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Sample records for bacillus thuringiensis bt

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), a natural bacteria found all over the Earth, has a fairly novel way of getting rid of unwanted insects. Bt forms a protein substance (shown on the right) that is not harmful to humans, birds, fish or other vertebrates. When eaten by insect larvae the protein causes a fatal loss of appetite. For over 25 years agricultural chemical companies have relied heavily upon safe Bt pesticides. New space based research promises to give the insecticide a new dimension in effectiveness and applicability. Researchers from the Consortium for Materials Development in Space along with industrial affiliates such as Abott Labs and Pern State University flew Bt on a Space Shuttle mission in the fall of 1996. Researchers expect that the Shuttle's microgravity environment will reveal new information about the protein that will make it more effective against a wider variety of pests.

  2. The impact of secondary pests on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, Rui; Ceddia, Graziano; Areal, Francisco J; Park, Julian

    2015-06-01

    The intensification of agriculture and the development of synthetic insecticides enabled worldwide grain production to more than double in the last third of the 20th century. However, the heavy dependence and, in some cases, overuse of insecticides has been responsible for negative environmental and ecological impacts across the globe, such as a reduction in biodiversity, insect resistance to insecticides, negative effects on nontarget species (e.g. natural enemies) and the development of secondary pests. The use of recombinant DNA technology to develop genetically engineered insect-resistant crops could mitigate many of the negative side effects of insecticides. One such genetic alteration enables crops to express toxic crystalline (Cry) proteins from the soil bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Despite the widespread adoption of Bt crops, there are still a range of unanswered questions concerning longer term agro-ecosystem interactions. For instance, insect species that are not susceptible to the expressed toxin can develop into secondary pests and cause significant damage to the crop. Here, we review the main causes surrounding secondary pest dynamics in Bt crops and the impact of such outbreaks. Regardless of the causes, if nonsusceptible secondary pest populations exceed economic thresholds, insecticide spraying could become the immediate solution at farmers' disposal, and the sustainable use of this genetic modification technology may be in jeopardy. Based on the literature, recommendations for future research are outlined that will help to improve the knowledge of the possible long-term ecological trophic interactions of employing this technology.

  3. Cannibalism of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic corn versus non-Bt corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcutt, Charles F

    2006-06-01

    Because of the importance of cannibalism in population regulation of Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in corn, Zea mays L., it is useful to understand the interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic corn and cannibalism. To determine the effects of Bt corn on cannibalism in H. zea, pairs of the same or different instars were taken from Bt or non-Bt corn and placed on artificial diet in proximity. Cannibalism occurred in 91% of pairs and was approximately 7% greater for pairs of larvae reared from Bt transgenic corn (95%) than from non-Bt corn (88%). Also, first instar by first instar pairs had a lower rate of cannibalism than other pairs. Time until cannibalism was not different for larvae from Bt corn versus non-Bt corn. Pupation rate of cannibals and surviving victims was not different for pairs from Bt corn versus non-Bt corn. Finally, cannibalism increased pupation rate of cannibals from both Bt and non-Bt corn by approximately 23 and 12%, respectively, although the increases were not significant. Thus, negative effects of Bt on larvae were compensated by increased cannibalism in comparison with larvae reared on non-Bt corn, which increased larval survival to levels comparable with larvae reared on non-Bt plants.

  4. IMPACT OF BT ( BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS ) CROPS ON BAT ACTIVITY IN SOUTH TEXAS AGROECOSYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread adoption of transgenic insecticidal crops raises concerns that nontarget species may be harmed and food webs disrupted. The goal of this research is to determine how transgenic Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) crops impact the activity of Brazilian freetailed bats (Tada...

  5. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin susceptibility and isolation of resistance mutants in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The protein toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are the most widely used natural insecticides in agriculture. Despite successful and extensive use of these toxins in transgenic crops, little is known about toxicity and resistance pathways in target insects since these organisms are not ideal for molecular genetic studies. To address this limitation and to investigate the potential use of these toxins to control parasitic nematodes, we are studying Bt toxin action and resistance in ...

  6. Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than its non-transgenic counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangsheng; Wang, Yongmo; Liu, Biao; Zhang, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Rice lines genetically modified with the crystal toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have experienced rapid development, with biosafety certificates for two Bt rice lines issued in 2009. There has still been no commercial release of these lines yet due to public concerns about human health and environmental risks. Some studies confirmed that Bt rice was as safe as conventional rice to non-target organisms when pesticides were not applied, however, pesticides are still required in Bt rice to control non-lepidopteran pests. In this study, we assessed the environmental effects of two Bt rice lines expressing either the cry1Ab/1Ac or cry2A genes, respectively, by using zooplanktons as indicator species under normal field management practices using pesticides when required. In the whole rice growing season, non-Bt rice was sprayed 5 times while Bt rice was sprayed 2 times, which ensured both rice achieved a normal yield. Field investigations showed that rice type (Bt and non-Bt) significantly influenced zooplankton abundance and diversity, which were up to 95% and 80% lower in non-Bt rice fields than Bt rice fields. Laboratory rearing showed that water from non-Bt rice fields was significantly less suitable for the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna and Paramecium caudatum in comparison with water from Bt rice fields. Higher pesticide residues were detected in the water from non-Bt than Bt rice fields, accounting for the bad performance of zooplankton in non-Bt field water. Our results demonstrate that Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than non-Bt rice, and its commercialization will be beneficial for biodiversity restoration in rice-based ecosystems.

  7. Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than its non-transgenic counterpart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangsheng Li

    Full Text Available Rice lines genetically modified with the crystal toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt have experienced rapid development, with biosafety certificates for two Bt rice lines issued in 2009. There has still been no commercial release of these lines yet due to public concerns about human health and environmental risks. Some studies confirmed that Bt rice was as safe as conventional rice to non-target organisms when pesticides were not applied, however, pesticides are still required in Bt rice to control non-lepidopteran pests. In this study, we assessed the environmental effects of two Bt rice lines expressing either the cry1Ab/1Ac or cry2A genes, respectively, by using zooplanktons as indicator species under normal field management practices using pesticides when required. In the whole rice growing season, non-Bt rice was sprayed 5 times while Bt rice was sprayed 2 times, which ensured both rice achieved a normal yield. Field investigations showed that rice type (Bt and non-Bt significantly influenced zooplankton abundance and diversity, which were up to 95% and 80% lower in non-Bt rice fields than Bt rice fields. Laboratory rearing showed that water from non-Bt rice fields was significantly less suitable for the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna and Paramecium caudatum in comparison with water from Bt rice fields. Higher pesticide residues were detected in the water from non-Bt than Bt rice fields, accounting for the bad performance of zooplankton in non-Bt field water. Our results demonstrate that Bt rice is safer to aquatic ecosystems than non-Bt rice, and its commercialization will be beneficial for biodiversity restoration in rice-based ecosystems.

  8. Consequences for Protaphorura armata (Collembola: Onychiuridae) following exposure to genetically modified Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize and non-Bt maize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckmann, Lars-Henrik [National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Vejlsovej 25, PO Box 314, DK-8600 Silkeborg (Denmark); Griffiths, Bryan S. [Scottish Crop Research Institute, Department of Soil Plant Dynamics, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA (United Kingdom); Caul, Sandra [Scottish Crop Research Institute, Department of Soil Plant Dynamics, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA (United Kingdom); Thompson, Jacqueline [Scottish Crop Research Institute, Department of Soil Plant Dynamics, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA (United Kingdom); Pusztai-Carey, Marianne [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Moar, William J. [Auburn University, Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Andersen, Mathias N. [Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Research Centre Foulum, PO Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark); Krogh, Paul Henning [National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Vejlsovej 25, PO Box 314, DK-8600 Silkeborg (Denmark)]. E-mail: phk@dmu.dk

    2006-07-15

    Studies on the effect of genetically modified Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops on true soil dwelling non-target arthropods are scarce. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of a 4-week exposure to two Bt maize varieties (Cry1Ab) Cascade and MEB307 on the collembolan Protaphorura armata. For comparison three non-Bt maize varieties, Rivaldo (isogenic to Cascade), Monumental (isogenic to MEB307) and DK242, and two control diets based on baker's yeast (uncontaminated and contaminated with Bt toxin Cry1Ab) were also tested. Due to a lower C:N ratio, individuals reared on yeast performed significantly better in all of the measured endpoints than those reared on maize. P. armata performed equally well when reared on two Bt and three non-Bt maize varieties. Although there were no negative effects of Bt maize in this experiment, we recommend future studies on Bt crops to focus on species interactions in long-term, multi-species experiments. - Protaphorura armata performed equally well when reared on two Bt and three non-Bt maize varieties.

  9. Susceptibility of Ostrinia furnacalis to Bacillus thuringiensis and Bt Corn Under Long-Term Laboratory Selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Li-ping; HE Kang-lai; WANG Zhen-ying; ZHOU Da-rong; BAI Shu-xiong

    2005-01-01

    The susceptibility of the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) formulation and Bt corn was evaluated using insect bioassays for 6 years. Four strains of O. furnacalis were developed by laboratory selection from the laboratory strain reared on a non-agar semi-artificial diet. The RR-1 strain was exposed to a commercial formulation of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk) incorporated into the artificial diet, the RR-2 strain was exposed to Bt corn (MON810)tissue incorporated into the diet, and the SS-1 and SS-2 strains were reared on the standard diet with or without non-Bt corn tissues material. Decreasing susceptibility of O. furnacalis to Bt and to Bt corn were found in each selected strain although the ED50 and larval weight fluctuated from generation to generation. The resistance of Bt-exposed strain (RR-1)to Btk increased 48-fold by generation 39; the Bt corn-exposed strain (RR-2) increased its resistance 37-fold to Btk by generation 24. No larvae of SS-1 survived when they were exposed to the leaves of Bt corn, Bt1 1 and MON810. However,2-54% of the RR-1 (generation 46) and RR-2 (generation 20) larvae survived a 3 day-exposure to the leaves of Bt1 1 and MON810. The survival of both selected strains on Bt corn silk increased by 10-69%, and the larval weights after many generations selection were increased by 15-22% compared with the unselected susceptible strain. The young larvae were much more susceptible to Bt than older larvae. The highest mortality occurred when the larvae were exposed to Bt at the neonate stage. All of the results suggested that ACB could not only develop resistance to Bt preparation but also to Bt corn. Bt had significant effects on the growth and development of Asian corn borer than on the larval mortality. In order to maintain the long-term effectiveness of Bt pesticide and Bt corn, the resistance management should pay much attention to the larvae that may have opportunities to grow and developed on non-Bt

  10. Pest management through Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in a tea-silkworm ecosystem: status and potential prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashora, Kavya; Roy, Somnath; Nagpal, Akanksha; Roy, Sudipta Mukhopadhyay; Flood, Julie; Prasad, Anjali Km; Khetarpal, Ravinder; Neave, Suzanne; Muraleedharan, N

    2017-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a soil bacterium that forms spores containing crystals comprising one or more Cry or Cyt proteins having potential and specific insecticidal activity. Different strains of Bt produce different types of toxins, affecting a narrow taxonomic group of insects. Therefore, it is used in non-chemical pest management, including inherent pest resistance through GM crops. The specificity of action of Bt toxins reduces the concern of adverse effects on non-target species, a concern which remains with chemical insecticides as well. To make use of Bt more sustainable, new strains expressing novel toxins are actively being sought globally. Since Bt is successfully used against many pests including the lepidopteran pests in different crop groups, the insecticidal activity against Samia cynthia (Drury) (Eri silkworm) and Antheraea assamensis Helfer (Muga silkworm) becomes a concern in the state of Assam in India which is a predominantly tea- and silk-producing zone. Though Bt can be used as an effective non-chemical approach for pest management for tea pests in the same geographical region, yet, it may potentially affect the silk industry which depends on silkworm. There is a need to identify the potentially lethal impact (through evaluating their mortality potential) of local Bt strains on key silkworm species in North Eastern India. This will allow the use of existing Bt for which the silkworms have natural resistance. Through this review, the authors aim to highlight recent progress in the use of Bt and its insecticidal toxins in tea pest control and the potential sensitivity for tea- and silk-producing zone of Assam in India.

  11. INSECTICIDAL TOXIN FROM BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS IS RELEASED FROM ROOTS OF TRANSGENIC BT CORN IN VITRO AND IN SITU. (R826107)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractThe insecticidal toxin encoded by the cry1Ab gene from Bacillus thuringiensis was released in root exudates from transgenic Bt corn during 40 days of growth in soil amended to 0, 3, 6, 9, or 12% (v/v) with montmorillonite or kaolinite in a...

  12. Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn on soil Folsomia fimetaria, Folsomia candida (Collembola), Hypoaspis aculeifer (Acarina) and Enchytraeus crypticus (Oligochaeta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, X.; Krogh, P. H.

    The effects of the Cry1Ab toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (corn variety Cascade Bt MON810 and DeKalb variety 618 Bt) were studied on survival and reproduction of the soil collembolan Folsomia fimetaria, Folsomia candida, the collembolan predator mite Hypoaspis aculeifer and enchytraeids....... There was a weak significant reduction by 30% on the reproduction of F. fimetaria fed Bt corn in Petri dishes for 21 days. Likewise there was a weak significant reduction by 40% of the reproduction of H. aculeifer by Bt corn in amounts corresponding to 20 g plant material kg-1 soil in the two species soil......-litter microcosm systems. There were no effects of Bt corn materials on the reproduction of F. fimetaria and E. crypticus in the single species soil-litter microcosms. No effects of Bt corn materials on mortality of all the 4 species were observed in all treatments. The tendency of effects of the Bt corn...

  13. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt for the Control of Insect Pests in Stored Tobacco: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanc M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the insect species causing infestations and serious damages to stored commodities, the cigarette beetle, Lasiodermaserricorne (F. and the tobacco moth, Ephestiaelutella (Hübner are the major pests of both raw and manufactured tobacco. Post-harvest tobacco control is achieved through sanitation, insect monitoring, and fumigation with phosphine. However, insect resistance to phosphine and control failures have been reported, and increasing regulatory pressure is being exerted on fumigants. Biological control agents such as Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt appear to be environmentally sound and potentially viable alternatives to chemical control. Bt is a bacterium that produces insecticidal crystal proteins during the sporulation phase and has been, for more than 40 years, the microorganism of choice for the biocontrol of phytophagous insect pests. It produces insecticidal crystal proteins that display specific activity against certain orders of insects and become active upon ingestion by the insect. Our laboratory has conducted extensive research and worldwide surveys to evaluate the presence of Bt in stored tobacco and has confirmed previous findings indicating that Bt may be considered part of the naturally occurring phylloplanemicroflora. Several Bt strains were isolated from tobacco and characterized by DNA and protein profiling. The insecticidal activity of selected strains and of two commercial products against the larvae of L. serricorne was determined by diet incorporation assays. Moreover, the stability of Bt spores and crystal proteins on cured tobacco leaves was assessed over a storage period of time of 30 months. Cigarette prototypes were made with Bt-treated tobacco. Standard cigarette and smoke evaluations did not show any significant difference between the test and control cigarettes. Although the tested Bt strains and products did not yield satisfactory levels of mortality at the required times and doses, the experimental results

  14. Helicoverpa armigera baseline susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins and resistance management for Bt cotton in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujar, G T; Kalia, V; Kumari, A; Singh, B P; Mittal, A; Nair, R; Mohan, M

    2007-07-01

    Transgenic cotton that produces insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), often referred to as Bt cotton, is widely grown in many countries. Bt cotton with a single cry1A gene and stacked also with cry2A gene has provided satisfactory protection against the damage by the lepidopteran bollworms, especially the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) which is considered as a key pest. The baseline susceptibility of the larvae of H. armigera to Cry1Ac and other toxins carried out in many countries has provided a basis for monitoring resistance. There is no evidence of development of field-level resistance in H. armigera leading to the failure of Bt cotton crop anywhere in the world, despite the fact that Bt cotton was grown on the largest ever area of 12.1 million hectares in 2006 and its cumulative cultivation over the last 11 years has surpassed the annual cotton area in the world. Nevertheless, the Bt resistance management has become a necessity to sustain Bt cotton and other transgenic crops in view of potential of the target insects to evolve Cry toxin resistance.

  15. Susceptibility of legume pod borer (LPB), Maruca vitrata to delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R

    2008-01-01

    Baseline susceptibility of legume pod borer (LPB) to the insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) from Bacillus thuringiensis, viz, Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ca and Cry2Aa was assessed in Taiwan. Insect bioassays were performed by incorporating the Bt delta-endotoxins into the LPB artificial diet. The efficacy of different Bt delta-endotoxins against second instar larvae of LPB showed that the toxin Cry1Ab was the most potent toxin (LC(50) 0.207ppm), followed by Cry1Ca, Cry1Aa, Cry2Aa and Cry1Ac in descending order, with LC(50)s 0.477ppm, 0.812ppm, 1.058ppm and 1.666ppm, respectively. Hence, Cry1Ab and/or Cry1Ca toxins would provide effective control of early larval stages of LPB.

  16. Persistence of Bt Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin in various soils determined by physicochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helassa, N.; Noinville, S.; Déjardin, P.; Janot, J. M.; Quiquampoix, H.; Staunton, S.

    2009-04-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins from the soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are produced by a class of genetically modified (GM) crops, and released into soils through root exudates and upon decomposition of residues. In contrast to the protoxin produced by the Bacillus, the protein produced in GM crops does not require activation in insect midguts and thereby potentially looses some of its species specificity. Although gene transfer and resistance emergence phenomena are well documented, the fate of these toxins in soil has not yet been clearly elucidated. Cry proteins, in common with other proteins, are adsorbed on soils and soil components. Adsorption on soil, and the reversibility of this adsorption is an important aspect of the environmental behaviour of these toxins. The orientation of the molecule and conformational changes on surfaces may modify the toxicity and confer some protection against microbial degradation. Adsorption will have important consequences for both the risk of exposition of non target species and the acquisition of resistance by target species. We have adopted different approaches to investigate the fate of Cry1Aa in soils and model minerals. In each series of experiments we endeavoured to maintain the protein in a monomeric form (pH above 6.5 and a high ionic strength imposed with 150 mM NaCl). The adsorption and the desorbability of the Cry1Aa Bt insecticidal protein were measured on two different homoionic clays: montmorillonite and kaolinite. Adsorption isotherms obtained followed a low affinity interaction for both clays and could be fitted using the Langmuir equation. Binding of the toxin decreased as the pH increased from 6.5 (close to the isoelectric point) to 9. Maximum adsorption was about 40 times greater on montmorillonite (1.71 g g-1) than on kaolinite (0.04 g g-1) in line with the contrasting respective specific surface areas of the minerals. Finally, some of the adsorbed toxin was desorbed by water and more, about 36

  17. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic crop: an environment friendly insect-pest management strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Chandra, Amaresh; Pandey, K C

    2008-09-01

    Introduction of DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane) and following move towards indiscriminate use of synthetic chemical insecticides led to the contamination of water and food sources, poisoning of non-target beneficial insects and development of insect-pests resistant to the chemical insecticides. Increased public concems about the adverse environmental effects of indiscriminate use of chemical insecticides prompted search of altemative methods for insect-pest control. One of the promising alternatives has been the use of biological control agents. There is well-documented history of safe application of Bt (B. thuringiensis, a gram positive soil bacterium) as effective biopesticides and a number of reports of expression of delta-endotoxin gene(s) in crop plants are available. Only a few insecticidal sprays are required on Bt transgenic crops, which not only save cost and time, but also reduce health risks. Insects exhibit remarkable ability to develop resistance to different insecticidal compounds, which raises concern about the unsystematic use of Bt transgenic technology also. Though resistance to Bt products among insect species under field conditions has been rare, laboratory studies show that insects are capable of developing high levels of resistance to one ormore Cry proteins. Now it is generally agreed that 'high-dose/refuge strategy' is the most promising and practical approach to prolong the effectiveness of Bt toxins. Although manybiosafety concerns, ethical and moral issues exist, area under Bt transgenic crops is rapidly increasing and they are cultivated on more than 32 million hectares world over Even after reservation of European Union (EU) for acceptance of geneticaly modified (GM) crops, 6 out of 25 countries have already adopted Bt crops and many otherindustrial countries will adopt Bt transgenic crops in near future. While the modem biotechnology has been recognized to have a great potential for the promotion of human well-being, adoption

  18. Constitutive activation of the midgut response to Bacillus thuringiensis in Bt-resistant Spodoptera exigua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hernández-Martínez

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is the most effective microbial control agent for controlling numerous species from different insect orders. The main threat for the long term use of B. thuringiensis in pest control is the ability of insects to develop resistance. Thus, the identification of insect genes involved in conferring resistance is of paramount importance. A colony of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae was selected for 15 years in the laboratory for resistance to Xentari™, a B. thuringiensis-based insecticide, reaching a final resistance level of greater than 1,000-fold. Around 600 midgut ESTs were analyzed by DNA-macroarray in order to find differences in midgut gene expression between susceptible and resistant insects. Among the differentially expressed genes, repat and arylphorin were identified and their increased expression was correlated with B. thuringiensis resistance. We also found overlap among genes that were constitutively over-expressed in resistant insects with genes that were up-regulated in susceptible insects after exposure to Xentari™, suggesting a permanent activation of the response to Xentari™ in resistant insects. Increased aminopeptidase activity in the lumen of resistant insects in the absence of exposure to Xentari™ corroborated the hypothesis of permanent activation of response genes. Increase in midgut proliferation has been proposed as a mechanism of response to pathogens in the adult from several insect species. Analysis of S. exigua larvae revealed that midgut proliferation was neither increased in resistant insects nor induced by exposure of susceptible larvae to Xentari™, suggesting that mechanisms other than midgut proliferation are involved in the response to B. thuringiensis by S. exigua larvae.

  19. Elevated atmospheric ozone increases concentration of insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1Ac protein in Bt Brassica napus and reduces feeding of a Bt target herbivore on the non-transgenic parent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himanen, Sari J. [University of Kuopio, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)], E-mail: sari.himanen@uku.fi; Nerg, Anne-Marja [University of Kuopio, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Nissinen, Anne [University of Kuopio, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Plant Protection, FIN-31600 Jokioinen (Finland); Stewart, C. Neal [University of Tennessee, Department of Plant Sciences, Knoxville, TN 37996-4561 (United States); Poppy, Guy M. [University of Southampton, School of Biological Sciences, Southampton SO16 7PX (United Kingdom); Holopainen, Jarmo K. [University of Kuopio, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-01-15

    Sustained cultivation of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic crops requires stable transgene expression under variable abiotic conditions. We studied the interactions of Bt toxin production and chronic ozone exposure in Bt cry1Ac-transgenic oilseed rape and found that the insect resistance trait is robust under ozone elevations. Bt Cry1Ac concentrations were higher in the leaves of Bt oilseed rape grown under elevated ozone compared to control treatment, measured either per leaf fresh weight or per total soluble protein of leaves. The mean relative growth rate of a Bt target herbivore, Plutella xylostella L. larvae was negative on Bt plants in all ozone treatments. On the non-transgenic plants, larval feeding damage was reduced under elevated ozone. Our results indicate the need for monitoring fluctuations in Bt toxin concentrations to reveal the potential of ozone exposure for altering dosing of Bt proteins to target and non-target herbivores in field environments experiencing increasing ozone pollution. - Elevated atmospheric ozone can induce fluctuations in insecticidal protein concentrations in transgenic plants.

  20. Cry1A toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis bind specifically to a region adjacent to the membrane-proximal extracellular domain of BT-R(1) in Manduca sexta: involvement of a cadherin in the entomopathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsch, J A; Candas, M; Griko, N B; Maaty, W S A; Midboe, E G; Vadlamudi, R K; Bulla, L A

    2002-09-01

    Many subspecies of the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produce various parasporal crystal proteins, also known as Cry toxins, that exhibit insecticidal activity upon binding to specific receptors in the midgut of susceptible insects. One such receptor, BT-R(1) (210 kDa), is a cadherin located in the midgut epithelium of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. It has a high binding affinity (K(d) approximately 1nM) for the Cry1A toxins of B. thuringiensis. Truncation analysis of BT-R(1) revealed that the only fragment capable of binding the Cry1A toxins of B. thuringiensis was a contiguous 169-amino acid sequence adjacent to the membrane-proximal extracellular domain. The purified toxin-binding fragment acted as an antagonist to Cry1Ab toxin by blocking the binding of toxin to the tobacco hornworm midgut and inhibiting insecticidal action. Exogenous Cry1Ab toxin bound to intact COS-7 cells expressing BT-R(1) cDNA, subsequently killing the cells. Recruitment of BT-R(1) by B. thuringiensis indicates that the bacterium interacts with a specific cell adhesion molecule during its pathogenesis. Apparently, Cry toxins, like other bacterial toxins, attack epithelial barriers by targeting cell adhesion molecules within susceptible insect hosts.

  1. In Silico Modeling and Functional Interpretations of Cry1Ab15 Toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis BtB-Hm-16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhanshu Kashyap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical homology based structural model of Cry1Ab15 δ-endotoxin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis BtB-Hm-16 was predicted using the Cry1Aa template (resolution 2.25 Å. The Cry1Ab15 resembles the template structure by sharing a common three-domain extending conformation structure responsible for pore-forming and specificity determination. The novel structural differences found are the presence of β0 and α3, and the absence of α7b, β1a, α10a, α10b, β12, and α11a while α9 is located spatially downstream. Validation by SUPERPOSE and with the use of PROCHECK program showed folding of 98% of modeled residues in a favourable and stable orientation with a total energy Z-score of −6.56; the constructed model has an RMSD of only 1.15 Å. These increments of 3D structure information will be helpful in the design of domain swapping experiments aimed at improving toxicity and will help in elucidating the common mechanism of toxin action.

  2. Is the Cry1Ab protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) taken up by plants from soils previously planted with Bt corn and by carrot from hydroponic culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icoz, I; Andow, D; Zwahlen, C; Stotzky, G

    2009-07-01

    The uptake of the insecticidal Cry1Ab protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) by various crops from soils on which Bt corn had previously grown was determined. In 2005, the Cry1Ab protein was detected by Western blot in tissues (leaves plus stems) of basil, carrot, kale, lettuce, okra, parsnip, radish, snap bean, and soybean but not in tissues of beet and spinach and was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to be 0.05 +/- 0.003 ng g(-1) of fresh plant tissue in basil, 0.02 +/- 0.014 ng g(-1) in okra, and 0.34 +/- 0.176 ng g(-1) in snap bean. However, the protein was not detected by ELISA in carrot, kale, lettuce, parsnip, radish, and soybean or in the soils by Western blot. In 2006, the Cry1Ab protein was detected by Western blot in tissues of basil, carrot, kale, radish, snap bean, and soybean from soils on which Bt corn had been grown the previous year and was estimated by ELISA to be 0.02 +/- 0.014 ng g(-1) of fresh plant tissue in basil, 0.19 +/- 0.060 ng g(-1) in carrot, 0.05 +/- 0.018 ng g(-1) in kale, 0.04 +/- 0.022 ng g(-1) in radish, 0.53 +/- 0.170 ng g(-1) in snap bean, and 0.15 +/- 0.071 ng g(-1) in soybean. The Cry1Ab protein was also detected by Western blot in tissues of basil, carrot, kale, radish, and snap bean but not of soybean grown in soil on which Bt corn had not been grown since 2002; the concentration was estimated by ELISA to be 0.03 +/- 0.021 ng g(-1) in basil, 0.02 +/- 0.008 ng g(-1) in carrot, 0.04 +/- 0.017 ng g(-1) in kale, 0.02 +/- 0.012 ng g(-1) in radish, 0.05 +/- 0.004 ng g(-1) in snap bean, and 0.09 +/- 0.015 ng g(-1) in soybean. The protein was detected by Western blot in 2006 in most soils on which Bt corn had or had not been grown since 2002. The Cry1Ab protein was detected by Western blot in leaves plus stems and in roots of carrot after 56 days of growth in sterile hydroponic culture to which purified Cry1Ab protein had been added and was estimated by ELISA to be 0.08 +/- 0.021 and 0.60 +/- 0.148 ng g(-1) of

  3. Effectiveness of the high dose/refuge strategy for managing pest resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) plants expressing one or two toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryspeirt, Aiko; Grégoire, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    To delay resistance development to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) plants expressing their own insecticide, the application of the Insect Resistance Management strategy called "High Dose/Refuge Strategy" (HD/R) is recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). This strategy was developed for Bt plants expressing one toxin. Presently, however, new Bt plants that simultaneously express two toxins are on the market. We used a mathematical model to evaluate the efficiency of the HD/R strategy for both these Bt toxins. As the current two-toxin Bt plants do not express two new Cry toxins but reuse one toxin already in use with a one-toxin plant, we estimated the spread of resistance when the resistance alleles are not rare. This study assesses: (i) whether the two toxins have to be present in high concentration, and (ii) the impact of the relative size of the refuge zone on the evolution of resistance and population density. We concluded that for Bt plants expressing one toxin, a high concentration is an essential condition for resistance management. For the pyramided Bt plants, one toxin could be expressed at a low titer if the two toxins are used for the first time, and a small refuge zone is acceptable.

  4. Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins involved in insecticidal activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.J.; Schipper, B.; Kleij, van der H.; Maagd, de R.A.; Stiekema, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The expected increase in application of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in crop protection makes it necessary to anticipate the development of Bt-resistant insects. To safeguard the long-term use of Bt-based insecticides, we studied the mode of action of Bt crystal proteins. CryIA(b), CryIC and CryIE ar

  5. Evaluation of an aerial spray strategy against the spruce budworm (choristoneura fumiferana clem.) using fenitrothion and B.t., (bacillus thuringiensis): Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettela, E.G.

    1993-12-31

    This report presents results from a series of trials to evaluate replicate test sites, two treated with fenitrothion followed by an application of Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) and two treated with two applications of B.t. A team of Cessna 188 aircraft equipped with Micronair AU4000 rotary atomizers applied all spray treatments; there were also unsprayed control plots for comparison. The investigators conducted biological evaluations of 60 selected balsam fir trees at each treatment site to record such information as number of buds and shoots, defoliation category for each bud/shoot, number of spruce budworms, and state of development of each bud/shoot. They also determined spray deposition. The report concludes with an assessment of the comparative efficacy of the treatments studied on spruce budworm mortality.

  6. EFEKTIVITAS VECTOBAC 12 AS (Bt H-14 DAN Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 TERHADAP VEKTOR MALARIA An. maculatus DI KOBAKAN DESA HARGOTIRTO, KECAMATAN KOKAP, KABUPATEN KULON PROGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blondine Ch. P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A study using Vectobac 12 AS ( Bt H-14 and Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 local strain was conducted at laboratory Vector and Reservoir Control Research Unit and breeding ponds of Anopheles maculatus in Kokap regency and Kulon Progo district. The objectives of this study are : (1. to detect the efficacy of B. thuringiensis H-14 local strain toward An. maculatus larvae at the laboratory. (2. to measure the effectiveness of B. thuringiensis H-14 local strain dosages 1 x LC95. 5 x LC95 and 10 x LC95 toward An. maculatus at the field. The efficacy test of B. thuringiensis H-14 local strain toward An. maculatus based on to the method proposed by WHO in order to determine the LC50 and LC90 which is computed using the probit analysis at the laboratory. The methods used R thuringiensis H-14 local strain dosages of 2.145 ppm (1 x LC95, 10.724 ppm (5 x LC95 and 21.448 ppm (10 x LC95 respectively were applied 8 ponds with the width of ponds ranging from 0.08 to 0.45 m2, 0.29 to 0.64 m2 and from 0.08-0.79 m2.The results showed, the dosages after 24 hours were 10.22 ppm (LC50, 27.11 ppm (LC90 and 35.75 ppm (LC95. After 48 hours the dosages were needed 7.74 ppm (LC50, 17.06 ppm (LC90 and 21.34 ppm (LC95, The effectiveness o/R thuringiensis H-14 local strain dosages of 2.145ppm (1 x LC95 toward An. maculatus larvae until 50 % survive the same time (7.35 days as B. thuringiensis H-14 (8.14 days dosages of 10.724 ppm (5 x LC95. B. thuringiensis H-14 local strain dosages of 21.448 ppm (10 x LC95 toward An. maculatus larvae until 50 % survive longer time (16.21 days than B. thuringiensis H-14 local strain 1 x LC95 and 5 x LC95 The B. thuringiensis H-14 local strain is effective for controlling mosquitoes larvae

  7. Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins that target nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Jun-Zhi; Hale, Kristina; Carta, Lynn; Platzer, Edward; Wong, Cynthie; Fang, Su-Chiung; Aroian, Raffi V.

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal proteins are pore-forming toxins used as insecticides around the world. Previously, the extent to which these proteins might also target the invertebrate phylum Nematoda has been mostly ignored. We have expressed seven different crystal toxin proteins from two largely unstudied Bt crystal protein subfamilies. By assaying their toxicity on diverse free-living nematode species, we demonstrate that four of these crystal proteins are active against multiple nem...

  8. Novel Vip3A Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize approaches high-dose efficacy against Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) under field conditions: Implications for resistance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkness, Eric C; Dively, Galen; Patton, Terry; Morey, Amy C; Hutchison, William D

    2010-01-01

    Sweet corn, Zea mays L., transformed to express a novel vegetative insecticidal protein, Vip3A (event MIR162, Syngenta Seeds, Inc..), produced by the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), was evaluated over four field seasons in Maryland and two field seasons in Minnesota for efficacy against the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie). Hybrids expressing the Vip3A protein and pyramided in hybrids also expressing the Cry1Ab Bt protein (event Bt11, ATTRIBUTE(®), Syngenta Seeds, Inc.) were compared to hybrids expressing only Cry1Ab or to genetically similar non-Bt hybrids each year. In addition to H. zea efficacy, results for Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) and Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) are presented. Over all years and locations, the non-Bt hybrids, without insecticide protection, averaged between 43 and 100% ears infested with a range of 0.24 to 1.74 H. zea larvae per ear. By comparison, in the pyramided Vip3A x Cry1Ab hybrids, no larvae were found and only minimal kernel damage (likely due to other insect pests) was recorded. Hybrids expressing only Cry1Ab incurred a moderate level of H. zea feeding damage, with surviving larvae mostly limited to the first or second instar as a result of previously documented growth inhibition from Cry1Ab. These results suggest that the Vip3A protein, pyramided with Cry1Ab, appears to provide the first "high-dose" under field conditions and will be valuable for ongoing resistance management.

  9. Bacteriocins synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis: generalities and potential applications

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar-Marroquín, Elma Laura; Galán-Wong, Luis J.; Moreno-Medina, Víctor Ricardo; Reyes-López, Miguel Ángel; Pereyra-Alférez, Benito

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Bacillus thuringiensis group, commonly known as Bt, produce a huge number of metabolites, which show biocidal and antagonistic activity. B. thuringiensis is widely known for synthesizing Cry, Vip and Cyt proteins, active against insects and other parasporins with biocidal activity against certain types of cancerous cells. Nevertheless, B. thuringiensis also synthesizes compounds with antimicrobial activity, especially bacteriocins. Some B. thuringiensis bacteriocins resembl...

  10. 76 FR 14289 - Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 174 Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab Protein in Corn; Temporary Exemption From the... regulation extends a temporary exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Bacillus... permissible level for residues of Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn. The temporary...

  11. 75 FR 34040 - Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 174 Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab Protein in Corn; Temporary Exemption from the... regulation establishes a temporary exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Bacillus... Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn under the FFDCA. The temporary tolerance exemption...

  12. Bacillus thuringiensis-based Products for Insect Pest Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maagd, de R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (or Bt, as it has become generally known) is one of the oldest and widely used biological control agents and has a long history of use. Bt and a number of related bacteria produce a variety of toxins, mostly—but not exclusively- localized in the parasporal crystals, which are,

  13. TRANSGENIC PLANTS EXPRESSING BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS DELTA-ENDOTOXINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-rong,Li; BrendaOppert; KunYanZhu; RandallA.Higgins; Fang-nengHuang; LawrentL.Buschman

    2003-01-01

    Commercial varieties of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) plants have been developed in many countries to control target pests. Initially, the expression of native Bt genes in plants was low due to mRNA instability, improper splicing, and post-translation modifications. Subsequently, modifications of the native Bt genes greatly enhanced expression levels. This is a review of the developments that made modem high-expression transgenic Bt plants possible, with an emphasis on the reasons for the low-level expression of native Bt genes in plant systems, and the techniques that have been used to improve plant expression of Bt toxin genes.

  14. Insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis: uniform or diverse

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Resistance to the insecticidal proteins produced by the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has been documented in more than a dozen species of insect. Nearly all of these cases have been produced primarily by selection in the laboratory, but one pest, the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella), has evolved resistance in open-field populations. Insect resistance to Bt has immediate and widespread significance because of increasing reliance on Bt toxins in genetically engineered crops a...

  15. Presence survival spores of Bacillus thuringiensis varieties in grain warehouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Yáñez Juan Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Genus Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt synthesized spores and crystals toxic to pest-insects in agriculture. Bt is comospolitan then possible to isolate some subspecies or varieties from warehouse. The aims of study were: i to isolate Bt varieties from grain at werehouse ii to evaluate Bt toxicity on Spodoptera frugiperda and Shit-ophilus zeamaisese iii to analyze Bt spores persistence in Zea mays grains at werehouse compared to same Bt on grains exposed to sun radiation. Results showed that at werehouse were recovered more than one variety of Bt spores. According to each isolate Bt1 o Bt2 were toxic to S. frugiperda or S. zeamaisese. One those Bt belong to var morrisoni. At werehouse these spores on Z. mays grains surviving more time, while the same spores exposed to boicide sun radiation they died.

  16. Sludge based Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides: viscosity impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, S K; Verma, M; Tyagi, R D; Valéro, J R; Surampalli, R Y

    2005-08-01

    Viscosity studies were performed on raw, pre-treated (sterilised and thermal alkaline hydrolysed or both types of treatment) and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) fermented sludges at different solids concentration (10-40 g/L) for production of biopesticides. Correlations were established among rheological parameter (viscosity), solids (total and dissolved) concentration and entomotoxicity (Tx) of Bt fermented sludges. Exponential and power laws were preferentially followed by hydrolysed fermented compared to raw fermented sludge. Soluble chemical oxygen demand variation corroborated with increase in dissolved solids concentration on pre-treatments, contributing to changes in viscosity. Moreover, Tx was higher for hydrolysed fermented sludge in comparison to raw fermented sludge owing to increased availability of nutrients and lower viscosity that improved oxygen transfer. The shake flask results were reproducible in fermenter. This study will have major impact on selecting fermentation, harvesting and formulation techniques of Bt fermented sludges for biopesticide production.

  17. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins in the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), is the primary target of the widely adopted transgenic corn events MON810 and Bt11, expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal toxin, Cry1Ab. Resistant strains of O. nubilalis have been selected in the laboratory by exposure to Bt ...

  18. BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS ELASTASES WITH INSECTICIDE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Matseliukh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was a screening of proteases with elastase activity among Bacillus thuringiensis strains, their isolation, partially purification, study of physicochemical properties and insecticide activity in relation to the larvae of the Colorado beetle. The objects of the investigation were 18 strains of B. thuringiensis, isolated from different sources: sea water, dry biological product "Bitoksibatsillin" and also from natural populations of Colorado beetles of the Crimea, Kherson, Odesa, Mykolaiv and Zaporizhiia regions of Ukraine. Purification of enzymes with elastase activity isolated from above mentioned strains was performed by gel-chromatography and insecticide activity was studied on the 3–4 larvae instar of Colorado beetle. The ability of a number of B. thuringiensis strains to synthesize the proteases with elastase activity has been established. The most active were enzymes obtained from strains IMV B-7465, IMV B-7324 isolated from sea water, and strains 9, 902, Bt-H and 0-239 isolated from Colorado beetles. The study of the physicochemical properties of the partially purified proteases of these strains showed that they belonged to enzymes of the serine type. Peptidases of a number of B. thuringiensis strains (IMV B-7324, IMV B-7465, 902, 0-239, 9 are metal-dependent enzymes. Optimal conditions of action of all tested enzymes are the neutral and alkaline рН values and the temperatures of 30–40 °С. The studies of influence of the complex enzyme preparations and partially purified ones of B. thuringiensis strains on the larvae instar of Colorado beetles indicated that enzymes with elastase activity could be responsible for insecticide action of the tested strains.

  19. Bacteriocins synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis: generalities and potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Marroquín, Elma Laura; Galán-Wong, Luis J.; Moreno-Medina, Víctor Ricardo; Reyes-López, Miguel Ángel; Pereyra-Alférez, Benito

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Bacillus thuringiensis group, commonly known as Bt, produce a huge number of metabolites, which show biocidal and antagonistic activity. B. thuringiensis is widely known for synthesizing Cry, Vip and Cyt proteins, active against insects and other parasporins with biocidal activity against certain types of cancerous cells. Nevertheless, B. thuringiensis also synthesizes compounds with antimicrobial activity, especially bacteriocins. Some B. thuringiensis bacteriocins resemble lantibiotics and other small linear peptides (class IIa) from the lactic acid bacteria bacteriocins classification system. Although many bacteriocins produced by Bt have been reported, there is no proper classification for them. In this work, we have grouped these based on molecular weight and functionality. Bacteriocins are small peptides synthesized by bacteria, presenting inhibitory activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and to a lesser extent against fungi. These molecules represent a good study model in the search for microbial control alternatives. Lactic acid bacteria produces a huge number of these types of molecules with great potential. Nonetheless, members of the Bacillus, cereus group, especially B. thuringiensis, emerge as an attractive alternative for obtaining bacteriocins showing novel activities. This review describes the potential applications of B. thuringiensis bacteriocins in the control of foodborne pathogens, environment and medical area. PMID:27340340

  20. Broad-spectrum resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins in Heliothis virescens.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Evolution of pest resistance to insecticidal proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) would decrease our ability to control agricultural pests with genetically engineered crops designed to express genes coding for these proteins. Previous genetic and biochemical analyses of insect strains with resistance to Bt toxins indicate that (i) resistance is restricted to single groups of related Bt toxins, (ii) decreased toxin sensitivity is associated with changes in Bt-toxin binding to sites...

  1. Complete Genome of Bacillus thuringiensis Myophage Spock

    OpenAIRE

    Maroun, Justin W.; Whitcher, Kelvin J.; Chamakura, Karthik R.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram-positive, sporulating soil microbe with valuable pesticide-producing properties. The study of bacteriophages of B. thuringiensis could provide new biotechnological tools for the use of this bacterium. Here, we present the complete annotated genome of Spock, a myophage of B. thuringiensis, and describe its features.

  2. Regulation by gut bacertia of immune response, Bacillus thuringiensis susceptibility and hemolin expression in Plodia interpunctella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) is an important stored grain insect pest worldwide, and the first lepidopteran with reported resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Since gut bacteria may affect Bt insecticidal activity, we determined whether P. interpunctella lacking gut enterobacteria had...

  3. Screen of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins for transgenic rice to control Sesamia inferens and Chilo suppressalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic rice to control stem borer damage is under development in China. To assess the potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenes in stem borer control, the toxicity of five Bt protoxins (Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ba and Cry1Ca) against two rice stem borers, Sesamia inferens (pink stem...

  4. Cadherin is a functional receptor of bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry2Aa in the beet armyworm, spodoptera exigua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins are effective against some insect pests in sprays and transgenic crops, although the evolution of resistance could threaten the long-term efficacy of such Bt use. One strategy to delay resistance to Bt crops is to “pyramid” two or more ...

  5. Efficient transformation of Bacillus thuringiensis requires nonmethylated plasmid DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Macaluso, A; Mettus, A M

    1991-01-01

    The transformation efficiency of Bacillus thuringiensis depends upon the source of plasmid DNA. DNA isolated from B. thuringiensis, Bacillus megaterium, or a Dam- Dcm- Escherichia coli strain efficiently transformed several B. thuringiensis strains, B. thuringiensis strains were grouped according to which B. thuringiensis backgrounds were suitable sources of DNA for transformation of other B. thuringiensis strains, suggesting that B. thuringiensis strains differ in DNA modification and restri...

  6. A new enrichment method for isolation of Bacillus thuringiensis from diverse sample types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ketan D; Bhanshali, Forum C; Chaudhary, Avani V; Ingle, Sanjay S

    2013-05-01

    New or more efficient methodologies having different principles are needed, as one method could not be suitable for isolation of organisms from samples of diverse types and from various environments. In present investigation, growth kinetics study revealed a higher germination rate, a higher growth rate, and maximum sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) compared to other Bacillus species. Considering these facts, a simple and efficient enrichment method was devised which allowed propagation of spores and vegetative cells of Bt and thereby increased Bt cell population proportionately. The new enrichment method yielded Bt from 44 out of 58 samples. Contrarily, Bt was isolated only from 16 and 18 samples by sodium acetate selection and dry heat pretreatment methods, respectively. Moreover, the percentages of Bt colonies isolated by the enrichment method were higher comparatively. Vegetative whole cell protein profile analysis indicated isolation of diverse population of Bt from various samples. Bt strains isolated by the enrichment method represented novel serovars and possibly new cry2 gene.

  7. Nano-Mechanical Properties of Heat Inactivated Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    NANO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF HEAT INACTIVATED BACILLUS ANTHRACIS AND BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS ...GAP/ENP/08-M07 NANO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF HEAT INACTIVATED BACILLUS ANTHRACIS AND BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SPORES THESIS...AFIT/GAP/ENP/08-M07 NANO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF HEAT INACTIVATED BACILLUS ANTHRACIS AND BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SPORES Jessica

  8. Cloning and Expression Analysis of the cry1Ac Gene from Bacillus thuringiensis Strain 4.0718%Bt4.0718 cry1Ac基因的克隆与表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁学知; 张何; 孙运军; 黄潢; 张春艳; 夏立秋

    2006-01-01

    在基因库中比对14种cry1Ac基因序列,发现了同源性很高的上游启动子区域和下游终止子区域.根据这一同源序列设计引物,从Bt4.0718中扩增出包含双启动子和终止子的4.2 kb片段,用PCR-RFLP检测确定其中含有cry1Ac基因.然后将此片段克隆到穿梭载体pHT304中,转化大肠杆菌DH5α和Bt无晶体突变株XZM-101.同时,利用原子力显微镜观察发现重组菌株BXZM34能够产生菱形晶体.%14 cry1Ac genes from GenBank were aligned and the consensus regions in the upstream of promoter and in the downstream of terminator were found. Based on the consensus sequences, a pair of primers was designed and a 4.2 kb element was amplified that includes the dual overlapping promoter and the whole termination-associated sequence from Bacillus thuringiensis strain 4. 0718, and the amplified 4.2 kb element was confirmed to contain the crylAc gene by cryI sub-genetype PCR-RFLP cry gene typing system. The 4.2 kb element was cloned into Bt-E. coli shuttle vector pHT30.4 and the cry1Ac gene was also expressed in E. coli DH5α and acrystalliferous mutant XZM-101. Meanwhile,rhombic crystal was observed from recombinant strain BXZM34 by atomic force microscope.

  9. Effects of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis maize grain on B. thuringiensis-susceptible Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, K L; Hellmich, R L; Iverson, C T; Lewis, L C

    2000-06-01

    Percentage survivorship, developmental time, adult body length, and sex ratio of Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) reared on field-produced grain from sixteen cultivars of maize, Zea mays L., including several transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Berliner hybrids and selected non-Bt isolines, were evaluated under laboratory conditions. Compared with isolines, development was delayed and survivorship reduced for P. interpunctella reared on grain from transgenic hybrids with the CaMV/35s promoter that express Cry1Ab protein. Similarly, compared with non-Bt hybrids, a transgenic hybrid with the CaMV/35s promoter that expresses Cry9C protein delayed development, decreased survivorship, and caused reductions in adult body length of P. interpunctella. In contrast, no significant differences in P. interpunctella developmental times or survivorship were observed between transgenic hybrids with the PEPC promoter expressing Cry1Ab and their isolines. Additionally, developmental time, survivorship, and adult body length were similar between P. interpunctella reared on a transgenic hybrid with the CaMV/35s promoter expressing Cry1Ac and non-Bt hybrids. Our data demonstrate that transgenic Bt maize grain, especially grain from hybrids with the CaMV/35s promoter expressing Cry1Ab or Cry9C, can significantly affect B. thuringiensis-susceptible P. interpunctella populations up to 4 or 5 mo after harvest.

  10. Abundance and diversity of Bacillus thuringiensis in Bangladesh and their cry genes profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. MozammelHoq

    1900-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt biopesticides, a recognized eco-friendly pest control agent, can be used to reduce many problems associated with indiscriminate use of chemical pesticides such as environmental pollutions, public health problems, emergence of resistance among pests in many developing countries etc. Bt strains were, therefore, isolated from different ecosystems of Bangladesh and characterized based on biochemical typing, 16S rRNA gene analysis, plasmid and cry genes profiles. Bt index was calculated 0.86 in this study and variations in abundance and distribution pattern of 16 different biotypes were demonstrated within 316 indigenous Bt strains which was compared to the other parts of the world. Bt indiana (17.8%, Bt kurstaki (16.7% and Bt thuringiensis (12.7% were found to be the most prevalent in Bangladesh among other biotypes. Hemolytic activity was variable among the biotypes and it was maximum for Bt biotype 10 (100%. Plasmids in the biotypes indiana, kurstaki, thuringiensis and israelensis were observed to occupy a wider range than other biotypes. The screening for insecticidal genes viz. cry1, cry2, cry3, cry4A, cry8, cry9, cry10 and cry11 in the native Bt strains revealed their presence in varied proportion rendering cry1, cry2 and cry3 the most abundant. The abundance of Bt strains, their diversities and the cry genes profile were thus analyzed in this study which will be the basis for further research development with Bt biopesticide in Bangladesh.

  11. The ecological roles of Bacillus thuringiensis within phyllosphere environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxian; Xue, Yarong; Han, Meizhe; Bu, Yuanqing; Liu, Changhong

    2014-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is one of the most used bio-control agents to control plant insects, but little is known about its effect on the microbial population and communities on plant leaves. With the culture dependent method, it has been observed that the dynamics of Bt within the phyllosphere varied dependent on both the doses of Bt sprayed on the leaves and the plant species, however, Bt's population size kept stable at about 1000 cfu g(-1) after 15 d since inoculation. By comparing the bacterial abundances and community structures within the phyllosphere of three plant species, we confirmed that Bt at the doses of 1.5×10(7) and 1.5×10(9) cfu mL(-1) respectively did not significantly influence the natural bacterial population size on the leaf surfaces based on culture dependent assay. However, based on culture independent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), Shannon-Wiener index (H') and Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA) analysis, Bt has a significant influence on the bacterial communities within the phyllosphere of amaranth and cotton, but not rice. These results indicate that Bt exhibits different behaviors and ecological roles on the microbial diversity within the phyllosphere, and its environmental safety has to be concerned and evaluated in the future.

  12. Effects of Exogenous Jasmonic Acid on Concentrations of Direct-Defense Chemicals and Expression of Related Genes in Bt(Bacillus thuringiensis)Corn(Zea mays)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yuan-jiao; WANG Jian-wu; LUO Shi-ming

    2007-01-01

    Bt corn is one of the top three large-scale commercialized transgenic crops around the world.It is increasingly clear that the complementary durable approaches for pest control,which combine the endogenous defense of the crop with the introduced foreign genes,are promising alternative strategies for pest resistance management and the next generation of insect-resistant transgenic crops.In the present study,we tested the inducible effects of exogenous jasmonic acid(JA) on direct-defense chemical content,Bt protein concentration,and related gene expression in the leaves of Bt corn cultivar 34B24 and non-Bt cultivar 34B23 by chemical analysis,ELISA,and RT-PCR.The results show that the expression of LOX,PR-2αMPI,and PR-1 genes in the treated leaf(the first leaf)was promoted by exogenous JA both in 34B24 and 34B23.As compared with the control,the concentration of DIMBOA in the treated leaf was significantly increased by 63 and 18% for 34B24 and 34B23,respectively.The total phenolic acid was also increased by 24 and 12% for both 34B24 and 34B23.The Bt protein content of 34B24 in the treated leaf was increased by 13% but decreased significantly by 27% in the second leaf.The induced response of 34B24 was in a systemic way and was much stronger than that of 34B23.Those findings indicated that there is a synergistic interaction between Bt gene and internally induced chemical defense system triggered by externally applied JA in Bt corn.

  13. Bacillus thuringiensis resistance in Plutella - too many trees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickmore, Neil

    2016-06-01

    Plutella xylostella was the first insect for which resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis was reported in the field, yet despite many studies on the nature of this resistance phenotype its genetic and molecular basis remains elusive. Many different factors have been proposed as contributing to resistance, although in many cases it has not been possible to establish a causal link. Indeed, there are so many studies published that it has become very difficult to 'see the wood for the trees'. This article will attempt to clarify our current understanding of Bt resistance in P. xylostella and consider the criteria that are used when validating a particular model.

  14. Bacillus thuringiensis and Its Pesticidal Crystal Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Schnepf, E.; Crickmore, N; Van Rie, J.; Lereclus, D.; Baum, J; Feitelson, J.; Zeigler, D. R.; Dean, D H

    1998-01-01

    During the past decade the pesticidal bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis has been the subject of intensive research. These efforts have yielded considerable data about the complex relationships between the structure, mechanism of action, and genetics of the organism’s pesticidal crystal proteins, and a coherent picture of these relationships is beginning to emerge. Other studies have focused on the ecological role of the B. thuringiensis crystal proteins, their performance in agricultural and o...

  15. BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS ELASTASES WITH INSECTICIDE ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Matseliukh; N. A. Nidialkova; V. V. Krout'; L. D. Varbanets; A. V. Kalinichenko; V. F. Patyka

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was a screening of proteases with elastase activity among Bacillus thuringiensis strains, their isolation, partially purification, study of physicochemical properties and insecticide activity in relation to the larvae of the Colorado beetle. The objects of the investigation were 18 strains of B. thuringiensis, isolated from different sources: sea water, dry biological product "Bitoksibatsillin" and also from natural populations of Colorado beetles of the Crimea, Kh...

  16. Susceptibility of Cry1Ab-resistant and -susceptible Sugarcane Borer (Lepidoptera: crambidae) to Four Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), is a primary corn stalk borer pest targeted by transgenic corn expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins in many areas of the mid-southern region of the United States. Recently, genes encoding for Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 Bt proteins were transferred in...

  17. Continuous evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins overcomes insect resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Ahmed H; Guzov, Victor M; Huai, Qing; Kemp, Melissa M; Vishwanath, Prashanth; Kain, Wendy; Nance, Autumn M; Evdokimov, Artem; Moshiri, Farhad; Turner, Keith H; Wang, Ping; Malvar, Thomas; Liu, David R

    2016-05-05

    The Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins (Bt toxins) are widely used insecticidal proteins in engineered crops that provide agricultural, economic, and environmental benefits. The development of insect resistance to Bt toxins endangers their long-term effectiveness. Here we have developed a phage-assisted continuous evolution selection that rapidly evolves high-affinity protein-protein interactions, and applied this system to evolve variants of the Bt toxin Cry1Ac that bind a cadherin-like receptor from the insect pest Trichoplusia ni (TnCAD) that is not natively bound by wild-type Cry1Ac. The resulting evolved Cry1Ac variants bind TnCAD with high affinity (dissociation constant Kd = 11-41 nM), kill TnCAD-expressing insect cells that are not susceptible to wild-type Cry1Ac, and kill Cry1Ac-resistant T. ni insects up to 335-fold more potently than wild-type Cry1Ac. Our findings establish that the evolution of Bt toxins with novel insect cell receptor affinity can overcome insect Bt toxin resistance and confer lethality approaching that of the wild-type Bt toxin against non-resistant insects.

  18. A Novel Tenebrio molitor Cadherin is a Functional Receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry3Aa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are effective biological insecticides. Cadherin-like proteins have been reported as functional Cry1A toxin receptors in Lepidoptera. We present the first report demonstrating a functional interaction between the coleopteran-specific ...

  19. BOOK REVIEW – BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS: A CORNERSTONE OF MODERN AGRICULTURE BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are you interested in the technical issues surrounding the use of Bacillus thuringiensis pesticidal traits as sprays and as plant incorporated protectants (transgenic crops)? Should the dimensions of human health, ecology, entomology, risk assessment, resistance management, and d...

  20. Characterization of native Bacillus thuringiensis strains and selection of an isolate active against Spodoptera frugiperda and Peridroma saucia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Analía; Virla, Eduardo G; Pera, Licia M; Baigorí, Mario D

    2009-12-01

    Twelve Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains, isolated from larvae and soil samples in Argentina, were molecularly and phenotypically characterized and their insecticidal activities against Spodoptera frugiperda and Peridroma saucia were determined. One isolate--Bt RT--produced more than 93% mortality on first instar larvae of both species, which was higher than that produced by the reference strain Bt 4D1. Bt RT carried a different cry gene profile than Bt 4D1. Scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of bipyramidal and cuboidal crystals. Phenotypic characterization revealed lytic enzymes that could contribute to Bt pathogenicity.

  1. Mobility of adsorbed Cry1Aa insecticidal toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) on montmorillonite measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helassa, Nordine; Daudin, Gabrielle; Noinville, Sylvie; Janot, Jean-Marc; Déjardin, Philippe; Staunton, Siobhán; Quiquampoix, Hervé

    2010-06-01

    The insecticidal toxins produced by genetically modified Bt crops are introduced into soil through root exudates and tissue decomposition and adsorb readily on soil components, especially on clays. This immobilisation and the consequent concentration of the toxins in "hot spots" could increase the exposure of soil organisms. Whereas the effects on non-target organisms are well documented, few studies consider the migration of the toxin in soil. In this study, the residual mobility of Bt Cry1Aa insecticidal toxin adsorbed on montmorillonite was assessed using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). This technique, which is usually used to study dynamics of cytoplasmic and membrane molecules in live cells, was applied for the first time to a protein adsorbed on a finely divided swelling clay mineral, montmorillonite. No mobility of adsorbed toxin was observed at any pH and at different degrees of surface saturation.

  2. Consequences for Protaphorura armata (Collembola: Onychiuridae) following exposure to genetically modified Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize and non-Bt maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckmann, L.-H.; Griffiths, B. S.; Caul, S.

    2006-01-01

    armata. For comparison three non-Bt maize varieties, Rivaldo (isogenic to Cascade), Monumental (isogenic to MEB307) and DK242, and two control diets based on baker's yeast (uncontaminated and contaminated with Bt toxin Cry1Ab) were also tested. Due to a lower C:N ratio, individuals reared on yeast...

  3. Mode of action of mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberón, Mario; Fernández, Luisa E; Pérez, Claudia; Gill, Sarjeet S; Bravo, Alejandra

    2007-04-01

    Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are used for insect control. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells. In lepidopteran insects, Cry1A monomeric toxins interact with a first receptor and this interaction triggers toxin oligomerization. The oligomeric structure interacts then with a second GPI-anchored receptor that induces insertion into membrane microdomains and larvae death. In the case of mosquitocidal Bt strains, two different toxins participate, Cry and Cyt. These toxins have a synergistic effect and Cyt1Aa overcomes Cry toxin-resistance. We will summarize recent findings on the identification of Cry receptors in mosquitoes and the mechanism of synergism: Cyt1Aa synergizes or suppresses resistance to Cry toxins by functioning as a Cry membrane-bound receptor.

  4. Bacillus thuringiensis monogenic strains: screening and interactions with insecticides used against rice pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M.N. Pinto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The screening of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt Cry proteins with high potential to control insect pests has been the goal of numerous research groups. In this study, we evaluated six monogenic Bt strains (Bt dendrolimus HD-37, Bt kurstaki HD-1, Bt kurstaki HD-73, Bt thuringiensis 4412, Bt kurstaki NRD-12 and Bt entomocidus 60.5, which codify the cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1Ba, cry1C, cry2A genes respectively as potential insecticides for the most important insect pests of irrigated rice: Spodoptera frugiperda, Diatraea saccharalis, Oryzophagus oryzae, Oebalus poecilus and Tibraca limbativentris. We also analyzed their compatibility with chemical insecticides (thiamethoxam, labdacyhalothrin, malathion and fipronil, which are extensively used in rice crops. The bioassay results showed that Bt thuringiensis 4412 and Bt entomocidus 60.5 were the most toxic for the lepidopterans, with a 93% and 82% mortality rate for S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis, respectively. For O. oryzae, the Bt kurstaki NRD-12 (64% and Bt dendrolimus HD-37 (62% strains were the most toxic. The Bt dendrolimus HD-37 strain also caused high mortality (82% to O. poecilus, however the strains assessed to T. limbativentris caused a maximum rate of 5%. The assays for the Bt strains interaction with insecticides revealed the compatibility of the six strains with the four insecticides tested. The results from this study showed the high potential of cry1Aa and cry1Ba genes for genetic engineering of rice plants or the strains to biopesticide formulations.

  5. Narrow terahertz attenuation signatures in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Brown, Elliott R; Viveros, Leamon; Burris, Kellie P; Stewart, C Neal

    2014-10-01

    Terahertz absorption signatures from culture-cultivated Bacillus thuringiensis were measured with a THz photomixing spectrometer operating from 400 to 1200 GHz. We observe two distinct signatures centered at ∼955 and 1015 GHz, and attribute them to the optically coupled particle vibrational resonance (surface phonon-polariton) of Bacillus spores. This demonstrates the potential of the THz attenuation signatures as "fingerprints" for label-free biomolecular detection.

  6. Effect of Bacillus thuringiensis on Habrobracon hebetor during combined biological control of Plodia interpunctella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akinkurolere Rotimi Oluwafemi; Qiong Rao; Xi-Qiao Wang; Hong-Yu Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The suitability of combining microbial pesticides and an insect parasitoid for pest management of stored cereal in China was evaluated using laboratory assays.For this purpose,interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt),Bt-intoxicated host larvae and the parasitoid Habrobracon hebetor (Say) (Hymenoptera:Braconidae) were alone caused 41.67% and 35.35% P.interpunctella larval mortality respectively.The Btparasitoid combined treatment significantly increased mortality of P.interpunctella (86%).Progeny development of H.hebetor was dependent upon its susceptibility to Bt.Fewer parasitoids emerged from Bt-parasitoid combined treatment than in non-Bt treatments.However,since Bt did not prevent parasitoid development,a combined treatment with Bt and parasitoid release could produce better protection against P.interpunctella than either treatments when used singly,because their lethal effects were additive to each other.

  7. Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins: An Overview of Their Biocidal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Leopoldo; Muñoz, Delia; Berry, Colin; Murillo, Jesús; Caballero, Primitivo

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a Gram positive, spore-forming bacterium that synthesizes parasporal crystalline inclusions containing Cry and Cyt proteins, some of which are toxic against a wide range of insect orders, nematodes and human-cancer cells. These toxins have been successfully used as bioinsecticides against caterpillars, beetles, and flies, including mosquitoes and blackflies. Bt also synthesizes insecticidal proteins during the vegetative growth phase, which are subsequently secreted into the growth medium. These proteins are commonly known as vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) and hold insecticidal activity against lepidopteran, coleopteran and some homopteran pests. A less well characterized secretory protein with no amino acid similarity to Vip proteins has shown insecticidal activity against coleopteran pests and is termed Sip (secreted insecticidal protein). Bin-like and ETX_MTX2-family proteins (Pfam PF03318), which share amino acid similarities with mosquitocidal binary (Bin) and Mtx2 toxins, respectively, from Lysinibacillus sphaericus, are also produced by some Bt strains. In addition, vast numbers of Bt isolates naturally present in the soil and the phylloplane also synthesize crystal proteins whose biological activity is still unknown. In this review, we provide an updated overview of the known active Bt toxins to date and discuss their activities. PMID:25514092

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis: fermentation process and risk assessment: a short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise M. F Capalbo

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Several factors make the local production of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt highly appropriate for pest control in developing nations. Bt can be cheaply produced on a wide variety of low cost, organic substrates. Local production results in considerable savings in hard currency which otherwise would be spent on importation of chemical and biological insecticides. The use of Bt in Brazil has been limited in comparison with chemical insecticides. Although Bt is imported, some Brazilian researchers have been working on its development and production. Fermentation processes (submerged and semi-solid were applied, using by-products from agro-industries. As the semi-solid fermentation process demonstrated to be interesting for Bt endotoxins production, it could be adopted for small scale local production. Although promising results had been achieved, national products have not been registered due to the absence of a specific legislation for biological products. Effective actions are being developed in order to solve this gap. Regardless of the biocontrol agents being considered atoxic and harmless to the environment, information related to direct and indirect effects of microbials are still insufficient in many cases. The risk analysis of the use of microbial control agents is of upmost importance nowadays, and is also discussed.

  9. Bacillus thuringiensis toxins: an overview of their biocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Leopoldo; Muñoz, Delia; Berry, Colin; Murillo, Jesús; Caballero, Primitivo

    2014-12-11

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a Gram positive, spore-forming bacterium that synthesizes parasporal crystalline inclusions containing Cry and Cyt proteins, some of which are toxic against a wide range of insect orders, nematodes and human-cancer cells. These toxins have been successfully used as bioinsecticides against caterpillars, beetles, and flies, including mosquitoes and blackflies. Bt also synthesizes insecticidal proteins during the vegetative growth phase, which are subsequently secreted into the growth medium. These proteins are commonly known as vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) and hold insecticidal activity against lepidopteran, coleopteran and some homopteran pests. A less well characterized secretory protein with no amino acid similarity to Vip proteins has shown insecticidal activity against coleopteran pests and is termed Sip (secreted insecticidal protein). Bin-like and ETX_MTX2-family proteins (Pfam PF03318), which share amino acid similarities with mosquitocidal binary (Bin) and Mtx2 toxins, respectively, from Lysinibacillus sphaericus, are also produced by some Bt strains. In addition, vast numbers of Bt isolates naturally present in the soil and the phylloplane also synthesize crystal proteins whose biological activity is still unknown. In this review, we provide an updated overview of the known active Bt toxins to date and discuss their activities.

  10. Investigation of lead(II) uptake by Bacillus thuringiensis 016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Hui; Lin, Zhang; Guan, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we investigated the lead(II) biosorption mechanism of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) 016 through batch and microscopic experiments. We found that the maximum lead(II) biosorption capacity of Bt 016 was 164.77 mg/g (dry weight). The pH value could affect the biosorption of lead(II) in a large extent. Fourier transform infrared analyses and selective passivation experiments suggested that the carboxyl, amide and phosphate functional groups of Bt 016 played an important role in lead(II) biosorption. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that noticeable lead(II) precipitates were accumulated on bacterial surfaces. Further transmission electron microscopy thin section analysis coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as well as selected area electron diffraction indicated that lead(II) immobilized on the bacteria could be transformated into random-shaped crystalline lead-containing minerals eventually. This work provided a new insight into lead(II) uptake of Bt, highlighting the potential of Bt in the restoration of lead(II) contaminated repositories.

  11. Screeninq on Synergist of Bacillus thuringiensis Wettable Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghua GE; Xiaohong ZHANG; Ziyan NANGONG; Ping SONG; Qinying WANG; Keqiang CAO

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to screen the best synergistic material for Bt wettable powder and evaluate their synergistic effect. [Method] The synergism of six different kinds of additives for Bacillus thuringiensis wettable powder (Bt WP) on the 2^nd instar larvae of Plutella xylostella was tested by method of leaf dipping in labora- tory. [Result] The mixtures of Bt with 0.1% ZnCl2, 0.5% ZnCl2, 1.0% ZnCl2, 1.0% MgCI2, 0.5% boric acid, 1.0% boric acid, 0.5% citric acid or 1.0% citric acid all ex- hibited synergistic effect, in which the synergistic effect of mixture containing 0.5% boric acid was the highest, with 17.2 synergistic ratio; followed by the mixture containing 1.0% ZnCl2, with 15.6 synergistic ratio. Moreover, addition of 0.5% boric acid could shorten the median lethal time of Bt wettable powder by about 10 h. After the mixtures of Bt with 0.5% boracic acid or 1.0% ZnCl2 was stored for 15 d at room temperature, toxicities of the two mixtures did not change significantly. [Conclusion] Boracic acid as the synergist of Bt wettable powder could not only increase insecti- cidal effect of Bt, but also accelerate its insecticidal rate. So, boracic acid could improve the disadvantages of Bt wettable powder such as poor insecticidal effect and slow insecticidal speed in a certain degree.

  12. Bacillus thuringiensis as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis in aerosol research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufts, Jenia A M; Calfee, M Worth; Lee, Sang Don; Ryan, Shawn P

    2014-05-01

    Characterization of candidate surrogate spores prior to experimental use is critical to confirm that the surrogate characteristics are as closely similar as possible to those of the pathogenic agent of interest. This review compares the physical properties inherent to spores of Bacillus anthracis (Ba) and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that impact their movement in air and interaction with surfaces, including size, shape, density, surface morphology, structure and hydrophobicity. Also evaluated is the impact of irradiation on the physical properties of both Bacillus species. Many physical features of Bt and Ba have been found to be similar and, while Bt is considered typically non-pathogenic, it is in the B. cereus group, as is Ba. When cultured and sporulated under similar conditions, both microorganisms share a similar cylindrical pellet shape, an aerodynamic diameter of approximately 1 μm (in the respirable size range), have an exosporium with a hairy nap, and have higher relative hydrophobicities than other Bacillus species. While spore size, morphology, and other physical properties can vary among strains of the same species, the variations can be due to growth/sporulation conditions and may, therefore, be controlled. Growth and sporulation conditions are likely among the most important factors that influence the representativeness of one species, or preparation, to another. All Bt spores may, therefore, not be representative of all Ba spores. Irradiated spores do not appear to be a good surrogate to predict the behavior of non-irradiated spores due to structural damage caused by the irradiation. While the use of Bt as a surrogate for Ba in aerosol testing appears to be well supported, this review does not attempt to narrow selection between Bt strains. Comparative studies should be performed to test the hypothesis that viable Ba and Bt spores will behave similarly when suspended in the air (as an aerosol) and to compare the known microscale characteristics

  13. The Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis AlHakam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challacombe, Jean F.; Altherr, Michael R.; Xie, Gary; Bhotika,Smriti S.; Brown, Nancy; Bruce, David; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell,Mary L.; Chen, Jin; Chertkov, Olga; Cleland, Cathy; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Doggett, Norman A.; Fawcett, John J.; Glavina, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Green, Lance D.; Han, Cliff S.; Hill, Karen K.; Hitchcock, Penny; Jackson, Paul J.; Keim, Paul; Kewalramani, Avinash Ramesh; Longmire, Jon; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie; Martinez, Diego; McMurry, Kim; Meincke, Linda J.; Misra, Monica; Moseman, Bernice L.; Mundt, Mark; Munk,A. Christine; Okinaka, Richard T.; Parson-Quintana, B.; Reilly, LeePhilip; Richardson, Paul; Robinson, Donna L.; Rubin, Eddy; Saunders,Elizabeth; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson,Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Wills, Patti L.; Gilna, Paul; Brettin, Thomas S.

    2007-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen that is widelyused as a biopesticide (3). Here we report the finished, annotated genomesequence of B. thuringiensis Al Hakam, which was collected in Iraq by theUnited Nations Special Commission (2).

  14. Insecticidal crystal proteins from native Bacillus thuringiensis: numerical analysis and biological activity against Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Analía; Pera, Licia M; Loto, Flavia; Virla, Eduardo G; Baigori, Mario D

    2009-01-01

    Fourteen strains of Bacillus thuringiensis collected from both larvae showing disease symptoms and soil samples in northwest Argentina were characterized by insecticidal activity against Spodoptera frugiperda. First instar larvae and protein profile SDS-PAGE analysis of whole cell proteins not only allowed the differentiation of native Bacillus thuringiensis but also revealed the possibility of applying protein profile analysis in classification of toxicity patterns. Cluster analysis showed that there were two main groups. Interestingly, one of them only contained the most pathogenic native strains. The biomass-bound protease activity of native pathogenic isolates and the reference strain Bt 4D1 is also reported.

  15. 粘虫颗粒体病毒对苏云金杆菌的增效特性及对Bt毒蛋白的降解活化作用%Synergistic effects of Pseudaletia unipuncta granulosis virus (PuGV-Ps) on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and the involved degradation of Bt toxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐健; 刘琴; 谭永安; 祝树德

    2008-01-01

    以小菜蛾Plutella xylostella为试虫,采用生物测定方法测定了粘虫颗粒体病毒(Pseudaletia unipuncta granulosisvires,PuGV-Ps)对苏云金杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,Bt)的增效作用.结果表明:不同配伍PuGV-Ps和Bt间的共毒系数在105.3至195.0之间,PuGV-Ps对Bt毒力具有增强作用,其中以Bt:PuGV-Ps为4:1增效作用最明显,72 h LC50为0.039 mg/mL.不同温度和pH值都影响PuGV-Ps对BI的增效作用,16℃-20℃增效程度明显高于24℃-32℃,而碱性条件下(pH 8-9)增效作用更显著.PuGV-Ps对Bt的增效作用因小菜蛾龄期不同而变化.2、3龄幼虫死亡率较单独使用Bt分别提高了50%和30.31%,而作用于低龄(1龄)和高龄(4龄)幼虫时对Bt的增效作用不显著.PuGV-Ps饲喂2 h后再接毒Bt,小菜蛾死亡率明显提高,48 h死亡率达66.67%,较直接饲喂Bt+PuGV-Ps处理死亡率提高了53.87%,差异极显著.SDS-PAGE表明PuGV-Ps具有碱性蛋白酶的活性,离体条件下能促进δ-内毒素酶解为47 kD,60 kD和61 kD的毒性肽.

  16. Effects of bacillus thuringiensis transgenic corn on corn earworm and fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcutt, Charles F; Odvody, Gary N; Correa, J Carlos; Remmers, Jeff

    2007-04-01

    We examined 17 pairs of near-isogenic hybrids of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) (176, Mon810, and Bt11) and non-Bt corn, Zea mays L., to examine the effects of Bt on larval densities of Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) during 2 yr. During ear formation, instar densities of H. zea and S. frugiperda were recorded for each hybrid. We found that H. zea first, second, and fifth instar densities were each affected by Mon810 and Bt11 Bt corn but not by 176 corn. Surprisingly, first and second instars were found in higher numbers on ears of Mon810 and Bt11 corn than on non-Bt corn. Densities of third and fourth instars were equal on Bt and non-Bt hybrids, whereas densities of fifth instars were lower on Bt plants. S. frugiperda larval densities were only affected during 1 yr when second, and fourth to sixth instars were lower on ears of Mon810 and Bt11 hybrids compared with their non-Bt counterparts. Two likely explanations for early instar H. zea densities being higher on Bt corn than non-Bt corn are that (1) Bt toxins delay development, creating a greater abundance of early instars that eventually die, and (2) reduced survival of H. zea to later instars on Bt corn decreased the normal asymmetric cannibalism or H. zea-S. frugiperda intraguild predation of late instars on early instars. Either explanation could explain why differences between Bt and non-Bt plants were greater for H. zea than S. frugiperda, because H. zea is more strongly affected by Bt toxins and more cannibalistic.

  17. A pangenomic study of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yongjun; Li, Zhaolong; Liu, Jiucheng; Shu, Changlong; Wang, Xumin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Duojun; Liu, Guiming; Hu, Songnian; Zhang, Jie; Al-Mssallem, Ibrahim; Yu, Jun

    2011-12-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis (B. thuringiensis) is a soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacterium and its plasmid-encoded toxins (Cry) are commonly used as biological alternatives to pesticides. In a pangenomic study, we sequenced seven B. thuringiensis isolates in both high coverage and base-quality using the next-generation sequencing platform. The B. thuringiensis pangenome was extrapolated to have 4196 core genes and an asymptotic value of 558 unique genes when a new genome is added. Compared to the pangenomes of its closely related species of the same genus, B. thuringiensis pangenome shows an open characteristic, similar to B. cereus but not to B. anthracis; the latter has a closed pangenome. We also found extensive divergence among the seven B. thuringiensis genome assemblies, which harbor ample repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The identities among orthologous genes are greater than 84.5% and the hotspots for the genome variations were discovered in genomic regions of 2.3-2.8Mb and 5.0-5.6Mb. We concluded that high-coverage sequence assemblies from multiple strains, before all the gaps are closed, are very useful for pangenomic studies.

  18. A pangenomic study of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjun Fang; Songnian Hu; Jie Zhang; Ibrahim A1-Mssallem; Jun Yu; Zhaolong Li; Jiucheng Liu; Changlong Shu; Xumin Wang; Xiaowei Zhang; Xiaoguang Yu; Duojun Zhao; Guiming Liu

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (B.thuringiensis) is a soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacterium and its plasmid-encoded toxins (Cry) are commonly used as biological alternatives to pesticides.In a pangenomic study,we sequenced seven B.thuringiensis isolates in both high coverage and base quality using the next-generation sequencing platform.The B.thuringiensis pangenome was extrapolated to have 4196 core genes and an asymptotic value of 558 unique genes when a new genome is added.Compared to the pangenomes of its closely related species of the same genus,B.thuringiensis pangenome shows an open characteristic,similar to B.cereus but not to B.anthracis; the latter has a closed pangenome.We also found extensive divergence among the seven B.thuringiensis genome assemblies,which harbor ample repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).The identities among orthologous genes are greater than 84.5% and the hotspots for the genome variations were discovered in genomic regions of 2.3-2.8 Mb and 5.0-5.6 Mb.We concluded that high-coverage sequence assemblies from multiple strains,before all the gaps are closed,are very useful for pangenomic studies.

  19. Genome characteristics of a novel phage from Bacillus thuringiensis showing high similarity with phage from Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihui Yuan

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is an important entomopathogenic bacterium belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, which also includes B. anthracis and B. cereus. Several genomes of phages originating from this group had been sequenced, but no genome of Siphoviridae phage from B. thuringiensis has been reported. We recently sequenced and analyzed the genome of a novel phage, BtCS33, from a B. thuringiensis strain, subsp. kurstaki CS33, and compared the gneome of this phage to other phages of the B. cereus group. BtCS33 was the first Siphoviridae phage among the sequenced B. thuringiensis phages. It produced small, turbid plaques on bacterial plates and had a narrow host range. BtCS33 possessed a linear, double-stranded DNA genome of 41,992 bp with 57 putative open reading frames (ORFs. It had a typical genome structure consisting of three modules: the "late" region, the "lysogeny-lysis" region and the "early" region. BtCS33 exhibited high similarity with several phages, B. cereus phage Wβ and some variants of Wβ, in genome organization and the amino acid sequences of structural proteins. There were two ORFs, ORF22 and ORF35, in the genome of BtCS33 that were also found in the genomes of B. cereus phage Wβ and may be involved in regulating sporulation of the host cell. Based on these observations and analysis of phylogenetic trees, we deduced that B. thuringiensis phage BtCS33 and B. cereus phage Wβ may have a common distant ancestor.

  20. Transport of Bacillus thuringiensis var. Kurstaki Via Fomites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Special Feature: Remediation Transport of Bacillus Thuringiensis var. Kurstaki Via Fomites Sheila Van Cuyk, Lee Ann B. Veal, Beverley Simpson, and...evaluate biodefense concepts of operations using routine spraying of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk). Btk is dispersed in large quantities as...used is a water-based slurry containing Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk). This bacterium produces a toxin that is lethal to gypsy moth

  1. Combining Ability and Heterosis Between High Strength Lines and Transgenic Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) Bollworm-Resistant Lines in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zheng-sheng; LI Xian-bi; XIAO Yue-hua; LUO Ming; LIU Da-jun; HUANG Shun-li; ZHANG Feng-xin

    2003-01-01

    To analyse the combining ability and heterosis between high-strength lines and transgenic Btbollworm-resistant lines in upland cotton, 5 high-strength lines were crossed as female lines with 12 transgenicBt bollworm-resistant lines according to NCII design. It was demonstrated that the compositions of variance invarious traits were quite different. For seed cotton yield, lint yield, boll numbers per plant and boll weight,the dominant (special combining ability) effects were the major effects, accounting for 87.38, 84.40, 80.04and 64.46 % of the total phenotypic variances, respectively, while for fibre strength and micronaire value, theadditive (general combining ability) effects had the major effects, with a ratio of additive variance to pheno-typic variance of 78.85 and 43.80 %. As for lint percent and 2. 5 % span length, the dominant and additivevariances had similar effects, in phenotypic variances (54.94 and 40. 11% for lint percent, 45.76and42.49% for 2.5% span length, respectively). The mid-parent heterosis (Hpm), surpassing parent heterosis(Hpb) and competitive heterosis (Hck) for seed cotton yield and lint yield were both extremely significant.For fibre properties, the Hck and Hpm of 2.5 % fibre span length were extremely significant, the Hck of fibrestrength was significant, and the favorable negative Hck of micronaire was also extremely significant. The in-crements of hybrid over common variety were 17 % for lint yield and fibre strength, 7 % for fibre span length,and 4% for fineness.

  2. Adhesion of Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis on a Planar Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Joy, David Charles [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion of spores of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and spherical silica particles on surfaces was experimentally and theoretically investigated in this study. Topography analysis via atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy indicates that Bt spores are rod shaped, {approx}1.3 {mu}m in length and {approx}0.8 {mu}m in diameter. The adhesion force of Bt spores and silica particles on gold-coated glass was measured at various relative humidity (RH) levels by AFM. It was expected that the adhesion force would vary with RH because the individual force components contributing to the adhesion force depend on RH. The adhesion force between a particle and a planar surface in atmospheric environments was modeled as the contribution of three major force components: capillary, van der Waals, and electrostatic interaction forces. Adhesion force measurements for Bt spore (silica particle) and the gold surface system were comparable with calculations. Modeling results show that there is a critical RH value, which depends on the hydrophobicity of the materials involved, below which the water meniscus does not form and the contribution of the capillary force is zero. As RH increases, the van der Waals force decreases while the capillary force increases to a maximum value.

  3. Characterization of a novel Bacillus thuringiensis phenotype possessing multiple appendages attached to a parasporal body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Suárez, Antonio; Cruz-Camarillo, Ramón; Rampersad, Joanne; Ammons, David R; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Ibarra, Jorge E; Rojas-Avelizapa, Luz I

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a bacterium best known for its production of crystal-like bodies comprised of one or more Cry-proteins, which can be toxic to insects, nematodes or cancer cells. Although strains of B. thuringiensis have occasionally been observed with filamentous appendages attached to their spores, appendages in association with their parasporal bodies are extremely rare. Herein we report the characterization of Bt1-88, a bacterial strain isolated from the Caribbean that produces a spore-crystal complex containing six long appendages, each comprised of numerous thinner filaments approximately 10 nm in diameter and 2.5 μm in length. Each of the multi-filament appendages was attached to a single, small parasporal body located at one end of the bacterial spore. Biochemical tests, 16S rDNA gene sequencing, and the identification of two Cry proteins by partial protein sequencing (putatively Cry1A and Cry2A), unambiguously identified Bt1-88 as a strain of B. thuringiensis. Bt1-88 represents the second reported strain of B. thuringiensis possessing a parasporal body/appendage phenotype characterized by one or more long appendages, comprised of numerous filaments in association with a parasporal body. This finding suggests that Bt1-88 is a member of a new phenotypic class of B. thuringiensis, in which the parasporal body may perform a novel structural role through its association with multi-filament appendages.

  4. Novel cloning vectors for Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, J A; Coyle, D M; Gilbert, M P; Jany, C S; Gawron-Burke, C

    1990-11-01

    Seven replication origins from resident plasmids of Bacillus thuringienis subsp. kurstaki HD263 and HD73 were cloned in Escherichia coli. Three of these replication origins, originating from plasmids of 43, 44, and 60 MDa, were used to construct a set of compatible shuttle vectors that exhibit structural and segregational stability in the Cry- strain B. thuringiensis HD73-26. These shuttle vectors, pEG597, pEG853, and pEG854, were designed with rare restriction sites that permit various adaptations, including the construction of small recombinant plasmids lacking antibiotic resistance genes. The cryIA(c) and cryIIA insecticidal crystal protein genes were inserted into these vectors to demonstrate crystal protein production in B. thuringiensis. Introduction of a cloned cryIA(c) gene from strain HD263 into a B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain exhibiting good insecticidal activity against Spodoptera exigua resulted in a recombinant strain with an improved spectrum of insecticidal activity. Shuttle vectors of this sort should be valuable in future genetic studies of B. thuringiensis as well as in the development of B. thuringiensis strains for use as microbial pesticides.

  5. Cloning of the Bacillus thuringiensis serovar sotto chitinase (Schi gene and characterization of its protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Fang Zhong

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitinase plays a positive role in the pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis to insect pests. We used touchdown PCR to clone the chitinase (Schi gene from Bacillus thuringiensis serovar sotto (Bt sotto chromosomal DNA. Our DNA sequencing analysis revealed that the Bt sotto Schi gene consists of an open reading frame (ORF of 2067 nucleotides with codes for the chitinase precursor. We also found that the putative promoter consensus sequences (the -35 and -10 regions of the Bt soto Schi gene are identical to those of the chiA71 gene from Bt Pakistani, the chiA74 gene from Bt kenyae and the ichi gene from Bt israelensis. The Schi chitinase precursor is 688 amino acids long with an estimated molecular mass of 75.75 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 5.74, and contains four domains, which are, in sequence, a signal peptide, an N-terminal catalytic domain, a fibronectin type III like domain and a C-terminal chitin-binding domain. Sequence comparison and the evolutionary relationship of the Bt sotto Schi chitinase to other chitinase and chitinase-like proteins are also discussed.

  6. Novel toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis strains against the melon fruit fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishir, Md Asaduzzaman; Akter, Asma; Bodiuzzaman, Md; Hossain, M Aftab; Alam, Md Musfiqul; Khan, Shakil Ahmed; Khan, Shakila Nargis; Hoq, M Mozammel

    2015-01-01

    Bactrocera cucurbitae (melon fruit fly) is one of the most detrimental vegetable-damaging pests in Bangladesh. The toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has been reported against a few genera of Bactrocera in addition to numerous other insect species. Bt strains, harbouring cry1A-type genes were, therefore, assayed in vivo against the 3(rd) instar larvae of B. cucurbitae in this study. The biotype-based prevalence of cry1 and cry1A genes was calculated to be 30.8% and 11.16%, respectively, of the test strains (n=224) while their prevalence was greatest in biotype kurstaki. Though three indigenous Bt strains from biotype kurstaki with close genetic relationship exhibited higher toxicity, maximum mortalities were recorded for Btk HD-73 (96%) and the indigenous Bt JSc1 (93%). LC50 and LC99 values were determined to be 6.81 and 8.32 for Bt JSc1, 7.30 and 7.92 for Bt SSc2, and 6.99 and 7.67 for Btk HD-73, respectively. The cause of toxicity and its variation among the strains was found to be correlated with the synergistic toxic effects of cry1, cry2, cry3 and cry9 gene products, i.e. relevant Cry proteins. The novel toxicity of the B. thuringiensis strains against B. cucurbitae revealed in the present study thus will help in developing efficient and eco-friendly control measures such as Bt biopesticides and transgenic Bt cucurbits.

  7. Development of Bacillus thuringiensis fermentation and process control from a practical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X M; Wang, S S

    1998-10-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most widely used biopesticide producer in the biological control market. It is very critical for the Bt pesticide industry to be able to achieve a high yield in the Bt fermentation process in order to reduce its cost and compete with chemical pesticides in the market. We review the overall development of Bt fermentation process research and provide our point of view for the future research opportunities and potential improvements. This minireview covers the areas of fermentation physiology, growth dynamics and high-yield process control. It is pointed out that many studies aimed to improve spore count and process research focusing on toxin protein yield is lacking. In addition, significant development opportunities reside in the process development for the genetically engineered Bt strains expressing multiple toxin proteins.

  8. Biological characteristics of Bacillus thuringiensis strain Btll and identification of its cry-type genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tinghui LIU; Wei GUO; Weiming SUN; Yongxiang SUN

    2009-01-01

    A novel strain of Bacillus thuringiensis Bt11, isolated from soil samples in China, was classified and characterized in terms of its crystal proteins, cry genes content. The Bt11 strain showed high toxicity against Spodoptera exigua and Helicoverpa armigera neonates. Btll strain shares morphological and biochemical characteristics with the previously described Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that crystals were composed of several polypeptides ranging from 20 to 130 kDa, of which the 35, 80, and 130 kDa proteins were the major components. PCR-RFLP with total DNA from strain Btll and specific primers for cryl, cry2, cry3, cry4/10, cry7, cry8, cry9, and cryll genes revealed that crylAa, crylAb, crylla, and cry9Ea genes were present.

  9. Transferrin Impacts Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Garner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the impact of transferrin on Bacillus thuringiensis biofilms. Three commercial strains, an environmental strain (33679, the type strain (10792, and an isolate from a diseased insect (700872, were cultured in iron restricted minimal medium. All strains produced biofilm when grown in vinyl plates at 30°C. B. thuringiensis 33679 had a biofilm biomass more than twice the concentration exhibited by the other strains. The addition of transferrin resulted in slightly increased growth yields for 2 of the 3 strains tested, including 33679. In contrast, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin resulted in an 80% decrease in biofilm levels for strain 33679. When the growth temperature was increased to 37°C, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin increased culture turbidity for only strain 33679. Biofilm levels were again decreased in strain 33679 at 37°C. Growth of B. thuringiensis cultures in polystyrene resulted in a decrease in overall growth yields at 30°C, with biofilm levels significantly decreased for 33679 in the presence of transferrin. These findings demonstrate that transferrin impacts biofilm formation in select strains of B. thuringiensis. Identification of these differences in biofilm regulation may be beneficial in elucidating potential virulence mechanisms among the differing strains.

  10. Linkage of an ABCC transporter to a single QTL that controls Ostrinia nubilalis larval resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Fa toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field evolved resistance of insect populations to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline (Cry) toxins expressed by crop plants has resulted in reduced control of insect feeding damage to field crops, and threatens the sustainability of Bt transgenic technologies. A single quantitative trait locus ...

  11. Bacillus thuringiensis plants expressing Cry1Ac, Cry2Ab and Cry1F are not toxic to the assassin bug, Zelus renardii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton and maize delivering insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), have been commercialized since 1996. Bt plants are subjected to environmental risk assessments for non-target organisms, especially natural enemies that suppress pest populations. In th...

  12. The Regulation of Exosporium-Related Genes in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qi; Kao, Guiwei; Qu, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jie; Song, Fuping

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are spore-forming members of the Bacillus cereus group. Spores of B. cereus group species are encircled by exosporium, which is composed of an external hair-like nap and a paracrystalline basal layer. Despite the extensive studies on the structure of the exosporium-related proteins, little is known about the transcription and regulation of exosporium gene expression in the B. cereus group. Herein, we studied the regulation of several exosporium-related genes in Bt. A SigK consensus sequence is present upstream of genes encoding hair-like nap proteins (bclA and bclB), basal layer proteins (bxpA, bxpB, cotB, and exsY ), and inosine hydrolase (iunH). Mutation of sigK decreased the transcriptional activities of all these genes, indicating that the transcription of these genes is controlled by SigK. Furthermore, mutation of gerE decreased the transcriptional activities of bclB, bxpB, cotB, and iunH but increased the expression of bxpA, and GerE binds to the promoters of bclB, bxpB, cotB, bxpA, and iunH. These results suggest that GerE directly regulates the transcription of these genes, increasing the expression of bclB, bxpB, cotB, and iunH and decreasing that of bxpA. These findings provide insight into the exosporium assembly process at the transcriptional level. PMID:26805020

  13. The introduction of integrated pest management in the Ethiopian horticultural sector : Bacillus thuringiensis strains and its toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belder, den E.; Elderson, J.

    2012-01-01

    1 Introduction As hazards of conventional broad acting pesticides are documented, researchers, poli cymakers and growers look for pesticides that are toxic only to the target pest, have no impact on other such as beneficial species, and have fewer environmental effects. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) i

  14. Isolation of transcripts from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte responsive to the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry3Bb1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been widely used as a method of insect pest management for several decades. In recent years, a transgenic corn expressing the Cry3Bb1 toxin has been successfully used for protection against corn rootworm larvae (Genus...

  15. Novel cloning vectors for Bacillus thuringiensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, J A; Coyle, D M; Gilbert, M P; Jany, C S; Gawron-Burke, C

    1990-01-01

    Seven replication origins from resident plasmids of Bacillus thuringienis subsp. kurstaki HD263 and HD73 were cloned in Escherichia coli. Three of these replication origins, originating from plasmids of 43, 44, and 60 MDa, were used to construct a set of compatible shuttle vectors that exhibit structural and segregational stability in the Cry- strain B. thuringiensis HD73-26. These shuttle vectors, pEG597, pEG853, and pEG854, were designed with rare restriction sites that permit various adapt...

  16. Regulation of protoxin synthesis in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Minnich, S A; Aronson, A I

    1984-01-01

    A derivative of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (HD-1) formed parasporal inclusions at 25 degrees C, but not at 32 degrees C. This strain differed from the parent only in the loss of a 110-megadalton (Md) plasmid, but plasmid and chromosomal copies of protoxin genes were present in both strains. On the basis of temperature shift experiments, the sensitive period appeared to be during midexponential growth, long before the time of protoxin synthesis at 3 to 4 h after the end of exponent...

  17. Using sewage sludge from Municipal and Industrial Solid Wastes to produce a Bacillus thuringiensis Biopesticide

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Mário Brum

    2012-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado - Biotecnologia em Controlo Biológico. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar que lamas têm capacidade para o desenvolvimento de Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) com a intenção de produzir um biopesticida. Neste estudo, realizamos testes de crescimento bacteriano em lamas de estações de tratamento de águas residuais urbanas e industriais. A bactéria utilizada foi uma estirpe nativa de Bt isolada na ilha de São Miguel. Os totais de células viáveis, taxa de crescimento m...

  18. Analysis of opportunities and challenges in patenting of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, H M Mahadeva; Asokan, R; Rajasekaran, P E; Mahmood, Riaz; Nagesha, S N; Arora, D K

    2012-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most widely used microbial control agent. The broad spectrum of susceptible hosts, production on artificial media and ease of application has caused the widespread use of this bacterium against several pests in agriculture, forest and vectors of human diseases. B.thuringiensis toxins are highly species specific which provide economic, environmental benefits, potential for future control and spread of the technology worldwide. This makes the B. thuringiensis crystal proteins an interesting tool for the implementation in integrated pest management programs. It has gained importance over the last 100 years for its biocontrol properties which is used in this review as a case study and analysis of the patents granted on B. thuringiensis was carried out. This study categorizes a number of patents related to B.thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins, application of B.thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins and the development of patentable technologies. The analyses were done using various criteria like patenting trends over the years, assignees playing a major role, comparison of the technology used in different patents and the patenting activity across the insect orders. Patent documents related to bacterium B.thuringiensis contain a trove of technical and commercial information and thus, patent analysis is considered as a useful tool for R management and techno economical development. Patent analysis also helps identifying and evaluating new and alternate technologies, keeping abreast with latest technologies for business interests, finding solutions to technical problems and ideas for new innovative trends.

  19. Effects of two varieties of Bacillus thuringiensis maize on the biology of Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryspeirt, Aiko; Grégoire, Jean-Claude

    2012-05-01

    On the market since 1996, genetically modified plants expressing an insecticidal toxin (Cry toxin stemmed from Bacillus thuringiensis) target several lepidopteran and coleopteran pests. In this study, we assessed the impact of two varieties of Bt maize producing different toxins (Cry1Ab or Cry1Fa, respectively) on the biology of a storage pest: Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). The Indianmeal moths were susceptible to both toxins but showed an escape behavior only from Cry1Fa. The weight of females issued from larvae reared on Cry1Ab increased with increasing toxin concentration, but adults of both sexes reared on Cry1Fa had decreased weight. Both toxins increased development time from egg to adult regardless of sex and had no impact on the male adult lifespan. Finally, we recorded a time lag between metamorphosis from the non-Bt and the Bt diets, which increased proportionally to Cry concentration in the Bt diet.

  20. Resistance of Trichoplusia ni Populations Selected by Bacillus thuringiensis Sprays to Cotton Plants Expressing Pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kain, Wendy; Song, Xiaozhao; Janmaat, Alida F.; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Myers, Judith; Shelton, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    Two populations of Trichoplusia ni that had developed resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis sprays (Bt sprays) in commercial greenhouse vegetable production were tested for resistance to Bt cotton (BollGard II) plants expressing pyramided Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab. The T. ni colonies resistant to Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki formulations were not only resistant to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac, as previously reported, but also had a high frequency of Cry2Ab-resistant alleles, exhibiting ca. 20% survival on BollGard II foliage. BollGard II-resistant T. ni strains were established by selection with BollGard II foliage to further remove Cry2Ab-sensitive alleles in the T. ni populations. The BollGard II-resistant strains showed incomplete resistance to BollGard II, with adjusted survival values of 0.50 to 0.78 after 7 days. The resistance to the dual-toxin cotton plants was conferred by two genetically independent resistance mechanisms: one to Cry1Ac and one to Cry2Ab. The 50% lethal concentration of Cry2Ab for the resistant strain was at least 1,467-fold that for the susceptible T. ni strain. The resistance to Cry2Ab in resistant T. ni was an autosomally inherited, incompletely recessive monogenic trait. Results from this study indicate that insect populations under selection by Bt sprays in agriculture can be resistant to multiple Bt toxins and may potentially confer resistance to multitoxin Bt crops. PMID:25480752

  1. Mortality of adult Stomoxys calcitrans fed isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysyk, T J; Kalischuk-Tymensen, L D; Selinger, L B

    2012-10-01

    We examined the ability of five isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner to cause mortality in adult stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Isolates Bacillus thuringiensis tolworthi 4L3 (serotype 9), Bacillus thuringiensis darmstadiensis 4M1 (serotype 10a10b), Bacillus thuringiensis thompsoni 401 (serotype 12), Bacillus thuringiensis thuringiensis HD2 (serotype 1), and Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki HD945 (serotype 3a3b3c) were administered to adult flies in diets containing blood only, sugar only, and both sugar and blood combined. B. t. tolworthi 4L3 had no effect on adult mortality regardless of the feeding substrate. The remaining isolates tended to cause the greatest mortality when administered in blood alone. B. t. thompsoni 401 was the only isolate that consistently caused adult mortality when fed in blood at concentrations ranging from 0.21 to 50.0 microg of protein per ml of blood. This isolate also caused mortality when applied topically. The time to 50% mortality declined with dose and reached a lower asymptote at approximately equal to 1.3 d at an oral dose of 8.75 microg/ml and at a topical dose of 0.14 microg per fly.

  2. PROFILIN ACTIVATES BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS PHOSPHOINOSITIDE SPECIFIC PHOSPHOLIPASE C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeepta Burgula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many extracellular signaling molecules including hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters andimmunoglobulins elicit intracellular responses by activating phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLCupon binding to their cell surface receptors. Activated PLC catalyses the hydrolysis of Phosphotidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 to generate DAG and IP3 , which act as signaling molecules that control various cellular processes.Exploring the mechanism of regulation of PLC activity may lead to understanding various signaling events thatregulate cell growth and differentiation. One of the dramatic effects of profilin is inhibition of PIP2 hydrolysis by PLC-γ in eukaryotic cells. In the present study, the effect of profilin on Phosphotidylinositol specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC purified from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt was examined. Assay of PI-PLC activity indicated that Bovine profilinactivated the hydrolysis of phosphotidylinositol (PI by BtPI-PLC in a concentration dependent manner under in vitroconditions. A 250 % increase in activity was noted in the presence of profilin but not in presence of phosphoprofilin. Inthe presence of profilin more proteins are observed in the soluble fraction. In conclusion it can be stated that thatprofilin activates bacterial PLC activity towards PI hydrolysis

  3. Is the Insect World Overcoming the Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Cecilia; Palma, Leopoldo

    2017-01-01

    The use of chemical pesticides revolutionized agriculture with the introduction of DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) as the first modern chemical insecticide. However, the effectiveness of DDT and other synthetic pesticides, together with their low cost and ease of use, have led to the generation of undesirable side effects, such as pollution of water and food sources, harm to non-target organisms and the generation of insect resistance. The alternative comes from biological control agents, which have taken an expanding share in the pesticide market over the last decades mainly promoted by the necessity to move towards more sustainable agriculture. Among such biological control agents, the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and its insecticidal toxins have been the most studied and commercially used biological control agents over the last 40 years. However, some insect pests have acquired field-evolved resistance to the most commonly used Bt-based pesticides, threatening their efficacy, which necessitates the immediate search for novel strains and toxins exhibiting different modes of action and specificities in order to perpetuate the insecticidal potential of this bacterium. PMID:28106770

  4. Is the Insect World Overcoming the Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Cecilia; Palma, Leopoldo

    2017-01-18

    The use of chemical pesticides revolutionized agriculture with the introduction of DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) as the first modern chemical insecticide. However, the effectiveness of DDT and other synthetic pesticides, together with their low cost and ease of use, have led to the generation of undesirable side effects, such as pollution of water and food sources, harm to non-target organisms and the generation of insect resistance. The alternative comes from biological control agents, which have taken an expanding share in the pesticide market over the last decades mainly promoted by the necessity to move towards more sustainable agriculture. Among such biological control agents, the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and its insecticidal toxins have been the most studied and commercially used biological control agents over the last 40 years. However, some insect pests have acquired field-evolved resistance to the most commonly used Bt-based pesticides, threatening their efficacy, which necessitates the immediate search for novel strains and toxins exhibiting different modes of action and specificities in order to perpetuate the insecticidal potential of this bacterium.

  5. Is the Insect World Overcoming the Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Peralta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemical pesticides revolutionized agriculture with the introduction of DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane as the first modern chemical insecticide. However, the effectiveness of DDT and other synthetic pesticides, together with their low cost and ease of use, have led to the generation of undesirable side effects, such as pollution of water and food sources, harm to non-target organisms and the generation of insect resistance. The alternative comes from biological control agents, which have taken an expanding share in the pesticide market over the last decades mainly promoted by the necessity to move towards more sustainable agriculture. Among such biological control agents, the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt and its insecticidal toxins have been the most studied and commercially used biological control agents over the last 40 years. However, some insect pests have acquired field-evolved resistance to the most commonly used Bt-based pesticides, threatening their efficacy, which necessitates the immediate search for novel strains and toxins exhibiting different modes of action and specificities in order to perpetuate the insecticidal potential of this bacterium.

  6. Specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins is correlated with the presence of high-affinity binding sites in the brush border membrane of target insect midguts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, C.; Vanderbruggen, H.; Hoefte, H.; Van Rie, J.; Jansens, S.; Van Mellaert, H. (J. Plateaustraat, Gent (Belgium))

    1988-11-01

    Binding studies were performed with two {sup 125}I-labeled Bacillus thuringiensis {delta}-endotoxins on brush border membrane vesicles prepared from the larval midgut of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta or the cabbage butterfly Pieris brassicae. One {delta}-endotoxin, Bt2-protoxin, is a 130-kDa recombinant crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. berliner. It kills larvae of both insect species. The active Bt2-toxin is a 60-kDa proteolytic fragment of the Bt2-protoxin. It binds saturably and with high affinity to brush border membrane vesicles from the midgut of both species. The other {delta}-endotoxin, Bt4412-protoxin, is a 136-kDa crystalline protein from B. thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis, which is highly toxic for P. brassicae, but not for M. sexta larvae. Bt4412-toxin, obtained after proteolytic activation of Bt4412-protoxin, shows high-affinity saturable binding to P. brassicae vesicles but not to M. sexta vesicles. The correlation between toxicity and specific binding is further strengthened by competition studies. Other B. thuringiensis {delta}-endotoxins active against M. sexta compete for binding of {sup 125}I-labeled Bt2-toxin to M. sexta vesicles, whereas toxins active against dipteran or coleopteran larvae do not compete. Bt2-toxin and Bt4412-toxin bind to different sites on P. brassicae vesicles.

  7. Effect of midgut proteolytic activity on susceptibility of lepidopteran larvae to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza eTalaei-Hassanloui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt is the most effective microbial control agent for controlling numerous species from different insect orders. All subspecies and strains of B. thuringiensis can produce a spore and a crystalline parasporal body. This crystal which contains proteinaceous protoxins is dissolved in the alkaline midgut, the resulting molecule is then cleaved and activated by proteolytic enzymes and acts as a toxin. An interesting aspect of this activation process is that variations in midgut pH and protease activity have been shown to account for the spectrum of some Bt proteins activity. Thus, an important factor that could be a determinant of toxin activity is the presence of proteases in the midgut microenvironment of susceptible insects. Reciprocally, any alteration in the midgut protease composition of the host can result in resistance to Bt. Here in this paper, we reviewed this processes in general and presented our assays to reveal whether resistance mechanism to Bt in Diamondback Moth larvae could be due to the function of the midgut proteases? We estimated LC50 for both probable susceptible and resistant populations in laboratory and greenhouse tests. Then, the midgut protease activities of the B. thuringiensis ind

  8. BOOK REVIEW: BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS: A CORNERSTONE OF MODERN AGRICULTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are you interested in the technical issues surrounding the use of Bacillus thuringiensis pesticidal traits as sprays and as plant incorporated protectants (transgenic crops)? Should the dimensions of human health, ecology, entomology, risk assessment, resistance management, and d...

  9. Experimental design and Bayesian networks for enhancement of delta-endotoxin production by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennouri, Karim; Ayed, Rayda Ben; Hassen, Hanen Ben; Mazzarello, Maura; Ottaviani, Ennio

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a Gram-positive bacterium. The entomopathogenic activity of Bt is related to the existence of the crystal consisting of protoxins, also called delta-endotoxins. In order to optimize and explain the production of delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, we studied seven medium components: soybean meal, starch, KH₂PO₄, K₂HPO₄, FeSO₄, MnSO₄, and MgSO₄and their relationships with the concentration of delta-endotoxins using an experimental design (Plackett-Burman design) and Bayesian networks modelling. The effects of the ingredients of the culture medium on delta-endotoxins production were estimated. The developed model showed that different medium components are important for the Bacillus thuringiensis fermentation. The most important factors influenced the production of delta-endotoxins are FeSO₄, K2HPO₄, starch and soybean meal. Indeed, it was found that soybean meal, K₂HPO₄, KH₂PO₄and starch also showed positive effect on the delta-endotoxins production. However, FeSO4 and MnSO4 expressed opposite effect. The developed model, based on Bayesian techniques, can automatically learn emerging models in data to serve in the prediction of delta-endotoxins concentrations. The constructed model in the present study implies that experimental design (Plackett-Burman design) joined with Bayesian networks method could be used for identification of effect variables on delta-endotoxins variation.

  10. Broad-spectrum resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins by western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakka, Siva R K; Shrestha, Ram B; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2016-06-14

    The evolution of resistance and cross-resistance threaten the sustainability of genetically engineered crops that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a serious pest of maize and has been managed with Bt maize since 2003. We conducted laboratory bioassays with maize hybrids producing Bt toxins Cry3Bb1, mCry3A, eCry3.1Ab, and Cry34/35Ab1, which represent all commercialized Bt toxins for management of western corn rootworm. We tested populations from fields where severe injury to Cry3Bb1 maize was observed, and populations that had never been exposed to Bt maize. Consistent with past studies, bioassays indicated that field populations were resistant to Cry3Bb1 maize and mCry3A maize, and that cross-resistance was present between these two types of Bt maize. Additionally, bioassays revealed resistance to eCry3.1Ab maize and cross-resistance among Cry3Bb1, mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab. However, no resistance or cross-resistance was detected for Cry34/35Ab1 maize. This broad-spectrum resistance illustrates the potential for insect pests to develop resistance rapidly to multiple Bt toxins when structural similarities are present among toxins, and raises concerns about the long-term durability of Bt crops for management of some insect pests.

  11. Genetic resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis alters feeding behaviour in the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikkei Shikano

    Full Text Available Evolved resistance to xenobiotics and parasites is often associated with fitness costs when the selection pressure is absent. Resistance to the widely used microbial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt has evolved in several insect species through the modification of insect midgut binding sites for Bt toxins, and reports of costs associated with Bt resistance are common. Studies on the costs of Bt-resistance restrict the insect to a single artificial diet or host-plant. However, it is well documented that insects can self-select appropriate proportions of multiple nutritionally unbalanced foods to optimize life-history traits. Therefore, we examined whether Bt-resistant and susceptible cabbage loopers Trichoplusia ni differed in their nutrient intake and fitness costs when they were allowed to compose their own protein:carbohydrate diet. We found that Bt-resistant T. ni composed a higher ratio of protein to carbohydrate than susceptible T. ni. Bt-resistant males exhibited no fitness cost, while the fitness cost (reduced pupal weight was present in resistant females. The absence of the fitness cost in resistant males was associated with increased carbohydrate consumption compared to females. We demonstrate a sex difference in a fitness cost and a new behavioural outcome associated with Bt resistance.

  12. Risk Assessment and Ecological Effects of Transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis Crops on Non-Target Organisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Lin Yu; Yun-He Li; Kong-Ming Wu

    2011-01-01

    The application of recombinant DNA technology has resulted in many insect-resistant varieties by genetic engineering (GE). Crops expressing Cry toxins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been planted worldwide, and are an effective tool for pest control. However, one ecological concern regarding the potential effects of insect-resistant GE plants on non-target organisms (NTOs) has been continually debated.In the present study, we briefly summarize the data regarding the development and commercial use of transgenic Bt varieties, elaborate on the procedure and methods for assessing the non-target effects of insect-resistant GE plants, and synthetically analyze the related research results, mostly those published between 2005 and 2010. A mass of laboratory and field studies have shown that the currently available Bt crops have no direct detrimental effects on NTOs due to their narrow spectrum of activity, and Bt crops are increasing the abundance of some beneficial insects and improving the natural control of specific pests. The use of Bt crops, such as Bt maize and Bt cotton, results in significant reductions of insecticide application and clear benefits on the environment and farmer health. Consequently, Bt crops can be a useful component of integrated pest management systems to protect the crop from targeted pests.

  13. Risk assessment and ecological effects of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis crops on non-target organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Lin; Li, Yun-He; Wu, Kong-Ming

    2011-07-01

    The application of recombinant DNA technology has resulted in many insect-resistant varieties by genetic engineering (GE). Crops expressing Cry toxins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been planted worldwide, and are an effective tool for pest control. However, one ecological concern regarding the potential effects of insect-resistant GE plants on non-target organisms (NTOs) has been continually debated. In the present study, we briefly summarize the data regarding the development and commercial use of transgenic Bt varieties, elaborate on the procedure and methods for assessing the non-target effects of insect-resistant GE plants, and synthetically analyze the related research results, mostly those published between 2005 and 2010. A mass of laboratory and field studies have shown that the currently available Bt crops have no direct detrimental effects on NTOs due to their narrow spectrum of activity, and Bt crops are increasing the abundance of some beneficial insects and improving the natural control of specific pests. The use of Bt crops, such as Bt maize and Bt cotton, results in significant reductions of insecticide application and clear benefits on the environment and farmer health. Consequently, Bt crops can be a useful component of integrated pest management systems to protect the crop from targeted pests.

  14. Production and characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac-resistant cotton bollworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilkumar, Konasale J; Rodrigo-Simón, Ana; Ferré, Juan; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Sivasupramaniam, Sakuntala; Moar, William J

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory-selected Bacillus thuringiensis-resistant colonies are important tools for elucidating B. thuringiensis resistance mechanisms. However, cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, a target pest of transgenic corn and cotton expressing B. thuringiensis Cry1Ac (Bt corn and cotton), has proven difficult to select for stable resistance. Two populations of H. zea (AR and MR), resistant to the B. thuringiensis protein found in all commercial Bt cotton varieties (Cry1Ac), were established by selection with Cry1Ac activated toxin (AR) or MVP II (MR). Cry1Ac toxin reflects the form ingested by H. zea when feeding on Bt cotton, whereas MVP II is a Cry1Ac formulation used for resistance selection and monitoring. The resistance ratio (RR) for AR exceeded 100-fold after 11 generations and has been maintained at this level for nine generations. This is the first report of stable Cry1Ac resistance in H. zea. MR crashed after 11 generations, reaching only an RR of 12. AR was only partially cross-resistant to MVP II, suggesting that MVP II does not have the same Cry1Ac selection pressure as Cry1Ac toxin against H. zea and that proteases may be involved with resistance. AR was highly cross-resistant to Cry1Ab toxin but only slightly cross-resistant to Cry1Ab expressing corn leaf powder. AR was not cross-resistant to Cry2Aa2, Cry2Ab2-expressing corn leaf powder, Vip3A, and cypermethrin. Toxin-binding assays showed no significant differences, indicating that resistance was not linked to a reduction in binding. These results aid in understanding why this pest has not evolved B. thuringiensis resistance, and highlight the need to choose carefully the form of B. thuringiensis protein used in experiments.

  15. Ecological aspects of Bacillus thuringiensis in an Oxisol Ecologia do Bacillus thuringiensis num Latossolo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessandra Heck Paes Leme Ferreira

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram positive, sporangial bacterium, known for its insecticidal habilities. Survival and conjugation ability of B. thuringiensis strains were investigated; vegetative cells were evaluated in non-sterile soil. Vegetative cells decreased rapidly in number, and after 48 hours the population was predominantly spores. No plasmid transfer was observed in non-sterile soil, probably because the cells died and the remaining cells sporulated quickly. Soil is not a favorable environment for B. thuringiensis multiplication and conjugation. The fate of purified B. thuringiensis toxin was analyzed by extractable toxin quantification using ELISA. The extractable toxin probably declined due to binding on surface-active particles in the soil.O comportamento de células vegetativas do Bacillus thuringiensis foi estudado em solo não esterilizado. Após o inóculo grande parte das células morrem e o restante esporula em 24 horas. Não foi observada conjugação provavelmente porque poucas células sobrevivem no solo e rapidamente esporulam, mostrando que este não é o ambiente propício para a multiplicação e conjugação desta bactéria. A toxina purificada, portanto livre de células, diminui rapidamente sua quantidade em solo não esterilizado. Provavelmente a ligação da toxina na fração argilosa do solo é a principal responsável por este fenômeno.

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis Conjugation in Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuls, Elise; van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Dijkstra, Camelia; Larkin, Oliver; Mahillon, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Spaceflight experiments have suggested a possible effect of microgravity on the plasmid transfer among strains of the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis, as opposed to no effect recorded for Gram-negative conjugation. To investigate these potential effects in a more affordable experimental setup, three ground-based microgravity simulators were tested: the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), and a superconducting magnet. The bacterial conjugative system consisted in biparental matings between two B. thuringiensis strains, where the transfer frequencies of the conjugative plasmid pAW63 and its ability to mobilize the nonconjugative plasmid pUB110 were assessed. Specifically, potential plasmid transfers in a 0-g position (simulated microgravity) were compared to those obtained under 1-g (normal gravity) condition in each device. Statistical analyses revealed no significant difference in the conjugative and mobilizable transfer frequencies between the three different simulated microgravitational conditions and our standard laboratory condition. These important ground-based observations emphasize the fact that, though no stimulation of plasmid transfer was observed, no inhibition was observed either. In the case of Gram-positive bacteria, this ability to exchange plasmids in weightlessness, as occurs under Earth's conditions, should be seen as particularly relevant in the scope of spread of antibiotic resistances and bacterial virulence.

  17. Antagonistic competition moderates virulence in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbutt, Jennie; Bonsall, Michael B; Wright, Denis J; Raymond, Ben

    2011-08-01

    Classical models of the evolution of virulence predict that multiple infections should select for elevated virulence, if increased competitiveness arises from faster growth. However, diverse modes of parasite competition (resource-based, antagonism, immunity manipulation) can lead to adaptations with different implications for virulence. Using an experimental evolution approach we investigated the hypothesis that selection in mixed-strain infections will lead to increased antagonism that trades off against investment in virulence. Selection in mixed infections led to improved suppression of competitors in the bacterial insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis. Increased antagonism was associated with decreased virulence in three out of four selected lines. Moreover, mixed infections were less virulent than single-strain infections, and between-strain competition tended to decrease pathogen growth in vivo and in vitro. Spiteful interactions among these bacteria may be favoured because of the high metabolic costs of virulence factors and the high risk of mixed infections.

  18. Field-evolved resistance by western corn rootworm to multiple Bacillus thuringiensis toxins in transgenic maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Aaron J; Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L; Clifton, Eric H; Dunbar, Mike W; Hoffmann, Amanda M; Ingber, David A; Keweshan, Ryan S

    2014-04-01

    The widespread planting of crops genetically engineered to produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) places intense selective pressure on pest populations to evolve resistance. Western corn rootworm is a key pest of maize, and in continuous maize fields it is often managed through planting of Bt maize. During 2009 and 2010, fields were identified in Iowa in which western corn rootworm imposed severe injury to maize producing Bt toxin Cry3Bb1. Subsequent bioassays revealed Cry3Bb1 resistance in these populations. Here, we report that, during 2011, injury to Bt maize in the field expanded to include mCry3A maize in addition to Cry3Bb1 maize and that laboratory analysis of western corn rootworm from these fields found resistance to Cry3Bb1 and mCry3A and cross-resistance between these toxins. Resistance to Bt maize has persisted in Iowa, with both the number of Bt fields identified with severe root injury and the ability western corn rootworm populations to survive on Cry3Bb1 maize increasing between 2009 and 2011. Additionally, Bt maize targeting western corn rootworm does not produce a high dose of Bt toxin, and the magnitude of resistance associated with feeding injury was less than that seen in a high-dose Bt crop. These first cases of resistance by western corn rootworm highlight the vulnerability of Bt maize to further evolution of resistance from this pest and, more broadly, point to the potential of insects to develop resistance rapidly when Bt crops do not achieve a high dose of Bt toxin.

  19. Occurrence and linkage between secreted insecticidal toxins in natural isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinasse, Sylvain; Chaufaux, Josette; Buisson, Christophe; Perchat, Stéphane; Gohar, Michel; Bourguet, Denis; Sanchis, Vincent

    2003-12-01

    Little is known about the occurrence and linkage between secreted insecticidal virulence factors in natural populations of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). We carried out a survey of 392 Bt strains isolated from various samples originating from 31 countries. The toxicity profile of the culture supernatants of these strains was determined individually against Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera) and Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera). We analyzed beta-exotoxin I production and searched for the genes encoding Vip1-2, Vip3, and Cry1I toxins in 125 of these strains. Our results showed that these insecticidal toxins were widespread in Bt but that their distribution was nonrandom, with significant linkage observed between vip3 and cry1I and between vip1-2 and beta-exotoxin I. Strains producing significant amounts of beta-exotoxin I were more frequently isolated from invertebrate samples than from dust, water, soil, or plant samples.

  20. Novel actin filaments from Bacillus thuringiensis form nanotubules for plasmid DNA segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shimin; Narita, Akihiro; Popp, David; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Lee, Lin Jie; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Oda, Toshiro; Koh, Fujiet; Larsson, Mårten; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    Here we report the discovery of a bacterial DNA-segregating actin-like protein (BtParM) from Bacillus thuringiensis, which forms novel antiparallel, two-stranded, supercoiled, nonpolar helical filaments, as determined by electron microscopy. The BtParM filament features of supercoiling and forming antiparallel double-strands are unique within the actin fold superfamily, and entirely different to the straight, double-stranded, polar helical filaments of all other known ParMs and of eukaryotic F-actin. The BtParM polymers show dynamic assembly and subsequent disassembly in the presence of ATP. BtParR, the DNA-BtParM linking protein, stimulated ATP hydrolysis/phosphate release by BtParM and paired two supercoiled BtParM filaments to form a cylinder, comprised of four strands with inner and outer diameters of 57 Å and 145 Å, respectively. Thus, in this prokaryote, the actin fold has evolved to produce a filament system with comparable features to the eukaryotic chromosome-segregating microtubule.

  1. Molecular Approaches to Improve the Insecticidal Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A. Lucena

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt is a gram-positive spore-forming soil bacterium that is distributed worldwide. Originally recognized as a pathogen of the silkworm, several strains were found on epizootic events in insect pests. In the 1960s, Bt began to be successfully used to control insect pests in agriculture, particularly because of its specificity, which reflects directly on their lack of cytotoxicity to human health, non-target organisms and the environment. Since the introduction of transgenic plants expressing Bt genes in the mid-1980s, numerous methodologies have been used to search for and improve toxins derived from native Bt strains. These improvements directly influence the increase in productivity and the decreased use of chemical insecticides on Bt-crops. Recently, DNA shuffling and in silico evaluations are emerging as promising tools for the development and exploration of mutant Bt toxins with enhanced activity against target insect pests. In this report, we describe natural and in vitro evolution of Cry toxins, as well as their relevance in the mechanism of action for insect control. Moreover, the use of DNA shuffling to improve two Bt toxins will be discussed together with in silico analyses of the generated mutations to evaluate their potential effect on protein structure and cytotoxicity.

  2. Molecular approaches to improve the insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Wagner A; Pelegrini, Patrícia B; Martins-de-Sa, Diogo; Fonseca, Fernando C A; Gomes, Jose E; de Macedo, Leonardo L P; da Silva, Maria Cristina M; Oliveira, Raquel S; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2014-08-13

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a gram-positive spore-forming soil bacterium that is distributed worldwide. Originally recognized as a pathogen of the silkworm, several strains were found on epizootic events in insect pests. In the 1960s, Bt began to be successfully used to control insect pests in agriculture, particularly because of its specificity, which reflects directly on their lack of cytotoxicity to human health, non-target organisms and the environment. Since the introduction of transgenic plants expressing Bt genes in the mid-1980s, numerous methodologies have been used to search for and improve toxins derived from native Bt strains. These improvements directly influence the increase in productivity and the decreased use of chemical insecticides on Bt-crops. Recently, DNA shuffling and in silico evaluations are emerging as promising tools for the development and exploration of mutant Bt toxins with enhanced activity against target insect pests. In this report, we describe natural and in vitro evolution of Cry toxins, as well as their relevance in the mechanism of action for insect control. Moreover, the use of DNA shuffling to improve two Bt toxins will be discussed together with in silico analyses of the generated mutations to evaluate their potential effect on protein structure and cytotoxicity.

  3. Bacillus thuringiensis: legado para el siglo XXI Bacillus thuringiensis: the legacy to the XXI century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orduz S.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Los insecticidas basados en la bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis son el principal renglón productivo del mercado mundial de biopesticidas. La investigación dedicada a esta área, promovida por la urgente necesidad de resolver problemas agrícolas y de salud pública, ha dado lugar a un conocimiento exhaustivo de su biología. La diversidad de cepas diferentes de B. thuringiensis ha permitido desarrollar productos principalmente, pero no exclusivamente, para el control de insectos. Con los nuevos desarrollos de la biología molecular, se ha logrado comprender su mecanismo de acción a nivel molecular y también se ha logrado extender sus capacidades entomopatógenas. Como producto de su amplio uso en muchos países, se han presentado casos de resistencia en poblaciones de insectos susceptibles. Con esta revisión se pretende elaborar un contexto teórico del estado actual de la investigación sobre B. thuringiensis, describiendo brevemente el conocimiento sobre esta bacteria, haciendo hincapié en los fenómenos biológicos que subyacen su actividad tóxica y la problemática que se avecina en el próximo siglo con los fenómenos de resistencia cada vez más comunes, todo esto analizado desde una perspectiva biotecnológica.

    Bacillus thuringiensis-based insecticides are the main production line of the biopesticides world market. The research devoted to this area, promoted by the necessity to solve problems in agriculture and public health has resulted in an exhaustive knowledge of its biology. The diversity of the B. thuringiensis strains has permitted to develop several products mainly, but not exclusively, for insect control. With the new developments in the field of molecular biology, it has been possible to understand the molecular basis of the mode of action and to increase the range of activity as well. As a result

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj; Temple, Louise

    2016-08-18

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages.

  5. Isolation of Bacillus thuringiensis from the state of Amazonas, in Brazil, and screening against Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelma Soares-da-Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the use of Bacillus thuringiensis isolated in the state of Amazonas, in Brazil, for the biological control of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. From 25 soil samples collected in nine municipalities, 484 bacterial colonies were obtained, 57 (11.78% of which were identified as B. thuringiensis. Six isolates, IBt-03, IBt-06, IBt-07, IBt-28, IBt-30, and BtAM-27 showed insecticidal activity, and only BtAM-27 presents the five genes investigated cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry10Aa, cry11Aa, and cry11Ba. The IBt-07 and IBt- 28, with lower LC50 values, showed equal toxicity compared to the standards. The isolates of B. thuringiensis from Amazonas constitute potential new means of biological control for A. aegypti, because of their larvicidal activity and the possibility that they may also contain new combinations of toxins.

  6. 40 CFR 180.1011 - Viable spores of the microorganism Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner; exemption from the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1011 Section 180.1011... microorganism Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. (a) For the... authentic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner conforming to the morphological and...

  7. Occurrence of natural Bacillus thuringiensis contaminants and residues of Bacillus thuringiensis-based insecticides on fresh fruits and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristine; Rosenquist, Hanne; Jørgensen, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    A total of 128 Bacillus cereus-like strains isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables for sale in retail shops in Denmark were characterized. Of these strains, 39% (50/128) were classified as Bacillus thuringiensis on the basis of their content of cry genes determined by PCR or crystal proteins...

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis colonises plant roots in a phylogeny-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Quist, J Cristian; Rogers, Hilary J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Berry, Colin

    2013-12-01

    Although much is known about the pathology of Bacillus thuringiensis against invertebrates, current understanding of its natural ecology is limited. This study evaluated the biodiversity of B. thuringiensis in relation to its interaction with plants. Phylogenetic relationships between 44 reference and field-collected strains, determined using 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, revealed a high degree of variability, similar to that found in databases. An Arabidopsis thaliana in vitro inoculation model was developed to screen the ability of B. thuringiensis to colonise roots. Significant colonisation differences up to 91-fold were observed between strains, and correlation between strain phylogeny and colonisation was found. The genetics and biochemistry of auxin production; presence of the gene encoding indole pyruvate decarboxylase; and the abilities of Bt strains to swarm, grow in rich/minimal media and affect root growth differed between the strains, but only auxin production correlated significantly with ability to colonise roots. Co-inoculation with Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN or Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 produced no effect on B. thuringiensis colonisation levels, regardless of the co-inoculant. Similarly, root colonisation of A. thaliana mutants impaired in plant defences was not significantly higher compared with controls. This is the first systematic and phylogenetic evaluation of B. thuringiensis interaction with plants.

  9. An overview of the safety and biological effects of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Infante, Néstor; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2016-05-01

    Crystal proteins (Cry) produced during the growth and sporulation phases of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacterium are known as delta endotoxins. These toxins are being used worldwide as bioinsecticides to control pests in agriculture, and some Cry toxins are used against mosquitoes to control vector transmission. This review summarizes the relevant information currently available regarding the biosafety and biological effects that Bt and its insecticidal Cry proteins elicit in mammals. This work was performed because of concerns regarding the possible health impact of Cry toxins on vertebrates, particularly because Bt toxins might be associated with immune-activating or allergic responses. The controversial data published to date are discussed in this review considering earlier toxicological studies of B. thuringiensis, spores, toxins and Bt crops. We discussed the experimental studies performed in humans, mice, rats and sheep as well as in diverse mammalian cell lines. Although the term 'toxic' is not appropriate for defining the effects these toxins have on mammals, they cannot be considered innocuous, as they have some physiological effects that may become pathological; thus, trials that are more comprehensive are necessary to determine their effects on mammals because knowledge in this field remains limited.

  10. Phylogenetic interrelations between serological variants of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patyka N. V.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. B. thuringiensis (Bt are gram-positive spore-forming aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacteria able to form during sporulation species specific crystal-like inclusions of protein nature, consisting of particular thermolabile d-endotoxins. Serological Bt variants produce different entomotoxins; their synthesis in many respects depends on the conditions of cultivation. There was accumulated a vast information on the entomotoxins, their origin, synthesis, structure, toxic properties and mechanisms of action on insects. These bacteria are dominating in the microbiomethods of pest control in plants and animals. There are more than 70 serovariants of Bt selectively specific to the definite groups of host insects. However, the description of new variants not always looks justified considering the phylogenetic systematization based on phenotype signs. Methods. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of the Bt intraspecific interrelations was performed on the basis of the cloned 16S rRNA genes of entomopathogenic bacteria BtH1, BtH10, BtH14. Results. The phylogenetically homogeneous lines were investigated – a homology of 16S rRNA of the strains 1 and 10 ranged from 90,0 to 94,0 %; no distinct genetic isolation among the strains of 14th and 10th serovars was revealed. Conclusions. The comparison of nucleotides sequences of 16S rRNA has shown the existence of strains polymorphism within the group of entomopathogens BtH1, BtH10, BtH14, connected with their entomocide activity

  11. Mechanism of Insect Resistance to the Microbial Insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rie, J.; McGaughey, W. H.; Johnson, D. E.; Barnett, B. D.; van Mellaert, H.

    1990-01-01

    Receptor binding studies show that resistance of a laboratory-selected Plodia interpunctella strain to a Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein (ICP) is correlated with a 50-fold reduction in affinity of the membrane receptor for this protein. The strain is sensitive to a second type of ICP that apparently recognizes a different receptor. Understanding the mechanism of resistance will provide strategies to prevent or delay resistance and hence prolong the usefulness of B. thuringiensis ICPs as environmentally safe insecticides.

  12. Ultra-violet-resistant mutants of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.R.; Karunakaran, V. (Polytechnic of Central London (UK). Faculty of Engineering and Science, School of Biological and Health Sciences); Burges, H.D. (Institute of Horticultural Research, Littlehampton (UK)); Hacking, A.J. (Reading Univ. (UK). Dextra Labs.Ltd.)

    1991-06-01

    One of the main disadvantages of using Bacillus thuringiensis as an insecticide is that the spore and crystal preparations applied to foliage are readily washed away by rain and are inactivated by sunlight. Spores from some strains of B. thuringiensis have been shown to be highly sensitive to u.v. light. This study has demonstrated how mutants with increased resistance to u.v., isolated by successive rounds of u.v. irradiation, and additionally with increased specific pathogenicity can be isolated. These techniques should be applied to strains that are frequently used in the industrial production of B.thuringiensis toxin. (author).

  13. Spore and crystal formation in Bacillus thuringiensis var thuringiensis during growth in cystine and cysteine.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajalakshmi, S.; Shethna, YI

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the addition of different concentratons of cystine and cysteine on sporulation and parasporal crystal formation in Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis was studied. The effect was well pronounced when the systine/cysteine additions were made after the stationary phase. Heat stable spores and crystals were formed when the culture was provided with a low concentration of cystine/cysteine (0.05 per cent w/v). At a moderate concentration of cystine or cysteine (0.15%), only ...

  14. Plasmid-associated sensitivity of Bacillus thuringiensis to UV light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, T.G.; Wilson, G.R.; Bull, D.L.; Aronson, A.I. (Department of Agriculture, College Station, TX (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus thuringiensis were more sensitive to UV light than were spores or cells of plasmid-cured B. thuringiensis strains or of the closely related Bacillus cereus. Introduction of B. thuringiensis plasmids into B. cereus by cell mating increased the UV sensitivity of the cells and spores. Protoxins encoded by one or more B. thuringiensis plasmids were not involved in spore sensitivity, since a B. thuringiensis strain conditional for protoxin accumulation was equally sensitive at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. In addition, introduction of either a cloned protoxin gene, the cloning vector, or another plasmid not containing a protoxin gene into a plasmid-cured strain of B. thuringiensis all increased the UV sensitivity of the spores. Although the variety of small, acid-soluble proteins was the same in the spores of all strains examined, the quantity of dipicolinic acid was about twice as high in the plasmid-containing strains, and this may account for the differences in UV sensitivity of the spores. The cells of some strains harboring only B. thuringiensis plasmids were much more sensitive than cells of any of the other strains, and the differences were much greater than observed with spores.

  15. Biological Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis in Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossentine, J; Robertson, M; Xu, D

    2016-04-22

    Whole-culture extracts of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner strains were assayed against larval and adult Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), an important invasive pest of many thin-skinned soft fruit crops in North America. Of the 22 serovars tested versus larval D. suzukii, strains of Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis, kurstaki, thompsoni, bolivia, and pakistani caused high (75 to 100%) first-instar mortalities. Pupal mortality, measured as a failure of adults to emerge, varied with serovar. The first D. suzukii instar was the most susceptible of the three larval instars to B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD-1. Larval D. suzukii are shielded from crop treatments, as they develop under the skin of infested fruit, and adults would be a more vulnerable target for an efficacious strain of B. thuringiensis Only one of the 21 B. thuringiensis serovars, var. thuringiensis, prepared as oral suspensions in sucrose for adult D. suzukii ingestion resulted in significant, albeit low mortality within 7 d. It is not a candidate for use in pest management, as it produces β-exotoxin that is toxic to vertebrates.

  16. Construction of an environmental safe Bacillus thuringiensis engineered strain against Coleoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yajun; Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2016-05-01

    Cloning of new toxic genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and construction of Bt engineered strains are two key strategies for bio-control of coleopteran pests in agriculture and forestry. In this study, we cloned a new cry3Aa-type gene, cry3Aa8, from wild Bt strain YC-03 against coleopteran, and constructed a Bt engineered strain, ACE-38, containing insecticidal protein-encoding gene cry3Aa8. The engineered strain, with almost four times of Cry3Aa yield compared with strain YC-03, was an antibiotic marker-free strain. Though no selective pressure was presented in the medium, cry3Aa8 in the engineered strain ACE-38 remained stable. The yield of Cry3Aa by strain ACE-38 reached 2.09 mg/ml in the optimized fermentation medium. The activity of strain ACE-38 against Plagiodera versicolora was tested, and the LC50 of ACE-38 cultures in the optimized fermentation medium was 1.13 μl/ml. Strain ACE-38 is a non-antibiotic Bt engineered strain with high Chrysomelidae toxicity and exhibits good fermentation property. The modified indigenous site-specific recombination system constructed in this study might be useful for the construction of Bt engineered strains containing genes that cannot be expressed in the indigenous site-specific recombination system using plasmid pBMB1205R.

  17. Three cadherin alleles associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis in pink bollworm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Shai; Biggs, Robert W.; Sisterson, Mark S.; Shriver, Laura; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Higginson, Dawn; Holley, Daniel; Gahan, Linda J.; Heckel, David G.; Carrière, Yves; Dennehy, Timothy J.; Brown, Judith K.; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by pests is the main threat to long-term insect control by transgenic crops that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Because inheritance of resistance to the Bt toxins in transgenic crops is typically recessive, DNA-based screening for resistance alleles in heterozygotes is potentially much more efficient than detection of resistant homozygotes with bioassays. Such screening, however, requires knowledge of the resistance alleles in field populations of pests that are associated with survival on Bt crops. Here we report that field populations of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), a major cotton pest, harbored three mutant alleles of a cadherin-encoding gene linked with resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac and survival on transgenic Bt cotton. Each of the three resistance alleles has a deletion expected to eliminate at least eight amino acids upstream of the putative toxin-binding region of the cadherin protein. Larvae with two resistance alleles in any combination were resistant, whereas those with one or none were susceptible to Cry1Ac. Together with previous evidence, the results reported here identify the cadherin gene as a leading target for DNA-based screening of resistance to Bt crops in lepidopteran pests. PMID:12695565

  18. F2 screen for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2-maize in field populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from the southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target of transgenic maize and cotton expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins in both North and South America. In 2013 and 2014, a total of 215 F2 two-parent families of S. frugiperda were established usin...

  19. Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance mechanisms among Lepidoptera: progress on genomic approaches to uncover causal mutations in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plants that expressed Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline (Cry) protein toxins can suffer feeding damage from a small number of lepidopteran insect species under field conditions, which has heightened concerns about the durability of pest control tactics. Genomics research has provid...

  20. Susceptibility of northern corn rootworm Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab Bacillus thuringiensis proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susceptibility of the northern corn rootworm (NCR), to mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was determined using a diet bioassay. Northern corn rootworm neonates were exposed to different concentrations of mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab, incorporated into artificial diet. Lar...

  1. Isolation and distribution of mosquito-larvicidal cry genes in Bacillus thuringiensis strains native to Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-kersh, T A; Al-akeel, R A; Al-sheikh, Y A; Alharbi, S A

    2014-12-01

    A total of 157 environmental samples were collected from 11 ecological regions across Saudi Arabia to isolate native Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains. Bt isolates (n=103) were recovered by the 50% (v/v) ethanol treatment method with Bt index range of 0.01 to 0.4. Most of Bt isolates showed spherical crystals (54%), while, irregular, bi-pyramidal, and spore-attached crystal constituted 27, 16 and 3% respectively. PCR analysis with eight general and specific dipteran primers of Cry and Cyt genes, revealed positive amplification for cry4 & cyt1, and cry4A, cry4B and cyt2, and cry 10 and cry 11 genes in 28%, 26%, 22%, and 25% of tested strains respectively; whereas cry2 gene was not detected except with the reference Bt kurstaki HD-1 strain. Bioassays against Aedes caspuis and Culex pipiens larvae indicated that 11 strains displayed better larvicidal activity compared with Bacillus thuringiensis H14 (Bti) reference (LC50 0.6 μg/ml) strain against Ae. caspuis, but only two strains (620A & 633R1, LC50 of 0.09 μg/ml & 0.064 μg/ml) that gave significant enhancement. Additionally, one strain (633R1) showed LC50 similar to that of Bti H14 (LC50 0.064 μg/ml) against Cx. pipiens. With the exception of cyt primers, sequenced DNA of all positive primers amplicons revealed 95 to 99% identity in GenBank with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis plasmid pBtoxis and also correlated with its SDS-PAGE expressed protein profiles analysis. It is hoped that our wild bio-insecticide Bt strains can be explored in future in the control of mosquito-vector borne diseases in Saudi Arabia.

  2. Ostrinia nubilalis parasitism and the field abundance of non-target insects in transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis corn (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguet, Denis; Chaufaux, Josette; Micoud, Annie; Delos, Marc; Naibo, Bernard; Bombarde, Fany; Marque, Gilles; Eychenne, Nathalie; Pagliari, Carine

    2002-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated in field trials the effects on non-target species, of transgenic corn producing the Cry1Ab toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). In 1998, we collected Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) larvae from transgenic Bt corn (Novartis Hybrid 176) and non-Bt corn at four geographical sites. We found a significant variation in parasitism by the tachinids Lydella thompsoni (Herting) and Pseudoperichaeta nigrolineata (Walker) among sites, and more parasitism in non-Bt than in Bt fields. The Bt effect did not vary significantly among fields. In 1999, we performed a field experiment at two sites, comparing the temporal abundance of non-target arthropods in Bt corn (Monsanto Hybrid MON810) and non-Bt corn. The non-target insects studied included the aphids Metopolophium dirhodum (Walker), Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) and Sitobion avenae (F.), the bug Orius insidiosus (Say), the syrphid Syrphus corollae (Meigen), the ladybird Coccinella septempunctata (L.), the lacewing Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens), thrips and hymenopteran parasitoids. For all species but one, the number of individuals varied greatly over the season but did not differ between the types of corn. The only exception was thrips which, at one site, was significantly more abundant in Bt corn than in non-Bt corn. However this difference did not remain significant when we took the multiple tests into account. Implications for pest resistance management, population dynamics and risk assessment are discussed.

  3. Aerobic granulation of pure bacterial strain Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil S ADAV; Duu-Jong LEE

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to cultivate aer-obic granules by pure bacterial strain, Bacillus thuringien-sis, in a sequencing batch reactor. Stable granules sized 2.0-2.2 mm were formed in the reactor after a five-week cultivation. These granules exhibited excellent settling attributes, and degraded phenol at rates of 1.49 and concentration, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopic test results show that Bacillus thuringiensis was distributed over the initial small aggregates, and the outer edge of the granule was away from the core regime in the following stage.

  4. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Cold Shock Protein-Like Bacteriocin Synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianpei; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Pan, Jieru; Su, Xiaoyu; Jin, Xin; Guan, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), one of the most successful biopesticides, may expand its potential by producing bacteriocins (thuricins). The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial potential of a novel Bt bacteriocin, thuricin BtCspB, produced by Bt BRC-ZYR2. The results showed that this bacteriocin has a high similarity with cold-shock protein B (CspB). BtCspB lost its activity after proteinase K treatment; however it was active at 60 °C for 30 min and was stable in the pH range 5–7. The partial loss of activity after the treatments of lipase II and catalase were likely due to the change in BtCspB structure and the partial degradation of BtCspB, respectively. The loss of activity at high temperatures and the activity variation at different pHs were not due to degradation or large conformational change. BtCspB did not inhibit four probiotics. It was only active against B. cereus strains 0938 and ATCC 10987 with MIC values of 3.125 μg/mL and 0.781 μg/mL, and MBC values of 12.5 μg/mL and 6.25 μg/mL, respectively. Taken together, these results provide new insights into a novel cold shock protein-like bacteriocin, BtCspB, which displayed promise for its use in food preservation and treatment of B. cereus-associated diseases. PMID:27762322

  5. Transfer of the toxin protein genes of Bacillus sphaericus into Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and their expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Bourgouin, C.; Delécluse, A; de la Torre, F; Szulmajster, J.

    1990-01-01

    The genes encoding the toxic determinants of Bacillus sphaericus have been expressed in a nontoxic and a toxic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. In both cases, the B. sphaericus toxin proteins were produced at a high level during sporulation of B. thuringiensis and accumulated as crystalline structures. B. thuringiensis transformants expressing B. sphaericus and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxins did not show a significant enhancement of toxicity against Aedes aegyp...

  6. Effects and mechanisms of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal toxins for mosquito larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Hua, Gang; Adang, Michael J

    2016-09-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram-positive aerobic bacterium that produces insecticidal crystalline inclusions during sporulation phases of the mother cell. The virulence factor, known as parasporal crystals, is composed of Cry and Cyt toxins. Most Cry toxins display a common 3-domain topology. Cry toxins exert intoxication through toxin activation, receptor binding and pore formation in a suitable larval gut environment. The mosquitocidal toxins of Bt subsp. israelensis (Bti) were found to be highly active against mosquito larvae and are widely used for vector control. Bt subsp. jegathesan is another strain which possesses high potency against broad range of mosquito larvae. The present review summarizes characterized receptors for Cry toxins in mosquito larvae, and will also discuss the diversity and effects of 3-D mosquitocidal Cry toxin and the ongoing research for Cry toxin mechanisms generated from investigations of lepidopteran and dipteran larvae.

  7. Luminal proteinases from Plodia interpunctella and the hydrolysis of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIA(c) protoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, B; Kramer, K J; Johnson, D; Upton, S J; Mcgaughey, W H

    1996-06-01

    The ability of proteinases in gut extracts of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella, to hydrolyze Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protoxin, casein, and rho-nitroanilide substrates was investigated. A polyclonal antiserum to protoxin CryIA(c) was used in Western blots to demonstrate slower protoxin processing by gut enzymes from Bt subspecies entomocidus-resistant larvae than enzymes from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant strains. Enzymes from all three strains hydrolyzed N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine rho-nitroanilide, N-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-phenylalanine rho-nitroanilide, and N-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-leucine rho-nitroanilide. Zymograms and activity blots were used to estimate the apparent molecular masses, number of enzymes, and relative activities in each strain. Several serine proteinase inhibitors reduced gut enzyme activities, with two soybean trypsin inhibitors, two potato inhibitors, and chymostatin the most effective in preventing protoxin hydrolysis.

  8. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Deng; Qi Peng; Fuping Song; Didier Lereclus

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcr...

  9. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic and post-translational levels.

  10. Vip3A is responsible for the potency of Bacillus thuringiensis 9816C culture supernatant against Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera exigua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Xiao, Liang; Yan, Bing; Bin, Guan; Chen, Yuehua; Ren, Gaixin

    2006-04-01

    Culture supernatant of Bacillus thuringiensis 9816C had high toxicity against Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera exigua. However, it lost insecticidal activities after being bathed in boiling water for 5 min. Acrystalliferous mutants of Bt9816C (Bt9816C-NP1 and Bt9816C-NP2) cured of its endogenous plasmids no longer possessed vip3A gene and toxicity. The 89 kD protein which existed in Bt9816C supernatant disappeared in the two mutants' supernatant; nevertheless, the two mutants still exhibited hemolytic and phospholipase C activity as Bt9816C did. The vip3A gene of Bt9816C, vip3Aa18, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. Bioassay demonstrated that the recombinant E. coli had high toxicity against S. exigua. Taken together, it suggested that Vip3A protein was responsible for the toxicity of Bt9816C culture supernatants.

  11. Microcalorimetric Studies on Influence of Sm3+, Dy3+ on Growth and Sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵儒铭; 刘义; 杨昌英; 谢志雄; 沈萍; 屈松生

    2004-01-01

    By using an LKB-2277 Bioactivity Monitor and cycle-flow method, the thermogenic curves of aerobic growth for Bacillus thuringiensis cry Ⅱ strain at 28 ℃ have been obtained. The metabolic thermogenic curves of Bt cry Ⅱ contain two distinct parts: the first part reflects the changes of bacterial growth phase and the second part corresponds to sporulation phase. From these thermogenic curves in the absence or presence of Sm3+, Dy3+ ions, the thermokinetic parameters such as the growth rate constants k, the interval time τI, the maximum power PMAxl and heat-output QLoG for log phase, the maximum power PMAX2 and heat-output QSTAT for stationary phase, the heat-output QSPOR for sporulation phase and total heat effects QT were calculated. Sm3+ and Dy3+ ions have promoting action on the growth of Bt cry Ⅱ in their lower concentration range, on the other hand, they have inhibitory action on the sporulation of Bt in their higher concentration range. It has also been found that the effects of Sm3+ and Dy3+ ions on Bt during the sporulation phase were far greater than those during the bacterial growth phase. It was concluded that the application of Bt for controlling insecticide could not be affected by the presence of the rare-earth elements in the environmental ecosystem.

  12. Development of photoperiod- and thermo-sensitive male sterility rice expressing transgene Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Jiwen; Zhang, Cuicui; Wang, Liangchao; Chen, Hao; Zhu, Zengrong; Tu, Jumin

    2015-01-01

    Stem borers and leaffolders are the main pests that cause severe damage in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production worldwide. We developed the first photoperiod- and thermo-sensitive male sterility (PTSMS) rice 208S with the cry1Ab/1Ac Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) gene, through sexual crossing with Huahui 1 (elite line with the cry1Ab/1Ac gene). The novel 208S and its hybrids presented high and stable resistance to stem borers and leaffolders, and the content of Cry1Ab/1Ac protein in chlorophyllous tissues achieved the identical level as donor and showed little accumulation in non-chlorophyllous tissue. No dominant dosage effect in the Bt gene was observed in 208S and its derived hybrids. An analysis of fertility transition traits indicated that 208S was completely sterile under long day length/high temperature, but partially fertile under short day length/low temperature. With fine grain quality and favorable combining ability, 208S had no observed negative effects on fertility and agronomic traits from Bt (cry1Ab/1Ac). Additionally, 208S as a male sterile line showed no fertility decrease caused by Bt transgenic process, as it is the case in Huahui 1. Thus, 208S has great application value in two-line hybrid production for insect resistance, and can also be used as a bridge material in rice Bt transgenic breeding. PMID:26366116

  13. Diversity of Bacillus thuringiensis isolated from Western Ghats of Tamil Nadu State, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalakshmi, A; Udayasuriyan, V

    2010-07-01

    The Western Ghats of India is the one of the world's 10 "Hottest biodiversity hotspots" that runs along the western part of India through four states including Tamil Nadu. The only biodiversity reserve in the Western Ghats is the Nilgiri biosphere located in the Tamil Nadu state. In the present study, 525 soil samples were collected from all the 14 different divisions of the Western Ghats in Tamil Nadu state, India. A total of 316 new isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that produce parasporal crystalline inclusions were isolated from 525 soil samples. Seven different types of crystalline inclusions were observed in the 316 new isolates of Bt. Cuboidal inclusion was predominantly present in 26.9% of the Bt isolates when compared to other shapes. Further characterization of 70 of the 316 Bt isolates for crystal protein profile through SDS-PAGE revealed six different types of crystal protein profile viz., 135 and 65, 135, 95, 65, 43, and 30 kDa crystal proteins. Variation in the mass of crystal protein(s) purified from the isolates of Bt revealed molecular diversity of this bacterium prevalent in the Western Ghats of Tamil Nadu, India.

  14. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Bacillus thuringiensis against dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, A Najitha; Balasubramanian, C; Moorthi, P Vinayaga

    2014-01-01

    The present study reveals the larvicidal activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) against Aedes aegypti responsible for the diseases of public health importance. The Bt-AgNPs were characterized by using UV-visible spectrophotometer followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. A surface plasmon resonance spectrum of AgNps was obtained at 420 nm. The particle sizes were measured through SEM imaging ranging from 43.52 to 142.97 nm. The Bt-AgNPs has also given a characteristic peak at 3 keV in EDX image. Interestingly, the mortality rendered by Bt-AgNPs was comparatively high than that of the control against third-instar larvae of A. aegypti (LC50 0.10 ppm and LC90 0.39 ppm) in all the tested concentrations, viz. 0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12, and 0.15 ppm. Hence, Bt-AgNPs would be significantly used as a potent mosquito larvicide against A. aegypti.

  15. Pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis isolated from two species of Acromyrmex (Hymenoptera, Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. N. Pinto

    Full Text Available The control of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants is necessary due to the severe damage they cause to diverse crops. A possibility was to control them using the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt that characteristically produces insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs. The ICPs have been effective in controlling lepidopterans, dipterans, and coleopterans, but their action against hymenopterans is unknown. This paper describes an attempt to isolate Bt from ants of two Acromyrmex species, to evaluate its pathogenicity towards these ants, and to test isolates by PCR. Bacterial isolates of Bt obtained from A. crassispinus and A. lundi have been assayed against A. lundi in the laboratory. The bioassays were carried out in BOD at 25°C, with a 12-hour photoperiod, until the seventh day after treatment. The Bt isolates obtained were submitted to total DNA extraction and tested by PCR with primers specific to cry genes. The results showed Bt presence in 40% of the assessed samples. The data from the in vivo assays showed a mortality rate higher than 50% in the target population, with the Bt HA48 isolate causing 100% of corrected mortality. The PCR results of Bt isolates showed a magnification of DNA fragments relative to cry1 genes in 22% of the isolates, and cry9 in 67%. Cry2, cry3, cry7, and cry8 genes were not detected in the tested samples, and 22% had no magnified DNA fragments corresponding to the assessed cry genes. The results are promising not only regarding allele identification in new isolates, but also fort the assays aimed at determining the Bt HA48 LC50's, which can eventually be applied in controlling of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants.

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis: mechanism of action, resistance, and new applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, André Luiz de Almeida; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Since the first report by Ishiwata in 1902 of a Bombyx mori infection, followed by the description by Berliner, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has become the main microorganism used in biological control. The application of Bt to combat invertebrates of human interest gained momentum with the growing demand for food free of chemical pesticides and with the implementation of agriculture methods that were less damaging to the environment. However, the mechanisms of action of these products have not been fully elucidated. There are two proposed models: the first is that Bt causes an osmotic imbalance in response to the formation of pores in a cell membrane, and the second is that it causes an opening of ion channels that activate the process of cell death. There are various ways in which Bt resistance can develop: changes in the receptors that do not recognize the Cry toxin, the synthesis of membrane transporters that eliminate the peptides from the cytosol and the development of regulatory mechanisms that disrupt the production of toxin receptors. Besides the potential for formulation of biopesticides and the use in developing genetically modified cultivars, recent studies with Bt have discussed promising applications in other branches of science. Chitinase, an enzyme that degrades chitin, increases the efficiency of Bt insecticides, and there has been of increasing interest in the industry, given that its substrate is extremely abundant in nature. Another promising field is the potential for Bt proteins to act against cancer cells. Parasporins, toxins of Bt that do not have an entomopathogenic effect, have a cytotoxic effect on the cells changed by some cancers. This demonstrates the potential of the microorganism and new opportunities opening for future applications.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain 407 Cry-

    OpenAIRE

    Poehlein, Anja; Liesegang, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen that has been used widely as a biopesticide. Here, we report the genome sequence of strain 407 Cry-, which is used to study the genetic determinants of pathogenicity. The genome consists of a 5.5-Mb chromosome and nine plasmids, including a novel 502-kb megaplasmid.

  18. Biochemical and molecular study of the Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vip3A) mode of action in Spodoptera species

    OpenAIRE

    Chakroun, Maissa

    2015-01-01

    Las proteínas insecticidas vegetativas (Vip) constituyen una nueva familia de toxinas producidas durante la fase de crecimiento vegetativo de diferentes cepas de Bacillus y principalmente por Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Esta familia de proteínas está representada por 4 miembros: Vip1, Vip2, Vip3 y la recientemente descrita Vip4. Las toxinas binarias Vip1 y Vip2 son activas contra coleópteros y homópteros; las proteínas Vip3 son activas contra lepidópteros, sin embargo, los insectos diana par...

  19. A selective chromogenic agar that distinguishes Bacillus anthracis from Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergensmeyer, Margaret A; Gingras, Bruce A; Restaino, Lawrence; Frampton, Elon W

    2006-08-01

    A selective and differential plating medium, R & F anthracis chromogenic agar (ACA), has been developed for isolating and identifying presumptive colonies of Bacillus anthracis. ACA contains the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indoxyl-choline phosphate that upon hydrolysis yields teal (blue green) colonies indicating the presence of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) activity. Among seven Bacillus species tested on ACA, only members of the Bacillus cereus group (B. anthracis, B. cereus, and B. thuringiensis) produced teal colonies (PC-PLC positive) having cream rings. Examination of colony morphology in 18 pure culture strains of B. anthracis (15 ATCC strains plus AMES-1-RIID, ANR-1, and AMED-RIID), with one exception, required 48 h at 35 to 37 degrees C for significant color production, whereas only 24 h was required for B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This differential rate of PC-PLC synthesis in B. anthracis (due to the truncated plcR gene and PlcR regulator in B. anthracis) allowed for the rapid differentiation on ACA of presumptive colonies of B. anthracis from B. cereus and B. thuringiensis in both pure and mixed cultures. Effective recovery of B. anthracis from a variety of matrices having both high (soil and sewage) and low microbial backgrounds (cloth, paper, and blood) spiked with B. anthracis ANR-1 spores suggests the probable utility of ACA plating for B. anthracis recovery in a diversity of applications.

  20. 40 CFR 180.1107 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delta endotoxin of Bacillus... From Tolerances § 180.1107 Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into... Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens is exempt from...

  1. Occurrence and diversity of mosquitocidal strains of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Balaraman

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the discovery of the first Bacillus thuringiensis strain capable of killing mosquito larvae,namely, B. thuringiensis var israelensis, there are several reports from different parts of the worldabout the occurrence of mosquitocidal strains belonging to different subspecies/serotypes numberingthirty-six. The main sources of these wild type strains are soils/sediments, plants, animal feces,sick/moribund insects and waters. The toxicity of the strains within a subspecies/serotype variedwidely. Some of the strains exhibited toxicity to mosquitoes as well as lepidopterans and dipterans(including mosquitoes as well as plant parasitic nematodes.

  2. [Screening of Bacillus thuringiensis strains containing vip3A genes and analysis of gene conservation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Wu; Tang, Li-Xia; Song, Shao-Yun; Yuan, Mei-Jin; Pang, Yi

    2003-09-01

    Vip3A, a novel insecticidal protein, is secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) during vegetative growth. Vip3A protein possesses insecticidal activity against a wild spectrum of lepidopteran insect larvae. Since the first cloning of vip3A gene from Bt, many other vip3A genes have been isolated. To investigate vip3A genes contribution to Bt and reflect the revolution relationships, the strains containing vip3A genes were screened and gene similarity was analyzed. 114 wild-type Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains isolated from different regions and 41 standard Bt strains from the Institute of Pasteur were screened for the vip3A genes using PCR amplification. 39 strains including B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk) HD-1 were found to contain the vip3A genes. Because acrystallerous strain Cry- B derived from Btk HD-1 was proved not to contain vip3A gene, it suppose that the vip3A gene may be located at the plasmids. Vip3A proteins expressed in these strains were detected with polyclonal antibody by Western blot and 4 strains among them were shown not to express the Vip3A proteins. The vip3A genes amplified from wild-type Bacillus thuringiensis strains S101 and 611 with different levels of activity against lepidopteran insect larvae were cloned into pGEM-T Easy vector. Alignment of these 2 putative Vip3A proteins with 6 others (Vip3A (a), Vip3A(b), Vip3A-S, Vip3A-S184, Vip83 and Vip3V) in the GenBank data base and 2 reported Vip3A proteins (Vip14 and Vip15) showed that vip3A genes are highly conservative. The plasmids pOTP-S101 and pOTP-611 were constructed by in- serting 2 vip3A genes (vip3A-S101 and vip3A-611) into the expression vector pQE30 respectively and were transformed into E. coli M15. E. coli M15 cells harboring the pOTP plasmids were induced with 1 mmol/L IPTG to express 89 kDa protein. Experiments showed that the level of soluble proteins of Vip3A-S101 in E. coli M15[pOTP-S101] and Vip3A-611 in E. coli M15 [pOTP-611] were about 48% and 35% respectively

  3. Bacillus thuringiensis isolates entomopathogenic for Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae and Anticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gobatto

    Full Text Available Samples of the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt were collected from soil and insects. Eight isolates were selected from rural soil, 15 from urban soil and 11 from insects. These were evaluated for entomopathogenicity against larvae of Anticarsia gemmatalis and Culex quinquefasciatus. The pathogenicity tests showed that a higher percentage of isolates were active against A. gemmatalis (60% compared to C. quinquefasciatus (31%. Probit analysis (LC50 indicated that against A. gemmatalis four of the isolates presented values similar to the reference strain against A. gemmatalis, while against C. quinquefasciatus one isolate showed an LC50 similar to the reference strain (IPS-82. SDS-PAGE characterisation of two isolates showed a 27 kDa protein fraction related to the Bt subspecies israelensis cytolytic toxin (cyt gene. One 130 kDa protein, possibly related to the Bt crystal inclusions (cry1 gene, was identified in the other two isolates, which were more toxic for lepidoptera; another isolate presented a protein of 100 kDa. Some new local Bt isolates had similar LC50 probit values to the reference strains.

  4. Division of labour and terminal differentiation in a novel Bacillus thuringiensis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Slamti, Leyla; Raymond, Ben; Liu, Guiming; Lemy, Christelle; Gominet, Myriam; Yang, Jingni; Wang, Hengliang; Peng, Qi; Zhang, Jie; Lereclus, Didier; Song, Fuping

    2015-02-01

    A major challenge in bacterial developmental biology has been to understand the mechanisms underlying cell fate decisions. Some differentiated cell types display cooperative behaviour. Cooperation is one of the greatest mysteries of evolutionary biology and microbes have been considered as an excellent system for experimentally testing evolution theories. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a spore-forming bacterium, which is genetically closely related to B. anthracis, the agent of anthrax, and to B. cereus, an opportunistic human pathogen. The defining feature that distinguishes Bt from its relatives is its ability to produce crystal inclusions in the sporulating cells. These toxins are solubilized after ingestion and are cooperative public goods in insect hosts. In this study, we describe a Bt strain LM1212 that presents the unique ability to terminally differentiate into crystal producers and spore formers. Transcriptional analysis based on lacZ and gfp reporter genes suggested that this phenotype is the consequence of a new type of cell differentiation associated with a novel regulation mode of cry gene expression. The differentiating crystal-producer phenotype has higher spore productivity than a typical Bt strain and is better able to compete with Cry toxin null 'cheaters'. Potentially, this division of labour provides additional fitness benefits in terms of spore viability or durability of Cry toxin.

  5. A single type of cadherin is involved in Bacillus thuringiensis toxicity in Plutella xylostella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y; Herrero, S; Kim, Y

    2015-12-01

    Cadherins have been described as one the main functional receptors for the toxins of the entomopathogenic bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). With the availability of the whole genome of Plutella xylostella, different types of cadherins have been annotated. In this study we focused on determining those members of the cadherin-related proteins that potentially play a role in the mode of action of Bt toxins. For this, we mined the genome of P. xylostella to identify these putative cadherins. The genome screening revealed 52 genes that were annotated as cadherin or cadherin-like genes. Further analysis revealed that six of these putative cadherins had three motifs common to all Bt-related cadherins: a signal peptide, cadherin repeats and a transmembrane domain. From the six selected cadherins, only P. xylostella cadherin 1 (PxCad1) was expressed in the larval midgut and only the silencing of this gene by RNA interference (double-stranded RNA feeding) reduce toxicity and binding to the midgut of the Cry1Ac type toxin from Bt. These results indicate that from the whole set of cadherin-related genes identified in P. xylostella, only PxCad1 is associated with the Cry1Ac mode of action.

  6. Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance mechanisms among Lepidoptera: progress on genomic approaches to uncover causal mutations in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Brad S

    2016-06-01

    Transgenic plants that express Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal (Cry) protein toxins (Bt crops) effectively control feeding by the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, although documented resistance evolution among a number of species in both the laboratory and field has heightened concerns about the durability of this technology. Research has provided major insights into the mutations that alter Bt toxin binding receptor structure and function within the midgut of Lepidoptera that directly impacts the efficacy of Bt toxins, and potentially leads to the evolution of resistance to Bt crops in the field. In this manuscript we provide an overview of available data on the identification of genes involved in high levels of resistance to Cry toxins, with emphasis on resistance described for O. nubilalis as the main target of Bt corn.

  7. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gillis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteriophages (phages have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here.

  8. 蛋白改造提高苏云金杆菌杀虫活力的研究进展%Advances in Enhancing the Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis with Protein Modification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王发祥; 刘永乐; 丁学知; 夏立秋

    2009-01-01

    苏云金杆菌(Bt)已被广泛应用于农林害虫防治,但传统制剂仍然存在很大局限性,利用蛋白质工程对其改造能有效的克服这些缺点.主要概述了近年来利用结构域转换和定点突变技术改造Bt Cry蛋白并增强其杀虫活性的研究进展.%Bacillus thuringiensis( Bt) has been widely used as a biopesticide in agriculture, forestry and mosquito control, but wild Bt strains still have many disadvantages, which can be resolved by protein engineering of the Bt 8-endotoxins. In this review, the recent progress in enhancing the toxicity or broadening insecticidal spectrum of Bacillus thuringiensis by technologies such as swapping domains and site-directed mutagenesis, were summarized.

  9. Use of Bacillus thuringiensis supernatant from a fermentation process to improve bioremediation of chlorpyrifos in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-Diez, Angel E; Estrada-Castañeda, Kelly J; Castañeda-Sandoval, Laura M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the potential of a nutrient-rich organic waste, namely the cell-free supernatant of Bacillus thuringiensis (BtS) gathered from fermentation, as a biostimulating agent to improve and sustain microbial populations and their enzymatic activities, thereby assisting in the bioremediation of chlorpyrifos-contaminated soil at a high dose (70 mg kg(-1)). Experiments were performed for up to 80 d. Chlorpyrifos degradation and its major metabolic product, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); total microbial populations were enumerated by direct counts in specific medium; and fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis was measured as an index of soil microbial activity. Throughout the experiment, there was higher chlorpyrifos degradation in soil supplemented with BtS (83.1%) as compared to non-supplemented soil. TCP formation and degradation occurred in all soils, but the greatest degradation (30.34%) was observed in soil supplemented with BtS. The total microbial populations were significantly improved by supplementation with BtS. The application of chlorpyrifos to soil inhibited the enzymatic activity; however, this negative effect was counteracted by BtS, inducing an increase of approximately 16% in FDA hydrolysis. These results demonstrate the potential of B. thuringiensis supernatant as a suitable biostimulation agent for enhancing chlorpyrifos and TCP biodegradation in chlorpyrifos-contaminated soils.

  10. Production of Protocatechuic Acid in Bacillus Thuringiensis ATCC33679

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca L. Garner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Protocatechuic acid, or 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, is produced by both soil and marine bacteria in the free form and as the iron binding component of the siderophore petrobactin. The soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki ATCC 33679, contains the asb operon, but does not produce petrobactin. Iron restriction resulted in diminished B. thuringiensis kurstaki ATCC 33679 growth and the production of catechol(s. The gene product responsible for protocatechuic acid (asbF and its receptor (fatB were expressed during stationary phase growth. Gene expression varied with growth temperature, with optimum levels occurring well below the Bacillus anthracis virulence temperature of 37 °C. Regulation of protocatechuic acid suggests a possible role for this compound during soil growth cycles.

  11. Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Strain KB1, a Potential Biocontrol Agent against Phytopathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Jo, Sung Hee; Hong, Chi Eun; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is the most widely known microbial pesticide used in agricultural applications. Herein, we report a draft genome sequence of the endophytic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis strain KB1, which exhibits antagonism against phytopathogens.

  12. Photoprotection of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki from ultraviolet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, E.; Rozen, H.; Joseph, T.; Braun, S.; Margulies, L. (Department of Entomology, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel))

    1991-05-01

    Irradiation of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD1 at 300-350 nm for up to 12 hr using a photochemical reactor results in a rapid loss of its toxicity to larvae of Heliothis armigera. Photoprotection of the toxic component was obtained by adsorption of cationic chromophores such as acriflavin (AF), methyl green, and rhodamine B to B. thuringiensis. AF gave the best photoprotection and a level of 0.42 mmol/g dye absorbed per gram of B. thuringiensis was highly toxic even after 12 hr of ultraviolet (uv) irradiation as compared to the control (77.5 and 5% of insect mortality, respectively). Ultraviolet and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic studies indicate molecular interactions between B. thuringiensis and AF. The nature of these interactions and energy or charge transfer as possible mechanisms of photoprotection are discussed. It is speculated that tryptophan residues are essential for the toxic effect of B. thuringiensis. It is suggested that photoprotection is attained as energy is transferred from the excited tryptophan moieties to the chromophore molecules.

  13. SinR controls enterotoxin expression in Bacillus thuringiensis biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fagerlund

    Full Text Available The entomopathogen Bacillus thuringiensis produces dense biofilms under various conditions. Here, we report that the transition phase regulators Spo0A, AbrB and SinR control biofilm formation and swimming motility in B. thuringiensis, just as they control biofilm formation and swarming motility in the closely related saprophyte species B. subtilis. However, microarray analysis indicated that in B. thuringiensis, in contrast to B. subtilis, SinR does not control an eps operon involved in exopolysaccharides production, but regulates genes involved in the biosynthesis of the lipopeptide kurstakin. This lipopeptide is required for biofilm formation and was previously shown to be important for survival in the host cadaver (necrotrophism. Microarray analysis also revealed that the SinR regulon contains genes coding for the Hbl enterotoxin. Transcriptional fusion assays, Western blots and hemolysis assays confirmed that SinR controls Hbl expression, together with PlcR, the main virulence regulator in B. thuringiensis. We show that Hbl is expressed in a sustained way in a small subpopulation of the biofilm, whereas almost all the planktonic population transiently expresses Hbl. The gene coding for SinI, an antagonist of SinR, is expressed in the same biofilm subpopulation as hbl, suggesting that hbl transcription heterogeneity is SinI-dependent. B. thuringiensis and B. cereus are enteric bacteria which possibly form biofilms lining the host intestinal epithelium. Toxins produced in biofilms could therefore be delivered directly to the target tissue.

  14. Genome Sequences of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar kurstaki Strain BP865 and B. thuringiensis Serovar aizawai Strain HD-133

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Haeyoung

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the draft genome sequences of two insecticidal strains against lepidopteran pests, Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki strain BP865, an isolate from the South Korean phylloplane, and strain HD-133, a reference strain of B. thuringiensis serovar aizawai. PMID:28153898

  15. Analysis of cry 1Ca gene from Bacillus thuringiensis strains with high insecticidal activity against Spodoptera exigua%对甜菜夜蛾具有杀虫活性的Bt 菌株cry1Ca 基因研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王杨; 周子珊; 刘永磊; 韩榕; 张林静; 张杰

    2016-01-01

    One pair of degenerate primers,designed based upon the 14 known sequences of cry 1Ca genes,was used to identify cry 1Ca genes from 472 wild isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis screened in our laboratory,and there were 22 isolates containing cry 1Ca genes.Five patterns of restriction fragment were obtained by the analysis of cry gene diversity depended on PCR-RFLP,indicating that 22 B .thuringiensis isolates could be classified as five types.SDS-PAGE analysis results showed that a main protein band with approximate 130 ku molecular mass was detected in each strain.Western Blotting analysis results also demonstrated that Cry1Ca proteins were expressed normally in all of the 22 strains.The preliminary bioassay was conducted with trypsin-activated Cry proteins ex-tracted from 22 Bt isolates against the neonate larvae of Spodoptera exigua (Hübner).The results showed that all of these strains hade high insecticidal activity against target larvae.The LC50 values of the five selected Bt isolates representing five types against S .exigua were measured,and the results indicated that the toxicity of the five strains was very high;the insecticidal activity of the strains T1-E12 (0.087 μg/g),B16-C8 (0.103 μg/g)and T1-B8 (0.202 μg/g)was similar to that of the positive strain G03 (0.090 μg/g),and these strains have great potential for commercialization.Our findings will lay the foundation for discovery of novel B .thuringiensis isolates.%根据已报道的14个 cry1Ca 基因,设计能够扩增 cry1Ca 全长基因的简并引物。利用该引物对本实验室分离的472株 Bt 菌株进行筛选。PCR 扩增发现22株菌含有 cry1Ca 基因。对22株菌株进行 cry 基因多样性分析,结果获得5种类型酶切图谱,表明这些菌株分为5种类型。SDS-PAGE 结果显示22株菌均表达约130 ku 的蛋白。Western Blotting 结果证实这些株菌中 cry1Ca 基因均正常表达。提取菌株的晶体蛋白,经胰蛋白

  16. Evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins insecticidal activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; García-Gómez, Blanca Ines; Rodriguez-Almazan, Claudia; Pardo, Liliana; Soberón, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis are use worldwide in transgenic crops for efficient pest control. Among the family of Cry toxins, the three domain Cry family is the better characterized regarding their natural evolution leading to a large number of Cry proteins with similar structure, mode of action but different insect specificity. Also, this group is the better characterized regarding the study of their mode of action and the molecular basis of insect specificit...

  17. Cytolytic Toxin and Related Genes in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Dong-lai; LI Yi-dan; GAO Ji-guo

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a ubiquitous gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium that forms parasporal crystal during the stationary phase of its growth cycle. These crystal proteins, including Cry and Cyt protein, are toxic to certain insects. Lately, some problems about Cyt classification, structural characteristic, action mechanism and resistance to Cyt toxin are becoming new hotspots. We review the progress of above problems in several foreign labs.

  18. Isolation and characterization of a novel native Bacillus thuringiensis strain BRC-HZM2 capable of degrading chlorpyrifos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songqing; Peng, Yan; Huang, Zhangmin; Huang, Zhipeng; Xu, Lei; Ivan, Gelbič; Guan, Xiong; Zhang, Lingling; Zou, Shuangquan

    2015-03-01

    Studies were carried out to isolate chlorpyrifos degrading Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains from chlorpyrifos-contaminated samples. Six Bt strains (isolation rate 2.7%) were isolated by modified sodium acetate antibiotic heat treatment, and one novel strain (BRC-HZM2) was selected for further analysis. Phenotype and phylogeny analysis of this strain was conducted on the basis of biochemical reactions, antibiotic sensitivity, 16s rRNA genes, plasmid profile, insecticidal crystal protein profiles, and PCR-RFLP for cry and cyt genes. The degradation rate of chlorpyrifos in liquid culture was estimated during 48 h of incubation for the isolate BRC-HZM2. More than 50% of the initial chlorpyrifos concentration degraded within 12 h, 88.9% after 48 h. These results highlight the potential of the Bt strain for biological control and the bioremediation of environments contaminated with chlorpyrifos.

  19. Effects of Ionic Strength and Sesquioxides on Adsorption of Toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp, kurstaki on Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Qing-Ling; PENG Ya-Wen; HUANG Tao; HU Hong-Qing; DENG Ya-Li; YU Xia

    2012-01-01

    Chemical reactions and fate of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in the soil environment are causing increasing concerns due to the large-scale cultivation of transgenic Bt plants.In this study,the effect of ionic strength (0-1000 mmol kg-1) adjusted by NaCl or CaCl2 on adsorption of Bt toxin by a lateritic red soil,a paddy soil and these soils after chemical removal of organic-bound or free Fe and Al oxides,as well as by pure minerals (goethite,hematite and gibbsite) which are widespread in these soils,were studied.The results indicated that when the supporting electrolyte was NaCl,the adsorption of Bt toxin by the lateritic red soil and paddy soil increased rapidly until the ionic strength reached 250 mmol kg- 1 and then gradually slowed down with the increase of ionic strength; while in case the supporting electrolyte was CaCl2,the adsorption of Bt toxin enhanced significantly at low ionic strength (< 10 mmol kg-1) and then decreased as the ionic strength increased.The adsorption of Bt toxin by the tested minerals and soils after the removal of organic-bound or free Fe and Al oxides also increased with increasing ionic strength controlled by NaC1.Removing organic-bound Fe and Al oxides obviously increased the adsorption of Bt toxin in the tested soils.Differently,removing free Fe and Al oxides increased the Bt adsorption by the paddy soil,but decreased the adsorption by the lateritic red soil.The study indicated that the varieties of ionic strength and the presence of Fe and Al oxides affected the adsorption of Bt toxin by the soils,which would contribute to the further understanding of the fate of Bt toxin in the soil environment and provide references for the ecological risk assessment of transgenic Bt plants.

  20. [Bioconversion of sewage sludge to biopesticide by Bacillus thuringiensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming; Zhou, Shun-gui; Lu, Na; Ni, Jin-ren

    2006-07-01

    Feasibility of bioconversion of sewage sludge to biopesticide by Bacillus thuringiensis was studied using sewage sludge as a raw material. The fermentation was also compared with conventional medium. Results showed that without any pretreatment, the nutrients contained in sewage sludge were almost sufficient for Bacillus thuringiensis growth, even with a rapid multiplicational rate. Higher viable cells and viable spores values were obtained earlier at 24 h, with 9.48 x 10(8) CFU x mL(-1) and 8.51 x 10(8) CFU x mL(-1) respectively, which was 12 hours earlier and nearly 20 percent higher than conventional medium. SEM of 36 h samples gave a clear phenomenon that the metabolizability in sludge was much faster with spores and crystals spreading around. The crystals in sludge seemed rather bigger and more regular. Also a better crystal protein yield of 2.80 mg x mL(-1) was observed in sludge medium compared to conventional medium at the end of fermentation. Sludge fermentation for Bacillus thuringiensis reduces the producing cost, and gives better fermentation capabilities. It's expected to be a new method for sludge disposal.

  1. Biochemical, immunological and toxicological characteristics of the crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Orduz

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the insecticidal and hemolytic activity of solubilized crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt subsp. medellin (Btmed was performed and compared to solubilized crystal proteins of isolates 1884 of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti and isolate PG-14 of B. thuringiensis subsp. morrisoni (Btm. In general, at acid pH values solubilization of the Bt crystalline parasporal inclusions (CPI was lower than at alkaline pH. The larvicidal activity demonstrated by the CPI of Btmed indicated that optimal solubilization of CPI takes place at a pH value of 11.3, in Bti at pH values from 5.03 to 11.3 and in Btm at pH values from 9.05 to 11.3. Hemolytic activity against sheep red blood cells was mainly found following extraction at pH 11.3 in all Bt strains tested. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions revealed that optimal solubilization of the CPI in all Bt strains takes place at the alkaline pH values from 9.05 to 11.3. An enriched preparation of Btmed crystals was obtained, solubilized and crystal proteins were separated on a size exclusion column (Sephacryl S-200. Three main protein peaks were observed on the chromatogram. The first peak had two main proteins that migrate between 90 to 100 kDa. These proteins are apparently not common to other Bt strains isolated to date. The second and third peaks obtained from the size exclusion column yielded polypeptides of 68 and 28-30 kDa, respectively. Each peak independently, showed toxicity against 1st instar Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Interestingly, combinations of the fractions corresponding to the 68 and 30 kDa protein showed an increased toxicity. These results suggest that the 94 kDa protein is an important component of the Btmed toxins with the highest potency to kill mosquito larvae. When crystal proteins of Bti were probed with antisera raised independently against the three main protein fractions of Btmed, the only crystal protein that showed

  2. 40 CFR 174.517 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry9C protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry9C protein... PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.517 Bacillus thuringiensis... Bacillus thuringiensis Cry9C protein in corn is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for...

  3. 40 CFR 174.509 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.509 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein are...

  4. 40 CFR 174.502 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105 protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.502 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105 protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. (a) Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105 protein...

  5. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  6. A genetically modified broad-spectrum strain of Bacillus thuringiensis toxic against Holotrichia parallela, Anomala corpulenta and Holotrichia oblita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanhua; Zhao, Can; Wang, Qinglei; Shu, Changlong; Feng, Xiaojie; Song, Fuping; Zhang, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Cry8Ea1 from Bacillus thuringiensis strain Bt185 has insecticidal activity against Holotrichia parallela. Cry8Ca2 from strain HBF-1 is effective against Anomala corpulenta. Cry8Ga1 from strain HBF-18 is toxic to H. oblita. Given the need to broaden the spectrum of B. thuringiensis, a broad-spectrum coleopteran active strain of B. thuringiensis, BIOT185, engineered to express multiple cry genes, including cry8Ea1, cry8Fa1 and cry8Ca2, was created by homologous recombination introducing the cry8Ca2 into the B. thuringiensis strain Bt185 by Liu et al. (Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 87:243-249, 2010). To further broaden the spectrum, an engineered B. thuringiensis strain BIOT1858G was constructed by introducing the recombinant plasmid pSTK-8G containing cry8Ga1 into the engineered B. thuringiensis strain BIOT185. PCR and Southern blotting demonstrated that the cry8Ga1 gene was transferred to the novel strain BIOT1858G. SDS-PAGE and RT-PCR confirmed the normal expression and transcription of the cry8Ga1 gene in addition to the cry8Ea1, cry8Fa1 and cry8Ca2 genes. Bioassays of BIOT1858G indicated that the recombinant strain broadened the spectrum against not only H. parallela susceptible to the Cry8E protein and A. corpulenta susceptible to the Cry8C protein but also H. oblita susceptible to the Cry8G protein. The pesticide could also decrease the cost of production and field labor.

  7. SR450 and Superhawk XP applications of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis de Barjac against Culex quinquefasciatus Say

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprayer comparisons and larval morality assays were conducted following SR450 backpack mist blower and Superhawk XP thermal fogger applications of Vectobac® WDG Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) de Barjac against Culex quinquefasciatus Say. Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis was applied at m...

  8. [Characterization of crystal-forming bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tohokuensis toxic to mosquitos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyrev, V P; Kalmykova, G V; Burtseva, L I; Glupov, V V

    2006-01-01

    Distribution study of Bacillus thuringiensis strains in Western Siberian soils allowed us to isolate crystal-forming bacteria assigned to a new pathovar of Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. tohokuensis with a toxic effect on mosquito larvae. A description of this bacterial pathovar is presented.

  9. Sub-chronic lung inflammation after airway exposures to Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barfod Kenneth K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to assess possible health effects of airway exposures to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt based biopesticides in mice. Endpoints were lung inflammation evaluated by presence of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, clearance of bacteria from the lung lumen and histological alterations of the lungs. Hazard identifications of the biopesticides were carried out using intratracheal (i.t. instillation, followed by an inhalation study. The two commercial biopesticides used were based on the Bt. subspecies kurstaki and israelensis, respectively. Groups of BALB/c mice were i.t instilled with one bolus (3.5 × 105 or 3.4 × 106 colony forming units (CFU per mouse of either biopesticide. Control mice were instilled with sterile water. BALFs were collected and the inflammatory cells were counted and differentiated. The BALFs were also subjected to CFU counts. Results BALF cytology showed an acute inflammatory response dominated by neutrophils 24 hours after instillation of biopesticide. Four days after instillation, the neutrophil number was normalised and inflammation was dominated by lymphocytes and eosinophils, whereas 70 days after instillation, the inflammation was interstitially located with few inflammatory cells present in the lung lumen. Half of the instilled mice had remaining CFU recovered from BALF 70 days after exposure. To gain further knowledge with relevance for risk assessment, mice were exposed to aerosols of biopesticide one hour per day for 2 × 5 days. Each mouse received 1.9 × 104 CFU Bt israelensis or 2.3 × 103 CFU Bt kurstaki per exposure. Seventy days after end of the aerosol exposures, 3 out of 17 mice had interstitial lung inflammation. CFU could be recovered from 1 out of 10 mice 70 days after exposure to aerosolised Bt kurstaki. Plethysmography showed that inhalation of Bt aerosol did not induce airway irritation. Conclusions Repeated low dose aerosol

  10. Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins against eri silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep Kumar, Donthula; Tarakeswari, Muddanuru; Lakshminarayana, Maddukuri; Sujatha, Mulpuri

    2016-07-01

    Ten purified crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) were tested at concentrations ranging from 2.93 to 3000ng/cm(2) for their toxicity to eri silkworm through protein paint bioassays using castor leaves. Based on LC50 values, Cry1Aa (2.6ng/cm(2)) was highly toxic followed by Cry1Ac (29.3ng/cm(2)) and Cry1Ab (68.7ng/cm(2)). The Cry1Ca and Cry1Ea proteins were moderately toxic to eri silkworm larvae and resulted in 23% and 28% mortality, respectively at the highest concentration tested (3000ng/cm(2)). Only reduction in larval weight was observed with Cry2Aa, Cry1Da and Cry9Aa proteins while Cry3Aa and Cry1Ba proteins were found to be nontoxic.

  11. Proteolytic Activation of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab through a Belt-and-Braces Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lian; Pan, Zhi-Zhen; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Yu-Jing; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2016-09-28

    Proteolytic processing of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal toxins by insect midgut proteases plays an essential role in their insecticidal toxicities against target insects. In the present study, proteolysis of Bt crystal toxin Cry2Ab by Plutella xylostella L. midgut proteases (PxMJ) was evaluated. Both trypsin and chymotrypsin were identified involving the proteolytic activation of Cry2Ab and cleaving Cry2Ab at Arg(139) and Leu(144), respectively. Three Cry2Ab mutants (R139A, L144A, and R139A-L144A) were constructed by replacing residues Arg(139), Leu(144), and Arg(139)-Leu(144) with alanine. Proteolysis assays revealed that mutants R139A and L144A but not R139A-L144A could be cleaved into 50 kDa activated toxins by PxMJ. Bioassays showed that mutants R139A and L144A were highly toxic against P. xylostella larvae, while mutant R139A-L144A was almost non-insecticidal. Those results demonstrated that proteolysis by PxMJ was associated with the toxicity of Cry2Ab against P. xylostella. It also revealed that either trypsin or chymotrypsin was enough to activate Cry2Ab protoxin. This characteristic was regarded as a belt-and-braces approach and might contribute to the control of resistance development in target insects. Our studies characterized the proteolytic processing of Cry2Ab and provided new insight into the activation of this Bt toxin.

  12. Host-Pathogen Coevolution: The Selective Advantage of Bacillus thuringiensis Virulence and Its Cry Toxin Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Masri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocal coevolution between host and pathogen is widely seen as a major driver of evolution and biological innovation. Yet, to date, the underlying genetic mechanisms and associated trait functions that are unique to rapid coevolutionary change are generally unknown. We here combined experimental evolution of the bacterial biocontrol agent Bacillus thuringiensis and its nematode host Caenorhabditis elegans with large-scale phenotyping, whole genome analysis, and functional genetics to demonstrate the selective benefit of pathogen virulence and the underlying toxin genes during the adaptation process. We show that: (i high virulence was specifically favoured during pathogen-host coevolution rather than pathogen one-sided adaptation to a nonchanging host or to an environment without host; (ii the pathogen genotype BT-679 with known nematocidal toxin genes and high virulence specifically swept to fixation in all of the independent replicate populations under coevolution but only some under one-sided adaptation; (iii high virulence in the BT-679-dominated populations correlated with elevated copy numbers of the plasmid containing the nematocidal toxin genes; (iv loss of virulence in a toxin-plasmid lacking BT-679 isolate was reconstituted by genetic reintroduction or external addition of the toxins. We conclude that sustained coevolution is distinct from unidirectional selection in shaping the pathogen's genome and life history characteristics. To our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize the pathogen genes involved in coevolutionary adaptation in an animal host-pathogen interaction system.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain 4.0718 at Different Growth Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth process of Bacillus thuringiensis Bt4.0718 strain was studied using proteomic technologies. The proteins of Bt whole cells at three phases—middle vegetative, early sporulation, and late sporulation—were extracted with lysis buffer, followed with separation by 2-DE and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Bioactive factors such as insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs including Cry1Ac(3, Cry2Aa, and BTRX28, immune inhibitor (InhA, and InhA precursor were identified. InhA started to express at the middle vegetative phase, suggesting its contribution to the survival of Bt in the host body. At the early sporulation phase, ICPs started their expression. CotJC, OppA, ORF1, and SpoIVA related to the formation of crystals and spores were identified, the expression characteristics of which ensured the stable formation of crystals and spores. This study provides an important foundation for further exploration of the stable expression of ICPs, the smooth formation of crystals, and the construction of recombinant strains.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerase from Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yung-Lin; Lin, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chia-Lin; Shaw, Gwo-Chyuan; Liaw, Shwu-Huey

    2014-01-01

    Poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) is a microbial biopolymer that has been commercialized as biodegradable plastics. The key enzyme for the degradation is PHB depolymerase (PhaZ). A new intracellular PhaZ from Bacillus thuringiensis (BtPhaZ) has been screened for potential applications in polymer biodegradation. Recombinant BtPhaZ was crystallized using 25% polyethylene glycol 3350, 0.2 M ammonium acetate, 0.1 M bis-tris pH 6.5 at 288 K. The crystals belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.97, b = 83.23, c = 85.50 Å, α = 73.45, β = 82.83, γ = 83.49°. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 1.42 Å resolution with an R merge of 6.4%. Unexpectedly, a molecular-replacement solution was obtained using the crystal structure of Streptomyces lividans chloroperoxidase as a template, which shares 24% sequence identity to BtPhaZ. This is the first crystal structure of an intracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerase. PMID:25286954

  15. Current models of the mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Vincent; Laprade, Raynald; Schwartz, Jean-Louis

    2012-09-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins constitute the active ingredient in the most widely used biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. A clear understanding of their mode of action is necessary for improving these products and ensuring their continued use. Accordingly, a long history of intensive research has established that their toxic effect is due primarily to their ability to form pores in the plasma membrane of the midgut epithelial cells of susceptible insects. In recent years, a rather elaborate model involving the sequential binding of the toxins to different membrane receptors has been developed to describe the events leading to membrane insertion and pore formation. However, it was also proposed recently that, in contradiction with this mechanism, Bt toxins function by activating certain intracellular signaling pathways which lead to the necrotic death of their target cells without the need for pore formation. Because work in this field has largely focused, for several years, on the elaboration and promotion of these two models, the present revue examines in detail the experimental evidence on which they are based. It is concluded that the presently available information still supports the notion that Bt Cry toxins act by forming pores, but most events leading to their formation, following binding of the activated toxins to their receptors, remain relatively poorly understood.

  16. Transgenic organisms expressing genes from Bacillus thuringiensis to combat insect pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Borovsky, Dov; Boussiba, Sammy; Einav, Monica; Gindin, Galina; Horowitz, A Rami; Kolot, Mikhail; Melnikov, Olga; Mendel, Zvi; Yagil, Ezra

    2010-01-01

    Various subspecies (ssp.) of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are considered the best agents known so far to control insects, being highly specific and safe, easily mass produced and with long shelf life.1 The para-crystalline body that is produced during sporulation in the exosporium includes polypeptides named δ-endotoxins, each killing a specific set of insects. The different entomopathogenic toxins of various Bt ssp. can be manipulated genetically in an educated way to construct more efficient transgenic bacteria or plants that express combinations of toxin genes to control pests.2 Joint research projects in our respective laboratories during the last decade demonstrate what can be done by implementing certain ideas using molecular biology with Bt ssp. israelensis (Bti) as a model system. Here, we describe our progress achieved with Gram-negative bacterial species, including cyanobacteria, and some preliminary experiments to form transgenic plants, mainly to control mosquitoes (Diptera), but also a particular Lepidopteran and Coleopteran pest species. In addition, a system is described by which environment-damaging genes can be removed from the recombinants thus alleviating procedures for obtaining permits to release them in nature.

  17. Bacillus thuringiensis membrane-damaging toxins acting on mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biopesticide in forestry and agriculture, being able to produce potent species-specific insecticidal toxins and considered nonpathogenic to other animals. More recently, however, repeated observations are documenting the association of this microorganism with various infectious diseases in humans, such as food-poisoning-associated diarrheas, periodontitis, bacteremia, as well as ocular, burn, and wound infections. Similar to B. cereus, B. thuringiensis produces an array of virulence factors acting against mammalian cells, such as phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC and PI-PLC), hemolysins, in particular hemolysin BL (HBL), and various enterotoxins. The contribution of some of these toxins to B. thuringiensis pathogenicity has been studied in animal models of infection, following intravitreous, intranasal, or intratracheal inoculation. These studies lead to the speculation that the activities of PC-PLC, PI-PLC, and HBL are responsible for most of the pathogenic properties of B. thuringiensis in nongastrointestinal infections in mammals. This review summarizes data regarding the biological activity, the genetic basis, and the structural features of these membrane-damaging toxins.

  18. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Ercolini, Danilo; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-08-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used bacterial entomopathogen producing insecticidal toxins, some of which are expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops. Surprisingly, the killing mechanism of B. thuringiensis remains controversial. In particular, the importance of the septicemia induced by the host midgut microbiota is still debated as a result of the lack of experimental evidence obtained without drastic manipulation of the midgut and its content. Here this key issue is addressed by RNAi-mediated silencing of an immune gene in a lepidopteran host Spodoptera littoralis, leaving the midgut microbiota unaltered. The resulting cellular immunosuppression was characterized by a reduced nodulation response, which was associated with a significant enhancement of host larvae mortality triggered by B. thuringiensis and a Cry toxin. This was determined by an uncontrolled proliferation of midgut bacteria, after entering the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. Consequently, the hemolymphatic microbiota dramatically changed upon treatment with Cry1Ca toxin, showing a remarkable predominance of Serratia and Clostridium species, which switched from asymptomatic gut symbionts to hemocoelic pathogens. These experimental results demonstrate the important contribution of host enteric flora in B. thuringiensis-killing activity and provide a sound foundation for developing new insect control strategies aimed at enhancing the impact of biocontrol agents by reducing the immunocompetence of the host.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar galleriae strain HD-29, a typical strain of commercial biopesticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Tian, Long-Jun; Zheng, Jinshui; Gao, Qiu-Ling; Wang, Yue-Ying; Peng, Dong-Hai; Ruan, Li-Fang; Sun, Ming

    2015-02-10

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar galleriae is highly toxic to Lepidoptera insect pests, and has been widely used as Bt biopesticide in many countries. Here we reported the complete genome of strain HD-29, a standard serotype strain in galleriae serovariety. More than previous work reported, it harbors ten plasmids, and three large ones carry eight insecticidal protein genes (cry1Aa, cry1Ac, cry1Ca, cry1Da, cry1Ia, cry2Ab, cry9Ea and vip3Aa) and an intact zwittermicin A biosynthetic gene cluster.

  20. Detecção e caracterização de proteínas parasporinas em Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Sabiá Júnior, Elias Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    A bactéria Gram-positiva Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) é amplamente conhecida devido à sua grande importância no controle biológico, graças à sua capacidade de produzir inclusões cristalinas formadas por proteínas inseticidas (Cry e Cyt), ativas contra um amplo espectro de insetos. Uma nova atividade foi relatada para cristais sem atividade inseticida, a citotoxicidade contra células cancerosas humanas. Essas proteínas citotóxicas, chamadas de Parasporinas (PS), não são hemolíticas e são estrut...

  1. Screen of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins for transgenic rice to control Sesamia inferens and Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yulin; Hu, Yang; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Oppert, Brenda; Lai, Fengxiang; Peng, Yufa; Zhang, Zhitao

    2010-09-01

    Transgenic rice to control stem borer damage is under development in China. To assess the potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenes in stem borer control, the toxicity of five Bt protoxins (Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ba and Cry1Ca) against two rice stem borers, Sesamia inferens (pink stem borer) and Chilo suppressalis (striped stem borer), was evaluated in the laboratory by feeding neonate larvae on artificial diets containing Bt protoxins. The results indicated that Cry1Ca exhibited the highest level of toxicity to both stem borers, with an LC(50) of 0.24 and 0.30 microg/g for C. suppressalis and S. inferens, respectively. However, S. inferens was 4-fold lower in susceptibility to Cry1Aa, and 6- and 47-fold less susceptible to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ba, respectively, compared to C. suppressalis. To evaluate interactions among Bt protoxins in stem borer larvae, toxicity assays were performed with mixtures of Cry1Aa/Cry1Ab, Cry1Aa/Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac/Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac/Cry1Ba, Cry1Ab/Cry1Ac, Cry1Ab/Cry1Ba, and Cry1Ab/Cry1Ca at 1:1 (w/w) ratios. All protoxin mixtures demonstrated significant synergistic toxicity activity against C. suppressalis, with values of 1.6- to 11-fold higher toxicity than the theoretical additive effect. Surprisingly, all but one of the Bt protoxin mixtures were antagonistic in toxicity to S. inferens. In mortality-time response experiments, S. inferens demonstrated increased tolerance to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac compared to C. suppressalis when treated with low or high protoxin concentrations. The data indicate the utility of Cry1Ca protoxin and a Cry1Ac/Cry1Ca mixture to control both stem borer populations.

  2. An ABC transporter mutation is correlated with insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Gahan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt-expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field.

  3. Methodology for fast evaluation of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Lúcia M. Carareto

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the production and use of Bacillus thuringiensis in Brazil at a commercial scale faces certain difficulties, among them the establishment of efficient methodologies for the quantitation of toxic products to be commercialized. Presently, the amount of toxin is given in percentage by analyzing the samples total protein content. Such methodology however, does not measure the actual amount of active protein present in the product, since most strains express different endotoxin genes and might even produce b-toxin. Since the various types of toxins exhibit different antigenic characteristics, this work has as objective the utilization of fast immunological techniques to quantify the level of crystal protein. Crystal protein produced by a subspecies of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis was purified by ultracentrifugation and utilized to immunize rabbits and to produce hiperimmune sera. Such sera were latter used to evaluate the level of proteins on commercial bioinsecticide and on laboratory cultures of B. thuringiensis through the immunodot technique. The results were obtained by comparison of data obtained from reactions with known concentrations of crystal protein permitting to evaluate the level of such protein on various materials.

  4. Relationship between chemical properties of the soil and the occurrence of Bacillus thuringiensis Relação entre as características químicas do solo e a ocorrência de Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Antonio Polanczyk

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The soil and other substrates such as mushroom compounds are the main sources of new Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt isolates for Integrated Pest Management programs. This study describes the relationship between chemical properties of the soil (pH, OM, P3+, K1+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H1++Al3+, B3+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Mn2+ and Zn2+ and the occurrence of Bt in Brazil. A total of 1,197 bacterial colonies were obtained, being 512 of them identified as Bt. The Bt index (iBt, which is the relation between Bt colonies and bacterial counts ranged from 0.18 to 0.86. The iBt may be expressed with the formula: iBt= -0.4 + 0.6Ca2+ + 0.07Cu2+ + 0.009Fe2+ - 0.53Mg2+ -0.12Mn2+ + 1.26Zn2+. A cluster of samples with fewer colonies and a high negative correlation (antagonism between Mn2+ and Ca2+; Mg2+ and Ca2+; Mg2+ and Zn2+; Mn2+ and Zn2+ and a high positive correlation (synergism between Mn2+ and Mg2+; Zn2+ and Ca2+ was observed. The relationship between these elements and their effect on the Bt presence are discussed.O solo e outros substratos, como restos vegetais são as principais fontes de obtenção de isolados de Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt para programas de Manejo Integrado de Pragas. Este estudo descreve uma investigação sobre a relação entre algumas propriedades químicas do solo (pH, MO, P3+, K1+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H1+ + Al3+, B3+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Mn2+ e Zn2+ e a ocorrência de Bt em solos do Brasil. Entre 1197 colônias bacterianas, 512 foram identificados como Bt. O índice de Bt (iBt, que é a relação entre o número de colônias de Bt e de colônias bacterianas, variou de 0,18 a 0,86. Os dados obtidos mostraram que o iBt pode ser representado pelo iBt da fórmula = -0,.4 + 0,6Ca2+ + 0,07Cu2+ + 0,009Fe2+ - 0,53Mg2+ -0,12Mn2+ + 1,26Zn2+. Observou-se o agrupamento das amostras com poucas colônias; uma correlação negativa elevada (antagonismo entre Mn2+ e Ca2+, Mg2+ e Ca2+, Mg2+ e Zn2+, Mn2+ e Zn2+; uma correlação positiva elevada (sinergismo entre Mn2+ e Mg2+, Zn2+ e

  5. Efficacy of single and double applications of Foray 48B (bacillus thuringiensis) against the gypsy moth (lymantria dispar l. ) in Ontario. Information report No. O-X-423

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    In May 1991, an experimental aerial spraying program was conducted in Pembroke District to compare the efficacy of single and double applications of Foray 48B (Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner) (B.t.) against gypsy moths. Two blocks were treated with a double application of 30 BIU/2.4L/ha and six blocks (three early and three late) were treated with a single application of 50 BIU/4 L/ha. This report gives the results of the program.

  6. Isolation and characterization of native Bacillus thuringiensis strains from Saudi Arabia with enhanced larvicidal toxicity against the mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae (s.l.).

    OpenAIRE

    El-Kersh, TA; Ahmed, AM; Al-Sheikh, YA; Tripet, F; Ibrahim, MS; Metwalli, AAM

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Worldwide, mosquito vectors are transmitting several etiological agents of important human diseases, including malaria, causing millions of deaths every year. In Saudi Arabia, as elsewhere, vector-control is based mostly on chemical insecticides which may be toxic and cause environmental deprivation. Here, to support the development of bio-pesticide alternatives, a study was conducted to identify native Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) isolates with improved toxicity against the malari...

  7. Isolation and characterization of native Bacillus thuringiensis strains from Saudi Arabia with enhanced larvicidal toxicity against the mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae (s.l.)

    OpenAIRE

    El-kersh, Talaat A.; Ahmed, Ashraf M.; AL-SHEIKH, YAZEED A.; Tripet, Frédéric; Ibrahim, Mohamed S.; Metwalli, Ali A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Worldwide, mosquito vectors are transmitting several etiological agents of important human diseases, including malaria, causing millions of deaths every year. In Saudi Arabia, as elsewhere, vector-control is based mostly on chemical insecticides which may be toxic and cause environmental deprivation. Here, to support the development of bio-pesticide alternatives, a study was conducted to identify native Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) isolates with improved toxicity against the malaria...

  8. Synergism and Antagonism between Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3A and Cry1 Proteins in Heliothis virescens, Diatraea saccharalis and Spodoptera frugiperda

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Rita Nunes Lemes; Camila Chiaradia Davolos; Paula Cristina Brunini Crialesi Legori; Odair Aparecido Fernandes; Juan Ferré; Manoel Victor Franco Lemos; Janete Apparecida Desiderio

    2014-01-01

    Second generation Bt crops (insect resistant crops carrying Bacillus thuringiensis genes) combine more than one gene that codes for insecticidal proteins in the same plant to provide better control of agricultural pests. Some of the new combinations involve co-expression of cry and vip genes. Because Cry and Vip proteins have different midgut targets and possibly different mechanisms of toxicity, it is important to evaluate possible synergistic or antagonistic interactions between these two c...

  9. Microscopic analysis of a native Bacillus thuringiensis strain from Malaysia that produces exosporium-enclosed parasporal inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Pui Fun; Rathinam, Xavier; Solayappan, Maheswaran; Ahmad Ghazali, Amir Hamzah; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2014-10-01

    The current study focused on the microscopic studies of a native Bacillus thuringiensis strain isolated from Malaysia, Bt-S84-13a, that produced an unusual crystal type. Primary detection of parasporal inclusions using a phase contrast microscope presented one to two small crystal proteins in the sporulating cells of Bt-S84-13a. Compound light microscopic examination of autolysed Bt-S84-13a cells stained with 0.133% Coomassie Brilliant Blue showed two types of crystal morphology: small crystals independent of spores and spore-associated crystals. Surface structure analysis with a scanning electron microscope revealed spherical-like, coarse and wrinkled-looking crystal in Bt-S84-13a. A close-up observation of the crystal morphology using a transmission electron microscope also demonstrated two parasporal inclusions in Bt-S84-13a. One inclusion was deposited against the forespore and was in a shape of incomplete rectangular. Another smaller inclusion was developed within the exosporium and was rectangular in shape. However, the latter inclusion was found lack in another bacterial cell which was still in the early stages of sporulation. This unique crystal morphology may imply some biological potential in Bt-S84-13a.

  10. Multilocus sequence analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis serovars navarrensis, bolivia and vazensis and Bacillus weihenstephanensis reveals a common phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufiane, Brahim; Baizet, Mathilde; Côté, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group sensu lato includes six closely-related bacterial species: Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus pseudomycoides and Bacillus weihenstephanensis. B. thuringiensis is distinguished from the other species mainly by the appearance of an inclusion body upon sporulation. B. weihenstephanensis is distinguished based on its psychrotolerance and the presence of specific signature sequences in the 16S rRNA gene and cspA genes. A total of seven housekeeping genes (glpF, gmK, ilvD, pta, purH, pycA and tpi) from different B. thuringiensis serovars and B. weihenstephanensis strains were amplified and their nucleotide sequences determined. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree was inferred from comparisons of the concatenated sequences. B. thuringiensis serovars navarrensis, bolivia and vazensis clustered not with the other B. thuringiensis serovars but rather with the B. weihenstephanensis strains, indicative of a common phylogeny. In addition, specific signature sequences and single nucleotide polymorphisms common to B. thuringiensis serovars navarrensis, bolivia and vazensis and the B. weihenstephanensis strains, and absent in the other B. thuringiensis serovars, were identified.

  11. Estimation of resistance allele frequency to maize incorporated Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2 protein in field populations of the fall army Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from south region of the United State

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target of transgenic maize and cotton expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins in both North and South Americas. In the falls of 2013 and 2014, a total of 215 F2 two-parent families of S. frugiperda were es...

  12. 苏云金芽孢杆菌杀虫晶体蛋白与DNA分子的相互作用%Interaction Between Insecticidal Crystal Proteins and DNA Molecule from Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏立秋; 孙运军; 莫湘涛; 丁学知

    2003-01-01

    @@ 苏云金芽孢杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,简称Bt)在形成芽孢的同时能够产生伴孢晶体,其中含有一种或几种杀虫晶体蛋白(ICPs,Insecticidal Crystal Proteins),即δ-内毒素[1].

  13. A Western Corn Rootworm Cadherin-like Protein is not Involved in the Binding and Toxicity of Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Aa Bacillus Thuringiensis Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte is an important insect pest of corn. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins Cry3Aa (as mCry3A) and Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 have been expressed in transgenic corn and are used to control the insect in the U.S. To date, there ...

  14. Binding Sites for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae Toxin on Heliothine Brush Border Membrane Vesicles Are Not Shared with Cry1A, Cry1F, or Vip3A Toxin ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gouffon, C.; van Vliet, A.; Van Rie, J; Jansens, S.; Jurat-Fuentes, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of combinations of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins with diverse modes of action for insect pest control has been proposed as the most efficient strategy to increase target range and delay the onset of insect resistance. Considering that most cases of cross-resistance to Bt toxins in laboratory-selected insect colonies are due to alteration of common toxin binding sites, independent modes of action can be defined as toxins sharing limited or no binding sites in brush border membrane...

  15. 1株对多种害虫高活性的苏云金杆菌Bt CYZ-4%Insecticidal Characteristics of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain CYZ 4 with High Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵焕丽; 陆秀君; 刘云飞; 张建光; 李保国; 安文义; 王颖

    2009-01-01

    通过生物测定得到了对多种重要农林害虫高活性的苏云金杆菌菌株Bt CYZ-4,对其基因型鉴定表明:该菌株基因型较丰富.该菌株对粘虫(Mythimna separata)初孵幼虫48h LC50为6.6×106个/mL(芽孢密度);对美国白蛾(Hyphantria cunea)、甜菜夜蛾(Spodoptera exigua)和棉铃虫(Helicoverpa armigera)初孵幼虫72h LC50分别为2.9×106、2.25×105和4.7×106个/mL;对林业害虫杨扇舟蛾(Clostera anachoreta)二龄幼虫72h LC50为1.7×106个/mL,同时该菌株对卫生害虫淡色库蚊(Culex pipiens paliens)也表现出较好的活性,24h LC50为2.01×105个/mL.利用cry1、cry2、cry3、cry7、cry8、cry9和vip3A基因引物对该菌株进行基因型鉴定,并对其扩增片段进行限制性酶切分析,结果表明,该菌株含有cry1Ac、cry1Ab、cry2Ab和vip3A基因,不存在cry3、cry7、cry8、cry9基因,其它基因型仍有待鉴定.SDS-PAGE分析表明,晶体蛋白质的分子质量主要为130、70、57、27ku,营养期为88ku.该菌株是一株具有应用潜力的Bt野生株.

  16. Characterization of chimeric Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3 toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoli; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Shelton, Anthony M; Cheng, Jiaan; Feng, Ming-Guang; Shen, Zhicheng

    2007-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vip) are potential alternatives for B. thuringiensis endotoxins that are currently utilized in commercial transgenic insect-resistant crops. Screening a large number of B. thuringiensis isolates resulted in the cloning of vip3Ac1. Vip3Ac1 showed high insecticidal activity against the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda and the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa zea but very low activity against the silkworm Bombyx mori. The host specificity of this Vip3 toxin was altered by sequence swapping with a previously identified toxin, Vip3Aa1. While both Vip3Aa1 and Vip3Ac1 showed no detectable toxicity against the European corn borer Ostrinia nubilalis, the chimeric protein Vip3AcAa, consisting of the N-terminal region of Vip3Ac1 and the C-terminal region of Vip3Aa1, became insecticidal to the European corn borer. In addition, the chimeric Vip3AcAa had increased toxicity to the fall armyworm. Furthermore, both Vip3Ac1 and Vip3AcAa are highly insecticidal to a strain of cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni) that is highly resistant to the B. thuringiensis endotoxin Cry1Ac, thus experimentally showing for the first time the lack of cross-resistance between B. thuringiensis Cry1A proteins and Vip3A toxins. The results in this study demonstrated that vip3Ac1 and its chimeric vip3 genes can be excellent candidates for engineering a new generation of transgenic plants for insect pest control.

  17. Chitinase production by Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus licheniformis: their potential in antifungal biocontrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Eman Zakaria

    2012-02-01

    Thirty bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of plants collected from Egypt and screened for production of chitinase enzymes. Bacillus thuringiensis NM101-19 and Bacillus licheniformis NM120-17 had the highest chitinolytic activities amongst those investigated. The production of chitinase by B. thuringiensis and B. licheniformis was optimized using colloidal chitin medium amended with 1.5% colloidal chitin, with casein as a nitrogen source, at 30°C after five days of incubation. An enhancement of chitinase production by the two species was observed by addition of sugar substances and dried fungal mats to the colloidal chitin media. The optimal conditions for chitinase activity by B. thuringiensis and B. licheniformis were at 40°C, pH 7.0 and pH 8.0, respectively. Na(+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and Ca(2+) caused enhancement of enzyme activities whereas they were markedly inhibited by Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and Ag(+). In vitro, B. thuringiensis and B. licheniformis chitinases had potential for cell wall lysis of many phytopathogenic fungi tested. The addition of B. thuringiensis chitinase was more effective than that of B. licheniformis in increasing the germination of soybean seeds infected with various phytopathogenic fungi.

  18. The Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis spp. galleriae Against Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) for Integrated Pest Management in California Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaee, Mohammad-Amir; Godfrey, Larry D

    2015-02-01

    Rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kushel) is the most damaging insect pest of rice in the United States. Larval feeding on the roots stunt growth and reduce yield. Current pest management against the weevil in California relies heavily on pyrethroids that can be damaging to aquatic food webs. Examination of an environmentally friendly alternative biopesticide based on Bacillus thuringiensis spp. galleriae chemistry against rice water weevil larvae showed moderate levels of activity in pilot studies. We further examined the performance of different formulations of Bt.galleriae against the leading insecticide used in California rice, λ-cyhalothrin. The granular formulation performed as well as the λ-cyhalothrin in use in California in some of our greenhouse and field studies. This is the first reported use of B. thuringiensis spp. galleriae against rice water weevil.

  19. Characterization of cry2-type genes of Bacillus thuringiensis strains from soil-isolated of Sichuan basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Liang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sichuan basin, situated in the west of China, is the fourth biggest basin in China. In order to describe a systematic study of the cry2-type genes resources from Bacillus thuringiensis strains of Sichuan basin, a total of 791 Bacillus thuringiensis strains have been screened from 2650 soil samples in different ecological regions. The method of PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP was used to identify the type of cry2 genes. The results showed that 322 Bacillus thuringiensis strains harbored cry2-type genes and four different RFLP patterns were found. The combination of cry2Aa/cry2Ab genes was the most frequent (90.4%, followed by cry2Aa (6.8% and cry2Ab alone (2.5%, and only one novel type of cry2 gene was cloned from one isolate (JF19-2. The full-length of this novel gene was obtained by the method of thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (Tail-PCR, which was designated as cry2Ag1 (GenBank No. ACH91610 by the Bt Pesticide Crystal Protein Nomenclature Committee. In addition, the result of scanning electron microscopic (SEM observation showed that these strains had erose, spherical, bipyramidal, and square crystal. And the results of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE demonstrated that these strains harbored about one to three major proteins. These strains exhibited a wide range of insecticidal spectrum toxic to Aedes aegypti (Diptera and Pieris rapae Linnaeus, 1758 (Lepidoptera. Particularly, JF19-2 contained cry2Ag gene had the highest insecticidal activity. All these researches mentioned above revealed the diversity and particularity of cry2-type gene resources from Bacillus thuringiensis strains in Sichuan basin.

  20. Identificación y producción de proteínas de Bacillus thuringiensis: evaluación de su actividad insecticída

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero Sánchez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    La bacteria entomopatógena Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) es el microorganismo más empleado actualmente como materia activa en el desarrollo de bioinsecticidas y la construcción de plantas transgénicas (planta Bt) resistentes a los insectos. Todo ello se debe a su gran capacidad para producir una enorme variedad de proteínas con elevada toxicidad contra un amplio número de especies de insectos que suelen originar importantes plagas agrícolasGforestales o de interés médicoGveterinario. En este tr...

  1. Genetic relationships between sympatric populations of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis, as revealed by rep-PCR genomic fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula S Peruca

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial strain Bacillus cereus is closely related to Bacillus thuringiensis, although any genetic relationship between the two strains is still in debate. Using rep-PCR genomic fingerprinting, we established the genetic relationships between Brazilian sympatric populations of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis simultaneously collected from two geographically separate sites. We observed the formation of both B. thuringiensis and B. cereus clusters, as well as strains of B. cereus that are more closely related to B. thuringiensis than to other B. cereus strains. In addition, lower genetic variability was observed among B. thuringiensis clusters compared to B. cereus clusters, indicating that either the two species should be categorized as separate or that B. thuringiensis may represent a clone from a B. cereus background.

  2. Interação entre inimigos naturais: Trichogramma e Bacillus thuringiensis no controle biológico de pragas agrícolas = Interaction between natural enemies: Trichogramma and Bacillus thuringiensis in pest control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Antonio Polanczyk

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos adversos de Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt nos parasitóides de ovos Trichogramma pratissolii e Trichogramma pretiosum. Suspensões de 6 isolados de Bt: E-3, E-10, E-15, E-16, E-19, E-20 e Bt kurstaki foram misturadas com mel (1:1, como fonte de alimento, e cartelas com ovos de Anagasta kuehniella foram fornecidas para o parasitismo. O experimento foi mantido em BOD a 25 + 1ºC, umidade relativa de 70+ 10% e fotofase de 14 horas. Foram analisados a longevidade, os parasitismos diário, acumulado e total. Não houve influência dos tratamentos sobre a longevidade e todos ostratamentos em T. pratissolii e E-3, E-10, E-16 e E- 19 em T. pretiosum diminuíram o tempo necessário para os parasitóides atingirem 80% de parasitismo. Apesar dessa aceleração do parasitismo, o Bt não influenciou o total de ovos parasitados, mostrando-se como tática de controle que pode ser usada com Trichogramma em programas de MIP.The goal of this work was to detect the possible side-effectsprovoked by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt strains on eggs parasitoids Thichogramma pratissolii and Trichogramma pretiosum. Six strains of Bt: E-3, E-10, E-15, E-16, E-19, and E-20 and Bt kurstaki were assayed in honey drop to stimulate the feeding of the parasitoids in each treatment and offered simultaneously displays with Anagasta kuehniella eggs. The experiment was maintained in a climatized chamber at 25+ 1ºC, RH 70+ 10%, and photophase of 14 hours. The longevity, the daily, the accumulated, and the total parasitism were observed. No treatments affected the longevity of both parasitoids. All treatments in T. pratissolii and E-3, E-10, E-16, and E-19 in T. pretiosum decreased the time necessary to reach 80% of parasitism. The lack of deleterious effects of Bt on these parasitoids suggests that these natural enemies can be used together in IPM programs.

  3. Chitinolitic activity in proteic extracts of Bacillus thuringiensis toxic to boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, T.S; Rocha, T.L. [EMBRAPA Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, DF (Brazil); Vasconcelos, E.A.R [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil); Grossi-de-Sa, M.F. [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a spore forming bacteria, which produces Cry proteins toxic towards several insect orders. Bt S 811 strain produces at least three Cry toxins: Cry1Ab, Cry1Ia12, and Cry8, and shown toxicity to insects from Coleoptera order. In order to characterize the production of theses toxins, and check its activity against Boll weevil larvae, proteic extracts from Bt cells and supernatant proteins from the bacterial culture, were obtained at different stages of cell cycle; 8, 16, 24, and 32 hours after inoculation (HAI). Proteins from 32 HAI of the supernatant, and 8 HAI of the cellular fractions, shown highest activity towards the Boll weevil larvae. Western blotting assays using anti-Cry8 and anti-Cry1I were carried out to analyse these toxins in the Bt proteic extracts. The existence of a Cry8 was detected at 8 HAI in the cellular fraction, what allow associate this molecule with the toxicity of this fraction. However, toxicity observed at 32 HAI in the supernatant fraction, was not possible to be associated with Cry8 or Cry1Ia toxins, indicating that there are another protein(s) responsible for the toxicity. A protein homo log to Cry1Ab was identified by 'Peptide Mass Fingerprint' at 32 HAI of the supernatant fraction and a chitin binding protein was identified by 2DE/MS/MS in this same stage and chitinolitic activity was also observed by enzymatic assay. All our data suggest a possible synergism between Cry toxins and a chitinase in the activity of this strain towards Boll weevil.

  4. Improvement and efficient display of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins on M13 phages and ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Sabino; Cantón, Emiliano; Zuñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Pecorari, Frédéric; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces insecticidal proteins that have been used worldwide in the control of insect-pests in crops and vectors of human diseases. However, different insect species are poorly controlled by the available Bt toxins or have evolved resistance to these toxins. Evolution of Bt toxicity could provide novel toxins to control insect pests. To this aim, efficient display systems to select toxins with increased binding to insect membranes or midgut proteins involved in toxicity are likely to be helpful. Here we describe two display systems, phage display and ribosome display, that allow the efficient display of two non-structurally related Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa. Improved display of Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa on M13 phages was achieved by changing the commonly used peptide leader sequence of the coat pIII-fusion protein, that relies on the Sec translocation pathway, for a peptide leader sequence that relies on the signal recognition particle pathway (SRP) and by using a modified M13 helper phage (Phaberge) that has an amber mutation in its pIII genomic sequence and preferentially assembles using the pIII-fusion protein. Also, both Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa were efficiently displayed on ribosomes, which could allow the construction of large libraries of variants. Furthermore, Cry1Ac or Cyt1Aa displayed on M13 phages or ribosomes were specifically selected from a mixture of both toxins depending on which antigen was immobilized for binding selection. These improved systems may allow the selection of Cry toxin variants with improved insecticidal activities that could counter insect resistances.

  5. [Growth and development kinetics of Bacillus thuringiensis in batch culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharova, Z V; Ignatenko, Iu N; Schulz, F; Khovrychev, M P; Rabotnova, I L

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of Bacillus thuringiensis growth and its assimilation of nutrient substances were studied under the conditions of batch cultivation in a complex medium containing yeast extract and in a chemically defined medium with amino acids. The growth of B. thuringiensis can be divided into five phases: exponential growth; decelerated growth; stationary phase when protein crystals are formed; stationary phase when spores are formed; lysis of sporangia releasing spores. The first phase may in turn be subdivided into three stages according to changes in the specific growth rate and substrate assimilation: a high specific growth rate and no glucose assimilation; an abrupt drop in mu and the beginning of intensive glucose assimilation from the medium; a new rise in the specific growth rate. As follows from the results of studying the kinetics of B. thuringiensis growth in a chemically defined medium, the above changes in the exponential growth phase are due to the fact that the culture assimilates yeast extract components in the complex medium or amino acids in the chemically defined medium during this phase, and then starts to assimilate glucose and ammonium in the following phases of growth.

  6. Modified Bacillus thuringiensis toxins and a hybrid B. thuringiensis strain counter greenhouse-selected resistance in Trichoplusia ni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Michelle T; Nieman, Christal L; Janmaat, Alida F; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Myers, Judith H

    2009-09-01

    Resistance of greenhouse-selected strains of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki was countered by a hybrid strain of B. thuringiensis and genetically modified toxins Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod, which lack helix alpha-1. Resistance to Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod was >100-fold less than resistance to native toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac.

  7. Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxins with brush border membrane vesicles of maize stem borer (Chilo partellus Swinhoe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Nain, Vikrant; Lakhanpaul, Suman; Kumar, P A

    2011-02-01

    Maize stem borer (Chilo partellus) is a major insect pest of maize and sorghum in Asia and Africa. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxins have been found effective against C. partellus, both in diet-overlay assay and in transgenic plants. Gene stacking as one of the resistance management strategies in Bt maize requires an understanding of receptor sharing and binding affinity of δ-endotoxins. In the present study, binding affinity of three fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled Cry1A toxins showed high correlation with the toxicity of respective δ-endotoxins. Competitive binding studies showed that Cry1Ab toxins share some of the binding sites with Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac with low affinity and that Cry1Ab may have additional binding sites that are unavailable to the other two toxins tested.

  8. Pesquisa de proteínas citotóxicas e nematicidas em isolados Bacillus thuringiensis dos Açores

    OpenAIRE

    Raimundo, Natacha Sofia Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado, Ciências Biomédicas, 25 de Maio de 2016, Universidade dos Açores. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), pertencente à família Bacillaceae, é classificado como gram-positiva e tem despertado elevado interesse em várias áreas, destacando-se a aplicações na agricultura e na saúde. Os isolados de Bt são caracterizados pela sua capacidade de produzir inclusões cristalinas de origem proteica durante a fase de esporulação, as quais são conhecidas como proteínas δ-endotoxinas ou pr...

  9. Risk assessment of Cry toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis on the predatory mites Euseius concordis and Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Thiago Rodrigues; Ausique, John Jairo Saldarriaga; Nunes, Daiane Heloisa; Ibanhes, Fernando Henrique; Delalibera Júnior, Italo

    2013-04-01

    Genetically modified plants carrying Cry toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for pest control. Possible adverse effects as a result of the use of this control technique to non-target organisms is still a concern; however, few studies have addressed the effects of Bt crops on phytoseiid predatory mites. Phytoseiids are important for the natural control of phytophagous mites, but they can also feed on pollen, plant exudates, etc. Thus, phytoseiids may ingest Bt toxins through several pathways. In this paper, we evaluate the direct effect of Bt-toxins by feeding the predators on Bt cell suspensions, on solution of a Bt toxin and the tri-trophic effect by Bt expressed in transgenic plants. We present a method of conducting toxicological tests with Phytoseiidae which can be useful in studies of risk analysis of toxins to be expressed by genetically engineered plants. This method was used to evaluate the potential effect of ingestion of suspensions of Bt (1.25 × 10(8) spores/ml) and of purified protein Cry1Ia12 (0.006 mg/ml and 0.018 mg/ml) on Euseius concordis, a predatory mite that develops and reproduces best on pollen. The effects of genetically modified Bollgard(®) cotton, which carries the Cry1Ac protein, on Neoseiulus californicus, a selective predator that feeds more on spider mites than on pollen or insects, was determined by feeding them with Tetranychus urticae reared in Bollgard(®) cotton and on the non-transgenic isoline. When E. concordis was fed with suspension of Bt isolate derived from product Dipel(®) PM, no significant effects were detected. Similarly, Cry1Ia12 Bt toxin, at a concentration of 0.006 mg/ml, did not affect E. concordis. At a concentration of 0.018 mg/ml, however, the intake of this protein reduced the reproduction of E. concordis. There were no effects of Bollgard(®) cotton on the biological traits and on the predatory capacity of N. californicus. Results indicate that the Cry toxins of B. thuringiensis

  10. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Qingling; Deng Yali; Li Huishu; Liu Jie [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Hu Hongqing, E-mail: hqhu@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Chen Shouwen [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Sa Tongmin [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L{sup -1}. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ({Delta}{sub r}G{sub m}{sup {theta}}) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ({Delta}{sub r}H{sub m}{sup {theta}}) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  11. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qingling; Deng, Yali; Li, Huishu; Liu, Jie; Hu, Hongqing; Chen, Shouwen; Sa, Tongmin

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L -1. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ( ΔGmθr) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ( ΔHmθr) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  12. Mode of Action and Specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins in the Control of Caterpillars and Stink Bugs in Soybean Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schünemann, Rogério; Knaak, Neiva; Fiuza, Lidia Mariana

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces delta-endotoxins that possess toxic properties and can be used as biopesticides, as well as a source of genes for the construction of transgenic plants resistant to insects. In Brazil, the introduction of Bt soybean with insecticidal properties to the velvetbean caterpillar, the main insect pest of soybean, has been seen a promising tool in the management of these agroecosystems. However, the increase in stink bug populations in this culture, in various regions of the country, which are not susceptible to the existing genetically modified plants, requires application of chemicals that damage the environment. Little is known about the actual toxicity of Bt to Hemiptera, since these insects present sucking mouthparts, which hamper toxicity assays with artificial diets containing toxins of this bacterium. In recent studies of cytotoxicity with the gut of different hemipterans, susceptibility in the mechanism of action of delta-endotoxins has been demonstrated, which can generate promising subsidies for the control of these insect pests in soybean. This paper aims to review the studies related to the selection, application and mode of action of Bt in the biological control of the major pest of soybean, Anticarsia gemmatalis, and an analysis of advances in research on the use of Bt for control hemipterans.

  13. SKPDT is a signaling peptide that stimulates sporulation and cry1Aa expression in Bacillus thuringiensis but not in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-Diez, Angel E; Robles-Burgueño, Refugio; de la Torre, Mayra

    2007-08-01

    We have identified and characterized in the supernatant of the transition phase of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki the peptide SKPDT. This peptide was previously identified by in silico analysis by Pottathil and Lazazzera (Front Biosci 8:32-45 2003) as a putative signaling peptide (NprRB) of the Phr family in B. thuringiensis. The chemically synthesized NprRB did not affect the growth kinetics of B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki but stimulated the sporulation, spore release, and transcription of cry1Aa when added to cultures during the transition phase. In fact, when the peptide (100 nM) was added to a culture in transition phase, the transcription of cry1Aa was stimulated almost threefold, mainly from the late promoter BtII, which requires the late-stage sporulation-specific transcription factor sigma (K). On the other hand, NprRB did not have any effect on B. subtilis. Thus, SKPDT seems to be a signaling peptide specific for B. thuringiensis.

  14. Efficiency of Intergeneric Recombinants Between Bacillus Thuringiensis and Bacillus Subtilis for Increasing Mortality Rate in Cotten Leaf Worm

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlOtaibi, Saad Aied

    2012-12-01

    In this study , two strains of Bacillus belonging to two serotypes and four of their transconjugants were screened with respect to their toxicity against lepidopterous cotton pest. . Bacterial transconjugants isolated from conjugation between both strains were evaluated for their transconjugant efficiency caused mortality in Spodoptera littoralis larvae . Two groups of bioinsecticides ; crystals , crystals and spores have been isolated from Bacillusstrains and their transconjugants . Insecticidal crystal protein ( ICP ) was specific for lepidopteran insects because of the toxin sufficient both for insect specificity and toxicity . The toxicities of these two groups against larvae of Spodoptera littoralis was expressed as transconjugant efficiency , which related to the mean number of larvae died expressed as mortality percentage . The results showed transconjugant efficiency in reducing the mean number of Spodoptera littoralis larvae feeding on leaves of Ricinus communis sprayed with bioinsecticides of Bt transconjugants. Most values of positive transconjugant efficiency related to increasing mortality percentage are due to toxicological effects appeared in response to the treatments with crystals + endospores than that of crystals alone .This indicated that crystals + endospores was more effective for increasing mortality percentage than that resulted by crystals . Higher positive transconjugant efficiency in relation to the mid parents and better parent was appeared at 168 h of treatment . The results indicated that recombinant Bacillus thuringiensis are important control agents for lepidopteran pests , as well as , susceptibility decreased with larval development . The results also suggested a potential for the deployment of these recominant entomopathogens in the management of Spodoptera. littoralis larvae .

  15. Molecular characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis strains from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Rivera, Alejandro; Benintende, Graciela; Cozzi, Jorge; Baizabal-Aguirre, Victor Manuel; Valdez-Alarcón, Juan José; López-Meza, Joel Edmundo

    2004-07-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis INTA 7-3, INTA 51-3, INTA Mo9-5 and INTA Mo14-4 strains were obtained from Argentina and characterized by determination of serotype, toxicity, plasmid composition, insecticidal gene content ( cry and vip ) and the cloning of the single- vip3A gene of the INTA Mo9-5 strain. The serotype analysis identified the serovars tohokuensis and darmstadiensis for the INTA 51-3 and INTA Mo14-4 strains, respectively, whereas the INTA Mo9-5 strain was classified as "autoagglutinated". In contrast to the plasmid patterns of INTA 7-3, INTA 51-3 and INTA Mo9-5 (which were similar to B. thuringiensis HD-1 strain), strain INTA Mo14-4 showed a unique plasmid array. PCR analysis of the four strains revealed the presence of cry genes and vip3A genes. Interestingly, it was found that B. thuringiensis 4Q7 strain, which is a plasmid cured strain, contained vip3A genes indicating the presence of these insecticidal genes in the chromosome. Bioassays towards various lepidopteran species revealed that B. thuringiensis INTA Mo9-5 and INTA 7-3 strains were highly active. In particular, the mean LC(50) obtained against A. gemmatalis larvae with the INTA Mo9-5 and INTA 7-3 strains were 7 (5.7-8.6) and 6.7 (5.6-8.0) ppm, respectively. The INTA Mo14-4 strain was non-toxic and strain INTA 51-3 showed only a weak larvicidal activity.

  16. Toxicity of seven Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins against Cylas puncticollis and Cylas brunneus (Coleoptera: Brentidae) using a novel artificial diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekobu, Moses; Solera, Maureen; Kyamanywa, Samuel; Mwanga, Robert O M; Odongo, Benson; Ghislain, Marc; Moar, William J

    2010-08-01

    "Sweetpotato weevils" Cylas puncticollis (Boheman) and Cylas brunneus F. (Coleoptera: Brentidae) are the most important biological threat to sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam), productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. Sweetpotato weevil control is difficult due to their cryptic feeding behavior. Expression of Cylas-active Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry proteins in sweetpotato could provide an effective control strategy. Unfortunately, Bt Cry proteins with relatively high toxicity against Cylas spp. have not been identified, partly because no published methodology for screening Bt Cry proteins against Cylas spp. in artificial diet exists. Therefore, the initial aim of this study was to develop an artificial diet for conducting bioassays with Cylas spp. and then to determine Bt Cry protein efficacy against C. puncticollis and C. brunneus by using this artificial diet. Five diets varying in their composition were evaluated. The highest survival rates for sweetpotato weevil larvae were observed for diet E that contained the highest amount of sweetpotato powder and supported weevil development from first instar to adulthood, similar to sweetpotato storage roots. Seven coleopteran-active Bt Cry proteins were incorporated into diet E and toxicity data were generated against neonate C. puncticollis and second-instar C. brunneus. All Bt Cry proteins tested had toxicity greater than the untreated control. Cry7Aa1, ET33/34, and Cry3Ca1 had LC50 values below 1 microg/g diet against both species. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using an artificial diet bioassay for screening Bt Cry proteins against sweetpotato weevil larvae and identifies candidate Bt Cry proteins for use in transforming sweetpotato varieties potentially conferring field resistance against these pests.

  17. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Its Dipteran-Specific Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitan Ben-Dov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti is the first Bacillus thuringiensis to be found and used as an effective biological control agent against larvae of many mosquito and black fly species around the world. Its larvicidal activity resides in four major (of 134, 128, 72 and 27 kDa and at least two minor (of 78 and 29 kDa polypeptides encoded respectively by cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cyt1Aa, cry10Aa and cyt2Ba, all mapped on the 128 kb plasmid known as pBtoxis. These six δ-endotoxins form a complex parasporal crystalline body with remarkably high, specific and different toxicities to Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. Cry toxins are composed of three domains (perforating domain I and receptor binding II and III and create cation-selective channels, whereas Cyts are composed of one domain that acts as well as a detergent-like membrane perforator. Despite the low toxicities of Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba alone against exposed larvae, they are highly synergistic with the Cry toxins and hence their combinations prevent emergence of resistance in the targets. The lack of significant levels of resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with Bti-bioinsecticide suggests that this bacterium will be an effective biocontrol agent for years to come.

  18. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and its dipteran-specific toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Dov, Eitan

    2014-03-28

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is the first Bacillus thuringiensis to be found and used as an effective biological control agent against larvae of many mosquito and black fly species around the world. Its larvicidal activity resides in four major (of 134, 128, 72 and 27 kDa) and at least two minor (of 78 and 29 kDa) polypeptides encoded respectively by cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cyt1Aa, cry10Aa and cyt2Ba, all mapped on the 128 kb plasmid known as pBtoxis. These six δ-endotoxins form a complex parasporal crystalline body with remarkably high, specific and different toxicities to Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. Cry toxins are composed of three domains (perforating domain I and receptor binding II and III) and create cation-selective channels, whereas Cyts are composed of one domain that acts as well as a detergent-like membrane perforator. Despite the low toxicities of Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba alone against exposed larvae, they are highly synergistic with the Cry toxins and hence their combinations prevent emergence of resistance in the targets. The lack of significant levels of resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with Bti-bioinsecticide suggests that this bacterium will be an effective biocontrol agent for years to come.

  19. The Correlation of the Presence and Expression Levels of cry Genes with the Insecticidal Activities against Plutella xylostella for Bacillus thuringiensis Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Lun Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt strains with high insecticidal activity is essential for the preparation of bioinsecticide. In this study, for 60 Bt strains isolated in Taiwan, their genotypes and the correlation of some cry genes as well as the expression levels of cry1 genes, with their insecticidal activities against Plutella xylostella, were investigated. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD results revealed that the genotypes of these Bt strains are highly diversified. Also, a considerable number of the Bt strains isolated in Taiwan were found to have high insecticidal activities. Since strains that showed individual combined patterns of PFGE and RAPD exhibited distinct insecticidal activities against P. xylostella, thus, these genotypes may be useful for the identification of the new Bt strains and those which have been used in bioinsecticides. In addition, although the presence of cry2Aa1 may have a greater effect on the insecticidal activity of Bt strains in bioassay than other cry genes, only high expression level of cry1 genes plays a key role to determine the insecticidal activity of Bt strains. In conclusion, both RAPD and PFGE are effective in the differentiation of Bt strains. The presence of cry2Aa1 and, especially, the expression level of cry1 genes are useful for the prediction of the insecticidal activities of Bt strains against P. xylostella.

  20. Cry-like genes, in an uncommon gene configuration, produce a crystal that localizes within the exosporium when expressed in an acrystalliferous strain of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammons, David; Toal, Graham; Roman, Angel; Rojas-Avelizapa, Luz I; Ventura-Suárez, Antonio; Rampersad, Joanne

    2016-02-01

    Cry proteins are pesticidal toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which aggregate in sporulating cells to form a crystal. Except in a relatively few cases, these crystals are located outside the exosporium that surrounds the spore. Bt2-56 is a strain of Bt that has the relatively uncommon characteristic of locating its Cry protein-containing crystal within the exosporium, and in association with a long, multifiber filament. With the ultimate goal of both understanding and manipulating the localization of Cry proteins within the exosporium, we sought to identify the genes coding for the exosporium-localized Cry proteins in Bt2-56. Herein we show (i) that five cry-like genes are present in the genome of Bt2-56, (ii) that two pairs of these genes show organizational similarity to a relatively uncommon gene configuration that coexpress a cry gene along with a gene whose product aids crystal formation and (iii) that when one of these two gene pairs (cry21A-cdA) is expressed in an acrystalliferous strain of Bt, crystals are formed that localize within the exosporium. In Bt ssp. finitimus, the only other strain in which crystal localization has been studied, a Cry protein needed expression of two non-cry ORFs in order to localize within the exosporium, indicating that there are some mechanistic differences for crystal localization between Bt ssp. finitimus and Bt2-56.

  1. The correlation of the presence and expression levels of cry genes with the insecticidal activities against Plutella xylostella for Bacillus thuringiensis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Lun; Chen, Pin-Hsin; Pang, Jen-Chieh; Lin, Chia-Wei; Hwang, Chin-Fa; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2014-08-19

    The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains with high insecticidal activity is essential for the preparation of bioinsecticide. In this study, for 60 Bt strains isolated in Taiwan, their genotypes and the correlation of some cry genes as well as the expression levels of cry1 genes, with their insecticidal activities against Plutella xylostella, were investigated. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) results revealed that the genotypes of these Bt strains are highly diversified. Also, a considerable number of the Bt strains isolated in Taiwan were found to have high insecticidal activities. Since strains that showed individual combined patterns of PFGE and RAPD exhibited distinct insecticidal activities against P. xylostella, thus, these genotypes may be useful for the identification of the new Bt strains and those which have been used in bioinsecticides. In addition, although the presence of cry2Aa1 may have a greater effect on the insecticidal activity of Bt strains in bioassay than other cry genes, only high expression level of cry1 genes plays a key role to determine the insecticidal activity of Bt strains. In conclusion, both RAPD and PFGE are effective in the differentiation of Bt strains. The presence of cry2Aa1 and, especially, the expression level of cry1 genes are useful for the prediction of the insecticidal activities of Bt strains against P. xylostella.

  2. Architecture and High-Resolution Structure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus Spore Coat Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K; Malkin, A

    2005-02-18

    We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the native surface topology and ultrastructure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus spores in water and in air. AFM was able to resolve the nanostructure of the exosporium and three distinctive classes of appendages. Removal of the exosporium exposed either a hexagonal honeycomb layer (B. thuringiensis) or a rodlet outer spore coat layer (B. cereus). Removal of the rodlet structure from B. cereus spores revealed an underlying honeycomb layer similar to that observed with B. thuringiensis spores. The periodicity of the rodlet structure on the outer spore coat of B. cereus was {approx}8 nm, and the length of the rodlets was limited to the cross-patched domain structure of this layer to {approx}200 nm. The lattice constant of the honeycomb structures was {approx}9 nm for both B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores. Both honeycomb structures were composed of multiple, disoriented domains with distinct boundaries. Our results demonstrate that variations in storage and preparation procedures result in architectural changes in individual spore surfaces, which establish AFM as a useful tool for evaluation of preparation and processing ''fingerprints'' of bacterial spores. These results establish that high-resolution AFM has the capacity to reveal species-specific assembly and nanometer scale structure of spore surfaces. These species-specific spore surface structural variations are correlated with sequence divergences in a spore core structural protein SspE.

  3. Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus weihenstephanensis Inhibit the Growth of Phytopathogenic Verticillium Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Wemheuer, Franziska; Harting, Rebekka; Kolarzyk, Anna M; Diaz Valerio, Stefani M; Poehlein, Anja; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta B; Nesemann, Kai; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A; Braus, Gerhard H; Daniel, Rolf; Liesegang, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium wilt causes severe yield losses in a broad range of economically important crops worldwide. As many soil fumigants have a severe environmental impact, new biocontrol strategies are needed. Members of the genus Bacillus are known as plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) as well as biocontrol agents of pests and diseases. In this study, we isolated 267 Bacillus strains from root-associated soil of field-grown tomato plants. We evaluated the antifungal potential of 20 phenotypically diverse strains according to their antagonistic activity against the two phytopathogenic fungi Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium longisporum. In addition, the 20 strains were sequenced and phylogenetically characterized by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) resulting in 7 different Bacillus thuringiensis and 13 Bacillus weihenstephanensis strains. All B. thuringiensis isolates inhibited in vitro the tomato pathogen V. dahliae JR2, but had only low efficacy against the tomato-foreign pathogen V. longisporum 43. All B. weihenstephanensis isolates exhibited no fungicidal activity whereas three B. weihenstephanensis isolates showed antagonistic effects on both phytopathogens. These strains had a rhizoid colony morphology, which has not been described for B. weihenstephanensis strains previously. Genome analysis of all isolates revealed putative genes encoding fungicidal substances and resulted in identification of 304 secondary metabolite gene clusters including 101 non-ribosomal polypeptide synthetases and 203 ribosomal-synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides. All genomes encoded genes for the synthesis of the antifungal siderophore bacillibactin. In the genome of one B. thuringiensis strain, a gene cluster for zwittermicin A was detected. Isolates which either exhibited an inhibitory or an interfering effect on the growth of the phytopathogens carried one or two genes encoding putative mycolitic chitinases, which might contribute to antifungal activities

  4. Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus weihenstephanensis Inhibit the Growth of Phytopathogenic Verticillium Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Wemheuer, Franziska; Harting, Rebekka; Kolarzyk, Anna M.; Diaz Valerio, Stefani M.; Poehlein, Anja; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta B.; Nesemann, Kai; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A.; Braus, Gerhard H.; Daniel, Rolf; Liesegang, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    Verticillium wilt causes severe yield losses in a broad range of economically important crops worldwide. As many soil fumigants have a severe environmental impact, new biocontrol strategies are needed. Members of the genus Bacillus are known as plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) as well as biocontrol agents of pests and diseases. In this study, we isolated 267 Bacillus strains from root-associated soil of field-grown tomato plants. We evaluated the antifungal potential of 20 phenotypically diverse strains according to their antagonistic activity against the two phytopathogenic fungi Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium longisporum. In addition, the 20 strains were sequenced and phylogenetically characterized by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) resulting in 7 different Bacillus thuringiensis and 13 Bacillus weihenstephanensis strains. All B. thuringiensis isolates inhibited in vitro the tomato pathogen V. dahliae JR2, but had only low efficacy against the tomato-foreign pathogen V. longisporum 43. All B. weihenstephanensis isolates exhibited no fungicidal activity whereas three B. weihenstephanensis isolates showed antagonistic effects on both phytopathogens. These strains had a rhizoid colony morphology, which has not been described for B. weihenstephanensis strains previously. Genome analysis of all isolates revealed putative genes encoding fungicidal substances and resulted in identification of 304 secondary metabolite gene clusters including 101 non-ribosomal polypeptide synthetases and 203 ribosomal-synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides. All genomes encoded genes for the synthesis of the antifungal siderophore bacillibactin. In the genome of one B. thuringiensis strain, a gene cluster for zwittermicin A was detected. Isolates which either exhibited an inhibitory or an interfering effect on the growth of the phytopathogens carried one or two genes encoding putative mycolitic chitinases, which might contribute to antifungal activities

  5. Susceptibility, mechanisms of response and resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins in Spodoptera spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda; Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Ferré, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Bioinsecticides based on Bacillus thuringiensis have long been used as an alternative to synthetic insecticides to control insect pests. In this review, we focus on insects of the genus Spodoptera, including relevant polyphagous species that are primary and secondary pests of many crops, and how B. thuringiensis toxins can be used for Spodoptera spp. pest management. We summarize the main findings related to susceptibility, midgut binding specificity, mechanisms of response and resistance of this insect genus to B. thuringiensis toxins.

  6. Cross-Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin CryIF in the Diamondback Moth (Plutella xylostella)

    OpenAIRE

    Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Finson, Naomi; Johnson, Marshall W.; David G Heckel

    1994-01-01

    Selection with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki, which contains CryIA and CryII toxins, caused a >200-fold cross-resistance to CryIF toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. CryIE was not toxic, but CryIB was highly toxic to both selected and unselected larvae. The results show that extremely high levels of cross-resistance can be conferred across classes of CryI toxins of B. thuringiensis.

  7. Occurrence and significance of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in ready-to-eat food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenquist, Hanne; Ørum-Smidt, Lasse; Andersen, Sigrid R

    2005-01-01

    Among 48,901 samples of ready-to-eat food products at the Danish retail market, 0.5% had counts of Bacillus cereus-like bacteria above 10(4) cfu g(-1). The high counts were most frequently found in starchy, cooked products, but also in fresh cucumbers and tomatoes. Forty randomly selected strains...... had at least one gene or component involved in human diarrhoeal disease, while emetic toxin was related to only one B. cereus strain. A new observation was that 31 out of the 40 randomly selected B. cereus-like strains could be classified as Bacillus thuringiensis due to crystal production and...

  8. Identification of metabolism pathways directly regulated by sigma54 factor in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qi; Wang, Guannan; Liu, Guiming; Zhang, Jie; Song, Fuping

    2015-01-01

    Sigma54 (σ54) regulates nitrogen and carbon utilization in bacteria. Promoters that are σ54-dependent are highly conserved and contain short sequences located at the −24 and −12 positions upstream of the transcription initiation site. σ54 requires regulatory proteins known as bacterial enhancer-binding proteins (bEBPs) to activate gene transcription. We show that σ54 regulates the capacity to grow on various nitrogen sources using a Bacillus thuringiensis HD73 mutant lacking the sigL gene encoding σ54 (ΔsigL). A 2-fold-change cutoff and a false discovery rate cutoff of P < 0.05 were used to analyze the DNA microarray data, which revealed 255 genes that were downregulated and 121 that were upregulated in the ΔsigL mutant relative to the wild-type HD73 strain. The σ54 regulon (stationary phase) was characterized by DNA microarray, bioinformatics, and functional assay; 16 operons containing 47 genes were identified whose promoter regions contain the conserved −12/−24 element and whose transcriptional activities were abolished or reduced in the ΔsigL mutant. Eight σ54-dependent transcriptional bEBPs were found in the Bt HD73 genome, and they regulated nine σ54-dependent promoters. The metabolic pathways activated by σ54 in this process have yet to be identified in Bacillus thuringiensis; nonetheless, the present analysis of the σ54 regulon provides a better understanding of the physiological roles of σ factors in bacteria. PMID:26029175

  9. A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi Willcoxon, Michi; Dennis, Jaclyn R; Lau, Sabina I; Xie, Weiping; You, You; Leng, Song; Fong, Ryan C; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-01-10

    A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins designated as Cry was developed and evaluated for screening a large number of Cry protein variants produced by DNA shuffling. This automation-amenable assay exploits an insect cell line expressing a single receptor of Bt Cry proteins. The Cry toxin used to develop this assay is a variant of the Cry1Ab protein called IP1-88, which was produced previously by DNA shuffling. Cell mortality caused by the activated Bt Cry toxin was determined by chemical cell viability assay in 96/384-well microtiter plates utilizing CellTiter 96(®) obtained from Promega. A widely-accepted mode-of-action theory of certain Bt Cry proteins suggests that the activated toxin binds to one or more receptors and forms a pore through the insect gut epithelial cell apical membrane. A number of insect proteins such as cadherin-like protein (Cad), aminopeptidase-N (APN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and ABC transporter (ABCC) have been identified as the receptors of Bt Cry toxins. In this study, Bt Cry toxin receptors Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer) cadherin-like protein (On-Cad) and aminopeptidase-N 1 and 3 (On-APN1, On-APN3) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) cadherin-like protein (Sf-Cad) were cloned in an insect cell line, Sf21, and a mammalian cell line, Expi293F. It was observed by ligand blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy that trypsin-activated IP1-88 bound to On-Cad and On-APN1, but not Sf-Cad or On-APN3. In contrast, IP1-88 bound only to APN1 in BBMV (Brush Border Membrane Vesicles) prepared from the third and fourth-instar O. nubilalis larval midgut. The sensitivity of the recombinant cells to the toxin was then tested. IP1-88 showed no toxicity to non-recombinant Sf21 and Expi293F. Toxicity was observed only when the On-Cad gene was cloned and expressed. Sf-Cad and On-APN1 were not able to make those cells sensitive to the toxin. Since the expression of On-Cad alone was

  10. Interactions of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin in genetically engineered cotton with predatory heteropterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jorge B; Ruberson, John R

    2008-06-01

    A number of cotton varieties have been genetically transformed with genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to continuously produce Bt endotoxins, offering whole plant and season-long protection against many lepidopteran larvae. Constant whole-plant toxin expression creates a significant opportunity for non-target herbivores to acquire and bio-accumulate the toxin for higher trophic levels. In the present study we investigated movement of Cry1Ac toxin from the transgenic cotton plant through specific predator-prey pairings, using omnivorous predators with common cotton pests as prey: (1) the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), with the predator Podisus maculiventris (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae); (2) the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acarina: Tetranychidae), with the predatory big-eyed bug Geocoris punctipes (Heteroptera: Geocoridae) and (3) with the predatory damsel bug Nabis roseipennis (Heteropera: Nabidae); and (4) the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) with the predatory pirate bug Orius insidiosus (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae). We quantified Cry1Ac toxin in the cotton plants, and in the pests and predators, and the effects of continuous feeding on S. exigua larvae fed either Bt or non-Bt cotton on life history traits of P. maculiventris. All three herbivores were able to convey Cry1Ac toxin to their respective predators. Among the herbivores, T. urticae exhibited 16.8 times more toxin in their bodies than that expressed in Bt-cotton plant, followed by S. exigua (1.05 times), and F. occidentalis immatures and adults (0.63 and 0.73 times, respectively). Of the toxin in the respective herbivorous prey, 4, 40, 17 and 14% of that amount was measured in the predators G. punctipes, P. maculiventris, O. insidiosus, and N. roseipennis, respectively. The predator P. maculiventris exhibited similar life history characteristics (developmental time, survival, longevity, and fecundity) regardless of the prey's food

  11. HarpinPss-mediated enhancement in growth and biological control of late leaf spot in groundnut by a chlorothalonil-tolerant Bacillus thuringiensis SFC24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, Kondreddy; Podile, Appa Rao

    2012-04-20

    Chemical and biological approaches have been adopted to increase the growth and yield of crops and reduce loss due to diseases. We have adopted an integrated approach, where both direct antagonism and induced resistance were combined to reduce the incidence of late leaf spot (LLS) disease in groundnut caused by Phaeoisariopsis personata. Chitinolytic chlorothalonil-tolerant soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis SFC24 (Bt SFC24) was manipulated in vitro to express secretable form of elicitor protein harpin(Pss) of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Severity of the LLS decreased by 65% when the leaves were sprayed with B. thuringiensis expressing harpin(Pss) (Bt-pss). As seed treatment, there was an increase in growth of groundnut. Bt and Bt-pss accounted to 13% and 36% increase in shoot length. Expression of a secretable form of harpin(Pss) thus improved the ability of B. thuringiensis SFC24 to promote growth and control LLS in groundnut. In this new approach a chlorothalonil-tolerant chitinolytic bacterium was genetically engineered to secrete elicitor harpin(Pss) for dual benefit of growth promotion and disease control.

  12. 40 CFR 180.1108 - Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delta endotoxin of Bacillus... From Tolerances § 180.1108 Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated... of Bacillus thuringiensis variety San Diego encapsulated into killed Pseudomonas fluorescens...

  13. 40 CFR 174.530 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.530 Bacillus... Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in or on the food commodities of cotton, cotton; cotton,...

  14. 40 CFR 174.520 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein... PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.520 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus...

  15. 77 FR 6471 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae Protein in Cotton; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 174 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae Protein in Cotton; Exemption from the Requirement of... regulation establishes an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Bacillus... residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton under the FFDCA. DATES: This regulation...

  16. Avaliação de produtos à base de Bacillus thuringiensis no controle da traça-das-crucíferas Evaluation of insecticides based on Bacillus thuringiensis in the control of the diamondback moth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia T Medeiros

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se em dois experimentos a suscetibilidade da traça-das-crucíferas a inseticidas à base de Bacillus thuringiensis em repolho cv. Itiban. O delineamento do primeiro experimento (de julho a setembro/03, em área de plantio comercial em Brazlândia (DF, foi de blocos casualizados, com seis tratamentos e dez repetições; os bioinseticidas utilizados foram B. thuringiensis kurstaki (S1450CO, B. thuringiensis aizawai comercial (Bta e três produtos formulados com as estirpes S1450BB, S811BB, S845BB de B. thuringiensis pertencentes ao Banco de Bacillus spp. da Embrapa Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia. No segundo experimento, realizado no campo experimental da Embrapa (DF, de outubro/03 a janeiro/04, o delineamento foi de blocos casualizados, com seis tratamentos e quatro repetições; os inseticidas utilizados foram os mesmos do primeiro experimento, com a adição de Spinosad, e retirado o tratamento S811BB. Os produtos foram aplicados quando foi atingido o nível de dano de seis furos nas quatro folhas centrais do repolho. O Bta comercial foi o produto mais eficaz no primeiro experimento, tendo sido aplicado cinco vezes e diferiu estaticamente dos demais produtos. Os formulados S845BB e S1450BB não apresentaram diferenças quando comparados ao produto comercial S1450 e foram aplicados seis vezes. O produto S811BB também foi aplicado seis vezes, mas sua eficácia foi inferior aos demais produtos e não diferiu da testemunha. Já no segundo experimento, o S1450 comercial foi aplicado cinco vezes e os demais produtos à base de Bt, seis vezes. Todos os produtos utilizados não diferiram entre si, diferindo apenas no número de aplicações.Two experiments were performed to evaluate the susceptibility of the diamondback moth to insecticides based on Bacillus thuringiensis in cabbage cv. Itiban. The first experiment was carried out from July to September 2003, in a production area in Brazlândia (DF, Brazil. Randomized blocks with six

  17. Gene expression patterns and sequence polymorphisms associated with mosquito resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Després, Laurence; Stalinski, Renaud; Tetreau, Guillaume; Paris, Margot; Bonin, Aurélie; Navratil, Vincent; Reynaud, Stéphane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the intensive use of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) toxins for mosquito control, little is known about the long term effect of exposure to this cocktail of toxins on target mosquito populations. In contrast to the many cases of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins observed in other insects, there is no evidence so far for Bti resistance evolution in field mosquito populations. High fitness costs measured in a Bti selected mosquito laboratory strain sugg...

  18. Degradation and detection of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis DNA and proteins in flour of three genetically modified rice events submitted to a set of thermal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofu; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xu, Junfeng; Dai, Chen; Shen, Wenbiao

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the degradation of three transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes (Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and Cry1Ab/Ac) and the corresponding encoded Bt proteins in KMD1, KF6, and TT51-1 rice powder, respectively, following autoclaving, cooking, baking, or microwaving. Exogenous Bt genes were more stable than the endogenous sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) gene, and short DNA fragments were detected more frequently than long DNA fragments in both the Bt and SPS genes. Autoclaving, cooking (boiling in water, 30 min), and baking (200 °C, 30 min) induced the most severe Bt protein degradation effects, and Cry1Ab protein was more stable than Cry1Ac and Cry1Ab/Ac protein, which was further confirmed by baking samples at 180 °C for different periods of time. Microwaving induced mild degradation of the Bt and SPS genes, and Bt proteins, whereas baking (180 °C, 15 min), cooking and autoclaving led to further degradation, and baking (200 °C, 30 min) induced the most severe degradation. The findings of the study indicated that degradation of the Bt genes and proteins somewhat correlated with the treatment intensity. Polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and lateral flow tests were used to detect the corresponding transgenic components. Strategies for detecting transgenic ingredients in highly processed foods are discussed.

  19. The compatibility of a nucleopolyhedrosis virus control with resistance management for Bacillus thuringiensis: co-infection and cross-resistance studies with the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, B; Sayyed, A H; Wright, D J

    2006-10-01

    The use of genetically modified crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins can lead to the reduction in application of broad-spectrum pesticides and an increased opportunity for supplementary biological control. Bt microbial sprays are also used by organic growers or as part of integrated pest management programs that rely on the use of natural enemies. In both applications the evolution of resistance to Bt toxins is a potential problem. Natural enemies (pathogens or insects) acting in combination with toxins can accelerate or decelerate the evolution of resistance to Bt. In the present study we investigated whether the use of a nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) could potentially affect the evolution of resistance to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac in Plutella xylostella. At low toxin doses there was evidence for antagonistic interactions between AcMNPV and Cry1Ac resistant and susceptible insects. However, this antagonism was much stronger and more widespread for susceptible larvae; interactions were generally not distinguishable from additive for resistant larvae. Selection for resistance to Cry1Ac in two populations of P. xylostella with differing resistance mechanisms did not produce any correlated changes in resistance to AcMNPV. Stronger antagonistic interactions between Bt and AcMNPV on susceptible rather than resistant larvae can decrease the relative fitness between Bt-resistant and susceptible larvae. These interactions and the lack of cross-resistance between virus and toxin suggest that the use of NPV is compatible with resistance management to Bt products.

  20. Cell Differentiation in a Bacillus thuringiensis Population during Planktonic Growth, Biofilm Formation, and Host Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplaetse, Emilie; Slamti, Leyla; Gohar, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is armed to complete a full cycle in its insect host. During infection, virulence factors are expressed under the control of the quorum sensor PlcR to kill the host. After the host’s death, the quorum sensor NprR controls a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing the vegetative cells to use the insect cadaver as a bioincubator and to survive. Only a part of the Bt population sporulates in the insect cadaver, and the precise composition of the whole population and its evolution over time are unknown. Using fluorescent reporters to record gene expression at the single-cell level, we have determined the differentiation course of a Bt population and explored the lineage existing among virulent, necrotrophic, and sporulating cells. The dynamics of cell differentiation were monitored during growth in homogenized medium, biofilm formation, and colonization of insect larvae. We demonstrated that in the insect host and in planktonic culture in rich medium, the virulence, necrotrophism, and sporulation regulators are successively activated in the same cell. In contrast, in biofilms, activation of PlcR is dispensable for NprR activation and we observed a greater heterogeneity than under the other two growth conditions. We also showed that sporulating cells arise almost exclusively from necrotrophic cells. In biofilm and in the insect cadaver, we identified an as-yet-uncharacterized category of cells that do not express any of the reporters used. Overall, we showed that PlcR, NprR, and Spo0A act as interconnected integrators to allow finely tuned adaptation of the pathogen to its environment. PMID:25922389

  1. Research Progress in Paraslporal Crystal from Bacillus thuringiensis%苏云金芽孢杆菌伴孢晶体的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪; 马玉超; 李煦; 于慧敏; 张建

    2012-01-01

    伴胞晶体是苏云金芽孢杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,简称Bt)在芽孢形成过程中产生的一种蛋白晶体.作为生物杀虫农药之一,伴胞晶体/Bt由于具有高效、广谱、环保及生物安全等优势,在农林业中得到广泛应用.介绍了伴胞晶体的最新分类、命名情况,综速了其结构、杀虫机理及应用方面的研究进展,并对Bc生物农药的发展前景进行了展望.%Parasporal crystals are insecticidal δ-endoloxin proteins (named Cry and Cyl toxins) produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) during the sporulation phase. As one of the bio-pesticides, parasporal cryatals/Bt have been widely used in agriculture and forestry with the advantages of high efficiency, broad-spectrum, environmental protection and bio-safety. The latest classification and nomenclature of parasporal crystals were introduced, the research progress in their structure, inseeticidal mechanism and application were reviewed in this paper, and their development prospect in Bt biological pesticides was forecasted.

  2. Bacillus thuringiensis HCB6 Amylase Immobilization by Chitosan Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusfahair; Ningsih, D. R.; Kartika, D.; Fatoni, A.; Zuliana, A. L.

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the amylase immobilization using a chitosan bead and to characterize immobilized amylase of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteria HCB6. This study was started of amylase production, continued by immobilization optimization including ratio of chitosan:enzymes, enzyme-matrix contact time, substrate concentration, pH effect, incubation temperature effect, reaction time, and stability of immobilized enzyme. Amylase activity assay was dinitro salicylic (DNS) method. The results showed the optimum chitosan:enzyme ratio was 2.5: 1 (v/v), immobilization contact time of 18 hours and immobilization efficiency of 87.93%. Furthermore, immobilized amylase of B. thuringiensis HCB6 showed optimum substrate concentration of 1.5%, optimum pH of 6, optimum incubation temperature of 37 ° C, and the reaction time of 30 minutes. The Michaelis-Menten constant KM value for free and immobilized amylase were 5.30% and 1.33% respectively. Immobilized amylase can be used up to five times with the remaining activity of 43.3%.

  3. Impact of Bt crops on non-target organisms – 3 systematic reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops producing Cry toxins, originating from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), has raised environmental concerns over their sustainable use and consequences for biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural land. During the last two decades...

  4. Evaluation of a new formulation of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lopes

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the potency (ITU and efficacy of a liquid formulation of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis developed by the State University of Londrina named BioUel, against early fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. The ITU/mg of BioUel was 960, the LC50 was of 0.271 (± 0.39 ppm, and the LC95 was 0.634 (± 0.099 ppm, in larvae of C. quinquefasciatus. In A. aegypti larvae, LC50 was 0.332 (± 0.042 ppm and LC95 was 0.694 (± 0.073 ppm. The ITU level of BioUel and its control results were similar to most commercial products tested. Stability was of approximately 90 days, which allows for local production.

  5. Novel fermentation media for production of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poopathi, Subbiah; Kumar, K Anup

    2003-08-01

    The production of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (deBarjac) (Bti) as a biopesticide is not cost-effective using existing fermentation technology. In this study, we explored the use of several less expensive alternative culture media (potato, common sugar, and Bengal gram) for the growth and production of Bti. Growth was obtained in all tested media and was comparable to that obtained in conventional medium (Luria-Bertani). Toxicity assays showed that the toxin produced from the novel growth media were effective in killing larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti and toxicity was comparable to that produced from Luria-Bertani medium. These observations suggest that potato can be used as a cheap source of culture medium for the production of Bti toxin in mosquito control programs.

  6. Flexibility Analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xin Min; XIA Li Qiu; YANG Xiao Ping; PENG Xiao Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the flexibility and mobility of the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Aa. Methods The graph theory-based program Constraint Network Analysis and normal mode-based program NMsim were used to analyze the global and local flexibility indices as well as the fluctuation of individual residues in detail. Results The decrease in Cry1Aa network rigidity with the increase of temperature was evident. Two phase transition points in which the Cry1Aa structure lost rigidity during the thermal simulation were identified. Two rigid clusters were found in domains I and II. Weak spots were found in C-terminal domain III. Several flexible regions were found in all three domains;the largest residue fluctuation was present in the apical loop2 of domain II. Conclusion Although several flexible regions could be found in all the three domains, the most flexible regions were in the apical loops of domain II.

  7. Improving SERS Detection of Bacillus thuringiensis Using Silver Nanoparticles Reduced with Hydroxylamine and with Citrate Capped Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilsamar Félix-Rivera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of techniques that could be useful in fields other than biological warfare agents countermeasures such as medical diagnostics, industrial microbiology, and environmental applications have become a very important subject of research. Raman spectroscopy can be used in near field or at long distances from the sample to obtain fingerprinting information of chemical composition of microorganisms. In this research, biochemical components of the cell wall and endospores of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt were identified by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS spectroscopy using silver (Ag nanoparticles (NPs reduced by hydroxylamine and borohydride capped with sodium citrate. Activation of “hot spots”, aggregation and surface charge modification of the NPs, was studied and optimized to obtain signal enhancements from Bt by SERS. Slight aggregation of the NPs as well as surface charge modification to a more acidic ambient was induced using small-size borohydride-reduced NPs in the form of metallic suspensions aimed at increasing the Ag NP-Bt interactions. Hydroxylamine-reduced NPs required slight aggregation and no pH modifications in order to obtain high spectral quality results in bringing out SERS signatures of Bt.

  8. Nanoscale imaging of Bacillus thuringiensis flagella using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Dupres, Vincent; Delestrait, Guillaume; Mahillon, Jacques; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2012-02-01

    Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in cell surface appendages.Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in

  9. Isolation and characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in inducing pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis toxin in cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visweshwar Regode

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxin proteins are deployed in transgenic plants for pest management. The present studies were aimed at characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in activation of inactive Cry1Ac protoxin (pro-Cry1Ac to active toxin in Helicoverpa armigera. Bacterial strains were isolated from H. armigera midgut and screened for their proteolytic activation towards pro-Cry1Ac. Among twelve gut bacterial isolates seven isolates showed proteolytic activity, and proteases from three isolates (IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 were found to be involved in the proteolytic conversion of pro-Cry1Ac into active toxin. The proteases from IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 isolates were purified to 11.90-, 15.50- and 17.20-fold, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for gut bacterial protease activity was 8.0 and 40 oC. Maximum inhibition of total proteolytic activity was exerted by PMSF followed by EDTA. Fluorescence zymography revealed that proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 were chymotrypsin-like and showing protease band at ~15, 65 and 15 kDa, respectively. Active Cry1Ac formed from processing pro-Cry1Ac by gut bacterial proteases exhibited toxicity towards H. armigera. The gut bacterial isolates IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 showed homology with Bacillus thuringiensis (CP003763.1, Vibrio fischeri (CP000020.2 and Escherichia coli (CP011342.1, respectively. Proteases produced by midgut bacteria are involved in proteolytic processing of Bt protoxin and play a major role in inducing pathogenicity of Bt toxins in H. armigera.

  10. Occurrence of Toxigenic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in Doenjang, a Korean Fermented Soybean Paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Min; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Moon Cheol; Koo, Minseon

    2016-04-01

    This study determined the prevalence and toxin profile of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in doenjang, a fermented soybean food, made using both traditional and commercial methods. The 51 doenjang samples tested were broadly contaminated with B. cereus; in contrast, only one sample was positive for B. thuringiensis. All B. cereus isolates from doenjang were positive for diarrheal toxin genes. The frequencies of nheABC and hblACD in traditional samples were 22.7 and 0%, respectively, whereas 5.1 and 5.1% of B. cereus isolates from commercial samples possessed nheABC and hblACD, respectively. The detection rate of ces gene was 10.8%. The predominant toxin profile among isolates from enterotoxigenic B. cereus in doenjang was profile 4 (entFM-bceT-cytK). The major enterotoxin genes in emetic B. cereus were cytK, entFM, and nheA genes. The B. thuringiensis isolate was of the diarrheagenic type. These results provide a better understanding of the epidemiology of the enterotoxigenic and emetic B. cereus groups in Korean fermented soybean products.

  11. GUS组织化学染色法--一种快速筛选抗二化螟转Bt cry1Ab基因水稻的方法%GUS histochemical assay: A rapid way to screen striped stem boren (chilo suppressalis) resistant transgenic rice with a cry1ab gene from Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴刚; 崔海瑞; 舒庆尧; 叶恭银; 夏英武

    2000-01-01

    @@ The time-consuming in vitro bioassay is the frequently used method to screen insect resistant transgenic rice and often remains a tedious task for us. Here we reported the resistance of Bt transgenic rice to striped stem borer by means of field natural infestation and in vitro bioassay. We found that there was a significant correlation between the number of GUS positive plants and the number of insect resistant plants, thus GUS histochemical assay could be used as a rapid and convenient method to screen insect resistant plants.

  12. Utilization of silkworm litter and pupal waste-an eco-friendly approach for mass production of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sarvamangala R; Amena, S; Vikas, A; Rahul, P; Jagadeesh, K; Praveen, K

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the utilization of pupal waste and silkworm litter separately as production media for the mass cultivation of the potential biopesticide, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Bt is the most successful commercial biopesticide accounting for 90% of all biopesticides sold all over the world. Biochemical analysis of the dry pupal waste revealed to be consisting of 4% carbohydrates, 44.9% proteins and 40% lipids. Similarly the biochemical composition of dry silkworm litter was found to be 4% carbohydrates, 57.5% proteins and 30.5% lipids. B. thuringiensis NCIM No. 2159 was mass cultivated in a semi-solid-state fermentation at a pH 7.0 and temperature 32°C. Changes in the pH and biochemical composition of the substrates were evaluated during the course of the fermentation. The reliability of the two substrates as production media was evaluated by determination of growth at regular intervals. Maximum growth was recorded at 96h incubation showing a spore count in the order of 3.5×10(10) and 3.0×10(10)CFU/g in pupal waste and silkworm litter respectively.

  13. Prevalence of cry2-type genes in Bacillus thuringiensis isolates recovered from diverse habitats in India and isolation of a novel cry2Af2 gene toxic to Helicoverpa armigera (cotton boll worm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katara, Jawahar Lal; Kaur, Sarvjeet; Kumari, Gouthami Krishna; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Insecticidal cry and vip genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been used for control of lepidopteran insects in transgenic crops. However, novel genes are required for gene pyramiding to delay evolution of resistance to the currently deployed genes. Two PCR-based techniques were employed for screening of cry2-type genes in 129 Bt isolates from diverse habitats in India and 27 known Bt strains. cry2Ab-type genes were more prevalent than cry2Aa- and cry2Ac-type genes. Correlation between source of isolates and abundance of cry2-type genes was not observed. Full-length cry2A-type genes were amplified by PCR from 9 Bt isolates and 4 Bt strains. The genes from Bt isolates SK-758 from Sorghum grain dust and SK-793 from Chilli seeds warehouse, Andhra Pradesh, were cloned and sequenced. The gene from SK-758 (NCBI GenBank accession No. GQ866915) was novel, while that from SK-793 (NCBI GenBank accession No. GQ866914) was identical to the cry2Ab1 gene. The Bacillus thuringiensis Nomenclature Committee ( http://www.lifesci.sussex.ac.uk/home/Neil_Crickmore/Bt/toxins2.html ) named these genes cry2Af2 and cry2Ab16, respectively. The cry2Af2 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and found to be toxic towards Helicoverpa armigera. The cry2Af2 gene will be useful for pyramiding in transgenic crops.

  14. Individual and Combined Effects of Bacillus Thuringiensis and Azadirachtin on Plodia Interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri-Ganbalani, Gadir; Borzoui, Ehsan; Abdolmaleki, Arman; Abedi, Zahra; George Kamita, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    The Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a major stored product pest that is found throughout the world. In this study, the effect of oral exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) subsp. kurstaki (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) and azadirachtin was evaluated in third instar P. interpunctella under laboratory conditions. The median lethal concentration (LC50) of Bt and azadirachtin on third instars was 490 and 241 μg a.i./ml, respectively. The median lethal time (LT50) of these insecticides was the same (4.5 d following exposure to 750 or 400 μg a.i./ml of Bt or azadirachtin, respectively). When the larvae fed on diet containing LC30 concentrations of both Bt and azadirachtin an additive interaction in terms of mortality was found. A synergistic interaction was found when the larvae fed on diet containing LC50 concentrations of both insecticides. Larvae that fed on insecticide-containing diet (either Bt or azadirachtin at an LC30 concentration, or both insecticides at LC30 or LC50 concentrations) showed lower glycogen and lipid levels, and generally lower protein content in comparison to control larvae. Larvae that fed on diet containing both Bt and azadirachtin showed reduced weight gain and nutritional indices in comparison to control larvae or larvae fed on the diet containing only one of the insecticides. Finally, exposure to both insecticides, either individually or in combination, reduced the level of digestive enzymes found in the midgut. Our findings indicate that both Bt and azadirachtin, either individually or in combination have significant potential for use in controlling of P. interpunctella.

  15. cDNAs of aminopeptidase-like protein genes from Plodia interpunctella strains with different susceptibilities to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y C; Kramer, K J; Oppert, B; Dowdy, A K

    2000-03-01

    Aminopeptidase N has been reported to be a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1A toxin-binding protein in several lepidopteran insects. cDNAs of aminopeptidase-like proteins from both Bt-susceptible RC688s and Bt-resistant HD198r strains of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella, were cloned and sequenced. They contain 3345 and 3358 nucleotides, respectively, and each has a 3048 bp open reading frame that encodes 1016 amino acids. Putative protein sequences include 10 potential glycosylation sites and a zinc metal binding site motif of HEXXH, which is typical of the active site of zinc-dependent metallopeptidases. Sequence analysis indicated that the deduced protein sequences are most similar to an aminopeptidase from Heliothis virescens with 62% sequence identity and highly similar to three other lepidopteran aminopeptidases from Plutella xylostella, Manduca sexta, Bombyx mori with sequence identities of 51-52%. Four nucleotide differences were observed in the open reading frames that translated into two amino acid differences in the putative protein sequences. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed an aminopeptidase gene coding difference between RC688s and HD198r strains of P. interpunctella in the PCR amplification of a specific allele (PASA) using preferential primers designed from a single base substitution. The gene mutation for Asp185-->Glu185 was also confirmed in two additional Bt-resistant P. interpunctella strains. This mutation is located within a region homologous to the conserved Cry1Aa toxin binding regions from Bombyx mori and Plutella xylostella. The aminopeptidase-like mRNA expression levels in the Bt-resistant strain were slightly higher than those in the Bt-susceptible strain. The sequences reported in this paper have been deposited in the GenBank database (accession numbers AF034483 for susceptible strain RC688s and AF034484 for resistant strain HD198r).

  16. Chronic toxicity and physiological changes induced in the honey bee by the exposure to fipronil and Bacillus thuringiensis spores alone or combined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, Maria Teresa; Amichot, Marcel; Pauron, David; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Kretzschmar, André; Maini, Stefano; Belzunces, Luc P

    2016-05-01

    In the agricultural environment, honey bees may be exposed to combinations of pesticides. Until now, the effects of these combinations on honey bee health have been poorly investigated. In this study, we assessed the impacts of biological and chemical insecticides, combining low dietary concentrations of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) spores (100 and 1000µg/L) with the chemical insecticide fipronil (1µg/L). In order to assess the possible effects of Cry toxins, the Bt kurstaki strain (Btk) was compared with a Bt strain devoid of toxin-encoding plasmids (Bt Cry(-)). The oral exposure to fipronil and Bt spores from both strains for 10 days did not elicit significant effects on the feeding behavior and survival after 25 days. Local and systemic physiological effects were investigated by measuring the activities of enzymes involved in the intermediary and detoxication metabolisms at two sampling dates (day 10 and day 20). Attention was focused on head and midgut glutathione-S-transferase (GST), midgut alkaline phosphatase (ALP), abdomen glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). We found that Bt Cry(-) and Btk spores induced physiological modifications by differentially modulating enzyme activities. Fipronil influenced the enzyme activities differently at days 10 and 20 and, when combined with Bt spores, elicited modulations of some spore-induced physiological responses. These results show that an apparent absence of toxicity may hide physiological disruptions that could be potentially damaging for the bees, especially in the case of combined exposures to other environmental stressors.

  17. Diversity in gut microflora of Helicoverpa armigera populations from different regions in relation to biological activity of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin Cry1Ac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasiva, Inakarla; Shouche, Yogesh; Kulkarni, Girish Jayant; Krishnayya, Pulipaka Venkata; Akbar, Shaik Mohammed; Sharma, Hari Chand

    2014-12-01

    Transgenic crops expressing toxin proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been deployed on a large scale for management of Helicoverpa armigera. Resistance to Bt toxins has been documented in several papers, and therefore, we examined the role of midgut microflora of H. armigera in its susceptibility to Bt toxins. The susceptibility of H. armigera to Bt toxin Cry1Ac was assessed using Log-dose-Probit analysis, and the microbial communities were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. The H. armigera populations from nine locations harbored diverse microbial communities, and had some unique bacteria, suggesting a wide geographical variation in microbial community in the midgut of the pod borer larvae. Phylotypes belonging to 32 genera were identified in the H. armigera midgut in field populations from nine locations. Bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae (Order Bacillales) were present in all the populations, and these may be the common members of the H. armigera larval midgut microflora. Presence and/or absence of certain species were linked to H. armigera susceptibility to Bt toxins, but there were no clear trends across locations. Variation in susceptibility of F1 neonates of H. armigera from different locations to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac was found to be 3.4-fold. These findings support the idea that insect migut microflora may influence the biological activity of Bt toxins.

  18. Screening of Bacillus thuringiensis strains effective against mosquitoes Prospecção de estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis efetivas contra mosquitos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Gomes Monnerat

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate 210 Bacillus thuringiensis strains against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae to select the most effective. These strains were isolated from different regions of Brazil and are stored in a Bacillus spp. collection at Embrapa Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia, Brasília, Brazil. The selected strains were characterized by morphological (microscopy, biochemical (SDS-PAGE 10% and molecular (PCR methods. Six B. thuringiensis strains were identified as mosquito-toxic after the selective bioassays. None of the strains produced the expected PCR products for detection of cry4, cry11 and cyt1A genes. These results indicate that the activity of mosquitocidal Brazilian strains are not related with Cry4, Cry11 or Cyt proteins, so they could be used as an alternative bioinsecticide against mosquitoes.Neste trabalho foram realizados testes de patogenicidade com 210 estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis contra larvas de Aedes aegypti e Culex quinquefasciatus, a fim de se determinar as mais eficazes. Estas estirpes foram isoladas de diversas regiões do Brasil e estão armazenadas na coleção de Bacillus spp. da Embrapa Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia. As estirpes selecionadas foram caracterizadas por métodos morfológicos (microscopia, bioquímicos (SDS-PAGE 10% e moleculares (Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase. Foram selecionadas seis estirpes entomopatogênicas de Bacillus thuringiensis. Nenhuma das estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis apresentou produtos de PCR esperados para a detecção dos genes cry4, cry11 e cyt1A. A patogenicidade das estirpes não está associada à presença das toxinas Cry4, Cry11 ou Cyt, assim, essas estirpes poderão ser utilizadas para a formatação de um bioinseticida alternativo contra mosquitos.

  19. Can pyramids and seed mixtures delay resistance to Bt crops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary strategy for delaying evolution of pest resistance to transgenic crops that produce insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) entails refuges of plants that do not produce Bt toxins and thus allow survival of susceptible pests. Recent advances include using refuges together...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis Strain IS5056, an Isolate Highly Toxic to Trichoplusia ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Emilia; Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Bideshi, Dennis K.

    2013-01-01

    The genome sequence of the entomopathogen Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis strain IS5056 was determined. The chromosome is composed of 5,491,935 bp. In addition, IS5056 harbors 14 plasmids ranging from 6,880 to 328,151 bp, four of which contain nine insecticidal protein genes, cry1Aa3, cry1Ab21, cry1Ba1, cry1Ia14, cry2Aa9, cry2Ab1, vip1, vip2, and vip3Aa10. PMID:23516221

  1. Spider mite infestations reduce Bacillus thuringiensis toxin concentration in corn leaves and predators avoid spider mites that have fed on Bacillus thuringiensis corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic crops containing pyramid-stacked genes for Bacillus thuringiensis derived toxins for controlling coleopteran and lepidopteran pests are increasingly common. As part of environmental risk assessments, these crops are evaluated for toxicity against non-target organisms, and for their poten...

  2. 77 FR 47287 - Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab Protein in Corn; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 174 Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab Protein in Corn; Exemption From the Requirement...-incorporated protectant (PIP), Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn, in or on the food and feed... permissible level for residues of Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn. DATES: This regulation...

  3. How Quorum Sensing Connects Sporulation to Necrotrophism in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchat, Stéphane; Talagas, Antoine; Poncet, Sandrine; Lazar, Noureddine; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier; Nessler, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate adaptation properties, cell fate or commitment to sporulation. The infectious cycle of Bacillus thuringiensis in the insect host is a powerful model to investigate the role of quorum sensing in natural conditions. It is tuned by communication systems regulators belonging to the RNPP family and directly regulated by re-internalized signaling peptides. One such RNPP regulator, NprR, acts in the presence of its cognate signaling peptide NprX as a transcription factor, regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of these bacteria in the insect cadaver. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of NprX and independently of its transcriptional activator function, NprR negatively controls sporulation. NprR inhibits expression of Spo0A-regulated genes by preventing the KinA-dependent phosphorylation of the phosphotransferase Spo0F, thus delaying initiation of the sporulation process. This NprR function displays striking similarities with the Rap proteins, which also belong to the RNPP family, but are devoid of DNA-binding domain and indirectly control gene expression via protein-protein interactions in Bacilli. Conservation of the Rap residues directly interacting with Spo0F further suggests a common inhibition of the sporulation phosphorelay. The crystal structure of apo NprR confirms that NprR displays a highly flexible Rap-like structure. We propose a molecular regulatory mechanism in which key residues of the bifunctional regulator NprR are directly and alternatively involved in its two functions. NprX binding switches NprR from a dimeric inhibitor of sporulation to a tetrameric transcriptional activator involved in the necrotrophic lifestyle of B. thuringiensis. NprR thus tightly coordinates sporulation and necrotrophism, ensuring survival and dissemination of the bacteria during host infection.

  4. Distribution of cryV-type insecticidal protein genes in Bacillus thuringiensis and cloning of cryV-type genes from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. entomocidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, B.S.; Park, S.H.; Choi, S. K.; Koo, B T; Lee, S. T.; Kim, J. I.

    1995-01-01

    DNA dot blot hybridizations with a cryV-specific probe and a cryI-specific probe were performed to screen 24 Bacillus thuringiensis strains for their cryV-type (lepidopteran- and coleopteran-specific) and cryI-type (lepidopteran-specific) insecticidal crystal protein gene contents, respectively. The cryV-specific probe hybridized to 12 of the B. thuringiensis strains examined. Most of the cryV-positive strains also hybridized to the cryI-specific probe, indicating that the cryV genes are clos...

  5. No adjuvant effect of Bacillus thuringiensis-maize on allergic responses in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Reiner

    Full Text Available Genetically modified (GM foods are evaluated carefully for their ability to induce allergic disease. However, few studies have tested the capacity of a GM food to act as an adjuvant, i.e. influencing allergic responses to other unrelated allergens at acute onset and in individuals with pre-existing allergy. We sought to evaluate the effect of short-term feeding of GM Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt-maize (MON810 on the initiation and relapse of allergic asthma in mice. BALB/c mice were provided a diet containing 33% GM or non-GM maize for up to 34 days either before ovalbumin (OVA-induced experimental allergic asthma or disease relapse in mice with pre-existing allergy. We observed that GM-maize feeding did not affect OVA-induced eosinophilic airway and lung inflammation, mucus hypersecretion or OVA-specific antibody production at initiation or relapse of allergic asthma. There was no adjuvant effect upon GM-maize consumption on the onset or severity of allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic asthma.

  6. A new formulation of Bacillus thuringiensis: UV protection and sustained release mosquito larvae studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Songqin; Gelbič, Ivan; Xu, Lei; Guan, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis is an important factor in determining the success of this product as a pest control agent. In this report we present the development of a highly active mosquitocidal formulation with high resistance to UV. LLP29-M19 strain of Bt, selected by repeated exposure to UV was found to be highly resistant to UV. The product was optimized and the methods used were statistically analyzed. Using single-factor experiments it was determined that the optimal concentration of sodium alginate, CaCl2 and hollow glass beads in the formulation were 1.0%, 2.0% and 3.5%, respectively. Plackett-Burman design was used to screen the interaction of the three factors, CaCl2, sodium alginate and hollow glass beads in the sustained-release formulation. The best combined concentration and mutual effects of the three factors were optimized by response surface methodology. The results showed that the most favorable composition was sodium alginate 0.78%, CaCl2 4.52%, hollow glass bead 3.12%, bacterial powder 3.0%, melanin 0.015%, sodium benzoate 0.2%, and mouse feed 0.5%, resulting in the immobilization time of 4.5 h, at which time the corrected sustained-release virulence rose 2391.67 fold, which was 6.07-fold higher than the basic formulation and deviated only 5.0% from the value predicted by RSM. PMID:28004743

  7. Environmental Distribution and Diversity of Insecticidal Proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner based biopesticides have been successfully used world over for the control of agricultural pests and vectors of human diseases. Currently there are more than 200 B. thuringiensis strains with differing insecticidal activities are available as biocontrol agents and for developing transgenic plants. However, two major disadvantages are the development of insect resistance and high target specificity (narrow host range. Globally there is a continuous search for new B. thuringiensis strains with novel insecticidal activities. The present study aims to study the environmental distribution of B. thuringiensis and their toxic potential against insect pests. Soil and grain samples were collected from different environments and were processed by a modified acetate selection method. Initially B. thuringiensis isolates were screened on the basis of colony morphology and phase contrast microscopy for the presence of parasporal crystal inclusions. The population dynamics showed that B. thuringiensis is abundant in sericulture environment compared to other niches. Relative abundance of B. thuringiensis strains in sericulture environment shows the persistent association of B. thuringiensis with Bombyx mori (silk worm as insect pathogen. The protein profiles of the selected strains were studied by SDS-PAGE. The protein profiles of majority of B. thuringiensis isolates from grain storage facilities predominantly showing the 130 kDa and 68 kDa proteins, which is characteristics of lepidopteran active B. thuringiensis. However, one isolate BTRX-4 has 80-85 kDa protein, which is novel in that, this strain also exhibits antilepidopteran activity, which is normally presented by B. thuringiensis strains having 130 kDa and 68 kDa proteins. The protein profile of B. thuringiensis isolates from sericulture environment shows two different protein profiles. B. thuringiensis isolates BTRX-16 to BTRX-22 predominantly show 130 kDa protein

  8. Call for Papers--Bt Research (ISSN 1925-1939)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Bt Research (ISSN 1925-1939) is a new launched, open access and peer-reviewed journal that disseminates significant creative reviews and opinions or innovative research work in the area of Bacillus thuringiensis, including the isolation and identification of novel Bt strains, identification of novel Bt toxic genes and their functions, the insecticidal mechanism Bt toxics, Bt genetic engineering, transgenic Bt plants, the resistance mechanism of target-insect to Bt toxins, and the development of novel experimental methods and techniques for Bt Research.

  9. Evaluation of Different Culture Media for Improvement in Bioinsecticides Production by Indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis and Their Application against Larvae of Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Chandrashekhar Devidas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of indigenous isolate Bacillus thuringiensis sv2 (Bt sv2 was checked on conventional and nonconventional carbon and nitrogen sources in shake flasks. The effects on the production of biomass, toxin production, and spore formation capability of mosquito toxic strain were determined. Toxicity differs within the same strain depending on the growth medium. Bt sv2 produced with pigeon pea and soya bean flour were found highly effective with LC50<4 ppm against larvae of Aedes aegypti. These results were comparable with bacteria produced from Luria broth as a reference medium. Cost-effective analyses have revealed that production of biopesticide from test media is highly economical. The cost of production of Bt sv2 with soya bean flour was significantly reduced by 23-fold. The use of nonconventional sources has yielded a new knowledge in this area as the process development aspects of biomass production have been neglected as an area of research. These studies are very important from the point of media optimization for economic production of Bacillus thuringiensis based insecticides in mosquito control programmes.

  10. Comparative genomics analysis of the companion mechanisms of Bacillus thuringiensis Bc601 and Bacillus endophyticus Hbe603 in bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Nan; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-06-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus endophyticus both act as the companion bacteria, which cooperate with Ketogulonigenium vulgare in vitamin C two-step fermentation. Two Bacillus species have different morphologies, swarming motility and 2-keto-L-gulonic acid productivities when they co-culture with K. vulgare. Here, we report the complete genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis Bc601 and eight plasmids of B. endophyticus Hbe603, and carry out the comparative genomics analysis. Consequently, B. thuringiensis Bc601, with greater ability of response to the external environment, has been found more two-component system, sporulation coat and peptidoglycan biosynthesis related proteins than B. endophyticus Hbe603, and B. endophyticus Hbe603, with greater ability of nutrients biosynthesis, has been found more alpha-galactosidase, propanoate, glutathione and inositol phosphate metabolism, and amino acid degradation related proteins than B. thuringiensis Bc601. Different ability of swarming motility, response to the external environment and nutrients biosynthesis may reflect different companion mechanisms of two Bacillus species. Comparative genomic analysis of B. endophyticus and B. thuringiensis enables us to further understand the cooperative mechanism with K. vulgare, and facilitate the optimization of bacterial consortium.

  11. Instruction for evaluating deposit of bacillus thuringiensis formulas during aerial treatments. Information report No. LAU-X-54

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnoff, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Studies carried out form many years revealed that the methods used for deposit assessment of chemical insecticides could not be used with Bacillus thuringiensis. A new method was developed giving the quantity of viable spores dispersed per surface unit. Details of this method are concisely described in this document. It specifically provides instructions for evaluating deposit of Bacillus thuringiensis formulas during aerial treatments.

  12. 40 CFR 174.504 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein... PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.504 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of...

  13. Susceptibility and aversion of Spodoptera frugiperda to Cry1F Bt maize and considerations for insect resistance management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize was developed primarily for North American pests such as European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis Hubner). However, most Bt maize products also are cultivated outside of North America, where the primary pests are different and often have lower susceptibility to Bt to...

  14. Germination and conjugation of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in the intestine of gnotobiotic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; Ørum-Smidt, Lasse; Bahl, Martin Iain;

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To study the ability of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores to germinate and subsequently transfer a conjugative plasmid in the intestinal tract of gnotobiotic rats. Methods and Results: Germination was studied by feeding germ-free rats with spores of a B. thuringiensis strain...... the conjugative plasmid pXO16 was introduced. Both strains were given as spores and transfer of pXO16 was observed from the donor to the recipient strain. Conclusions: Bacillus thuringiensis is able to have a full life cycle in the intestine of gnotobiotic rats including germination of spores, several cycles...... harbouring a plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled quantification of germinated bacteria by flow cytometry. To study in vivo conjugation, germ-free rats were first associated with a B. thuringiensis recipient strain and after 1 week an isogenic donor strain harbouring...

  15. A P-Glycoprotein Is Linked to Resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa Toxin in a Leaf Beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Pauchet

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrysomela tremula is a polyvoltine oligophagous leaf beetle responsible for massive attacks on poplar trees. This beetle is an important model for understanding mechanisms of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt insecticidal toxins, because a resistant C. tremula strain has been found that can survive and reproduce on transgenic poplar trees expressing high levels of the Cry3Aa Bt toxin. Resistance to Cry3Aa in this strain is recessive and is controlled by a single autosomal locus. We used a larval midgut transcriptome for C. tremula to search for candidate resistance genes. We discovered a mutation in an ABC protein, member of the B subfamily homologous to P-glycoprotein, which is genetically linked to Cry3Aa resistance in C. tremula. Cultured insect cells heterologously expressing this ABC protein swell and lyse when incubated with Cry3Aa toxin. In light of previous findings in Lepidoptera implicating A subfamily ABC proteins as receptors for Cry2A toxins and C subfamily proteins as receptors for Cry1A and Cry1C toxins, this result suggests that ABC proteins may be targets of insecticidal three-domain Bt toxins in Coleoptera as well.

  16. A P-Glycoprotein Is Linked to Resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa Toxin in a Leaf Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchet, Yannick; Bretschneider, Anne; Augustin, Sylvie; Heckel, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Chrysomela tremula is a polyvoltine oligophagous leaf beetle responsible for massive attacks on poplar trees. This beetle is an important model for understanding mechanisms of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal toxins, because a resistant C. tremula strain has been found that can survive and reproduce on transgenic poplar trees expressing high levels of the Cry3Aa Bt toxin. Resistance to Cry3Aa in this strain is recessive and is controlled by a single autosomal locus. We used a larval midgut transcriptome for C. tremula to search for candidate resistance genes. We discovered a mutation in an ABC protein, member of the B subfamily homologous to P-glycoprotein, which is genetically linked to Cry3Aa resistance in C. tremula. Cultured insect cells heterologously expressing this ABC protein swell and lyse when incubated with Cry3Aa toxin. In light of previous findings in Lepidoptera implicating A subfamily ABC proteins as receptors for Cry2A toxins and C subfamily proteins as receptors for Cry1A and Cry1C toxins, this result suggests that ABC proteins may be targets of insecticidal three-domain Bt toxins in Coleoptera as well. PMID:27929397

  17. Screening and Full - length Amplification of Novel Chitinase Genes from 15 Serovars of Bacillus thuringiensis%苏云金杆菌几丁质酶新基因的筛选和全长基因的扩增

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林毅; 关雄

    2004-01-01

    以煮沸冻融法制备PCR扩增模板,利用苏云金芽孢杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,Bt)几丁质酶基因特异引物进行15个Bt血清变种的扩增分析,获得9个几丁质酶全长基因扩增产物.经克隆和序列测定,从Bt serovar.entomocidus HD109、Bt serovar.canadensis HD224、Bt serovar.alesti HD16和Bt serovar.toumanoffiHD201等4个菌株中分离了几丁质酶新基因.

  18. Extended genetic analysis of Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Zahner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST was undertaken to extend the genetic characterization of 29 isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis previously characterized in terms of presence/absence of sequences encoding virulence factors and via variable number tandem repeat (VNTR. Additional analysis involved polymerase chain reaction for the presence of sequences (be, cytK, inA, pag, lef, cya and cap, encoding putative virulence factors, not investigated in the earlier study. MLST analysis ascribed novel and unique sequence types to each of the isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a single sequence of 2,838 bp of concatenated loci sequences. The strains were not monophyletic by analysis of any specific housekeeping gene or virulence characteristic. No clear association in relation to source of isolation or to genotypic profile based on the presence or absence of putative virulence genes could be identified. Comparison of VNTR profiling with MLST data suggested a correlation between these two methods of genetic analysis. In common with the majority of previous studies, MLST was unable to provide clarification of the basis for pathogenicity among members of the B. cereus complex. Nevertheless, our application of MLST served to reinforce the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered as the same species.

  19. Extended genetic analysis of Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahner, Viviane; Silva, Ana Carolina Telles de Carvalho e; de Moraes, Gabriela Pinhel; McIntosh, Douglas; de Filippis, Ivano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST) was undertaken to extend the genetic characterization of 29 isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis previously characterized in terms of presence/absence of sequences encoding virulence factors and via variable number tandem repeat (VNTR). Additional analysis involved polymerase chain reaction for the presence of sequences (be, cytK, inA, pag, lef, cya and cap), encoding putative virulence factors, not investigated in the earlier study. MLST analysis ascribed novel and unique sequence types to each of the isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a single sequence of 2,838 bp of concatenated loci sequences. The strains were not monophyletic by analysis of any specific housekeeping gene or virulence characteristic. No clear association in relation to source of isolation or to genotypic profile based on the presence or absence of putative virulence genes could be identified. Comparison of VNTR profiling with MLST data suggested a correlation between these two methods of genetic analysis. In common with the majority of previous studies, MLST was unable to provide clarification of the basis for pathogenicity among members of the B. cereus complex. Nevertheless, our application of MLST served to reinforce the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered as the same species. PMID:23440117

  20. Mortality of Oryzophagus oryzae (Costa Lima, 1936 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Spodoptera frugiperda (J E Smith, 1797 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae Larvae Exposed to Bacillus thuringiensis and Extracts of Melia azedarach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diouneia Lisiane Berlitz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Oryzophagus oryzae (Costa Lima 1936 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Spodoptera frugiperda (J E Smith, 1797 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae cause important crop losses in southern Brazil. Control is possible by the use of the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis and extracts of Melia azedarach. This study aimed to evaluate the mortality, in vivo, of O. oryzae and S. frugiperda submitted to two isolates of B. thuringiensis and the aqueous extract of M. azedarach. The LC50 for O. oryzae due to bacteria was 5.40μg/mL (Bt 2014-2 and due to plant extract 0.90μg/mL. For S. frugiperda, the Bt 1958-2 bacterial suspension (1.10(10UFC/mL caused a 100% of corrected mortality, showing that the purified Cry proteins caused a CL10 of 268μg/mL five days after the treatments, and M. azedarach toxins caused a CL50 173μg/mL four days after the treatment. Corrected mortality for O. oryzae and S. frugiperda in the interaction between the bacterial and plant toxins were 11 and 6%, respectively. In the PCR analysis of B. thuringiensis isolates, DNA fragments were enlarged and corresponded to the cry1 and cry2 genes for Bt 1958-2. Thus, it could be concluded that the usage of Bt 2014-2 active against O. oryzae larvae; Bt 1958-2 for S. frugiperda and, for both the insect species, M. azedarach aqueous extract could be used.

  1. Side effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki on the hymenopterous parasitic wasp Trichogramma chilonis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amichot, Marcel; Curty, Christine; Benguettat-Magliano, Olivia; Gallet, Armel; Wajnberg, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Most of the detrimental effects of using conventional insecticides to control crop pests are now well identified and are nowadays major arguments for replacing such compounds by the use of biological control agents. In this respect, the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki and Trichogramma (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) parasitic wasp species are both effective against lepidopterous pests and can actually be used concomitantly. In this work, we studied the potential side effects of B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki on Trichogramma chilonis females. We first evidenced an acute toxicity of B. thuringiensis on T. chilonis. Then, after ingestion of B. thuringiensis at sublethal doses, we focused on life history traits of T. chilonis such as longevity, reproductive success and the time spent on host eggs patches. The reproductive success of T. chilonis was not modified by B. thuringiensis while a significant effect was observed on longevity and the time spent on host eggs patches. The physiological and ecological meanings of the results obtained are discussed.

  2. 害虫对苏云金芽孢杆菌的抗性及其延缓措施%Research on the Pest Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪伦记; 纠敏

    2005-01-01

    苏云金芽孢杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,简称Bt)在害虫防治中发挥着重要作用.现已表明,有近20种昆虫可对Bt生物制剂产生抗性,转Bt基因作物的释放更加剧了害虫的抗性进化.开展害虫的抗性研究,加强对Bt基因的保护,对持续利用Bt生物制剂和转Bt基因作物具有非常重要的意义.

  3. Asymmetrical cross-resistance between Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in pink bollworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabashnik, Bruce E; Unnithan, Gopalan C; Masson, Luke; Crowder, David W; Li, Xianchun; Carrière, Yves

    2009-07-21

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins kill some key insect pests and can reduce reliance on insecticide sprays. Sustainable use of such crops requires methods for delaying evolution of resistance by pests. To thwart pest resistance, some transgenic crops produce 2 different Bt toxins targeting the same pest. This "pyramid" strategy is expected to work best when selection for resistance to 1 toxin does not cause cross-resistance to the other toxin. The most widely used pyramid is transgenic cotton producing Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab. Cross-resistance between these toxins was presumed unlikely because they bind to different larval midgut target sites. Previous results showed that laboratory selection with Cry1Ac caused little or no cross-resistance to Cry2A toxins in pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), a major cotton pest. We show here, however, that laboratory selection of pink bollworm with Cry2Ab caused up to 420-fold cross-resistance to Cry1Ac as well as 240-fold resistance to Cry2Ab. Inheritance of resistance to high concentrations of Cry2Ab was recessive. Larvae from a laboratory strain resistant to Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in diet bioassays survived on cotton bolls producing only Cry1Ac, but not on cotton bolls producing both toxins. Thus, the asymmetrical cross-resistance seen here does not threaten the efficacy of pyramided Bt cotton against pink bollworm. Nonetheless, the results here and previous evidence indicate that cross-resistance occurs between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in some key cotton pests. Incorporating the potential effects of such cross-resistance in resistance management plans may help to sustain the efficacy of pyramided Bt crops.

  4. Survival and conjugal transfer between Bacillus thuringiensis strains in aquatic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Furlaneto Luciana; Saridakis Halha Ostrensky; Arantes Olívia Márcia Nagy

    2000-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to assess the survival of cells and spores and plasmid transfer between Bacillus thuringienis strains in aquatic environment. Results indicated that cells and spores of B. thuringiensis can survive for 10 days in water, without altering their number. The sporulation process began after 12-15 hours of inoculation of water. B. thuringiensis was able to transfer conjugative plasmids in the aquatic environment.

  5. Prediction of insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis strains by polymerase chain reaction product profiles.

    OpenAIRE

    Carozzi, N B; Kramer, V C; Warren, G W; Evola, S; Koziel, M G

    1991-01-01

    A rapid analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis strains predictive of insecticidal activity was established by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology. Primers specific to regions of high homology within genes encoding three major classes of B. thuringiensis crystal proteins were used to generate a PCR product profile characteristic of each insecticidal class. Predictions of insecticidal activity were made on the basis of the electrophoretic patterns of the PCR products. Included in the s...

  6. Characterization and selection of Bacillus thuringiensis isolates effective against Sitophilus oryzae Caracterização e seleção de isolados de Bacillus thuringiensis efetivos contra Sitophilus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najara da Silva

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The entomopathogenic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis is a control agent with toxic and environmental characteristics that allows the control of pest insects according to the Integrate Pest Management (IPM precepts. In order to find new strains, potentially toxic to Sitophilus oryzae L. 1763 (Coleoptera: Curculinidae, 1.073 strains of B. thuringiensis from parts of Brazil were used. Genetic material was extracted with InstaGene Matrix kit, used for the amplification of sequences in Polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and viewed in 1.5% agarose gel. The gene cry35Ba class was represented by 60 B. thuringiensis isolates (5.6%, which were then subjected to bioassays with S. oryzae larvae. Among the isolates studied, four caused more than 50% mortality in pathogenicity tests, and the isolates 544 and 622 were the most virulent, as determined by CL50 estimates. The four toxic isolates had spherical, bi-pyramidal and cuboid crystals, and a 44-kDa protein was found in sodium dodecyl sulphate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, which coded for the product of cry35Ba genes. These data demonstrate the potential of B. thuringiensis for the management of S. oryzae larvae.A bactéria entomopatogênica Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt é um agente de controle com características tóxicas e ambientais que permitem o controle de insetos-praga de acordo com as premissas do Manejo integrado de pragas (MIP. Com o objetivo de buscar novas linhagens potencialmente tóxicas para Sitophilus oryzae L. 1763 (Coleoptera: Curculinidae, caracterizaram-se molecularmente 1,073 isolados de B. thuringiensis de regiões do Brasil. O material genético foi extraído através do kit InstaGene Matrix, utilizado para a amplificação das seqüências através da técnica de Polymerase chain reaction PCR, sendo os resultados visualizados em gel de agarose 1,5%. A classe do gene cry35Ba foi representada por 60 isolados (5,6% de Bt, os quais foram submetidos a bioensaio com larvas

  7. The complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar Hailuosis YWC2-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Qinbin; Cao, Ye; Li, Qiao; Zhu, Zizhong; Wang, Linxia; Li, Ping

    2016-02-10

    Bacillus thuringiensis, a typical aerobic, Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium, is an important microbial insecticide widely used in the control of agricultural pests. B. thuringiensis serovar Hailuosis YWC2-8 with high insecticidal activity against Diptera and Lepidoptera insects has three insecticidal crystal protein genes, such as cry4Cb2, cry30Ea2, and cry56Aa1. In this study, the complete genome sequence of B. thuringiensis YWC2-8 was analyzed, which contains one circular gapless chromosome and six circular plasmids.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. chinensis Strain CT-43▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Wang, Jieping; Yin, Wen; Shao, Xiaohu; Zheng, Huajun; Li, Mingshun; Zhao, Youwen; Sun, Ming; Wang, Shengyue; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis has been widely used as an agricultural biopesticide for a long time. As a producing strain, B. thuringiensis subsp. chinensis strain CT-43 is highly toxic to lepidopterous and dipterous insects. It can form various parasporal crystals consisting of Cry1Aa3, Cry1Ba1, Cry1Ia14, Cry2Aa9, and Cry2Ab1. During fermentation, it simultaneously generates vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa10 and the insecticidal nucleotide analogue thuringiensin. Here, we report the finished, annotated genome sequence of B. thuringiensis strain CT-43. PMID:21551307

  9. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. chinensis strain CT-43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Wang, Jieping; Yin, Wen; Shao, Xiaohu; Zheng, Huajun; Li, Mingshun; Zhao, Youwen; Sun, Ming; Wang, Shengyue; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-07-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis has been widely used as an agricultural biopesticide for a long time. As a producing strain, B. thuringiensis subsp. chinensis strain CT-43 is highly toxic to lepidopterous and dipterous insects. It can form various parasporal crystals consisting of Cry1Aa3, Cry1Ba1, Cry1Ia14, Cry2Aa9, and Cry2Ab1. During fermentation, it simultaneously generates vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa10 and the insecticidal nucleotide analogue thuringiensin. Here, we report the finished, annotated genome sequence of B. thuringiensis strain CT-43.

  10. Results of three years of experimental aerial application of Bacillus thuringiensis at 2. 0 l/ha against choristoneura fumiferana c. Information report No. LAU-X-89B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valero, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Research into the potential of using Bacillus thuringiensis 3a3b for control of the spruce budworm led to the development of a concentrated, effective and economical suspension of B.t. called Futura. This report gives the results of spraying Futura in the Saguenay/Lac St.-Jean and Lower St. Lawrence regions of Quebec in 1985, 1986 and 1987. Eight blocks of mature forest dominated by fir and white spruce were treated using two different strengths.

  11. Studied on Convenient Rapid and Efficient Methods for Recovering Plasmids DNA of Bacillus thuringiensis%高效回收苏云金杆菌质粒DNA的方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘全兰; 张何; 陈宇; 夏立秋

    2001-01-01

    介绍三种简易、快速和高效回收苏云金杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,简称Bt)质粒DNA的方法. 这些方法省时、经济、适用范围广,回收的Bt质粒DNA质量高,可直接用于各种分子克隆操作.

  12. Synergistic activity of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins against Simulium spp. larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerat, Rose; Pereira, Eleny; Teles, Beatriz; Martins, Erica; Praça, Lilian; Queiroz, Paulo; Soberon, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Ramos, Felipe; Soares, Carlos Marcelo

    2014-09-01

    Species of Simulium spread diseases in humans and animals such as onchocerciasis and mansonelosis, causing health problems and economic loses. One alternative for controlling these insects is the use of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis (Bti). This bacterium produces different dipteran-active Cry and Cyt toxins and has been widely used in blackfly biological control programs worldwide. Studies on other insect targets have revealed the role of individual Cry and Cyt proteins in toxicity and demonstrated a synergistic effect among them. However, the insecticidal activity and interactions of these proteins against Simulium larvae have not been reported. In this study we demonstrate that Cry4Ba is the most effective toxin followed by Cry4Aa and Cry11Aa. Cry10Aa and Cyt1Aa were not toxic when administered alone but both were able to synergise the activity of Cry4B and Cry11Aa toxins. Cyt1Aa is also able to synergise with Cry4Aa. The mixture of all toxin-producing strains showed the greatest level of synergism, but still lower than the Bti parental strain.

  13. Raman spectroscopy of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology and inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J. B.; Almeida, J.; Cole, K. D.; Reipa, V.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to detect spore contamination and inactivation is relevant to developing and determining decontamination strategy success for food and water safety. This study was conducted to develop a systematic comparison of nondestructive vibrational spectroscopy techniques (Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, SERS, and normal Raman) to determine indicators of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology (spore, vegetative, outgrown, germinated and inactivated spore forms). SERS was found to provide better resolution of commonly utilized signatures of spore physiology (dipicolinic acid at 1006 cm-1 and 1387 cm-1) compared to normal Raman and native fluorescence indigenous to vegetative and outgrown cell samples was quenched in SERS experiment. New features including carotenoid pigments (Raman features at 1142 cm-1, 1512 cm-1) were identified for spore cell forms. Pronounced changes in the low frequency region (300 cm-1 to 500 cm-1) in spore spectra occurred upon germination and inactivation (with both free chlorine and by autoclaving) which is relevant to guiding decontamination and detection strategies using Raman techniques.

  14. Evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins insecticidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; García-Gómez, Blanca Ines; Rodriguez-Almazan, Claudia; Pardo, Liliana; Soberón, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis are use worldwide in transgenic crops for efficient pest control. Among the family of Cry toxins, the three domain Cry family is the better characterized regarding their natural evolution leading to a large number of Cry proteins with similar structure, mode of action but different insect specificity. Also, this group is the better characterized regarding the study of their mode of action and the molecular basis of insect specificity. In this review we discuss how Cry toxins have evolved insect specificity in nature and analyse several cases of improvement of Cry toxin action by genetic engineering, some of these examples are currently used in transgenic crops. We believe that the success in the improvement of insecticidal activity by genetic evolution of Cry toxins will depend on the knowledge of the rate-limiting steps of Cry toxicity in different insect pests, the mapping of the specificity binding regions in the Cry toxins, as well as the improvement of mutagenesis strategies and selection procedures.

  15. Susceptibility of Spodoptera exigua to 9 toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Ferré, Juan; Escriche, Baltasar

    2008-03-01

    Nine of the most common lepidopteran active Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis have been tested for activity against Spodoptera exigua. Because of possible intraspecific variability, three laboratory strains (FRA, HOL, and MUR) have been used. Mortality assays were performed with the three strains. LC(50) values for the active toxins were determined to the FRA and the HOL strains, whereas susceptibility of the MUR strain was assessed using only two concentrations. The results showed that Cry1Ca, Cry1Da, and Cry1Fa were the most effective toxins with all strains. Cry1Ab was found effective for the HOL strain, but very little effective against FRA (6.5-fold) and MUR strains. Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac were marginally toxic to all strains, whereas the rest of the toxins tested (Cry1Ba, Cry2Aa, and Cry2Ab) were non toxic. Significant differences in susceptibility among strains were also found for Cry1Da, being the FRA strain 25-fold more susceptible than the HOL strain. Growth inhibition, as an additional susceptibility parameter, was determined in the FRA strain with the 9 toxins. The toxicity profile obtained differed from that observed in mortality assays. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ca, Cry1Da, and Cry1Fa toxins produced a similar larval growth inhibition. Cry2Aa had a lower but clear effect on larval growth inhibition, whereas Cry1Ba and Cry2Ab did not have any effect.

  16. Novel Vip3-related protein from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rang, Cécile; Gil, Patricia; Neisner, Nathalie; Van Rie, Jeroen; Frutos, Roger

    2005-10-01

    A novel vip3-related gene was identified in Bacillus thuringiensis. This novel gene is 2,406 bp long and codes for a 91-kDa protein (801 amino acids). This novel protein exhibits between 61 and 62% similarity with Vip3A proteins and is designated Vip3Ba1. Vip3Ba1 has several specific features. Differences between Vip3Ba1 and the Vip3A proteins are spread throughout the sequence but are more frequent in the C-terminal part from amino acid 456 onward. The regions containing the two proteolytic processing sites, which are highly conserved among the Vip3A toxins, are markedly different in Vip3Ba1. The pattern DCCEE (Asp Cys Cys Glu Glu) is repeated four times between position 463 and 483 in Vip3Ba1, generating the sequence 463-DCCEEDCCEEDCCEEDCCEE-483. This sequence, which is rich in negatively charged amino acids, also contains 73% of the cysteines present in Vip3Ba1. This repeated sequence is not present in Vip3A proteins. The Vip3Ba1protein was produced in Escherichia coli and tested against Ostrinia nubilalis and Plutella xylostella, and it generated significant growth delays but had no larvicidal effect, indicating that its host range might be different than that of Vip3A proteins.

  17. Interaction between Functional Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rang, Cécile; Vachon, Vincent; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Villalon, Mario; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Dirk; Frutos, Roger; Laprade, Raynald

    1999-01-01

    Interactions among the three structural domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins were investigated by functional analysis of chimeric proteins. Hybrid genes were prepared by exchanging the regions coding for either domain I or domain III among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, and Cry1E. The activity of the purified trypsin-activated chimeric toxins was evaluated by testing their effects on the viability and plasma membrane permeability of Sf9 cells. Among the parental toxins, only Cry1C was active against these cells and only chimeras possessing domain II from Cry1C were functional. Combination of domain I from Cry1E with domains II and III from Cry1C, however, resulted in an inactive toxin, indicating that domain II from an active toxin is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity. Pores formed by chimeric toxins in which domain I was from Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac were slightly smaller than those formed by toxins in which domain I was from Cry1C. The properties of the pores formed by the chimeras are therefore likely to result from an interaction between domain I and domain II or III. Domain III appears to modulate the activity of the chimeric toxins: combination of domain III from Cry1Ab with domains I and II of Cry1C gave a protein which was more strongly active than Cry1C. PMID:10388684

  18. 苏云金芽胞杆菌挥发性物质的测定%Determination of Bacillus thuringiensis volatile substances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑梅霞; 潘志针; 刘波; 陈峥; 车建美; 唐建阳; 朱育菁; 陈梅春

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析、鉴定苏云金芽胞杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis, Bt)的挥发性成分。方法采用顶空固相微萃取技术(HS-SPME)对 Bt 的挥发性成分进行捕集,再通过气相色谱-质谱联用(GC-MS)技术对挥发性成分进行鉴定。以本实验室分离的高效苏云金芽胞杆菌 FJAT-12菌株为实验菌株,探索 Bt 菌株的不同培养方式、不同固相微萃取吸附方式及不同萃取头的选择对挥发性成分鉴定结果的影响,确定 Bt 菌株挥发性物质测定的最优方法。结果采用NA液体培养基培养,选择水浴至气-液平衡再吸附的吸附方式,采用65µm PDMS/DVB萃取头的萃取效果最佳。Bt菌株的挥发性成分主要为6-甲基-2-庚酮、2,4-二氨基甲苯、苯甲醇、2,3-二乙基-5-甲基吡嗪、2-甲基萘、2,3-Dimethyl-5-isopentylpyrazine、十四烷、正十二烷、2-甲硫基苯并噻唑。结论 HS-SPME/GC-MS效果好,方法实用,便于操作,适用于对Bt挥发性成分进行分析,从而为食品安全评估提供理论依据。%Objective To analyze and identify the volatile substances of Bacillus thuringiensis. Methods The volatile constituents of Bacillus thuringiensis were captured by headspace solid phase micro-extraction technology (HS-SPME) and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) tech-nology. The optimal method was used to analyze the volatile constituents of Bacillus thuringiensis FJAT-12, which was a high efficient strain separated by our lab, investigated from the culture way, adsorption pattern and fibers type. Results Bacillus thuringiensis FJAT-12 was better cultured by NA liquid medium, and volatile vial was maintained in a water bath at 50 ℃ for equilibrating (180 min) and then extracted by 65 µm PDMS/DVB fibers for 60 min. The mainly volatile constituents of Bt were 6-methyl-2-Heptanone, 4-methyl-1,3-Benzenediamine, Benzyl Alcohol, 3,5-diethyl-2-methyl-Pyrazine, 2-methyl-Naphthalene, 2,3-Dimethyl-5-isopentylpyrazine

  19. Transgenic insect-resistant corn affects the fourth trophic level: effects of Bacillus thuringiensis-corn on the facultative hyperparasitoid Tetrastichus howardi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prütz, Gernot; Brink, Andreas; Dettner, Konrad

    2004-09-01

    As hyperparasitoids may have a considerable influence on the control of herbivorous arthropods, analyzing the host-mediated impact of Bacillus thuringiensis-plants (“Bt-plants”) on hyperparasitoids is of interest. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in order to assess the potential effect of Bt-corn leaf material on the facultative hyperparasitoid Tetrastichus howardi (Olliff) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), mediated through the herbivore Chilo partellus Swinhoe (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) and its primary parasitoid Cotesia flavipes (Cameron) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). In the Bt-group, significantly less C. flavipes larvae per host spun cocoons and pupated than in the control, and the mean fresh weight of a single C. flavipes cocoon was significantly reduced compared to the control. All C. flavipes cocoons of one host formed cocoon clusters. T. howardi females of the Bt-group parasitized significantly less cocoon clusters than in the control. Moreover, significantly fewer C. flavipes cocoons per cocoon cluster were successfully parasitized as compared to the control. As a consequence, T. howardi females of the control had more offspring than in the Bt-group. Adult female T. howardi offspring of the Bt-group weighed significantly less than in the control, but there was no significant weight difference between males of both groups. Our results suggest that transgenic insect-resistant plants could affect hyperparasitoids indirectly. However, it remains to be determined whether facultative hyperparasitoids prefer to develop as primary or secondary parasitoids under field conditions.

  20. Cadherin is involved in the action of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lin; Hou, Leilei; Zhang, Boyao; Liu, Lang; Li, Bo; Deng, Pan; Ma, Weihua; Wang, Xiaoping; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Chen, Lizhen; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins are effective against some insect pests in sprays and transgenic crops, although the evolution of resistance could threaten the long-term efficacy of such Bt use. One strategy to delay resistance to Bt crops is to "pyramid" two or more Bt proteins that bind to distinct receptor proteins within the insect midgut. The most common Bt pyramid in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) employs Cry1Ac with Cry2Ab to target several key lepidopteran pests, including the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), which is a serious migratory pest of many vegetable crops and is increasingly important in cotton in China. While cadherin and aminopeptidase-N are key receptors of Cry1 toxins in many lepidopterans including S. exigua, the receptor for Cry2A toxins remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a heterologous expressed peptide corresponding to cadherin repeat 7 to the membrane proximal extracellular domain (CR7-MPED) in the S. exigua cadherin 1b (SeCad1b) binds Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa. Moreover, SeCad1b transcription was suppressed in S. exigua larvae by oral RNA interference and susceptibility to Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa was significantly reduced. These results indicate that SeCad1b plays important functional roles of both Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa, having major implications for resistance management for S. exigua in Bt crops.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Genomics and Proteomics in the New Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis X022 Revealed the Metabolic Regulation Mechanism of Carbon Flux Following Cu(2+) Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Meifang; Xie, Junyan; Liu, Xuemei; Li, Yang; Rang, Jie; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Fengjuan; Xia, Liqiu; Hu, Shengbiao; Sun, Yunjun; Ding, Xuezhi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) X022 is a novel strain isolated from soil in China, and showed strong insecticidal activity against several Lepidopteran pests. In this work, we performed whole genome sequencing of this Bt strain using the next-generation sequencing technology, and further conducted a comparative analysis with the proteomics data of the specific spore-release period based on LC-MS/MS approach. The Bt X022 genome consisted of one circular chromosomal DNA and seven plasmids, which were further functionally annotated using the RAST server. Comparative analysis of insecticidal substances showed that X022 contained genes coding for three Cry proteins (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia and Cry2Ab) and a vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3A). However, three insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) (Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac and Cry1Da) were detected by proteomics in the spore-release period. Moreover, a putative biosynthetic gene cluster and the metabolic pathway for poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in Bt X022 were deduced based on the comparative analysis of genomic and proteomic data, which revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux correlated with increased production of ICPs caused by Cu(2+.) Hence, these results provided a deeper understanding of the genetic background and protein expression profile of Bt X022. This study established a foundation for directed genetic modification and further application of this new isolated Bt strain.

  2. Comparative analysis of genomics and proteomics in the new isolated Bacillus thuringiensis X022 revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux following Cu2+ treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meifang eQuan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt X022, which showed strong insecticidal activity against several Lepidopteran pests, is a novel strain isolated from soil in China. In this work, we performed whole genome sequencing of this Bt strain using the next-generation sequencing technology, and further conducted a comparative analysis with the proteomics data of the specific spore-release period based on LC-MS/MS approach. The Bt X022 genome consisted of one circular chromosomal DNA and seven plasmids, which were further functionally annotated using the RAST server. Comparative analysis of insecticidal substances showed that X022 contained genes coding for three Cry proteins (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia and Cry2Ab and a vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3A. However, three insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs (Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac and Cry1Da were detected by proteomics in the spore-release period. Moreover, a putative biosynthetic gene cluster and the metabolic pathway for poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in Bt X022 were deduced based on the comparative analysis of genomic and proteomic data, which revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux correlated with increased production of ICPs caused by Cu2+ . Hence, these results provided a deeper understanding of the genetic background and protein expression profile of Bt X022. This study established a foundation for directed genetic modification and further application of this new isolated Bt strain.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Genomics and Proteomics in the New Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis X022 Revealed the Metabolic Regulation Mechanism of Carbon Flux Following Cu2+ Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Meifang; Xie, Junyan; Liu, Xuemei; Li, Yang; Rang, Jie; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Fengjuan; Xia, Liqiu; Hu, Shengbiao; Sun, Yunjun; Ding, Xuezhi

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) X022 is a novel strain isolated from soil in China, and showed strong insecticidal activity against several Lepidopteran pests. In this work, we performed whole genome sequencing of this Bt strain using the next-generation sequencing technology, and further conducted a comparative analysis with the proteomics data of the specific spore-release period based on LC-MS/MS approach. The Bt X022 genome consisted of one circular chromosomal DNA and seven plasmids, which were further functionally annotated using the RAST server. Comparative analysis of insecticidal substances showed that X022 contained genes coding for three Cry proteins (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia and Cry2Ab) and a vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3A). However, three insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) (Cry1Ca, Cry1Ac and Cry1Da) were detected by proteomics in the spore-release period. Moreover, a putative biosynthetic gene cluster and the metabolic pathway for poly-β-hydroxybutyrate in Bt X022 were deduced based on the comparative analysis of genomic and proteomic data, which revealed the metabolic regulation mechanism of carbon flux correlated with increased production of ICPs caused by Cu2+. Hence, these results provided a deeper understanding of the genetic background and protein expression profile of Bt X022. This study established a foundation for directed genetic modification and further application of this new isolated Bt strain. PMID:27303381

  4. Detection of cry1 genes in Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from South of Brazil and activity against Aanticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrowski Vera Lucia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt is characterized by its ability to produce proteic crystalline inclusions during sporulation. Cry1 protein has insecticidal activity and is highly specific to certain insects and not toxic to unrelated insects, plants or vertebrates. In this work, the patogenicity of twelve Bt isolates was tested against Anticarsia gemmatalis, one of the most important insect pests of soybeans. Spore-crystal complex was applied to the surface of artificial diets and the mortality of A. gemmatalis larvae was assessed seven days after each treatment. When compared to a control Bt isolate known by its high toxicity to A. gemmatalis larvae, four novel Bt isolates exhibited even higher toxic activities against the insect, resulting in more than 90% mortality. PCR was used to amplify DNA fragments related to known cry1 genes. Bt strains with high toxicity produced expected PCR products of around 280 bp, whereas non-toxic or low toxic strains did not produce any PCR product or showed amplified fragments of different sizes. Toxic Bt isolates also exhibited an expected protein profile when total protein extracts were evaluated by SDS-PAGE.

  5. The role of a purine-specific nucleoside hydrolase in spore germination of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; He, Xihong; Liu, Gang; Tan, Huarong

    2008-05-01

    A homologous gene (iunH) of a putative nucleoside hydrolase (NH), which had been identified from the exosporia of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis spores, was cloned from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. Disruption of iunH did not affect the vegetative growth and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis, but promoted both inosine- and adenosine-induced spore germination. The inosine- or adenosine-induced germination rate decreased when the wild-type iunH gene was overexpressed in Bacillus thuringiensis. The iunH gene product was characterized as a purine-specific NH. The kinetic parameters of IunH with inosine as substrate were K(m)=399+/-115 microM, k(cat)=48.9+/-8.5 s(-1) and k(cat)/K(m)=1.23 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The optimal pH and temperature for IunH were found to be pH 6 and 80 degrees C. Meanwhile, the specific activity of inosine hydrolase in intact spores of the wild-type strain with inosine as substrate was 2.89+/-0.23x10(-2) micromol min(-1) (mg dry wt)(-1). These results indicate that IunH is important in moderating inosine- or adenosine-induced germination of Bacillus thuringiensis spores.

  6. Microcalorimetric Study of the Biological Effects of Zn+ on Bacillus thuringiensis Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚俊; 刘义; 等

    2002-01-01

    A microcalorimetric technique was used to investigate the influence of Zn2+ on the growth metabolism of Bacillus thuringiensis .LKB-2277 Bioactivity Monitor was employed to obtain the power-time curves,from which the maximum peak-heat output power(Pmax) in the log phase,the growth rate constants(k), the inhibitory ratios(I) ,the generational time(tG) and the total heat effect (Qtotal) in 23 h for the growth metabolism of Bacillus thuringiensis at 28℃ can be evaluated,The results indicate that the concentration of Zn2+ affects its growth obviously,Low concentration (0-50μg/mL) of Zn2+ promotes the growth of Bacillus thuringiensis while high concentration (50-500μg/mL) of Zn2+ inhibits its growth .When the concentration reached up to 600μg/mL,it can not grow at all.

  7. Microcalorimetric Study of the Biological Effects of Zn2+ on Bacillus thuringiensis Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO,Jun(姚俊); LIU,Yi(刘义); GAO,Zhen-Ting(高振霆); LIU,Peng(刘鹏); SUN,Ming(孙明); ZOU,xueb(邹雪); QU,Song-Sheng(屈松生); YU,Zi-Niu(喻子牛)

    2002-01-01

    A microcalorimetric technique was used to investigate the influence of Zn2 + on the growth metabolism of Bacillus thuringiensis. LKB-2277 Bioaciivity Monitor was employed to obtain the power-iime curves, from which the maximum peak-heat output power(Pmax) in the log phase, the growth rate constants (k),the inhibitory raiios (Ⅰ), the generational time (tG) and the total heat effect (Qtotal) in 23 h for the growth metabolism of Bacillus thuringiensis at 28 ℃ can be evaluated. The results indicate that the concentration of Zn2+ affects its growth obviously. Low concentration (0-50 μg/mL) of Zn2 + promotes the growth of Bacillus thuringiensis while high concentration (50-500 μg/mL) of Zn2 + inhibits its growth. When the concentration reached up to 600 μg/mL, it can not grow at all.

  8. Identification of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH as a binding protein for a 68-kDa Bacillus thuringiensis parasporal protein cytotoxic against leukaemic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadarajah Vishna

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt, an ubiquitous gram-positive spore-forming bacterium forms parasporal proteins during the stationary phase of its growth. Recent findings of selective human cancer cell-killing activity in non-insecticidal Bt isolates resulted in a new category of Bt parasporal protein called parasporin. However, little is known about the receptor molecules that bind parasporins and the mechanism of anti-cancer activity. A Malaysian Bt isolate, designated Bt18 produces parasporal protein that exhibit preferential cytotoxic activity for human leukaemic T cells (CEM-SS but is non-cytotoxic to normal T cells or other cancer cell lines such as human cervical cancer (HeLa, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and colon cancer (HT-29 suggesting properties similar to parasporin. In this study we aim to identify the binding protein for Bt18 in human leukaemic T cells. Methods Bt18 parasporal protein was separated using Mono Q anion exchange column attached to a HPLC system and antibody was raised against the purified 68-kDa parasporal protein. Receptor binding assay was used to detect the binding protein for Bt18 parasporal protein in CEM-SS cells and the identified protein was sent for N-terminal sequencing. NCBI protein BLAST was used to analyse the protein sequence. Double immunofluorescence staining techniques was applied to localise Bt18 and binding protein on CEM-SS cell. Results Anion exchange separation of Bt18 parasporal protein yielded a 68-kDa parasporal protein with specific cytotoxic activity. Polyclonal IgG (anti-Bt18 for the 68-kDa parasporal protein was successfully raised and purified. Receptor binding assay showed that Bt18 parasporal protein bound to a 36-kDa protein from the CEM-SS cells lysate. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 36-kDa protein was GKVKVGVNGFGRIGG. NCBI protein BLAST revealed that the binding protein was Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. Double immunofluorescence staining showed

  9. La biotecnología de Bacillus thuringiensis en la agricultura

    OpenAIRE

    Portela Dussán, Diana Daniela; Chaparro Giraldo, Alejandra; López Pazos, Silvio Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis es un bacilo Gram positivo que durante su fase de esporulación produce una inclusión parasporal, conformada por proteínas Cry con actividad biológica contra insectos-plaga. Gracias a estas proteínas Bacillus thuringiensis presenta toxicidad contra larvas de insectos-plaga de los órdenes Lepidóptera, Coleóptera y Díptera, entre otros. Además es amigable con el medioambiente, razones por la cuales se ha hecho común el uso y desarrollo de productos comerciales y plantas tr...

  10. Study of Thermokinetic Properties of Sodium Selenite on Bacillus thuringiensis Cry B by Microcalorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Xi; LIU,Yi; ZHAO,Ru-Ming; YU,Zi-Niu; QU Song-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    By using an LKB2277 Bioactivity Monitor, the power-time curves of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry B at 28℃ effected by Na2SeO3 were determined. Some paarameters, such as growh rate constant k, inhibitory ratio I, the maximum heat production rate Pmax, heat output Q, were obtained. Considering both the growth rate constant k and heat output Q, it was found that a low concentration of Na2SeO3 had a promoting action on the growth of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry B, but a high concentration of Na2SeO3 had an inhibitory action.

  11. Huringiensis strategy to culture media design for the fermentation of bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    L. Beltrán; S. Díaz; Berdugo, C.; G. Buitrago; A Zamora; N. Moreno

    2012-01-01

    In this work was studied the culture medium for the Bacillus thuringiensis fermentation, the purpose was the production of biopesticide using as active ingredient native strains. The culture was developed in flasks of 1000 ml containing 100ml of culture medium, which was inoculated with 10ml of the bacteria, incubated at 29 ºC and 200 rpm. In this study we used an experimental design model for the strain HD1 of Bacillus thuringiensis, with glucose as carbon source, evaluating the concentratio...

  12. Expression of the neutral protease gene from a thermophilic Bacillus sp BT1 strain in Bacillus subtilis and its natural host : Identification of a functional promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecerek, B; Venema, G

    2000-01-01

    The expression of the neutral protease gene (npr) from the thermophilic Bacillus sp. BT1 strain was studied in its natural host and in mesophilic Bacillus subtilis. In the thermophilic BT1 strain, the transcription of the protease gene is initiated from its own promoter, just 5' to the gene. In cont

  13. Molecular and insecticidal characterization of Vip3A protein producing Bacillus thuringiensis strains toxic against Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Showkat Ahmad; Yadav, Radha; Malik, Abdul; Padaria, Jasdeep Chatrath

    2016-02-01

    Vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vip) represent the second generation of insecticidal proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) during the vegetative growth stage of growth. Bt-based biopesticides are recognized as viable alternatives to chemical insecticides; the latter cause environmental pollution and lead to the emergence of pest resistance. To perform a systematic study of vip genes encoding toxic proteins, a total of 30 soil samples were collected from diverse locations of Kashmir valley, India, and characterized by molecular and analytical methods. Eighty-six colonies showing Bacillus-like morphology were selected. Scanning electron microscopy observations confirmed the presence of different crystal shapes, and PCR analysis of insecticidal genes revealed a predominance of the lepidopteran-specific vip3 (43.18%) gene followed by coleopteran-specific vip1 (22.72%) and vip2 (15.90%) genes in the isolates tested. Multi-alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that vip3 sequences were highly conserved, whereas vip1 and vip2 showed adequate differences in amino acid sequences compared with already reported sequences. Screening for toxicity against Helicoverpa armigera larvae was performed using partially purified soluble fractions containing Vip3A protein. The mortality levels observed ranged between 70% and 96.6% in the isolates. The LC50 values of 2 of the native isolates, JK37 and JK88, against H. armigera were found to be on par with that of Bt subsp. kurstaki HD1, suggesting that these isolates could be developed as effective biopesticides against H. armigera.

  14. Synergy between toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Bacillus sphaericus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Margaret C; Jiannino, Joshua A; Federici, Brian A; Walton, William E

    2004-09-01

    Synergistic interactions among the multiple endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis de Barjac play an important role in its high toxicity to mosquito larvae and the absence of insecticide resistance in populations treated with this bacterium. A lack of toxin complexity and synergism are the apparent causes of resistance to Bacillus sphaericus Neide in particular Culex field populations. To identify endotoxin combinations of the two Bacillus species that might improve insecticidal activity and manage mosquito resistance to B. sphaericus, we tested their toxins alone and in combination. Most combinations of B. sphaericus and B. t. subsp. israelensis toxins were synergistic and enhanced toxicity relative to B. sphaericus, particularly against Culex quinquefasciatus Say larvae resistant to B. sphaericus and Aedes aegypti (L.), a species poorly susceptible to B. sphaericus. Toxicity also improved against susceptible Cx. quinquefasciatus. For example, when the CytlAa toxin from B. t. subsp. israelensis was added to Bin and Cry toxins, or when native B. t. subsp. israelensis was combined with B. sphaericus, synergism values as high as 883-fold were observed and combinations were 4-59,000-fold more active than B. sphaericus. These data, and previous studies using cytolytic toxins, validate proposed strategies for improving bacterial larvicides by combining B. sphaericus with B. t. subsp. israelensis or by engineering recombinant bacteria that express endotoxins from both strains. These combinations increase both endotoxin complexity and synergistic interactions and thereby enhance activity and help avoid insecticide resistance.

  15. Increase of the Bacillus thuringiensis secreted toxicity against lepidopteron larvae by homologous expression of the vip3LB gene during sporulation stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, Sameh; Jamoussi, Kaïs; Dabbeche, Emna; Jaoua, Samir

    2011-09-01

    The Vegetative insecticidal Vip3A proteins display a wide range of insecticidal spectrum against several agricultural insect pests. The fact that the expression of vip3 genes occurs only during the vegetative growth phase of Bacillus thuringiensis is a limiting factor in term of production level. Therefore, extending the synthesis of the Vip proteins to the sporulation phase is a good alternative to reach high levels of toxin synthesis. In this study, we have demonstrated that the maximal production of the secreted Vip3LB (also called Vip3Aa16) during the growth of the wild-type strain B. thuringiensis BUPM 95 is reached at the end of the vegetative growth phase, and that the protein remains relatively stable in the culture supernatant during the late sporulation stages. The vip3LB gene was cloned and expressed under the control of the sporulation dependant promoters BtI and BtII in B. thuringiensis BUPM 106 (Vip3(-)) and BUPM 95 (Vip3(+)) strains. The examination of the culture supernatants during the sporulation phase evidenced the synthesis of Vip3LB and its toxicity against the second-instars larvae of the Lepidopteron insect Spodoptera littoralis for the recombinant BUPM 106. Moreover, there was an increase of the Vip3LB synthesis level and an enhancement of the oral toxicity for the recombinant BUPM 95 resulting from the expression of the vip3LB gene during both the vegetative and sporulation phases and the relative stability of the Vip3LB protein.

  16. Bt toxin modification for enhanced efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deist, Benjamin R; Rausch, Michael A; Fernandez-Luna, Maria Teresa; Adang, Michael J; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-10-22

    Insect-specific toxins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provide a valuable resource for pest suppression. Here we review the different strategies that have been employed to enhance toxicity against specific target species including those that have evolved resistance to Bt, or to modify the host range of Bt crystal (Cry) and cytolytic (Cyt) toxins. These strategies include toxin truncation, modification of protease cleavage sites, domain swapping, site-directed mutagenesis, peptide addition, and phage display screens for mutated toxins with enhanced activity. Toxin optimization provides a useful approach to extend the utility of these proteins for suppression of pests that exhibit low susceptibility to native Bt toxins, and to overcome field resistance.

  17. A seed mixture increases dominance of resistance to Bt cotton in Helicoverpa zea

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Widely grown transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) can benefit agriculture, but adaptation by pests threatens their continued success. Refuges of host plants that do not make Bt toxins can promote survival of susceptible insects and delay evolution of resistance, particularly if resistance is inherited as a recessive trait. However, data have been lacking to compare the dominance of resistance when Bt and non-Bt seeds are planted in random mixtures ...

  18. Insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis silences Erwinia carotovora virulence by a new form of microbial antagonism, signal interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi-Hu; Zhang, Xi-Fen; Xu, Jin-Ling; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2004-02-01

    It is commonly known that bacteria may produce antibiotics to interfere with the normal biological functions of their competitors in order to gain competitive advantages. Here we report that Bacillus thuringiensis suppressed the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence of plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora through a new form of microbial antagonism, signal interference. E. carotovora produces and responds to acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signals to regulate antibiotic production and expression of virulence genes, whereas B. thuringiensis strains possess AHL-lactonase, which is a potent AHL-degrading enzyme. B. thuringiensis did not seem to interfere with the normal growth of E. carotovora; rather, it abolished the accumulation of AHL signal when they were cocultured. In planta, B. thuringiensis significantly decreased the incidence of E. carotovora infection and symptom development of potato soft rot caused by the pathogen. The biocontrol efficiency is correlated with the ability of bacterial strains to produce AHL-lactonase. While all the seven AHL-lactonase-producing B. thuringiensis strains provided significant protection against E. carotovora infection, Bacillus fusiformis and Escherichia coli strains that do not process AHL-degradation enzyme showed little effect in biocontrol. Mutation of aiiA, the gene encoding AHL-lactonase in B. thuringiensis, resulted in a substantial decrease in biocontrol efficacy. These results suggest that signal interference mechanisms existing in natural ecosystems could be explored as a new version of antagonism for prevention of bacterial infections.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Nay; Majed, Racha; Perchat, Stéphane; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Gohar, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis can produce a floating biofilm which includes two parts: a ring and a pellicle. The ring is a thick structure which sticks to the culture container, while the pellicle extends over the whole liquid surface and joins the ring. We have followed over time, from 16 to 96 h, sporulation in the two biofilm parts. Sporulation was followed in situ in 48-wells polystyrene microtiterplates with a fluorescence binocular stereomicroscope and a spoIID-yfp transcriptional fusion. Sporulation took place much earlier in the ring than in the pellicle. In 20 h-aged biofilms, spoIID was expressed only in the ring, which could be seen as a green fluorescent circle surrounding the non-fluorescent pellicle. However, after 48 h of culture, the pellicle started to express spoIID in specific area corresponding to protrusions, and after 96 h both the ring and the whole pellicle expressed spoIID. Spore counts and microscopy observations of the ring and the pellicle harvested separately confirmed these results and revealed that sporulation occured 24 h-later in the pellicle comparatively to the ring, although both structures contained nearly 100% spores after 96 h of culture. We hypothesize that two mechanisms, due to microenvironments in the biofilm, can explain this difference. First, the ring experiences a decreased concentration of nutrients earlier than the pellicle, because of a lower exchange area with the culture medium. An second, the ring is exposed to partial dryness. Both reasons could speed up sporulation in this biofilm structure. Our results also suggest that spores in the biofilm display a phenotypic heterogeneity. These observations might be of particular significance for the food industry, since the biofilm part sticking to container walls - the ring - is likely to contain spores and will therefore resist both to washing and to cleaning procedures, and will be able to restart a new biofilm when food production has resumed.

  20. Effect of Bacillus thuringiensis on microbial functional groups in sorghum rhizosphere Efeito do Bacillus thuringiensis sobre grupos funcionais de microrganismos na rizosfera de sorgo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Brasil

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the effect of two strains of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki on sorghum rhizosphere microorganisms. The strains were HD1, that produces the bioinsecticidal protein, and 407, that is a mutant non-producer. The strains do not influence microbial population, but reduce plant growth and improve mycorrhizal colonization and free living fixing N2 community.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de duas cepas de Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki sobre microrganismos na rizosfera do sorgo. As cepas foram a HD1, produtora do cristal bioinseticida, e a 407, uma mutante não-produtora. As duas cepas não influenciam a comunidade microbiana, mas reduzem o crescimento da planta. A colonização micorrízica e a população de fixadores de N2 de vida livre aumentaram.

  1. Estructura tridimensional de las toxinas de Bacillus thuringiensis: revisión Three dimensional structure of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerón Salamanca JA.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available La ingeniería de proteínas de las d-endotoxinas de Bacillus thuringiensis puede orientar la búsqueda de variantes con un espectro mayor de especies susceptibles, potencia optimizada, y estabilidad apropiada. Aquí, nosotros revisamos las características más importantes de la estructura tridimensional de las proteínas Cry y Cyt. Es posible concluir que existe un modelo general obvio con propiedades específicas de acuerdo a su función y organismo susceptible.Structure-based protein engineering of Bacillus thuringiensis d-endotoxins may direct the search for variants with broader susceptible species spectra, optimal potency, and stability properties. Here, we revised the more important characteristics of the Cry and Cyt proteins three-dimensional structure; it is possible to conclude that an obvious general model exists with specific properties according to its function and target organism.

  2. Valorization of soy waste through SSF for the production of compost enriched with Bacillus thuringiensis with biopesticide properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballardo, Cindy; Abraham, Juliana; Barrena, Raquel; Artola, Adriana; Gea, Teresa; Sánchez, Antoni

    2016-03-15

    There is a growing generation of biodegradable wastes from different human activities from industrial to agricultural including home and recreational activities. On the other hand, agricultural and horticultural activities require significant amounts of organic amendments and pesticides. In this framework, the present study evaluates the viability of soy fiber residue valorization as organic soil amendment with biopesticide properties through aerobic solid-state fermentation (SSF) in the presence of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). The experiments were performed first under sterile and non-sterile conditions at lab scale using 115 g of sample and controlled temperature (30 °C). Bt growth was successful in sterile conditions, obtaining 6.2 × 10(11) CFU g(-1) DM and 8.6 × 10(10) spores g(-1) DM after 6 days. Bt survived on solid culture under non-sterile conditions (3.8 × 10(9) CFU g(-1) DM and 1.3 × 10(8) spores g(-1) DM). Further, the valorization process was scaled-up to 10 L reactors (2300 g) under non-sterile conditions obtaining a final stabilized material with viable Bt cells and spores (9.5 × 10(7) CFU g(-1) DM and 1.1 × 10(8) spores g(-1) DM in average) after 9 days of SSF. These results confirm the possibility of managing biodegradable wastes by their transformation to a waste derived soil amendment with enhanced biopesticide effect, in comparison to traditional compost using a valuable and low-cost technique (SSF).

  3. A naturally occurring plant cysteine protease possesses remarkable toxicity against insect pests and synergizes Bacillus thuringiensis toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Srinidi; Ma, Peter W K; Williams, W Paul; Luthe, Dawn S

    2008-03-12

    When caterpillars feed on maize (Zea maize L.) lines with native resistance to several Lepidopteran pests, a defensive cysteine protease, Mir1-CP, rapidly accumulates at the wound site. Mir1-CP has been shown to inhibit caterpillar growth in vivo by attacking and permeabilizing the insect's peritrophic matrix (PM), a structure that surrounds the food bolus, assists in digestion and protects the midgut from microbes and toxins. PM permeabilization weakens the caterpillar defenses by facilitating the movement of other insecticidal proteins in the diet to the midgut microvilli and thereby enhancing their toxicity. To directly determine the toxicity of Mir1-CP, the purified recombinant enzyme was directly tested against four economically significant Lepidopteran pests in bioassays. Mir1-CP LC(50) values were 1.8, 3.6, 0.6, and 8.0 ppm for corn earworm, tobacco budworm, fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer, respectively. These values were the same order of magnitude as those determined for the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Bt-CryIIA. In addition to being directly toxic to the larvae, 60 ppb Mir1-CP synergized sublethal concentrations of Bt-CryIIA in all four species. Permeabilization of the PM by Mir1-CP probably provides ready access to Bt-binding sites on the midgut microvilli and increases its activity. Consequently, Mir1-CP could be used for controlling caterpillar pests in maize using non-transgenic approaches and potentially could be used in other crops either singly or in combination with Bt-toxins.

  4. A naturally occurring plant cysteine protease possesses remarkable toxicity against insect pests and synergizes Bacillus thuringiensis toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinidi Mohan

    Full Text Available When caterpillars feed on maize (Zea maize L. lines with native resistance to several Lepidopteran pests, a defensive cysteine protease, Mir1-CP, rapidly accumulates at the wound site. Mir1-CP has been shown to inhibit caterpillar growth in vivo by attacking and permeabilizing the insect's peritrophic matrix (PM, a structure that surrounds the food bolus, assists in digestion and protects the midgut from microbes and toxins. PM permeabilization weakens the caterpillar defenses by facilitating the movement of other insecticidal proteins in the diet to the midgut microvilli and thereby enhancing their toxicity. To directly determine the toxicity of Mir1-CP, the purified recombinant enzyme was directly tested against four economically significant Lepidopteran pests in bioassays. Mir1-CP LC(50 values were 1.8, 3.6, 0.6, and 8.0 ppm for corn earworm, tobacco budworm, fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer, respectively. These values were the same order of magnitude as those determined for the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Bt-CryIIA. In addition to being directly toxic to the larvae, 60 ppb Mir1-CP synergized sublethal concentrations of Bt-CryIIA in all four species. Permeabilization of the PM by Mir1-CP probably provides ready access to Bt-binding sites on the midgut microvilli and increases its activity. Consequently, Mir1-CP could be used for controlling caterpillar pests in maize using non-transgenic approaches and potentially could be used in other crops either singly or in combination with Bt-toxins.

  5. Efficacy of genetically modified Bt toxins alone and in combinations against pink bollworm resistant to Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evolution of resistance in pests threatens the long-term success of transgenic crops that produce insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Previous work showed that genetically modified Bt toxins Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod effectively countered resistance to native Bt toxins Cry1Ab and ...

  6. Crystal structure of Cry51Aa1: A potential novel insecticidal aerolysin-type β-pore-forming toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengchen; Chinte, Unmesh; Chen, Lirong; Yao, Qingqing; Meng, Ying; Zhou, Dayong; Bi, Li-Jun; Rose, John; Adang, Michael J; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2015-07-03

    The structures of several Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal proteins have been determined by crystallographic methods and a close relationship has been explicated between specific toxicities and conserved three-dimensional architectures. In this study, as a representative of the coleopteran- and hemipteran-specific Cry51A group, the complete structure of Cry51Aa1 protoxin has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.65 Å resolution. This is the first report of a coleopteran-active Bt insecticidal toxin with high structural similarity to the aerolysin-type β-pore forming toxins (β-PFTs). Moreover, study of featured residues and structural elements reveal their possible roles in receptor binding and pore formation events. This study provides new insights into the action of aerolysin-type β-PFTs from a structural perspective, and could be useful for the control of coleopteran and hemipteran insect pests in agricultures.

  7. Toxicidad de δ-endotoxinas recombinantes de Bacillus thuringiensis sobre larvas de la polilla guatemalteca (Tecia solanivora (Lepidóptera: Gelechiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Hernández-Fernández

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de determinar la actividad tóxica específica de las proteínas recombinantes Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, Cry1B y Cry1C de Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt, sobre larvas de primer instar de Tecia solanivora se estableció la CL50 para las toxinas. Para este fin se implementó la cría masiva de este insecto bajo condiciones de laboratorio, 58±5% de humedad relativa, 18±5ºC de temperatura y un fotoperiodo de 23 h oscuridad y 1 h luz. Se utilizó una dieta seminatural consistente en láminas de papa variedad parda pastusa autoclavada con solución preservante (ácido ascórbico 7 g/L y metilparabeno 5 g/L, ya que fue estable en el tiempo, garantizó la reproducibilidad de los resultados y fue de fácil evaluación. Las proteínas recombinantes se evaluaron a una concentración de 0,1 μg/cm2. Los resultados obtenidos de porcentaje de mortalidad indicaron que no había diferencias entre las delta-endotoxinas recombinantes Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, Cry1B y Cry1C de Bt (PPalabras clave: Bacillus thuringiensis; proteínas recombinantes; Tecia solanivora; papa parda pastusa; Bacillus thuringiensis; bioassay; recombinant endotoxin; Tecia solanivora; pastusa potato variety.

  8. Potential Use of Proteinase Inhibitors, Avidin, and Other Bio-reagents for Synergizing Bt Performance and Delaying Resistance Development to Bt

    Science.gov (United States)

    After being ingested by target insects, the insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) need to go through a proteolytic process by insect midgut proteinases to become activated. At the same time, Bt can be hydrolyzed and degraded by midgut proteinases to become non-toxic to target insect...

  9. Contributions of gut bacteria to Bacillus thuringiensis-induced mortality vary across a range of Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Jonathan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gut microbiota contribute to the health of their hosts, and alterations in the composition of this microbiota can lead to disease. Previously, we demonstrated that indigenous gut bacteria were required for the insecticidal toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis to kill the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. B. thuringiensis and its associated insecticidal toxins are commonly used for the control of lepidopteran pests. A variety of factors associated with the insect host, B. thuringiensis strain, and environment affect the wide range of susceptibilities among Lepidoptera, but the interaction of gut bacteria with these factors is not understood. To assess the contribution of gut bacteria to B. thuringiensis susceptibility across a range of Lepidoptera we examined larval mortality of six species in the presence and absence of their indigenous gut bacteria. We then assessed the effect of feeding an enteric bacterium isolated from L. dispar on larval mortality following ingestion of B. thuringiensis toxin. Results Oral administration of antibiotics reduced larval mortality due to B. thuringiensis in five of six species tested. These included Vanessa cardui (L., Manduca sexta (L., Pieris rapae (L. and Heliothis virescens (F. treated with a formulation composed of B. thuringiensis cells and toxins (DiPel, and Lymantria dispar (L. treated with a cell-free formulation of B. thuringiensis toxin (MVPII. Antibiotics eliminated populations of gut bacteria below detectable levels in each of the insects, with the exception of H. virescens, which did not have detectable gut bacteria prior to treatment. Oral administration of the Gram-negative Enterobacter sp. NAB3, an indigenous gut resident of L. dispar, restored larval mortality in all four of the species in which antibiotics both reduced susceptibility to B. thuringiensis and eliminated gut bacteria, but not in H. virescens. In contrast, ingestion of B. thuringiensis toxin (MVPII following antibiotic

  10. Isolation and partial characterization of a mutant of Bacillus thuringiensis producing melanin Isolamento e caracterização parcial de um mutante de Bacillus thuringiensis produtor de melanina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislayne T. Vilas-Bôas

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A mutant (407-P of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis strain 407 producing a melanin was obtained after treatment with the mutagenic agent ethyl-methane-sulfonate. Several microbiological and biochemical properties of the two strains were analyzed and the results were similar. The mutant 407-P was also incorporated into non-sterilized soil samples, recovered, easily identified, and quantified, what enables its use in ecology of B. thuringiensis.Um mutante (407-P da linhagem Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis 407 produtor de melanina foi obtido após tratamento com o agente mutagênico etil-metano-sulfonato. Diversas propriedades microbiológicas e bioquímicas das duas linhagens foram analisadas e os resultados foram similares. O mutante 407-P foi incorporado em amostras de solo não esterilizado, recuperado, facilmente identificado e quantificado, possibilitando seu uso em estudos de ecologia de B. thuringiensis.

  11. The Effectiveness of Trypsin Modulating Oostatic Factor (TMOF and Combination of TMOF with Bacillus thuringiensis Against Aedes aegypti Larvae in the Laboratory

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    YS Lau

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trypsin Modulating Oostatic Factor (TMOF terminates trypsin biosynthesis in adult and larval mos­quito gut. It will inhibit the growth and development of mosquito larvae feeding on it resulting in death by starvation. The objective of this study is to determine the effective dose of Pichia-TMOF and the combination of Pichia-TMOF with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt as larvicide on Ae. aegypti larvae.Methods: Aedes aegypti first-instar larvae were exposed to various doses of Pichia-TMOF, Bt and combination of Pichia-TMOF and Bt. The development of the larvae were observed and recorded daily during the bioassay larval test until the adult emergence.Results: The results showed that 400 ppm Pichia-TMOF and 300 ppm Pichia-TMOF were able to cause 100% and 67% cumulative mortality on Ae. aegypti larvae on 8th day respectively. At 200 ppm, 100 ppm and 50 ppm con­centra­tion Pichia-TMOF showed obvious stunted effect on Ae. aegypti larvae. Moreover, the combination of 400 ppm Pichia-TMOF with 0.1 ppm Bt showed synergistic effect on Ae. aegypti. Conclusion: Pichia-TMOF inhibited trypsin biosynthesis is potential to act in larval gut causing stunted growth and lar­val development and causing mortality. The combination of Pichia-TMOF and Bt increased the effectiveness in caus­ing larval mortality.

  12. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Mediated by an ABC Transporter Mutation Increases Susceptibility to Toxins from Other Bacteria in an Invasive Insect.

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    Yutao Xiao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of pest resistance reduces the efficacy of insecticidal proteins from the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt used widely in sprays and transgenic crops. Recent efforts to delay pest adaptation to Bt crops focus primarily on combinations of two or more Bt toxins that kill the same pest, but this approach is often compromised because resistance to one Bt toxin causes cross-resistance to others. Thus, integration of Bt toxins with alternative controls that do not exhibit such cross-resistance is urgently needed. The ideal scenario of negative cross-resistance, where selection for resistance to a Bt toxin increases susceptibility to alternative controls, has been elusive. Here we discovered that selection of the global crop pest, Helicoverpa armigera, for >1000-fold resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac increased susceptibility to abamectin and spineotram, insecticides derived from the soil bacteria Streptomyces avermitilis and Saccharopolyspora spinosa, respectively. Resistance to Cry1Ac did not affect susceptibility to the cyclodiene, organophospate, or pyrethroid insecticides tested. Whereas previous work demonstrated that the resistance to Cry1Ac in the strain analyzed here is conferred by a mutation disrupting an ATP-binding cassette protein named ABCC2, the new results show that increased susceptibility to abamectin is genetically linked with the same mutation. Moreover, RNAi silencing of HaABCC2 not only decreased susceptibility to Cry1Ac, it also increased susceptibility to abamectin. The mutation disrupting ABCC2 reduced removal of abamectin in live larvae and in transfected Hi5 cells. The results imply that negative cross-resistance occurs because the wild type ABCC2 protein plays a key role in conferring susceptibility to Cry1Ac and in decreasing susceptibility to abamectin. The negative cross-resistance between a Bt toxin and other bacterial insecticides reported here may facilitate more sustainable pest control.

  13. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Mediated by an ABC Transporter Mutation Increases Susceptibility to Toxins from Other Bacteria in an Invasive Insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Gong, Lingling; He, Fei; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Wu, Kongming

    2016-01-01

    Evolution of pest resistance reduces the efficacy of insecticidal proteins from the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) used widely in sprays and transgenic crops. Recent efforts to delay pest adaptation to Bt crops focus primarily on combinations of two or more Bt toxins that kill the same pest, but this approach is often compromised because resistance to one Bt toxin causes cross-resistance to others. Thus, integration of Bt toxins with alternative controls that do not exhibit such cross-resistance is urgently needed. The ideal scenario of negative cross-resistance, where selection for resistance to a Bt toxin increases susceptibility to alternative controls, has been elusive. Here we discovered that selection of the global crop pest, Helicoverpa armigera, for >1000-fold resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac increased susceptibility to abamectin and spineotram, insecticides derived from the soil bacteria Streptomyces avermitilis and Saccharopolyspora spinosa, respectively. Resistance to Cry1Ac did not affect susceptibility to the cyclodiene, organophospate, or pyrethroid insecticides tested. Whereas previous work demonstrated that the resistance to Cry1Ac in the strain analyzed here is conferred by a mutation disrupting an ATP-binding cassette protein named ABCC2, the new results show that increased susceptibility to abamectin is genetically linked with the same mutation. Moreover, RNAi silencing of HaABCC2 not only decreased susceptibility to Cry1Ac, it also increased susceptibility to abamectin. The mutation disrupting ABCC2 reduced removal of abamectin in live larvae and in transfected Hi5 cells. The results imply that negative cross-resistance occurs because the wild type ABCC2 protein plays a key role in conferring susceptibility to Cry1Ac and in decreasing susceptibility to abamectin. The negative cross-resistance between a Bt toxin and other bacterial insecticides reported here may facilitate more sustainable pest control. PMID:26872031

  14. An Ultra-Violet Tolerant Wild-Type Strain of Melanin-Producing Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinenea, Estibaliz; Salazar, Francisco; Ramirez, Melanie; Ortiz, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent used in agriculture, forestry and mosquito control. However, the insecticidal activity of the B. thuringiensis formulation is not very stable and rapidly loses its biological activity under field conditions, due to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. Melanin is known to absorb radiation therefore photo protection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been extensively studied. Objectives: The aim of this study was to find a wild type strain of naturally melanin-producing B. thuringiensis to avoid any mutation or manipulation that can affect the Cry protein content. Materials and Methods: Bacillus thuringiensis strains were isolated from soils of different States of Mexico and pigment extraction was followed by lowering the pH to 2 using 1N HCl. Pigment was characterized by some chemical tests based on its solubility, bleaching by H2O2 and flocculation with FeCl3, and using an Infrared (IR) spectrum. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiment was performed to probe the melanin efficacy. Results: ELI52 strain of B. thuringiensis was confirmed to naturally produce melanin. The Cry protein analysis suggested that ELI52 is probably a B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain with toxic activity against the Diptera order of insects. Ultra Violet protection efficacy of melanin was probed counting total viable colonies after UV radiation and comparing the results with the non-producing melanin strain L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) was also detected in the culture. ELI52 strain showed an antagonistic effect over some common bacteria from the environment. Conclusions: ELI52 wild-type strain of B. thuringiensis is a good bio-insecticide that produces melanin with UV-resistance that is probably toxic against the Diptera order of insects and can inhibit the growth of other environmental bacteria. PMID:26421136

  15. Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain Btm27, an Egyptian Isolate Highly Toxic to Cotton Leafworm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Brigida; Chen, Yue; Koenig, Sara S. K.; El-Helow, Ehab R.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a potent microbial control agent against insect pests. Here, we present the draft genome of the Egyptian strain Btm27 that shows high toxicity toward the cotton leafworm. The genome contains three insecticidal genes cry1Ac9, cry2Ab1, and vip3V that have been implicated in conferring toxicity toward lepidoptera. PMID:25977430

  16. Transcriptome of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcriptomic profiles of the lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by the biopesticide Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of 49,613 assembled transcript sequences, of which...

  17. Fulminant phlegmonitis of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum due to Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hisatake; Ogura, Hiroshi; Seki, Masafumi; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of phlegmonitis of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum in patient in an immunocompromised state. Culture of gastric juice and blood yielded Bacillus thuringiensis. This case showed that even low-virulence bacilli can cause lethal gastrointestinal phlegmonous gastritis in conditions of immunodeficiency. PMID:25834344

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar Tolworthi Strain Pasteur Institute Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Kohzo; Nakashima, Kaede

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi strain Pasteur Institute Standard was determined. The genome consists of a 5.9-Mb chromosome and eight plasmids, one of which is linear. The second largest plasmid (293 kb) carries the genes encoding insecticidal proteins. PMID:26139717

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis INTA Fr7-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Marcelo F.; Ortiz, Elio M.; Sauka, Diego H.; Benintende, Graciela B.; Zandomeni, Rubén O.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the complete annotated 6,035,547-bp draft genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis INTA Fr7-4. This strain contains three cry8 and two vip1 and vip2 insecticidal toxin genes. PMID:28360155

  20. Investigation of Cytocidal Activity of Bacillus Thuringiensis Parasporal Toxin on CCRF-CEM Cell Line

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    Elham Moazamian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Parasporin is a parasporal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis and exhibits special cytocidal activity against human cancer cells. Similar to other insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis crystal toxins, parasporin shows target specificity and damages the cellular membrane. In this study, different strains of Bacillus thuringiensis isolated from various regions of Iran and their cytocidal activity against CCRF-CEM cell line and human erythrocyte were investigated.   Materials & Methods: Fifty soil samples were collected from different Iranian provinces, and characterization was performed based on protein crystal morphology by phase-contrast microscope and variations of Cry protein toxin using SDS-PAGE. After parasporin was processed with proteinase K, the active form was produced and protein activity on the cell line was evaluated. Results: Parasporal inclusion proteins showed different cytotoxicity against acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells (ALL, but not against normal lymphocyte. Isolated parasporin demonstrated no hemolytic activity against human erythrocyte. It appears that these proteins have the ability to differentiate between normal lymphocytes and leukemia cells and have specific receptors on specific cancer cell lines. Conclusion: Our results provide evidence that the parasporin-producing organism is a common member in Bacillus thuringiensis populations occurring in the natural environments of Iran.

  1. Fulminant phlegmonitis of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum due to Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hisatake; Ogura, Hiroshi; Seki, Masafumi; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2015-03-28

    We report a case of phlegmonitis of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum in patient in an immunocompromised state. Culture of gastric juice and blood yielded Bacillus thuringiensis. This case showed that even low-virulence bacilli can cause lethal gastrointestinal phlegmonous gastritis in conditions of immunodeficiency.

  2. UJI SEROLOGI ISOLAT BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS DAN PATOGENISITASNYA TERHADAP JENTIK NYAMUK VEKTOR

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    Blondie Ch. P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Serology test study of 20 Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria isolates and it's pathogenicity against vector mosquito larvae last instar III, on samples from various soil habitate was done in Salatiga municipal, Semarang regency, Purworejo regency and East Flores regency. The method used in this study (to determine Bacillus thuringiensis isolate serotype was based on H-antigen (flagela which is used as a movement organ of the bacteria. The twenty Bacillus thuringiensis isolates which were tested, can be grouped to 11 serotype (serotype H-3, 14, 43, 10, 8, 24, 11, 6, 23, 28, 13 and 11. H-14 serotype is the dominant serotype (3 isolate followed by H-3, 43, 10 and 23 serotype are 2 isolate respectively and H-8, 24, 11, 6, 28 and 13 serotype are 1 isolate respectively. The pathogenicity test of 3 Bacillus thuringiensis isolate H-14 serotype against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito larvae, showed that 3 isolates (100% has pathogenecity at 82.7% - 94.7% and 64.0% - 93.3% for 24 hours of exposure respectively. In 48 hours of exposure, using the same test, results showed that 3 isolates (100% have a pathogenicity at 84.0% - 98.7% and 81.3% - 96.0% respectively.

  3. Persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis bioinsecticides in the gut of human-flora-associated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse;

    2006-01-01

    The capability of two bioinsecticide strains of Bacillus thuringiensis (ssp. israelensis and ssp. kurstaki) to germinate and persist in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract of human-flora-associated rats was studied. Rats were dosed either with vegetative cells or spores of the bacteria for 4 conse...

  4. An improved method for rapid generation and screening of Bacillus thuringiensis phage-resistant mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-11-01

    A simple method to isolate, screen and select phage-resistant mutants of Bacillus thuringiensis was developed. The traditional double-layer agar method was improved by a combination of the spotting assay using a lytic phage, to generate the bacterial-resistant mutants, with an inverted spotting assay (ISA), to rapidly screen the candidate-resistant mutants.

  5. Activity of wild-type and hybrid Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxins against Agrotis ipsilon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maagd, de R.A.; Weemen-Hendriks, M.; Molthoff, J.W.; Naimov, S.

    2003-01-01

    Twelve Cry1 and two Cry9 ?-endotoxins fromBacillus thuringiensis were tested for their activity against black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon).A. ipsilon was not susceptible to many toxins, but three toxins had significant activity. Cry9Ca was the most toxic, followed by Cry1Aa and Cry1Fb. Hybrids between

  6. Solubilization, Activation, and Insecticidal Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar thompsoni HD542 Crystal Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naimov, S.; Boncheva, R.; Karlova, R.B.; Dukiandjiev, S.; Minkov, I.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Cry15Aa protein, produced by Bacillus thuringiensis serovar thompsoni HD542 in a crystal together with a 40 kDa accompanying protein is one of a small group of non-typical, less well-studied members of the Cry family of insecticidal proteins, and may provide an alternative for the more commonly used

  7. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crava, Cristina M.; Jakubowska, Agata K.; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity. PMID:25993013

  8. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crava, Cristina M; Jakubowska, Agata K; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity.

  9. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M Crava

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV. We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity.

  10. Specificity and combinatorial effects of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins in the context of GMO environmental risk assessment

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    Angelika eHilbeck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stacked GM crops expressing up to six Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis are today replacing the formerly grown single- transgene GM crop varieties. Stacking of multiple Cry toxins not only increase the environmental load of toxins but also raise the question on how possible interactions of the toxins can be assessed for risk assessment, which is mandatory for GM crops. However, no operational guidelines for a testing strategy or testing procedures exist. From the developers point of view, little data testing for combinatorial effects of Cry toxins is necessary as the range of affected organisms is focused on pest species and no evidence is claimed to exists pointing to combinatorial effects on nontarget organisms. We have examined this rationale critically using information reported in the scientific literature. To do so we address the hypothesis of narrow specificity of Cry toxins subdivided into three underlying different conceptual conditions i 'efficacy' in target pests as indicator for 'narrow specificity', ii lack of reported adverse effects of Cry toxins on nontarget organisms, and iii proposed modes of action of Cry toxins (or the lack thereof as mechanisms underlying the reported activity/efficacy/specificity of Cry toxins. Complementary to this information we evaluate reports about outcomes of combinatorial effect testing of Cry toxins in the scientific literature and relate those findings to the practice of the environmental risk assessment of Bt-corps in general and of stacked Bt-events in particular.

  11. Three toxins, two receptors, one mechanism: Mode of action of Cry1A toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis in Heliothis virescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, Anne; Heckel, David G; Pauchet, Yannick

    2016-09-01

    Insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are highly active against Lepidoptera. However, field-evolved resistance to Bt toxins is on the rise. The 12-cadherin domain protein HevCaLP and the ABC transporter HevABCC2 are both genetically linked to Cry toxin resistance in Heliothis virescens. We investigated their interaction using stably expressing non-lytic clonal Sf9 cell lines expressing either protein or both together. Untransfected Sf9 cells are innately sensitive to Cry1Ca toxin, but not to Cry1A toxins; and quantitative PCR revealed negligible expression of genes involved in Cry1A toxicity such as cadherin, ABCC2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aminopeptidase N (APN). Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac caused swelling of Sf9 cells expressing HevABCC2, and caused faster swelling, lysis and up to 86% mortality in cells expressing both proteins. No such effect was observed in control Sf9 cells or in cells expressing only HevCaLP. The results of a mixing experiment demonstrated that both proteins need to be expressed within the same cell for high cytotoxicity, and suggest a novel role for HevCaLP. Binding assays showed that the toxin-receptor interaction is specific. Our findings confirm that HevABCC2 is the central target in Cry1A toxin mode of action, and that HevCaLP plays a supporting role in increasing Cry1A toxicity.

  12. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Peng, Donghai; Cheng, Chunsheng; Zhou, Wei; Ju, Shouyong; Wan, Danfeng; Yu, Ziquan; Shi, Jianwei; Deng, Yaoyao; Wang, Fenshan; Ye, Xiaobo; Hu, Zhenfei; Lin, Jian; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins) are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1). In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control. PMID:26795495

  13. Functional characterizations of residues Arg-158 and Tyr-170 of the mosquito-larvicidal Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leetachewa, Somphob; Moonsom, Saengduen; Chaisri, Urai; Khomkhum, Narumol; Yoonim, Nonglak; Wang, Ping; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2014-01-01

    The insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins involves toxin stabilization, oligomerization, passage across the peritrophic membrane (PM), binding to midgut receptors and pore-formation. The residues Arg-158 and Tyr-170 have been shown to be crucial for the toxicity of Bt Cry4Ba. We characterized the biological function of these residues. In mosquito larvae, the mutants R158A/E/Q (R158) could hardly penetrate the PM due to a significantly reduced ability to alter PM permeability; the mutant Y170A, however, could pass through the PM, but degraded in the space between the PM and the midgut epithelium. Further characterization by oligomerization demonstrated that Arg-158 mutants failed to form correctly sized high-molecular weight oligomers. This is the first report that Arg-158 plays a role in the formation of Cry4Ba oligomers, which are essential for toxin passage across the PM. Tyr-170, meanwhile, is involved in toxin stabilization in the toxic mechanism of Cry4Ba in mosquito larvae. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(10): 546-551] PMID:24286331

  14. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeremy L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm aminopeptidase N (APN and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM, and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM, which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research.

  15. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjuan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1. In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control.

  16. Total Protein of Crude Extracts and Quantification the Native Bacillus Thuringiensis Strains Isolated From Boyacá and Cundinamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneida Torres Cabra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cry proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt produce parasporal crystal during sporulation which are toxic against insect larvae of lepidopteran, coleopteran and dipteran. In the present study, 10 native isolations of Bt strains were quantified from the Native Strains Bank of the Jorge Tadeo Lozano University, isolated from soil in the municipalities of Ráquira, Santa Sofía, Villa de Leyva and Sutamarchán, in Boyacá; and also in Susa, Cundinamarca. Crude extracts of total proteins from the 10 strains incubated in Luria-Bertani medium (LB for 15 days at 37 °C were obtained. For quantification of total protein of the spore crystal mixture was used the Bradford method using a standard pattern a calibration curve with bovine serum albumin (BSA. After 5 minutes, the determination was realized in the spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 595 nm. The brighter blue were presented by the strains ZBUJTL35 and ZBUJTL39, with a concentration of 560.71 and 526.43 mg / ml, respectively. The Bradford method is a simple and fast technique to estimate the protein concentration. The strains will be used to determine the toxicity over Bemisiatabaci larvae.

  17. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa protoxin intoxication of Tenebrio molitor induces widespread changes in the expression of serine peptidase transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, Brenda; Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N

    2012-09-01

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, is a pest of stored grain products and is sensitive to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin. As digestive peptidases are a determining factor in Cry toxicity and resistance, we evaluated the expression of peptidase transcripts in the midgut of T. molitor larvae fed either a control or Cry3Aa protoxin diet for 24 h (RNA-Seq), or in larvae exposed to the protoxin for 6, 12, or 24 h (microarrays). Cysteine peptidase transcripts (9) were similar to cathepsins B, L, and K, and their expression did not vary more than 2.5-fold in control and Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Serine peptidase transcripts (48) included trypsin, chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin-like, elastase 1-like, and unclassified serine peptidases, as well as homologs lacking functional amino acids. Highly expressed trypsin and chymotrypsin transcripts were severely repressed, and most serine peptidase transcripts were expressed 2- to 15-fold lower in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Many serine peptidase and homolog transcripts were found only in control larvae. However, expression of a few serine peptidase transcripts was increased or found only in Cry3Aa-treated larvae. Therefore, Bt intoxication significantly impacted the expression of serine peptidases, potentially important in protoxin processing, while the insect maintained the production of critical digestive cysteine peptidases.

  18. pH-controlled Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac protoxin loading and release from polyelectrolyte microcapsules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Yang

    Full Text Available Crystal proteins synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt have been used as biopesticides because of their toxicity to the insect larval hosts. To protect the proteins from environmental stress to extend their activity, we have developed a new microcapsule formulation. Poly (acrylic acid (PAH and poly (styrene sulfonate (PSS were fabricated through layer-by-layer self-assembly based on a CaCO(3 core. Cry1Ac protoxins were loaded into microcapsules through layer-by-layer self-assembly at low pH, and the encapsulated product was stored in water at 4°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to observe the morphology of the capsules. To confirm the successful encapsulation, the loading results were observed with a confocal laser scattering microscope (CLSM, using fluorescein-labeled Cry1Ac protoxin (FITC-Cry1Ac. The protoxins were released from the capsule under the alkaline condition corresponding to the midgut of certain insects, a condition which seldom exists elsewhere in the environment. The following bioassay experiment demonstrated that the microcapsules with Cry1Ac protoxins displayed approximately equivalent insecticidal activity to the Asian corn borer compared with free Cry1Ac protoxins, and empty capsules proved to have no effect on insects. Further result also indicated that the formulation could keep stable under the condition of heat and desiccation. These results suggest that this formulation provides a promising methodology that protects protoxins from the environment and releases them specifically in the target insects' midgut, which has shown potential as biopesticide in the field.

  19. Comparison of susceptibility of Chilo suppressalis and Bombyx mori to five Bacillus thuringiensis proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yaoyu; Yang, Yan; Meissle, Michael; Peng, Yufa; Li, Yunhe

    2016-05-01

    Transformation of rice with genes encoding insecticidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) should confer high resistance to target lepidopteran pests, such as Chilo suppressalis, and low toxicity to non-target organisms, such as silkworm Bombyx mori. Five purified Cry proteins that have been used for plant transformation were tested using dietary exposure assays. The susceptibility of C. suppressalis larvae to the five insecticidal proteins in the decreasing order was: Cry1Ca>Cry1Ab>Cry1Ac>Cry2Aa>Cry1Fa. However, the toxicities of the Cry proteins to B. mori were in the order: Cry1Fa>Cry1Ca>Cry2Aa>Cry1Ab>Cry1Ac. The Cry1Ca, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac proteins exhibited relatively high toxicity to C. suppressalis larvae, with EC50 values of 16.4, 45.8 and 89.6ng/g, respectively. The toxicities of the three Cry proteins to B. mori larvae were 8, 14, and 22times lower, with EC50 values of 138.3, 628.4 and 1939.2ng/g, respectively. The Cry1Fa and Cry2Aa proteins showed high toxicity to B. mori larvae, with EC50 values of 135.7 and 373.9ng/g, respectively, but low toxicity to C. suppressalis larvae, with EC50 values of 6092.1 and 1208.5ng/g, respectively. We thus conclude that Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca are appropriate for transforming rice to control lepidopteran rice pests. In contrast, Cry1Fa and Cry2Aa are not appropriate due to their high toxicity to silkworm larvae and low activity against the target pest.

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 toxin disrupts cell membranes by forming large protein aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharad, Sudarat; Toca-Herrera, José L.; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cyt2Aa2 showed toxicity against Dipteran insect larvae and in vitro lysis activity on several cells. It has potential applications in the biological control of insect larvae. Although pore-forming and/or detergent-like mechanisms were proposed, the mechanism underlying cytolytic activity remains unclear. Analysis of the haemolytic activity of Cyt2Aa2 with osmotic stabilizers revealed partial toxin inhibition, suggesting a distinctive mechanism from the putative pore formation model. Membrane permeability was studied using fluorescent dye entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) at various protein/lipid molar ratios. Binding of Cyt2Aa2 monomer to the lipid membrane did not disturb membrane integrity until the critical protein/lipid molar ratio was reached, when Cyt2Aa2 complexes and cytolytic activity were detected. The complexes are large aggregates that appeared as a ladder when separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with Aedes albopictus cells was investigated by confocal microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF). The results showed that Cyt2Aa2 binds on the cell membrane at an early stage without cell membrane disruption. Protein aggregation on the cell membrane was detected later which coincided with cell swelling. Cyt2Aa2 aggregations on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were visualized by AFM. The AFM topographic images revealed Cyt2Aa2 aggregates on the lipid bilayer at low protein concentration and subsequently disrupts the lipid bilayer by forming a lesion as the protein concentration increased. These results supported the mechanism whereby Cyt2Aa2 binds and aggregates on the lipid membrane leading to the formation of non-specific hole and disruption of the cell membrane. PMID:27612497

  1. Detection and Full- length Amplification of Enterotoxin Genes for 15 serovars of Bacillus thuringiensis%苏云金杆菌肠毒素基因的检测和全长基因的扩增

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林毅; 关雄

    2004-01-01

    以煮沸冻融法制备PCR扩增模板,应用肠毒素(enterotoxin)基因特异引物EntA和EntB对15个苏云金杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis.Bt)血清变种进行PCR扩增分析,其中13个含有肠毒素基因,为从分子水平探讨Bt与蜡质芽孢杆菌(Bacillus cereus,Bc)的肠毒素致病性差异奠定基础.

  2. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity and Hematotoxicity of the Recombinant Spore-Crystal Complexes Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 from Bacillus thuringiensis in Swiss Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Freire, Ingrid; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Barbosa, Lilian Carla Pereira; Martins, Erica Soares; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2014-01-01

    The insecticidal properties of Cry-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have long been used as spore-crystals in commercial spray formulations for insect control. Recently, some Bt-endotoxin genes have been cloned in many different plants. Toxicological evaluations of three spore-crystal endotoxins, BtCry1Ia, BtCry10Aa and BtCry1Ba6 from B. thuringiensis, were carried out on mice to understand their adverse effects on hematological systems and on genetic material. These three spore-crystals have shown toxic activity to the boll weevil, which is one of the most aggressive pests of the cotton crop. Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 did not increase the micronucleus frequency in the peripheral erythrocytes of mice and did not cause changes in the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes. However, some hematologic disburbances were observed, specifically related to Cry1Ia and Cry1Ba6, respectively, for the erythroid and lymphoid lineage. Thus, although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results showed that these Bt spore-crystals were not harmless to mice, indicating that each spore-crystal endotoxin presents a characteristic profile of toxicity and might be investigated individually. PMID:25268978

  3. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and hematotoxicity of the recombinant spore-crystal complexes Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 from Bacillus thuringiensis in Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Freire, Ingrid; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Barbosa, Lilian Carla Pereira; Martins, Erica Soares; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2014-09-29

    The insecticidal properties of Cry-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have long been used as spore-crystals in commercial spray formulations for insect control. Recently, some Bt-endotoxin genes have been cloned in many different plants. Toxicological evaluations of three spore-crystal endotoxins, BtCry1Ia, BtCry10Aa and BtCry1Ba6 from B. thuringiensis, were carried out on mice to understand their adverse effects on hematological systems and on genetic material. These three spore-crystals have shown toxic activity to the boll weevil, which is one of the most aggressive pests of the cotton crop. Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 did not increase the micronucleus frequency in the peripheral erythrocytes of mice and did not cause changes in the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes. However, some hematologic disburbances were observed, specifically related to Cry1Ia and Cry1Ba6, respectively, for the erythroid and lymphoid lineage. Thus, although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results showed that these Bt spore-crystals were not harmless to mice, indicating that each spore-crystal endotoxin presents a characteristic profile of toxicity and might be investigated individually.

  4. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity and Hematotoxicity of the Recombinant Spore-Crystal Complexes Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 from Bacillus thuringiensis in Swiss Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid de Souza Freire

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal properties of Cry-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt have long been used as spore-crystals in commercial spray formulations for insect control. Recently, some Bt-endotoxin genes have been cloned in many different plants. Toxicological evaluations of three spore-crystal endotoxins, BtCry1Ia, BtCry10Aa and BtCry1Ba6 from B. thuringiensis, were carried out on mice to understand their adverse effects on hematological systems and on genetic material. These three spore-crystals have shown toxic activity to the boll weevil, which is one of the most aggressive pests of the cotton crop. Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 did not increase the micronucleus frequency in the peripheral erythrocytes of mice and did not cause changes in the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes. However, some hematologic disburbances were observed, specifically related to Cry1Ia and Cry1Ba6, respectively, for the erythroid and lymphoid lineage. Thus, although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results showed that these Bt spore-crystals were not harmless to mice, indicating that each spore-crystal endotoxin presents a characteristic profile of toxicity and might be investigated individually.

  5. Chemical modulators of the innate immune response alter gypsy moth larval susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broderick Nichole A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gut comprises an essential barrier that protects both invertebrate and vertebrate animals from invasion by microorganisms. Disruption of the balanced relationship between indigenous gut microbiota and their host can result in gut bacteria eliciting host responses similar to those caused by invasive pathogens. For example, ingestion of Bacillus thuringiensis by larvae of some species of susceptible Lepidoptera can result in normally benign enteric bacteria exerting pathogenic effects. Results We explored the potential role of the insect immune response in mortality caused by B. thuringiensis in conjunction with gut bacteria. Two lines of evidence support such a role. First, ingestion of B. thuringiensis by gypsy moth larvae led to the depletion of their hemocytes. Second, pharmacological agents that are known to modulate innate immune responses of invertebrates and vertebrates altered larval mortality induced by B. thuringiensis. Specifically, Gram-negative peptidoglycan pre-treated with lysozyme accelerated B. thuringiensis-induced killing of larvae previously made less susceptible due to treatment with antibiotics. Conversely, several inhibitors of the innate immune response (eicosanoid inhibitors and antioxidants increased the host's survival time following ingestion of B. thuringiensis. Conclusions This study demonstrates that B. thuringiensis infection provokes changes in the cellular immune response of gypsy moth larvae. The effects of chemicals known to modulate the innate immune response of many invertebrates and vertebrates, including Lepidoptera, also indicate a role of this response in B. thuringiensis killing. Interactions among B. thuringiensis toxin, enteric bacteria, and aspects of the gypsy moth immune response may provide a novel model to decipher mechanisms of sepsis associated with bacteria of gut origin.

  6. Continuous evolution of B. thuringiensis toxins overcomes insect resistance

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins (Bt toxins) are widely used insecticidal proteins in engineered crops that provide agricultural, economic, and environmental benefits. The development of insect resistance to Bt toxins endangers their long-term effectiveness. We developed a phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE) selection that rapidly evolves high-affinity protein-protein interactions, and applied this system to evolve variants of the Bt toxin Cry1Ac that bind a cadherin-like recept...

  7. Use of by-products rich in carbon and nitrogen as a nutrient source to produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner)-based bio pesticide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicente, Fernando H. [EMBRAPA Milho e Sorgo, Sete Lagoas, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: valicent@cnpms.embrapa.br; Mourao, Andre H.C. [Curso de Meio Ambiente, Sete Lagoas, MG (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    The amount and sources of carbon and nitrogen used to produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner)-based biopesticide may influence the quality of the fi nal product. The objective of this research was to test different levels of carbon and nitrogen: medium 1 - 1.5% maize glucose + 0.5% soy fl our, medium 2 - 3.0% maize glucose + 1.0% soy flour, medium 3 - 1.0% maize glucose + 3.0% soy fl our and medium 4 - Luria Bertani (LB) + salts (FeSO{sub 4}, ZnSO{sub 4}, MnSO{sub 4}, MgSO{sub 4}). The seed culture was produced in LB medium plus salt, under agitation (200 rpm) for 18h at 30 deg C. The strain 344 of Bt was used (B. thuringiensis var tolworthi - belonging to the EMBRAPA's Bt Bank). The pH was measured at regular intervals, and After culturing for 96h, the pH of the four tested media was basified (6.91 and 8.15), the number of spores yielded 4.39 x 10{sup 9} spores/ml in medium 3, where the amount of protein is high. The dry biomass weight accumulated in media 3 was 39.3 g/l. Mortality of 2-day-old larvae Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) was 100% when using Bt produced in media 3 and 4. CL{sub 50} for medium 3 was 8.4 x 10{sup 6} spores/ml. All tested media were satisfactory to Bt growth, and medium 3 was the most promising to be used on a large scale Bt-based biopesticide production. (author)

  8. Structural Insights into Bacillus thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and Parasporin Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Chengchen Xu; Bi-Cheng Wang; Ziniu Yu; Ming Sun

    2014-01-01

    Since the first X-ray structure of Cry3Aa was revealed in 1991, numerous structures of B. thuringiensis toxins have been determined and published. In recent years, functional studies on the mode of action and resistance mechanism have been proposed, which notably promoted the developments of biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. With the exploration of known pore-forming toxins (PFTs) structures, similarities between PFTs and B. thuringiensis toxins have provided grea...

  9. Plant growth regulation of Bt-cotton through Bacillus species

    OpenAIRE

    Pindi, Pavan Kumar; Sultana, Tasleem; Vootla, Praveen Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Deccan plateau in India periodically experiences droughts due to irregular rain fall and the soil in many parts of the region is considered to be poor for farming. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are originally defined as root-colonizing bacteria, i.e., Bacillus that cause either plant growth promotion or biological control of plant diseases. The study aims at the isolation of novel Bacillus species and to assess the biotechnological potential of the novel species as a biofertilizer, wit...

  10. Plant growth regulation of Bt-cotton through Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindi, Pavan Kumar; Sultana, Tasleem; Vootla, Praveen Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Deccan plateau in India periodically experiences droughts due to irregular rain fall and the soil in many parts of the region is considered to be poor for farming. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are originally defined as root-colonizing bacteria, i.e., Bacillus that cause either plant growth promotion or biological control of plant diseases. The study aims at the isolation of novel Bacillus species and to assess the biotechnological potential of the novel species as a biofertilizer, with respect to their plant growth promoting properties as efficient phosphate-solubilizing bacteria. Seven different strains of Bacillus were isolated from cotton rhizosphere soil near boys' hostel of Palamuru University which belongs to Deccan plateau. Among seven isolated strains, Bacillus strain-7 has shown maximum support for good growth of eight cotton cultivars. This bacterial species is named Bacillus sp. PU-7 based on the phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis. Among eight cotton cultivars, Mahyco has shown high levels of IAA, proteins, chlorophyll, sugars and low level of proline. Efficacy of novel Bacillus sp. PU-7 with Mahyco cultivar has been checked experimentally at field level in four different cotton grown agricultural soils. The strains supported plant growth in almost all the cases, especially in the deep black soil, with a clear evidence of maximum plant growth by increased levels of phytohormone production and biochemical analysis, followed by shallow black soil. Hence, it is inferred that the novel isolate can be used as bioinoculant in the cotton fields.

  11. Genomic and transcriptomic insights into the efficient entomopathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Peng, Donghai; Wang, Yueying; Ye, Weixing; Zheng, Jinshui; Zhao, Changming; Han, Dongmei; Geng, Ce; Ruan, Lifang; He, Jin; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis has been globally used as a microbial pesticide for over 70 years. However, information regarding its various adaptions and virulence factors and their roles in the entomopathogenic process remains limited. In this work, we present the complete genomes of two industrially patented Bacillus thuringiensis strains (HD-1 and YBT-1520). A comparative genomic analysis showed a larger and more complicated genome constitution that included novel insecticidal toxicity-related genes (ITRGs). All of the putative ITRGs were summarized according to the steps of infection. A comparative genomic analysis showed that highly toxic strains contained significantly more ITRGs, thereby providing additional strategies for infection, immune evasion, and cadaver utilization. Furthermore, a comparative transcriptomic analysis suggested that a high expression of these ITRGs was a key factor in efficient entomopathogenicity. We identified an active extra urease synthesis system in the highly toxic strains that may aid B. thuringiensis survival in insects (similar to previous results with well-known pathogens). Taken together, these results explain the efficient entomopathogenicity of B. thuringiensis. It provides novel insights into the strategies used by B. thuringiensis to resist and overcome host immune defenses and helps identify novel toxicity factors. PMID:26411888

  12. New Bacillus thuringiensis toxin combinations for biological control of lepidopteran larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleuch, Jihen; Zghal, Raida Zribi; Jemaà, Mohamed; Azzouz, Hichem; Tounsi, Slim; Jaoua, Samir

    2014-04-01

    Cyt1Aa from Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis is known by its synergistical activity with B. thuringiensis and Bacillus sphaericus toxins. It is able to improve dipteran specific toxins activity and can prevent or overcome larval resistance to those proteins. The objective of the current study was to investigate the possible improvement of larvicidal activity of B. thuringiensis kurstaki expressing heterogeneous proteins Cyt1A and P20. cyt1A98 and p20 genes encoding the cytolytic protein (Cyt1A98) and the accessory protein (P20), respectively, were introduced individually and in combination into B. thuringiensis kurstaki strain BNS3. Immunoblot analysis evidenced the expression of these genes in the recombinant strains and hinted that P20 acts as molecular chaperone protecting Cyt1A98 from proteolytic attack in BNS3. The toxicities of recombinant strains were studied and revealed that BNS3pHTp20 exhibited higher activity than that of the negative control (BNS3pHTBlue) toward Ephestia kuehniella, but not toward Spodoptera littoralis. When expressed in combination with P20, Cyt1A98 enhanced BNS3 activity against E. kuehniella and S. littoralis. Thus, Cyt1Aa protein could enhance lepidopteran Cry insecticidal activity and would prevent larval resistance to the most commercialized B. thuringiensis kurstaki toxins.

  13. An anionic defensin from Plutella xylostella with potential activity against Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X-X; Zhang, Y-Q; Freed, S; Yu, J; Gao, Y-F; Wang, S; Ouyang, L-N; Ju, W-Y; Jin, F-L

    2016-12-01

    Insect defensins, are cationic peptides that play an important role in immunity against microbial infection. In the present study, an anionic defensin from Plutella xylostella, (designated as PxDef) was first cloned and characterized. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that the mature peptide owned characteristic six-cysteine motifs with predicted isoelectric point of 5.57, indicating an anionic defensin. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that PxDef was significantly induced in epidermis, fat body, midgut and hemocytes after injection of heat-inactivated Bacillus thuringiensis, while such an induction was delayed by the injection of live B. thuringiensis in the 4th instar larvae of P. xylostella. Knocking down the expression of nuclear transcription factor Dorsal in P. xylostella by RNA interference significantly decreased the mRNA level of PxDef, and increased the sensitivity of P. xylostella larvae to the infection by live B. thuringiensis. The purified recombinant mature peptide (PxDef) showed higher activity against Gram-positive bacteria, with the minimum inhibition concentrations of 1.6 and 2.6 µM against B. thuringiensis and Bacillus subtilis, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report about an anionic PxDef, which may play an important role in the immune system of P. xylostella against B. thuringiensis.

  14. Genomic and transcriptomic insights into the efficient entomopathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Peng, Donghai; Wang, Yueying; Ye, Weixing; Zheng, Jinshui; Zhao, Changming; Han, Dongmei; Geng, Ce; Ruan, Lifang; He, Jin; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2015-09-28

    Bacillus thuringiensis has been globally used as a microbial pesticide for over 70 years. However, information regarding its various adaptions and virulence factors and their roles in the entomopathogenic process remains limited. In this work, we present the complete genomes of two industrially patented Bacillus thuringiensis strains (HD-1 and YBT-1520). A comparative genomic analysis showed a larger and more complicated genome constitution that included novel insecticidal toxicity-related genes (ITRGs). All of the putative ITRGs were summarized according to the steps of infection. A comparative genomic analysis showed that highly toxic strains contained significantly more ITRGs, thereby providing additional strategies for infection, immune evasion, and cadaver utilization. Furthermore, a comparative transcriptomic analysis suggested that a high expression of these ITRGs was a key factor in efficient entomopathogenicity. We identified an active extra urease synthesis system in the highly toxic strains that may aid B. thuringiensis survival in insects (similar to previous results with well-known pathogens). Taken together, these results explain the efficient entomopathogenicity of B. thuringiensis. It provides novel insights into the strategies used by B. thuringiensis to resist and overcome host immune defenses and helps identify novel toxicity factors.

  15. Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis and parasitoids of late-instar larvae of the spruce budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmaker, A.; Cusson, M.; Frankenhuyzen, van K.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner var. kurstaki and parasitoids that attack late instars of the eastern spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens). In a petri-dish arena, females of Tranosema rostrale rostrale (Brishke) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) were abl

  16. The pre-pore from Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin is necessary to induce insect death in Manduca sexta

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez-Juárez, N.; Muñoz-Garay, C.; Gómez, I.; Gill, S. S.; Soberón, M; Bravo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The insecticidal Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria are pore-forming toxins that lyse midgut epithelial cells in insects. We have previously proposed that they form pre-pore oligomeric intermediates before membrane insertion.

  17. Analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis Population Dynamics and Its Interaction With Pseudomonas fluorescens in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Ruiz, Norma Elena; Sansinenea-Royano, Estibaliz; Cedillo-Ramirez, Maria Lilia; Marsch-Moreno, Rodolfo; Sanchez-Alonso, Patricia; Vazquez-Cruz, Candelario

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent, however, studies so far have shown that B. thuringiensis is very sensitive to environmental factors such as soil moisture and pH. Ultraviolet light from the sun had been considered as the main limiting factor for its persistence in soil and it has recently been shown that the antagonism exerted by other native soil organisms, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens, is a determining factor in the persistence of this bacterium under in vitro culture conditions. Objectives: The aim of the present investigation was to analyze the population dynamics of B. thuringiensis and its interaction with P. fluorescens using microbiological and molecular methods in soil, under different conditions, and to determinate the effect of nutrients and moisture on its interaction. Materials and Methods: The monitoring was performed by microbiological methods, such as viable count of bacteria, and molecular methods such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and hybridization, using the direct extraction of DNA from populations of inoculated soil. Results: The analysis of the interaction between B. thuringiensis and P. fluorescens in soil indicated that the disappearance of B. thuringiensis IPS82 is not dependent on the moisture but the composition of nutrients that may be affecting the secretion of toxic compounds in the environment of P. fluorescens. The results showed that the recovered cells were mostly spores and not vegetative cells in all proved treatments. The molecular methods were effective for monitoring bacterial population inoculated in soil. Conclusions: Bacillus thuringiensis is very sensitive to the interaction of P. fluorescens, however is capable to survive in soil due to its capacity of sporulate. Some of the cells in the form of spores germinated and folded slightly and remained in a constant cycle of sporulation and germination. This confirms that B. thuringiensis IPS82 can germinate, grow and

  18. Cultivable gut bacteria of scarabs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) inhibit Bacillus thuringiensis multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yueming; Shu, Changlong; Crickmore, Neil; Liu, Chunqin; Xiang, Wensheng; Song, Fuping; Zhang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    The entomopathogen Bacillus thuringiensis is used to control various pest species of scarab beetle but is not particularly effective. Gut bacteria have diverse ecological and evolutionary effects on their hosts, but whether gut bacteria can protect scarabs from B. thuringiensis infection remains poorly understood. To investigate this, we isolated 32 cultivable gut bacteria from Holotrichia oblita Faldermann, Holotrichia parallela Motschulsky, and Anomala corpulenta Motschulsky, and analyzed their effect on B. thuringiensis multiplication and Cry toxin stability. 16S rDNA analysis indicated that these gut bacteria belong to the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes phyla. A confrontation culture analyses of the 32 isolates against three scarab-specific B. thuringiensis strains showed that the majority of the scarab gut bacteria had antibacterial activity against the B. thuringiensis strains. The Cry toxin stability analysis results showed that while several strains produced proteases capable of processing the scarab-specific toxin Cry8Ea, none were able to completely degrade it. These results suggest that gut bacteria can potentially affect the susceptibility of scarabs to B. thuringiensis and that this should be considered when considering future control measures.

  19. Decreased toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis to mosquito larvae after contact with leaf litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Stalinski, Renaud; Kersusan, Dylann; Veyrenc, Sylvie; David, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Després, Laurence

    2012-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a bacterium producing crystals containing Cry and Cyt proteins, which are toxic for mosquito larvae. Nothing is known about the interaction between crystal toxins and decaying leaf litter, which is a major component of several mosquito breeding sites and represents an important food source. In the present work, we investigated the behavior of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxic crystals sprayed on leaf litter. In the presence of leaf litter, a 60% decrease in the amount of Cyt toxin detectable by immunology (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays [ELISAs]) was observed, while the respective proportions of Cry toxins were not affected. The toxicity of Cry toxins toward Aedes aegypti larvae was not affected by leaf litter, while the synergistic effect of Cyt toxins on all B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins was decreased by about 20% when mixed with leaf litter. The toxicity of two commercial B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains (VectoBac WG and VectoBac 12AS) and a laboratory-produced B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain decreased by about 70% when mixed with leaf litter. Taken together, these results suggest that Cyt toxins interact with leaf litter, resulting in a decreased toxicity of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in litter-rich environments and thereby dramatically reducing the efficiency of mosquitocidal treatments.

  20. A novel metalloproteinase virulence factor is involved in Bacillus thuringiensis pathogenesis in nematodes and insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Donghai; Lin, Jian; Huang, Qiong; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jinshui; Zhu, Lei; Sun, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis has been developed as the leading microbial insecticide for years. The pathogenesis of B. thuringiensis requires common extracellular factors that depend on the PlcR regulon, which regulates a large number of virulence factors; however, the precise role of many of these proteins is not known. In this study, we describe the complete lifecycle of a nematicidal B. thuringiensis strain in the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using in vitro and in vivo molecular techniques to follow host and bacterial effectors during the infection process. We then focus on the metalloproteinase ColB, a collagenase, which was found highly important for destruction of the intestine thereby facilitates the adaptation and colonization of B. thuringiensis in C. elegans. In vivo green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter-gene studies showed that ColB expression is highly induced and regulated by the global activator PlcR. Finally, we demonstrated that ColB also takes part in B. thuringiensis virulence in an insect model following injection and oral infection. Indeed, addition of purified ColB accelerates the action of Cry toxin proteins in insects, too. These results give novel insights into host adaptation for B. thuringiensis and other B. cereus group bacteria and highlight the role of collagenase metalloproteases to synergize infection process.

  1. 40 CFR 174.518 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Bb1 protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Bb1 protein... PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.518 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Bb1 protein in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus...

  2. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.505 Bacillus... of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  3. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.506 Bacillus... Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  4. 40 CFR 174.519 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2 protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2 protein... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.519 Bacillus... Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2 protein in or on corn or cotton are exempt from the requirement of...

  5. 40 CFR 174.501 - Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein in corn and cotton; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa protein... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.501 Bacillus... Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins in or on corn or cotton are exempt from the requirement of...

  6. 40 CFR 174.532 - Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.532 Bacillus... Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn, in or on the food and feed commodities of corn;...

  7. MAPK signaling pathway alters expression of midgut ALP and ABCC genes and causes resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin in diamondback moth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojiang Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Insecticidal crystal toxins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are widely used as biopesticide sprays or expressed in transgenic crops to control insect pests. However, large-scale use of Bt has led to field-evolved resistance in several lepidopteran pests. Resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L., was previously mapped to a multigenic resistance locus (BtR-1. Here, we assembled the 3.15 Mb BtR-1 locus and found high-level resistance to Cry1Ac and Bt biopesticide in four independent P. xylostella strains were all associated with differential expression of a midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP outside this locus and a suite of ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C (ABCC genes inside this locus. The interplay between these resistance genes is controlled by a previously uncharacterized trans-regulatory mechanism via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. Molecular, biochemical, and functional analyses have established ALP as a functional Cry1Ac receptor. Phenotypic association experiments revealed that the recessive Cry1Ac resistance was tightly linked to down-regulation of ALP, ABCC2 and ABCC3, whereas it was not linked to up-regulation of ABCC1. Silencing of ABCC2 and ABCC3 in susceptible larvae reduced their susceptibility to Cry1Ac but did not affect the expression of ALP, whereas suppression of MAP4K4, a constitutively transcriptionally-activated MAPK upstream gene within the BtR-1 locus, led to a transient recovery of gene expression thereby restoring the susceptibility in resistant larvae. These results highlight a crucial role for ALP and ABCC genes in field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac and reveal a novel trans-regulatory signaling mechanism responsible for modulating the expression of these pivotal genes in P. xylostella.

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis Is an Environmental Pathogen and Host-Specificity Has Developed as an Adaptation to Human-Generated Ecological Niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Costa Argôlo-Filho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt has been used successfully as a biopesticide for more than 60 years. More recently, genes encoding their toxins have been used to transform plants and other organisms. Despite the large amount of research on this bacterium, its true ecology is still a matter of debate, with two major viewpoints dominating: while some understand Bt as an insect pathogen, others see it as a saprophytic bacteria from soil. In this context, Bt’s pathogenicity to other taxa and the possibility that insects may not be the primary targets of Bt are also ideas that further complicate this scenario. The existence of conflicting research results, the difficulty in developing broader ecological and genetics studies, and the great genetic plasticity of this species has cluttered a definitive concept. In this review, we gathered information on the aspects of Bt ecology that are often ignored, in the attempt to clarify the lifestyle, mechanisms of transmission and target host range of this bacterial species. As a result, we propose an integrated view to account for Bt ecology. Although Bt is indeed a pathogenic bacterium that possesses a broad arsenal for virulence and defense mechanisms, as well as a wide range of target hosts, this seems to be an adaptation to specific ecological changes acting on a versatile and cosmopolitan environmental bacterium. Bt pathogenicity and host-specificity was favored evolutionarily by increased populations of certain insect species (or other host animals, whose availability for colonization were mostly caused by anthropogenic activities. These have generated the conditions for ecological imbalances that favored dominance of specific populations of insects, arachnids, nematodes, etc., in certain areas, with narrower genetic backgrounds. These conditions provided the selective pressure for development of new hosts for pathogenic interactions, and so, host specificity of certain strains.

  9. TRANSGENIC PLANTS EXPRESSING BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS DELTA-ENDOTOXINS%表达苏云金杆菌内毒素的转基因植物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李华荣; Brenda Oppert; 朱坤炎; Randall A. Higgins; 黄方能; Lawrent L. Buschman

    2003-01-01

    为防治一些重要农业害虫,转基因Bt作物已在许多国家商业化种植.在发展Bt作物的初期,未经改造的Bt基因被直接用来转化作物.但由于Bt mRNA的不稳定,不适当的剪切以及译后变异,Bt在作物上的表达水平往往很低且不稳定.后来,科学工作者对Bt基因进行了一系列针对性的改造或人工合成,从而使其在植物细胞中得到高效表达.本文着重总结了这一转基因技术的发展过程.其内容包括未经改造的Bt基因在植物中表达低的原因以及改善Bt毒蛋白表达的有关技术.%Commercial varieties of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) plants have been developed in manycountries to control target pests. Initially, the expression of native Bt genes in plants was low due to mRNA insta-bility, improper splicing, and post-translation modifications. Subsequently, modifications of the native Bt genesgreatly enhanced expression levels. This is a review of the developments that made modern high-expression trans-genic Bt plants possible, with an emphasis on the reasons for the low-level expression of native Bt genes in plantsystems, and the techniques that have been used to improve plant expression of Bt toxin genes.

  10. [Toxicity of isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis from Wroclaw against larvae of Aedes aegypti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonc, E; Kucińska, J; Rydzanicz, K

    2001-01-01

    Seven field isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis from the Lower Silesia, region of Poland, the Osola plain and phylloplane niches and soil samples from the Karkonosze National Park were tested in vitro for insecticidal activity against mosquito larvae Aedes aegypti. Both the spore/crystal mixture and pured crystals from B. thuringienis strains KpC1, KpF3 and OpQ3 (belonging to the first physiological group including the subspecies japonensis, yoso, jinghongiensis ) proved to be the most active against insects (61-65% of corrected mortality). The lowest toxicity (7-28% mortality) was caused by B. thuringiensis wratislaviensis strains (PO12 and 13).

  11. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis 147, a Brazilian strain with high insecticidal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Luiz Carlos Bertucci; Farias, Débora Lopes; Silva, Isabella de Moraes Guimarães; Melo, Fernando Lucas; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais; Aguiar, Raimundo Wagner de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a ubiquitous Gram-positive and sporulating bacterium. Its crystals and secreted toxins are useful tools against larvae of diverse insect orders and, as a consequence, an alternative to recalcitrant chemical insecticides. We report here the draft genome sequence ofB. thuringiensis 147, a strain isolated from Brazil and with high insecticidal activity. The assembled genome contained 6,167,994 bp and was distributed in seven replicons (a chromosome and 6 plasmids). We identified 12 coding regions, located in two plasmids, which encode insecticidal proteins. PMID:26517667

  12. Characterization of Cry34/Cry35 Binary Insecticidal Proteins from Diverse Bacillus thuringiensis Strain Collections

    OpenAIRE

    Schnepf, H. Ernest; Lee, Stacey; Dojillo, JoAnna; Burmeister, Paula; Fencil, Kristin; Morera, Lisa; Nygaard, Linda; Narva, Kenneth E.; Wolt, Jeff D.

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins of the Cry34 and Cry35 classes function as binary toxins showing activity on the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. We surveyed 6,499 B. thuringiensis isolates by hybridization for sequences related to cry35A genes, identifying 78 strains. Proteins of the appropriate molecular mass (ca. 44 kDa) for Cry35 were observed in 42 of the strains. Full-length, or nearly full-length, sequences of 34 cry34 genes and 16 cry35 genes were...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. chinensis Strain CT-43▿

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jin; Wang, Jieping; Yin, Wen; Shao, Xiaohu; Zheng, Huajun; Li, Mingshun; Zhao, Youwen; Sun, Ming; Wang, Shengyue; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis has been widely used as an agricultural biopesticide for a long time. As a producing strain, B. thuringiensis subsp. chinensis strain CT-43 is highly toxic to lepidopterous and dipterous insects. It can form various parasporal crystals consisting of Cry1Aa3, Cry1Ba1, Cry1Ia14, Cry2Aa9, and Cry2Ab1. During fermentation, it simultaneously generates vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa10 and the insecticidal nucleotide analogue thuringiensin. Here, we report the finished...

  14. Immune and cellular impacts in the autogenous Aedes caspius larvae after experimentally-induced stress: Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects possess effective defense mechanisms against pathogens via induction of antimicrobial immune and oxidative stress responses. In this study, immune impact and histological damages in the gastric caeca have been investigated in the 3rd instar larvae of the autogenous Aedes caspius upon infection with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt. Data showed a significant increase in phenoloxidase (PO activity by 1.23 folds at 4 h post-infection which then reduced to the normal level at 8 h post-infection and until larval death. Besides, the nitric oxide (NO titer was significantly increased by 1.4 folds at 4 h post-infection, then, reduced down to its normal level at 8 h post-infection, after which, it was significantly decreasing by time until being hardly detected at 44 h post-infection compared to that of control mosquitoes. Moreover, percentages of cellular apoptosis were significantly elevating from 6 to 48 h post-infection. Consequently, cytological damages in the epithelium and the microvilli of the gastric caeca were observed at 48 h post-infection. Finally, larval body sizes were significantly smaller prior to death (at 48 h post-infection. Taken together, these data suggest further modes of action of Bt as inhibiting the antibacterial immune responses, inducing cellular apoptosis prior to damaging the epithelium of gastric caeca. This may explain – partially at least – the irresistibility and high pathogenicity of Bt against mosquito vector, which may help in understanding, and hence, overcoming the developing resistance by some mosquito vectors to some mosquitocidal bacteria. This may help in improving the biocontrol measures against mosquito vectors.

  15. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry2Ab in a strain of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, R J; Olsen, K M; Garsia, K A; Young, S R

    2007-06-01

    Transgenic cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., expressing the crylAc and cry2Ab genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Berliner variety kurstaki in a pyramid (Bollgard II) was widely planted for the first time in Australia during the 2004-2005 growing season. Before the first commercial Bollgard II crops, limited amounts of cotton expressing only the crylAc gene (Ingard) was grown for seven seasons. No field failures due to resistance to CrylAc toxin were observed during that period and a monitoring program indicated that the frequency of genes conferring high level resistance to the CrylAc toxin were rare in the major pest of cotton, Helicoverpa armigera (Htibner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Before the deployment of Bollgard II, an allele conferring resistance to Cry2Ab toxin was detected in field-collected H. armigera. We established a colony (designated SP15) consisting of homozygous resistant individuals and examined their characteristics through comparison with individuals from a Bt-susceptible laboratory colony (GR). Through specific crosses and bioassays, we established that the resistance present in SP15 was due to a single autosomal gene. The resistance was recessive. Homozygotes were highly resistant to Cry2Ab toxin, so much so, that we were unable to induce significant mortality at the maximum concentration of toxin available. Homozygotes also were unaffected when fed leaves of a cotton variety expressing the cry2Ab gene. Although cross-resistant to Cry2Aa toxin, SP15 was susceptible to CrylAc and to the Bt product DiPel.

  16. The Comparison of Methods Isolated Bacillus Thuringiensis from soil%土壤分离苏云金芽胞杆菌的方法比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠守勇

    2014-01-01

    苏云金芽胞杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,简称Bt)是世界上应用最广的微生物农药,通过比较三种经典的从土壤样品中分离Bt的方法,发现NaAC-抗生素法的分离效果最好,最高分离率5.06%,平均达到2.82%,为大规模从土样中分离Bt奠定了基础。%Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most widely used microbial pesticides in the world. This paper com-pared three classic Bt isolated methods and found that the best one was NaAC-antibiotic methods,the maximum isola-tion rate was 5.06%,the average was 2.82%. It established the foundation for the further research on the large-scale Bt isolated from soil.

  17. 76 FR 57653 - Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab Protein in Corn; Temporary Exemption From the Requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 174 Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab Protein in Corn; Temporary Exemption From the... residues of Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn, in or on the food or feed commodities of corn... temporary tolerance exemption for Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn that was set to expire...

  18. Stability of Bacillus thuringiensis and NPV Microencapsulated Formulation under Sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Sadat Naghavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microencapsulation technology is used for the formulation of bio pesticides and is effective against the ultra-violet radiation of sunlight. The present research studied the stability of Bt and NPV formulations microencapsulated with gelatin and sodium alginate, individually or in combination. The formulations were evaluated in outdoor space and under sunlight on potted growing cabbage. The stability of each active ingredient tested in each formulation was studied at 0, 3, 7 and 10 days after spraying on cabbage infested with diamondback moth Plutella xylostella second instars larvae. Results showed that non-formulated and microencapsulated formulations not exposed to sunlight (time zero had similar mortality. However, after being exposed to sunlight for three days, the non-formulated Bt and NPV resulted in a significantly lower mortality (less than 40%; compared with the microencapsulated bio pesticides (more than 70% mortality. Fifty percent (50% mortality was reached in microencapsulated formulations after seven and ten days of exposure to sunlight, whereas there was no mortality in larvae exposed to unformulated treated plants after ten days. ANOVA analysis showed the highest larval mortality was achieved by the Bt+NPV gelatin microencapsulated formulation followed by gelatin coated Bt, sodium alginate coated NPV, sodium alginate coated Bt+NPV, gelatin coated NPV and sodium alginate coated Bt. The formulations showed no significant LT50 differences between microencapsulated versus unformulated Bt and NPV.

  19. 苏云金芽孢杆菌的生物防治安全性研究进展%Advances on the Safety of Biological Control with Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹琼; 倪超超

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is one of the most successful biological insecticides applied so far in the world. However, some reports in the past ten years showed that people doubted the safety of Bacillus thuringiensis, which was considered non-toxic to human and animals. Some experts thought that it was necessary to develop new Bt strains with better safety and efficiency with modern biological technology to avoid potential toxicity to human and animals.%苏云金芽孢杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,Bt)是目前全球应用最成功的生物杀虫剂之一。然而近10年多的研究成果表明,一直以来人们认为对人畜无毒性的苏云金芽孢杆菌的安全性问题受到质疑,一些专家认为有必要通过现代生物技术对苏云金芽孢杆菌进一步改良,重新选育一些安全性更可靠、杀虫效率更高的 Bt 菌株应用于生物防治,以避免其对人畜的可能毒害。

  20. Estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis efetivas contra insetos das ordens Lepidoptera, Coleoptera e Diptera Bacillus thuringiensis strains effective against insects of Lepidoptera, Coleoptera and Diptera orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lílian Botelho Praça

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar entre 300 estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis as efetivas simultaneamente contra larvas de Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith e Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus e Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Foram selecionadas duas estirpes de B. thuringiensis, denominadas S234 e S997, que apresentaram atividade contra as três ordens de insetos. As estirpes foram caracterizadas por métodos morfológicos, bioquímicos e moleculares. As mesmas apresentaram duas proteínas principais de 130 e 65 kDa, produtos de reação em cadeia da polimerase de tamanho esperado para a detecção dos genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B e cry2 e cristais bipiramidais, cubóides e esféricos.The aim of this work was to select among 300 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis those which are simultaneously effective against larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith and Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Two strains of B. thuringiensis were selected, S234 and S997, which presented activity against those three insect orders. Both strains were characterized by morphological, biochemical and molecular methods. They have presented two main proteins with 130 and 65 kDa, polimerase chain reaction products with expected sizes for detection of the genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B and cry2 and bipiramidal, cubical and spherical crystals.

  1. Effect of crop plants on fitness costs associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in cabbage loopers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Tetreau, Guillaume; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Fitness costs associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins critically impact the development of resistance in insect populations. In this study, the fitness costs in Trichoplusia ni strains associated with two genetically independent resistance mechanisms to Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab, individually and in combination, on four crop plants (cabbage, cotton, tobacco and tomato) were analyzed, in comparison with their near-isogenic susceptible strain. The net reproductive rate (R0) and intrinsic rate of increase (r) of the T. ni strains, regardless of their resistance traits, were strongly affected by the host plants. The ABCC2 gene-linked mechanism of Cry1Ac resistance was associated with relatively low fitness costs, while the Cry2Ab resistance mechanism was associated with higher fitness costs. The fitness costs in the presence of both resistance mechanisms in T. ni appeared to be non-additive. The relative fitness of Bt-resistant T. ni depended on the specific resistance mechanisms as well as host plants. In addition to difference in survivorship and fecundity, an asynchrony of adult emergence was observed among T. ni with different resistance mechanisms and on different host plants. Therefore, mechanisms of resistance and host plants available in the field are both important factors affecting development of Bt resistance in insects. PMID:26868936

  2. Effects of Two Varieties of Bacillus thuringiensis Maize on the Biology of Plodia interpunctella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Grégoire

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available On the market since 1996, genetically modified plants expressing an insecticidal toxin (Cry toxin stemmed from Bacillus thuringiensis target several lepidopteran and coleopteran pests. In this study, we assessed the impact of two varieties of Bt maize producing different toxins (Cry1Ab or Cry1Fa, respectively on the biology of a storage pest: Plodia interpunctella (Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae. The Indianmeal moths were susceptible to both toxins but showed an escape behavior only from Cry1Fa. The weight of females issued from larvae reared on Cry1Ab increased with increasing toxin concentration, but adults of both sexes reared on Cry1Fa had decreased weight. Both toxins increased development time from egg to adult regardless of sex and had no impact on the male adult lifespan. Finally, we recorded a time lag between metamorphosis from the non-Bt and the Bt diets, which increased proportionally to Cry concentration in the Bt diet.

  3. Effect of crop plants on fitness costs associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in cabbage loopers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Tetreau, Guillaume; Wang, Ping

    2016-02-12

    Fitness costs associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins critically impact the development of resistance in insect populations. In this study, the fitness costs in Trichoplusia ni strains associated with two genetically independent resistance mechanisms to Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab, individually and in combination, on four crop plants (cabbage, cotton, tobacco and tomato) were analyzed, in comparison with their near-isogenic susceptible strain. The net reproductive rate (R0) and intrinsic rate of increase (r) of the T. ni strains, regardless of their resistance traits, were strongly affected by the host plants. The ABCC2 gene-linked mechanism of Cry1Ac resistance was associated with relatively low fitness costs, while the Cry2Ab resistance mechanism was associated with higher fitness costs. The fitness costs in the presence of both resistance mechanisms in T. ni appeared to be non-additive. The relative fitness of Bt-resistant T. ni depended on the specific resistance mechanisms as well as host plants. In addition to difference in survivorship and fecundity, an asynchrony of adult emergence was observed among T. ni with different resistance mechanisms and on different host plants. Therefore, mechanisms of resistance and host plants available in the field are both important factors affecting development of Bt resistance in insects.

  4. Research progresses on mechanism of insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin.%昆虫对Bt毒素的抗性机理研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭声江; 陈晓峰; 李典谟

    2001-01-01

    文中综述了昆虫对苏云金杆菌(Bt)毒素产生抗性的生化遗传机理及抗性的遗传及交叉抗性情况。昆虫对Bt毒素的抗性可能在6个环节发生,其中与毒素特异结合的受体上结合位点的改变及毒素水解过程的变化是抗性产生的两个主要环节。从现有研究结果来看,实验室及田间抗性昆虫品系对Bt毒素产生的抗性主要与昆虫中肠上皮细胞膜上Bt毒素特异结合受体的变化有关。深入研究昆虫对Bt毒素的抗性机理,将有助于建立抗性的早期监测技术、抗性治理措施,实现无公害Bt农药及转Bt基因作物的持续利用。%The current knowledge of biochemical and genetic mechanisms of insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin is reviewed. Six potential steps concerning the occurrence of resistance are suggest ed. Available information on resistance inheritance and cross-resistance is provided. Binding site modifi cation and altered proteolytic processing are involved in most cases of resistance. From the available information it seems that binding site modification is the most significant resistance mechanism in the field and laboratory resistant strains. Studying the mechanism of insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin will provide more toxin selection, wider utilization, and longer durability in integrated pest management programs that utilize Bt toxin and Bt crops.

  5. Bt transgenic crops do not have favorable effects on resistant insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce E. Tabashnik

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available hypothesized that insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins produced by transgenic crops could have nutritionally favorable effects that increase the fitness of resistant insects eating such crops. This idea was based on increased pupal weight of resistant larvae of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L., fed leaf discs treated externally with a Bt toxin. We summarize evidence from diamondback moth and other pests showing that the Bt toxins in transgenic crops do not enhance performance of resistant insects. Aside from a few notable exceptions in which performance of resistant insects did not differ between Bt and non-Bt crops, Bt crops had adverse affects on resistant insects.

  6. Comparison of quantitative PCR and culture-based methods for evaluating dispersal of Bacillus thuringiensis endospores at a bioterrorism hoax crime scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crighton, Taryn; Hoile, Rebecca; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2012-06-10

    Since the anthrax mail attacks of 2001, law enforcement agencies have processed thousands of suspicious mail incidents globally, many of which are hoax bioterrorism threats. Bio-insecticide preparations containing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) spores have been involved in several such threats in Australia, leading to the requirement for rapid and sensitive detection techniques for this organism, a close relative of Bacillus anthracis. Here we describe the development of a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for the detection of Bt crystal toxin gene cry1, and evaluation of the method's effectiveness during a hoax bioterrorism event in 2009. When combined with moist wipe sampling, the cry1 qPCR was a rapid, reliable, and sensitive diagnostic tool for detecting and quantifying Bt contamination, and mapping endospore dispersal within a mail sorting facility. Results from the cry1 qPCR were validated by viable counts of the same samples on Bacillus-selective agar (PEMBA), which revealed a similar pattern of contamination. Extensive and persistent contamination of the facility was detected, both within the affected mailroom, and extending into office areas up to 30m distant from the source event, emphasising the need for improved containment procedures for suspicious mail items, both during and post-event. The cry1 qPCR enables detection of both viable and non-viable Bt spores and cells, which is important for historical crime scenes or scenes subjected to decontamination. This work provides a new rapid method to add to the forensics toolbox for crime scenes suspected to be contaminated with biological agents.

  7. Unusually high frequency of genes encoding vegetative insecticidal proteins in an Australian Bacillus thuringiensis collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Cheryl E; Court, Leon; Boets, Annemie; Mourant, Roslyn; Van Rie, Jeroen; Akhurst, Raymond J

    2008-09-01

    Of 188 Australian Bacillus thuringiensis strains screened for genes encoding soluble insecticidal proteins by polymerase chain reaction/restriction-length fragment polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 87% showed the presence of such genes. Although 135 isolates (72%) produced an RFLP pattern identical to that expected for vip3A genes, 29 isolates possessed a novel vip-like gene. The novel vip-like gene was cloned from B. thuringiensis isolate C81, and sequence analysis demonstrated that it was 94% identical to the vip3Ba1 gene. The new gene was designated vip3Bb2. Cell-free supernatants from both the B. thuringiensis strain C81 and from Escherichia coli expressing the Vip3Bb2 protein were toxic for the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera.

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins affect lifespan and reproductive performance of Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera exigua adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Ma, Yan; Wan, Pin-Jun; Mu, Li-Li; Li, Guo-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Being delivered as sprays or expressed in plant, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline proteins (Cry toxins) display insecticidal activities against numerous Lepidopteran, Dipteran, and Coleopteran larvae. Comparative study of toxicities of Bt Cry toxins between larvae and adults may afford important new insights into the interactions of the toxins with receptor proteins in host insect, and represent intriguing targets for the control of insect pests. However, the effectiveness of Bt Cry toxins in insect adults has paid less attention. In the present article, the effectiveness of Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca on lifespans and reproductive performance of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) and Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) adults were evaluated by in vivo experiments. Considering transgenic plants express modified, truncated versions of cry genes yielding active toxin fragment, we used activated Bt toxins at the concentration of 500, 100, and 20 microg/ml in a 10% sucrose aquous solution. At the highest concentration, Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca shortened 48.1 and 48.9% of H. armigera female lifespan, and 43.5 and 38.5% of S. exigua female lifespan, and they reduced 37.8 and 40.3%, and 50.5 and 47.4% of H. armigera and S. exigua male lifespans respectively. Bt toxins negatively affected copulation. Exposure to 500 microg/ml of Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca greatly reduced 50.0 and 46.8%, and 58.7 and 57.3% spermatophore acceptance by H. armigera and S. exigua females, respectively. Similarly, Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca exposure decreased 40.0 and 50.3%, and 61.3 and 60.0% of spermatophore transfer by H. armigera and S. exigua males, respectively. Moreover, exposure females rather than males to 500 microg/ml of Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca significantly dropped 57.5 and 57.5% of the number of eggs laid by H. armigera, and 35.4 and 45.8% of the number of egg masses deposited by S. exigua. In contrast, both Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca did not negatively influence the egg hatchability. At the middle and the lowest concentrations, however

  9. Current state and trends of patent protection for insecticidal genes from Bacillus thuringiensis%Bt杀虫基因专利保护现状与趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张杰; 束长龙; 张春鸽

    2011-01-01

    苏云金芽胞杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,Bt)能产生多种对昆虫有特异活性的杀虫晶体蛋白,这些毒蛋白由cry或cyt基因编码.目前Bt杀虫基因已经广泛应用于转基因抗虫作物并且取得了巨大的经济、社会和生态效益.Bt杀虫基因的巨大市场价值引起国内外相关研究机构和企业的高度关注,并且利用知识产权将这些基因和技术转化为自己独占的权利.本文主要分析Bt杀虫基因的克隆命名情况,并对其中受专利保护的基因进行统计分析,借此为我国在转基因技术研发、产业化应用过程中,合理有效地规避知识产权陷阱,有效利用Bt资源提供决策参考.%Bacillus thuringiensis can produce various crystalline proteins with specific activities against pests during its life cycle. All of these insecticidal proteins are encoded by cry or cyt genes. Currently, pesticidal Bt genes have been widely incorporated into several major crops, resulting in transgenic insect-resistant crops, and thus achieved enormous economical, social and environmental benefits. The tremendous market value of Bt genes is attractive for both the research institutions and giant enterprises in the world, and the genes and techniques obtained were patented and transferred as the exclusive intellectual property rights. In this study, cloning and nomenclature of Bt novel toxin genes were reviewed, and the patents of Bt genes and techniques were treated respectively. The results will provide a reference for the researchers of our country to evade the patent trap and use the Bt gene resources efficiently in their transgenic and industrialization procedures.

  10. Structural Insights into Bacillus thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and Parasporin Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengchen; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since the first X-ray structure of Cry3Aa was revealed in 1991, numerous structures of B. thuringiensis toxins have been determined and published. In recent years, functional studies on the mode of action and resistance mechanism have been proposed, which notably promoted the developments of biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. With the exploration of known pore-forming toxins (PFTs) structures, similarities between PFTs and B. thuringiensis toxins have provided great insights into receptor binding interactions and conformational changes from water-soluble to membrane pore-forming state of B. thuringiensis toxins. This review mainly focuses on the latest discoveries of the toxin working mechanism, with the emphasis on structural related progress. Based on the structural features, B. thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins could be divided into three categories: three-domain type α-PFTs, Cyt toxin type β-PFTs and aerolysin type β-PFTs. Structures from each group are elucidated and discussed in relation to the latest data, respectively. PMID:25229189

  11. Structural Insights into Bacillus thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and Parasporin Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengchen Xu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the first X-ray structure of Cry3Aa was revealed in 1991, numerous structures of B. thuringiensis toxins have been determined and published. In recent years, functional studies on the mode of action and resistance mechanism have been proposed, which notably promoted the developments of biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. With the exploration of known pore-forming toxins (PFTs structures, similarities between PFTs and B. thuringiensis toxins have provided great insights into receptor binding interactions and conformational changes from water-soluble to membrane pore-forming state of B. thuringiensis toxins. This review mainly focuses on the latest discoveries of the toxin working mechanism, with the emphasis on structural related progress. Based on the structural features, B. thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins could be divided into three categories: three-domain type α-PFTs, Cyt toxin type β-PFTs and aerolysin type β-PFTs. Structures from each group are elucidated and discussed in relation to the latest data, respectively.

  12. Structural insights into Bacillus thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengchen; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2014-09-16

    Since the first X-ray structure of Cry3Aa was revealed in 1991, numerous structures of B. thuringiensis toxins have been determined and published. In recent years, functional studies on the mode of action and resistance mechanism have been proposed, which notably promoted the developments of biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. With the exploration of known pore-forming toxins (PFTs) structures, similarities between PFTs and B. thuringiensis toxins have provided great insights into receptor binding interactions and conformational changes from water-soluble to membrane pore-forming state of B. thuringiensis toxins. This review mainly focuses on the latest discoveries of the toxin working mechanism, with the emphasis on structural related progress. Based on the structural features, B. thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins could be divided into three categories: three-domain type α-PFTs, Cyt toxin type β-PFTs and aerolysin type β-PFTs. Structures from each group are elucidated and discussed in relation to the latest data, respectively.

  13. Eficiência e Persistência de Três Produtos Comerciais à Base de Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis e Bacillus sphaericus no controle de Culicidae (Diptera em Lagoas de Tratamento de Efluentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Lopes

    2010-11-01

    Abstract. The hematofagic effect caused by females belonging to some species of Culicidae on humans and animals can be directly related to pathogen transmission, allergic reactions and uneasiness. The emergence of populations resistant to chemical insecticides has fostered the use of alternative methods, mainly biological control. The trials were conducted in three effluent treatment lagoons, on larvae of Culicidae to test the efficiency and persistence of commercial products whose active principles are based on Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis Berliner and Bacillus sphaericus Neide. The products tested were Vectolex (a granulated formulation of B. sphaericus, Sphaericus (a liquid formulation of B. sphaericus and Bt-horus (a liquid formulation of B. thuringiensis. The products were applied biweekly and evaluations were conducted 0, 24, 48, 72, and 120 hours after each application. The lagoons were colonized by Culex nigripalpus Theobald (1.5%, Culex saltanensis Dyar (2.25%, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (96.25%. Bt-horus reduced larvae by 89.06%, 83.97% and 89.96% at 24, 48 and 72 hours after product application, respectively. The granulated and the liquid formulations containing B. sphaericus reduced larvae by 98.89 % and 98.34% 24 hours after application, and by 99.79% and 99.78% after 48 hours, respectively. The products and the different formulations were effective in controlling larvae of all three Culicidae species in lagoons with high levels of organic matter, but the persistence was recorded in two and three days for products containing respectively B. sphaericus and B. thuringiensis israelensis.

  14. Effect of vegetation on the presence and genetic diversity of Bacillus thuringiensis in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricieto, Ana Paula Scaramal; Fazion, Fernanda Aparecida Pires; Carvalho Filho, Celso Duarte; Vilas-Boas, Laurival Antonio; Vilas-Bôas, Gislayne Trindade

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis isolates were obtained from soil samples collected at different sites located in the same region but with different vegetation. The sites showed different frequencies of B. thuringiensis, depending on the type of vegetation. Strains of B. thuringiensis were found to be less common in samples of riparian forest soil than in soil of other types of vegetation. The rate of occurrence of B. thuringiensis in the samples also varied according to the vegetation. These results show that whenever this bacterium was found, it showed a high rate of occurrence, indicating that this species could be better adapted to using soil as a reservoir than other Bacillus species. The presence of cry genes was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, and genes that exhibited activity against Diptera species were the most commonly found. The isolates obtained were characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA, and 50% were clustered into clonal groups. These results demonstrated the possible occurrence of a high number of genetically similar strains when samples are collected from the same region, even if they are from locations with different vegetation.

  15. Cyt toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis: a protein fold conserved in several pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberón, Mario; López-Díaz, Jazmin A; Bravo, Alejandra

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria produce different insecticidal proteins known as Cry and Cyt toxins. Among them the Cyt toxins represent a special and interesting group of proteins. Cyt toxins are able to affect insect midgut cells but also are able to increase the insecticidal damage of certain Cry toxins. Furthermore, the Cyt toxins are able to overcome resistance to Cry toxins in mosquitoes. There is an increasing potential for the use of Cyt toxins in insect control. However, we still need to learn more about its mechanism of action in order to define it at the molecular level. In this review we summarize important aspects of Cyt toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, including current knowledge of their mechanism of action against mosquitoes and also we will present a primary sequence and structural comparison with related proteins found in other pathogenic bacteria and fungus that may indicate that Cyt toxins have been selected by several pathogenic organisms to exert their virulence phenotypes.

  16. The Pathogenomic Sequence Analysis of B. cereus and B. Thuringiensis isolates closely related to Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, C S; Xie, G; Challacombe, J F; Altherr, M R; Bhotika, S S; Bruce, D; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Chen, J; Chertkov, O; Cleland, C; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Doggett, N A; Fawcett, J J; Glavina, T; Goodwin, L A; Hill, K K; Hitchcock, P; Jackson, P J; Keim, P; Kewalramani, A R; Longmire, J; Lucas, S; Malfatti, S; McMurry, K; Meincke, L J; Misra, M; Moseman, B L; Mundt, M; Munk, A C; Okinaka, R T; Parson-Quintana, B; Reilly, L P; Richardson, P; Robinson, D L; Rubin, E; Saunders, E; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Ticknor, L O; Wills, P L; Gilna, P; Brettin, T S

    2005-10-12

    The sequencing and analysis of two close relatives of Bacillus anthracis are reported. AFLP analysis of over 300 isolates of B. cereus, B. thuringiensis and B. anthracis identified two isolates as being very closely related to B. anthracis. One, a B. cereus, BcE33L, was isolated from a zebra carcass in Nambia; the second, a B. thuringiensis, 97-27, was isolated from a necrotic human wound. The B. cereus appears to be the closest anthracis relative sequenced to date. A core genome of over 3,900 genes was compiled for the Bacillus cereus group, including B anthracis. Comparative analysis of these two genomes with other members of the B. cereus group provides insight into the evolutionary relationships among these organisms. Evidence is presented that differential regulation modulates virulence, rather than simple acquisition of virulence factors. These genome sequences provide insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to the host range and virulence of this group of organisms.

  17. Cloning, characterization and expression of a novel haplotype cry2A-type gene from Bacillus thuringiensis strain SWK1, native to Himalayan valley Kashmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyaz, A L; Arulselvi, P Indra

    2016-05-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a gram positive bacterium which is effectively being used in pest management strategies as an eco-friendly bioinsecticide. In the present study a new cry2A gene was cloned from a promising indigenous B. thuringiensis SWK1 strain previously characterized for its toxicity against Spodoptera litura and Helicoverpa armigera larvae. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned cry2A gene pointed out that the open reading frame has 1902 bases encoding a polypeptide of 634 amino acid residues with a probable molecular weight of 70kDa. Homology comparisons showed that the deduced amino acid sequence of Cry2A had a similarity of 94% compared to that of the known Cry2Aa protein in the NCBI database and this gene has been named as cry2Al1 by the B. thuringiensis δ-endotoxin Nomenclature Committee. cry2Al1 was ligated into pET 22b vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS under the control of T7 promoter induced by isopropyl-beta-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed the expression of cry2Al1 as ∼65kDa protein. Insect pest bioassays with neonate larvae of S. litura and H. armigera showed that the purified Cry2Al1 are toxic to S. litura and H. armigera with LC50 2.448μg/ml and H. armigera with 3.374μg/ml respectively.

  18. Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis D(delta)-endotoxins against codling moth (Cydia pomonella L.) larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boncheva, R.; Dukiandjiev, S.; Minkov, I.; Maagd, de R.A.; Naimov, S.

    2006-01-01

    Solubilized protoxins of nine Cry1 and one hybrid Cry1 ¿-endotoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis were tested for their activity against larvae of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella L). Cry1Da was the most toxic, followed by Cry1Ab, Cry1Ba, and Cry1Ac, while Cry1Aa, Cry1Fa, Cry1Ia, and SN19 were still l

  19. Synergisms of cadherin fragments to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis%钙粘蛋白片段与苏云金杆菌晶体毒素协同作用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔金杰; 李国清

    2011-01-01

    从钙粘蛋白介导苏云金杆菌晶体(Bt Cry)毒素对害虫的毒杀过程、钙粘蛋白重复区和近膜区与Bt Cry毒素的分子间作用涉及的结合位点及可能的互作机制等方面,综述了钙粘蛋白片段与Bt Cry毒素协同作用的最新研究进展.昆虫钙粘蛋白某些片段在非折叠状态时,可与Bt Cry毒素形成寡聚体,从而增加Bt Cry毒素对靶标害虫的毒杀活性.相关研究成果有助于提高Bt Cry毒素毒杀害虫的能力,克服害虫抗药性,具有一定的应用前景.%The recent advances in synergism of cadherin fragments to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins were reviewed. Cadherin receptors mediated virulence of the Cry toxins to insect pests. The molecular interaction between cadherin extracellular repeats or membrane proximal domain and Cry toxins involved in several active sites. Some unfolding fragments of cadherins could facilitate the formation of Bt Cry toxin oligomers, and consequently exhibited synergistic effects on Bt Cry toxins to target pests. This discovery provides novel strategies to enhance the insecticidal activity of Bt Cry toxins, and to overcome the resistance of insects to Bt toxin-based bio-pesticides or transgenic crops.

  20. Genomic characterization and comparison of seven Myoviridae bacteriophage infecting Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Amber Brooke; Quinn, McKenzie Rea; Brouillette, Alexis; Caruso, Steven; Cresawn, Steven; Erill, Ivan; Lewis, Lynn; Loesser-Casey, Kathryn; Pate, Morgan; Scott, Crystal; Stockwell, Stephanie; Temple, Louise

    2016-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Kurstaki, a bacterium that is a source of biopesticides and a safe simulant for pathogenic Bacillus species, was used to isolate seven unique bacteriophages. The phage genomes were sequenced and ranged in size from 158,100 to 163,019 bp encoding 290-299 genes, and the GC content of ~38% was similar to that of the host bacterium. All phages had terminal repeats 2-3 kb long. Three of the phages encoded tRNAs and three contained a self-splicing intron in the DNA polymerase gene. They were categorized as a single cluster (>60% nucleotide conservation) containing three subclusters (>80% nucleotide conservation), supported by genomic synteny and phylogenetic analysis. Considering the published genomes of phages that infect the genus Bacillus and noting the ability of many of the Bacillus cereus group phages to infect multiple species, a clustering system based on gene content is proposed.

  1. Field persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis on maize leaves (Zea mays L. Persistência de Bacillus thuringiensis em folhas de milho em condições de campo (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinéia de Lara Haddad

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The persistence slope of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt based products in the field is an important parameter to evaluate their efficacy. The half-life, estimated based on persistence slope parameters, is one of the most effective tools to select microbial pesticides. The aim of this research was to study the relationship between viability loss of Bt spores on maize leaves and their concentration, comparing it with field persistence. The experimental design was split-plot on time, composed by maize plants, in which three concentrations (half, normal and double doses of a Dipel commercial formulation were applied. In each plot three leaves in the upper part of three plants where randomly selected. Samples of these leaves were collected 3 to 72 hours after treatment, to count the number of viable spores in two foliar dishes with 1 cm in diameter. The field persistence was determined using an exponential model, linearized by a logarithmic transformation of viable spores number in time. Using the log linear method of confidence intervals, there were no significantly differences (P = 0.05 in half-lifes: 18.2 hours for half-dose, 16.5 hours for normal dose and 13.6 hours for double dose. Assuming a fictitious index of insect consumption equal to one, the effective doses according to concentrations were calculated. It was verified that 77%, 78% and 80.5% of the effective doses (viable spores remained on the leaf surface after the first day of treatment, respectively.A curva de persistência de produtos à base de Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt no campo é um importante parâmetro para avaliar a sua eficiência. A meia-vida, baseada em estimativas dos parâmetros desta curva, é um aspecto importante na seleção de pesticidas microbianos. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi estudar a relação entre a perda de viabilidade de esporos de Bt em folhas de milho, e sua concentração, comparando-as com a persistência em campo. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o

  2. Engineering modified Bt toxins to counter insect resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo-López, Liliana; López, Idalia; Gómez, Isabel; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Bravo, Alejandra

    2007-12-07

    The evolution of insect resistance threatens the effectiveness of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins that are widely used in sprays and transgenic crops. Resistance to Bt toxins in some insects is linked with mutations that disrupt a toxin-binding cadherin protein. We show that susceptibility to the Bt toxin Cry1Ab was reduced by cadherin gene silencing with RNA interference in Manduca sexta, confirming cadherin's role in Bt toxicity. Native Cry1A toxins required cadherin to form oligomers, but modified Cry1A toxins lacking one alpha-helix did not. The modified toxins killed cadherin-silenced M. sexta and Bt-resistant Pectinophora gossypiella that had cadherin deletion mutations. Our findings suggest that cadherin promotes Bt toxicity by facilitating toxin oligomerization and demonstrate that the modified Bt toxins may be useful against pests resistant to standard Bt toxins.

  3. [The analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticical protein gene cloning and expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qi-Liang; Liu, Zi-Duo; Sun, Ming; Wei, Fang; Yu, Zi-Niu

    2002-09-01

    Three kinds of Bacillus thuringiensis serotype-subsp. Leesis(H33) strain YBT-833, subsp. Aizawai(H7) strain YBT-1416 and subsp. Kurstaki(H3ab) strain YBT-1535, which were isolated by our lab, are chosen as original strain to clone vegetative insecticidal protein gene. Southern hybridization showed that vip genes are all localized at roughly 4-5 kb size-fractionated XbaI fragments of total DNA from YBT-833, YBT-1416 and YBT-1535. Three subgenomic libraries containing the vip gene fragment, were constructed with pUC19 as vector. Then, three vegetative insecticidal protein gene vip83, vip14 and vip15 are obtained from the libraries through the methods of colony-blot-in-situ screening and enzyme-cut detection. Comparision of DNA sequence made out that only vip83 gene exist five different base pairs with known vip genes. Because the sequences of vip14 and vip15 are the same, two of the three genes, vip83 and vip14, were subcloned to shuttle vehicle pHT315 to get recombinant plasmids pBMB8901 and pBMB8902 in turn. The plasmids were separately transformed into vip Bt. receptors BMB171 and 4Q7 to obtain four engineered strains BMB8901-171, BMB8902-171, BMB8901-4Q7 and BMB8902-4Q7. SDS-PAGE results indicated that all recombinant strains express 88 kD vegetative insecticidal protein. Bioassay also showed that the proteins of genes vip83 and vip14 both have certain toxicity to Lepidopteran insect larvae such as Heliochis armigera, Spodotera exigua and Plutella xylostella. While the toxicity of vip protein from four engineered strains to Plutella xylostellas are highest, whose LC50 value is 28.6, 31.6, 45.4 and 37.6 microL/mL respectively. This study will contributed to construct high efficacy and wide spectrum engineered strains on theory and reality.

  4. Proteome response of Tribolium castaneum larvae to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin producing strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Contreras

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of Tribolium castaneum (Tc larvae was determined against spore-crystal mixtures of five coleopteran specific and one lepidopteran specific Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxin producing strains and those containing the structurally unrelated Cry3Ba and Cry23Aa/Cry37Aa proteins were found toxic (LC(50 values 13.53 and 6.30 µg spore-crystal mixture/µL flour disc, respectively. Using iTRAQ combined with LC-MS/MS allowed the discovery of seven novel differentially expressed proteins in early response of Tc larvae to the two active spore-crystal mixtures. Proteins showing a statistically significant change in treated larvae compared to non-intoxicated larvae fell into two major categories; up-regulated proteins were involved in host defense (odorant binding protein C12, apolipophorin-III and chemosensory protein 18 and down-regulated proteins were linked to metabolic pathways affecting larval metabolism and development (pyruvate dehydrogenase Eα subunit, cuticular protein, ribosomal protein L13a and apolipoprotein LI-II. Among increased proteins, Odorant binding protein C12 showed the highest change, 4-fold increase in both toxin treatments. The protein displayed amino acid sequence and structural homology to Tenebrio molitor 12 kDa hemolymph protein b precursor, a non-olfactory odorant binding protein. Analysis of mRNA expression and mortality assays in Odorant binding protein C12 silenced larvae were consistent with a general immune defense function of non-olfactory odorant binding proteins. Regarding down-regulated proteins, at the transcriptional level, pyruvate dehydrogenase and cuticular genes were decreased in Tc larvae exposed to the Cry3Ba producing strain compared to the Cry23Aa/Cry37Aa producing strain, which may contribute to the developmental arrest that we observed with larvae fed the Cry3Ba producing strain. Results demonstrated a distinct host transcriptional regulation depending upon the Cry toxin treatment. Knowledge

  5. Antagonism between Cry1Ac1 and Cyt1A1 toxins of bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rincon-Castro MC; Barajas-Huerta; Ibarra

    1999-05-01

    Most strains of the insecticidal bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis have a combination of different protoxins in their parasporal crystals. Some of the combinations clearly interact synergistically, like the toxins present in B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. In this paper we describe a novel joint activity of toxins from different strains of B. thuringiensis. In vitro bioassays in which we used pure, trypsin-activated Cry1Ac1 proteins from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki, Cyt1A1 from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, and Trichoplusia ni BTI-Tn5B1-4 cells revealed contrasting susceptibility characteristics. The 50% lethal concentrations (LC50s) were estimated to be 4,967 of Cry1Ac1 per ml of medium and 11.69 ng of Cyt1A1 per ml of medium. When mixtures of these toxins in different proportions were assayed, eight different LC50s were obtained. All of these LC50s were significantly higher than the expected LC50s of the mixtures. In addition, a series of bioassays were performed with late first-instar larvae of the cabbage looper and pure Cry1Ac1 and Cyt1A1 crystals, as well as two different combinations of the two toxins. The estimated mean LC50 of Cry1Ac1 was 2.46 ng/cm2 of diet, while Cyt1A1 crystals exhibited no toxicity, even at very high concentrations. The estimated mean LC50s of Cry1Ac1 crystals were 15.69 and 19.05 ng per cm2 of diet when these crystals were mixed with 100 and 1,000 ng of Cyt1A1 crystals per cm2 of diet, respectively. These results indicate that there is clear antagonism between the two toxins both in vitro and in vivo. Other joint-action analyses corroborated these results. Although this is the second report of antagonism between B. thuringiensis toxins, our evidence is the first evidence of antagonism between toxins from different subspecies of B. thuringiensis (B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis) detected both in vivo and in vitro. Some possible explanations for this relationship are discussed.

  6. In Vitro Antagonism of Bacillus thuringiensis NCIM2130 against Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., A Stem Rot Pathogen of Groundnut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra. R. Rakh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stem rot is one of the most drastic diseases of groundnut that cause major crop loss. Stem rot pathogen of groundnut, Sclerotium rolfsii, was isolated from the infected groundnut stem. Present investigation was started to search for effective biocontrol agent against Sclerotium rolfsii. To find effective biocontrol agent, 120 Bacillus spp. isolated from various rhizospheric soils of healthy plants, screened in vitro against the stem rot pathogen by dual culture technique. Out of these Bacillus spp, Bacillus 57 isolate found effective in controlling the phytopathogen by Novel Ring method (80.21 %. Bacillus 57 was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Bacillus thuringiensis NCIM2130. To effectively control the phytopathogen in vitro, the Bacillus thuringiensis NCIM2130 produced the Volatile metabolites, and Siderophore.

  7. Fitness cost of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis in velvetbean caterpillar Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ricardo Sosa-Gómez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Selection pressure to obtain resistant genotypes can result in fitness cost. In this study, we report the effects of the selection pressure of a commercial formulation of Bacillus thuringiensis on biological aspects of a Dipel-resistant strain of velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner. Comparisons of Dipel-resistant and susceptible individuals revealed significant differences in pupal weight and larval development time. Both strains (Dipel-resistant and susceptible were susceptible to Cry1Ac toxin expressed in foliar cotton tissues. Resistant and susceptible strains showed low survival rates of 22.5% and 51.2%, respectively, when fed with Greene diet containing Bt-cotton. Larvae bioassayed after three laboratory generations presented lower survival and less instar numbers than individuals maintained in the laboratory for more than 144 generations. Pupal weight was 9.4% lower and larval development time was 1.9 days longer in the resistant population than in the susceptible strain. Other parameters, such as duration of pupal stage, adult longevity, number of eggs per female, oviposition period, and egg fertility, remained unaffected.

  8. Reduced levels of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase are common to lepidopteran strains resistant to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

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    Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes

    Full Text Available Development of insect resistance is one of the main concerns with the use of transgenic crops expressing Cry toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Identification of biomarkers would assist in the development of sensitive DNA-based methods to monitor evolution of resistance to Bt toxins in natural populations. We report on the proteomic and genomic detection of reduced levels of midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (mALP as a common feature in strains of Cry-resistant Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda when compared to susceptible larvae. Reduced levels of H. virescens mALP protein (HvmALP were detected by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE analysis in Cry-resistant compared to susceptible larvae, further supported by alkaline phosphatase activity assays and Western blotting. Through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR we demonstrate that the reduction in HvmALP protein levels in resistant larvae are the result of reduced transcript amounts. Similar reductions in ALP activity and mALP transcript levels were also detected for a Cry1Ac-resistant strain of H. armigera and field-derived strains of S. frugiperda resistant to Cry1Fa. Considering the unique resistance and cross-resistance phenotypes of the insect strains used in this work, our data suggest that reduced mALP expression should be targeted for development of effective biomarkers for resistance to Cry toxins in lepidopteran pests.

  9. Expression of cry1Ab gene from a novel Bacillus thuringiensis strain SY49-1 active on pest insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizoglu, Ugur; Ayvaz, Abdurrahman; Yılmaz, Semih; Karabörklü, Salih; Temizgul, Rıdvan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the cry1Ab gene of previously characterized and Lepidoptera-, Diptera-, and Coleoptera-active Bacillus thuringiensis SY49-1 strain was cloned, expressed and individually tested on Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae. pET-cry1Ab plasmids were constructed by ligating the cry1Ab into pET28a (+) expression vector. Constructed plasmids were transferred to an Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain rendered competent with CaCl2. Isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside was used to induce the expression of cry1Ab in E. coli BL21(DE3), and consequently, ∼130kDa of Cry1Ab was obtained. Bioassay results indicated that recombinant Cry1Ab at a dose of 1000μgg(-1) caused 40% and 64% mortality on P. interpunctella and E. kuehniella larvae, respectively. However, the mortality rates of Bt SY49-1 strains' spore-crystal mixture at the same dose were observed to be 70% on P. interpunctella and 90% on E. kuehniella larvae. The results indicated that cry1Ab may be considered as a good candidate in transgenic crop production and as an alternative biocontrol agent in controlling stored product moths.

  10. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab in Trichoplusia ni Is Conferred by a Novel Genetic Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaozhao; Kain, Wendy; Cassidy, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry2Ab in a greenhouse-originated Trichoplusia ni strain resistant to both Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab was characterized. Biological assays determined that the Cry2Ab resistance in the T. ni strain was a monogenic recessive trait independent of Cry1Ac resistance, and there existed no significant cross-resistance between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in T. ni. From the dual-toxin-resistant T. ni strain, a strain resistant to Cry2Ab only was isolated, and the Cry2Ab resistance trait was introgressed into a susceptible laboratory strain to facilitate comparative analysis of the Cry2Ab resistance with the susceptible T. ni strain. Results from biochemical analysis showed no significant difference between the Cry2Ab-resistant and -susceptible T. ni larvae in midgut proteases, including caseinolytic proteolytic activity and zymogram profile and serine protease activities, in midgut aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and in midgut esterases and hemolymph plasma melanization activity. For analysis of genetic linkage of Cry2Ab resistance with potential Cry toxin receptor genes, molecular markers for the midgut cadherin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aminopeptidase N (APN) genes were identified between the original greenhouse-derived dual-toxin-resistant and the susceptible laboratory T. ni strains. Genetic linkage analysis showed that the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni was not genetically associated with the midgut genes coding for the cadherin, ALP, and 6 APNs (APN1 to APN6) nor associated with the ABC transporter gene ABCC2. Therefore, the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni is conferred by a novel but unknown genetic mechanism. PMID:26025894

  11. Investigating alternatives to traditional insecticides: effectiveness of entomopathogenic fungi and Bacillus thuringiensis against citrus thrips and avocado thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Deane K; Morse, Joseph G

    2013-02-01

    Citrus thrips, Scirtothrips citri (Moulton) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a plant-feeding pest most widely recognized for causing damage to citrus (Citrus spp. L. [Rutaceae]) and mango (Mangifera indica L. [Anacardiaceae]) fruits. This insect has recently broadened its known host range to become a significant pest of California grown blueberries. Avocado thrips, Scirtothrips. perseae Nakahara (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a recent, invasive pest of California avocados, Persea americana Mill. (Laurales: Lauraceae). Effective alternatives to traditional pesticides are desirable for both pests to reduce impacts on natural enemies and broaden control options in an effort to minimize pesticide resistance via rotation of control materials. We evaluated Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) subsp. israelensis proteins (Cyt 1A and Cry 11A, activated and inactivated) and multiple strains (GHA, 1741ss, SFBb1, S44ss, NI1ss, and 3769ss) of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin against both species. Avocado thrips and citrus thrips were not susceptible to either Bt protein tested, regardless of activation status. All strains of B. bassiana were able to infect both avocado thrips and citrus thrips. However, the commercially available GHA strain was the most effective strain against both species and had a faster rate of infection then the other strains tested. Citrus thrips were more susceptible than avocado thrips to all B. bassiana strains (LC50 and LC95 of 8.6 x 10(4) and 4.8 x 10(6) conidia per ml for citrus thrips, respectively). Investigation of citrus thrips field control using the GHA strain of B. bassiana is therefore justified.

  12. Identificação de genes cry de Bacillus thuringiensis no controle de Sphenophorus levis, o bicudo da cana-de-açúcar Identification of cry genes from Bacillus thuringiensis effective against Sphenophorus levis, the sugar-cane borer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Aparecida Silva Cícero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A bactéria B. thuringiensis caracteriza-se pela produção de proteínas tóxicas a representantes de diversas ordens de insetos, as quais são codificadas por genes cry. Este trabalho foi realizado com objetivo de selecionar isolados de B. thuringiensis, por meio da caracterização morfológica e molecular, identificando as diferentes subclasses dos genes cry3 e cry35 e determinar a patogenicidade contra Sphenophorus levis, uma das mais importantes pragas da cultura da cana-de-açúcar. Foram utilizados 1163 isolados de B. thuringiensis e com a observação em microscópio com contraste de fases foram confirmadas como pertencentes à espécie de B. thuringiensis. O material genético foi purificado pela matriz de troca iônica "Instagene Matrix" e submetido a PCR com iniciadores gerais cry3 e cry35 identificando-se 30 isolados contendo genes com potencial para o controle de coleópteros, os quais juntamente com as linhagens-padrão de B. thuringiensis var. tenebrionis, B. thuringiensis var. morrissone e B. thuringiensis var. tolworthi foram utilizados para a realização do bioensaio. Através de análise discriminante alocaram-se os isolados em quatro grupos quanto à toxicidade de B. thuringiensis. Os grupos ficaram assim definidos: um grupo que promovem até 10% de mortalidade contendo as testemunhas e duas linhagens;um grupo que causou 39% de mortalidade contendo três linhagens padrão e dez isolados; um grupo com 52% de mortalidade contendo treze isolados e um grupo com 70% de mortalidade contendo cinco isolados, os quais devem ser considerados promissores no controle biológico de S. levis.Bacillus thuringiensis is well known for its ability to produce toxic proteins to different insect orders which are encoded by the cry genes. This work was carried out aiming to select among different B. thuringiensis isolates, by morphological and molecular characterization, identifying different classes of cry3 and cry35 genes, and to determine the

  13. Survival and conjugal transfer between Bacillus thuringiensis strains in aquatic environment Sobrevivência e conjugação de Bacillus thuringiensis em ambiente aquático

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Furlaneto; Halha Ostrensky Saridakis; Olívia Márcia Nagy Arantes

    2000-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to assess the survival of cells and spores and plasmid transfer between Bacillus thuringienis strains in aquatic environment. Results indicated that cells and spores of B. thuringiensis can survive for 10 days in water, without altering their number. The sporulation process began after 12-15 hours of inoculation of water. B. thuringiensis was able to transfer conjugative plasmids in the aquatic environment.O presente trabalho é um estudo sobre a sob...

  14. Spore prevalence and toxigenicity of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from U.S. retail spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariram, Upasana; Labbé, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    Recent incidents of foodborne illness associated with spices as the vehicle of transmission prompted this examination of U.S. retail spices with regard to Bacillus cereus. This study focused on the levels of aerobic-mesophilic spore-forming bacteria and B cereus spores associated with 247 retail spices purchased from five states in the United States. Samples contained a wide range of aerobic-mesophilic bacterial spore counts ( 10(7) CFU/g). Using a novel chromogenic agar, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores were isolated from 77 (31%) and 11 (4%) samples, respectively. Levels of B. cereus were thuringiensis isolates possessed at least one type of enterotoxin gene: HBL (hemolysin BL) or nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE). None of the 88 isolates obtained in this study possessed the emetic toxin gene (ces). Using commercially available immunological toxin detection kits, the toxigenicity of the isolates was confirmed. The NHE enterotoxin was expressed in 98% of B. cereus and 91% of B. thuringiensis isolates that possessed the responsible gene. HBL enterotoxin was detected in 87% of B. cereus and 100% of B. thuringiensis PCR-positive isolates. Fifty-two percent of B. cereus and 54% of B. thuringiensis isolates produced both enterotoxins. Ninety-seven percent of B. cereus isolates grew at 12°C, although only two isolates grew well at 9°C. The ability of these spice isolates to form spores, produce diarrheal toxins, and grow at moderately abusive temperatures makes retail spices an important potential vehicle for foodborne illness caused by B. cereus strains, in particular those that produce diarrheal toxins.

  15. 40 CFR 174.511 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab protein... PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.511 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of...

  16. 40 CFR 174.510 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac protein... PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.510 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1154 - CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated in killed Pseudomonas fluorescens, and the... Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated in killed Pseudomonas fluorescens, and the expression plasmid and cloning vector genetic constructs. CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of...

  18. Oxygen mass transfer in fermentation of bacillus thuringiensis

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    R. Ríos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to obtain a correlation based on literature, depicting the relationships betwen the physical oxygen transfer rate (OTR and microbial oxygen uptake rate (OUR in order to determine the conditions (mass transfer coefficient, resulting on diferents combinations of aereations and agitations rates, under which growth will not be limited by oxygen. This correlation was adapted to culture with B. thuringiensis in order to estimate what biomass concentration are feasible for the physical limits set by operations conditions before microbial activity becomes limited by oxygen.

  19. Progress of Anticancer Researches on Bacillus thuringiensis%苏云金芽孢杆菌抗癌的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李今煜; 陈小旋; 关雄

    2002-01-01

    最近研究发现某些非杀虫的苏云金芽孢杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,Bt)株系的伴孢蛋白对体外培养的人癌细胞(MOLT-4、HeLa)具有毒杀能力.这类蛋白不属于已知的任何一种Cry/Cyt蛋白,其抗癌活性需经蛋白酶水解活化,所导致的细胞病变有明显的核凝聚和细胞肿胀过程.这个发现可能导致Bt在医疗上的新应用.文章综述了国外一些研究的新进展以期对国内的Bt研究提供新的思路.

  20. Isolation and Identification of Bacillus Thuringiensis from Uranium Soil%含铀土壤中苏云金芽胞杆菌的分离与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘洁茹; 关怡; 郑能雄; 黄天培; 关雄

    2010-01-01

    从新疆某铀矿厂采集土样,通过光学显微镜观察其伴胞晶体,并经生理生化特征和cry基因的鉴定确认为苏云金芽胞杆茵(Bacillus thuringiensis,简称Bt),将其命名为BRC-ZYR4.利用PCR-RFLP方法和SDS-PAGE方法对该茵株进行了cry基因型和杀虫晶体蛋白(Insecticidal Crystal Proteins,简称ICPs)的鉴定.结果表明,BRC-ZYR4可能含有cry1Ad、cry1Cb和cry1Ea基因,含有约130、75、50、30和25kDa ICPs.

  1. Proteínas Cry1 e Vip3A de Bacillus thuringiensis: sinergismo e efeito sub-letal no controle de Heliothis virescens

    OpenAIRE

    Lemes, Ana Rita Nunes [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    A bactéria Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) possui a capacidade de produzir inclusões protéicas (proteína Cry) e proteínas vegetativas (Vip). Estas proteínas podem ser tóxicas para insetos e por meio de transgenia, a expressão em plantas, podem também proporcionar controle de importantes pragas agrícolas. Nesse sentido, esta pesquisa teve por objetivo avaliar o potencial de controle das proteínas Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ca, Vip3A(1), Vip3A(2) e Vip3A(3) em uma população brasileira da lagarta-da-maçã, ...

  2. [Advances in safety studies of soil Bt toxin proteins released from transgenic Bt crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yaoyu; Jiang, Mingxing; Cheng, Jia; Jiang, Yonghou

    2003-11-01

    Commercialized transgenic Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) crops are permitted for field growth in a large scale, which leads to significant issues of ecological risk assessment in soil ecosystem. In this paper, some general safety problems involving in the soil Bt active toxins released from insect-resistant transgenic Bt crops in the forms of plant residues, root exudates and pollens were reviewed, including their adsorption by soil active-particles, their insecticidal activity, persistence, and biodegradation by soil microbes, and their effects on soil organisms.

  3. LSSP-PCR para la identificación de polimorfismos en el gen cry1B en cepas nativas de Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Ilce Orozco Mera

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Título en ingles: LSSP-PCR to identify polymorphisms in the gene cry1B of Bacillus thuringiensis native strain Resumen: Se estandarizó la técnica LSSP-PCR (reacción en cadena de la polimerasa con un único oligonucleótido en condiciones de baja astringencia, para identificar polimorfismos del gen cry1B en aislamientos nativos de Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt. Se evaluaron 164 aislamientos nativos colombianos identificándose el gen cry1Ba en 11 de estos aislamientos. Los 11 fragmentos amplificados, junto con el de la cepa de referencia Bt subsp. aizawai HD137, se analizaron por LSSP-PCR y los patrones electroforéticos obtenidos se compararon cualitativamente. Con los productos amplificados mediante el oligonucleótido directo se construyó un dendrograma utilizando UPGMA que  mostró tres agrupamientos con similitud de 83, 79 y 68%. La agrupación con 68% de similaridad correspondió al aislamiento nativo BtGC120 que presentó el patrón de bandas más variable. Con el oligonucleótido reverso el aislamiento BtGC120 mostró una menor variabilidad (43%. La secuencia nucleotidica obtenida de este fragmento de 806 pares de bases mostró una identidad de 93% con la secuencia de los genes cry1Bc1 de Bt morrisoni y cry1Bb1 de la cepa BT-EG5847. Se predijo del marco de lectura +3 una proteína de 268 residuos aminoácidicos, con 88% de identidad con la proteína Cry1Bc. Esta  secuencia reveló dos dominios, una endotoxina N implicada en la formación del poro y otra endotoxina M relacionada en el reconocimiento del receptor. La evaluación biológica del aislamiento BtGC120 sobre larvas de primer instar del insecto plaga Spodoptera frugiperda, mostró una CL50 de 1,896 ng de proteína total por cm2. Este estudio muestra que la LSSP-PCR es una técnica que permite identificar de una manera específica variaciones en las secuencias de los genes cry de Bt, con potencialidad

  4. Expression of Aminopeptidase N1(APN1),the Main Receptor Protein for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A Toxin from Helicoverpa armigera Larval Midgut in Trichoplusia ni cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Hong-lei; LIANG Ge-mei; WANG Gui-rong; YU Hong-kun; GUO Yu-yuan; WU Kong-ming

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to successfully express the Bt(Bacillus thuringiensis)toxin receptor protein located on the internal membrane of larval midgut of cotton bollworm(Helicoverpa armigera Hiibner)within eukaryotic expression system,which is one of the key links for clarifying the relationship between receptor and Bt resistance.The fragments of aminopeptidase N1(APN1)gene without signal peptide in the susceptible and the resistant H. armigera were cloned separately using PCR method,and were separately cloned into pUC 19 vector.After sequencing the gene,the fragments encoding for APN1 without signal peptide were cloned into the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system with transfer vector pFastBacHTB under the polyhedron gene promoter.The recombinant transposing plasmid pFastBacHTB/APN1 was screened and then transformed into Escherichia coli DH10Bac.It was cultured in LB medium,which contained Te, Kan,Ge,X-gal,and IPTG.The resulting recombinant bacmid was transfected into cells of the insect Trichoplusia ni and recombinant baculoviruse was obtained.The lysate of cells infected with recombinant baculoviruse was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and blot analysis.The results showed that the recombinant baculoviruse was fully capable of expressing APN1.The APN1 gene successfully expressed in T. ni cell established the base for continuing the research on its function and relationship of resistance with Bt.

  5. Knockdown of the MAPK p38 pathway increases the susceptibility of Chilo suppressalis larvae to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinxing; Liu, Lang; Zhang, Boyao; Wang, Xiaoping; Lei, Chaoliang; Lin, Yongjun; Ma, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces a wide range of toxins that are effective against a number of insect pests. Identifying the mechanisms responsible for resistance to Bt toxin will improve both our ability to control important insect pests and our understanding of bacterial toxicology. In this study, we investigated the role of MAPK pathways in resistance against Cry1Ca toxin in Chilo suppressalis, an important lepidopteran pest of rice crops. We first cloned the full-length of C. suppressalis mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38, ERK1, and ERK2, and a partial sequence of JNK (hereafter Csp38, CsERK1, CsERK2 and CsJNK). We could then measure the up-regulation of these MAPK genes in larvae at different times after ingestion of Cry1Ca toxin. Using RNA interference to knockdown Csp38, CsJNK, CsERK1 and CsERK2 showed that only knockdown of Csp38 significantly increased the mortality of larvae to Cry1Ca toxin ingested in either an artificial diet, or after feeding on transgenic rice expressed Cry1Ca. These results suggest that MAPK p38 is responsible for the resistance of C. suppressalis larvae to Bt Cry1Ca toxin. PMID:28262736

  6. Toxicidad biológica de cepas nativas de Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner en larvas de Tecia solanivora Povolny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Martínez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available La biodiversidad microbiológica de los suelos del departamento de Boyacá aún no ha sido explorada en toda su magnitud y existen microorganismos, como en el caso de Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt, que pueden emplearse para el desarrollo de estrategias biológicas de control de plagas en el futuro. Por lo anterior, el presente trabajo evaluó la actividad biológica, expresada como  toxicidad, de cepas nativas de B. thuringiensis en la Polilla Guatemalteca  de  la  papa  Tecia  solanivora Povolny, una de  las plagas más  limitantes en el cultivo de papa en la región andina colombiana. Esta  evaluación  se  realizó con  aislados de  Bt obtenidos y conservados por el Grupo de Manejo Biológico de Cultivos (GMBC en el Laboratorio de Control Biológico de la UPTC, colectados de muestras de  suelo en  la Provincia Centro de Boyacá y  previamente  caracterizados  macro  y microscópicamente.  La   toxicidad  se  evaluó mediante bioensayos con larvas de primer instar de  T.  solanivora,  utilizando  el método  decontaminación superficial de cubos de papa. Se evaluó  la mortalidad  ocho  días  después  de montado  el  bioensayo  y  se  determinó, igualmente,  la Concentración letal media (Cl 50 de las cepas que presentaron  la mayor actividad  tóxica en  los  bioensayos  iniciales.  Los  aislamientosGMBC-B054, GMBC-B071, GMBC-B076, GMBC- B098, GMBC-B111 y GMBC-B117 fueron  los más activos, con Cl 50 de 1.08x106, 4.24x106, 5.12x106, 4.36x103, 3.56x103  y  1.19x104  esporas  · mL-1,respectivamente.

  7. Bacillus thuringiensis metalloproteinase Bmp1 functions as a nematicidal virulence factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoxia; Chen, Ling; Huang, Qiong; Zheng, Jinshui; Zhou, Wei; Peng, Donghai; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Some Bacillus thuringiensis strains have high toxicity to nematodes. Nematicidal activity has been found in several families of crystal proteins, such as Cry5, Cry6, and Cry55. The B. thuringiensis strain YBT-1518 has three cry genes that have high nematicidal activity. The whole genome sequence of this strain contains multiple potential virulence factors. To evaluate the pathogenic potential of virulence factors, we focused on a metalloproteinase called Bmp1. It encompasses a consecutive N-terminal signal peptide, an FTP superfamily domain, an M4 neutral protease GluZincin superfamily, two Big-3 superfamily motifs, and a Gram-positive anchor superfamily motif as a C-terminal domain. Here, we showed that purified Bmp1 protein showed metalloproteinase activity and toxicity against Caenorhabditis elegans (the 50% lethal concentration is 610 ± 9.37 μg/ml). In addition, mixing Cry5Ba with Bmp1 protein enhanced the toxicity 7.9-fold (the expected toxicity of the two proteins calculated from their separate toxicities) against C. elegans. Confocal microscopic observation revealed that Bmp1 protein was detected from around the mouth and esophagus to the intestine. Striking microscopic images revealed that Bmp1 degrades intestine tissues, and the Cry5Ba causes intestinal shrinkage from the body wall. Thus, the B. thuringiensis Bmp1 metalloproteinase is a nematicidal virulence factor. These findings give a new insight into the relationship between B. thuringiensis and its host nematodes.

  8. Larvicidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin against Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Lara, Ana Paula DE Souza Stori; Lorenzon, Lucas Bigolin; Vianna, Ana Muñoz; Santos, Francisco Denis Souza; Pinto, Luciano Silva; Aires Berne, Maria Elisabeth; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2016-10-01

    Effective control of gastrointestinal parasites is necessary in sheep production. The development of anthelmintics resistance is causing the available chemically based anthelmintics to become less effective. Biological control strategies present an alternative to this problem. In the current study, we tested the larvicidal effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin against Haemonchus contortus larvae. Bacterial suspensions [2 × 108 colony-forming units (CFU) g-1 of the feces] of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis and recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Cry11Aa toxin were added to naturally H. contortus egg-contaminated feces. The larvae were quantified, and significant reductions of 62 and 81% (P < 0·001) were, respectively observed, compared with the control group. A 30 mL bacterial suspension (1 × 108 CFU mL-1) of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis and recombinant E. coli expressing Cry11Aa toxin were then orally administered to lambs naturally infected with H. contortus. Twelve hours after administration, feces were collected and submitted to coprocultures. Significant larvae reductions (P < 0·001) of 79 and 90% were observed respectively compared with the control group. The results suggest that the Cry11Aa toxin of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis is a promising new class of biological anthelmintics for treating sheep against H. contortus.

  9. Isolation, toxicity and detection of cry gene in Bacillus thuringiensis isolates in Krabi province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakai Thaphan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available One hundred twenty one isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis were isolated from 91 soil samples collected in the national park and wildlife sanctuary in Krabi province. All isolates of B.thuringiensis were tested for their insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura, S. exigua and Plutella xylostella larvae. Seven isolates of B. thuringiensis named JCPT7, JCPT16, JCPT18, JCPT64, JCPT68, JCPT74 and JCPT89 exhibited toxic activities against the insects, more than 90% mortality. The detection of cry gene of these isolates was done by a method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The PCR result indicated that cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1C, cry1D, cry1I, cry9A, cry9B and cry2A were on chromosomal DNA and cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1C, cry1D, cry1I and cry2A were on plasmid DNA. This study has introduced the promising B. thuringiensis isolates collected from soil samples which could be developed as an effective biocontrol agent for Lepidopterous pest.

  10. Altered protoxin activation by midgut enzymes from a Bacillus thuringiensis resistant strain of Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, B; Kramer, K J; Johnson, D E; MacIntosh, S C; McGaughey, W H

    1994-02-15

    Processing of Bacillus thuringiensis protoxins to toxins by midgut proteinases from a strain of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hubner), resistant to B. thuringiensis subspecies entomocidus (HD-198) was slower than that by midgut proteinases from the susceptible parent strain or a strain resistant to B. thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki (HD-1, Dipel). Midgut extracts from entomocidus-resistant insects exhibited five-fold lower activity toward the synthetic substrate alpha-N-benzoyl-DL-arginine rho-nitroanilide than extracts from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant insects. Midgut enzymes from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant insects converted the 133 kDa CryIA(c) protoxin to 61-63 kDa proteins, while incubations with entomocidus-resistant enzymes resulted in predominantly products of intermediate size, even with increased amounts of midgut extract. The 61-63 kDa proteins were only produced by entomocidus-resistant midgut extracts after long term incubations with the protoxin. The data suggest that altered protoxin activation by midgut proteinases is involved in some types of insect resistance to B. thuringiensis.

  11. New variants of lepidoptericidal toxin genes encoding Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauka, Diego H; Rodriguez, Sonia E; Benintende, Graciela B

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an entomopathogenic bacterium characterized by producing parasporal proteinaceous insecticidal crystal inclusions during sporulation. Many strains are capable of also expressing other insecticidal proteins called Vip during the vegetative growing phase. Particularly, Vip3A proteins have activity against certain Lepidoptera species through a unique mechanism of action which emphasized their possible use in resistance management strategies against resistant pests. The aim of the work was to develop a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method that can distinguish between vip3A genes from B. thuringiensis strains. In addition, 4 novel vip3Aa genes were cloned and sequenced. The method was originally based on amplification of a single PCR amplicon and the use of 2 restriction enzymes with recognition sites that facilitate simultaneous detection. Subsequently, a third restriction enzyme was used to distinguish between vip3A variants. Thirteen vip3Aa genes were identified in strains belonging to 10 different B. thuringiensis serovars. Three intra-subclass variants of vip3Aa genes could be differentiated. The presented method can serve as an invaluable tool for the investigation of known and novel vip3A genes in B. thuringiensis strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where variants of a same subclass of insecticidal genes could be distinguished following PCR-RFLP.

  12. Isolation, characterization and genome sequencing of phage MZTP02 from Bacillus thuringiensis MZ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei; Song, Shaoyun; Sun, Fan; Jia, Yanhua; Zeng, Wenhui; Pang, Yi

    2008-01-01

    A lysogenic phage, MZTP02, was produced via induction by mitomycin C from Bacillus thuringiensis (B. thuringiensis) strain MZ1. Plaques were about 3 mm in diameter with a small inner zone consisting of new B. thuringiensis colonies. Electron microscopic analysis showed that MZTP02 had a long tail (220 nm x 18 nm) and an icosahedral head (82 nm x 85 nm). MZTP02 was insensitive to organic solvents such as chloroform, and infected six B. thuringiensis strains. Its complete genome contained 15,717 base pairs (bp) with 37.55% G + C content. Two inverted terminal repeats consisting of 40 bp were 65% identical. Twenty putative open reading frames (ORFs) were found in the MZTP02 genome, and nine predicted proteins, including two terminase subunits, portal protein, minor head protein, scaffold protein, two putative membrane proteins, tail component, and minor structural protein, showed similarity to other phage proteins. But six ORFs were unique. The presence of a terminal protein at the 5'-terminus was demonstrated using proteinase K, lambda exonuclease and E. coli exonuclease III to digest the genome DNA. A TMP phylogenetic tree was constructed based on amino acid sequences from ten phages.

  13. Characterization of the synergistic interaction between Beauveria bassiana strain GHA and Bacillus thuringiensis morrisoni strain tenebrionis applied against Colorado potato beetle larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wraight, S P; Ramos, M E

    2017-01-17

    Studies were undertaken to further characterize the previously identified synergistic activity of Bacillus thuringiensis- and Beauveria bassiana-based biopesticides against Colorado potato beetle (CPB). A flowable concentrate of B. thuringiensis morrisoni strain tenebrionis (Bt) (Novodor® FC) and a wettable powder of B. bassiana strain GHA (Bb) (Mycotrol® 22WP) were applied against CPB larval populations infesting potato in field plots. Novodor FC and an oil-dispersion formulation of Bb (Mycotrol ES) were applied against second-instar CPB larvae on potted potato plants in greenhouse tests under low relative humidity (RH), variable-temperature conditions. Each pathogen was applied alone and in combination (tank-mixed) with the other pathogen. In the field tests, each biopesticide was also combined with the spray-carrier (formulation without active ingredient) of the other pathogen. Results from the greenhouse tests showed that under warm, dry conditions, low activity of Mycotrol was counterbalanced by high activity of the Novodor, and under cool, somewhat more humid conditions, low Novodor activity was balanced by high activity of Mycotrol, with the result being a constant level of synergism (CPB mortality ca. 20 percentage points higher than predicted by independent action). Similar levels of synergism were observed under the markedly different conditions of the field and greenhouse environments, and the synergism was confirmed as arising from interaction of the two micobes, as the Bt spray carrier had no significant effect on efficacy of the Mycotrol product and the Bb spray carrier had no effect on the efficacy of Novodor. The great capacity of these two control agents to act in concert to control CPB is well documented (the fast-acting, toxic Bt acting to protect potato crops from defoliation and the slow-acting Bb reducing survival to the adult stage). These finding further underscore the strong complementary action of these agents applied jointly against CPB.

  14. Interação de proteínas Vip3A e Cry1la10 de Bacillus thuringiensis com atividade inseticida a lepidópteros-praga

    OpenAIRE

    Marucci, Suzana Cristina [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    Vip3Aa and Cry1Ia proteins have potential in control of Lepidopteran pest and emerge as a promising alternative in the pest resistance management the Cry1A proteins, which has been highly used in the formulation of commercial insecticides based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and in transgenic plants. Therefore, this study aimed to cloning and expression of Vip3Aa42, Vip3Aa43 and Cry1Ia10 proteins in Escherichia coli, in order to analyze the correlation between the binding to receptors through...

  15. Characteristics of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry2Ab in a strain of Helicoverpa punctigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) isolated from a field population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, S; Parker, T L; Mahon, R J

    2010-12-01

    In 1996, the Australian cotton industry adopted Ingard that expresses the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin gene cry1Ac and was planted at a cap of 30%. In 2004-2005, Bollgard II, which expresses cry1Ac and cry2Ab, replaced Ingard in Australia, and subsequently has made up >80% of the area planted to cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. The Australian target species Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) and Helicoverpa punctigera (Wallengren) are innately moderately tolerant to Bt toxins, but the absence of a history of insecticide resistance indicates that the latter species is less likely to develop resistance to Bt cotton. From 2002-2003 to 2006-2007, F2 screens were deployed to detect resistance to CrylAc or Cry2Ab in natural populations of H. punctigera. Alleles that conferred an advantage against CrylAc were not detected, but those that conferred resistance to Cry2Ab were present at a frequency of 0.0018 (n = 2,192 alleles). Importantly, the first isolation of Cry2Ab resistance in H. punctigera occurred before significant opportunities to develop resistance in response to Bollgard II. We established a colony (designated Hp4-13) consisting of homozygous resistant individuals and examined their characteristics through comparison with individuals from a Bt-susceptible laboratory colony. Through specific crosses and bioassays, we established that the resistance present in Hp4-13 is due to a single autosomal gene. The resistance is fully recessive. Homozygotes are able to survive a dose of Cry2Ab toxin that is 15 times the reported concentration in field grown Bollgard II in Australia (500 microg/ml) and are fully susceptible to Cry1Ac and to the Bt product DiPel. These characteristics are the same as those described for the first Cry2Ab resistant strain of H. armigera isolated from a field population in Australia.

  16. Cloning and Tissue-Specific Expression of a Chitin Deacetylase Gene from Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Its Response to Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guoying; Li, Xiumin; Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Xiaoting

    2015-01-01

    Chitin deacetylases (CDAs) convert chitin into chitosan, the N-deacetylated form of chitin, which influences the mechanical and permeability properties of structures such as the cuticle and peritrophic matrices. In this article, a new CDA encoding gene, Hacda2, was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method in Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), with an open reading frame of 1,611 bp. The deduced protein composed of 536 amino acid residues with a signal peptide, a chitin-binding domain, a low-density lipoprotein receptor class A domain, and a polysaccharide deacetylase-like catalytic domain. The highest expression level of Hacda2 was detected in fat body among tissues tested in the fifth-instar larvae using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. Feeding of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) diet changed the expression level of Hacda1, Hacda2, Hacda5a, and Hacda5b significantly and differentially in the third-instar larvae. Hacda5a and Hacda5b expression were initially down-regulated and then up-regulated, whereas, the expression level of Hacda1 and Hacda2 was suppressed constantly postfeeding on Bt diet. These results suggested that HaCDAs may be involved in the response of H. armigera larvae to Bt and may be helpful to elucidate the roles of HaCDAs in the action of Bt cry toxin. The potential of HaCDAs to be used as synergists of Bt insecticidal protein needs to be further tested. PMID:26163665

  17. Diversity of thermal ecotypes and potential pathotypes of Bacillus thuringiensis soil isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiecicka, Izabela; Bartoszewicz, Marek; Kasulyte-Creasey, Daiva; Drewnowska, Justyna M; Murawska, Emilia; Yernazarova, Aliya; Lukaszuk, Edyta; Mahillon, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    Ecological diversification of Bacillus thuringiensis soil isolates was examined to determine whether bacteria adapted to grow at low temperature and/or potentially pathogenic correspond to genetically distinct lineages. Altogether, nine phylogenetic lineages were found among bacilli originating from North-Eastern Poland (n = 24) and Lithuania (n = 25) using multi-locus sequence typing. This clustering was chiefly confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. One third of the bacilli were found to be psychrotolerant, which strongly supports the hypothesis of the existence of thermal ecotypes among B. thuringiensis. PCR screening was also performed to detect potential enterotoxin genes and Bacillus anthracis pXO1- and pXO2-like replicons. The cytK-positive isolates (22%) were significantly associated with two phylogenetic lineages (potential CytK pathotypes), whereas there was no correlation between phylogenetic grouping and the presence of the potential tripartite enterotoxin pathotypes (86% of strains). A statistically significant association between phylogenetic lineages and ecologic properties was found with regard to the cry1-positive Lithuanian isolates, while the cry genes in Polish isolates and the pXO1- and pXO2 replicon-like elements showed scattered distribution across phylogenetic lineages. Our results support the hypothesis that B. thuringiensis comprises strains belonging to different phylogenetic lineages, which exhibit specific ecological properties.

  18. Behavior of transition state regulator AbrB in batch cultures of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano Goné, Astrid Magdalena; Dinorín Téllez Girón, Jabel; Jiménez Montejo, Fabiola Eloisa; Hidalgo-Lara, María Eugenia; López Y López, Víctor Eric

    2014-11-01

    The transition state regulator AbrB is involved in the regulation of various cellular functions such as exponential growth, transition state and sporulation onset, due to its ability to activate, suppress or prevent the inappropriate expression of various genes in Bacillus subtilis. In order to understand combined behavior in batch cultures of AbrB in Bacillus thuringiensis, we cloned and expressed the abrB gene of B. thuringiensis in Escherichia coli. The deduced sequence of abrB gene coded for a protein consisting of 94 amino acids with ~10.5 kDa protein that shares 100 and 85 % identity with those from Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis. The recombinant AbrB protein was used as antigen for the production of rabbit polyclonal antibodies anti-AbrB. Two media cultures with carbon: nitrogen ratios of 7.0, but varying access to nutrients were tested in batch cultures. In the case of both media, AbrB accumulation occurred from the beginning of the process and was maximal during early exponential growth. Thereafter, the level of AbrB decreased when there were no nutrient limitations and coincided with a decreased value in specific growth rate, although growth continued exponentially. Nonetheless, sporulation onset was determined 3 h and 4 h later, in media with highly metabolizable nutrients clean medium and Farrera medium, respectively. Hence, the maximal level of AbrB accumulation in batch cultures of B. thuringiensis is not influenced by limiting nutrients; however, nutrient availability affects the required time lapse for transition state regulator accumulation.

  19. Modular genetic architecture of the toxigenic plasmid pIS56-63 harboring cry1Ab21 in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis strain IS5056.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Emilia; Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis IS5056, a strain highly toxic to Trichoplusia ni larvae, produces the newly described Cry1Ab21 delta-endotoxin encoded by a gene located in the 63.8 kb pIS56-63 plasmid. In this report we present the structure and functional similarity of this plasmid to other B. thuringiensis large toxigenic plasmids with particular interest focused on its modular architecture. The 61 open reading frames (ORFs) of the plasmid made four functional modules: (i) M1-mic, the mobile insertion cassette harboring cry1Ab21; (ii) M2-tra, the putative conjugative element; (iii) M3-reg, regulation sequence; and (iv) M4-rep, the ori44 replicon. These modules display similarity to corresponding sequences in distinct B. thuringiensis plasmids, but, in general, not to plasmid of other Bacillus cereus sensu lato. The nucleotide sequence and organization of genes in pIS56-63 were highly similar (80-100%) to those in pHT73 of B. thuringiensis HT73, and in p03 of B. thuringiensis HD771, particularly within the M3-reg and M4-rep modules, and slightly less in M2-tra, the latter of which is composed of two segments exhibiting homology to sequences in pBMB28, pAH187_45, pCT83, and pIS56-85 or to pCT72, pBMB67, p04, and pIS56-68. The tetrapartite structure of the toxigenic pIS56-63 plasmid strongly suggests that its hybrid nature is a result of recombination of various genetic elements originating from different extrachromosomal and chromosomal sources in B. thuringiensis. The presence of cry1Ab21 in the mobile cassette suggests that its occurrence on pIS56-63 resulted from recombination and transposition events during the evolution of the plasmid.

  20. Effects of Bt-maize material on the life cycle of the land snail Cantareus aspersus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramarz, Paulina; de Vaufleury, Annette; Gimbert, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Insect resistant Bt-maize (MON 810) expresses active Cry1Ab endotoxin derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Snails constitute non-target soil species potentially exposed to Bt-toxin through consumption of plant material and soil in fields where transgenic plants have been grown. We studied...... the effect of the Cry1Ab toxin on survival, growth and egg hatchability of the snail Cantareus aspersus. From the age of 4 to 88 weeks, snails were fed either powdered Bt-maize or non-Bt-maize and exposed to soil samples collected after harvesting either the Bt-maize or non-Bt-maize. We applied four...... treatments: non-Bt soil + non-Bt-maize (MM); Bt soil + Bt-maize (BB), non-Bt soil + Bt-maize (MB), Bt soil + non-Bt-maize (BM). Eggs laid by snails not exposed to Bt-toxin were also exposed to the two types of soils (Bt and non-Bt soil). At the end of growth (47 weeks of exposure), snails exposed to Bt...

  1. Production of Polyclonal and Monoclonal Antibodies Against the Bacillus thuringiensis Vegetative Insecticidal Protein Vip3Aa16

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Hamadou-Charfi, D.; Sauer, A.; Abdelkafi-Mesrati, L.; Jaoua, S.; Dietrich, S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish a quantitative determination of the vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3A from the culture supernatant of Bacillus thuringiensis either by ELISA or by the conventional quantification method of the Western blot band. The Vip3A protein was produced by fermentation of the B. thuringiensis reference strain BUPM95 in 3 L. By Western blot, the Vip3Aa16 toxin was detected in the culture supernatant during the exponential growth phase of B. thuringiensis BUPM95. ...

  2. Diagnostic properties of three conventional selective plating media for selection of Bacillus cereus, B. thuringiensis and B. weihenstephanensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Hansen, Bjarne Munk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic properties of the two selective plating media and a chromogenic medium for identification of Bacillus cereus. The 324 isolates were B. cereus (37%), Bacillus weihenstephanensis (45%) or Bacillus thuringiensis (18%), as identified by a new...... combination of techniques. All isolates were growing on mannitol–egg yolk–polymyxin agar (MYP), and they did not form acid from mannitol. However, a significant lower number of B. thuringiensis isolates did not show lecithinase activity. All isolates were also growing on polymyxin–egg yolk...... recommended selective plating media MYP and PEMBA for detection of B. cereus group bacteria both have their limitations for identification of some B. cereus, B. weihenstephanensis or B. thuringiensis. However, MYP is preferable compared to PEMBA. The chromogenic medium has its own advantages and limitations...

  3. U. V. -induced and N-methyl-N'-nitrosoguanidine-induced mutagenesis in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffray, Y.; Boutibonnes, P.

    1987-03-01

    The lethal and mutagenic effects of u.v. light and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on Bacillus thuringiensis were investigated. Lethality studies demonstrated that B. thuringiensis was relatively sensitive to these agents. This bacterium was mutated at the rifampicin resistance marker by u.v. light and to a lesser extent by the direct acting alkylating agent MNNG. One mutant selected for its greater sensitivity to u.v. light expressed a higher frequency of mutagenesis after u.v. light treatment and appeared to be defective in an excision repair pathway. However, this mutant was only slightly mutable by MNNG in comparison with the wild-type strain. This unusual phenotype does not yet have a parallel among the radiation sensitive mutants described in other bacterial species.

  4. Are nematodes a missing link in the confounded ecology of the entomopathogen Bacillus thuringiensis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Lifang; Crickmore, Neil; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis, which is well known as an entomopathogen, has been accepted by the public as a safe bioinsecticide. The natural ecology of this bacterium has never been particularly clear, with views ranging from it being an obligate pathogen to an opportunist pathogen that can otherwise exist as a soil saprophyte or a plant endophyte. This confusion has recently led to it being considered as an environmental pathogen that has evolved to occupy a diverse set of environmental niches in which it can thrive without needing a host. A significant driving force behind this classification is the fact that B. thuringiensis is found in high numbers in environments that are not occupied by the insect hosts to which it is pathogenic. It is our opinion that the ubiquitous presence of this bacterium in the environment is the result of a variety of vectoring systems, particularly those that include nematodes.

  5. Enduring toxicity of transgenic Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing mosquito larvicidal genes from Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasherob, Robert; Otieno-Ayayo, Zachariah Ngalo; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Miaskovsky, Rina; Boussiba, Sammy; Zaritsky, Arieh

    2003-10-01

    Persistence of biological control agents against mosquito larvae was tested under simulated field conditions. Mosquito larvicidal activity of transgenic Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing cry4Aa, cry11Aa and p20 from Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis was greater than B. thuringiensis ssp. israelensis primary powder (fun 89C06D) or wettable powder (WP) (Bactimos products) when either mixed with silt or exposed to sunlight outdoors. Reduction of Bactimos primary powder toxicity was at least 10-fold higher than Anabaena's after mixing with silt. In outdoors experiments, Bactimos WP remained toxic (over 30% mortality of 3rd instar Aedes aegypti larvae) for 2-4 days only, while transgenic Anabaena's toxicity endured 8-21 days.

  6. Two-component system YvqEC-dependent bacterial resistance against vancomycin in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumeng; Hu, Yimin; Fan, Qingyun; Wang, Xun; He, Jin

    2015-08-01

    YvqEC is one of the two-component signal transduction systems that may respond to cell envelope stress and enable cells to adjust multiple cellular functions. It consists of a histidine kinase YvqE and a response regulator YvqC. In this study, we separately constructed a single gene mutant ΔyvqE and a double gene mutant ΔyvqEC in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 through a homing endonucleases I-SceI mediated markerless gene deletion method. We found that the deletion of either yvqE or yvqEC weakened the resistance of B. thuringiensis against vancomycin. We also identified nine operons that may be involved in the cellular metabolism regulated by YvqC. This study not only enriches our understanding of bacterial resistance mechanisms against vancomycin, but also helps investigate the functions of YvqEC.

  7. PENGENDALIAN JENTIK NYAMUK VEKTOR DEMAM BERDARAH, MALARIA DAN FILARIASIS MENGGUNAKAN STRAIN LOKAL BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS H-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blondie Ch. P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted anticipating vector control for the control of Dengue Haemmoraghic Fever (Aedes aegypti, malaria (Anopheles aconitus and filariasis (Culex quinguefasciatus using a local strain of Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 grown in local media (coconut water and soybean infusion. Tryptose Phosphate Broth chemical media (standard media was used as a comparison to the media under investigation. Good growth was obtained in all media (local media and standard media and local strain of B. thuringiensis H-14 was effective against the three mosquito larvae. The local strain of Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 cultured in coconut water media, killed 50% of the third instar larvae of Ae. aegypti, An. aconitus and Cx. quinquefasciatus at concentrations of 13 x 10'5, 31 x 10-5 and 10 x 10-5 concentrations for 24 hours of exposure respectively and 13 x 10-5, 9 x 10-5 and 7 x 10-5 at 48 hours exposure. Meanwhile when B. thurigiensis H-14 were cultured in soybean infusion media, they killed 50% of the third instar larvae of Ae. aegypti, An. aconitus and Cx. quinquefasciatus at concentrations of 5 x 10-5, 7 x 10-5 and 4 x 10-5 for 24 hours of exposure respectively and 3 x 10-5, 5 x 10-5 and 3 x 10-5 at 48 hours exposure. However when they were cultured in TPB media, they killed 50% of the third instar larvae of Ae. aegypti, An. aconitus and Cx. quinquefasciatus at concentrations of 12 x 10-5, 15 x 10-5 and 3 x 10-5 for 24 hours of exposure respectively and 12 x 10-5, 15 x 10-5 and 2 x 10-5 at 48 hours exposure. This investigation shows that the local strain of B. thuringiensis H-14 has potential as bioinsecticide agent.

  8. Molecular and toxigenic characterization of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains isolated from commercial ground roasted coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Jeane Quintanilha; Cavados, Clara de Fátima Gomes; Vivoni, Adriana Marcos

    2012-03-01

    Thirty samples of roasted ground coffee beans from 10 different commercial brands were analyzed to investigate the occurrence and levels of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis strains. Strains were evaluated for their genetic diversity by repetitive element sequence polymorphism PCR (Rep-PCR) and for their toxigenic profiles, i.e., the presence of hblA, hblC, hblD, nheA, nheB, nheC, cytK, ces, and entFM. Survival and multiplication of B. cereus sensu lato in the ready-to-drink coffee was determined to evaluate this beverage as a possible vehicle for B. cereus infection. B. cereus was detected in 17 (56.7%) of the 30 samples, and B. thuringiensis was detected in 8 (26.7%) of the 30 samples. Five samples did not produce any characteristic growth. The most common gene, entFM, was detected in 23 strains (92%). The NHE complex (nheA, nheB, and nheC genes) was found in 19 strains (76%). The HBL complex (hblA, hblC, and hblD) was found in 16 strains (64%). All strains were negative for ces. The cytK gene was found in 16 strains (64%). The computer-assisted cluster analysis of Rep-PCR profiles using a clustering criterion of 80% similarity revealed four main clusters. Cluster 1 was the predominant and comprised three B. thuringiensis strains with 100% similarity, cluster 2 comprised two B. cereus strains (100% similarity), cluster 3 comprised two B. thuringiensis strains (90% similarity), and cluster 4 comprised one B. thuringiensis strain and one B. cereus strain (85% similarity). The cluster analysis of fingerprints generated by Rep-PCR revealed a high genetic diversity among the B. cereus strains, suggesting that the contamination could have originated from different sources. In our experiments, when sugar was added and the beverage was kept in thermic bottles there was a significant increase in B. cereus sensu lato levels, which may increase the risk of food poisoning. These results highlight the need for additional studies on this subject to better evaluate

  9. Online monitoring of Escherichia coli and Bacillus thuringiensis spore inactivation after advanced oxidation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherchan, Samendra P; Snyder, Shane A; Gerba, Charles P; Pepper, Ian L

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have shown that advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as UV light in combination with hydrogen peroxide is an efficient process for the removal of a large variety of emerging contaminants including microorganisms. The mechanism of destruction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the enhanced formation of hydroxyl (·OH) radicals, which have a high oxidation potential. The goal of this study was to utilize in-line advanced oxidation to inactivate microbes, and document the inactivation via an in-line, real-time sensor. Escherichia coli cells and Bacillus thuringiensis spores were exposed to UV/H2O2 treatment in DI water, and the online sensor BioSentry(®) was evaluated for its potential to monitor inactivation in real-time. B. thuringiensis was selected as a non-pathogenic surrogate for B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a proven biological weapon. UV radiation and UV/H2O2 exposure resulted in a >6 log10 reduction of the viable culturable counts of E. coli vegetative cells, and a 3 log10 reduction of B. thuringiensis spores. Scanning electron microscopy of the treated samples revealed severe damage on the surface of most E. coli cells, yet there was no significant change observed in the morphology of the B. thuringiensis spores. Following AOP exposure, the BioSentry sensor showed an increase in the categories of unknown, rod and spores counts, but overall, did not correspond well with viable count assays. Data from this study show that advanced oxidation processes effectively inactivate E. coli vegetative cells, but not B. thuringiensis spores, which were more resistant to AOP. Further, the BioSentry in-line sensor was not successful in documenting destruction of the microbial cells in real-time.

  10. 固定化Bacillus thuringiensis ZJOU-010壳聚糖酶的研究%Immobilization and Enzymatic Properties of Chitosanase from Bacillus thuringiensis ZJOU-010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈静; 陈余; 鹿刘奇; 陈小娥; 方旭波

    2010-01-01

    采用吸附交联技术,以DEAE-22纤维素为载体、戊二醛为交联剂,固定Bacillus thuringiensis ZJOU-010壳聚糖酶,考察固定化酶的制备条件,并研究固定化酶的性质.结果表明B.thuringiensis ZJOU-010壳聚糖酶的最佳固定化条件为:戊二醛体积分数3.0%、加酶量20mg、固定化时间10h;在此条件下制备的固定化壳聚糖酶的最适pH值和温度分别为4.83和50℃;与游离酶相比,该固定化酶的热稳定性较好,在40℃和50℃条件下的半衰期(t1/2)分别为36.3h和6.2h,动力学常数Km值为9.19g/L;该固定化酶重复使用10批后活力仍可保持初始活力的88.32%.

  11. Identification of distinct Bacillus thuringiensis 4A4 nematicidal factors using the model nematodes Pristionchus pacificus and Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatsenko, Igor; Nikolov, Angel; Sommer, Ralf J

    2014-07-14

    Bacillus thuringiensis has been extensively used for the biological control of insect pests. Nematicidal B. thuringiensis strains have also been identified; however, virulence factors of such strains are poorly investigated. Here, we describe virulence factors of the nematicidal B. thuringiensis 4A4 strain, using the model nematodes Pristionchus pacificus and Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that B. thuringiensis 4A4 kills both nematodes via intestinal damage. Whole genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis 4A4 identified Cry21Ha, Cry1Ba, Vip1/Vip2 and β-exotoxin as potential nematicidal factors. Only Cry21Ha showed toxicity to C. elegans, while neither Cry nor Vip toxins were active against P. pacificus, when expressed in E. coli. Purified crystals also failed to intoxicate P. pacificus, while autoclaved spore-crystal mixture of B. thuringiensis 4A4 retained toxicity, suggesting that primary β-exotoxin is responsible for P. pacificus killing. In support of this, we found that a β-exotoxin-deficient variant of B. thuringiensis 4A4, generated by plasmid curing lost virulence to the nematodes. Thus, using two model nematodes we revealed virulence factors of the nematicidal strain B. thuringiensis 4A4 and showed the multifactorial nature of its virulence.

  12. Functional analysis of the sporulation-specific diadenylate cyclase CdaS in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cao; Ma, Yang; Wang, Xun; Xie, Yuqun; Ali, Maria K.; He, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a recently discovered bacterial secondary messenger molecule, which is associated with various physiological functions. In the genus Bacillus, the intracellular level and turnover of c-di-AMP are mainly regulated by three diadenylate cyclases (DACs), including DisA, CdaA and CdaS, and two c-di-AMP-specific phosphodiesterases (GdpP and PgpH). In this study, we demonstrated that CdaS protein from B. thuringiensis is a hexameric DAC protein that can convert ATP or ADP to c-di-AMP in vitro and the N-terminal YojJ domain is essential for the DAC activity. Based on the markerless gene knock-out method, we demonstrated that the transcription of cdaS was initiated by the sporulation-specific sigma factor σH and the deletion of cdaS significantly delayed sporulation and parasporal crystal formation. These findings contrast with similar experiments conducted using B. subtilis, wherein transcription of its cdaS was initiated by the sigma factor σG. Deletion of all the three DAC genes from a single strain was unsuccessful, suggesting that c-di-AMP is an indispensable molecule in B. thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis indicated increased diversity of CdaS in the B. cereus and B. subtilis Bacillus subgroups. In summary, this study identifies important aspects in the regulation of c-di-AMP in the genus Bacillus. PMID:26441857

  13. Genetic Diversity of Bacillus thuringiensis from Different Geo-Ecological Regions of Ukraine by Analyzing the 16S rRNA and gyrB Genes and by AP-PCR and saAFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punina, N V; Zotov, V S; Parkhomenko, A L; Parkhomenko, T U; Topunov, A F

    2013-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group consists of closely related species of bacteria and is of interest to researchers due to its importance in industry and medicine. However, it remains difficult to distinguish these bacteria at the intra- and inter-species level. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a member of the B. cereus group. In this work, we studied the inter-species structure of five entomopathogenic strains and 20 isolates of Bt, which were collected from different geo-ecological regions of Ukraine, using various methods: physiological and biochemical analyses, analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes, by AP-PCR (BOX and ERIC), and by saAFLP. The analysis of the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes revealed the existence of six subgroups within theB.cereus group: B anthracis, B. cereus I and II, Bt I and II, and Bt III, and confirmed that these isolates belong to the genus Bacillus. All strains were subdivided into 3 groups. Seventeen strains belong to the group Bt II of commercial, industrial strains. The AP-PCR (BOX and ERIC) and saAFLP results were in good agreement and with the results obtained for the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. Based on the derived patterns, all strains were reliably combined into 5 groups. Interestingly, a specific pattern was revealed by the saAFLP analysis for the industrial strain Bt 0376 р.о., which is used to produce the entomopathogenic preparation "STAR-t".

  14. Bioactivity of vip3A Protein from Bacillus thuringiensis Isolates and Cloning of Vip3A-LS1 Gene from Bt LS1%苏云金杆菌营养期蛋白杀虫活性及Vip3A-LS1基因克隆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆秀君; 郝会海; 宋萍; 杜克久; 李国勋

    2007-01-01

    对营养期高活性杀虫菌株进行筛选,得到高效菌株Bt LS1,对其营养期杀虫蛋白活性及发酵特性进行了系统研究,克隆了该菌株的vip3A新基因.测定了31株vip3A基因阳性菌株营养期杀虫蛋白的活性,发现Bt LS1和Bt LS8菌株对甜菜夜蛾Spodoptera exigua生长的抑制作用明显高于其他菌株.进一步研究表明,Bt LS1菌株营养期杀虫蛋白对初孵和2龄甜菜夜蛾幼虫的体重增长抑制率分别为95.3% ±2.1%和90.7% ±6.6%;对棉铃虫Helicoverpa armigera初孵幼虫的校正死亡率为22.1%,对2龄幼虫的体重增长抑制率为78.7% ±6.6%.发酵液中以胞内可溶性物质为主.设计vip3A全长基因特异引物PCR扩增,插入质粒pBluescript SK(+),克隆测序证实该菌株中存在vip3A新基因,命名为Vip3A-LS1,GenBank登录号为DQ016968.按该序列推断的蛋白与同类蛋白的8个氨基酸之间存在差异.

  15. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 interactions with western corn rootworm midgut membrane binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 are binary insecticidal proteins that are co-expressed in transgenic corn hybrids for control of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Bt crystal (Cry proteins with limited potential for field-relevant cross-resistance are used in combination, along with non-transgenic corn refuges, as a strategy to delay development of resistant rootworm populations. Differences in insect midgut membrane binding site interactions are one line of evidence that Bt protein mechanisms of action differ and that the probability of receptor-mediated cross-resistance is low. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Binding site interactions were investigated between Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 and coleopteran active insecticidal proteins Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, and Cry8Ba on western corn rootworm midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV. Competitive binding of radio-labeled proteins to western corn rootworm BBMV was used as a measure of shared binding sites. Our work shows that (125I-Cry35Ab1 binds to rootworm BBMV, Cry34Ab1 enhances (125I-Cry35Ab1 specific binding, and that (125I-Cry35Ab1 with or without unlabeled Cry34Ab1 does not share binding sites with Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, or Cry8Ba. Two primary lines of evidence presented here support the lack of shared binding sites between Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 and the aforementioned proteins: 1 No competitive binding to rootworm BBMV was observed for competitor proteins when used in excess with (125I-Cry35Ab1 alone or combined with unlabeled Cry34Ab1, and 2 No competitive binding to rootworm BBMV was observed for unlabeled Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1, or a combination of the two, when used in excess with (125I-Cry3Aa, or (125I-Cry8Ba. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Combining two or more insecticidal proteins active against the same target pest is one tactic to delay the onset of resistance to either protein. We conclude that Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 are compatible with Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, or Cry8Ba

  16. Toxicity studies for indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from Malang city, East Java on Aedes aegypti larvae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zulfaidah Penata Gama; Nobukazu Nakagoshi; Suharjono; Faridah Setyowati

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity of indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis (B. thuringiensis) isolates from Malang City for controlling Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti) larvae. Methods: Soil samples were taken from Purwantoro and Sawojajar sub-districts. Bacterial isolation was performed using B. thuringiensis selective media. Phenotypic characteristics of the isolates were obtained with the simple matching method. The growth and prevalence of spores were determined by the Total Plate Count method, and toxicity tests were also performed on the third instar larval stage of Ae. aegypti. The percentage of larval mortality was analysed using probit regression. The LC50 was analysed by ANOVA, and the Tukey HSD interval was 95%. Results:Among the 33 selected bacterial isolates, six were obtained (PWR4-31, PWR4-32, SWJ4-2b, SWJ4-4b, SWJ-4k and SWJ5-1) that had a similar phenotype to reference B. thuringiensis. Based on the dendrogram, all of the bacterial isolates were 71%similar. Three isolates that had a higher prevalence of reference B. thuringiensis were PWR4-32, SWJ4-4b and SW5-1, of which the spore prevalence was 52.44%, 23.59%, 34.46%, respectively. These three indigenous isolates from Malang City successfully killed Ae. aegypti larvae. The PWR4-32 isolates were the most effective at killing the larvae. Conclusions:Six indigenous B. thuringiensis isolates among the 33 bacterial isolates found in the Sawojajar and Purwantoro sub-districts were toxic to the third instar larvae of Ae. aegypti. The PWR4-32 isolates were identical to the reference B. thuringiensis and had 88%phenotype similarity. The PWR4-32 isolates had the highest spore prevalence (52.44%), and the early stationary phase occurred at 36 h. The PWR4-32 isolates were the most effective at killing Ae. aegypti larvae (LC50-72 h=2.3í108 cells/mL).

  17. Expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis mosquitocidal toxin Cry11Aa in the aquatic bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, Gemma; Guevara, Oscar Enrique; Orduz, Sergio; Crickmore, Neil

    2005-12-01

    A mosquitocidal aquatic bacterium has been developed by introducing an operon containing the cry11Aa, and p20 genes from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) into the gram-negative aquatic bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus. After transformation, the cry11Aa gene was successfully expressed in recombinant A. excentricus under the tac promoter, at the level of 0.04 pg/cell. The recombinant bacteria were toxic to Aedes aegypti larvae with an LC(50) of 6.83 x 10(5) cells/mL. We believe that these bacteria may have potential as genetically engineered microorganisms for the control of mosquito larvae.

  18. Does distant homology with Evf reveal a lipid binding site in Bacillus thuringiensis cytolytic toxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigden, Daniel J

    2009-05-19

    The Cry and Cyt classes of insecticidal toxins derived from the sporulating bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis are valuable substitutes for synthetic pesticides in agricultural contexts. Crystal structures and many biochemical data have provided insights into their molecular mechanisms, generally thought to involve oligomerization and pore formation, but have not localised the site on Cyt toxins responsible for selective binding of phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids. Here, distant homology between the structure of Cyt toxins and Erwinia virulence factor (Evf) is demonstrated which, along with sequence conservation analysis, allows a putative lipid binding site to be localised in the toxins.

  19. Cloning and localization of vip3A gene of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zeng Ling; Guo, Wen Yi; Qiu, Jun Zhi; Huang, Tian Pei; Li, Xun Bo; Guan, Xiong

    2004-09-01

    An insecticidal protein gene, vip3A, was cloned from Bacillus thuringiensis strain WB50. The nucleotide sequence of 2,460 bp (GenBank acc. No. AY295778) showed 99% homology with the known vip3A genes. Using specific primers for vip3A gene, PCR was performed to demonstrate that the gene was not located on the bacterial chromosome and this was confirmed by Southern blotting using an internal fragment (486 bp) from vip3A gene as a probe. The gene was carried on a plasmid of 31.8 kb.

  20. Draft genome sequences of two Bacillus thuringiensis strains and characterization of a putative 41.9-kDa insecticidal toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Leopoldo; Muñoz, Delia; Berry, Colin; Murillo, Jesús; Caballero, Primitivo

    2014-04-30

    In this work, we report the genome sequencing of two Bacillus thuringiensis strains using Illumina next-generation sequencing technology (NGS). Strain Hu4-2, toxic to many lepidopteran pest species and to some mosquitoes, encoded genes for two insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins, cry1Ia and cry9Ea, and a vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip) gene, vip3Ca2. Strain Leapi01 contained genes coding for seven Cry proteins (cry1Aa, cry1Ca, cry1Da, cry2Ab, cry9Ea and two cry1Ia gene variants) and a vip3 gene (vip3Aa10). A putative novel insecticidal protein gene 1143 bp long was found in both strains, whose sequences exhibited 100% nucleotide identity. The predicted protein showed 57 and 100% pairwise identity to protein sequence 72 from a patented Bt strain (US8318900) and to a putative 41.9-kDa insecticidal toxin from Bacillus cereus, respectively. The 41.9-kDa protein, containing a C-terminal 6× HisTag fusion, was expressed in Escherichia coli and tested for the first time against four lepidopteran species (Mamestra brassicae, Ostrinia nubilalis, Spodoptera frugiperda and S. littoralis) and the green-peach aphid Myzus persicae at doses as high as 4.8 µg/cm2 and 1.5 mg/mL, respectively. At these protein concentrations, the recombinant 41.9-kDa protein caused no mortality or symptoms of impaired growth against any of the insects tested, suggesting that these species are outside the protein's target range or that the protein may not, in fact, be toxic. While the use of the polymerase chain reaction has allowed a significant increase in the number of Bt insecticidal genes characterized to date, novel NGS technologies promise a much faster, cheaper and efficient screening of Bt pesticidal proteins.