis and tooth loss.

  11. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery, i...... on the coronary vessels, with cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial exudate. In the lighter cases, PCIS may be treated with NSAID and, in the more severe cases, with systemic glucocorticoid which has a prompt effect....

  12. [Acute Kidney Injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Silke; Stahl, Rolf

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important part of renal diseases and a common clinical problem. AKI is an acute decline in renal function. Due to a lack of therapeutic options, prevention and optimal management of patients with AKI are the most important strategies. Although seldom the sole cause of patients' death, AKI is associated with a significant increase in mortality. Our objective is to draw the attention towards the prevention of AKI of non-renal causes.

  13. 13 CFR 120.612 - Loans eligible to back Certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loans eligible to back Certificates. 120.612 Section 120.612 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS... necessary for the successful operation of the Secondary Market program. (b) The loans that back a Pool...

  14. UBC researcher's back-pain studies focus on space travel.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, M

    1996-01-01

    Researchers at the University of British Columbia have been studying back pain that develops in astronauts in space. Their findings not only may help astronauts cope with future space travel, but also lead to new treatments for Earth-bound patients who experience back pain.

  15. Back pain and backpacks in children : Biomedical or biopsychosocial model?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reneman, M.F.; Poels, B.J.J.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2006-01-01

    Public press, professional organisations and journals have been sending alarming messages about the rising prevalence of back pain in school age children. Carrying backpacks has been suggested as one of the key factors contributing to back pain in children. The basic assumption based on the biomedic

  16. Back pain during different sequential treatment regimens of teriparatide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyritis, George; Marin, Fernando; Barker, Clare;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate changes in back pain in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis who received teriparatide for 24 months or switched at 12 months to raloxifene or no active treatment.......To investigate changes in back pain in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis who received teriparatide for 24 months or switched at 12 months to raloxifene or no active treatment....

  17. Back pain is a reason to think about osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vertkin, A.L.; Anton Vyacheslavovich Naumov; S R Shakirova; D M Zaichenko; N N Vladimirova; E. V. Adonina

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives information on osteoporosis (OP) as a cause of back pain. In OP the latter is stated to be induced by not only osteoporotic fractures, but also other pathological changes associated with bone mineral density loss. Data on the management of back pain due to OP are presented and the efficacies of alendronate and vitamin D3 are noted

  18. Territorial Entanglements: Ambiguities of Giving Back in Northwestern Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Benjamin Dwyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research note is part of the thematic section, Limits to Giving Back, in the special issue titled “Giving Back in Field Research,” published as Volume 10, Issue 2 in the Journal of Research Practice.

  19. Identifying intrinsic and reflexive contributions to low-back stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Drunen, P.; Maaswinkel, E.; Van der Helm, F.C.T.; Van Dieën, J.H.; Happee, R.

    2013-01-01

    Motor control deficits have been suggested as potential cause and/or effect of a-specific chronic low-back pain and its recurrent behavior. Therefore, the goal of this study is to identify motor control in low-back stabilization by simultaneously quantifying the intrinsic and reflexive contributions

  20. Back-analysis for Determining the Rheological Parameter of Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wenhuan; Zhu Dayong

    1994-01-01

    In this paper,a new method of back analysis for determmning the parameters of rheological surrounding rock is proposed. This method is based on the elasticviscoelastic correspondence principle, and the theological parameters are back analyzed from the measured displacemenrs during construction of the tunnel.A numerical exampie proves that the proposed method is applicanle to engineering practice.

  1. Backing up and Moving forward in Fractional Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Angela T.; Lischka, Alyson E.; Willingham, James C.; Hartland, Kristin S.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a process called "Backing Up" which is a way to preassess student understanding of a topic and gauge student readiness to move forward in the learning process. This process of backing up begins with using responses to a word problem to identify categories of students' understandings in relation to the expectations…

  2. Lumbar CT findings of patients with low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Kyun Sang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    Low back pain is probably the second most common disease entity to upper respiratory infection in developed country. We were missing at least 50% of the pathologic conditions by using conventional diagnostic modalities in low back pain. They did tell us nothing or little about facet abnormalities, lateral recesses, vertebral canal and soft tissue surrounding lumbar spines. High resolutional CT has been the biggest turning point in the diagnosis and management of low back pain. CT make a contribution to reducing the morbidity and probably the cost of evaluating patients with low back pain, and to increasing diagnostic accuracy. We observed 100 cases of lumbar CT using TCT 80A scanner for the evaluation of low back pain during the period from Apr. 1985 to Sept. 1985 at Chung-Ang University Hospital. Lumbar CT scan reveals high-positive findings (98%) in low back pain patients. Common low back disorders in CT are disc bulging (53%), herniated nucleus pulposus (32%), degenerative arthritis in posterior facet joints (27%), spinal stenosis (20%) and postoperative spines (15%). Uncommon low back disorders in CT are compression fracture of vertebral bodies, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis, tropism, transitional vertebra, Scheueman's disease, limbic fracture, transverse process or articular process fracture, sacroiliac joint subluxation, conjoined nerve root and meningocele.

  3. Orthopaedic Injuries in Equestrian Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason David; Gelbs, Jared Craig; Zhu, David Shiyu; Gallacher, Stacey Elisa; Sutton, Karen Michelle; Blaine, Theodore Alton

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the common nature of orthopaedic injuries in equestrian sports, there is no published review to specifically characterize orthopaedic injuries in equestrian athletes. Purpose: To characterize orthopaedic injury patterns in equine sports–related injuries and their treatment. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This review was performed through a PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus query (from 1978 to June 2014) in the English literature using search terms “(equine-related OR equestrian-related OR horse-related OR equestrian OR equestrians) AND (injury OR injuries).” Only full-text studies reporting on orthopaedic injury patterns pertinent to equestrian sports in the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) were included. Orthopaedic injuries were defined as those resulting in a fracture or dislocation. In all, 182 studies were excluded, leaving a total of 27 studies for evaluation. The studies included were analyzed for demographic and epidemiological data for orthopaedic injuries, including fractures and dislocations. Cranial and facial injuries were excluded from analysis. Results: The majority of those injured in the US were female (64.5%). The leading cause of injury in the US was falling from a horse. The use of protective equipment seemed to vary widely, with helmet use ranging from less than 6% up to 66.7%. In the UK, fractures were found to account for 17.4% of reported injures, compared with 33.6% of injuries in the US. The majority of fractures in US riders occurred in the upper extremities (50.7%). Conclusion: This review helps characterize the epidemiology of equestrian injuries based on currently available data. PMID:26535400

  4. Reporting outcomes of back pain trials: A modified Delphi study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froud, Robert; Eldridge, Sandra; Kovacs, Francisco;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a common and expensive health complaint. Many low back pain trials have been conducted, but these are reported in a variety of ways and are often difficult to interpret. AIM: To facilitate consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for future low back pain...... commonly used in back pain trials, are reported using between-group mean differences (accompanied by minimally important difference (between-group/population-level) thresholds where these exist), the proportion of participants improving and deteriorating according to established and relevant minimally...... pain experts reached a high level of consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for patient-reported outcomes in future low back pain trials. The statement has the potential to increase interpretability and improve patient care....

  5. Optical cavity back action on an AFM microlever

    CERN Document Server

    Jourdan, Guillaume; Chevrier, Joël

    2008-01-01

    Two back action processes generated by an optical cavity based detection device can deeply transform the dynamical behavior of an AFM microlever: the photothermal force or the radiation pressure. Whereas noise damping or amplifying depends only on the detuning inside the cavity for radiation pressure back action, we present experimental results carried out under vacuum and at room temperature on the photothermal back action process which appears to be much more complex. We show for the first time that it can simultaneously act on two vibration modes in opposite direction: noise on one mode is amplified whereas it is damped on another mode. Modelisation of this effect leads us to conclude that indeed it is specific to photothermal back action and cannot be observed in case of radiation pressure back action.

  6. Central sensitization in chronic low back pain: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzarello, Ilaria; Merlini, Luciano; Rosa, Michele Attilio; Perrone, Mariada; Frugiuele, Jacopo; Borghi, Raffaele; Faldini, Cesare

    2016-11-21

    Low back pain is one of the four most common disorders in all regions, and the greatest contributor to disability worldwide, adding 10.7% of total years lost due to this health state. The etiology of chronic low back pain is, in most of the cases (up to 85%), unknown or nonspecific, while the specific causes (specific spinal pathology and neuropathic/radicular disorders) are uncommon. Central sensitization has been recently recognized as a potential pathophysiological mechanism underlying a group of chronic pain conditions, and may be a contributory factor for a sub-group of patients with chronic low back pain. The purposes of this narrative review are twofold. First, to describe central sensitization and its symptoms and signs in patients with chronic pain disorders in order to allow its recognition in patients with nonspecific low back pain. Second, to provide general treatment principles of chronic low back pain with particular emphasis on pharmacotherapy targeting central sensitization.

  7. What influences retrospective self-appraised recovery status among danes with low-back problems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Boyle, Eleanor; Lauridsen, Henrik H;

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Phenomenological, qualitative investigation. The discord between commonly used outcome measures and patients' self-perceived recovery is problematic in the investigation and rehabilitation of low-back pain-related disorders. To better understand the course and development of this co......STUDY DESIGN: Phenomenological, qualitative investigation. The discord between commonly used outcome measures and patients' self-perceived recovery is problematic in the investigation and rehabilitation of low-back pain-related disorders. To better understand the course and development...... of this costly and disabling condition, the complex process of patient recovery requires further elucidation. OBJECTIVE: To explore issues and experiences impacting retrospective, self-appraised recovery. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 purposively sampled individuals, after which...... computer-assisted substantive categorization and thematic analysis was performed. RESULTS: Self-appraised status could be determined as "recovered" for 17 respondents, "unsure" for 6, and "not recovered" for 9. Recovery/non-recovery hinged on continued pain-related issues and the perception that injury...

  8. Long-term Follow-up of Whiplash Injury of the Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh El-Sallakh

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Whiplash injury patients have long-term residual symptoms; mainly pins and needles sensation in their limbs, headache, and dizziness. Increasing age and low back pain are bad prognostic factors. Claiming compensation prolongs the time for recovery. Sex, body mass index, type of treatment, smoking, and alcohol have no association with the incidence of persistent symptoms. However, smoking had a significant worsening effect on the severity of the symptoms in patients with high WDQS. WDQS, SF-36 and time to symptom relief are sensitive outcome measures of these injuries.

  9. Management of Sport Injuries with Korean Medicine: A Survey of Korean National Volleyball Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsop Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to report the current state of Korean medicine (KM treatment on sports injury by implementing survey with volleyball team medical doctors participating in 2013-2014 season. Six KM doctors completed a questionnaire that includes injury parameters: type, location, situation, and pain scores. We collected 166 injury cases from 94 Korean male and female national volleyball players. Knee (25.9%, low back (13.3%, elbow, and ankle (8.4% injuries were most common. Joint (41.6% and muscle (30.7% were major injured tissues. KM team medical doctors utilized acupuncture (40.4%, chuna manual therapy (16.0%, physical therapy (15.2%, taping (9.0%, and cupping (7.8% to treat volleyball injuries. Any types of medications were used infrequently. Additional physical and exercise therapy were preferred after receiving acupuncture (both 46.9%. This study presented the preliminary injury profile of Korean elite volleyball players. Injury and treatment parameters could be useful to build advanced KM model in sport medicine.

  10. Lower cervical spine injury treated with lateral mass plates and pedicle screws through posterior approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xue-ling; ZHAO Hong-bin; WANG Bin; ZHU Xiao-song; LI Lin-zhi; ZHANG Chun-qiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To treat injury of the lower cervical spine C6 to C7 with cervical lateral mass plates and T1 pedicle screws through posterior approach. Methods: The data of 8 patients with lower cervical spine C6 or C7 injury (6 patients with fracture and dislocation in C6 and C7 and 2 with fracture in C7) were analyzed retrospectively in this study. For the preoperative American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) classification, Grade C was found in 3 cases and Grade D in 5 cases. Screws were placed on the lateral masses and the first thoracic pedicle with Margerl technique. Lamina or facet bone allografting was used to achieve a long-term stability. Results: All the 8 patients were followed up for 5-37 months (mean: 15 months). No operative death occurred. There were no examples of aggravation of spinal cord injury or vertebral artery injury, cerebrospinal fluid leak, nerve roots injury, screw malposition or back-out, loose of alignment or implant failure. Clinical symptoms and ASIA classification were improved in all the patients. Postoperative MRI scanning confirmed the satisfactory screw placement in all the cases. Conclusions: Lateral mass plates and pedicle screws through posterior approach are safe and beneficial for patients with lower cervical spine C6 or C7 injury.

  11. Review of physiotherapy records to characterise musculoskeletal injury in Australian soldiers in the 16th Air Defence Regiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Sellentin

    2011-10-01

    source of the dependence was investigated by analysis of standardised residuals for each cell. Results: Five predominant types or areas of injury sustained by Australian soldiers of the 16th Air Defence Regiment were identified to be neck, low back, ankle, patella and knee ligament. The frequency of low back injuries was found to be significantly higher than the other types of injury (chi-square goodness of fit test, p < 0.001, then analysis of standardised residuals with Bonferroni adjustment. There was insufficient evidence of a relationship between type of injury and subunit (chi-square test of independence, p = 0.33. Five predominant causes of musculoskeletal injury were identified to be biomechanical, work, running, sports and physical training. Evidence of a relationship between type of injury and cause was found to be statistically significant (chi-square test of independence, p < 0.001 in the cause ‘sports’, which is associated with a relatively higher frequency of ankle inversion injuries, and ‘running’, which is associated with a relatively higher frequency of patella-femoral joint injuries (p < 0.002. Conclusion: This is the first full review of data on musculoskeletal injuries sustained by Australian soldiers of the 16th Air Defence Regiment. Types of musculoskeletal injuries and causes were analysed and patterns of injury were identified. Measures can now be drawn up with the aim of injury prevention.

  12. “Surgically created” excision of the back mimicking homicide: report of an unusual case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Janík

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fatalities due to sharp force trauma, with respect to manner of death, may be homicidal, self-inflicted, or accidental in nature. This article presents a case of an unusual sharp force injury inflicted under very specific and seemingly obscured circumstances, initially suggestive of homicidal origin. A 69-year-old, socially isolated male was found dead with a strange, heavily blood-stained excision-like lesion on the right subscapular area. The autopsy confirmed that the wound led to fatal external blood loss. Toxicological analysis of the blood and urine revealed severe alcohol intoxication. The police investigation turned up that the man had suffered from a painful skin furuncle of the right upper back. As he was worried about receiving medical treatment, he voluntarily asked his two acquaintances for “surgical” assistance to remove the skin affection. Based on the circumstances surrounding death and findings at autopsy, it was concluded that the injury was inflicted without the intent to harm or cause death, as a result of simple negligence. Consequently, the manner of death was ultimately certified as an involuntary manslaughter. Our case has clearly illustrated that even highly suspicious and atypically shaped wounds created by sharp-edged instruments with localization in non-accessible body areas does not exclusively indicate homicidal activity, hence, the accidental, suicidal or even iatrogenic origin of the wounding mechanism must be taken into consideration.

  13. Training and transfer effects of N-back training for brain-injured and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeløv, Jonas Kristoffer; Dall, Jonas Olsen; Kristensen, Casper Daniel; Aagesen, Marie Holt; Olsen, Stine Almgren; Snuggerud, Therese Ruud; Sikorska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Working memory impairments are prevalent among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). Computerised training targeting working memory has been researched extensively using samples from healthy populations but this field remains isolated from similar research in ABI patients. We report the results of an actively controlled randomised controlled trial in which 17 patients and 18 healthy subjects completed training on an N-back task. The healthy group had superior improvements on both training tasks (SMD = 6.1 and 3.3) whereas the ABI group improved much less (SMD = 0.5 and 1.1). Neither group demonstrated transfer to untrained tasks. We conclude that computerised training facilitates improvement of specific skills rather than high-level cognition in healthy and ABI subjects alike. The acquisition of these specific skills seems to be impaired by brain injury. The most effective use of computer-based cognitive training may be to make the task resemble the targeted behaviour(s) closely in order to exploit the stimulus-specificity of learning.

  14. Influence of low back pain and prognostic value of MRI in sciatica patients in relation to back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. el Barzouhi (Abdelilah); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); G.J.L.A. Nijeholt (Geert J. Lycklama A); B.F.W. van der Kallen (Bas); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); B.W. Koes (Bart); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Patients with sciatica frequently complain about associated back pain. It is not known whether there are prognostic relevant differences in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings between sciatica patients with and without disabling back pain. Methods: The study population

  15. Do illness perceptions of people with chronic low back pain differ from people without chronic low back pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C. Paul; van Ittersum, Miriam W.; Kaptein, Ad A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine why some people develop chronic low back pain, and whether illness perceptions are an important risk factor in the transition from acute to chronic low back pain. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants Four hundred and two members of the general Dutch population, with and

  16. Movement control tests of the low back; evaluation of the difference between patients with low back pain and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kool Jan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether there is a difference between patients with low back pain and healthy controls in a test battery score for movement control of the lumbar spine. Methods This was a case control study, carried out in five outpatient physiotherapy practices in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Twelve physiotherapists tested the ability of 210 subjects (108 patients with non-specific low back pain and 102 control subjects without back pain to control their movements in the lumbar spine using a set of six tests. We observed the number of positive tests out of six (mean, standard deviation and 95% confidence interval of the mean. The significance of the differences between the groups was calculated with Mann-Whitney U test and p was set on 0.8 was considered a large difference. Results On average, patients with low back pain had 2.21(95%CI 1.94–2.48 positive tests and the healthy controls 0.75 (95%CI 0.55–0.95. The effect size was d = 1.18 (p 0.7. Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating a significant difference between patients with low back pain and subjects without back pain regarding their ability to actively control the movements of the low back. The effect size between patients with low back pain and healthy controls in movement control is large.

  17. Patterns of Pediatric Maxillofacial Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bede, Salwan Yousif Hanna; Ismael, Waleed Khaleel; Al-Assaf, Dhuha

    2016-05-01

    Facial trauma in children and adolescents is reported to range from 1% to 30%. Because of many anatomical, physiological, and psychological characteristics of the pediatric population, maxillofacial injuries in children should be treated with special consideration that is attributable to certain features inherent in facial growth patterns of children. This study evaluated maxillofacial injuries in 726 children in terms of incidence, patterns of injury, causes, and treatment modalities and compared these parameters among 3 pediatric age groups. Intergroup differences were analyzed using Z test for 2 populations' proportion. The results showed that the incidence of pediatric maxillofacial injuries and fractures is higher than that reported elsewhere with male predominance. Soft tissue injuries are more frequently encountered in younger individuals, whereas the incidence of skeletal injuries increases with age. This study also revealed that certain etiologies, namely road traffic accidents, violence, bicycle, missiles, and industrial injures, increase with age; on the other hand, falls and puncture wounds are more common in younger children.

  18. Pedestrian Injuries: Emergency Care Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthy, Bharath

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Traffic-related pedestrian injuries are a growing public health threat worldwide. The global economic burden of motor vehicle collisions and pedestrian injuries totals $500 billion. In 2004, there were 4,641 pedestrian deaths and over 70,000 injuries in the United States. Injury patterns vary depending on the age, gender and socioeconomic status of the individual. Children, older adults, and those of lower socioeconomic status are most affected. The burden of injury upon the individual, families and society is frequently overwhelming. Although pedestrian injuries and deaths are relatively on the decline in the United States, this is not universally true throughout the world. It requires particular attention by emergency medicine physicians, public health experts and policy makers.

  19. Amusement park injuries and deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braksiek, Robert J; Roberts, David J

    2002-01-01

    Media coverage of amusement park injuries has increased over the past several years, raising concern that amusement rides may be dangerous. Amusement park fatalities and increases in reported injuries have prompted proposed legislation to regulate the industry. Since 1979, the medical literature has published reports of 4 subdural hematomas, 4 internal carotid artery dissections, 2 vertebral artery dissections, 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 1 intraparenchymal hemorrhage, and 1 carotid artery thrombosis with stroke, all related to roller coaster rides. In this article, we review reports of amusement park injuries in the medical literature and Consumer Product Safety Commission data on the overall risk of injury. We also discuss the physics and the physiologic effects of roller coasters that may influence the type and severity of injuries. Although the risk of injury is low, emergency physicians are advised to include participation on thrill rides as part of their history, particularly when evaluating patients presenting with neurologic symptoms.

  20. Lap belt injuries in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, N

    2010-07-01

    The use of adult seat belts without booster seats in young children may lead to severe abdominal, lumbar or cervical spine and head and neck injuries. We describe four characteristic cases of lap belt injuries presenting to a tertiary children\\'s hospital over the past year in addition to a review of the current literature. These four cases of spinal cord injury, resulting in significant long-term morbidity in the two survivors and death in one child, arose as a result of lap belt injury. These complex injuries are caused by rapid deceleration characteristic of high impact crashes, resulting in sudden flexion of the upper body around the fixed lap belt, and consequent compression of the abdominal viscera between the lap belt and spine. This report highlights the dangers of using lap belts only without shoulder straps. Age-appropriate child restraint in cars will prevent these injuries.