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Sample records for bacillus bombyseptieus infection

  1. A genome-wide survey for host response of silkworm, Bombyx mori during pathogen Bacillus bombyseptieus infection.

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    Lulin Huang

    Full Text Available Host-pathogen interactions are complex relationships, and a central challenge is to reveal the interactions between pathogens and their hosts. Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb which can produces spores and parasporal crystals was firstly separated from the corpses of the infected silkworms (Bombyx mori. Bb naturally infects the silkworm can cause an acute fuliginosa septicaemia and kill the silkworm larvae generally within one day in the hot and humid season. Bb pathogen of the silkworm can be used for investigating the host responses after the infection. Gene expression profiling during four time-points of silkworm whole larvae after Bb infection was performed to gain insight into the mechanism of Bb-associated host whole body effect. Genome-wide survey of the host genes demonstrated many genes and pathways modulated after the infection. GO analysis of the induced genes indicated that their functions could be divided into 14 categories. KEGG pathway analysis identified that six types of basal metabolic pathway were regulated, including genetic information processing and transcription, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, metabolism of cofactors and vitamins, and xenobiotic biodegradation and metabolism. Similar to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt, Bb can also induce a silkworm poisoning-related response. In this process, genes encoding midgut peritrophic membrane proteins, aminopeptidase N receptors and sodium/calcium exchange protein showed modulation. For the first time, we found that Bb induced a lot of genes involved in juvenile hormone synthesis and metabolism pathway upregulated. Bb also triggered the host immune responses, including cellular immune response and serine protease cascade melanization response. Real time PCR analysis showed that Bb can induce the silkworm systemic immune response, mainly by the Toll pathway. Anti-microorganism peptides (AMPs, including of Attacin, Lebocin, Enbocin, Gloverin

  2. EXPERIMENTAL-INFECTION IN MICE WITH BACILLUS-LICHENIFORMIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, J.S.; Jensen, H.E.; Jensen, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Bacillus licheniformis was assessed in normal and immunodepressed BALB/c mice. The animals were challenged intravenously with 4 x 10(7) colony forming units of B, licheniformis (ATCC 14580) and both normal and immunodepressed mice were susceptible. However, the infection was...

  3. Production of Diarrheal Enterotoxins and Other Potential Virulence Factors by Veterinary Isolates of Bacillus Species Associated with Nongastrointestinal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Rowan, Neil J.; Caldow, George; Gemmell, Curtis G.; Hunter, Iain S.

    2003-01-01

    With the exceptions of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus species are generally perceived to be inconsequential. However, the relevance of other Bacillus species as food poisoning organisms and etiological agents in nongastrointestinal infections is being increasingly recognized. Eleven Bacillus species isolated from veterinary samples associated with severe nongastrointestinal infections were assessed for the presence and expression of diarrheagenic enterotoxins and other poten...

  4. Disseminated Bacillus Calmette-Guerin infections after intravesical therapy

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    I Gerogianni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is the treatment of choice for superficial bladder carcinoma. Disseminated BCG infection presenting as granulomatous hepatitis or pneumonitis is a very rare complication of this treatment. Here we report a case series of seven patients previously treated with BCG presenting with pneumonitis. In two of the cases, identification of Mycobacterium bovis was achieved with molecular methods.

  5. Cytokine Response to Infection with Bacillus anthracis Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Pickering, Alison K.; Osorio, Manuel; Lee, Gloria M.; Grippe, Vanessa K.; Bray, Mechelle; Merkel, Tod J.

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, is a gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium. The inhalational form of anthrax is the most severe and is associated with rapid progression of the disease and the outcome is frequently fatal. Transfer from the respiratory epithelium to regional lymph nodes appears to be an essential early step in the establishment of infection. This transfer is believed to occur by means of carriage within alveolar macrophages following phagocytosis. Therefo...

  6. EXPERIMENTAL-INFECTION IN MICE WITH BACILLUS-LICHENIFORMIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, J.S.; Jensen, H.E.; Jensen, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Bacillus licheniformis was assessed in normal and immunodepressed BALB/c mice. The animals were challenged intravenously with 4 x 10(7) colony forming units of B, licheniformis (ATCC 14580) and both normal and immunodepressed mice were susceptible. However, the infection was...... more severe in the immunosuppressed animals. In normal mice, lesions were restricted to the liver and kidneys, while lesions also occurred in other organs of immunodepressed mice. By crossed immunoelectrophoresis it was shown that antigens of B. licheniformis are potent immunogens, and the bacteria...

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Phages Infecting Bacillus subtilis

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    Anna Krasowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been suggested as an alternative approach to reduce the amount of pathogens in various applications. Bacteriophages of various specificity and virulence were isolated as a means of controlling food-borne pathogens. We studied the interaction of bacteriophages with Bacillus species, which are very often persistent in industrial applications such as food production due to their antibiotic resistance and spore formation. A comparative study using electron microscopy, PFGE, and SDS-PAGE as well as determination of host range, pH and temperature resistance, adsorption rate, latent time, and phage burst size was performed on three phages of the Myoviridae family and one phage of the Siphoviridae family which infected Bacillus subtilis strains. The phages are morphologically different and characterized by icosahedral heads and contractile (SIOΦ, SUBω, and SPOσ phages or noncontractile (ARπ phage tails. The genomes of SIOΦ and SUBω are composed of 154 kb. The capsid of SIOΦ is composed of four proteins. Bacteriophages SPOσ and ARπ have genome sizes of 25 kbp and 40 kbp, respectively. Both phages as well as SUBω phage have 14 proteins in their capsids. Phages SIOΦ and SPOσ are resistant to high temperatures and to the acid (4.0 and alkaline (9.0 and 10.0 pH.

  8. Impact of Gastrointestinal Bacillus anthracis Infection on Hepatic B Cells

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    Natacha Colliou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of Bacillus anthracis results in rapid gastrointestinal (GI infection, known as GI anthrax. We previously showed that during GI anthrax, there is swift deterioration of intestinal barrier function leading to translocation of gut-associated bacteria into systemic circulation. Additionally, we described dysfunction in colonic B cells. In concordance with our previous studies, here, we report early migration of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis along with other gut-resident bacteria into the infected murine liver. Additionally, despite a global decrease in the B cell population, we observed an increase in both B-1a and marginal zone (MZ-like B cells. Both of these cell types are capable of producing immunoglobulins against common pathogens and commensals, which act as a general antibody barrier before an antigen-specific antibody response. Accumulation of these cells in the liver was associated with an increase in chemokine expression. These data suggest that the presence of Sterne and other commensals in the liver trigger migration of MZ-like B cells from the spleen to the liver to neutralize systemic spread. Further research is required to evaluate the possible cause of their failure to clear the infection within the liver, including the potential role of dysfunctional mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling.

  9. Genomic characterization and comparison of seven Myoviridae bacteriophage infecting Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Amber Brooke; Quinn, McKenzie Rea; Brouillette, Alexis; Caruso, Steven; Cresawn, Steven; Erill, Ivan; Lewis, Lynn; Loesser-Casey, Kathryn; Pate, Morgan; Scott, Crystal; Stockwell, Stephanie; Temple, Louise

    2016-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Kurstaki, a bacterium that is a source of biopesticides and a safe simulant for pathogenic Bacillus species, was used to isolate seven unique bacteriophages. The phage genomes were sequenced and ranged in size from 158,100 to 163,019bp encoding 290-299 genes, and the GC content of ~38% was similar to that of the host bacterium. All phages had terminal repeats 2-3kb long. Three of the phages encoded tRNAs and three contained a self-splicing intron in the DNA polymerase gene. They were categorized as a single cluster (>60% nucleotide conservation) containing three subclusters (>80% nucleotide conservation), supported by genomic synteny and phylogenetic analysis. Considering the published genomes of phages that infect the genus Bacillus and noting the ability of many of the Bacillus cereus group phages to infect multiple species, a clustering system based on gene content is proposed. PMID:26773385

  10. Transcriptome of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcriptomic profiles of the lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by the biopesticide Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of 49,613 assembled transcript sequences, of which...

  11. Bacillus anthracis infections – new possibilities of treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Dorota Żakowska; Michał Bartoszcze; Marcin Niemcewicz; Agata Bielawska-Drózd; Józef Knap; Piotr Cieślik; Krzysztof Chomiczewski; Janusz Kocik

    2015-01-01

    [b]Introduction and objective[/b]. [i]Bacillus anthracis[/i] is one of biological agents which may be used in bioterrorism attacks. The aim of this study a review of the new treatment possibilities of anthrax, with particular emphasis on the treatment of pulmonary anthrax. [b]Abbreviated description of the state of knowledge[/b]. Pulmonary anthrax, as the most dangerous clinical form of the disease, is also extremely difficult to treat. Recently, considerable progress in finding new dru...

  12. Passive protection by polyclonal antibodies against Bacillus anthracis infection in guinea pigs.

    OpenAIRE

    Little, S F; Ivins, B E; Fellows, P F; Friedlander, A M

    1997-01-01

    The protective effects of polyclonal antisera produced by injecting guinea pigs with protective antigen (PA), the chemical anthrax vaccine AVA, or Sterne spore vaccine, as well as those of toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced against PA, lethal factor, and edema factor, were examined in animals infected with Bacillus anthracis spores. Only the anti-PA polyclonal serum significantly protected the guinea pigs from death, with 67% of infected animals surviving. Although none ...

  13. Prosthetic Joint Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis after Intravesical Instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG

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    Eric Gomez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is a treatment to prevent recurrence of superficial urothelial bladder carcinoma. Complications after bladder instillation of BCG have been reported including locally invasive and systemic infections due to dissemination of Mycobacterium bovis from the bladder. We present an uncommon case and literature review of prosthetic joint infection due to M. bovis after intravesical BCG treatment of bladder cancer.

  14. Plasmid transfer between strains of Bacillus thuringiensis infecting Galleria mellonella and Spodoptera littoralis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrett, P.; Stephenson, M

    1990-01-01

    To determine the possibility of plasmid transfer occurring between strains of Bacillus thuringiensis in infected lepidopterous larvae, Galleria mellonella and Spodoptera littoralis were infected with two or more strains of B. thuringiensis and the resulting bacteria from the dead insects were examined for plasmid transfer. Transfer rates of plasmids coding for crystal production and tetracycline resistance were high, reaching levels similar to those obtained in laboratory broth cultures. Tran...

  15. The role of anthrolysin O in gut epithelial barrier disruption during Bacillus anthracis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Brian L.; Lodolce, James P.; Kolodziej, Lauren; Boone, David L.; Tang, Wei Jen

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax, caused by the bacterial infection of Bacillus anthracis, posts a significant bioterrorism threat by its relatively high mortality rate in humans. Different from inhalational anthrax by the route of infection, accumulating evidence indicates the bypass of vegetative bacteria across GI epithelium is required to initiate GI anthrax. Previously, we reported that purified anthrolysin O (ALO), instead of tripartite anthrax edema and lethal toxins, is capable of disrup...

  16. Changes in intestinal microflora of Caenorhabditis elegans following Bacillus nematocida B16 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Keqin; Huang, Xiaowei; Hui, Fengli; Kan, Yunchao; Yao, Lunguang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pathogenic bacteria on a host and its symbiotic microbiota is vital and widespread in the biotic world. The soil-dwelling opportunistic bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 uses a "Trojan horse" mechanism to kill Caenorhabditis elegans. The alterations in the intestinal microflora that occur after B16 infection remain unknown. Here, we analyzed the intestinal bacteria presented in normal and infected worms. The gut microbial community experienced a complex change after B16 inoculation, as determined through marked differences in species diversity, structure, distribution and composition between uninfected and infected worms. Regardless of the worm's origin (i.e., from soil or rotten fruits), the diversity of the intestinal microbiome decreased after infection. Firmicutes increased sharply, whereas Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Acidobacteria decreased to different degrees. Fusobacteria was only present 12 h post-infection. After 24 h of infection, 1228 and 1109 bacterial species were identified in the uninfected and infected groups, respectively. The shared species reached 21.97%. The infected group had a greater number of Bacillus species but a smaller number of Pediococcus, Halomonas, Escherichia and Shewanella species (P microbiota using C. elegans as the model species. PMID:26830015

  17. Fatal Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection Initially Reported as a Bacillus Species, Ohio, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Doker, Thomas J.; Quinn, Celia L.; Salehi, Ellen D.; Sherwood, Joshua J.; Benoit, Tina J.; Elrod, Mindy Glass; Gee, Jay E.; Shadomy, Sean V.; Bower, William A.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Walke, Henry T.; Blaney, David D.; DiOrio, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    A fatal case of melioidosis was diagnosed in Ohio one month after culture results were initially reported as a Bacillus species. To identify a source of infection and assess risk in patient contacts, we abstracted patient charts; interviewed physicians and contacts; genetically characterized the isolate; performed a Burkholderia pseudomallei antibody indirect hemagglutination assay on household contacts and pets to assess seropositivity; and collected household plant, soil, liquid, and insect...

  18. The Early Humoral Immune Response to Bacillus anthracis Toxins in Patients Infected with Cutaneous Anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Doganay, Mehmet; Brenneman, Karen E.; Akmal, Arya; Goldman, Stanley; Galloway, Darrell R.; Mateczun, Alfred J; Cross, Alan S.; Baillie, Leslie W.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, elaborates a tripartite toxin composed of two enzymatically active subunits, lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) which, when associated with a cell-binding component, protective antigen (PA), form lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET), respectively. In this preliminary study we characterised the toxin-specific antibody responses observed in 17 individuals infected with cutaneous anthrax. The majority of the toxin-specific antibody resp...

  19. Effective Antimicrobial Regimens for Use in Humans for Therapy of Bacillus anthracis Infections and Postexposure Prophylaxis†

    OpenAIRE

    Deziel, Mark R.; Heine, Henry; Louie, Arnold; Kao, Mark; Byrne, William R.; Basset, Jennifer; Miller, Lynda; Bush, Karen; Kelly, Michael; Drusano, G L

    2005-01-01

    Expanded options for treatments directed against pathogens that can be used for bioterrorism are urgently needed. Treatment regimens directed against such pathogens can be identified only by using data derived from in vitro and animal studies. It is crucial that these studies reliably predict the efficacy of proposed treatments in humans. The objective of this study was to identify a levofloxacin treatment regimen that will serve as an effective therapy for Bacillus anthracis infections and p...

  20. Infective endocarditis due to Bacillus cereus in a pregnant female: A case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Mahek Shah; Soumya Patnaik; Supakanya Wongrakpanich; Yaser Alhamshari; Talal Alnabelsi

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of infective endocarditis during pregnancy is around 0.006% with high maternal and fetal mortality. Bacillus cereus is an extremely rare cause for endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers (IVDA) or those with valvular disease or devices such as pacemakers. We report a case of B. cereus endocarditis, which, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reported in pregnancy. A 30-year-old, 25-week pregnant female presented with right shoulder pain, swelling and erythema on the lateral...

  1. Quantum dot incorporated Bacillus spore as nanosensor for viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinya; Zhou, Qian; Shen, Zhongfeng; Li, Zheng; Fei, Ruihua; Ji, Eoon Hye; Hu, Shen; Hu, Yonggang

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we report a high-throughput biological method to prepare spore-based monodisperse microparticles (SMMs) and then form the nanocomposites of CdTe quantum dot (QD)-loaded SMMs by utilizing the endogenous functional groups from Bacillus spores. The SMMs and QD-incorporated spore microspheres (QDSMs) were characterized by using transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, zeta potential analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, potentiometric titrations, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. The thermodynamics of QD/SMM interaction and antigen/QDSM interaction was also investigated by isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC). Fluorescent QDSMs coded either with a single luminescence color or with multiple colors of controlled emission intensity ratios were obtained. Green QDSMs were used as a model system to detect porcine parvovirus antibody in swine sera via flow cytometry, and the results demonstrated a great potential of QDSMs in high-throughput immunoassays. Due to the advantages such as simplicity, low cost, high throughput and eco-friendliness, our developed platform may find wide applications in disease detection, food safety evaluation and environmental assessment. PMID:26190468

  2. Physical Sequestration of Bacillus anthracis in the Pulmonary Capillaries in Terminal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouvion, Gregory; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Khun, Huot; Moya-Nilges, Marie; Roux, Pascal; Latroche, Claire; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas; Huerre, Michel; Chrétien, Fabrice; Goossens, Pierre L

    2016-07-15

    The lung is the terminal target of Bacillus anthracis before death, whatever the route of infection (cutaneous, inhalational, or digestive). During a cutaneous infection in absence of toxins, we observed encapsulated bacteria colonizing the alveolar capillary network, bacteria and hemorrhages in alveolar and bronchiolar spaces, and hypoxic foci in the lung (endothelial cells) and brain (neurons and neuropil). Circulating encapsulated bacteria were as chains of approximately 13 µm in length. Bacteria of such size were immediately trapped within the lung capillary network, but bacteria of shorter length were not. Controlling lung-targeted pathology would be beneficial for anthrax treatment. PMID:26977051

  3. Bacillus anthracis infections – new possibilities of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Żakowska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction and objective[/b]. [i]Bacillus anthracis[/i] is one of biological agents which may be used in bioterrorism attacks. The aim of this study a review of the new treatment possibilities of anthrax, with particular emphasis on the treatment of pulmonary anthrax. [b]Abbreviated description of the state of knowledge[/b]. Pulmonary anthrax, as the most dangerous clinical form of the disease, is also extremely difficult to treat. Recently, considerable progress in finding new drugs and suitable therapy for anthrax has been achieved, for example, new antibiotics worth to mentioning, levofloxacin, daptomycin, gatifloxacin and dalbavancin. However, alternative therapeutic options should also be considered, among them the antimicrobial peptides, characterized by lack of inducible mechanisms of pathogen resistance. Very promising research considers bacteriophages lytic enzymes against selected bacteria species, including antibiotic-resistant strains. [b]Results[/b]. Interesting results were obtained using monoclonal antibodies: raxibacumab, cAb29 or cocktails of antibodies. The application of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides to boost the immune response elicited by Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed and CMG2 protein complexes, also produced satisfying therapy results. Furthermore, the IFN-α and IFN-β, PA-dominant negative mutant, human inter-alpha inhibitor proteins and LF inhibitors in combination with ciprofloxacin, also showed very promising results. [b]Conclusions[/b]. Recently, progress has been achieved in inhalation anthrax treatment. The most promising new possibilities include: new antibiotics, peptides and bacteriophages enzymes, monoclonal antibodies, antigen PA mutants, and inter alpha inhibitors applications. In the case of the possibility of bioterrorist attacks, the examination of inhalation anthrax treatment should be intensively continued.

  4. New aspects of the infection mechanisms of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakowska, Dorota; Bartoszcze, Michał; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata; Kocik, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    Articles concerning new aspects of B. anthracis mechanisms of infection were reviewed. It was found, that the hair follicle plays an important role in the spore germination process. The hair follicle represent an important portal of entry in the course of the cutaneous form of disease infections. After mouse exposition to aerosol of spores prepared from B. anthracis strains, an increase in the level of TNF-α cytokines was observed. The TNF-α cytokines were produced after intrusion into the host by the microorganism. This process may play a significant role in the induced migration of infected cells APCs (Antigen Presenting Cells) via chemotactic signals to the lymph nodes. It was explained that IgG, which binds to the spore surface, activates the adaptive immune system response. As a result, the release C3b opsonin from the spore surface, and mediating of C3 protein fragments of B. anthracis spores phagocytosis by human macrophages, was observed. The genes coding germination spores protein in mutant strains of B. anthracis MIGD was a crucial discovery. According to this, it could be assumed that the activity of B. anthracis spores germination process is dependent upon the sleB, cwlJ1 and cwlJ2 genes, which code the GSLEs lithic enzymes. It was also discovered that the specific antibody for PA20, which binds to the PA20 antigenic determinant, are able to block further PA83 proteolytic fission on the surface of cells. This process neutralized PA functions and weakened the activity of free PA20, which is produced during the PA83 enzyme fission process. Interaction between PA63 monomer and LF may be helpful in the PA63 oligomerization and grouping process, and the creation of LF/PA63 complexes may be a part of an alternative process of assembling the anthrax toxin on the surface of cells. It was found that actin-dependent endocytosis plays an important role in the PA heptamerisation process and leads to blocking the toxin activity. Chaperones, a protein derived from

  5. Colonic immune suppression, barrier dysfunction, and dysbiosis by gastrointestinal bacillus anthracis Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaíma L Lightfoot

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI anthrax results from the ingestion of Bacillus anthracis. Herein, we investigated the pathogenesis of GI anthrax in animals orally infected with toxigenic non-encapsulated B. anthracis Sterne strain (pXO1+ pXO2- spores that resulted in rapid animal death. B. anthracis Sterne induced significant breakdown of intestinal barrier function and led to gut dysbiosis, resulting in systemic dissemination of not only B. anthracis, but also of commensals. Disease progression significantly correlated with the deterioration of innate and T cell functions. Our studies provide critical immunologic and physiologic insights into the pathogenesis of GI anthrax infection, whereupon cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs in immune cells may play a central role in promoting dysfunctional immune responses against this deadly pathogen.

  6. DNA synthesis in toluene-treated bacteriophage-infected minicells of Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateriophage (phi29, SPP1, or SP01)-infected, toluene-treated minicells of Bacillus subtilis are capable of limited amounts of non-replicative DNA synthesis as measured by incorporation of [3H]dTTP into a trichloroacetic acid-precipitable form. The [3H]dTTP is covalently incorporated into small DNA fragments which result from the degradation of a small percentage of the infecting phage genomes (molecular weights in the range of 2.105). Short exposure of the DNA molecules containing the incorporated [3H]dTMP to Escherichia coli exonuclease III results in over 90% of the [3H]dTMP being converted to a trichloroacetic acid-soluble form. The synthesis is totally dependent on host-cell enzymes and is not inhibited by the addition of chloramphenicol, rifampicin, nalidixic acid and mitomycin C and only slightly (approx. 20%) inhibited by the addition of 6-(p-hydroxyphenylazo)-uracil. (Auth.)

  7. Transcriptome of the lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) larval midgut and its response to infection by bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcriptomic profiles of the serious lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, a biopesticide commonly used for its control in nature. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of ...

  8. Genome Sequence of Bacillus pumilus Strain Bonn, Isolated from an Anthrax-Like Necrotic Skin Infection Site of a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Grass, Gregor; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Molitor, Ernst; Götte, Natascha; Antwerpen, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Bacillus pumilus strain Bonn associated with human skin infection. B. pumilus Bonn was isolated from a carbuncle-like necrotic site, resembling cutaneous anthrax, on the back of the hand of a 10-year-old child.

  9. Genome Sequence of Bacillus pumilus Strain Bonn, Isolated from an Anthrax-Like Necrotic Skin Infection Site of a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, Gregor; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Molitor, Ernst; Götte, Natascha; Antwerpen, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Bacillus pumilus strain Bonn associated with human skin infection. B. pumilus Bonn was isolated from a carbuncle-like necrotic site, resembling cutaneous anthrax, on the back of the hand of a 10-year-old child. PMID:26868410

  10. The role of anthrolysin O in gut epithelial barrier disruption during Bacillus anthracis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Brian L; Lodolce, James P; Kolodziej, Lauren E; Boone, David L; Tang, Wei Jen

    2010-04-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax, caused by the bacterial infection of Bacillus anthracis, posts a significant bioterrorism threat by its relatively high mortality rate in humans. Different from inhalational anthrax by the route of infection, accumulating evidence indicates the bypass of vegetative bacteria across GI epithelium is required to initiate GI anthrax. Previously, we reported that purified anthrolysin O (ALO), instead of tripartite anthrax edema and lethal toxins, is capable of disrupting gut epithelial tight junctions and barrier function in cultured cells. Here, we show that ALO can disrupt intestinal tissue barrier function in an ex vivo mouse model. To explore the effects of ALO in a cell culture model of B. anthracis infection, we showed that anthrax bacteria can effectively reduce the monolayer integrity of human Caco-2 brush-border expressor (C2BBE) cells based on the reduced transepithelial resistance and the increased leakage of fluorescent dye. This disruption is likely caused by tight junction dysfunction observed by the reorganization of the tight junction protein occludin. Consequently, we observe significant passage of vegetative anthrax bacteria across C2BBE cells. This barrier disruption and bacterial crossover requires ALO since ALO-deficient B. anthracis strains fail to induce monolayer dysfunction and allow the passage of anthrax bacteria. Together these findings point to a pivotal role for ALO within the establishment of GI anthrax infection and the initial bypass of the epithelial barrier. PMID:20188700

  11. Detection of Anthrax Toxin in the Serum of Animals Infected with Bacillus anthracis by Using Engineered Immunoassays

    OpenAIRE

    Mabry, Robert; Brasky, Kathleen; Geiger, Robert; Carrion, Ricardo; Hubbard, Gene B; Leppla, Stephen; Patterson, Jean L.; Georgiou, George; Iverson, B L

    2006-01-01

    Several strategies that target anthrax toxin are being developed as therapies for infection by Bacillus anthracis. Although the action of the tripartite anthrax toxin has been extensively studied in vitro, relatively little is known about the presence of toxins during an infection in vivo. We developed a series of sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for detection of both the protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF) components of the anthrax exotoxin in serum. ...

  12. Fatal Burkholderia pseudomallei infection initially reported as a Bacillus species, Ohio, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doker, Thomas J; Quinn, Celia L; Salehi, Ellen D; Sherwood, Joshua J; Benoit, Tina J; Glass Elrod, Mindy; Gee, Jay E; Shadomy, Sean V; Bower, William A; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Walke, Henry T; Blaney, David D; DiOrio, Mary S

    2014-10-01

    A fatal case of melioidosis was diagnosed in Ohio one month after culture results were initially reported as a Bacillus species. To identify a source of infection and assess risk in patient contacts, we abstracted patient charts; interviewed physicians and contacts; genetically characterized the isolate; performed a Burkholderia pseudomallei antibody indirect hemagglutination assay on household contacts and pets to assess seropositivity; and collected household plant, soil, liquid, and insect samples for culturing and real-time polymerase chain reaction testing. Family members and pets tested were seronegative for B. pseudomallei. Environmental samples were negative by real-time polymerase chain reaction and culture. Although the patient never traveled internationally, the isolate genotype was consistent with an isolate that originated in Southeast Asia. This investigation identified the fifth reported locally acquired non-laboratory melioidosis case in the contiguous United States. Physicians and laboratories should be aware of this potentially emerging disease and refer positive cultures to a Laboratory Response Network laboratory. PMID:25092821

  13. Genomics of Bacillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Økstad, Ole Andreas; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    Members of the genus Bacillus are rod-shaped spore-forming bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes, the low G+C gram-positive bacteria. The Bacillus genus was first described and classified by Ferdinand Cohn in Cohn (1872), and Bacillus subtilis was defined as the type species (Soule, 1932). Several Bacilli may be linked to opportunistic infections. However, pathogenicity among Bacillus spp. is mainly a feature of bacteria belonging to the Bacillus cereus group, including B. cereus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus thuringiensis. Here we review the genomics of B. cereus group bacteria in relation to their roles as etiological agents of two food poisoning syndromes (emetic and diarrhoeal).

  14. Global metabolomic analysis of a mammalian host infected with Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chinh T Q; Shetty, Vivekananda; Maresso, Anthony W

    2015-12-01

    Whereas DNA provides the information to design life and proteins provide the materials to construct it, the metabolome can be viewed as the physiology that powers it. As such, metabolomics, the field charged with the study of the dynamic small-molecule fluctuations that occur in response to changing biology, is now being used to study the basis of disease. Here, we describe a comprehensive metabolomic analysis of a systemic bacterial infection using Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax disease, as the model pathogen. An organ and blood analysis identified approximately 400 metabolites, including several key classes of lipids involved in inflammation, as being suppressed by B. anthracis. Metabolite changes were detected as early as 1 day postinfection, well before the onset of disease or the spread of bacteria to organs, which testifies to the sensitivity of this methodology. Functional studies using pharmacologic inhibition of host phospholipases support the idea of a role of these key enzymes and lipid mediators in host survival during anthrax disease. Finally, the results are integrated to provide a comprehensive picture of how B. anthracis alters host physiology. Collectively, the results of this study provide a blueprint for using metabolomics as a platform to identify and study novel host-pathogen interactions that shape the outcome of an infection. PMID:26438791

  15. Roles of Macrophages and Neutrophils in the Early Host Response to Bacillus anthracis Spores in a Mouse Model of Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Cote, Christopher K.; Van Rooijen, Nico; Welkos, Susan L.

    2006-01-01

    The development of new approaches to combat anthrax requires that the pathogenesis and host response to Bacillus anthracis spores be better understood. We investigated the roles that macrophages and neutrophils play in the progression of infection by B. anthracis in a mouse model. Mice were treated with a macrophage depletion agent (liposome-encapsulated clodronate) or with a neutrophil depletion agent (cyclophosphamide or the rat anti-mouse granulocyte monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5), and the a...

  16. Infective endocarditis due to Bacillus cereus in a pregnant female: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mahek; Patnaik, Soumya; Wongrakpanich, Supakanya; Alhamshari, Yaser; Alnabelsi, Talal

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of infective endocarditis during pregnancy is around 0.006% with high maternal and fetal mortality. Bacillus cereus is an extremely rare cause for endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers (IVDA) or those with valvular disease or devices such as pacemakers. We report a case of B. cereus endocarditis, which, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reported in pregnancy. A 30-year-old, 25-week pregnant female presented with right shoulder pain, swelling and erythema on the lateral aspect of deltoid muscle from large abscess over her deltoid muscle. She was found to have a vegetation on the native tricuspid valve. Cultures from abscess fluid and blood cultures grew B. cereus, she was appropriately treated with antimicrobials and had favorable outcomes. There are cereus endocarditis reported but none during pregnancy. When cultures grow unusual organisms the case must be thoroughly investigated. This case illustrates a rare situation (endocarditis in pregnancy) with an unusual outcome (B. cereus) on an uncommon valve (tricuspid valve). PMID:26793477

  17. Infective endocarditis due to Bacillus cereus in a pregnant female: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahek Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of infective endocarditis during pregnancy is around 0.006% with high maternal and fetal mortality. Bacillus cereus is an extremely rare cause for endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers (IVDA or those with valvular disease or devices such as pacemakers. We report a case of B. cereus endocarditis, which, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reported in pregnancy. A 30-year-old, 25-week pregnant female presented with right shoulder pain, swelling and erythema on the lateral aspect of deltoid muscle from large abscess over her deltoid muscle. She was found to have a vegetation on the native tricuspid valve. Cultures from abscess fluid and blood cultures grew B. cereus, she was appropriately treated with antimicrobials and had favorable outcomes. There are <20 cases of B. cereus endocarditis reported but none during pregnancy. When cultures grow unusual organisms the case must be thoroughly investigated. This case illustrates a rare situation (endocarditis in pregnancy with an unusual outcome (B. cereus on an uncommon valve (tricuspid valve.

  18. Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis infection in New Zealand white rabbits: natural history and intravenous levofloxacin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Steven B; Hatkin, Joshua M; Dyer, David N; Orr, Steven A; Pitt, M Louise M

    2010-12-01

    The natural history for inhalational Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain) exposure in New Zealand white rabbits was investigated to better identify potential, early biomarkers of anthrax. Twelve SPF Bordetella-free rabbits were exposed to 150 LD(50) aerosolized B. anthracis spores, and clinical signs, body temperature, complete blood count, bacteremia, and presence of protective antigen in the blood (that is, antigenemia) were examined. The development of antigenemia and bacteremia coincided and preceded both pyrexia and inversion of the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, an indicator of infection. Antigenemia was determined within 1 h by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, compared with the 24-h traditional culture needed for bacteremia determination. Rabbits appeared clinically normal until shortly before succumbing to anthrax approximately 47 h after challenge or approximately 22 h after antigenemia, which suggests a relatively narrow therapeutic window of opportunity. To evaluate the therapeutic rabbit model, B. anthracis-exposed rabbits were treated (after determination of antigenemia and later confirmed to be bacteremic) intravenously with the fluoroquinolone antibiotic levofloxacin for 5 d at a total daily dose of 25 or 12.5 mg/kg, resulting in nearly 90% and 70% survival, respectively, to the study end (28 d after challenge). The peak level for 12.5 mg/kg was equivalent to that observed for a 500-mg daily levofloxacin dose in humans. These results suggest that intravenous levofloxacin is an effective therapeutic against inhalational anthrax. Taken together, our findings indicate that antigenemia is a viable and early biomarker for B. anthracis infection that can be used as a treatment trigger to allow for timely intervention against this highly pathogenic disease. PMID:21262133

  19. Characterization and comparative genomic analysis of bacteriophages infecting members of the Bacillus cereus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Shin, Hakdong; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-05-01

    The Bacillus cereus group phages infecting B. cereus, B. anthracis, and B. thuringiensis (Bt) have been studied at the molecular level and, recently, at the genomic level to control the pathogens B. cereus and B. anthracis and to prevent phage contamination of the natural insect pesticide Bt. A comparative phylogenetic analysis has revealed three different major phage groups with different morphologies (Myoviridae for group I, Siphoviridae for group II, and Tectiviridae for group III), genome size (group I > group II > group III), and lifestyle (virulent for group I and temperate for group II and III). A subsequent phage genome comparison using a dot plot analysis showed that phages in each group are highly homologous, substantiating the grouping of B. cereus phages. Endolysin is a host lysis protein that contains two conserved domains: a cell-wall-binding domain (CBD) and an enzymatic activity domain (EAD). In B. cereus sensu lato phage group I, four different endolysin groups have been detected, according to combinations of two types of CBD and four types of EAD. Group I phages have two copies of tail lysins and one copy of endolysin, but the functions of the tail lysins are still unknown. In the B. cereus sensu lato phage group II, the B. anthracis phages have been studied and applied for typing and rapid detection of pathogenic host strains. In the B. cereus sensu lato phage group III, the B. thuringiensis phages Bam35 and GIL01 have been studied to understand phage entry and lytic switch regulation mechanisms. In this review, we suggest that further study of the B. cereus group phages would be useful for various phage applications, such as biocontrol, typing, and rapid detection of the pathogens B. cereus and B. anthracis and for the prevention of phage contamination of the natural insect pesticide Bt. PMID:24264384

  20. Invasive Bacillus cereus Infection in a Renal Transplant Patient: A Case Report and Review

    OpenAIRE

    Susan John; John Neary; Lee, Christine H

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a common cause of gastrointestinal diseases. The majority of individuals with B cereus-related food poisoning recover without any specific treatment. It can, however, rarely cause invasive disease in immunocompromised patients.

  1. Invasive Bacillus cereus infection in a renal transplant patient: A case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Susan; Neary, John; Lee, Christine H

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a common cause of gastrointestinal diseases. The majority of individuals with B cereus-related food poisoning recover without any specific treatment. It can, however, rarely cause invasive disease in immunocompromised patients. PMID:24294281

  2. Anthrax toxin targeting of myeloid cells through the CMG2 receptor is essential for establishment of Bacillus anthracis infections in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shihui; Miller-Randolph, Sharmina; Crown, Devorah; Moayeri, Mahtab; Sastalla, Inka; Okugawa, Shu; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis kills through a combination of bacterial infection and toxemia. Anthrax toxin working via the CMG2 receptor mediates lethality late in infection, but its roles early in infection remain unclear. We generated myeloid-lineage specific CMG2-deficient mice to examine the roles of macrophages, neutrophils, and other myeloid cells in anthrax pathogenesis. Macrophages and neutrophils isolated from these mice were resistant to anthrax toxin. However, the myeloid-specific CMG2-defic...

  3. Isolation and characterization of a Siphoviridae phage infecting Bacillus megaterium from a heavily trafficked holy site in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, B A; Askora, Ahmed; Abo-Senna, Amel S M

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized a Siphoviridae phage isolated from the vicinity of a religious structure (Kaaba) in Makkah, Saudi Arabia. The phage was designated as φBM and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, restriction digestion of its DNA, and host range. Electron micrograph indicated that φBM phage has an icosahedral head with diameter of about 65 ± 5 nm and long, non-contractile tail with length of about 300 ± 10 nm and width of about 17 ± 2 nm, respectively. On the basis of the φBM phage morphology, we thus propose that φBM represents a member of Siphoviridae phages. The φBM phage was shown to be able to infect Bacillus megaterium and two other Bacillus species and has no effect on other tested bacteria. φBM was stable over the pH range of 5-9, chloroform resistant and stable at 4 °C. A one-step growth experiment showed a latent period of about 40 min and a burst size of approximately 65 per infected cell. The purified bacteriophage appeared to consist of ten proteins. The genome size was estimated to be ∼38 kb. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the isolation of a bacteriophage from Kaaba a heavily trafficked holy site in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25624065

  4. Disseminated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin and Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infections-Implications on Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pamela Pw

    2015-08-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is a live vaccine and has the potential to cause local disease and systemic dissemination in immunocompromised hosts, including infants who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through vertical transmission, and patients with primary immunodeficiencies (PID) such as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), hyper-IgM syndrome, and defects of the IL12- IFNγ axis (Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases, MSMD). Disseminated BCG is extremely difficult to treat. The chance of complete eradication is low unless functional immune response is restored by haematopoietic stem cell transplant. Prolonged use of anti-mycobacterial drugs often causes organ toxicities and drug resistance. Inflammatory complications which develop upon immunoreconstitution post-transplant may necessitate immunosuppressive treatment, which adversely affect immune recovery and increases risks of opportunistic infections. Multiple BCG reactivations can occur in patients with CGD and MSMD, and BCG can remain latent until reactivations take place in adulthood and manifest as disease. It is important for neonatologists, general practitioners, primary care clinicians and nurses working in maternal and child care centres to be aware of BCG-related complications, which may be the first sign of an underlying immunodeficiency. As neonatal BCG is included in standard vaccination schedule in many countries, it is a challenge to identify and avoid administration of BCG to infants who potentially have PIDs. Deferring BCG vaccination is recently advocated to protect highly vulnerable populations, but the appropriate strategy is yet to be determined. Newborn screening for SCID offers a potential to avoid this complication, if an integrated system of screening and vaccination can be organised. PMID:26477962

  5. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin increases the susceptibility of Crioceris quatuordecimpunctata to Beauveria bassiana infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spotted asparagus beetle, Crioceris quatuordecimpunctata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is one of the most devastating pests of asparagus in China and elsewhere. In this study, we investigated the interaction of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin and the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bas...

  6. Human monoclonal antibodies against anthrax lethal factor and protective antigen act independently to protect against Bacillus anthracis infection and enhance endogenous immunity to anthrax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, Mark T.; Li, Han; Williamson, E. Diane; LeButt, Chris S.; Flick-Smith, Helen C.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Westra, Hans; Galloway, Darrell; Mateczun, Alfred; Goldman, Stanley; Groen, Herman; Baillie, Les W. J.

    2007-01-01

    The unpredictable nature of bioterrorism and the absence of real-time detection systems have highlighted the need for an efficient postexposure therapy for Bacillus anthracis infection. One approach is passive immunization through the administration of antibodies that mitigate the biological action

  7. Bacillus anthracis HssRS signaling to HrtAB regulates heme resistance during infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stauff, Devin L; Skaar, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis proliferates to high levels within vertebrate tissues during the pathogenesis of anthrax. This growth is facilitated by the acquisition of nutrient iron from host heme. However, heme acquisition can lead to the accumulation of toxic amounts of heme within B. anthracis. Here, we show that B. anthracis resists heme toxicity by sensing heme through the HssRS two-component system, which regulates expression of the heme-detoxifying transporter HrtAB. In addition, we demonstrate ...

  8. Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Infection in New Zealand White Rabbits: Natural History and Intravenous Levofloxacin Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, Steven B.; Hatkin, Joshua M; Dyer, David N; Orr, Steven A.; Pitt, M. Louise M.

    2010-01-01

    The natural history for inhalational Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain) exposure in New Zealand white rabbits was investigated to better identify potential, early biomarkers of anthrax. Twelve SPF Bordetella-free rabbits were exposed to 150 LD50 aerosolized B. anthracis spores, and clinical signs, body temperature, complete blood count, bacteremia, and presence of protective antigen in the blood (that is, antigenemia) were examined. The development of antigenemia and bacteremia coincided and pr...

  9. Oral Vaccination of Guinea Pigs with a Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Vaccine in a Lipid Matrix Protects against Aerosol Infection with Virulent M. bovis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Simon; Cross, Martin L; Nadian, Allan; Vipond, Julia; Court, Pinar; Williams, Ann; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Aldwell, Frank E.; Chambers, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Increased incidence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in the United Kingdom caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis is a cause of considerable economic loss to farmers and the government. The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) represents a wildlife source of recurrent M. bovis infections of cattle in the United Kingdom, and its vaccination against TB with M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attractive disease control option. Delivery of BCG in oral bait holds the best prospect for vaccina...

  10. Proteomics Reveals that Proteins Expressed During the Early Stage of Bacillus anthracis Infection Are Potential Targets for the Development of Vaccines and Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Ming Huang; Craig A. Elmets; De-chu C. Tang; Fuming Li; Nabiha Yusuf

    2004-01-01

    In this review, we advance a new concept in developing vaccines and/or drugs to target specific proteins expressed during the early stage of Bacillus anthracis (an thrax) infection and address existing challenges to this concept. Three proteins (immune inhibitor A, GPR-like spore protease, and alanine racemase) initially identified by proteomics in our laboratory were found to have differential expres sions during anthrax spore germination and early outgrowth. Other studies of different bacillus strains indicate that these three proteins are involved in either germination or cytotoxicity of spores, suggesting that they may serve as potential targets for the design of anti-anthrax vaccines and drugs.

  11. Infection of Tribolium castaneum with Bacillus thuringiensis: quantification of bacterial replication within cadavers, transmission via cannibalism, and inhibition of spore germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Höfling, Christina; Futo, Momir; Scharsack, Jörn P; Kurtz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Reproduction within a host and transmission to the next host are crucial for the virulence and fitness of pathogens. Nevertheless, basic knowledge about such parameters is often missing from the literature, even for well-studied bacteria, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, an endospore-forming insect pathogen, which infects its hosts via the oral route. To characterize bacterial replication success, we made use of an experimental oral infection system for the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and developed a flow cytometric assay for the quantification of both spore ingestion by the individual beetle larvae and the resulting spore load after bacterial replication and resporulation within cadavers. On average, spore numbers increased 460-fold, showing that Bacillus thuringiensis grows and replicates successfully in insect cadavers. By inoculating cadaver-derived spores and spores from bacterial stock cultures into nutrient medium, we next investigated outgrowth characteristics of vegetative cells and found that cadaver-derived bacteria showed reduced growth compared to bacteria from the stock cultures. Interestingly, this reduced growth was a consequence of inhibited spore germination, probably originating from the host and resulting in reduced host mortality in subsequent infections by cadaver-derived spores. Nevertheless, we further showed that Bacillus thuringiensis transmission was possible via larval cannibalism when no other food was offered. These results contribute to our understanding of the ecology of Bacillus thuringiensis as an insect pathogen. PMID:26386058

  12. Bacillus cereus as a nongastrointestinal pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Pavani G.

    2014-01-01

    The potential of Bacillus cereus to cause systemic infections is of serious concern. Apart from Gastrointestinal infections, it causes respiratory tract infections, nosocomial infections, eye infections, CNS infections, cutaneous infections, endocarditis, osteomyelitis and urinary tract infections. The potential of this bacterium to cause life threatening infections has increased. Trauma is an important predisposing factor for Bacillus cereus infections. The maintenance of skin and mucous mem...

  13. Protection Afforded by Fluoroquinolones in Animal Models of Respiratory Infections with Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W; Moen, Scott T; Healy, Daniel; Pawlik, Jennifer E; Taormina, Joanna; Hardcastle, Jason; Thomas, John M; Lawrence, William S; Ponce, Cindy; Chatuev, Bagram M; Gnade, Bryan T; Foltz, Sheri M; Agar, Stacy L; Sha, Jian; Klimpel, Gary R; Kirtley, Michelle L; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Chopra, Ashok K

    2010-01-01

    Successful treatment of inhalation anthrax, pneumonic plague and tularemia can be achieved with fluoroquinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, and initiation of treatment is most effective when administered as soon as possible following exposure. Bacillus anthracis Ames, Yersinia pestis CO92, and Francisella tularensis SCHU S4 have equivalent susceptibility in vitro to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin (minimal inhibitory concentration is 0.03 μg/ml); however, limited information is available regarding in vivo susceptibility of these infectious agents to the fluoroquinolone antibiotics in small animal models. Mice, guinea pig, and rabbit models have been developed to evaluate the protective efficacy of antibiotic therapy against these life-threatening infections. Our results indicated that doses of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin required to protect mice against inhalation anthrax were approximately 18-fold higher than the doses of levofloxacin required to protect against pneumonic plague and tularemia. Further, the critical period following aerosol exposure of mice to either B. anthracis spores or Y. pestis was 24 h, while mice challenged with F. tularensis could be effectively protected when treatment was delayed for as long as 72 h postchallenge. In addition, it was apparent that prolonged antibiotic treatment was important in the effective treatment of inhalation anthrax in mice, but short-term treatment of mice with pneumonic plague or tularemia infections were usually successful. These results provide effective antibiotic dosages in mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits and lay the foundation for the development and evaluation of combinational treatment modalities. PMID:21127743

  14. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Infection in NADPH Oxidase Deficiency: Defective Mycobacterial Sequestration and Granuloma Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Deffert, Christine; Schäppi, Michela G.; Pache, Jean-Claude; Cachat, Julien; Vesin, Dominique; Bisig, Ruth; Ma Mulone, Xiaojuan; Kelkka, Tiina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Garcia, Irène; Olleros, Maria-Luisa; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) lack generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2. CGD is an immune deficiency that leads to frequent infections with certain pathogens; this is well documented for S. aureus and A. fumigatus, but less clear for mycobacteria. We therefore performed an extensive literature search which yielded 297 cases of CGD patients with mycobacterial infections; M. bovis BCG was most commonly described (74%). The rela...

  15. Bacillus calmette-guerin infection in NADPH oxidase deficiency: defective mycobacterial sequestration and granuloma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffert, Christine; Schäppi, Michela G; Pache, Jean-Claude; Cachat, Julien; Vesin, Dominique; Bisig, Ruth; Ma Mulone, Xiaojuan; Kelkka, Tiina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Garcia, Irene; Olleros, Maria L; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2014-09-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) lack generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2. CGD is an immune deficiency that leads to frequent infections with certain pathogens; this is well documented for S. aureus and A. fumigatus, but less clear for mycobacteria. We therefore performed an extensive literature search which yielded 297 cases of CGD patients with mycobacterial infections; M. bovis BCG was most commonly described (74%). The relationship between NOX2 deficiency and BCG infection however has never been studied in a mouse model. We therefore investigated BCG infection in three different mouse models of CGD: Ncf1 mutants in two different genetic backgrounds and Cybb knock-out mice. In addition, we investigated a macrophage-specific rescue (transgenic expression of Ncf1 under the control of the CD68 promoter). Wild-type mice did not develop severe disease upon BCG injection. In contrast, all three types of CGD mice were highly susceptible to BCG, as witnessed by a severe weight loss, development of hemorrhagic pneumonia, and a high mortality (∼ 50%). Rescue of NOX2 activity in macrophages restored BCG resistance, similar as seen in wild-type mice. Granulomas from mycobacteria-infected wild-type mice generated ROS, while granulomas from CGD mice did not. Bacterial load in CGD mice was only moderately increased, suggesting that it was not crucial for the observed phenotype. CGD mice responded with massively enhanced cytokine release (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-12) early after BCG infection, which might account for severity of the disease. Finally, in wild-type mice, macrophages formed clusters and restricted mycobacteria to granulomas, while macrophages and mycobacteria were diffusely distributed in lung tissue from CGD mice. Our results demonstrate that lack of the NADPH oxidase leads to a markedly increased severity of BCG infection through mechanisms including increased cytokine production and

  16. Bacillus calmette-guerin infection in NADPH oxidase deficiency: defective mycobacterial sequestration and granuloma formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Deffert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD lack generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS through the phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2. CGD is an immune deficiency that leads to frequent infections with certain pathogens; this is well documented for S. aureus and A. fumigatus, but less clear for mycobacteria. We therefore performed an extensive literature search which yielded 297 cases of CGD patients with mycobacterial infections; M. bovis BCG was most commonly described (74%. The relationship between NOX2 deficiency and BCG infection however has never been studied in a mouse model. We therefore investigated BCG infection in three different mouse models of CGD: Ncf1 mutants in two different genetic backgrounds and Cybb knock-out mice. In addition, we investigated a macrophage-specific rescue (transgenic expression of Ncf1 under the control of the CD68 promoter. Wild-type mice did not develop severe disease upon BCG injection. In contrast, all three types of CGD mice were highly susceptible to BCG, as witnessed by a severe weight loss, development of hemorrhagic pneumonia, and a high mortality (∼ 50%. Rescue of NOX2 activity in macrophages restored BCG resistance, similar as seen in wild-type mice. Granulomas from mycobacteria-infected wild-type mice generated ROS, while granulomas from CGD mice did not. Bacterial load in CGD mice was only moderately increased, suggesting that it was not crucial for the observed phenotype. CGD mice responded with massively enhanced cytokine release (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-12 early after BCG infection, which might account for severity of the disease. Finally, in wild-type mice, macrophages formed clusters and restricted mycobacteria to granulomas, while macrophages and mycobacteria were diffusely distributed in lung tissue from CGD mice. Our results demonstrate that lack of the NADPH oxidase leads to a markedly increased severity of BCG infection through mechanisms including increased cytokine

  17. Protective effect of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens against infections of Citrus aurantium seedlings by Phoma tracheiphila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai-Grami, L; Ben Slimane, I; Mnari-Hattab, M; Rezgui, S; Aouani, M A; Hajlaoui, M R; Limam, F

    2014-02-01

    Isolate TEB1 an antagonistic endophytic bacterium, obtained from citrus leaves and identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by 16S rDNA sequencing, was used for the biological control of mal secco disease of Citrus aurantium seedlings caused by the mitosporic fungus Phoma tracheiphila. The isolate TEB1 exhibited a good in vitro activity against P. tracheiphila in dual cultures as well as with the well diffusion method. C. aurantium seedlings watered with a suspension of TEB1 cells showed a reduction of 53.61 and 48.63% in disease severity and incidence, respectively. A PCR test with specific primers was performed 365 days after inoculation and P. tracheiphila was detected along the whole stem in inoculated control plant while no amplification product was obtained in TEB1 treated seedlings. Molecular analysis of TEB1 revealed a positive amplification of fenD and ituC genes responsible of the biosynthesis of fengycin and iturin lipopeptides, respectively. Moreover, observations by optical microscope showed that TEB1 reduced by 55% the germination of P. tracheiphila conidia and exhibited a marked effect on mycelia structure. Data suggest that lipopeptides produced by the bacterium interact with the cytoplasmic membrane of the fungus causing pore formation. TEB1 appears a potential candidate for the biological control of citrus mal secco disease. PMID:23990072

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Host Responses to Four Different Types of Microorganisms in Bombyx Mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tingcai; Lin, Ping; Huang, Lulin; Wu, Yuqian; Jin, Shengkai; Liu, Chun; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-01-01

    Several pathogenic microorganisms have been used to investigate the genome-wide transcriptional responses of Bombyx mori to infection. However, studies have so far each focused on one microorganism, and systematic genome-wide comparison of transcriptional responses to different pathogenic microorganisms has not been undertaken. Here, we surveyed transcriptional responses of B. mori to its natural bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens, Bacillus bombyseptieus, B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), and Beauveria bassiana, respectively, and to nonpathogenic Escherichia coli, by microarray analysis. In total, the expression of 2,436, 1,804, 1,743, and 912 B. mori genes was modulated by infection with B. bombyseptieus, BmNPV, B. bassiana, and E. coli, respectively. Notably, the expression of 620, 400, 177, or 165 of these genes was only modulated by infection with B. bombyseptieus, BmNPV, B. bassiana, or E. coli, respectively. In contrast to the expression of genes related to juvenile hormone synthesis and metabolism, that of genes encoding juvenile hormone binding proteins was microorganism-specific. Three basal metabolic pathways were modulated by infection with any of the four microorganisms, and 3, 14, 5, and 2 metabolic pathways were specifically modulated by infection with B. bombyseptieus, BmNPV, B. bassiana, and E. coli, respectively. Interestingly, BmNPV infection modulated the JAK/STAT signaling pathway, whereas both the Imd and Toll signaling pathways were modulated by infection with B. bombyseptieus, B. bassiana, or E. coli These results elucidate potential molecular mechanisms of the host response to different microorganisms, and provide a foundation for further work on host-pathogen interaction. PMID:27382132

  19. Anti-Infective Metabolites of a Newly Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis KL1 Associated with Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees.), a Traditional Medicinal Herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudipta; Yasmin, Sahana; Ghosh, Subhadeep; Bhattacharya, Somesankar; Banerjee, Debdulal

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate endophytic bacteria possessing anti-infective property from Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees.), a well-known medicinal plant. A total of 23 strains were isolated from this plant among which the strain KL1, isolated from surface-sterilized leaf of this medicinal herb, showed broad-spectrum antagonism against an array of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial pathogens. Ethyl acetate extract of KL1-fermented media yielded a greenish amorphous substance retaining anti-infective property. Solvent-extracted crude material was separated by thin-layer chromatography, and the active ingredient was located by autobiogram analysis. The purified anti-infective compound was found as anthracene derivative as analyzed by ultraviolet and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The strain was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis KL1 from cultural, physiochemical, and molecular aspects. The above results indicate the pharmaceutical potential of the candidate isolate. PMID:26997870

  20. Bacillus cereus as a nongastrointestinal pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavani G.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Bacillus cereus to cause systemic infections is of serious concern. Apart from Gastrointestinal infections, it causes respiratory tract infections, nosocomial infections, eye infections, CNS infections, cutaneous infections, endocarditis, osteomyelitis and urinary tract infections. The potential of this bacterium to cause life threatening infections has increased. Trauma is an important predisposing factor for Bacillus cereus infections. The maintenance of skin and mucous membrane integrity limits infection by this micro-organism. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(1.000: 28-30

  1. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-inoculation at different time points influences the outcome of C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dong-Hua; Wang, Ji-Chun; Liu, Jun; Du, Yun-Ting; Cui, Li-Wang; Cao, Ya-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine. We performed a series of co-infection experiments with BCG-Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi Landau, 1965 AS using C57BL/6 mice to analyse whether BCG can affect the development of protective immunity to infection with Plasmodium spp. and the mechanism of this protection. We divided mice into four groups: BCG-inoculation 4 weeks prior to P. c. chabaudi AS infection (B-4w-Pc); simultaneous BCG-inoculation and P. c. chabaudi AS infection (Pc+B); BCG-inoculation 3 days post P. c. chabaudi AS (Pc-3-B) infection; and mono-P. c. chabaudi AS infection as control (Pc). The parasitemia level in the B-4w-Pc group was noticeably higher than control group at 6-19 days post infection (dpi). Compared with the control group, the proportion of CD4(+)CD69(+) T cells was significantly reduced 5, 8 and 12 dpi, but the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs was significantly increased in the B-4w-Pc group on 5 and 8 dpi. The B-4w-Pc group also demonstrated reduced levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α on 5 and 8 dpi and significantly elevated level of IL-10 on 12 dpi. There were significantly fewer mDCs (CD11c(+)CD11b(+)) and pDCs (CD11c(+)B220(+)) in the B-4w-Pc group than the control group at all the time points post infection and the expression of MHC II was noticeably reduced on day 8 pi. Our findings confirmed that BCG inoculation prior to Plasmodium infection resulted in excessive activation and proliferation of Tregs and upregulation of anti-inflammatory mediators, which inhibited establishment of a Th1-dominant immune response during the early stages of Plasmodium infection by inhibiting dendritive cells response. BCG inoculation prior to P. c. chabaudi AS infection may contribute to overgrowth of parasites as well as mortality in mice. PMID:27188912

  2. Disseminated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) infection following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in a patient with Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Arja, R.F.; Gonzalez, B.E.; Jacobs, M.R.; Cabral, L.; Egler, R.; Auletta, J.; Arnold, J.; Cooke, K.R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first case, to our knowledge, of disseminated Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin infection in a child with Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome type II after undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The patient presented 30 days post HSCT with fever and lymphadenitis. Lymph node, blood, and gastric aspirates were positive for M. bovis. The patient received a prolonged treatment course with a combination of isoniazid, levofloxacin, and ethambutol. Her course was further complicated by granulomatous lymphadenitis and otitis media associated with M. bovis that developed during immune suppression taper and immune reconstitution. Ultimately, the patient recovered fully, in association with restoration of immune function, and has completed 12 months of therapy. PMID:24995715

  3. Oral vaccination of guinea pigs with a Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine in a lipid matrix protects against aerosol infection with virulent M. bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Simon; Cross, Martin L; Nadian, Allan; Vipond, Julia; Court, Pinar; Williams, Ann; Hewinson, R Glyn; Aldwell, Frank E; Chambers, Mark A

    2008-08-01

    Increased incidence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in the United Kingdom caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis is a cause of considerable economic loss to farmers and the government. The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) represents a wildlife source of recurrent M. bovis infections of cattle in the United Kingdom, and its vaccination against TB with M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attractive disease control option. Delivery of BCG in oral bait holds the best prospect for vaccinating badgers over a wide geographical area. Using a guinea pig pulmonary challenge model, we evaluated the protective efficacy of candidate badger oral vaccines, based on broth-grown or ball-milled BCG, delivered either as aqueous suspensions or formulated in two lipids with differing fatty acid profiles (one being animal derived and the other being vegetable derived). Protection was determined in terms of increasing body weight after aerosol challenge with virulent M. bovis, reduced dissemination of M. bovis to the spleen, and, in the case of one oral formulation, restricted growth of M. bovis in the lungs. Only oral BCG formulated in lipid gave significant protection. These data point to the potential of the BCG-lipid formulation for further development as a tool for controlling tuberculosis in badgers. PMID:18519560

  4. Bacillus coagulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and, as a result, is often misclassified as lactic acid bacteria such as lactobacillus. In fact, some commercial products ... sporogenes or "spore-forming lactic acid bacterium." Unlike lactic acid bacteria such as lactobacillus or bifidobacteria, Bacillus coagulans forms ...

  5. Influence of dietary probiotic Bacillus TC22 and Prebiotic fructooligosaccharide on growth, immune responses and disease resistance against Vibrio splendidus infection in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yancui; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Ai, Qinghui; Zhang, Yanjiao; Wang, Xiaojie; Liufu, Zhiguo

    2011-09-01

    The effects of probiotic Bacillus TC22 (isolated from intestine of infected sea cucumber) and prebiotic fructooligosaccharide (FOS) on growth, immunity and disease resistance in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus were studied. Six experimental diets were formulated with combinations of three levels of TC22 (0, 107 and 109 CFU g-1 diet) and two levels of FOS (0 and 0.5%) in a 3 × 2 factorial experiment. At the end of the 8-week feeding trial, animals were challenged by injecting Vibrio splendidus. The results revealed that the specific growth rates (SGR) of sea cucumbers were not affected by TC22 and FOS, or the interaction between TC22 and FOS ( P > 0.05). However, there were significant interactions between TC22 and FOS for immune response and disease resistance in sea cucumbers ( P 0.05). Therefore, further studies should examine the effects of combinations of other levels of FOS (> 0.5% or < 0.5%) and TC22 on the immunity and disease resistance of sea cucumbers.

  6. Influence of Dietary Probiotic Bacillus TC22 and Prebiotic Fructooligosaccharide on Growth, Immune Responses and Disease Resistance against Vibrio splendidus Infection in Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yancui; MAI Kangsen; XU Wei; ZHANG Wenbing; AI Qinghui; ZHANG Yanjiao; WANG Xiaojie; LIUFU Zhiguo

    2011-01-01

    The effects of probiotic Bacillus TC22 (isolated from intestine of infected sea cucumber) and prebiotic fructooligosaccharide (FOS) on growth,immunity and disease resistance in sea cucumber Apostichopusjaponicus were studied.Six experimental diets were formulated with combinations of three levels of TC22 (0,107 and 109 CFU g-1 diet) and two levels of FOS (0 and 0.5%) in a 3 × 2 factorial experiment.At the end of the 8-week feeding trial,animals were challenged by injecting Vibrio splendidus.The results revealed that the specific growth rates (SGR) of sea cucumbers were not affected by TC22 and FOS,or the interaction between TC22 and FOS (P>0.05).However,there were significant interactions between TC22 and FOS for immune response and disease resistance in sea cucumbers (P<0.05).When sea cucumbers were fed with TC22 at 109 CFUg-1 feed and 0.5% FOS alone or in combination,the phagocytosis,respiratory burst and phenoloxidase activity of sea cucumber coelomocytes were significantly enhanced; the disease resistance against V.splendidus infection was also increased significantly (P<0.05).However,dietary combination of TC22 at 109 CFUg-1 diet and 0.5% FOS did not yield significantly higher efficiency than either TC22 at 109 CFUg-1 diet or 0.5% FOS used alone (P> 0.05).Therefore,further studies should examine the effects of combinations of other levels of FOS (> 0.5% or < 0.5%) and TC22 on the immunity and disease resistance of sea cucumbers.

  7. Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The events of 11 September 2001 and the subsequent anthrax outbreaks have shown that the West needs to be prepared for an increasing number of terrorist attacks, which may include the use of biological warfare. Bacillus anthracis has long been considered a potential biological warfare agent, and this review will discuss the history of its use as such. It will also cover the biology of this organism and the clinical features of the three disease forms that it can produce: cutaneous, gastrointe...

  8. Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    BOSERET, GÉRALDINE; Linden, Annick; Mainil, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    The literature describes several methods for detection of Bacillus anthracis based on application of specific bacteriophages. The following methods of pahoinpitely are used to identify the causative agent of anthrax: the reaction of bacteriophage titer growth (RBTG), the reaction of phage adsorption (RPA), fagoterapii method (FTM) and fluorescentserological method (FSM). The essence of RBTG consists in the following: if there is the researchform of bacteria presents in the test material, then...

  9. Mutation in alkylhydroperoxidase D gene dramatically decreases persistence of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus calmette-guerin in infected macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farivar Taghi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the leading cause of death from a single bacterial species in the world and is subjected to a highly oxidative environment in its host macrophage and consequently has evolved protective mechanisms against reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates. Alkyl hydroperoxidase D (AhpD is a molecule from these mycobacterial defense systems that has a dual function. It not only works with Alkyl hydroperoxidase C (AhpC in mycobacterial defense system against oxidative stress but also has a role in oxidation/reduction of succinyltransferase B (SucB, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD and AhpC. The present study was undertaken to find out the effects of inactivation of ahpD gene in the intra-macrophage persistence of resulted BCG mutant. Materials and Methods: We did allelic exchange mutagenesis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG and evaluate the effects of this mutagenesis in intracellular persistence of wild type BCG strains and ahpD mutant ones by comparing colony forming units (CFU in infected macrophage. Results: Our findings showed that after producing allelic exchange mutagenesis in ahpD gene of M.bovis BCG a sever decrease in the CFU′s of ahpD mutant BCG strains has been observed and intracellular persistence of ahpD mutant BCG strains decreased significantly. Conclusion: Mutagenesis in ahpD gene will cause significant decrease in intracellular survival of ahpD mutant strains than wild type M.bovis BCG strains and could leads to an inefficiency in pyruvate dehydrogenase pathway and could also impair impairs mycobacterial defense system against oxidative and nitrosative stress.

  10. Phages preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-07-01

    Many bacteriophages (phages) have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here. PMID:25010767

  11. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gillis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteriophages (phages have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here.

  12. Epidemiology of bacillus cereus implied in food contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacillus Cereus is an opportunistic pathogen. It is a causative agent in both gastrointestinal and in non gastrointestinal infections. In this study, 41 strains of Bacillus Cereus were isolated on Polymixin-Mannitol-Egg-Yolk Phenol red Agar (PMYPA) from foods (milk products, pasta, meat). These isolates were characterised and identified by biochemical and molecular tests. Pcr was performed for detection and characterisation of toxins genes in bacillus cereus. (author). 108 refs

  13. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Matthew D.; Wilder, Julie A.; Mega, William M.; Hutt, Julie A.; Kuehl, Philip J.; Valderas, Michelle W.; Chew, Lawrence L.; Liang, Bertrand C.; Squires, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA), one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax). Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively) supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse inject...

  14. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Potential Hazards Exposure of employees to community and nosocomial infections, e.g., Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) . Nosocomial infections are infections that occur from exposure to infectious ...

  15. In vitro and in vivo effects of Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus sp. on Fusarium acuminatum, Botrytis cinerea and Aspergillus niger infecting cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Zdravković

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L is an important member of the Cucurbitaceae family. Production of healthy nursery is necessary for high-quality production of this crop in greenhouses and in fields. With the idea of minimizing the use of pesticides and mineral fertilizers to preserve soil quality, we investigated the effects of plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB on growth promotion and protection of cucumber plants from phytopathogenic fungi. The effects of Pseudomonas spp. strains with different antifungal activities and Bacillus sp. Q10 strain with PGP activity were tested on cucumber plants. Antagonistic activity of Pseudomonas spp. against the growth of several phytopathogenic fungi isolated from cucumber: F. acuminatum, B. cinerea and A. niger, was observed. The influences of overnight cultures, supernatants and heat-stable antifungal factors were tested on the phytopathogenic fungi in vitro. Pseudomonas sp. K35 and K24 strains were more effective than P. chlororaphis Q16 and Pseudomonas sp. K27, showing 70-80% of fungal growth inhibition regardless of culture or fraction applied. The good antagonists that belong to pseudomonads and Bacillus sp. Q10 strain were used as mixtures for estimation of plant growth and health promoting effects on cucumber plants. Growth dynamics differed depending on the applied strain of Pseudomonas sp. The M3 treatment (a mixture of Bacillus sp. Q10 and P. chlororaphis Q16 stimulated the initial phase of growth, while M4 (a mixture of Bacillus sp. Q10 and Pseudomonas sp. K24 resulted in the maximal height at the final measurement. Significant differences in leaf and plant weight (M4, and leaf weight (M5, containing K35 strain were found after the treatments. No significant differences in chlorophyll and NBI level were observed in any of the tested combinations. The obtained results suggested that M3 was suitable for stimulation of the early phase of cucumber growth, while the mixtures M4 and M5 improved plant

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Bacillus subtilis [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis Bacillus subtilis Bacillus_subtilis_L.png Bacillus_subtilis_NL.png Bacillus..._subtilis_S.png Bacillus_subtilis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus...+subtilis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus+subtilis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus+subtilis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus

  17. Immunization with a Recombinant, Pseudomonas fluorescens-Expressed, Mutant Form of Bacillus anthracis-Derived Protective Antigen Protects Rabbits from Anthrax Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Reed

    Full Text Available Protective antigen (PA, one of the components of the anthrax toxin, is the major component of human anthrax vaccine (Biothrax. Human anthrax vaccines approved in the United States and Europe consist of an alum-adsorbed or precipitated (respectively supernatant material derived from cultures of toxigenic, non-encapsulated strains of Bacillus anthracis. Approved vaccination schedules in humans with either of these vaccines requires several booster shots and occasionally causes adverse injection site reactions. Mutant derivatives of the protective antigen that will not form the anthrax toxins have been described. We have cloned and expressed both mutant (PA SNKE167-ΔFF-315-E308D and native PA molecules recombinantly and purified them. In this study, both the mutant and native PA molecules, formulated with alum (Alhydrogel, elicited high titers of anthrax toxin neutralizing anti-PA antibodies in New Zealand White rabbits. Both mutant and native PA vaccine preparations protected rabbits from lethal, aerosolized, B. anthracis spore challenge subsequent to two immunizations at doses of less than 1 μg.

  18. The compatibility of a nucleopolyhedrosis virus control with resistance management for Bacillus thuringiensis: co-infection and cross-resistance studies with the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, B; Sayyed, A H; Wright, D J

    2006-10-01

    The use of genetically modified crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins can lead to the reduction in application of broad-spectrum pesticides and an increased opportunity for supplementary biological control. Bt microbial sprays are also used by organic growers or as part of integrated pest management programs that rely on the use of natural enemies. In both applications the evolution of resistance to Bt toxins is a potential problem. Natural enemies (pathogens or insects) acting in combination with toxins can accelerate or decelerate the evolution of resistance to Bt. In the present study we investigated whether the use of a nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) could potentially affect the evolution of resistance to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac in Plutella xylostella. At low toxin doses there was evidence for antagonistic interactions between AcMNPV and Cry1Ac resistant and susceptible insects. However, this antagonism was much stronger and more widespread for susceptible larvae; interactions were generally not distinguishable from additive for resistant larvae. Selection for resistance to Cry1Ac in two populations of P. xylostella with differing resistance mechanisms did not produce any correlated changes in resistance to AcMNPV. Stronger antagonistic interactions between Bt and AcMNPV on susceptible rather than resistant larvae can decrease the relative fitness between Bt-resistant and susceptible larvae. These interactions and the lack of cross-resistance between virus and toxin suggest that the use of NPV is compatible with resistance management to Bt products. PMID:16905146

  19. Identification of MBF2 family genes in Bombyx mori and their expression in different tissues and stages and in response to Bacillus bombysepticus infection and starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chun-Yan; Zha, Xing-Fu; Liu, Chun; Han, Min-Jin; Zhang, Li-Ying; Shi, Pan-Pan; Wang, He; Zheng, Ren-Wen; Xia, Qing-You

    2016-08-01

    The Multiprotein bridge factor 2 (MBF2) gene was first identified as a co-activator involved in BmFTZ-F1-mediated activation of the Fushi tarazu gene. Herein, nine homologous genes of MBF2 gene are identified. Evolutionary analysis showed that this gene family is insect-specific and that the family members are closely related to response to pathogens (REPAT) genes. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that these genes could be expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Developmental profiles analysis showed that the MBF2 gene family members were highly expressed in the different stages. Analysis of the expression patterns of nine MBF2 family genes showed that Bacillus bombysepticus treatment induced the up-regulation of several MBF2 family genes, including MBF2-4, -7, -9, -8. Furthermore, we found the MBF2 family genes were modulated by starvation and the expression of these genes recovered upon re-feeding, except for MBF2-5, -9. These findings suggested roles for these proteins in insect defense against pathogens and nutrient metabolism, which has an important guiding significance for designing pest control strategies. PMID:27121992

  20. Anthrax Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Daniel A.; Caitlin W. Hicks; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan; Eichacker, Peter Q.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis infection is rare in developed countries. However, recent outbreaks in the United States and Europe and the potential use of the bacteria for bioterrorism have focused interest on it. Furthermore, although anthrax was known to typically occur as one of three syndromes related to entry site of (i.e., cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalational), a fourth syndrome including severe soft tissue infection in injectional drug users is emerging. Although shock has been described ...

  1. Study on pre-immunization with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) on Candida albicans infection in mice%卡介苗免疫预防小鼠白色念珠菌感染的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽波; 王玉祥

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨卡介苗(BCG)预先免疫对小鼠白色念珠菌感染的影响.方法 采用BCG或灭菌生理盐水皮内注射预先免疫2周,然后由尾静脉注射白色念珠菌进行攻击,观察小鼠死亡率及计算存活小鼠肾组织带菌量.结果 BCG免疫组存活时间长于生理盐水免疫组(P<0.01);存活小鼠肾组织菌落计数:BCG免疫组远少于省里盐水免疫组(P<0.01).结论 BCG对小鼠白色念珠菌感染具有很好的保护作用.%Objective To investigate the effect of preimmunization with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) on Candida albicans infection in mice. Methods BCG or 0.9% sterile saline was injected intracutaneously to ICR mice for preimmunization for two weeks before inoculation of Candida albicans by vena caudalis injection, then mortality rate of mice was observed and Candida albicans in mice kidney was examined. Results Survival time in BCG preimmunization group was longer than that in 0.9% sterile saline group (P<0.01); colony count of Candida albicans in mice kidney in BCG preimmunization group was less than that in saline group (P < 0.01). Conclusions BCG pre-immunization has protective effect from Candida albicans infection in mice.

  2. Anti-Infective Metabolites of a Newly Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis KL1 Associated with Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees.), a Traditional Medicinal Herb

    OpenAIRE

    Sudipta Roy; Sahana Yasmin; Subhadeep Ghosh; Somesankar Bhattacharya; Debdulal Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate endophytic bacteria possessing anti-infective property from Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees.), a well-known medicinal plant. A total of 23 strains were isolated from this plant among which the strain KL1, isolated from surface-sterilized leaf of this medicinal herb, showed broad-spectrum antagonism against an array of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial pathogens. Ethyl acetate extract of KL1-fermented media yielded a greenish amorphous substance re...

  3. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Aygun, Fatma Deniz; Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case ...

  4. BacillusRegNet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misirli, Goksel; Hallinan, Jennifer; Röttger, Richard;

    2014-01-01

    interactions. There is a need to develop new platform technologies that can be applied to the investigation of whole-genome datasets in an efficient and cost-effective manner. One such approach is the transfer of existing knowledge from well-studied organisms to closely-related organisms. In this paper, we...... associated BacillusRegNet website (http://bacillus.ncl.ac.uk)....

  5. A New Approach for Designing A Potentially Vaccine Candidate against Urinary Tract Infection by Using Protein Display on Lacto-bacillus Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Fallah Mehrabadi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is really high in the world. Escherichia coli is a major agent of UTI. One of the strategies for decreasing UTI infections is vaccine development. As the attachment is a really important stage in colonization and infection, at­tachment inhibition has an applied strategy. FimH protein is a major factor during bacterial colonization in urinary tract and could be used as a vaccine. Thus, it was considered in this research as a candidate antigen. Methods: The sequences of fimH and acmA genes were used for designing a synthetic gene. It was cloned to pET23a expression vector and transformed to E. coli (DE3 Origami. To confirm the expression of recombinant protein, SDS-PAGE and western blotting methods were used. Subsequently, recombinant protein was purified. On the other hand, Lactobacillus reuteri was cultured and mixed with FimH / AcmA recombinant protein. The rate of protein localization on lactobacillus surface was assessed using ELISA method. Results: It was showed that the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli (DE3 Origami and purified by affinity chromatography. Moreover, this protein could be localized on lactobacillus surface by 5 days. Conclusion: In current study, a fusion recombinant protein was pre­pared and displayed on L. reuteri surface. This strain could be used for animal experiment as a competitor against Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. Using manipulated probiotics strains instead of antibiotic ther­apy could decrease the antibiotic consumption and reduce multi-drug resistant strains.

  6. Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus sphaericus biopesticides production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Bendary, Magda A

    2006-01-01

    The long residual action and toxicity of the chemical insecticides have brought about serious environmental problems such as the emergence and spread of insecticide resistance in many species of vectors, mammalian toxicity, and accumulation of pesticide residues in the food chain. All these problems have highlighted the need for alternative biological control agents. Entomo-pathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and Bacillus sphaericus (Bs) are two safe biological control agents. They have attracted considerable interest as possible replacements for the chemical insecticides. Although microbial insecticides based on Bt and Bs are available for use, their high cost makes large-scale application impracticable in developing countries. This review focuses on the economic production of these two microorganisms by submerged fermentation and solid state fermentation using agro-industrial by-products and other wastes. PMID:16598830

  7. Effects of probiotic Bacillus species in aquaculture – An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian-Teodor BURUIANĂ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The ingestion of a large amount of certain types of beneficial bacteria can reduce the multiplication and development of pathogenic bacteria in the gut. A “probiotic” is a product that contains live microorganisms which positively influence the host intestinal microbiota by preventing the proliferation of pathogenic bacteria and promoting the growth and development of beneficial bacteria. Bacillus spp. are Gram-positive endospore-forming bacteria with beneficial effects in aquaculture industry. The dietary supplementation of Bacillus spp. in fish culture improved especially growth performance, immune response and the disease resistance of fish against pathogenic bacterial infections. The objective of the current paper is to review the recent published investigations reported in the scientific literature on the use of probiotic Bacillus spp. in aquaculture, focusing on their beneficial effects on the host. This review includes the main effects of Bacillus spp. administration in shrimp culture, carp culture, tilapia culture, and other fish culture.

  8. Effect of bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination on CD4+Foxp3+ T cells during acquired immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela I; Obregón-Henao, Andres; Arnett, Kimberly; Shanley, Crystal A; Podell, Brendan; Orme, Ian M; Ordway, Diane J

    2016-04-01

    Increasing information has shown that many newly emerging strains ofMycobacterium tuberculosis, including the highly prevalent and troublesome Beijing family of strains, can potently induce the emergence of Foxp3(+)CD4 Tregs Although the significance of this is still not fully understood, we have previously provided evidence that the emergence of this population can significantly ablate the protective effect of BCG vaccination, causing progressive fatal disease in the mouse model. However, whether the purpose of this response is to control inflammation or to directly dampen the acquired immune response is still unclear. In the present study, we have shown, using both cell depletion and adoptive transfer strategies, that Tregscan have either properties. Cell depletion resulted in a rapid, but transient, decrease in the lung bacterial load, suggesting release or temporary re-expansion of effector immunity. Transfer of Tregsinto Rag2(-/-)or marked congenic mice worsened the disease course and depressed cellular influx of effector T cells into the lungs. Tregs from infected donors seemed to preferentially depress the inflammatory response and granulocytic influx. In contrast, those from BCG-vaccinated and then challenged donors seemed more focused on depression of acquired immunity. These qualitative differences might be related to increasing knowledge reflecting the plasticity of the Tregresponse. PMID:26590147

  9. The Bacillus anthracis Exosporium: What's the Big "Hairy" Deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel A; Welkos, Susan; Cote, Christopher K

    2015-10-01

    In some Bacillus species, including Bacillus subtilis, the coat is the outermost layer of the spore. In others, such as the Bacillus cereus family, there is an additional layer that envelops the coat, called the exosporium. In the case of Bacillus anthracis, a series of fine hair-like projections, also referred to as a "hairy" nap, extends from the exosporium basal layer. The exact role of the exosporium in B. anthracis, or for any of the Bacillus species possessing this structure, remains unclear. However, it has been assumed that the exosporium would play some role in infection for B. anthracis, because it is the outermost structure of the spore and would make initial contact with host and immune cells during infection. Therefore, the exosporium has been a topic of great interest, and over the past decade much progress has been made to understand its composition, biosynthesis, and potential roles. Several key aspects of this spore structure, however, are still debated and remain undetermined. Although insights have been gained on the interaction of exosporium with the host during infection, the exact role and significance of this complex structure remain to be determined. Furthermore, because the exosporium is a highly antigenic structure, future strategies for the next-generation anthrax vaccine should pursue its inclusion as a component to provide protection against the spore itself during the initial stages of anthrax. PMID:26542035

  10. Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis—One Species on the Basis of Genetic Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Helgason, Erlendur; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Dominique A. Caugant; Johansen, Henning A.; Fouet, Agnes; Mock, Michéle; Hegna, Ida; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2000-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis are members of the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria, demonstrating widely different phenotypes and pathological effects. B. anthracis causes the acute fatal disease anthrax and is a potential biological weapon due to its high toxicity. B. thuringiensis produces intracellular protein crystals toxic to a wide number of insect larvae and is the most commonly used biological pesticide worldwide. B. cereus is a probably ubiquitous so...

  11. Inactivation of Spores of Bacillus anthracis Sterne, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis by Chlorination

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, E W; Adcock, N. J.; Sivaganesan, M; Rose, L. J.

    2005-01-01

    Three species of Bacillus were evaluated as potential surrogates for Bacillus anthracis for determining the sporicidal activity of chlorination as commonly used in drinking water treatment. Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis were found to be an appropriate surrogate for spores of B. anthracis for use in chlorine inactivation studies.

  12. 多黏菌素E治疗严重烧伤后多药耐药革兰阴性杆菌感染的临床评估%Clinical assessment of colistin in treating infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacillus in patients with severe burn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张家平; 杨小顺; 陈建; 彭毅志; 黄跃生

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect and side effects of eolistin in treating in-fections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacillus in patients with severe burn in order to provide the basis for reasonable application of this antibiotic in clinic. Methods Nine burn patients suf-fered from infections caused by MDR gram-negative bacillus admitted to our institute from August 2005 to January 2009 were involved in this study. On the premises that isolated bacteria were only sensitive to colistin or not sensitive to other antibiotics, patients were treated with intravenous drip of colistin (100×10~4-150× 10~4U/d), or intravenous drip combined with administration of the drug into respiratory tract by atomization or instillation (50×10~4-100×10~4 U/d). The bacteriologic and therapeutic effects and side effects (inclu-ding neurotoxicity and nephrotoxicity, rise in serum levels of creatinine, urea nitrogen and cystatin C were detected and compared before and after administration) of colistin were observed. Results Out of 9 pa-tients, 7 patients were with bloodstream and pulmonary infections, 1 patient was with bloodstream, pulmona-ry, and invasive wound infections, and 1 patient was with bloodstream and urinary tract infections. The path-ogenic bacteria were proved to be Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas maltophilia. After the administration of colistin, bacteria clearance rate of blood reached 92.3% in 9 pa-tients;isolation rate of MDR gram-negative bacillus of sputum was significantly decreased in 7 patients with pulmonary infection (before treatment 58.2% v.s. After treatment 14.6% , P 0.05),1例患者明显升高但停药1个月后回降.用药期间和停药5 d内患者均未见神经毒性反应或其他不良反应.结论 在未出现更有效药物的前提下,合理应用多黏菌素E是目前治疗严重烧伤MDR革兰阴性杆菌感染的良好选择.

  13. Comparison of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis are closely related, spore forming soil bacteria. B. thuringiensis produces insecticidal crystal proteins during sporulation and these toxins are the most important biopesticides in the world today. Genomes of the B. thuringiensis and B. cereus strains were analysed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis after treatment of the DNA with the restriction enzyme NotI. The NotI fingerprint patterns varied both within the B. thuringiensis and the B. cereus strains. The size of the fragments varied between 15 and 1350 kb. When physical maps of the B. thuringiensis and B. cereus strains were compared, B. thuringiensis appeared to be as closely related to B. cereus as the B. cereus strains were to each other. Nine out of 12 B. thuringiensis strains and 18 out of 25 B. cereus strains produced enterotoxins. The close relationship between B. thuringiensis and B. cereus should be taken into consideration when B. thuringiensis is used as a biopesticide. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  14. Bacillus velezensis is not a later heterotypic synonym of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; Bacillus methylotrophicus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp plantarum and ‘Bacillus oryzicola’ are later heterotypic synonyms of Bacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rhizosphere isolated bacteria belonging to the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum and Bacillus methylotrophicus clades are an important group of strains that are used as plant growth promoters and antagonists of plant pathogens. These properties have made these strains the focus of comm...

  15. Biodiversity in Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pielaat A; Fricker M; Nauta MJ; Leusden FM van; MGB

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have been performed by different partners to identify variability in properties of Bacillus cereus strains that contribute to the extent of their virulence as part of an EU project. To this end, 100 B. cereus strains were selected and screened for biological properties, such as toxin pro

  16. Fatal Sepsis by Bacillus Circulans in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jahani Sherafat

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An immunosuppressed man was admitted to hospital with diarrhea and a history of urinary tract infection. He was subjected to treatment with antibiotics. The patient died of putative severe sepsis. The etiological agent was a carbapenemase producing isolate of Bacillus circulans with resistance to all prescribed antimicrobial agents.

  17. Bacillus cereus immune escape: a journey within macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Seav-Ly; Ramarao, Nalini

    2013-10-01

    During bacterial infection, professional phagocytes are attracted to the site of infection, where they constitute a first line of host cell defense. Their function is to engulf and destroy the pathogens. Thus, bacteria must withstand the bactericidal activity of professional phagocytes, including macrophages to counteract the host immune system. Bacillus cereus infections are characterized by bacteremia despite the accumulation of inflammatory cells at the site of infection. This implies that the bacteria have developed means of resisting the host immune system. Bacillus cereus spores survive, germinate, and multiply in contact with macrophages, eventually producing toxins that kill these cells. However, the exact mechanism by which B. cereus evades immune attack remains unclear. This review addresses the interaction between B. cereus and macrophages, highlighting, in particular, the ways in which the bacteria escape the microbicidal activities of professional phagocytes. PMID:23827020

  18. The Pore-Forming Haemolysins of Bacillus Cereus: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Sanchis; Nalini Ramarao

    2013-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group contains diverse Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal diseases and severe eye infections in humans. They have also been incriminated in a multitude of other severe, and frequently fatal, clinical infections, such as osteomyelitis, septicaemia, pneumonia, liver abscess and meningitis, particularly in immuno-compromised patients and preterm neonates. The pathogenic properties of this organism are mediated by the synergistic ef...

  19. Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Karen K.; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Okinaka, Richard T.; Asay, Michelle; Blair, Heather; Bliss, Katherine A.; Laker, Mariam; Pardington, Paige E.; Richardson, Amber P.; Tonks, Melinda; Beecher, Douglas J.; Kemp, John D.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Wong, Amy C. Lee; Keim, Paul

    2004-01-01

    DNA from over 300 Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus anthracis isolates was analyzed by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). B. thuringiensis and B. cereus isolates were from diverse sources and locations, including soil, clinical isolates and food products causing diarrheal and emetic outbreaks, and type strains from the American Type Culture Collection, and over 200 B. thuringiensis isolates representing 36 serovars or subspecies were from the U.S. D...

  20. Pathogenomic Sequence Analysis of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis Isolates Closely Related to Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Cliff S.; Xie, Gary; Challacombe, Jean F.; Altherr, Michael R.; Bhotika, Smriti S.; Bruce, David; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Chen, Jin; Chertkov, Olga; Cleland, Cathy; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Doggett, Norman A.; Fawcett, John J.; Glavina, Tijana

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis are closely related gram-positive, spore-forming bacteria of the B. cereus sensu lato group. While independently derived strains of B. anthracis reveal conspicuous sequence homogeneity, environmental isolates of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis exhibit extensive genetic diversity. Here we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of the genomes of two members of the B. cereus group, B. thuringiensis 97-27 subsp. konkukian sero...

  1. Bacillus cereus, a volatile human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottone, Edward J

    2010-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, motile, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that is widely distributed environmentally. While B. cereus is associated mainly with food poisoning, it is being increasingly reported to be a cause of serious and potentially fatal non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. The pathogenicity of B. cereus, whether intestinal or nonintestinal, is intimately associated with the production of tissue-destructive exoenzymes. Among these secreted toxins are four hemolysins, three distinct phospholipases, an emesis-inducing toxin, and proteases. The major hurdle in evaluating B. cereus when isolated from a clinical specimen is overcoming its stigma as an insignificant contaminant. Outside its notoriety in association with food poisoning and severe eye infections, this bacterium has been incriminated in a multitude of other clinical conditions such as anthrax-like progressive pneumonia, fulminant sepsis, and devastating central nervous system infections, particularly in immunosuppressed individuals, intravenous drug abusers, and neonates. Its role in nosocomial acquired bacteremia and wound infections in postsurgical patients has also been well defined, especially when intravascular devices such as catheters are inserted. Primary cutaneous infections mimicking clostridial gas gangrene induced subsequent to trauma have also been well documented. B. cereus produces a potent beta-lactamase conferring marked resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. Antimicrobials noted to be effective in the empirical management of a B. cereus infection while awaiting antimicrobial susceptibility results for the isolate include ciprofloxacin and vancomycin. PMID:20375358

  2. Genome analysis shows Bacillus axarquiensis is not a later heterotypic synonym of Bacillus mojavensis; reclassification of Bacillus malacitensis and Brevibacterium halotolerans as heterotypic synonyms of Bacillus axarquiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Christopher A; Bowman, Michael J; Schisler, David A; Rooney, Alejandro P

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus axarquiensis and Bacillus malacitensis were previously reported to be later heterotypic synonyms of Bacillus mojavensis, based primarily on DNA-DNA relatedness values. We have sequenced draft genomes of Bacillus axarquiensis NRRL B-41617T and Bacillus malacitensis NRRL B-41618T. Comparative genomics and DNA-DNA relatedness calculations showed that while Bacillus axarquiensis and Bacillus malacitensis are synonymous with each other, they are not synonymous with Bacillus mojavensis. In addition, a draft genome was completed for Brevibacterium halotolerans, a strain long suspected of being a Bacillus subtilis group member based on 16S rRNA similarities (99.8 % with Bacillus mojavensis). Comparative genomics and DNA-DNA relatedness calculations showed that Brevibacterium halotolerans is synonymous with Bacillus axarquiensis and Bacillus malacitensis. The pairwise in silico DNA-DNA hybridization values calculated in comparisons between the three conspecific strains were all greater than 92 %, which is well above the standard species threshold of 70 %. While the pairwise in silico DNA-DNA hybridization values calculated in comparisons of the three conspecific strains with Bacillus mojavensis were all less than 65 %. The combined results of our genotype and phenotype studies showed that Bacillus axarquiensis, Bacillus malacitensis and Brevibacterium halotolerans are conspecific and distinct from Bacillus mojavensis. Because the valid publication of the name Bacillus axarquiensis predates the publication of the name Bacillus malacitensis, we propose that Bacillus malacitensis be reclassified as a synonym of Bacillus axarquiensis. In addition, we propose to reclassify Brevibacterium halotolerans as a synonym of Bacillus axarquiensis. An amended description of Bacillus axarquiensis is provided. PMID:27030978

  3. 76 FR 14289 - Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 174 Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab Protein in Corn; Temporary Exemption From the... permissible level for residues of Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn. The temporary tolerance... Register of January 21, 2011 (76 FR 3885) (FRL-8855- 4), EPA issued a notice pursuant to section...

  4. 75 FR 34040 - Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 174 Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab Protein in Corn; Temporary Exemption from the... Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab protein in corn under the FFDCA. The temporary tolerance exemption expires...) 305-5805. II. Background and Statutory Findings In the Federal Register of September 30, 2009 (74...

  5. Isolation and Identification of Bacillus Species From Soil and Evaluation of Their Antibacterial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Bacillus species are the predominant soil bacteria because of their resistant-endospore formation and production of essential antibiotics such as bacitracin. Objectives The aim of this study was to isolate Bacillus spp. from riverside soil and investigate their antimicrobial characteristics against some pathogenic bacteria. Materials and Methods Fifty soil samples were collected from different sites of Bahmanshir riverside in Abadan city, Iran, and analyzed for the presence of Bacillus species. The media used in this research were nutrient broth and agar. Bacillus species were identified by their phenotypic and biochemical characteristics. The antimicrobial effects of Bacillus extract against the target bacteria including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae and Corynebacterium diphtheriae were examined. Results The identified Bacillus species included B. cereus (86.6%, B. subtilis (6.6%, B. thuringiensis (3.3%, and B. pumilus (3.3%. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of the extracted compounds was carried out against five different bacteria. Antibiotic production tests indicated that two Bacillus strains belong to B. cereus, which showed antimicrobial properties. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of these compounds ranged between 8.34-33.34 mg/mL for the target bacteria. Conclusions This study indicated that some Bacillus species have the potential to produce antimicrobial compounds which can be used to control microbial infections.

  6. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, Fatma Deniz; Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia. PMID:27195164

  7. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Deniz Aygun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia.

  8. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia. PMID:27195164

  9. Novel giant siphovirus from Bacillus anthracis features unusual genome characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly H Ganz

    Full Text Available Here we present vB_BanS-Tsamsa, a novel temperate phage isolated from Bacillus anthracis, the agent responsible for anthrax infections in wildlife, livestock and humans. Tsamsa phage is a giant siphovirus (order Caudovirales, featuring a long, flexible and non-contractile tail of 440 nm (not including baseplate structure and an isometric head of 82 nm in diameter. We induced Tsamsa phage in samples from two different carcass sites in Etosha National Park, Namibia. The Tsamsa phage genome is the largest sequenced Bacillus siphovirus, containing 168,876 bp and 272 ORFs. The genome features an integrase/recombinase enzyme, indicative of a temperate lifestyle. Among bacterial strains tested, the phage infected only certain members of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group (B. anthracis, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis and exhibited moderate specificity for B. anthracis. Tsamsa lysed seven out of 25 B. cereus strains, two out of five B. thuringiensis strains and six out of seven B. anthracis strains tested. It did not lyse B. anthracis PAK-1, an atypical strain that is also resistant to both gamma phage and cherry phage. The Tsamsa endolysin features a broader lytic spectrum than the phage host range, indicating possible use of the enzyme in Bacillus biocontrol.

  10. Modulation of the Bacillus anthracis Secretome by the Immune Inhibitor A1 Protease

    OpenAIRE

    Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Swick, Michelle C.; Engler, David A.; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Koehler, Theresa M.

    2014-01-01

    The Bacillus anthracis secretome includes protective antigen, lethal factor, and edema factor, which are the components of anthrax toxin, and other proteins with known or potential roles in anthrax disease. Immune inhibitor A1 (InhA1) is a secreted metalloprotease that is unique to pathogenic members of the Bacillus genus and has been associated with cleavage of host proteins during infection. Here, we report the effect of InhA1 on the B. anthracis secretome. Differential in-gel electrophores...

  11. Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes with Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D'Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch, Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri

    2005-01-01

    Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-...

  12. Genotypic Diversity among Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Cathrine Rein; Caugant, Dominique A; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-four strains of Bacillus cereus were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and compared with 12 Bacillus thuringiensis strains. In addition, the 36 strains were examined for variation in 15 chromosomal genes encoding enzymes (by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis [MEE]). The genome of each strain had a distinct NotI restriction enzyme digestion profile by PFGE, and the 36 strains could be assigned to 27 multilocus genotypes by MEE. However, neither PFGE nor MEE analysis co...

  13. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), a natural bacteria found all over the Earth, has a fairly novel way of getting rid of unwanted insects. Bt forms a protein substance (shown on the right) that is not harmful to humans, birds, fish or other vertebrates. When eaten by insect larvae the protein causes a fatal loss of appetite. For over 25 years agricultural chemical companies have relied heavily upon safe Bt pesticides. New space based research promises to give the insecticide a new dimension in effectiveness and applicability. Researchers from the Consortium for Materials Development in Space along with industrial affiliates such as Abott Labs and Pern State University flew Bt on a Space Shuttle mission in the fall of 1996. Researchers expect that the Shuttle's microgravity environment will reveal new information about the protein that will make it more effective against a wider variety of pests.

  14. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.;

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were...... predicted to be essential. The vast majority of essential genes were categorized in relatively few domains of cell metabolism, with about half involved in information processing, one-fifth involved in the synthesis of cell envelope and the determination of cell shape and division, and one-tenth related to...... cell energetics. Only 4% of essential genes encode unknown functions. Most essential genes are present throughout a wide range of Bacteria, and almost 70% can also be found in Archaea and Eucarya. However, essential genes related to cell envelope, shape, division, and respiration tend to be lost from...

  15. Electric DNA arrays for determination of pathogenic Bacillus cereus

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yanling

    2007-01-01

    Silicon-based electric chip arrays were developed for characterization of Bacillus cereus with respect to the capacity to produce toxins involved in food poisoning and foodborne infections. Bacteria of the B. cereus group contain different sets of four toxins encoded by eight genes. The purpose of this work was to develop a fast method for determination of the presence of these genes in colonies from primary enrichment cultures. The specific DNA detection was based on immobilization of DNA ca...

  16. Bacillus anthracis IsdG, a Heme-Degrading Monooxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    Skaar, Eric P.; Gaspar, Andrew H.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, utilizes hemin and hemoglobin for growth in culture, suggesting that these host molecules serve as sources for the nutrient iron during bacterial infection. Bioinformatic analyses of the B. anthracis genome revealed genes with similarity to the iron-regulated surface determinant (isd) system responsible for heme uptake in Staphylococcus aureus. We show that the protein product of one of these genes, isdG, binds hemin in a manner resembling t...

  17. Production, Secretion and Biological Activity of Bacillus cereus Enterotoxins

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Senesi; Emilia Ghelardi

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus behaves as an opportunistic pathogen frequently causing gastrointestinal diseases, and it is increasingly recognized to be responsible for severe local or systemic infections. Pathogenicity of B. cereus mainly relies on the secretion of a wide array of toxins and enzymes and also on the ability to undergo swarming differentiation in response to surface-sensing. In this report, the pathogenicity exerted by B. cereus toxins is described with particular attention to the regulator...

  18. Genome Differences That Distinguish Bacillus anthracis from Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Radnedge, Lyndsay; Agron, Peter G.; Hill, Karen K.; Jackson, Paul J.; Ticknor, Lawrence O; Keim, Paul; Andersen, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    The three species of the group 1 bacilli, Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus, and B. thuringiensis, are genetically very closely related. All inhabit soil habitats but exhibit different phenotypes. B. anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax and is phylogenetically monomorphic, while B. cereus and B. thuringiensis are genetically more diverse. An amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis described here demonstrates genetic diversity among a collection of non-anthrax-causing Bacillus speci...

  19. New Developments in Vaccines, Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxins, and Antibiotic Therapeutics for Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Beierlein, J.M.; Anderson, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent responsible for anthrax infections, poses a significant biodefense threat. There is a high mortality rate associated with untreated anthrax infections; specifically, inhalation anthrax is a particularly virulent form of infection with mortality rates close to 100%, even with aggressive treatment. Currently, a vaccine is not available to the general public and few antibiotics have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of inhalation anthrax. With the...

  20. 牛源地衣芽胞杆菌诱导小鼠临床乳房炎模型中热休克蛋白和核因子-κB表达上调%Up-regulated expression of heat shock protein 70 and NF-κB in mouse mastitis model established by artificial infection of Bacillus licheniformis from bovine mastitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘露; 徐君; 李姝; 程跃; 蔡亚非

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To further understand how the immune pathogenesis of cow mastitis occurs and look for better control methods to provide data for basic study. Methods: In this study the main mastitis pathogens were isolated and identified by the traditional bacterial culture methods and molecular methods. Bacillus licheniformis was selected from the main pathogens. Then mouse mammary gland was infected by Bacillus licheniformis. HE staining was done to observe the change of the mouse mammary gland after infection and immunohistochemical staining to detect the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and NF-κB in those slices. Results: Symptoms of inflammation appeared in the mouse mammary gland after infection. Histopathologic examination of mammary gland revealed that numbers of polymorphonuclear neutrophils were present in alveoli. The expression of HSP70 and NF-κB in the experimental group was significantly increased compared with the saline group and the blank group. Conclusion:The results showed that Bacillus licheniformis was suitable for the replica of mastitis model in mouse. An increase in the expression of HSP70 and NF-κB in the experimental group explained their participation in the pathological process after bacterial infection.%目的:为进一步认识奶牛乳腺炎发生的免疫病理机制和寻找更理想的防治方法提供基础研究数据.方法:从采集回来的奶牛奶样中用传统细菌培养方法和分子学方法分离鉴定主要病原菌,挑选其中地衣芽胞杆菌感染小鼠乳腺组织,H-E染色分析感染后小鼠乳腺组织变化,免疫组织化学方法分析热休克蛋白70(HSP70)和核因子-kB(NF-kB)在感染小鼠体内的表达.结果:感染后小鼠乳腺出现明显的炎症症状,组织病理学观察显示腺泡腔内有大量嗜中性粒细胞浸润.实验组中HSP70和NF-kB表达量比生理盐水组和空白组均有增加.结论:成功通过地衣芽胞杆菌诱发建立实验性乳房炎小

  1. N-terminal amino acid sequence of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase: comparison with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus subtilis Enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, H; Fietzek, P P; Lampen, J. O.

    1982-01-01

    The thermostable, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis was immunologically cross-reactive with the thermolabile, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences showed extensive homology with each other, but not with the saccharifying alpha-amylases of Bacillus subtilis.

  2. PRODUKSI ANTIBIOTIKA OLEH Bacillus subtilis M10 DALAM MEDIA UREA-SORBITOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supartono Supartono

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PRODUCTION OF ANTIBIOTICS BY Bacillus subtilis M10 IN UREA-SORBITOL MEDIUM. Infection diseases still become the main health problems that suffered by people in Indonesia. Besides, there were many pathogen bacteria found to be resistant to the some antibiotics. Therefore, the efforts to get a new antibiotic require to be done continuously. A new local strain of Bacillus subtilis BAC4 has been known producing an antibiotic that inhibit Serratia marcescens ATCC 27117 growth. To make efficient the local strain, mutation on Bacillus subtilis BAC4 was done by using acridine orange and a mutant cell of Bacillus subtilis M10 that overproduction for producing antibiotic was obtained. Nevertheless, the production kinetics of antibiotic by this mutant has not been reported. The objective of this research was to study the production kinetics of antibiotic by Bacillus subtilis M10 mutant. The production of antibiotic was conducted using batch fermentation and antibiotic assay was performed with agar absorption method using Serratia marcescens ATCC 27117 as bacteria assay. Research result provided that Bacillus subtilis M10 mutant with overproduction of antibiotic produced an antibiotic since 8th hour’s fermentation and optimum of it production was at 14th hours after inoculation.  Penyakit infeksi masih menjadi masalah yang utama diderita oleh masyarakat Indonesia. Di samping itu, banyak bakteri patogen yang ditemukan resisten terhadap beberapa antibiotika. Oleh karena itu, upaya-upaya untuk mendapatkan antibiotika baru perlu dilakukan secara terus-menerus. Suatu galur lokal baru Bacillus subtilis BAC4 teridentifikasi memproduksi senyawa antibiotika yang menghambat pertumbuhan Serratia marcescens ATCC27117. Untuk memberdayakan galur tersebut, terhadap Bacillus subtilis BAC4 dilakukan mutasi dengan larutan akridin oranye dan diperoleh mutan Bacillus subtilis M10 yang memproduksi antibiotika berlebihan. Namun, kinetika produksi antibiotika oleh Bacillus

  3. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP) caused by Bacillus Cereus in an Alcoholic Patient: Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Ansari, Mohammad Aftab Alam; Sarfraz, Asim; Jaiswal, Nitesh; Singh, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is infection of peritoneal covering of the abdomen caused by bacteria, without any known etiology. Common known predisposing factors are cirrhosis of liver and old age among others. Bacillus cereus is an uncommon cause of SBP and often wrongly interpreted as a contaminant. We hereby report a case of peritonitis in chronic alcoholic, elderly male patient presenting in the outpatient department. Bacillus cereus is often regarded as contaminant but must be...

  4. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R; Reed, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones. PMID:27533890

  5. 77 FR 745 - Bacillus Amyloliquefaciens Strain D747; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... lethal dose, (LD 50 ) > 5,050 mg/kg. EPA Toxicity Category IV.] 6. Acute dermal irritation (OCSPP...-5805. II. Background and Statutory Findings In the Federal Register of February 4, 2011 (76 FR 6465.../pathogenicity studies show that Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain D747 is not toxic, infective, or pathogenic...

  6. Administration of Bacillus subtilis strains in the rearing water enhances the water quality, growth performance, immune response, and resistance against Vibrio harveyi infection in juvenile white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zokaeifar, Hadi; Babaei, Nahid; Saad, Che Roos; Kamarudin, Mohd Salleh; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Balcazar, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    In this study, vegetative cell suspensions of two Bacillus subtilis strains, L10 and G1 in equal proportions, was administered at two different doses 10(5) (BM5) and 10(8) (BM8) CFU ml(-1) in the rearing water of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) for eight weeks. Both probiotic groups showed a significant reduction of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate ions under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In comparison to untreated control group, final weight, weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR), food conversion ratio (FCR) and digestive enzymatic activity were significantly greater in the BM5 and BM8 groups. Significant differences for survival were recorded in the BM8 group as compared to the control. Eight weeks after the start of experiment, shrimp were challenged with Vibrio harveyi. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in shrimp survival between probiotic and control groups. Cumulative mortality of the control group was 80%, whereas cumulative mortality of the shrimp that had been given probiotics was 36.7% with MB8 and 50% with MB5. Subsequently, real-time RT-PCR was employed to determine the mRNA levels of prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin (PE), lipopolysaccharide- and β-1,3-glucan- binding protein (LGBP) and serine protein (SP). The expression of all immune-related genes studied was only significantly up-regulated in the BM5 group compared to the BM8 and control groups. These results suggest that administration of B. subtilis strains in the rearing water confers beneficial effects for shrimp aquaculture, considering water quality, growth performance, digestive enzymatic activity, immune response and disease resistance. PMID:24161773

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Plant Probiotic Bacillus Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Park, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Soo-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of four Bacillus strains that exhibit plant probiotic activities. Three of them are the type strains of Bacillus endophyticus, "Bacillus gaemokensis," and Bacillus trypoxylicola, and the other, Bacillus sp. strain KCTC 13219, should be reclassified into a species belonging to the genus Lysinibacillus. PMID:27174273

  8. Anthrax infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Daniel A; Hicks, Caitlin W; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan; Eichacker, Peter Q

    2011-12-15

    Bacillus anthracis infection is rare in developed countries. However, recent outbreaks in the United States and Europe and the potential use of the bacteria for bioterrorism have focused interest on it. Furthermore, although anthrax was known to typically occur as one of three syndromes related to entry site of (i.e., cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalational), a fourth syndrome including severe soft tissue infection in injectional drug users is emerging. Although shock has been described with cutaneous anthrax, it appears much more common with gastrointestinal, inhalational (5 of 11 patients in the 2001 outbreak in the United States), and injectional anthrax. Based in part on case series, the estimated mortalities of cutaneous, gastrointestinal, inhalational, and injectional anthrax are 1%, 25 to 60%, 46%, and 33%, respectively. Nonspecific early symptomatology makes initial identification of anthrax cases difficult. Clues to anthrax infection include history of exposure to herbivore animal products, heroin use, or clustering of patients with similar respiratory symptoms concerning for a bioterrorist event. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with Gram stain and culture from blood or surgical specimens followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR or immunohistochemistry). Although antibiotic therapy (largely quinolone-based) is the mainstay of anthrax treatment, the use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists is a consideration. PMID:21852539

  9. Inflammatory Cytokine Response to Bacillus anthracis Peptidoglycan Requires Phagocytosis and Lysosomal Trafficking▿

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Janaki K.; Khurana, Taruna; Langer, Marybeth; West, Christopher M.; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Metcalf, Jordan P.; Merkel, Tod J.; Coggeshall, K. Mark

    2010-01-01

    During advanced stages of inhalation anthrax, Bacillus anthracis accumulates at high levels in the bloodstream of the infected host. This bacteremia leads to sepsis during late-stage anthrax; however, the mechanisms through which B. anthracis-derived factors contribute to the pathology of infected hosts are poorly defined. Peptidoglycan, a major component of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria, can provoke symptoms of sepsis in animal models. We have previously shown that peptidoglycan of...

  10. Bacteriophage PBC1 and Its Endolysin as an Antimicrobial Agent against Bacillus cereus

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Minsuk; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic human pathogen responsible for food poisoning and other, nongastrointestinal infections. Due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant B. cereus strains, the demand for alternative therapeutic options is increasing. To address these problems, we isolated and characterized a Siphoviridae virulent phage, PBC1, and its lytic enzymes. PBC1 showed a very narrow host range, infecting only 1 of 22 B. cereus strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major capsid pr...

  11. Environmental Persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joseph P.; Meyer, Kathryn M.; Kelly, Thomas J.; Choi, Young W.; Rogers, James V.; Riggs, Karen B.; Willenberg, Zachary J.

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data for how the viability of biological agents may degrade over time in different environments. In this study, experiments were conducted to determine the persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores on outdoor materials with and without exposure to simulated sunlight, using ultraviolet (UV)-A/B radiation. Spores were inoculated onto glass, wood, concrete, and topsoil and recovered after periods of 2, 14, 28, and 56 days. Recovery and inactivation kinetics for the two species were assessed for each surface material and UV exposure condition. Results suggest that with exposure to UV, decay of spore viability for both Bacillus species occurs in two phases, with an initial rapid decay, followed by a slower inactivation period. The exception was with topsoil, in which there was minimal loss of spore viability in soil over 56 days, with or without UV exposure. The greatest loss in viable spore recovery occurred on glass with UV exposure, with nearly a four log10 reduction after just two days. In most cases, B. subtilis had a slower rate of decay than B. anthracis, although less B. subtilis was recovered initially. PMID:26372011

  12. Production, Secretion and Biological Activity of Bacillus cereus Enterotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Senesi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus behaves as an opportunistic pathogen frequently causing gastrointestinal diseases, and it is increasingly recognized to be responsible for severe local or systemic infections. Pathogenicity of B. cereus mainly relies on the secretion of a wide array of toxins and enzymes and also on the ability to undergo swarming differentiation in response to surface-sensing. In this report, the pathogenicity exerted by B. cereus toxins is described with particular attention to the regulatory mechanisms of production and secretion of HBL, Nhe and CytK enterotoxins.

  13. Bacillus subtilis Deoxyribonucleic Acid Gyrase

    OpenAIRE

    Sugino, A; Bott, K F

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis 168 was shown to contain a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) gyrase activity which closely resembled those of the enzymes isolated from Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus in its enzymatic requirements, substrate specificity, and sensitivity to several antibiotics. The enzyme was purified from the wild type and nalidixic acid-resistant and novobiocin-resistant mutants of B. subtilis and was functionally characterized in vitro. The genetic loci nalA and novA but not novB were s...

  14. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Annika Gillis; Jacques Mahillon

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteriophages (phages) have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages inf...

  15. Plasmid-mediated transformation in Bacillus megaterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, B. J.; Carlton, B C

    1980-01-01

    A transformation system was developed for Bacillus megaterium by using antibiotic resistance plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid molecules derived from Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. Lysozyme-generated protoplasts of B. megaterium allowed uptake of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid in the presence of polyethylene glycol. Transformants expressed the antibiotic resistance determinants present on the plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid, and reisolated plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid yielded restrictio...

  16. Physical map of the Bacillus cereus chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Kolstø, A B; Grønstad, A; Oppegaard, H

    1990-01-01

    A physical map of the Bacillus cereus chromosome has been constructed by aligning 11 NotI fragments, ranging in size from 200 to 1,300 kilobases. The size of the chromosome is about 5.7 megabases. This is the first Bacillus genome of which a complete physical map has been described.

  17. What sets Bacillus anthracis apart from other Bacillus species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the cause of anthrax, and two large plasmids are essential for toxicity: pXO1, which contains the toxin genes, and pXO2, which encodes a capsule. B. anthracis forms a highly monomorphic lineage within the B. cereus group, but strains of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. cereus exist that are genetically closely related to the B. anthracis cluster. During the past five years B. cereus strains that contain the pXO1 virulence plasmid were discovered, and strains with both pXO1 and pXO2 have been isolated from great apes in Africa. Therefore, the presence of pXO1 and pXO2 no longer principally separates B. anthracis from other Bacilli. The B. anthracis lineage carries a specific mutation in the global regulator PlcR, which controls the transcription of secreted virulence factors in B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Coevolution of the B. anthracis chromosome with its plasmids may be the basis for the successful development and uniqueness of the B. anthracis lineage. PMID:19514852

  18. Bacteriophage PBC1 and its endolysin as an antimicrobial agent against Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsuk; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic human pathogen responsible for food poisoning and other, nongastrointestinal infections. Due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant B. cereus strains, the demand for alternative therapeutic options is increasing. To address these problems, we isolated and characterized a Siphoviridae virulent phage, PBC1, and its lytic enzymes. PBC1 showed a very narrow host range, infecting only 1 of 22 B. cereus strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the major capsid protein revealed that PBC1 is more closely related to the Bacillus clarkii phage BCJA1c and phages of lactic acid bacteria than to the phages infecting B. cereus. Whole-genome comparison showed that the late-gene region, including the terminase gene, structural genes, and holin gene of PBC1, is similar to that from B. cereus temperate phage 250, whereas their endolysins are different. Compared to the extreme host specificity of PBC1, its endolysin, LysPBC1, showed a much broader lytic spectrum, albeit limited to the genus Bacillus. The catalytic domain of LysPBC1 when expressed alone also showed Bacillus-specific lytic activity, which was lower against the B. cereus group but higher against the Bacillus subtilis group than the full-length protein. Taken together, these results suggest that the virulent phage PBC1 is a useful component of a phage cocktail to control B. cereus, even with its exceptionally narrow host range, as it can kill a strain of B. cereus that is not killed by other phages, and that LysPBC1 is an alternative biocontrol agent against B. cereus. PMID:25595773

  19. Biofilm formation in Bacillus thuringiensis : Investigation of the roles of a putative cell surface adhesin and a chemotaxis-related protein responsive to cyclic-di-GMP

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group of bacteria is a subgroup in the Bacillus genus and consists of six different species. Research has evolved mainly around B. cereus, B. thuringiensis and B. anthracis, an opportunistic pathogen capable of food poisoning and infections in mammals, an insecticidal pathogen which can also be an opportunistic pathogen in mammals, and an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing cutaneous and or/systemic anthrax in mammals, respectively. These species are closely related ...

  20. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis study of Bacillus sphaericus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Zahner

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE has been used in the study of some Bacillus species. In this work we applied MLEE and numerical analysis in the study of the Bacillus sphaericus group. B. sphaericus can be distinguished from other entomopathogenic Bacillus by a unique allele (NP-4. Within the species, all insect pathogens were recovered in the same phenetic cluster and all of these strains have the same band position (electrophoresis migration on the agarose gel (ADH-2. The entomopathogenic group of B. sphaericus seems to be a clonal population, having two widespread frequent genotypes (zymovar 59 and zymovar 119.

  1. EXAFS investigation of uranium(VI) complexes formed at Bacillus cereus and Bacillus sphaericus surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium(VI) complex formation at vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus sphaericus was studied using uranium LII-edge and LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. A comparison of the measured equatorial U-O distances and other EXAFS structural parameters of uranyl species formed at the Bacillus strains with those of the uranyl structure family indicates that the uranium is predominantly bound as uranyl complexes with phosphoryl residues. (orig.)

  2. Genome Sequence of Bacillus anthracis Isolated from an Anthrax Burial Site in Pollino National Park, Basilicata Region (Southern Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Fasanella, Antonio; Braun, Peter; Grass, Gregor; Hanczaruk, Matthias; Aceti, Angela; Serrecchia, Luigina; Leonzio, Giuseppe; Tolve, Francesco; Georgi, Enrico; Antwerpen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A Bacillus anthracis strain was isolated from a burial-site in Pollino National Park where a bovine died of anthrax and was buried in 2004. We report the first genome sequence of B. anthracis isolated in the Basilicata region (southern Italy), which is the highest risk area of anthrax infection in Italy.

  3. A Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Marker Specific for the Bacillus cereus Group Is Diagnostic for Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara; Frova, Giuseppe; Gallo, Romina; Mori, Elena; Fani, Renato; Sorlini, Claudia

    1999-01-01

    Aiming to develop a DNA marker specific for Bacillus anthracis and able to discriminate this species from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, we applied the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique to a collection of 101 strains of the genus Bacillus, including 61 strains of the B. cereus group. An 838-bp RAPD marker (SG-850) specific for B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis, and B. mycoides was identified. This fragment included a pu...

  4. Meningitis due to Bacillus cereus: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Michael P; Elam, Kara; Bearman, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is infrequently associated with invasive central nervous system (CNS) disease. Infection is associated with conditions that lead to reduced host immunity and provide direct access to the CNS, such as spinal anesthesia and ventricular tubes and shunts. A case of ventriculitis secondary to B cereus in a patient receiving intrathecal chemotherapy is reported, along with a review of the current literature. B cereus can colonize medical devices, thus posing a risk for invasive disease. Despite aggressive treatment with broad-spectrum anti-infectives, the mortality of CNS invasive B cereus is high. Clinicians should not dismiss Gram-positive rods resembling Bacillus species from normally sterile sites as contaminants in critically ill patients. Appropriate antibiotic therapy should be promptly initiated to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:23449377

  5. Bacillus anthracis spore interactions with mammalian cells: Relationship between germination state and the outcome of in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Stojkovic Bojana; Prouty Angela M; Tamilselvam Batcha; Gut Ian M; Czeschin Stephanie; van der Donk Wilfred A; Blanke Steven R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background During inhalational anthrax, internalization of Bacillus anthracis spores by host cells within the lung is believed to be a key step for initiating the transition from the localized to disseminated stages of infection. Despite compelling in vivo evidence that spores remain dormant within the bronchioalveolar spaces of the lungs, and germinate only after uptake into host cells, most in vitro studies of infection have been conducted under conditions that promote rapid germin...

  6. Isolation of a New Mexican Strain of Bacillus subtilis with Antifungal and Antibacterial Activities

    OpenAIRE

    M. G. L. Basurto-Cadena; M. Vázquez-Arista; García-Jiménez, J.; Salcedo-Hernández, R.; Bideshi, D. K.; Barboza-Corona, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Although several strains of B. subtilis with antifungal activity have been isolated worldwide, to date there are no published reports regarding the isolation of a native B. subtilis strain from strawberry plants in Mexico. A native bacterium (Bacillus subtilis 21) demonstrated in vitro antagonistic activity against different plant pathogenic fungi. Under greenhouse conditions, it was shown that plants infected with Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium verticillioides and treated with B. subtilis 2...

  7. Application of In Vivo Induced Antigen Technology (IVIAT) to Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Peppercorn, Amanda; Young, John S; Drysdale, Melissa; Baresch, Andrea; Bikowski, Margaret V.; Ashford, David A.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D.; Lyons, C. Rick; Koehler, Theresa M.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Rollins, Sean McKenzie; Calderwood, Stephen Beaven; Ryan, Edward Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) is an immuno-screening technique that identifies bacterial antigens expressed during infection and not during standard in vitro culturing conditions. We applied IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis and identified PagA, seven members of a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase autolysin family, three P60 family lipoproteins, two transporters, spore cortex lytic protein SleB, a penicillin binding protein, a putative prophage holin, respiratory nitrate reductase Nar...

  8. In Vivo Demonstration and Quantification of Intracellular Bacillus anthracis in Lung Epithelial Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Brooke H.; Liu, Qing; Sarah A Jenkins; Tuvim, Michael J.; Dickey, Burton F.; Xu, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is initiated by the entry of Bacillus anthracis spores into the lung. A critical early event in the establishment of an infection is the dissemination of spores from the lung. Using in vitro cell culture assays, we previously demonstrated that B. anthracis spores are capable of entering into epithelial cells of the lung and crossing a barrier of lung epithelial cells without apparent disruption of the barrier integrity, suggesting a novel portal for spores to disseminate ...

  9. EXPRESSION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS PROTECTIVE ANTIGEN IN VACCINE STRAIN BRUCELLA ABORTUS RB51

    OpenAIRE

    Poff, Sherry Ann

    1997-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that can cause cutaneous, gastrointestinal or respiratory disease in many vertebrates, including humans. Commercially available anthrax vaccines for immunization of humans are of limited duration and do not protect against the respiratory form of the disease. Brucella abortus is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes chronic infection in animals and humans. As with other intracellular pathogens, cell mediated im...

  10. Meningitis due to Bacillus cereus: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Michael P.; Kara Elam; Gonzalo Bearman

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is infrequently associated with invasive central nervous system (CNS) disease. Infection is associated with conditions that lead to reduced host immunity and provide direct access to the CNS, such as spinal anesthesia and ventricular tubes and shunts. A case of ventriculitis secondary to B cereus in a patient receiving intrathecal chemotherapy is reported, along with a review of the current literature. B cereus can colonize medical devices, thus posing a risk for invasive dise...

  11. A Cluster of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia Cases among Injection Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Linda MN Hoang; Romney, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A...

  12. Triple fixation of Bacillus subtilis dormant spores.

    OpenAIRE

    Kozuka, S; Tochikubo, K

    1983-01-01

    A triple-fixation method with a sequential application of 5% glutaraldehyde, 1% osmium tetroxide, and 2% potassium permanganate gave superior preservation of the ultrastructure of Bacillus subtilis dormant spores with a thick spore coat.

  13. Microbial Transformation of Quercetin by Bacillus cereus

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Koppaka V.; Weisner, Nghe T.

    1981-01-01

    Biotransformation of quercetin was examined with a number of bacterial cultures. In the presence of a bacterial culture (Bacillus cereus), quercetin was transformed into two crystalline products, identified as protocatechuic acid and quercetin-3-glucoside (isoquercitrin).

  14. Narrow terahertz attenuation signatures in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Brown, Elliott R; Viveros, Leamon; Burris, Kellie P; Stewart, C Neal

    2014-10-01

    Terahertz absorption signatures from culture-cultivated Bacillus thuringiensis were measured with a THz photomixing spectrometer operating from 400 to 1200 GHz. We observe two distinct signatures centered at ∼955 and 1015 GHz, and attribute them to the optically coupled particle vibrational resonance (surface phonon-polariton) of Bacillus spores. This demonstrates the potential of the THz attenuation signatures as "fingerprints" for label-free biomolecular detection. PMID:23821459

  15. Antifungal activity of indigenous bacillus sp. isolate Q3 against marshmallow mycobiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jošić Dragana Lj.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Marshmallow is a host of a number of saprophytic and parasitic fungi in Serbia. The seeds of marshmallow are contaminated with fungi from different genera, especially Alternaria and Fusarium, which significantly reduced seed germination and caused seedling decay. In this study we investigate antagnonism of indigenous Bacillus sp. isolate Q3 against marshmallow mycopopulation. Bacillus sp. Q3 was isolated from maize rhizosphere, characterized by polyphasic approch and tested for plant growth promoting treats. Bacillus sp. Q3 produced antifungal metabolites with growth inhibition activity against numerous fungi in dual culture: 61.8% of Alternaria alternata, 74.8% of Myrothecium verrucaria and 33.6% of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. That effect could be caused by different antifungal metabolites including siderophores, hydrolytic enzymes, organic acids and indole acetic acid (IAA. Suppression of natural marshmallow seed infection by Q3 isolate was observed. The seeds were immersed in different concentrations of bacterial suspension during 2h and their infections by phytopathogenic fungi were estimated. The results showed significant reduction of seed infection by Alternaria spp. The presented results indicate possible application of this isolate as promising biological agent for control of marshmallow seed pathogenic fungi.

  16. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP) caused by Bacillus Cereus in an Alcoholic Patient: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Ansari, Mohammad Aftab Alam; Sarfraz, Asim; Jaiswal, Nitesh; Singh, Siddharth

    2015-02-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is infection of peritoneal covering of the abdomen caused by bacteria, without any known etiology. Common known predisposing factors are cirrhosis of liver and old age among others. Bacillus cereus is an uncommon cause of SBP and often wrongly interpreted as a contaminant. We hereby report a case of peritonitis in chronic alcoholic, elderly male patient presenting in the outpatient department. Bacillus cereus is often regarded as contaminant but must be carefully identified and correlated clinically in case of isolation from peritoneal fluid. PMID:25859458

  17. Elizabethkingia meningosepticum (Chryseobacterium meningosepticum Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ceyhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chryseobacterium meningosepticum is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacillus historically associated primarily with meningitis in neonates and a wide variety of infections in immunocompromised patients. Neonatal infections often occur as outbreaks with environmental contamination being the source. C. meningosepticum infections are not common but are clinically important because the organism is naturally resistant to multiple antibiotics. In this paper, we have reviewed the nosocomial outbreaks of C. meningosepticum in newborns and infants reported so far in the literature and overviewed the infection control interventions, treatment modalities, and prevention measures.

  18. Immunological Correlates for Protection against Intranasal Challenge of Bacillus anthracis Spores Conferred by a Protective Antigen-Based Vaccine in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Shay; Kobiler, David; Levy, Haim; Marcus, Hadar; Pass, Avi; Rothschild, Nili; Altboum, Zeev

    2006-01-01

    Correlates between immunological parameters and protection against Bacillus anthracis infection in animals vaccinated with protective antigen (PA)-based vaccines could provide surrogate markers to evaluate the putative protective efficiency of immunization in humans. In previous studies we demonstrated that neutralizing antibody levels serve as correlates for protection in guinea pigs (S. Reuveny et al., Infect. Immun. 69:2888-2893, 2001; H. Marcus et al., Infect. Immun. 72:3471-3477, 2004). ...

  19. Iturin levels on wheat spikes linked to biological control of Fusarium head blight by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, J M; Gibson, D M; Vaughan, R H; Bergstrom, G C

    2013-02-01

    The TrigoCor strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens provides consistent control against Fusarium head blight of wheat in controlled settings but there is a lack of disease and deoxynivalenol suppression in field settings. Since production of antifungal compounds is thought to be the main mode of action of TrigoCor control, we quantified levels of a key family of antifungal metabolites, iturins, as well as monitored Bacillus populations on wheat spikes over 14 days post-application in both the greenhouse and the field. We found that initial iturin levels on spikes in the greenhouse were three times greater than on spikes in the field, but that by 3 days post-application, iturin levels were equivalent and very low in both settings. We also determined that iturins declined rapidly over a 3-day post-application period on wheat spikes in both environments, despite the presence of significant Bacillus populations. Greenhouse trials and antibiosis tests indicated that the lower iturin levels on wheat spikes in the field could be a major factor limiting disease control in field settings. Future efforts to improve Bacillus disease control on wheat spikes and in the phyllosphere of various plants should focus on maintaining higher levels of iturins over critical infection periods. PMID:23075168

  20. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda Mn; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided. PMID:26015795

  1. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  2. Crystal structure of Bacillus anthracis transpeptidase enzyme CapD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R.; Richter, S.; Zhang, R.; Anderson, V. J.; Missiakas, D.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-09-04

    Bacillus anthracis elaborates a poly-{gamma}-d-glutamic acid capsule that protects bacilli from phagocytic killing during infection. The enzyme CapD generates amide bonds with peptidoglycan cross-bridges to anchor capsular material within the cell wall envelope of B. anthracis. The capsular biosynthetic pathway is essential for virulence during anthrax infections and can be targeted for anti-infective inhibition with small molecules. Here, we present the crystal structures of the {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase CapD with and without {alpha}-l-Glu-l-Glu dipeptide, a non-hydrolyzable analog of poly-{gamma}-d-glutamic acid, in the active site. Purified CapD displays transpeptidation activity in vitro, and its structure reveals an active site broadly accessible for poly-{gamma}-glutamate binding and processing. Using structural and biochemical information, we derive a mechanistic model for CapD catalysis whereby Pro{sup 427}, Gly{sup 428}, and Gly{sup 429} activate the catalytic residue of the enzyme, Thr{sup 352}, and stabilize an oxyanion hole via main chain amide hydrogen bonds.

  3. Bacillus thuringiensis membrane-damaging toxins acting on mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biopesticide in forestry and agriculture, being able to produce potent species-specific insecticidal toxins and considered nonpathogenic to other animals. More recently, however, repeated observations are documenting the association of this microorganism with various infectious diseases in humans, such as food-poisoning-associated diarrheas, periodontitis, bacteremia, as well as ocular, burn, and wound infections. Similar to B. cereus, B. thuringiensis produces an array of virulence factors acting against mammalian cells, such as phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC and PI-PLC), hemolysins, in particular hemolysin BL (HBL), and various enterotoxins. The contribution of some of these toxins to B. thuringiensis pathogenicity has been studied in animal models of infection, following intravitreous, intranasal, or intratracheal inoculation. These studies lead to the speculation that the activities of PC-PLC, PI-PLC, and HBL are responsible for most of the pathogenic properties of B. thuringiensis in nongastrointestinal infections in mammals. This review summarizes data regarding the biological activity, the genetic basis, and the structural features of these membrane-damaging toxins. PMID:25283838

  4. Production of amylolytic enzymes by bacillus spp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty six bacteria and twenty fungi were isolated from various sources. These varied from rotten fruites to local drinks and soil samples from different parts of Sudan. On the basis of index of amylolytic activity, forty one bacteria and twelve fungi were found to hydrolyse strach. The best ten strach hydrolysing isolates were identified all as bacilli (Bacillus licheniformis SUD-K1, SUD-K2, SUD-K4, SUD-O, SUD-SRW, SUD-BRW, SUD-By, Bacillus subtilis SUD-K3, and Bacillus circulans SUD-D and SUD-K7). Their amylase productivity was studied with respect to temperature and time. Amylolytic activity was measured by spectrophotometer, the highest activity was produced in around 24 hours of growth in all; six of which gave the highest amylase activity at 50 deg C and the rest at 45C. Based on the thermal production six isolates were chosen for further investigation. These were Bacillus licheniformis SUD-K1, SUD-K2, SUD-K4, SUD-O, Bacillus subtilis SUD-K3 and Bacillus circulans SUD-K7. The inclusion of strach and Mg++ ions in the culture medium gave the highest enzyme yield. The Ph 9.0 was found to be the optimum for amylase production for all isolates except Bacillus subtilis SUD-K3 which had an optimum at pH 7.0. Three isolates (Bacillus licheniformis SUD-K1, SUD-K4 and SUD-O recorded highestamylase production in a medium supplemented with peptone while the rest (Bacillus licheniformis SUD-K2, Bacillus subtilis SUD-K3 and Bacillus circulans SUD-K7) gave highest amylase productivity in a medium supplemented with malt extract. Four isolates (Bacillus licheniformis SUD-K1 and Bacillus subtilis SUD-K3 gave maximum amylase production in a medium containing 0.5% soluble strach while the rest (gave maximum amylase production at 2%. Soluble strach was found to be best substrate among the different carbon sources tested. The maximum temperature for amylase activity ranged from 60-70 deg C and 1% strach concentration was optimum for all isolates. Addition of different metal ions

  5. Treatment of the Mycobacterium chelonae Infection after Fat Injection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seok-Kwun; Choi, Ji-An; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    For recent years, use of autologous fat injection has increased significantly in facial contouring surgery. Along with such increase in use, complications like atypical mycoplasma infection have been also on the increasing trend. The authors report two cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection that occurred after autologous fat injection. Patients were treated as infection that resistant to common antibiotics and results were negative to routine culture and Gram staining. Acid-fast bacillus s...

  6. Bacillus Strains Most Closely Related to Bacillus nealsonii Are Not Effectively Circumscribed within the Taxonomic Species Definition

    OpenAIRE

    Kealy Peak, K.; Kathleen E. Duncan; Luna, Vicki A.; King, Debra S.; McCarthy, Peter J.; Cannons, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus strains with >99.7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity were characterized with DNA:DNA hybridization, cellular fatty acid (CFA) analysis, and testing of 100 phenotypic traits. When paired with the most closely related type strain, percent DNA:DNA similarities (% S) for six Bacillus strains were all far below the recommended 70% threshold value for species circumscription with Bacillus nealsonii. An apparent genomic group of four Bacillus strain pairings with 94%–70% S was contradicted...

  7. Complications of bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy in 1,278 patients with bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, D L; Stogdill, V D; Stogdill, B J; Crispen, R G

    1986-02-01

    Our series of 195 patients, plus 134 reported on in the literature and 949 reviewed by various physicians provide 1,278 patients for review of bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy complications. Cystitis occurred in 91 per cent of the patients. Complications identified included fever more than 103F in 50 patients (3.9 per cent), granulomatous prostatitis in 17 (1.3 per cent), bacillus Calmette-Guerin pneumonitis or hepatitis in 12 (0.9 per cent), arthritis or arthralgia in 6 (0.5 per cent), hematuria requiring catheterization or transfusion in 6 (0.5 per cent), skin rash in 5 (0.4 per cent), skin abscess in 5 (0.4 per cent), ureteral obstruction in 4 (0.3 per cent), epididymo-orchitis in 2 (0.2 per cent), bladder contracture in 2 (0.2 per cent), hypotension in 1 (0.1 per cent) and cytopenia in 1 (0.1 per cent). Most of the severe irritative side effects and subsequent systemic complications can be prevented with prophylactic isoniazid given for 3 days, beginning the morning of treatment. Patients with life-threatening systemic bacillus Calmette-Guerin infection or anaphylaxis should receive 500 mg. cycloserine twice daily for 3 days in addition to combination antituberculous therapy because the rapid action of this drug may be life-saving. Direct intralesional bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy can produce sepsis and death, and should be avoided but intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin generally is well tolerated and has produced no complication in more than 95 per cent of the patients treated. PMID:3511286

  8. [Bacillus thuringiensis: a biotechnology model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, V; Lereclus, D

    1999-01-01

    This paper is on the different biotechnological approaches that have been used to improve Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) for the control of agricultural insect pests and have contributed to the successful use of this biological control agent; it describes how a better knowledge of the high diversity of Bt strains and toxins genes together with the development of efficient host-vector systems has made it possible to overcome a number of the problems associated with Bt based insect control measures. First we present an overview of the biology of Bt and of the mode of action of its insecticidal toxins. We then describe some of the progress that has been made in furthering our knowledge of the genetics of Bt and of its insecticidal toxin genes and in the understanding of their regulation. The paper then deals with the use of recombinant DNA technology to develop new Bt strains for more effective pest control or to introduce the genes encoding partial-endotoxins directly into plants to produce insect-resistant trangenic plants. Several examples describing how biotechnology has been used to increase the production of insecticidal proteins in Bt or their persistence in the field by protecting them against UV degradation are presented and discussed. Finally, based on our knowledge of the mechanism of transposition of the Bt transposon Tn4430, we describe the construction of a new generation of recombinant strains of Bt, from which antibiotic resistance genes and other non-Bt DNA sequences were selectively eliminated, using a new generation of site-specific recombination vectors. In the future, continuing improvement of first generation products and research into new sources of resistance is essential to ensure the long-term control of insect pests. Chimeric toxins could also be produced so as to increase toxin activity or direct resistance towards a particular type of insect. The search for new insecticidal toxins, in Bt or other microorganisms, may also provide new weapons

  9. Comparative analysis of two-component signal transduction systems of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, M.W.H.J. de; Francke, C.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group are ubiquitously present in the environment and can adapt to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. In bacteria, these adaptive responses are generally mediated by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), which consist of a histidine kinase (HK) and

  10. BOOK REVIEW – BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS: A CORNERSTONE OF MODERN AGRICULTURE BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are you interested in the technical issues surrounding the use of Bacillus thuringiensis pesticidal traits as sprays and as plant incorporated protectants (transgenic crops)? Should the dimensions of human health, ecology, entomology, risk assessment, resistance management, and d...

  11. Regulation of Polyglutamic Acid Synthesis by Glutamate in Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Kambourova, Margarita; Tangney, Martin; Priest, Fergus G.

    2001-01-01

    The synthesis of polyglutamic acid (PGA) was repressed by exogenous glutamate in strains of Bacillus licheniformis but not in strains of Bacillus subtilis, indicating a clear difference in the regulation of synthesis of capsular slime in these two species. Although extracellular γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) activity was always present in PGA-producing cultures of B. licheniformis under various growth conditions, there was no correlation between the quantity of PGA and enzyme activity. Moreo...

  12. Evaluation of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus metabolites for anthelmintic activity

    OpenAIRE

    M L Vijaya Kumar; Thippeswamy, B.; I L Kuppust; Naveenkumar, K. J.; C K Shivakumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the anthelmintic acivity of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus metabolites. Materials and Methods: The successive solvent extractions with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol. The solvent extracts were tested for anthelmintic activity against Pheretima posthuma at 20 mg/ml concentration. The time of paralysis and time of death of the worms was determined for all the extracts. Albendazole was taken as a standard reference and sterile water as a control. Results: ...

  13. Secondary cell wall polysaccharides in Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus strains

    OpenAIRE

    Leoff, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a systematic comparison of cell wall carbohydrates, in particular the non classical secondary cell wall polysaccharides from closely related strains within the Bacillus cereus group. The results suggest that the cell wall glycosyl composition of the various Bacillus cereus group strains display differences that correlate with their phylogenetic relatedness. Comparative structural analysis of polysaccharide components that were released from the cell walls of the various s...

  14. Differentiation between spores of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus by a quantitative immunofluorescence technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, A. P.; Martin, K L; Broster, M G

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescence assay based on fiber optic microscopy was used to measure the reaction of formalized spores of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus isolates with fluorescein conjugates prepared by hyperimmunization with B. anthracis Vollum spores. The spores of 11 of the 20 B. cereus strains reacted with the anti-anthrax conjugate to such an extent that they were indistinguishable from the spores of the several B. anthracis isolates tested. However, absorption of the conju...

  15. Genotype Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Strains Circulating in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rume, Farzana Islam; Affuso, Alessia; Serrecchia, Luigina; Rondinone, Valeria; Manzulli, Viviana; Campese, Emanuele; Di Taranto, Pietro; Biswas, Paritosh Kumar; Ahsan, Chowdhury Rafiqul; Yasmin, Mahmuda; Fasanella, Antonio; Hugh-Jones, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is considered an endemic disease affecting ruminants with sporadic zoonotic occurrences in humans. Due to the lack of knowledge about risks from an incorrect removal of infected carcasses, the disease is not properly monitored, and because of the socio-economic conditions, the situation is under-reported and under-diagnosed. For sensitive species, anthrax represents a fatal outcome with sudden death and sometimes bleeding from natural orifices. The most common source of infection for ruminants is ingestion of spores during grazing in contaminated pastures or through grass and water contaminated with anthrax spores. Domestic cattle, sheep and goats can also become infected through contaminated bone meal (used as feed) originating from anthrax-infected carcasses. The present investigation was conducted to isolate B. anthracis organisms from 169 samples (73 soil, 1 tissue, 4 bone and 91 bone meal samples) collected from 12 different districts of Bangladesh. The sampling was carried out from 2012 to 2015. Twelve samples resulted positive for B. anthracis. Biomolecular analyses were conducted starting from the Canonical Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (CanSNP) to analyze the phylogenetic origin of strains. The analysis of genotype, obtained through the Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA) with the analysis of 15 Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTR), demonstrated four different genotypes: two of them were previously identified in the district of Sirajganj. The sub-genotyping, conducted with Single Nucleotide Repeats analysis, revealed the presence of eight subgenotypes. The data of the present study concluded that there was no observed correlation between imported cattle feed and anthrax occurrence in Bangladesh and that the remarkable genetic variations of B. anthracis were found in the soil of numerous outbreaks in this country. PMID:27082248

  16. Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes withBacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D' Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch,Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri; Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman,Eugene; Chu, Lien; Fonstein, Michael; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Overbeek, Ross; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2005-09-14

    Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-layer proteins suggesting differences in their phenotype were identified. The B. cereus group has signal transduction systems including a tyrosine kinase related to two-component system histidine kinases from B. subtilis. A model for regulation of the stress responsive sigma factor sigmaB in the B. cereus group different from the well studied regulation in B. subtilis has been proposed. Despite a high degree of chromosomal synteny among these genomes, significant differences in cell wall and spore coat proteins that contribute to the survival and adaptation in specific hosts has been identified.

  17. ABILITY OF BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM: Bacillus coagulans, Bacilus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Nitrosomonas sp. and Pseudomonas putida IN BIOREMEDIATION OF WASTE WATER IN CISIRUNG WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT

    OpenAIRE

    Ratu SAFITRI; Bambang PRIADIE; Mia MIRANTI; Arum Widi ASTUTI

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the ability of bacterial consortium: Bacillus coagulans, Bacilus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Nitrosomonas sp., and Pseudomonas putida in bioremediation of wastewater origin Cisirung WWTP. This study uses an experimental method completely randomized design (CRD), which consists of two treatment factors (8x8 factorial design). The first factor is a consortium of bacteria (K), consisting of 8 level factors (k1, k2, k3, k4, k5...

  18. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Schipma, Matthew; White, Amanda; Willse, Alan

    2006-01-01

    A genome-independent microarray and new statistical techniques were used to genotype Bacillus strains and quantitatively compare DNA fingerprints with the known taxonomy of the genus. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand process level variability and lead to recommended standard operating procedures for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics.

  19. Complete Genome of Bacillus thuringiensis Myophage Spock

    OpenAIRE

    Maroun, Justin W.; Whitcher, Kelvin J.; Chamakura, Karthik R.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram-positive, sporulating soil microbe with valuable pesticide-producing properties. The study of bacteriophages of B. thuringiensis could provide new biotechnological tools for the use of this bacterium. Here, we present the complete annotated genome of Spock, a myophage of B. thuringiensis, and describe its features.

  20. Distribution of phenotypes among Bacillus thuringiensis strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extensive collection of Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from around the world were phenotypically profiled using standard biochemical tests. Six phenotypic traits occurred in 20-86% of the isolates and were useful in distinguishing isolates: production of urease (U; 20.5% of isolates), hydrolysis...

  1. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Bottini, N.; Deutscher, J.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    phosphorylation, indicating that this post-translational modifi cation could regulate physiological processes ranging from stress response and exopolysaccharide synthesis to DNA metabolism. Some interesting work in this fi eld was done in Bacillus subtilis , and we here present the current state of knowledge on...

  2. Complete Genome of Bacillus subtilis Myophage Grass

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Stanton Y.; Colquhoun, Jennifer M.; Perl, Abbey L.; Chamakura, Karthik R.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a ubiquitous Gram-positive model organism. Here, we describe the complete genome of B. subtilus myophage Grass. Aside from genes encoding core proteins pertinent to the life cycle of the phage, Grass has several interesting features, including an FtsK/SpoIIIE protein.

  3. Comparison of hand hygiene procedures for removing Bacillus cereus spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Teppei; Hayashi, Shunji; Hosoda, Kouichi; Morisawa, Yuji; Hirai, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming bacterium. B. cereus occasionally causes nosocomial infections, in which hand contamination with the spores plays an important role. Therefore, hand hygiene is the most important practice for controlling nosocomial B. cereus infections. This study aimed to determine the appropriate hand hygiene procedure for removing B. cereus spores. Thirty volunteers' hands were experimentally contaminated with B. cereus spores, after which they performed 6 different hand hygiene procedures. We compared the efficacy of the procedures in removing the spores from hands. The alcohol-based hand-rubbing procedures scarcely removed them. The soap washing procedures reduced the number of spores by more than 2 log10. Extending the washing time increased the spore-removing efficacy of the washing procedures. There was no significant difference in efficacy between the use of plain soap and antiseptic soap. Handwashing with soap is appropriate for removing B. cereus spores from hands. Alcohol-based hand-rubbing is not effective. PMID:25252644

  4. The Pore-Forming Haemolysins of Bacillus Cereus: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Sanchis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group contains diverse Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal diseases and severe eye infections in humans. They have also been incriminated in a multitude of other severe, and frequently fatal, clinical infections, such as osteomyelitis, septicaemia, pneumonia, liver abscess and meningitis, particularly in immuno-compromised patients and preterm neonates. The pathogenic properties of this organism are mediated by the synergistic effects of a number of virulence products that promote intestinal cell destruction and/or resistance to the host immune system. This review focuses on the pore-forming haemolysins produced by B. cereus: haemolysin I (cereolysin O, haemolysin II, haemolysin III and haemolysin IV (CytK. Haemolysin I belongs to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC family whose best known members are listeriolysin O and perfringolysin O, produced by L. monocytogenes and C. perfringens respectively. HlyII and CytK are oligomeric ß-barrel pore-forming toxins related to the α-toxin of S. aureus or the ß-toxin of C. perfringens. The structure of haemolysin III, the least characterized haemolytic toxin from the B. cereus, group has not yet been determined.

  5. The pore-forming haemolysins of bacillus cereus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramarao, Nalini; Sanchis, Vincent

    2013-06-01

    The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group contains diverse Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal diseases and severe eye infections in humans. They have also been incriminated in a multitude of other severe, and frequently fatal, clinical infections, such as osteomyelitis, septicaemia, pneumonia, liver abscess and meningitis, particularly in immuno-compromised patients and preterm neonates. The pathogenic properties of this organism are mediated by the synergistic effects of a number of virulence products that promote intestinal cell destruction and/or resistance to the host immune system. This review focuses on the pore-forming haemolysins produced by B. cereus: haemolysin I (cereolysin O), haemolysin II, haemolysin III and haemolysin IV (CytK). Haemolysin I belongs to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family whose best known members are listeriolysin O and perfringolysin O, produced by L. monocytogenes and C. perfringens respectively. HlyII and CytK are oligomeric ß-barrel pore-forming toxins related to the α-toxin of S. aureus or the ß-toxin of C. perfringens. The structure of haemolysin III, the least characterized haemolytic toxin from the B. cereus, group has not yet been determined. PMID:23748204

  6. Investigation of biosurfactant production by Bacillus pumilus 1529 and Bacillus subtilis WPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shila khajavi shojaei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biosurfactants are unique amphipathic molecules with extensive application in removing organic and metal contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate production of biosurfactant and determine optimal conditions to produce biosurfactant by Bacillus pumilus 1529 and Bacillus subtilis WPI. Materials and methods: In this study, effect of carbon source, temperature and incubation time on biosurfactant production was evaluated. Hemolytic activity, emulsification activity, oil spreading, drop collapse, cell hydrophobicity and measurement of surface tension were used to detect biosurfactant production. Then, according to the results, the optimal conditions for biosurfactant production by and Bacillus subtilis WPI was determined. Results: In this study, both bacteria were able to produce biosurfactant at an acceptable level. Glucose, kerosene, sugarcane molasses and phenanthrene used as a sole carbon source and energy for the mentioned bacteria. Bacillus subtilis WPI produced maximum biosurfactant in the medium containing kerosene and reduced surface tension of the medium to 33.1 mN/m after 156 hours of the cultivation at 37°C. Also, the highest surface tension reduction by Bacillus pumilus 1529 occurred in the medium containing sugarcane molasses and reduce the surface tension of culture medium after 156 hours at 37°C from 50.4 to 28.83 mN/m. Discussion and conclusion: Bacillus pumilus 1529 and Bacillus subtilis WPI had high potential in production of biosurfactant and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons and Phenanthrene. Therefore, it could be said that these bacteria had a great potential for applications in bioremediation and other environmental process.

  7. Construction of occluded recombinant baculoviruses containing the full-length cry1Ab and cry1Ac genes from Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, B M; Crook, N. E.

    1998-01-01

    The administration of baculoviruses to insects for bioassay purposes is carried out, in most cases, by contamination of food surfaces with a known amount of occlusion bodies (OBs). Since per os infection is the natural route of infection, occluded recombinant viruses containing crystal protein genes (cry1Ab and cry1Ac) from Bacillus thuringiensis were constructed for comparison with the baculovirus prototype Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV). The transfer vector pAcUW2B was ...

  8. Co-Immunization of Plasmid DNA Encoding IL-12 and IL-18 with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Vaccine against Progressive Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Bo-Young; Eoh, Hyungjin; Ha, Sang-Jun; Bang, Hyeeun; Kim, Seung-Cheol; Sung, Young-Chul; Cho, Sang-Nae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has widely been used to immunize against tuberculosis, but its protective efficacy is variable in adult pulmonary tuberculosis, while it is not efficiently protective against progressive infection of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. In this study, the protective effects of plasmid DNA vaccine constructs encoding IL-12 or IL-18 with the BCG vaccine were evaluated against progressive infection of M. tuberculosis, using mouse aerosol cha...

  9. Comparative efficacy of Bacillus anthracis live spore vaccine and protective antigen vaccine against anthrax in the guinea pig.

    OpenAIRE

    Little, S F; Knudson, G B

    1986-01-01

    Several strains of Bacillus anthracis have been reported previously to cause fatal infection in immunized guinea pigs. In this study, guinea pigs were immunized with either a protective antigen vaccine or a live Sterne strain spore vaccine, then challenged with virulent B. anthracis strains isolated from various host species from the United States and foreign sources. Confirmation of previously reported studies (which used only protective antigen vaccines) was made with the identification of ...

  10. Noncapsulated Toxinogenic Bacillus anthracis Presents a Specific Growth and Dissemination Pattern in Naive and Protective Antigen-Immune Mice▿

    OpenAIRE

    Glomski, Ian J.; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Mock, Michèle; Goossens, Pierre L

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming bacterium that causes anthrax. B. anthracis has three major virulence factors, namely, lethal toxin, edema toxin, and a poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule. The toxins modulate host immune responses, and the capsule inhibits phagocytosis. With the goal of increasing safety, decreasing security concerns, and taking advantage of mammalian genetic tools and reagents, mouse models of B. anthracis infection have been developed using attenuated bacteria that produce...

  11. Testing Nucleoside Analogues as Inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis Spore Germination In Vitro and in Macrophage Cell Culture ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Zadkiel; Lee, Kyungae; Abel-Santos, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, has a dormant stage in its life cycle known as the endospore. When conditions become favorable, spores germinate and transform into vegetative bacteria. In inhalational anthrax, the most fatal manifestation of the disease, spores enter the organism through the respiratory tract and germinate in phagosomes of alveolar macrophages. Germinated cells can then produce toxins and establish infection. Thus, germination is a crucial step for the i...

  12. Baulamycins A and B, Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics Identified as Inhibitors of Siderophore Biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Ashootosh; Schofield, Michael M.; Chlipala, George E.; Schultz, Pamela J.; Yim, Isaiah; Newmister, Sean A.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Scaglione, Jamie B.; Hanna, Philip C.; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are high-affinity iron chelators produced by microorganisms and frequently contribute to the virulence of human pathogens. Targeted inhibition of the biosynthesis of siderophores staphyloferrin B of Staphylococcus aureus and petrobactin of Bacillus anthracis hold considerable potential as a single or combined treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and anthrax infection, respectively. The biosynthetic pathways for both siderophores involve a nonribosomal peptide synt...

  13. Resistance to antimicrobials and acid and bile tolerance of Bacillus spp isolated from Bikalga, fermented seeds of Hibiscus sabdariffa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Compaore, Clarisse S.; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Diawara, Brehima;

    2013-01-01

    In the aim of selecting starter cultures, thirteen species of Bacillus spp. including six Bacillus subtilis ssp. subtilis, four Bacillus licheniformis and three Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum isolated from traditional Bikalga were investigated. The study included, for all isolates, gen...

  14. Tinea Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body they infect. Tinea corporis is a fungal infection of the skin on the body. ("Corporis" is ... Causes & Risk Factors How did I get a fungal infection? You can get a fungal infection by touching ...

  15. Disseminated bacillus calmette guerin disease in a twin infant with severe combined immunodeficiency disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatal-disseminated Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG disease is well known in infants with severe combined immunodeficiency after BCG vaccination. We report a 7 month male infant delivered as a product of in vitro fertilization and twin gestation that presented with fever, cough and multiple nodular skin lesions. A biopsy of skin lesions revealed the presence of acid fast bacilli. Mycobacterium bovis infection was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and molecular studies. Immunological profile confirmed the diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency. Only few reports of similar case exist in the literature.

  16. Computational based functional analysis of Bacillus phytases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anukriti; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Gaur, Smriti

    2016-02-01

    Phytase is an enzyme which catalyzes the total hydrolysis of phytate to less phosphorylated myo-inositol derivatives and inorganic phosphate and digests the undigestable phytate part present in seeds and grains and therefore provides digestible phosphorus, calcium and other mineral nutrients. Phytases are frequently added to the feed of monogastric animals so that bioavailability of phytic acid-bound phosphate increases, ultimately enhancing the nutritional value of diets. The Bacillus phytase is very suitable to be used in animal feed because of its optimum pH with excellent thermal stability. Present study is aimed to perform an in silico comparative characterization and functional analysis of phytases from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens to explore physico-chemical properties using various bio-computational tools. All proteins are acidic and thermostable and can be used as suitable candidates in the feed industry. PMID:26672917

  17. Anthrose Biosynthetic Operon of Bacillus anthracis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Shengli; McPherson, Sylvia A.; Tan, Li; Chesnokova, Olga N.; Turnbough, Charles L.; Pritchard, David G.

    2008-01-01

    The exosporium of Bacillus anthracis spores consists of a basal layer and an external hair-like nap. The nap is composed primarily of the glycoprotein BclA, which contains a collagen-like region with multiple copies of a pentasaccharide side chain. This oligosaccharide possesses an unusual terminal sugar called anthrose, followed by three rhamnose residues and a protein-bound N-acetylgalactosamine. Based on the structure of anthrose, we proposed an enzymatic pathway for its biosynthesis. Exam...

  18. Bacillus cereus Biofilms—Same, Only Different

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majed, Racha; Faille, Christine; Kallassy, Mireille; Gohar, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus displays a high diversity of lifestyles and ecological niches and include beneficial as well as pathogenic strains. These strains are widespread in the environment, are found on inert as well as on living surfaces and contaminate persistently the production lines of the food industry. Biofilms are suspected to play a key role in this ubiquitous distribution and in this persistency. Indeed, B. cereus produces a variety of biofilms which differ in their architecture and mechanism of formation, possibly reflecting an adaptation to various environments. Depending on the strain, B. cereus has the ability to grow as immersed or floating biofilms, and to secrete within the biofilm a vast array of metabolites, surfactants, bacteriocins, enzymes, and toxins, all compounds susceptible to act on the biofilm itself and/or on its environment. Within the biofilm, B. cereus exists in different physiological states and is able to generate highly resistant and adhesive spores, which themselves will increase the resistance of the bacterium to antimicrobials or to cleaning procedures. Current researches show that, despite similarities with the regulation processes and effector molecules involved in the initiation and maturation of the extensively studied Bacillus subtilis biofilm, important differences exists between the two species. The present review summarizes the up to date knowledge on biofilms produced by B. cereus and by two closely related pathogens, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis. Economic issues caused by B. cereus biofilms and management strategies implemented to control these biofilms are included in this review, which also discuss the ecological and functional roles of biofilms in the lifecycle of these bacterial species and explore future developments in this important research area. PMID:27458448

  19. Antimicrobial Effects of Honey on Bacillus Cereus

    OpenAIRE

    This paper should be cited as: Javadzadeh M, Najafi M, Rezaei M, Dastoor M, Behzadi AS, Amiri A . [ Antimicrobial Effects of Honey on Bacillus Cereus ]. MLJ. 201 4 ; 8 ( 2 ): 55 - 61 [Article in Persian] Javadzadeh, M. (MSc; M Najafi; Rezaei, M. (MSc; Dastoor, M. (BSc; Behzadi, AS. (MSc; Amiri, A. (MSc

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Honey is a healthy and nutritious food that has been used for a long time as a treatment for different diseases. One of the applied properties of honey is its antimicrobial effect, which differs between different types of honey due to variation of phenolic and antioxidant compositions. This study aimed to assess antimicrobial effect of honey on Bacillus cereus, considering its chemical properties. Material and Methods: Three samples of honey (A1 and A2 of Khorasan Ra...

  20. Insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Höfte, H; Whiteley, H. R.

    1989-01-01

    A classification for crystal protein genes of Bacillus thuringiensis is presented. Criteria used are the insecticidal spectra and the amino acid sequences of the encoded proteins. Fourteen genes are distinguished, encoding proteins active against either Lepidoptera (cryI), Lepidoptera and Diptera (cryII), Coleoptera (cryIII), or Diptera (cryIV). One gene, cytA, encodes a general cytolytic protein and shows no structural similarities with the other genes. Toxicity studies with single purified ...

  1. Bacillus cellulasensis sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawlankar, Rahul; Thorat, Meghana N; Krishnamurthi, Srinivasan; Dastager, Syed G

    2016-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain NIO-1130(T) was isolated from sediment sample taken from Chorao Island, Goa Province, India, and subjected to a taxonomic investigation. The strain was Gram-positive, aerobic, and motile. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the isolate within the genus Bacillus and strain NIO-1130(T) showed highest sequence similarity with Bacillus halosaccharovorans DSM 25387(T) (98.4%) and Bacillus niabensis CIP 109816(T) (98.1%), whereas other Bacillus species showed <97.0% similarity. Tree based on gyrB gene sequence revealed that strain bacillus group. The major menaquinone was MK-7 and the predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, iso-C17:0, and anteiso-C17:0. The strain showed a DNA G+C content of 39.9 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that strain NIO-1130(T) exhibits 70% similarity with Bacillus halosaccharovorans DSM 25387(T) and Bacillus niabensis CIP 109816(T). On the basis of physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, we consider the isolate to represent a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus cellulasensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is NIO-1130(T) (=NCIM 5461(T)=CCTCC AB 2011126(T)). PMID:26410293

  2. Isolation of bacillus thuringiensis from different samples from Mansehra District

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis has made it very interesting for the control of a variety of agricultural pests and human disease vectors. The present study is an attempt to explore the potential and diversity. of Bacillus thuringiensis. from the local environment for the control of cotton spotted bollworm (Earias sp.), a major pest of cotton. Two hundred and ninety eight samples of soil, grain dust, wild animal dung, birds dropping, decaying leaves and dead insects were collected from different ecological environments of Mansehra District yielding 438 Bacillus thuringiensis isolates that produce parasporal crystalline inclusions. In this study the soil samples were found to be the richest source for Bacillus thuringiensis. (author)

  3. BACILLUS CEREUS: ISOLATION IN JENNET MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Scatassa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jennet milk as human food is hypoallergenic for patients affected by Cow Milk Protein Allergy and multiple food allergies. For these pathologies, jennet milk represents the best alternative to other types of milk. Therefore, jennet milk consumers are very sensible to the effects of pathogens' contaminations, and several hygienic practices during the milk production need to be adopted. During regular monitoring in one Sicilian jennet farm, Bacillus cereus in the milk was detected. In 3 bulk milk samples (maximum concentration: 1.2 x 103 ufc/ml, in 3 individual milk samples (10, 20 e 60 ufc/ml, in the milk filter (5 ufc/cm2, in the soil (maximum concentration: 1.5 x 103 ufc/g, on the hands and the gloves of two milkers, on the animal hide (from 1 to 3 ufc/cm2. No spores were detected. A total of 8 Bacillus cereus s.s. strains were analyzed for diarrhoic toxin, and 6 strains producing enterotoxins resulted. The improvement of environmental and milking hygienic conditions reduced Bacillus cereus concentration.

  4. Bioaccumulation of copper, zinc, cadmium and lead by Bacillus sp., Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus and Bacillus subtilis Bioacumulação de cobre, zinco, cádmio e chumbo por Bacillus sp., Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus e Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Augusto da Costa

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents some results on the use of microbes from the genus Bacillus for uptake of cadmium, zinc, copper and lead ions. Maximum copper bioaccumulations were 5.6 mol/g biomass for B. sphaericus, 5.9 mol/g biomass for B. cereus and B. subtilis, and 6.4 mol/g biomass for Bacillus sp. Maximum zinc bioaccumulations were 4.3 mol/g biomass for B. sphaericus, 4.6 mol/g biomass for B. cereus, 4.8 mol/g biomass for Bacillus sp. and 5.0 mol/g biomass for B. subtilis. Maximum cadmium bioaccumulations were 8.0 mol/g biomass for B. cereus, 9.5 mol/g biomass for B. subtilis, 10.8 mol/g biomass for Bacillus sp. and 11.8 mol/g biomass for B. sphaericus. Maximum lead biomaccumulations were 0.7 mol/g biomass for B. sphaericus, 1.1 mol/g biomass for B. cereus, 1.4 mol/g biomass for Bacillus sp. and 1.8 mol/g biomass for B. subtilis. The different Bacillus strains tested presented distinct uptake capacities, and the best results were obtained for B. subtilis and B. cereus.Este trabalho apresenta resultados de acumulação dos íons metálicos cádmio, zinco, cobre e chumbo por bactérias do gênero Bacillus. A bioacumulação máxima de cobre foi 5,6 mol/g biomassa para B. sphaericus, 5,9 mol/g biomassa para B. cereus e B. subtilis, e 6,4 mol/g biomassa para Bacillus sp.. A bioacumulação máxima de zinco foi 4,3 mol/g biomassa para B. sphaericus, 4,6 mol/g biomassa para B. cereus, 4,8 mol/g biomassa para Bacillus sp. e 5,0 mol/g biomassa para B. subtilis. A bioacumulação máxima de cádmio foi 8,0 mol/g biomassa para B. cereus, 9,5 mol/g biomassa para B. subtilis, 10,8 mol/g biomassa para Bacillus sp. e 11,8 mol/g biomassa para B. sphaericus. A bioacumulação máxima de chumbo foi 0,7 mol/g biomassa para B. sphaericus, 1,1 mol/g biomassa para B. cereus, 1,4 mol/g biomassa para Bacillus sp. e 1,8 mol/g biomassa para B. subtilis. As distintas linhagens de Bacillus testadas apresentaram variáveis capacidades de carregamento de íons metálicos, sendo os

  5. Genetic transformation of Bacillus strains close to bacillus subtilis and isolated from the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal and plasmid transformation was found in five out of 118 Bacillus strains, close or identical to Bacillus subtilis, and isolated from soil in Moscow or in the Moscow district. The efficiency of transformation in these strains was lower than that in derivatives of Bac. subtilis strain 168. In these strains the ability to undergo transformation was dependent on the rate of sporulation and the presence of restrictases. As in the case of Bac. subtilis 168 the strains isolated may be used as models in genetic transformation studies on Bac. subtilis

  6. A MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO ANTHRAX INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rukmini; Chow, Carson C; Bartels, John D.; Clermont, Gilles; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) can trigger an acute inflammatory response that results in multisystem organ failure and death. Previously, we developed a mathematical model of acute inflammation after gram-negative infection that had been matched qualitatively to literature data. We modified the properties of the invading bacteria in that model to those specific to B. anthracis and simulated the host response to anthrax infection. We simulated treatment strategies against anthrax in a genetical...

  7. Disseminated BCG infection in a patient with severe combined immunodeficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disseminated mycobacterial infection after bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) accination is a very rare disorder, occurring mostly in patients with immunologic eficiency. We report a case of disseminated BCG infection in a 16-month-old girl with severe combined immunodeficiency. Plain radiographs showed multiple osteolytic lesions in the femora, tibiae, humerus, and phalanges. Abdominal sonography and CT scanning revealed multiple nodules in the spleen, and portocaval lymphadenopathy

  8. Nosocomial infections and their control strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassan; Ahmed; Khan; Aftab; Ahmad; Riffat; Mehboob

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are also known as hospital-acquired/associated infections. National Healthcare Safety Network along with Centers for Disease Control for surveillance has classified nosocomial infection sites into 13 types with 50 infection sites, which are specific on the basis of biological and clinical criteria. The agents that are usually involved in hospitalacquired infections include Streptococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Legionella and Enterobacteriaceae family members, namely, Proteus mirablis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens. Nosocomial pathogens can be transmitted through person to person, environment or contaminated water and food, infected individuals, contaminated healthcare personnel’s skin or contact via shared items and surfaces. Mainly, multi-drug-resistant nosocomial organisms include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia, whereas Clostridium difficile shows natural resistance. Excessive and improper use of broadspectrum antibiotics, especially in healthcare settings, is elevating nosocomial infections, which not only becomes a big health care problem but also causes great economic and production loss in the community. Nosocomial infections can be controlled by measuring and comparing the infection rates within healthcare settings and sticking to the best healthcare practices. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides the methodology for surveillance of nosocomial infections along with investigation of major outbreaks. By means of this surveillance, hospitals can devise a strategy comprising of infection control practices.

  9. Nosocomial infections and their control strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassan Ahmed Khan; Aftab Ahmad; Riffat Mehboob

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are also known as hospital-acquired/associated infections. National Healthcare Safety Network along with Centers for Disease Control for surveillance has classified nosocomial infection sites into 13 types with 50 infection sites, which are specific on the basis of biological and clinical criteria. The agents that are usually involved in hospital-acquired infections include Streptococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Legionella and Enterobacteriaceae family members, namely, Proteus mirablis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens. Nosocomial pathogens can be transmitted through person to person, environment or contaminated water and food, infected individuals, contaminated healthcare personnel’s skin or contact via shared items and surfaces. Mainly, multi-drug-resistant nosocomial organisms include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia, whereas Clostridium dififcile shows natural resistance. Excessive and improper use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially in healthcare settings, is elevating nosocomial infections, which not only becomes a big health care problem but also causes great economic and production loss in the community. Nosocomial infections can be controlled by measuring and comparing the infection rates within healthcare settings and sticking to the best healthcare practices. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides the methodology for surveillance of nosocomial infections along with investigation of major outbreaks. By means of this surveillance, hospitals can devise a strategy comprising of infection control practices.

  10. Dynamics of Aerial Tower Formation in Bacillus subtilis Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Naveen; Seminara, Agnese; Wilking, James; Brenner, Michael; Weitz, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Biofilms are highly-organized colonies of bacteria that form on surfaces. These colonies form sophisticated structures which make them robust and difficult to remove from environments such as catheters, where they pose serious infection problems. Previous work has shown that sub-mm sized aerial towers form on the surface of Bacillus subtilis colony biofilms. Spore-formation is located preferentially at the tops of these towers, known as fruiting bodies, which aid in the dispersal and propagation of the colony to new sites. The formation of towers is strongly affected by the quorum-sensing molecule surfactin and the cannibalism pathway of the bacteria. In the present work, we use confocal fluorescence microscopy to study the development of individual fruiting bodies, allowing us to visualize the time-dependent spatial distribution of matrix-forming and sporulating bacteria within the towers. With this information, we investigate the physical mechanisms, such as surface tension and polymer concentration gradients, that drive the formation of these structures.

  11. Effect of oral administration of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9 strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Lopamudra Haldar; Gandhi, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of oral administration of two Bacillus strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model. Materials and Methods: An in vivo experiment was conducted for 49-day period on 36 adult male albino Wister rats divided equally into to four groups. After 7-day adaptation period, one group (T1) was fed on sterile skim milk along with basal diet for the next 28 days. Second (T2) and (T3) groups received spore biomass of Bacillus coagulans B...

  12. Detection of Anthrax Simulants with Microcalorimetric Spectroscopy: Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Edward T.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2003-04-01

    Recent advances in the development of ultrasensitive micromechanical thermal detectors have led to the advent of novel subfemtojoule microcalorimetric spectroscopy (CalSpec). On the basis of principles of photothermal IR spectroscopy combined with efficient thermomechanical transduction, CalSpec provides acquisition of vibrational spectra of microscopic samples and absorbates. We use CalSpec as a method of identifying nanogram quantities of biological micro-organisms. Our studies focus on Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus spores as simulants for Bacillus anthracis spores. Using CalSpec, we measured IR spectra of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores present on surfaces in nanogram quantities (approximately 100 -1000 spores). The spectra acquired in the wavelength range of 690 -4000 cm-1 (2.5 -14.5 μm) contain information-rich vibrational signatures that reflect the different ratios of biochemical makeup of the micro-organisms. The distinctive features in the spectra obtained for the two types of micro-organism can be used to distinguish between the spores of the Bacillus family. As compared with conventional IR and Fourier-transform IR microscopic spectroscopy techniques, the advantages of the present technique include significantly improved sensitivity (at least a full order of magnitude), absence of expensive IR detectors, and excellent potential for miniaturization.

  13. Complete Genome of Bacillus thuringiensis Myophage BigBertha

    OpenAIRE

    Ting, Jose H.; Smyth, Trinity B.; Chamakura, Karthik R.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2013-01-01

    BigBertha is a myophage of Bacillus thuringiensis, a widely used biocontrol agent that is active against many insect pests of plants. Here, we present the complete annotated genome of BigBertha. The genome shares 85.9% sequence identity with Bacillus cereus phage B4.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L.; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj

    2016-01-01

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages. PMID:27540049

  15. Genetic map of the Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallier, H.; Welker, N.E. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

    1990-02-01

    A circular genetic map of Bacillus stearothermophilus NUB36 was constructed by transduction with bacteriophage TP-42C and protoplast fusion. Sixty-four genes were tentatively assigned a cognate Bacillus subtilis gene based on growth response to intermediates or end products of metabolism, cross-feeding, accumulation of intermediates, or their relative order in a linkage group. Although the relative position of many genes on the Bacillus subtilis genetic map appears to be similar, some differences were detected. The tentative order of the genes in the Bacillus stearothermophilus aro region is aspB-aroBAFEC-tyra-hisH-(trp), whereas it is aspB-aroE-tyrA-hisH-(trp)-aroHBF in Bacillus subtilis. The aroA, aroC, and aroG genes in Bacillus subtilis are located in another region. The tentative order of genes in the trp operon of Bacillus stearothermophilus is trpFCDABE, whereas it is trpABFCDE in Bacillus subtilis.

  16. Quantitative immunofluorescence studies of the serology of Bacillus anthracis spores.

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, A. P.; Martin, K L

    1983-01-01

    A fluorescein-conjugated antibody against formalin-inactivated spores of Bacillus anthracis Vollum reacted only weakly with a variety of Bacillus species in microfluorometric immunofluorescence assays. A conjugated antibody against spores of B. anthracis Sterne showed little affinity for spores of several B. anthracis isolates including B. anthracis Vollum, indicating that more than one anthrax spore serotype exists.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj; Temple, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages. PMID:27540049

  18. Semiautomated Metabolic Staining Assay for Bacillus cereus Emetic Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Finlay, W. J. J.; Logan, N A; Sutherland, A. D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a specific, sensitive, semiautomated, and quantitative Hep-2 cell culture-based 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay for Bacillus cereus emetic toxin. Of nine Bacillus, Brevibacillus, and Paenibacillus species assessed for emetic toxin production, only B. cereus was cytotoxic.

  19. Rapid screening test for enterotoxin-producing Bacillus cereus.

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, S G

    1993-01-01

    Culture supernatants of 30 enterotoxin-producing Bacillus cereus isolates produced a characteristic progressive destruction of McCoy cell monolayers. Enterotoxin-negative B. cereus and other group 1 Bacillus spp. caused no monolayer disruption. The McCoy cell tissue culture system appears to provide a rapid screening assay for detection of enterotoxin-producing B. cereus.

  20. Staph Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... staph infections are caused by the species Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) . Which of these infections do you worry about most? S. aureus most commonly causes skin infections like folliculitis, boils, ...

  1. Hookworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm ... with any of the following roundworms: Necator americanus Ancylostoma ... Ancylostoma ceylanicum Ancylostoma braziliense The first 2 ...

  2. Infections in patients with aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Jessica M; Scheinberg, Phillip; Young, Neal S; Walsh, Thomas J

    2009-07-01

    Infection is a major cause of death in patients with aplastic anemia (AA). There are differences between the immunocompromised state of a patient with AA and the patient who is neutropenic due to chemotherapy and this leads to a difference in the infections that they incur. Prolonged neutropenia is one of the largest risk factors for the development of infections with the invasive mycoses and bacteria. Recovery from neutropenia is directly related to survival, and supportive care plays a large role in protection while the patient is in a neutropenic state. The most common invasive mycoses include the Aspergillus species, Zygomycetes, Candida spp., and Fusarium spp. Bacterial infections that are seen in patients with AA include gram-positive coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus, Staphylococus aureus, Clostridium spp., Micrococcus, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, Listeria monocytogenes, and Bacillus cereus. Gram-negative infections including gram-negative bacilli, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Bacteroides fragilis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumonia, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio vulnificus. Viral infections are much less common but include those that belong to the Herpesviridae family, community-acquired respiratory viral infection, and the viral hepatitides A, B, and C. Evidence of the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis has also been documented. This review discusses the major invasive fungal infections, bacterial pathogens, parasites, and viral infections that are found in patients with AA who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy. The specific immune impairment and current treatment parameters for each of these classes of infection will also be discussed. PMID:19549579

  3. A novel multiplex PCR discriminates Bacillus anthracis and its genetically related strains from other Bacillus cereus group species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Ogawa

    Full Text Available Anthrax is an important zoonotic disease worldwide that is caused by Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming pathogenic bacterium. A rapid and sensitive method to detect B. anthracis is important for anthrax risk management and control in animal cases to address public health issues. However, it has recently become difficult to identify B. anthracis by using previously reported molecular-based methods because of the emergence of B. cereus, which causes severe extra-intestinal infection, as well as the human pathogenic B. thuringiensis, both of which are genetically related to B. anthracis. The close genetic relation of chromosomal backgrounds has led to complexity of molecular-based diagnosis. In this study, we established a B. anthracis multiplex PCR that can screen for the presence of B. anthracis virulent plasmids and differentiate B. anthracis and its genetically related strains from other B. cereus group species. Six sets of primers targeting a chromosome of B. anthracis and B. anthracis-like strains, two virulent plasmids, pXO1 and pXO2, a bacterial gene, 16S rRNA gene, and a mammalian gene, actin-beta gene, were designed. The multiplex PCR detected approximately 3.0 CFU of B. anthracis DNA per PCR reaction and was sensitive to B. anthracis. The internal control primers also detected all bacterial and mammalian DNAs examined, indicating the practical applicability of this assay as it enables monitoring of appropriate amplification. The assay was also applied for detection of clinical strains genetically related to B. anthracis, which were B. cereus strains isolated from outbreaks of hospital infections in Japan, and field strains isolated in Zambia, and the assay differentiated B. anthracis and its genetically related strains from other B. cereus group strains. Taken together, the results indicate that the newly developed multiplex PCR is a sensitive and practical method for detecting B. anthracis.

  4. Hyaluronic Acid Production in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Widner, Bill; Behr, Régine; Von Dollen, Steve; Tang, Maria; Heu, Tia; Sloma, Alan; Sternberg, Dave; DeAngelis, Paul L; Paul H. Weigel; Brown, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The hasA gene from Streptococcus equisimilis, which encodes the enzyme hyaluronan synthase, has been expressed in Bacillus subtilis, resulting in the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the 1-MDa range. Artificial operons were assembled and tested, all of which contain the hasA gene along with one or more genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis of the UDP-precursor sugars that are required for HA synthesis. It was determined that the production of UDP-glucuronic acid is limiting in...

  5. Bacillus subtilis pur operon expression and regulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ebbole, D J; Zalkin, H

    1989-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis pur operon is a 12-gene cluster, purEKB-purC(orf)QLF-purMNH(J)-purD, organized in groups of overlapping coding units separated by intercistronic gaps. Translational fusions of Escherichia coli lacZ were constructed to purE, purC, and purM, the first gene of each group. Analyses of gene fusions integrated into the chromosomal pur operon exclude the possibility of internal promoters in intercistronic regions and support the view that transcription is from the single sigma ...

  6. Bacillus subtilis regulatory protein GerE

    OpenAIRE

    Ducros, V M A; Brannigan, J.A.; Lewis, R J; Wilkinson, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    GerE is the latest-acting of a series of factors which regulate gene expression in the mother cell during sporulation in Bacillus. The gene encoding GerE has been cloned from B. subtilis and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purified GerE has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The small plate-like crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and diffract beyond 2.2 Angstrom resolution with a synchrotron radiation X-ra...

  7. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Bottini, N.;

    2005-01-01

    phosphorylation, indicating that this post-translational modifi cation could regulate physiological processes ranging from stress response and exopolysaccharide synthesis to DNA metabolism. Some interesting work in this fi eld was done in Bacillus subtilis , and we here present the current state of knowledge on...... protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in this gram-positive model organism. With its two kinases, two kinase modulators, three phosphatases and at least four different tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, B. subtilis is the bacterium with the highest number of presently known participants in the global network...

  8. Features of Bacillus cereus swarm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesi, Sonia; Salvetti, Sara; Celandroni, Francesco; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2010-11-01

    When propagated on solid surfaces, Bacillus cereus can produce differentiated swarm cells under a wide range of growth conditions. This behavioural versatility is ecologically relevant, since it allows this bacterium to adapt swarming to environmental changes. Swarming by B. cereus is medically important: swarm cells are more virulent and particularly prone to invade host tissues. Characterisation of swarming-deficient mutants highlights that flagellar genes as well as genes governing different metabolic pathways are involved in swarm-cell differentiation. In this review, the environmental and genetic requirements for swarming and the role played by swarm cells in the virulence this pathogen exerts will be outlined. PMID:21035546

  9. Enhanced transformation efficiency of recalcitrant Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis isolates upon in vitro methylation of plasmid DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop Groot, M.N.; Nieboer, F.; Abee, T.

    2008-01-01

    Digestion patterns of chromosomal DNAs of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis strains suggest that Sau3AI-type restriction modification systems are widely present among the isolates tested. In vitro methylation of plasmid DNA was used to enhance poor plasmid transfer upon electroporation

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Supercritical CO[subscript 2]-Tolerant Bacteria Bacillus subterraneus MITOT1 and Bacillus cereus MIT0214

    OpenAIRE

    Peet, Kyle C.; Thompson, Janelle R.

    2015-01-01

    We report draft genome sequences of Bacillus subterraneus MITOT1 and Bacillus cereus MIT0214 isolated through enrichment of samples from geologic sequestration sites in pressurized bioreactors containing a supercritical (sc) CO[subscript 2] headspace. Their genome sequences expand the phylogenetic range of sequenced bacilli and allow characterization of molecular mechanisms of scCO[subscript 2] tolerance.

  11. Enhanced transformation efficiency of recalcitrant Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis isolates upon in vitro methylation of plasmid DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Nierop Groot, M.N.; Nieboer, F.; Abee, T.

    2008-01-01

    Digestion patterns of chromosomal DNAs of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus weihenstephanensis strains suggest that Sau3AI-type restriction modification systems are widely present among the isolates tested. In vitro methylation of plasmid DNA was used to enhance poor plasmid transfer upon electroporation to recalcitrant strains that carry Sau3AI restriction barriers.

  12. Aging Leads to Prolonged Duration of Inflammation-Induced Depression-Like Behavior Caused by Bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Keith W.; O’Connor, Jason C.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Dantzer, Robert; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; McCusker, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Geriatric depression is a costly health issue, but little is known about its physiological underpinnings. Systemic inflammation sensitizes the innate immune system of aged animals and humans, but it is unknown if chronic, low-grade infections affect the duration of depressive-like behaviors. In this report, we infected adult (4–6 months) and aged (20–24 months) Balb/c mice with an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), to induce a chronic infection. We then ...

  13. Identification of Bacillus cereus Group Species Associated with Food Poisoning Outbreaks in British Columbia, Canada▿

    OpenAIRE

    McIntyre, Lorraine; Bernard, Kathryn; Beniac, Daniel; Isaac-Renton, Judith L.; Naseby, David Craig

    2008-01-01

    Food poisoning laboratories identify Bacillus cereus using routine methods that may not differentiate all Bacillus cereus group species. We recharacterized Bacillus food-poisoning strains from 39 outbreaks and identified B. cereus in 23 outbreaks, B. thuringiensis in 4, B. mycoides in 1, and mixed strains of Bacillus in 11 outbreaks.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia secondary to acute right leg cellulitis: case of community-acquired infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wahab, Asrul Abdul; Rahman, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacillus that causes wide spectrum clinical infections. However, it is most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infection. In this case a 58-year-old male with underlying hypertension and dyslipidaemia was admitted for acute right leg cellulitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was identified from the case, though it was not a usual suspected organism. It might be due to community-acquired infection.

  15. ABILITY OF BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM: Bacillus coagulans, Bacilus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Nitrosomonas sp. and Pseudomonas putida IN BIOREMEDIATION OF WASTE WATER IN CISIRUNG WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratu SAFITRI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to determine the ability of bacterial consortium: Bacillus coagulans, Bacilus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Nitrosomonas sp., and Pseudomonas putida in bioremediation of wastewater origin Cisirung WWTP. This study uses an experimental method completely randomized design (CRD, which consists of two treatment factors (8x8 factorial design. The first factor is a consortium of bacteria (K, consisting of 8 level factors (k1, k2, k3, k4, k5, k6, k7, and k8. The second factor is the time (T, consisting of a 7 level factors (t0, t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, and t7. Test parameters consist of BOD (Biochemical Oxygen Demand, COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand, TSS (Total Suspended Solid, Ammonia and Population of Microbes during bioremediation. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by Duncan test. The results of this study showed that the consortium of Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Nitrosomonas sp., and Pseudomonas putida with inoculum concentration of 5% (k6 is a consortium of the most effective in reducing BOD 71.93%, 64.30% COD, TSS 94.85%, and 88.58% of ammonia.

  16. Antimicrobial Effects of Honey on Bacillus Cereus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    This paper should be cited as: Javadzadeh M, Najafi M, Rezaei M, Dastoor M, Behzadi AS, Amiri A . [ Antimicrobial Effects of Honey on Bacillus Cereus ]. MLJ. 201 4 ; 8 ( 2 : 55 - 61 [Article in Persian] Javadzadeh, M. (MSc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Honey is a healthy and nutritious food that has been used for a long time as a treatment for different diseases. One of the applied properties of honey is its antimicrobial effect, which differs between different types of honey due to variation of phenolic and antioxidant compositions. This study aimed to assess antimicrobial effect of honey on Bacillus cereus, considering its chemical properties. Material and Methods: Three samples of honey (A1 and A2 of Khorasan Razavi Province and A3 of South Khorasan province (were prepared and studied in terms of chemical parameters .The antibacterial effect of honey was surveyed throughTurbidimeter using spectrometer with incubator time of 2, 4, 6, and 8hrs. the level of turbidity caused by bacterium growth was measured at different times with a wavelength of 600nm. Results: According to the study, the samples containing higher concentration of polyphenol has more antimicrobial activity. The samples of A2, A3, and A1 had the highest concentration of polyphenol, respectively. Conclusion: The results indicate the prebiotic effect of honey that can be justified by the presence of fructo-oligosacharids and vitamin B. Keywords: Honey, Bacillus Cereus, Antibacterial, Turbidimetry.

  17. Fast Neutron Radiation Effects on Bacillus Subtili

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaoming; REN Zhenglong; ZHANG Jianguo; ZHENG Chun; TAN Bisheng; YANG Chengde; CHU Shijin

    2009-01-01

    To examine the sterilizing effect and mechanism of neutron radiation, Bacillus sub-tilis vat. niger, strain (ATCC 9372) spores were irradiated with the fast neutron from the Chinese fast burst reactor Ⅱ(CFBR-Ⅱ). The plate-count results indicated that the D10 value was 384.6 Gy with a neutron radiation dose rate of 7.4 Gy/min. The rudimental catalase activity of the spores declined obviously with the increase in the radiation dose. Meanwhile, under the scanning electron microscope, no visible influence of the neutron radiation on the spore configuration was detected even if the dose was increased to 4 kGy. The content and distribution of DNA double-strand breaks induced by neutron radiation at different doses were measured and quantified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Further analysis of the DNA release percentage (PR), the DNA breakage level (L), and the average molecular weight, indicated that DNA fragments were obvi-ously distributed around the 5 kb regions at different radiation doses, which suggests that some points in the DNA molecule were sensitive to neutron radiation. Both PR and L varied regularly to some extent with the increase in radiation dose. Thus neutron radiation has a high sterilization power, and can induce falling enzyme activity and DNA breakage in Bacillus subtilis spores

  18. The Phylogeny of Bacillus cereus sensu lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okinaka, Richard T; Keim, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The three main species of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, and B. anthracis, were recognized and established by the early 1900s because they each exhibited distinct phenotypic traits. B. thuringiensis isolates and their parasporal crystal proteins have long been established as a natural pesticide and insect pathogen. B. anthracis, the etiological agent for anthrax, was used by Robert Koch in the 19th century as a model to develop the germ theory of disease, and B. cereus, a common soil organism, is also an occasional opportunistic pathogen of humans. In addition to these three historical species designations, are three less-recognized and -understood species: B. mycoides, B. weihenstephanensis, and B. pseudomycoides. All of these "species" combined comprise the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group. Despite these apparently clear phenotypic definitions, early molecular approaches to separate the first three by various DNA hybridization and 16S/23S ribosomal sequence analyses led to some "confusion" because there were limited differences to differentiate between these species. These and other results have led to frequent suggestions that a taxonomic change was warranted to reclassify this group to a single species. But the pathogenic properties of B. anthracis and the biopesticide applications of B. thuringiensis appear to "have outweighed pure taxonomic considerations" and the separate species categories are still being maintained. B. cereus sensu lato represents a classic example of a now common bacterial species taxonomic quandary. PMID:26999390

  19. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CRUDE OIL DEGRADING BACILLUS SPP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Akhavan Sepahi, I. Dejban Golpasha, M. Emami, A. M. Nakhoda

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, application of microorganisms for removing crude oil pollution from contaminated sites as bioremediation studies, was considered by scientists because other methods such as surfactant washing and incineration lead to production of more toxic compounds and they are non-economic. Fifteen crude oil degrading bacillus spp. were isolated from contaminated sites. Two isolated showed best growth in liquid media with 1-3% (v/v crude oil and mineral salt medium, then studied for enzymatic activities on tested media. The results showed maximal increase in optical densities and total viable count concomitant with decrease in pH on fifth day of experimental period for bacillus S6. Typical generation time on mineral salt with 1% crude oil is varying between 18-20h, 25-26h respectively for bacillus S6 and S35. Total protein was monitored at determined time intervals as biodegradation indices. Increasing of protein concentration during the incubation period reveals that isolated bacillus can degrade crude oil and increase microbial biomass. These bacillus spp. reduced surface tension from 60 (mN/m to 31 and 38 (mN/m, It means that these bacillus spp. can produce sufficient surfactant and have good potential of emulsification capacity. The results demonstrated that these bacillus spp. can utilize crude oil as a carbon and energy source.

  20. DNA fingerprinting of Bacillus cereus from diverse sources by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Swarnakaran Hemalatha; Narasimhan Banu

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic pathogen causing food poisoning manifested by diarrhoeal or emetic syndrome. It is closely related to animal and human pathogens Bacillus anthracis and the insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis. In the present study, antibiotic resistance, heavy metal tolerance & molecular typing of Bacillus cereus from diverse sources such as soil, sewage water, air, fresh water, sea water and milk were studied. Bacillus cereus resistant to Penicillin (10 units/ml) an...

  1. Pneumococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococci are a type of streptococcus bacteria. The bacteria spread through contact with people who are ill or by healthy people who carry the bacteria in the back of their nose. Pneumococcal infections can be mild or severe. The most common types of infections are Ear infections Sinus infections ...

  2. Expression, purification, and characterization of a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus in Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The gene coding for a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus was expressed in Bacillus subtilis DB104, under the control of the sacB gene promoter. This was followed by either the native signal peptide sequence of this protease or the signal peptide sequence of the sacB gene. The protease was purified 3.8-fold, with a specific activity of 16530 U mg-1. As analyzed by SDS-PAGE, the molecular mass of the expressed protease was about 35 kDa, and the optimal temperature and pH of the protease were 65℃ and 7.5, respectively. Moreover, it still had about 80% activity after 1 h reaction at 65 ℃ .

  3. Expression, purification, and characterization of a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus in Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The gene coding for a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus was expressed in Bacillus subtilis DB104, under the control of the sacB gene promoter. This was followed by either the native signal peptide sequence of this protease or the signal peptide sequence of the sacB gene. The protease was purified 3.8-fold, with a specific activity of 16530 U mg-1. As analyzed by SDS-PAGE, the molecular mass of the expressed protease was about 35 kDa, and the optimal temperature and pH of the protease were 65℃ and 7.5, respectively. Moreover, it still had about 80% activity after 1 h reaction at 65℃.

  4. Occurrence and significance of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in ready-to-eat food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenquist, Hanne; Ørum-Smidt, Lasse; Andersen, Sigrid R;

    2005-01-01

    had at least one gene or component involved in human diarrhoeal disease, while emetic toxin was related to only one B. cereus strain. A new observation was that 31 out of the 40 randomly selected B. cereus-like strains could be classified as Bacillus thuringiensis due to crystal production and......Among 48,901 samples of ready-to-eat food products at the Danish retail market, 0.5% had counts of Bacillus cereus-like bacteria above 10(4) cfu g(-1). The high counts were most frequently found in starchy, cooked products, but also in fresh cucumbers and tomatoes. Forty randomly selected strains....../or content of cry genes. Thus, a large proportion of the B. cereus-like organisms present in food may belong to B. thuringiensis....

  5. Flow-cytometric Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Spores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Kamboj

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Flow-cytometric technique has been established as a powerful tool for detection andidentification of microbiological agents. Unambiguous and rapid detection of Bacillus anthracisspores has been reported using immunoglobulin G-fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate againstlive spores. In addition to the high sensitivity, the present technique could differentiate betweenspores of closely related species, eg, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis using fluorescenceintensity. The technique can be used for detection of live as well as inactivated spores makingit more congenial for screening of suspected samples of bioterrorism.

  6. Noncapsulated toxinogenic Bacillus anthracis presents a specific growth and dissemination pattern in naive and protective antigen-immune mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomski, Ian J; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Mock, Michèle; Goossens, Pierre L

    2007-10-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming bacterium that causes anthrax. B. anthracis has three major virulence factors, namely, lethal toxin, edema toxin, and a poly-gamma-D-glutamic acid capsule. The toxins modulate host immune responses, and the capsule inhibits phagocytosis. With the goal of increasing safety, decreasing security concerns, and taking advantage of mammalian genetic tools and reagents, mouse models of B. anthracis infection have been developed using attenuated bacteria that produce toxins but no capsule. While these models have been useful in studying both toxinogenic infections and antitoxin vaccine efficacy, we questioned whether eliminating the capsule changed bacterial growth and dissemination characteristics. Thus, the progression of infection by toxinogenic noncapsulated B. anthracis was analyzed and compared to that by previously reported nontoxinogenic capsulated bacteria, using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The influence of immunization with the toxin component protective antigen (PA) on the development of infection was also examined. The toxinogenic noncapsulated bacteria were initially confined to the cutaneous site of infection. Bacteria then progressed to the draining lymph nodes and, finally, late in the infection, to the lungs, kidneys, and frequently the gastrointestinal tract. There was minimal colonization of the spleen. PA immunization reduced bacterial growth from the outset and limited infection to the site of inoculation. These in vivo observations show that dissemination by toxinogenic noncapsulated strains differs markedly from that by nontoxinogenic capsulated strains. Additionally, PA immunization counters bacterial growth and dissemination in vivo from the onset of infection. PMID:17635863

  7. Genetic Differentiation between Sympatric Populations of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, Gislayne; Sanchis, Vincent; Lereclus, Didier; Lemos, Manoel Victor F.; Bourguet, Denis

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about genetic exchanges in natural populations of bacteria of the spore-forming Bacillus cereus group, because no population genetics studies have been performed with local sympatric populations. We isolated strains of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. cereus from small samples of soil collected at the same time from two separate geographical sites, one within the forest and the other at the edge of the forest. A total of 100 B. cereus and 98 B. thuringiensis strains were isolated and characterized by electrophoresis to determine allelic composition at nine enzymatic loci. We observed genetic differentiation between populations of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Populations of a given Bacillus species—B. thuringiensis or B. cereus—were genetically more similar to each other than to populations of the other Bacillus species. Hemolytic activity provided further evidence of this genetic divergence, which remained evident even if putative clones were removed from the data set. Our results suggest that the rate of gene flow was higher between strains of the same species, but that exchanges between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis were nonetheless possible. Linkage disequilibrium analysis revealed sufficient recombination for B. cereus populations to be considered panmictic units. In B. thuringiensis, the balance between clonal proliferation and recombination seemed to depend on location. Overall, our data indicate that it is not important for risk assessment purposes to determine whether B. cereus and B. thuringiensis belong to a single or two species. Assessment of the biosafety of pest control based on B. thuringiensis requires evaluation of the extent of genetic exchange between strains in realistic natural conditions. PMID:11872495

  8. Structural genes encoding the thermophilic alpha-amylases of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus licheniformis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, G L; Mainzer, S E; Rey, M W; Lamsa, M H; Kindle, K L; Carmona, C; Requadt, C

    1986-01-01

    The genes encoding the thermostable alpha-amylases of Bacillus stearothermophilus and B. licheniformis were cloned in Escherichia coli, and their DNA sequences were determined. The coding and deduced polypeptide sequences are 59 and 62% homologous to each other, respectively. The B. stearothermophilus protein differs most significantly from that of B. licheniformis in that it possesses a 32-residue COOH-terminal tail. Transformation of E. coli with vectors containing either gene resulted in t...

  9. Bacillus thuringiensis as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis in aerosol research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufts, Jenia A M; Calfee, M Worth; Lee, Sang Don; Ryan, Shawn P

    2014-05-01

    Characterization of candidate surrogate spores prior to experimental use is critical to confirm that the surrogate characteristics are as closely similar as possible to those of the pathogenic agent of interest. This review compares the physical properties inherent to spores of Bacillus anthracis (Ba) and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that impact their movement in air and interaction with surfaces, including size, shape, density, surface morphology, structure and hydrophobicity. Also evaluated is the impact of irradiation on the physical properties of both Bacillus species. Many physical features of Bt and Ba have been found to be similar and, while Bt is considered typically non-pathogenic, it is in the B. cereus group, as is Ba. When cultured and sporulated under similar conditions, both microorganisms share a similar cylindrical pellet shape, an aerodynamic diameter of approximately 1 μm (in the respirable size range), have an exosporium with a hairy nap, and have higher relative hydrophobicities than other Bacillus species. While spore size, morphology, and other physical properties can vary among strains of the same species, the variations can be due to growth/sporulation conditions and may, therefore, be controlled. Growth and sporulation conditions are likely among the most important factors that influence the representativeness of one species, or preparation, to another. All Bt spores may, therefore, not be representative of all Ba spores. Irradiated spores do not appear to be a good surrogate to predict the behavior of non-irradiated spores due to structural damage caused by the irradiation. While the use of Bt as a surrogate for Ba in aerosol testing appears to be well supported, this review does not attempt to narrow selection between Bt strains. Comparative studies should be performed to test the hypothesis that viable Ba and Bt spores will behave similarly when suspended in the air (as an aerosol) and to compare the known microscale characteristics

  10. Biocontrol of Soil Fungi in Tomato with Microencapsulates Containing Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela H. Suarez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: An option to reduce pollution by synthetic agro-chemical in root plant disease management is the use of antagonist rhizobacteria belonging to Bacillus genus, because their inhibitory properties, stimulation of plant growth and crop yield increase. Approach: This study was carried out in order to evaluate if Bacillus subtilis strains could play an antagonists role of plant pathogens and if they can be microencapsulated inside a biopolymer matrix. It was adapted an equipment and evaluated a technique for microcapsules elaboration, in order to incorporate B. subtilis strains and to analyze their potential as biocontrol agents by determining their antagonistic effect against pathogenic soil fungi; in addition, it was analyzed their effect on tomato plant growth promotion under greenhouse conditions. B. subtilis strains identified as B1, J1, M2 and their mixture were used; microcapsules containing bacterial strains were inoculated to tomato seeds cv. Floradade. When seedlings emerged, a second application of microcapsules containing B. subtilis was performed on the pots, which previously were inoculated with the fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum. Response variables were: Incidence and disease severity, plant growth, aerial and root dry weight, leaf area and fruit yield. Results: The outcome showed that the equipment designed and adapted for microcapsules elaboration was useful to obtain microcapsules containing the bacterial strains. B. subtilis strains exerted apparent biocontrol, since incidence and disease severity was reduced and for that reason inhibited the infective activity of the inoculated plant pathogens, also microcapsules containing Bacillus strains stimulated tomato growth and fruit yield. Conclusion: Microcapsules containing B. subtilis strains could be effective biocontrol agents against soil fungi plant pathogens and could have a potential biofertilizer effect, since they stimulated growth and yield

  11. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy/sup +/ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy/sup +/ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy/sup +/ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  12. How Quorum Sensing Connects Sporulation to Necrotrophism in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchat, Stéphane; Talagas, Antoine; Poncet, Sandrine; Lazar, Noureddine; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier; Nessler, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate adaptation properties, cell fate or commitment to sporulation. The infectious cycle of Bacillus thuringiensis in the insect host is a powerful model to investigate the role of quorum sensing in natural conditions. It is tuned by communication systems regulators belonging to the RNPP family and directly regulated by re-internalized signaling peptides. One such RNPP regulator, NprR, acts in the presence of its cognate signaling peptide NprX as a transcription factor, regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of these bacteria in the insect cadaver. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of NprX and independently of its transcriptional activator function, NprR negatively controls sporulation. NprR inhibits expression of Spo0A-regulated genes by preventing the KinA-dependent phosphorylation of the phosphotransferase Spo0F, thus delaying initiation of the sporulation process. This NprR function displays striking similarities with the Rap proteins, which also belong to the RNPP family, but are devoid of DNA-binding domain and indirectly control gene expression via protein-protein interactions in Bacilli. Conservation of the Rap residues directly interacting with Spo0F further suggests a common inhibition of the sporulation phosphorelay. The crystal structure of apo NprR confirms that NprR displays a highly flexible Rap-like structure. We propose a molecular regulatory mechanism in which key residues of the bifunctional regulator NprR are directly and alternatively involved in its two functions. NprX binding switches NprR from a dimeric inhibitor of sporulation to a tetrameric transcriptional activator involved in the necrotrophic lifestyle of B. thuringiensis. NprR thus tightly coordinates sporulation and necrotrophism, ensuring survival and dissemination of the bacteria during host infection. PMID:27483473

  13. Bacillus circulans exopolysaccharide: Production, characterization and bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidhyalakshmi, R; Valli, Nachiyar C; Narendra Kumar, G; Sunkar, Swetha

    2016-06-01

    A bacterium with the ability to produce appreciable amount of exopolysaccharide was isolated from slimy layer of coconut. 16S rDNA analysis identified the organism as Bacillus circulans. EPS production was observed at all stages of culture growth and reached maximum of 0.065mg/ml by 96h, which on further incubation started to decrease. Response Surface Methodology using Box Behnken design has shown the influence of sucrose which was found to be directly proportional to exopolysaccharide production with production reaching 1.09mg/ml. HPLC analysis identified the presence of glucose, mannose, fructose and verbascose and NMR analysis confirmed the presence of glucose, mannose and galactose. Even though the extracted B. circulans EPS did not show appreciable anti-bacterial or anti-fungal activity, it exhibited appreciable antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activity. PMID:26902891

  14. Bacillus subtilis as potential producer for polyhydroxyalkanoates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Sanjay KS

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs are biodegradable polymers produced by microbes to overcome environmental stress. Commercial production of PHAs is limited by the high cost of production compared to conventional plastics. Another hindrance is the brittle nature and low strength of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB, the most widely studied PHA. The needs are to produce PHAs, which have better elastomeric properties suitable for biomedical applications, preferably from inexpensive renewable sources to reduce cost. Certain unique properties of Bacillus subtilis such as lack of the toxic lipo-polysaccharides, expression of self-lysing genes on completion of PHA biosynthetic process – for easy and timely recovery, usage of biowastes as feed enable it to compete as potential candidate for commercial production of PHA.

  15. Whole genome protein microarrays for serum profiling of immunodominant antigens of Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Elizabeth Kempsell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A commercial Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax whole genome protein microarray has been used to identify immunogenic Anthrax proteins using sera from groups of donors with (a confirmed B. anthracis naturally acquired cutaneous infection, (b confirmed B. anthracis intravenous drug use-acquired infection (c occupational exposure in a wool-sorters factory (d humans and rabbits vaccinated with the UK Anthrax protein vaccine and compared to naïve unexposed controls. Anti-IAP responses were observed for both IgG and IgA in the challenged groups; however the anti-IAP IgG response was more evident in the vaccinated group and the anti-IAP IgA response more evident in the B. anthracis-infected groups. Infected individuals appeared somewhat suppressed for their general IgG response, compared with other challenged groups.Immunogenic protein antigens were identified in all groups, some of which were shared between groups whilst others were specific for individual groups. The toxin proteins were immunodominant in all vaccinated, infected or other challenged groups. However a number of other chromosomally-located and plasmid encoded open reading frames were also recognised by infected or exposed groups in comparison to controls. Some of these antigens e.g. BA4182 are not recognised by vaccinated individuals, suggesting that there are proteins more specifically expressed by live Anthrax spores in vivo and are not currently found in the UK licensed Anthrax Vaccine (AVP. These may perhaps be preferentially expressed during infection and represent expression of alternative pathways in the B. anthracis ‘infectome’. These may make highly attractive candidates for diagnostic and vaccine biomarker development as they may be more specifically associated with the infectious phase of the pathogen. A number of B. anthracis small hypothetical protein targets have been synthesised, tested in mouse immunogenicity studies and validated in parallel using human sera from the

  16. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  17. Enhancement of Biocontrol Activities and Cyclic Lipopeptides Production by Chemical Mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis XF-1, a Biocontrol Agent of Plasmodiophora brassicae and Fusarium solani

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xing-Yu; Yang, Jing-Jing; Mao, Zi-Chao; Ho, Hon-Hing; Wu, Yi-Xing; He, Yue-qiu

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis XF-1 has been used as a biocontrol agent of clubroot disease of crucifers infected by Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate pathogen. In order to maximize the growth inhibition of the pathogen, random mutagenesis using N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine was applied to strain XF-1. The efficacy of 226 selected mutants was assessed against the growth of an indicator fungal pathogen: Fusarium solani using agar plate assay and the disruptive effects on the resting spores of P....

  18. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Bacillus anthracis: From Fingerprint Analysis of the Bacterium to Quantification of its Toxins in Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfitt, Adrian R.; Boyer, Anne E.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Kozel, Thomas R.; de, Barun K.; Gallegos, Maribel; Moura, Hercules; Pirkle, James L.; Barr, John R.

    A range of mass spectrometry-based techniques have been used to identify, characterize and differentiate Bacillus anthracis, both in culture for forensic applications and for diagnosis during infection. This range of techniques could usefully be considered to exist as a continuum, based on the degrees of specificity involved. We show two examples here, a whole-organism fingerprinting method and a high-specificity assay for one unique protein, anthrax lethal factor.

  19. Bacillus anthracis Capsule Activates Caspase-1 and Induces Interleukin-1β Release from Differentiated THP-1 and Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Min-Hee; Ahn, Hae-Jeong; Ha, Hyun-Joon; Park, Jungchan; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Bong-Su; Oh, Hee-Bok; Rhie, Gi-eun

    2009-01-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule is one of the major virulence factors of Bacillus anthracis, which causes a highly lethal infection. The antiphagocytic PGA capsule disguises the bacilli from immune surveillance and allows unimpeded growth of bacilli in the host. Recently, efforts have been made to include PGA as a component of anthrax vaccine; however, the innate immune response of PGA itself has been poorly investigated. In this study, we characterized the innate immune response eli...

  20. Pseudosecretion of Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyltransferase by Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Le Grice, S F; Gentz, R; Bannwarth, W; Kocher, H. P.

    1987-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis harboring the vector 25RBSII secrets an Escherichia coli-derived chloramphenicol acetyltransferase into culture supernatants. The secreted enzyme lacks 18 amino acids; these are removed externally rather than during secretion.

  1. Protein engineering of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans strain 251

    OpenAIRE

    Penninga, Dirk

    1996-01-01

    An enormous diversity of molecular functions in living organisms is carried out by proteins. Our studies have focussed on the functional analysis of a starch-converting enzyme, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Bacillus circulans strain 251. Zie: Summary

  2. Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki Strain HD-1

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Michael; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Dyer, David; Bulla, Lee

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain HD-1, which serves as the primary U.S. reference standard for all commercial insecticidal formulations of B. thuringiensis manufactured around the world.

  3. Two Genes Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase Are Present in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Glaser, Philippe; Andersen, Paal S.;

    1995-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. Surprisingly, two genes encoding UPRTase activity were cloned from Bacillus subtilis by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The genes were sequenced, and the putative...

  4. Selection of Bacillus subtilis mutants impaired in ammonia assimilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, D R; Aronson, A I

    1980-01-01

    The selection of Bacillus subtilis mutants capable of using D-histidine to fulfill a requirement for L-histidine resulted in mutants with either no glutamate synthase activity or increased amounts of an altered glutamine synthetase.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS: A CORNERSTONE OF MODERN AGRICULTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are you interested in the technical issues surrounding the use of Bacillus thuringiensis pesticidal traits as sprays and as plant incorporated protectants (transgenic crops)? Should the dimensions of human health, ecology, entomology, risk assessment, resistance management, and d...

  6. Circulating lethal toxin decreases the ability of neutrophils to respond to Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Zachary P; Ernst, Stephen M; Boyer, Anne E; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Barr, John R; Glomski, Ian J

    2014-04-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) play a protective role during Bacillus anthracis infection. However, B. anthracis is able to subvert the PMN response effectively as evidenced by the high mortality rates of anthrax. One major virulence factor produced by B. anthracis, lethal toxin (LT), is necessary for dissemination in the BSL2 model of mouse infection. While human and mouse PMNs kill vegetative B. anthracis, short in vitro half-lives of PMNs have made it difficult to determine how or if LT alters their bactericidal function. Additionally, the role of LT intoxication on PMN's ability to migrate to inflammatory signals remains controversial. LF concentrations in both serum and major organs were determined from mice infected with B. anthracis Sterne strain at defined stages of infection to guide subsequent administration of purified toxin. Bactericidal activity of PMNs assessed using ex vivo cell culture assays showed significant defects in killing B. anthracis. In vivo PMN recruitment to inflammatory stimuli was significantly impaired at 24 h as assessed by real-time analysis of light-producing PMNs within the mouse. The observations described above suggest that LT serves dual functions; it both attenuates accumulation of PMNs at sites of inflammation and impairs PMNs bactericidal activity against vegetative B. anthracis. PMID:24152301

  7. 临床药师参与足部G+粗大杆菌混合G-杆菌感染治疗体会%Experience of Clinical Pharmacists' Participation in the Drug Treatment of Foot G+ Gross Coli Mixed G- Bacillus Infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢颖; 高杰; 毛璐; 甄健存

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of clinical pharmacists participation in the treatment of foot G+ gross coli mixed G- coli infections. Method: Clinical pharmacists took part in the therapy of a patient with foot G+ gross coli mixed G- coli infection. Pharmacists helped doctors choose anti-infective drugs under the consideration of the guide, drug susceptibility results, characteristics of drugs, self medication experience and drug adverse reactions. Result: The patients with gas gangrene and mixed infection was cured successfully by the operation and rational drug therapy. Conclusion: The participation of clinical pharmacists in the treatment of surgical infections can supplement the deficiency of antimicrobial drug knowledge in the surgeons. It is beneficial to improve the levels of clinical treatment and rational drug use.%目的:探讨临床药师在治疗足部G+粗大杆菌混合G-杆菌感染病例中的作用.方法:临床药师通过参与1例足G+粗大杆菌混合感染患者的救治工作,发挥自身药学特长,结合指南、药敏结果、药物特点、用药经验及药物不良反应等方面知识帮助临床医生合理选择抗菌药物,处理不良反应.结果:通过手术及合理的用药方案成功治疗气性坏疽及感染.结论:临床药师参与外科感染的治疗,可以弥补外科医生对抗菌药物知识的不足,有利于提高临床治疗水平,促进合理用药.

  8. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Deng; Qi Peng; Fuping Song; Didier Lereclus

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcr...

  9. Expression of UGA-Containing Mycoplasma Genes in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Kannan, T. R.; Baseman, Joel B.

    2000-01-01

    We used Bacillus subtilis to express UGA-containing Mycoplasma genes encoding the P30 adhesin (one UGA) of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and methionine sulfoxide reductase (two UGAs) of Mycoplasma genitalium. Due to natural UGA suppression, these Mycoplasma genes were expressed as full-length protein products, but at relatively low efficiency, in recombinant wild-type Bacillus. The B. subtilis-expressed Mycoplasma proteins appeared as single bands and not as multiple bands compared to expression in r...

  10. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis strain HD521

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qiao; Xu, Li Z.; Zou, Ting; Ai, Peng; Huang, Gang H.; Li, Ping; Zheng, Ai P.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is the most widely used biological pesticide in the world. It belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group, which contains six species. Among these six species, B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis, and B. cereus have a low genetic diversity. B. thuringiensis strain HD521 shows maroon colony which is different from most of the B. thuringiensis strains. Strain HD521 also displays an ability to inhibit plant sheath blight disease pathogen (Rhizoctonia solani AG1 IB) growth a...

  11. Efficient transformation of Bacillus thuringiensis requires nonmethylated plasmid DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Macaluso, A; Mettus, A M

    1991-01-01

    The transformation efficiency of Bacillus thuringiensis depends upon the source of plasmid DNA. DNA isolated from B. thuringiensis, Bacillus megaterium, or a Dam- Dcm- Escherichia coli strain efficiently transformed several B. thuringiensis strains, B. thuringiensis strains were grouped according to which B. thuringiensis backgrounds were suitable sources of DNA for transformation of other B. thuringiensis strains, suggesting that B. thuringiensis strains differ in DNA modification and restri...

  12. Natural Dissemination of Bacillus anthracis Spores in Northern Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Dragon, D C; Bader, D. E.; Mitchell, J.; Woollen, N.

    2005-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from around fresh and year-old bison carcasses and areas not associated with known carcasses in Wood Buffalo National Park during an active anthrax outbreak in the summer of 2001. Sample selection with a grid provided the most complete coverage of a site. Soil samples were screened for viable Bacillus anthracis spores via selective culture, phenotypic analysis, and PCR. Bacillus anthracis spores were isolated from 28.4% of the samples. The highest concentrations of...

  13. Genetic analysis of petrobactin transport in Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Paul E.; Dixon, Shandee D.; Janes, Brian K.; Carr, Katherine A.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Anderson, Erica C.; Keene, Sarra E.; Sherman, David H.; Hanna, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Iron acquisition mechanisms play an important role in the pathogenesis of many infectious microbes. In Bacillus anthracis, the siderophore petrobactin is required for both growth in iron depleted conditions and for full virulence of the bacterium. Here we demonstrate the roles of two putative petrobactin binding proteins FatB and FpuA (encoded by GBAA5330 and GBAA4766, respectively) in Bacillus anthracis iron acquisition and pathogenesis. Markerless deletion mutants were created using allelic...

  14. A monograph on amylases from Bacillus spp.

    OpenAIRE

    M. K. Sarath Josh; S. Sreedevi; Prakasan Priji; K. N. Unni; S Sajith; S.Pradeep; V. N. Jisha; R. B. Smitha; Sailas Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the production of alpha, beta and gamma amylase subtypes; starch degrading microbes, especially bacteria have an invincible role in the food, fermentation, textile and paper industries. Of them, α-amylases from Bacillus spp. have contributed tremendous advancements in bio-industry, especially in starch, detergent and pharmaceutical arena. Though general reviews are seen in literature on amylases, no focused review is available yet solely on α-amylases produced by Bacillus spp. Hence...

  15. Induction of natural competence in Bacillus cereus ATCC14579

    OpenAIRE

    Mirończuk, Aleksandra M; Kovács, Ákos T; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2008-01-01

    Summary Natural competence is the ability of certain microbes to take up exogenous DNA from the environment and integrate it in their genome. Competence development has been described for a variety of bacteria, but has so far not been shown to occur in Bacillus cereus. However, orthologues of most proteins involved in natural DNA uptake in Bacillus subtiliscould be identified in B. cereus. Here, we report that B. cereus ATCC14579 can become naturally competent. When expressing the B. subtilis...

  16. The Silicon Layer Supports Acid Resistance of Bacillus cereus Spores

    OpenAIRE

    Hirota, Ryuichi; Hata, Yumehiro; Ikeda, Takeshi; Ishida, Takenori; Kuroda, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is considered to be a “quasiessential” element for most living organisms. However, silicate uptake in bacteria and its physiological functions have remained obscure. We observed that Si is deposited in a spore coat layer of nanometer-sized particles in Bacillus cereus and that the Si layer enhances acid resistance. The novel acid resistance of the spore mediated by Si encapsulation was also observed in other Bacillus strains, representing a general adaptation enhancing survival u...

  17. Use of metabolic and molecular methods for the identification of a Bacillus strain isolated from paper affected by foxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paolis, Maria Rita; Lippi, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    Foxing of paper is a deterioration phenomenon occurring in the form of brown-yellowish spots, the abiotic and/or biotic causes of which are not yet completely understood. Nevertheless, microbiological infection has been recognized that may contribute to paper damage and therefore it becomes important to know the taxonomic position and the degradative activity of the potential infectious biological agents which mostly are fungi, but also bacteria and yeasts. A cellulolytic bacterial strain isolated from a foxed paper sample exhibited morphological and physiological characteristics of the Bacillus genus. To study its taxonomic position, different identification methods were used: the Biolog system, the direct amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction analysis (DAPD-PCR) and the partial sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene. Biolog system and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA gene assigned the strain to the Paenibacillus polymyxa species. DAPD-PCR analysis indicated a high similarity with Bacillus circulans, by comparing the isolated strain with some closely related Bacillus species. PMID:17686620

  18. Unraveling aspects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens mediated enhanced production of rice under biotic stress of Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchi eSrivastava

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani (RS is a necrotrophic fungi causing sheath blight in rice leading to substantial loss in yield. Excessive and persistent use of preventive chemicals raises human health and environment safety concerns. As an alternative, use of biocontrol agents is highly recommended. In the present study an abiotic stress tolerant, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (SN13 is demonstrated to act as a biocontrol agent and enhance immune response against RS in rice by modulating various physiological, metabolic and molecular functions. A sustained tolerance by SN13 primed plant over a longer period of time, post RS infection may be attributed to several unconventional aspects of the plants’ physiological status. The prolonged stress tolerance observed in presence of SN13 is characterized by (a involvement of bacterial mycolytic enzymes, (b sustained maintenance of elicitors to keep the immune system induced involving non-metabolizable sugars such as turanose besides the known elicitors, (c a delicate balance of ROS and ROS scavengers through production of proline, mannitol and arabitol and rare sugars like fructopyranose, β-d glucopyranose and myoinositol and expression of ferric reductases and hypoxia induced proteins, (d production of metabolites like quinozoline and expression of terpene synthase and (e hormonal cross talk. As the novel aspect of biological control this study highlights the role of rare sugars, maintenance of hypoxic conditions, and sucrose and starch metabolism in Bacillus amyloliquifaciens (SN13 mediated sustained biotic stress tolerance in rice.

  19. Anthrax Toxin-Expressing Bacillus cereus Isolated from an Anthrax-Like Eschar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Chung K; Ibrahim, Hisham; Lee, Philip; Churchwell, George; Gumke, Megan; Stanek, Danielle; Gee, Jay E; Boyer, Anne E; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Barr, John R; Li, Han; Boulay, Darbi; Cronin, Li; Quinn, Conrad P; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus isolates have been described harboring Bacillus anthracis toxin genes, most notably B. cereus G9241, and capable of causing severe and fatal pneumonias. This report describes the characterization of a B. cereus isolate, BcFL2013, associated with a naturally occurring cutaneous lesion resembling an anthrax eschar. Similar to G9241, BcFL2013 is positive for the B. anthracis pXO1 toxin genes, has a multi-locus sequence type of 78, and a pagA sequence type of 9. Whole genome sequencing confirms the similarity to G9241. In addition to the chromosome having an average nucleotide identity of 99.98% when compared to G9241, BcFL2013 harbors three plasmids with varying homology to the G9241 plasmids (pBCXO1, pBC210 and pBFH_1). This is also the first report to include serologic testing of patient specimens associated with this type of B. cereus infection which resulted in the detection of anthrax lethal factor toxemia, a quantifiable serum antibody response to protective antigen (PA), and lethal toxin neutralization activity. PMID:27257909

  20. Campylobacter Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter infection is a common foodborne illness. You get it from eating raw or undercooked poultry. You ... whether you need to take antibiotics. To prevent campylobacter infection, cook poultry thoroughly. Use a separate cutting ...

  1. Anaerobic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genital tract. They can cause infections in various parts of the body in children and adults of all ages. The most common are dental infections, inflammation of the abdominal lining (peritonitis), and ...

  2. Staph Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... staph food poisoning, and these infections: Folliculitis and Boils Folliculitis is an infection of hair follicles, tiny ... But sometimes it goes on to become a boil (also called a furuncle). With a boil, the ...

  3. EFFECT OF BACILLUS OF CALMETTE-GUÉRIN, AVRIDINE AND Propionibacterium acnes AS IMMUNOMODULATORS ON RABIES IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEGID J.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The cellular and humoral immune responses of mice inoculated with rabies virus and treated with the Bacillus of Calmette-Guérin, Avridine and Propionibacterium acnes were evaluated in this paper. There was a higher percentage of surviving mice in groups submitted to P. acnes treatment. Lower levels of interferon-g (IFN-g were found in infected mice. The intra-pad inoculation test (IPI was not effective to detect cellular immune response, contrary to the results found in MIF reaction. The survival of mice did not present correlation with the levels of antirabies serum neutralizing (SN antibodies titers, IFN-g concentration and MIF response.

  4. Mechanical transmission of Bacillus anthracis by stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans) and mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti and Aedes taeniorhynchus).

    OpenAIRE

    Turell, M J; Knudson, G B

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated the potential of stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans, and two species of mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti and Aedes taeniorhynchus, to transmit Bacillus anthracis Vollum 1B mechanically. After probing on Hartley guinea pigs with a bacteremia of ca. 10(8.6) CFU of B. anthracis per ml of blood, individual or pools of two to four stable flies or mosquitoes were allowed to continue feeding on either uninfected guinea pigs or A/J mice. All three insect species transmitted lethal anthrax infect...

  5. Transfer of the toxin protein genes of Bacillus sphaericus into Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and their expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Bourgouin, C.; Delécluse, A; La Torre, F.; Szulmajster, J

    1990-01-01

    The genes encoding the toxic determinants of Bacillus sphaericus have been expressed in a nontoxic and a toxic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. In both cases, the B. sphaericus toxin proteins were produced at a high level during sporulation of B. thuringiensis and accumulated as crystalline structures. B. thuringiensis transformants expressing B. sphaericus and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxins did not show a significant enhancement of toxicity against Aedes aegyp...

  6. Ground Anthrax Bacillus Refined Isolation (GABRI) method for analyzing environmental samples with low levels of Bacillus anthracis contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Fasanella, Antonio; Di Taranto, Pietro; Garofolo, Giuliano; Colao, Valeriana; Marino, Leonardo; Buonavoglia, Domenico; Pedarra, Carmine; Adone, Rosanna; Hugh-Jones, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background In this work are reported the results of a qualitative analytical method capable of detecting Bacillus anthracis spores when they are present in very low concentration in the soil. The Ground Anthrax Bacillus Refined Isolation (GABRI) method, assessed in our laboratory, was compared with the classic method. The comparison involved artificially anthrax-contaminated soil samples (500 spores/7.5 grams soil) and naturally contaminated soil samples collected in Bangladesh during a field...

  7. Genetic relationships between sympatric populations of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis, as revealed by rep-PCR genomic fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula S Peruca; Vilas-Bôas, Gislayne T.; OMN Arantes

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial strain Bacillus cereus is closely related to Bacillus thuringiensis, although any genetic relationship between the two strains is still in debate. Using rep-PCR genomic fingerprinting, we established the genetic relationships between Brazilian sympatric populations of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis simultaneously collected from two geographically separate sites. We observed the formation of both B. thuringiensis and B. cereus clusters, as well as strains of B. cereus that are mo...

  8. The Biosynthesis of UDP-D-QuiNAc in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyoun Hwang

    Full Text Available N-acetylquinovosamine (2-acetamido-2,6-di-deoxy-D-glucose, QuiNAc is a relatively rare amino sugar residue found in glycans of few pathogenic gram-negative bacteria where it can play a role in infection. However, little is known about QuiNAc-related polysaccharides in gram-positive bacteria. In a routine screen for bacillus glycan grown at defined medium, it was surprising to identify a QuiNAc residue in polysaccharides isolated from this gram-positive bacterium. To gain insight into the biosynthesis of these glycans, we report the identification of an operon in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 that contains two genes encoding activities not previously described in gram-positive bacteria. One gene encodes a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine C4,6-dehydratase, (abbreviated Pdeg that converts UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-4-keto-4,6-D-deoxy-GlcNAc (UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-α-D-xylo-4-hexulose; and the second encodes a UDP-4-reductase (abbr. Preq that converts UDP-4-keto-4,6-D-deoxy-GlcNAc to UDP-N-acetyl-quinovosamine in the presence of NADPH. Biochemical studies established that the sequential Pdeg and Preq reaction product is UDP-D-QuiNAc as determined by mass spectrometry and one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments. Also, unambiguous evidence for the conversions of the dehydratase product, UDP-α-D-4-keto-4,6-deoxy-GlcNAc, to UDP-α-D-QuiNAc was obtained using real-time 1H-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The two genes overlap by 4 nucleotides and similar operon organization and identical gene sequences were also identified in a few other Bacillus species suggesting they may have similar roles in the lifecycle of this class of bacteria important to human health. Our results provide new information about the ability of Bacilli to form UDP-QuiNAc and will provide insight to evaluate their role in the biology of Bacillus.

  9. Population of Pratylenchus coffeae (Z. and growth of Arabica coffee seedling inoculated by Pseudomonas diminuta L. and Bacillus subtilis (C..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Fauzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPratylenchus coffeae is a parasitic nematoda that infected the roots of some plants, one of them is coffee. The Infection of Pratylenchus coffeae cause root tissue damage that led to root lession and make root become rotten, it will interfere the ability of roots to absorb water and nutrients in the soil which resulted in the growth of plants. At the moment, control of Pratylenchus coffeae are following integrated pests management (IPM program, which integrated between the use of coffee resistant clone and application of biological agents. Research on biological control was conducted more intensive, at the moment; due to it is friendlier save against environment and cheaper then using chemical nematicides. The research was conducted to know the effects of Micorrhiza Helper Bacteria (MHB,Pseudomonas diminuta and Bacillus subtilis in suppressing the population of P. coffeaeas well as their effect on growth of coffee seedling.  Coffee arabica (Coffea arabica L. seedling one moth old were used in the experiment. The experiment prepared with eight treatments and five  replications, as follows: A (Pseudomonas diminuta with density of 108 cfu / ml, B (Pseudomonas diminuta with density of 2x108 cfu / ml, C (Bacillus subtilis with density of 108 cfu / ml , D (Bacillus subtilis with density 2x108 cfu / ml, E (Carbofuran nematicide 5 g formulation / pot, F (Pseudomonas diminuta and Bacillus subtilis with each density of 108 cfu / ml, K- (Nematoda inoculation but without bacteria and nematicide, K+ (coffee seedling  without any additional treatment. The experiment was conducted for sixteen weeks or about four months. The results of the experiment showed that application of MHB could suppress population of P. coffeae and increase coffee seedling growth significantly. Inoculation of B. subtilis at 108 cfu per seedling suppressed significantly nematoda population of 71.3% compared with untreated seedling but inoculated with nematoda. It was not

  10. Characterization of antagonistic-potential of two Bacillus strains and their biocontrol activity against Rhizoctonia solani in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Srivastava, Supriya; Kumar, Sudheer; Kashyap, Prem Lal; Srivastava, Alok K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the biocontrol mechanism of two antagonistic Bacillus strains (Bacillus subtilis MB14 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MB101), three in vitro antagonism assays were screened and the results were concluded that both strains inhibited Rhizoctonia solani growth in a similar manner by dual culture assay, but the maximum percent of inhibition only resulted with MB101 by volatile and diffusible metabolite assays. Moreover, cell free supernatant (CFS) of MB101 also showed significant (p > 0.05) growth inhibition as compared to MB14, when 10 and 20% CFS mix with the growth medium of R. solani. After in vitro-validation, both strains were evaluated under greenhouse and the results concluded that strain MB101 had significant biocontrol potential as compared to MB14. Strain MB101 was enhanced the plant height, biomass and chlorophyll content of tomato plant through a higher degree of root colonization. In field trials, strain MB101 showed higher lessening in root rot symptoms with significant fruit yield as compare to strain MB14 and infected control. Next to the field study, the presence of four antibiotic genes (srfAA, fenD, ituC, and bmyB) also concluded the antifungal nature of both Bacillus strains. Phylogenetic analysis of protein sequences revealed a close relatedness of three genes (srfAA, fenD, and ituC) with earlier reported sequences of B. subtilis and B. amyloliquefaciens. However, bmyB showed heterogeneity in among both strains (MB14 and MB101) and it may be concluded that higher degree of antagonism, root colonization and different antibiotic producing genes may play an important role in biocontrol mechanism of strain MB101. PMID:24277414

  11. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-related cold thigh abscess as an unusual cause of thigh swelling in infants following BCG vaccine administration: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Shaalan Mohammad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Thigh swelling in an infant can be a symptom of a simple benign condition or a life-threatening condition. We observed a cluster of thigh swelling episodes in infants in which the cause was Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-related cold thigh abscess. We report this unusual case series to raise awareness about this diagnosis. Case presentations We performed a retrospective review of five infants (four boys and one girl who presented with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-related left thigh abscess. The swelling was noticed by the parents at a mean period of three months prior to presentation. The ages at presentation were five, five, eight and nine months for the boys, and six months for the girl. All of the patients were healthy Saudi infants, and received the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine at birth. Clinically, all of the patients were well and did not demonstrate signs of systemic infection. All patients underwent needle aspiration, with subsequent incision and drainage in four of the five cases. The cultures obtained from the abscess fluids were the key to establishing the diagnosis. Only three patients (60% received antituberculosis drugs. Wound healing lasted for a mean period of approximately seven months. Two-year follow-up was unremarkable for all of our patients. Conclusions Technical errors continue to be significant in the development of vaccine-related complications. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-related cold thigh abscess is an extremely rare entity.

  12. FNAC of Bacillus- Calmette- Guerin lymphadenitis masquerading as Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Nalini

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG lymphadenitis is a well known entity. Disseminated BCG infection usually presents as generalized lymphadenopathy, skin rash and hepatosplenomegaly and at times, can pose a diagnostic challenge to clinicians. There are only a few published studies on the cytological findings of BCG lymphadenitis. In this letter we report the fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of BCG lymphadenitis clinically masquerading as Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH. FNA smears showed sheets of foamy macrophages and many polymorphs in a dirty necrotic background with many macrophages as well as polymorphs showing negatively stained rod like structures within their cytoplasm. Zeihl Neelson stain revealed that these cells were heavily loaded with acid fast bacilli (AFB. In the index case, AFB were also seen within the cytoplasm of polymorphs, which has not been documented earlier in the literature.

  13. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF BOVINE ABORTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH BACILLUS-LICHENIFORMIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, J.S.; Krogh, H.V.; Jensen, H.E.

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective study of bovine abortions associated with Bacillus licheniformis is described. The material consisted of 2445 bovine abortions submitted for diagnostics from 1986 through 1993. Initially, B, licheniformis had been isolated from 81 cases. Sections of these cases were reexamined...... microscopically and immunohistochemically by a PAP technique using a primary antibody against B, licheniformis. Of these abortions, 47 were most likely associated with B. licheniformis as tissue lesions with immunostained bacteria were present in these. In the remaining cases the diagnosis may not have been...... established due to the lack of sufficient materials, or the isolation of the bacterium was considered to be a result of contamination. In four cases concomitant infections with B, licheniformis and bovine virus diarrhoea virus were present. Abortions caused by B. licheniformis were predominantly seen during...

  14. Relapsing peritonitis with Bacillus cereus in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Eyð Tausen; Vang, Amanda Gratton; Á Steig, Torkil; Gaini, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    We present a case where Bacillus cereus was determined to be the causative agent of relapsing peritonitis in a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The patient, a 70-year-old man from the Faroe Islands, was admitted with relapsing peritonitis four times over a 3-month period. Peritoneal cultures were positive for growth of B. cereus, a rare bacterial cause of peritonitis. The cultures demonstrated susceptibility to vancomycin, and therefore the patient was treated with intraperitoneal vancomycin, intraperitoneal gentamycin and oral ciprofloxacin. As a result of the relapsing B. cereus peritonitis diagnosis and a CT scan showing contraction of the peritoneum after longstanding inflammation, the peritoneal catheter was removed and the patient converted to haemodialysis. To date, the patient has not been readmitted due to peritonitis. A lack of proper hygiene when changing the dialysis bag was the suspected source of infection with B. cereus. PMID:27118739

  15. Comparative sequence analyses on the 16S rRNA (rDNA) of Bacillus acidocaldarius, Bacillus acidoterrestris, and Bacillus cycloheptanicus and proposal for creation of a new genus, Alicyclobacillus gen. nov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisotzkey, J. D.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr; Fox, G. E.; Deinhard, G.; Poralla, K.

    1992-01-01

    Comparative 16S rRNA (rDNA) sequence analyses performed on the thermophilic Bacillus species Bacillus acidocaldarius, Bacillus acidoterrestris, and Bacillus cycloheptanicus revealed that these organisms are sufficiently different from the traditional Bacillus species to warrant reclassification in a new genus, Alicyclobacillus gen. nov. An analysis of 16S rRNA sequences established that these three thermoacidophiles cluster in a group that differs markedly from both the obligately thermophilic organisms Bacillus stearothermophilus and the facultatively thermophilic organism Bacillus coagulans, as well as many other common mesophilic and thermophilic Bacillus species. The thermoacidophilic Bacillus species B. acidocaldarius, B. acidoterrestris, and B. cycloheptanicus also are unique in that they possess omega-alicylic fatty acid as the major natural membranous lipid component, which is a rare phenotype that has not been found in any other Bacillus species characterized to date. This phenotype, along with the 16S rRNA sequence data, suggests that these thermoacidophiles are biochemically and genetically unique and supports the proposal that they should be reclassified in the new genus Alicyclobacillus.

  16. Inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo; Yonetamari, Kenta; Tokumitsu, Yusuke; Yonemori, Seiya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-08-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals is measured. This study aims to evaluate the bactericidal effects of OH radicals produced by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma widely used for plasma medicine; however, in this study, OH radicals are produced by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of water vapor instead of plasma to allow the production of OH radicals with almost no other reactive species. A 172 nm VUV light from a Xe2 excimer lamp irradiates a He–H2O mixture flowing in a quartz tube to photodissociate H2O to produce OH, H, O, HO2, H2O2, and O3. The produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) flow out of the quartz tube nozzle to the bacteria on an agar plate and cause inactivation. The inactivation by OH radicals among the six ROS is observed by properly setting the experimental conditions with the help of simulations calculating the ROS densities. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals causes visible inactivation.

  17. Cannibalism stress response in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfler, Carolin; Heckmann, Judith; Fritsch, Anne; Popp, Philipp; Gebhard, Susanne; Fritz, Georg; Mascher, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    When faced with carbon source limitation, the Gram-positive soil organism Bacillus subtilis initiates a survival strategy called sporulation, which leads to the formation of highly resistant endospores that allow B. subtilis to survive even long periods of starvation. In order to avoid commitment to this energy-demanding and irreversible process, B. subtilis employs another strategy called 'cannibalism' to delay sporulation as long as possible. Cannibalism involves the production and secretion of two cannibalism toxins, sporulation delaying protein (SDP) and sporulation killing factor (SKF), which are able to lyse sensitive siblings. The lysed cells are thought to then provide nutrients for the cannibals to slow down or even prevent them from entering sporulation. In this study, we uncovered the role of the cell envelope stress response (CESR), especially the Bce-like antimicrobial peptide detoxification modules, in the cannibalism stress response during the stationary phase. SDP and SKF specifically induce Bce-like systems and some extracytoplasmic function σ factors in stationary-phase cultures, but only the latter provide some degree of protection. A full Bce response is only triggered by mature toxins, and not by toxin precursors. Our study provides insights into the close relationship between stationary-phase survival and the CESR of B. subtilis. PMID:26364265

  18. A pangenomic study of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjun Fang; Songnian Hu; Jie Zhang; Ibrahim A1-Mssallem; Jun Yu; Zhaolong Li; Jiucheng Liu; Changlong Shu; Xumin Wang; Xiaowei Zhang; Xiaoguang Yu; Duojun Zhao; Guiming Liu

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (B.thuringiensis) is a soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacterium and its plasmid-encoded toxins (Cry) are commonly used as biological alternatives to pesticides.In a pangenomic study,we sequenced seven B.thuringiensis isolates in both high coverage and base quality using the next-generation sequencing platform.The B.thuringiensis pangenome was extrapolated to have 4196 core genes and an asymptotic value of 558 unique genes when a new genome is added.Compared to the pangenomes of its closely related species of the same genus,B.thuringiensis pangenome shows an open characteristic,similar to B.cereus but not to B.anthracis; the latter has a closed pangenome.We also found extensive divergence among the seven B.thuringiensis genome assemblies,which harbor ample repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).The identities among orthologous genes are greater than 84.5% and the hotspots for the genome variations were discovered in genomic regions of 2.3-2.8 Mb and 5.0-5.6 Mb.We concluded that high-coverage sequence assemblies from multiple strains,before all the gaps are closed,are very useful for pangenomic studies.

  19. Surface topography of the Bacillus stearothermophilus ribosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface topography of the intact 70S ribosome and free 30S and 50S subunits from Bacillus stearothermophilus strain 2,184 was investigated by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was employed to separate ribosomal proteins for analysis of their reactivity. Free 50S subunits incorporated about 18% more 125I than did 50S subunits derived from 70S ribosomes, whereas free 30S subunits and 30S subunits derived from 70S ribosomes incorporated similar amounts of 125I. Iodinated 70S ribosomes and subunits retained 62-78% of the protein synthesis activity of untreated particles and sedimentation profiles showed no gross conformational changes due to iodination. The proteins most reactive to enzymatic iodination were S4, S7, S10 and Sa of the small subunit and L2, L4, L5/9, L6 and L36 of the large subunit. Proteins S2, S3, S7, S13, Sa, L5/9, L10, L11 and L24/25 were labeled substantially more in the free subunits than in the 70S ribosome. Other proteins, including S5, S9, S12, S15/16, S18 and L36 were more extensively iodinated in the 70S ribosome than in the free subunits. The locations of tyrosine residues in some homologus ribosomal proteins from B. stearothermophilus and E. coli are compared. (orig.)

  20. Bacillus subtilis Spore Inner Membrane Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linli; Abhyankar, Wishwas; Ouwerling, Natasja; Dekker, Henk L; van Veen, Henk; van der Wel, Nicole N; Roseboom, Winfried; de Koning, Leo J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G

    2016-02-01

    The endospore is the dormant form of Bacillus subtilis and many other Firmicutes. By sporulation, these spore formers can survive very harsh physical and chemical conditions. Yet, they need to go through germination to return to their growing form. The spore inner membrane (IM) has been shown to play an essential role in triggering the initiation of germination. In this study, we isolated the IM of bacterial spores, in parallel with the isolation of the membrane of vegetative cells. With the use of GeLC-MS/MS, over 900 proteins were identified from the B. subtilis spore IM preparations. By bioinformatics-based membrane protein predictions, ca. one-third could be predicted to be membrane-localized. A large number of unique proteins as well as proteins common to the two membrane proteomes were identified. In addition to previously known IM proteins, a number of IM proteins were newly identified, at least some of which are likely to provide new insights into IM physiology, unveiling proteins putatively involved in spore germination machinery and hence putative germination inhibition targets. PMID:26731423

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis Conjugation in Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuls, Elise; van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Dijkstra, Camelia; Larkin, Oliver; Mahillon, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Spaceflight experiments have suggested a possible effect of microgravity on the plasmid transfer among strains of the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis, as opposed to no effect recorded for Gram-negative conjugation. To investigate these potential effects in a more affordable experimental setup, three ground-based microgravity simulators were tested: the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), and a superconducting magnet. The bacterial conjugative system consisted in biparental matings between two B. thuringiensis strains, where the transfer frequencies of the conjugative plasmid pAW63 and its ability to mobilize the nonconjugative plasmid pUB110 were assessed. Specifically, potential plasmid transfers in a 0-g position (simulated microgravity) were compared to those obtained under 1-g (normal gravity) condition in each device. Statistical analyses revealed no significant difference in the conjugative and mobilizable transfer frequencies between the three different simulated microgravitational conditions and our standard laboratory condition. These important ground-based observations emphasize the fact that, though no stimulation of plasmid transfer was observed, no inhibition was observed either. In the case of Gram-positive bacteria, this ability to exchange plasmids in weightlessness, as occurs under Earth's conditions, should be seen as particularly relevant in the scope of spread of antibiotic resistances and bacterial virulence.

  2. Comparison of different Bacillus subtilis expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrová, Ludmila; Muchová, Katarína; Barák, Imrich

    2010-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis is considered to have great potential as a host for the production and secretion of recombinant proteins. Many different expression systems have been developed for B. subtilis. Here we compare two widely used expression systems, the IPTG-inducible derivative of spac system (hyper-spank) and the xylose-inducible (xyl) to the SURE (subtilin-regulated gene expression) system. Western blot analysis of the membrane protein SpoIISA together with its protein partner SpoIISB showed that the highest expression level of this complex is obtained using the SURE system. Measurement of β-galactosidase activities of the promoter-lacZ fusions in individual expression systems confirmed that the P(spaS) promoter of the SURE system is the strongest of those compared, although the induction/repression ratio reached only 1.84. Based on these results, we conclude that the SURE system is the most efficient of these three B. subtilis expression systems in terms of the amount of expressed product. Remarkably, the yield of the SpoIISA-SpoIISB complex obtained from B. subtilis was comparable to that normally obtained from the Escherichia coli arabinose-inducible expression system. PMID:20863884

  3. A novel metalloproteinase virulence factor is involved in Bacillus thuringiensis pathogenesis in nematodes and insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Donghai; Lin, Jian; Huang, Qiong; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jinshui; Zhu, Lei; Sun, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis has been developed as the leading microbial insecticide for years. The pathogenesis of B. thuringiensis requires common extracellular factors that depend on the PlcR regulon, which regulates a large number of virulence factors; however, the precise role of many of these proteins is not known. In this study, we describe the complete lifecycle of a nematicidal B. thuringiensis strain in the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using in vitro and in vivo molecular techniques to follow host and bacterial effectors during the infection process. We then focus on the metalloproteinase ColB, a collagenase, which was found highly important for destruction of the intestine thereby facilitates the adaptation and colonization of B. thuringiensis in C. elegans. In vivo green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter-gene studies showed that ColB expression is highly induced and regulated by the global activator PlcR. Finally, we demonstrated that ColB also takes part in B. thuringiensis virulence in an insect model following injection and oral infection. Indeed, addition of purified ColB accelerates the action of Cry toxin proteins in insects, too. These results give novel insights into host adaptation for B. thuringiensis and other B. cereus group bacteria and highlight the role of collagenase metalloproteases to synergize infection process. PMID:26995589

  4. Bacillus anthracis TIR Domain-Containing Protein Localises to Cellular Microtubule Structures and Induces Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Emil; Thwaite, Joanne E; Jenner, Dominic C; Spear, Abigail M; Flick-Smith, Helen; Atkins, Helen S; Byrne, Bernadette; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognise invading pathogens and mediate downstream immune signalling via Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domains. TIR domain proteins (Tdps) have been identified in multiple pathogenic bacteria and have recently been implicated as negative regulators of host innate immune activation. A Tdp has been identified in Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. Here we present the first study of this protein, designated BaTdp. Recombinantly expressed and purified BaTdp TIR domain interacted with several human TIR domains, including that of the key TLR adaptor MyD88, although BaTdp expression in cultured HEK293 cells had no effect on TLR4- or TLR2- mediated immune activation. During expression in mammalian cells, BaTdp localised to microtubular networks and caused an increase in lipidated cytosolic microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3), indicative of autophagosome formation. In vivo intra-nasal infection experiments in mice showed that a BaTdp knockout strain colonised host tissue faster with higher bacterial load within 4 days post-infection compared to the wild type B. anthracis. Taken together, these findings indicate that BaTdp does not play an immune suppressive role, but rather, its absence increases virulence. BaTdp present in wild type B. anthracis plausibly interact with the infected host cell, which undergoes autophagy in self-defence. PMID:27391310

  5. Architecture and High-Resolution Structure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus Spore Coat Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K; Malkin, A

    2005-02-18

    We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the native surface topology and ultrastructure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus spores in water and in air. AFM was able to resolve the nanostructure of the exosporium and three distinctive classes of appendages. Removal of the exosporium exposed either a hexagonal honeycomb layer (B. thuringiensis) or a rodlet outer spore coat layer (B. cereus). Removal of the rodlet structure from B. cereus spores revealed an underlying honeycomb layer similar to that observed with B. thuringiensis spores. The periodicity of the rodlet structure on the outer spore coat of B. cereus was {approx}8 nm, and the length of the rodlets was limited to the cross-patched domain structure of this layer to {approx}200 nm. The lattice constant of the honeycomb structures was {approx}9 nm for both B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores. Both honeycomb structures were composed of multiple, disoriented domains with distinct boundaries. Our results demonstrate that variations in storage and preparation procedures result in architectural changes in individual spore surfaces, which establish AFM as a useful tool for evaluation of preparation and processing ''fingerprints'' of bacterial spores. These results establish that high-resolution AFM has the capacity to reveal species-specific assembly and nanometer scale structure of spore surfaces. These species-specific spore surface structural variations are correlated with sequence divergences in a spore core structural protein SspE.

  6. Occurrence of Toxigenic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in Doenjang, a Korean Fermented Soybean Paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Min; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Moon Cheol; Koo, Minseon

    2016-04-01

    This study determined the prevalence and toxin profile of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in doenjang, a fermented soybean food, made using both traditional and commercial methods. The 51 doenjang samples tested were broadly contaminated with B. cereus; in contrast, only one sample was positive for B. thuringiensis. All B. cereus isolates from doenjang were positive for diarrheal toxin genes. The frequencies of nheABC and hblACD in traditional samples were 22.7 and 0%, respectively, whereas 5.1 and 5.1% of B. cereus isolates from commercial samples possessed nheABC and hblACD, respectively. The detection rate of ces gene was 10.8%. The predominant toxin profile among isolates from enterotoxigenic B. cereus in doenjang was profile 4 (entFM-bceT-cytK). The major enterotoxin genes in emetic B. cereus were cytK, entFM, and nheA genes. The B. thuringiensis isolate was of the diarrheagenic type. These results provide a better understanding of the epidemiology of the enterotoxigenic and emetic B. cereus groups in Korean fermented soybean products. PMID:27052865

  7. Extended genetic analysis of Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Zahner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST was undertaken to extend the genetic characterization of 29 isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis previously characterized in terms of presence/absence of sequences encoding virulence factors and via variable number tandem repeat (VNTR. Additional analysis involved polymerase chain reaction for the presence of sequences (be, cytK, inA, pag, lef, cya and cap, encoding putative virulence factors, not investigated in the earlier study. MLST analysis ascribed novel and unique sequence types to each of the isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a single sequence of 2,838 bp of concatenated loci sequences. The strains were not monophyletic by analysis of any specific housekeeping gene or virulence characteristic. No clear association in relation to source of isolation or to genotypic profile based on the presence or absence of putative virulence genes could be identified. Comparison of VNTR profiling with MLST data suggested a correlation between these two methods of genetic analysis. In common with the majority of previous studies, MLST was unable to provide clarification of the basis for pathogenicity among members of the B. cereus complex. Nevertheless, our application of MLST served to reinforce the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered as the same species.

  8. Extended genetic analysis of Brazilian isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahner, Viviane; Silva, Ana Carolina Telles de Carvalho e; de Moraes, Gabriela Pinhel; McIntosh, Douglas; de Filippis, Ivano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple locus sequence typing (MLST) was undertaken to extend the genetic characterization of 29 isolates of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis previously characterized in terms of presence/absence of sequences encoding virulence factors and via variable number tandem repeat (VNTR). Additional analysis involved polymerase chain reaction for the presence of sequences (be, cytK, inA, pag, lef, cya and cap), encoding putative virulence factors, not investigated in the earlier study. MLST analysis ascribed novel and unique sequence types to each of the isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a single sequence of 2,838 bp of concatenated loci sequences. The strains were not monophyletic by analysis of any specific housekeeping gene or virulence characteristic. No clear association in relation to source of isolation or to genotypic profile based on the presence or absence of putative virulence genes could be identified. Comparison of VNTR profiling with MLST data suggested a correlation between these two methods of genetic analysis. In common with the majority of previous studies, MLST was unable to provide clarification of the basis for pathogenicity among members of the B. cereus complex. Nevertheless, our application of MLST served to reinforce the notion that B. cereus and B. thuringiensis should be considered as the same species. PMID:23440117

  9. Production of Alpha Amylase by Bacillus cereus in Submerged Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen H. Raplong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have the ability to secrete enzymes when they are grown in the presence of certain substrates. Amylases are among the most important industrial enzymes and are of great significance in biotechnological studies. Bacteria belonging to the genus Bacillus were isolated using mannitol egg yolk polymyxin B (MYP agar a highly selective media for Bacillus cereus isolation. The isolates were tested for α-amylase production on nutrient agar supplemented with starch and in submerged fermentation. The bacteria isolated and identified (using the Microgen Bacillus identification kit were all Bacillus cereus and SB2 had the largest zone of hydrolysis of 12mm on nutrient agar supplemented with starch as well as the highest enzyme activity of 1.62U/ml. Amylase activity of 2.56U/ml was obtained after 24 hours incubation in submerged fermentation. When amylase enzyme production parameters where optimized, maximum amylase activity was obtained at a pH of 6.5, temperature of 350C, incubation time of 24 hours and 4% inoculums concentration. Bacillus cereus SB2 is a potential isolate for alpha-amylase production with soluble starch as the sole carbon source in submerged fermentation.

  10. Bacillus as a potential diagnostic marker for yellow tongue coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Juan; Cai, Xueting; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xiaoyan; Hu, Chunping; Xia, Junquan; Shen, Jianping; Su, Kelei; Yan, Huaijiang; Xu, Yuehua; Zhang, Yiyan; Zhang, Sujie; Yang, Lijun; Zhi, Hao; Gao, Sizhi Paul; Yu, Qiang; Hu, Jingqing; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Observation of tongue coating, a foundation for clinical diagnosis and treatment in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), is a major indicator of the occurrence, development, and prognosis of disease. The biological basis of tongue diagnosis and relationship between the types and microorganisms of tongue coating remain elusive. Thirteen chronic erosive gastritis (CEG) patients with typical yellow tongue coating (YTC) and ten healthy volunteers with thin white tongue coating (WTC) were included in this study. Patients were provided a 2-course targeted treatment of a herbal medicine Ban Xia Xie Xin decoction, traditionally prescribed for CEG patients with YTC, to evaluate the relationship between tongue coating microbiota and diagnosis of CEG with typical YTC. The tongue coating segregation structure was determined using Illumina Miseq sequencing of the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Bacillus was significantly observed only in CEG patients with YTC, but not in patients who received the decoction. YTC (n = 22) and WTC (n = 29) samples were collected for bacterial culturing to illustrate the relationship between Bacillus and YTC. The Bacillus positivity rate of YTC samples was 72.7%; Bacillus was not observed in WTC samples. In conclusion, Bacillus was strongly associated with YTC. PMID:27578261

  11. UJI TOKSISITAS ISOLAT Bacillus thuringiensis dari Kabupaten Lahat, Palembang, Sumatera Selatan TERHADAP LARVA NYAMUK Culex sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, Welianto

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the optimal concentration of isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis to control larvae of the mosquito Culex sp. The method used is the isolation of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, then the inoculation of bacteria. Bacillus thuringiensis mud samples, as much as 25 grams, obtained in the area of Lahat, South Sumatra containing Bacillus thuringiensis which includes five districts, namely Sub Gumay Talang, Jaray, Kikim West, South Kikim, and Central Kikim. Gumay ...

  12. Phytase, Phosphatase Activity and P-Nutrition of Soybean as Influenced by Inoculation of Bacillus

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ramesh; Sushil K. Sharma; Joshi, O. P.; Khan, I. R.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of different Bacillus isolates on rhizosphere soil enzyme activities and P-nutrition of soybean was carried out under microcosm conditions. Significant increase in enzyme activities viz., fluorescein diacetate activity, phosphatase and phytase activity and consequent effects on P-nutrition were observed with the inoculation of Bacillus isolates over uninoculated control. Among the isolates, BD-3-1B, KHBD-6, BDKH-3, Bacillus amyloliquefacians, and Bacillus cereus were found to b...

  13. Postexposure Prophylaxis against Anthrax: Evaluation of Various Treatment Regimens in Intranasally Infected Guinea Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Altboum, Zeev; Gozes, Yehoshua; Barnea, Ada; Pass, Avi; White, Moshe; Kobiler, David

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency of postexposure prophylaxis against Bacillus anthracis infection was tested in guinea pigs infected intranasally with either Vollum or strain ATCC 6605 spores (75 times the 50% lethal dose [LD50] and 87 times LD50, respectively). Starting 24 h postinfection, animals were treated three times per day for 14 days with ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin, cefazolin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). Administration of cefazolin and TMP-SMX failed to protect the anim...

  14. Malate dehydrogenases from actinomycetes: structural comparison of Thermoactinomyces enzyme with other actinomycete and Bacillus enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, K.; Sundaram, T K; Kernick, M

    1984-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenases from bacteria belonging to the genus Thermoactinomyces are tetrameric, like those from Bacillus spp., and exhibit a high degree of structural homology to Bacillus malate dehydrogenase as judged by immunological cross-reactivity. Malate dehydrogenases from other actinomycetes are dimers and do not cross-react with antibodies to Bacillus malate dehydrogenase.

  15. 40 CFR 180.1128 - Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1128 Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of... biofungicide Bacillus subtilis MBI 600 in or on all food commodities, including residues resulting from...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Group Phage TsarBomba

    OpenAIRE

    Erill, Ivan; Caruso, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group bacteriophage TsarBomba, a double-stranded DNA Myoviridae, was isolated from soil collected in Saratov, Russia. TsarBomba was found to be similar to Bacillus phages BCP78 and BCU4, and to have a wide host range among Bacillus cereus group species.

  17. Bacillus Strains Most Closely Related to Bacillus nealsonii Are Not Effectively Circumscribed within the Taxonomic Species Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peak, K Kealy; Duncan, Kathleen E; Luna, Vicki A; King, Debra S; McCarthy, Peter J; Cannons, Andrew C

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus strains with >99.7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity were characterized with DNA:DNA hybridization, cellular fatty acid (CFA) analysis, and testing of 100 phenotypic traits. When paired with the most closely related type strain, percent DNA:DNA similarities (% S) for six Bacillus strains were all far below the recommended 70% threshold value for species circumscription with Bacillus nealsonii. An apparent genomic group of four Bacillus strain pairings with 94%-70% S was contradicted by the failure of the strains to cluster in CFA- and phenotype-based dendrograms as well as by their differentiation with 9-13 species level discriminators such as nitrate reduction, temperature range, and acid production from carbohydrates. The novel Bacillus strains were monophyletic and very closely related based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. Coherent genomic groups were not however supported by similarly organized phenotypic clusters. Therefore, the strains were not effectively circumscribed within the taxonomic species definition. PMID:22046187

  18. Quorum Sensing in Bacillus thuringiensis Is Required for Completion of a Full Infectious Cycle in the Insect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Slamti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS is a biological process commonly described as allowing bacteria belonging to a same pherotype to coordinate gene expression to cell density. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication mainly relies on cytoplasmic sensors regulated by secreted and re-imported signaling peptides. The Bacillus quorum sensors Rap, NprR, and PlcR were previously identified as the first members of a new protein family called RNPP. Except for the Rap proteins, these RNPP regulators are transcription factors that directly regulate gene expression. QS regulates important biological functions in bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group. PlcR was first characterized as the main regulator of virulence in B. thuringiensis and B. cereus. More recently, the PlcR-like regulator PlcRa was characterized for its role in cysteine metabolism and in resistance to oxidative stress. The NprR regulator controls the necrotrophic properties allowing the bacteria to survive in the infected host. The Rap proteins negatively affect sporulation via their interaction with a phosphorelay protein involved in the activation of Spo0A, the master regulator of this differentiation pathway. In this review we aim at providing a complete picture of the QS systems that are sequentially activated during the lifecycle of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis in an insect model of infection.

  19. Quorum sensing in Bacillus thuringiensis is required for completion of a full infectious cycle in the insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamti, Leyla; Perchat, Stéphane; Huillet, Eugénie; Lereclus, Didier

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial cell-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS) is a biological process commonly described as allowing bacteria belonging to a same pherotype to coordinate gene expression to cell density. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication mainly relies on cytoplasmic sensors regulated by secreted and re-imported signaling peptides. The Bacillus quorum sensors Rap, NprR, and PlcR were previously identified as the first members of a new protein family called RNPP. Except for the Rap proteins, these RNPP regulators are transcription factors that directly regulate gene expression. QS regulates important biological functions in bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group. PlcR was first characterized as the main regulator of virulence in B. thuringiensis and B. cereus. More recently, the PlcR-like regulator PlcRa was characterized for its role in cysteine metabolism and in resistance to oxidative stress. The NprR regulator controls the necrotrophic properties allowing the bacteria to survive in the infected host. The Rap proteins negatively affect sporulation via their interaction with a phosphorelay protein involved in the activation of Spo0A, the master regulator of this differentiation pathway. In this review we aim at providing a complete picture of the QS systems that are sequentially activated during the lifecycle of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis in an insect model of infection. PMID:25089349

  20. Genetic Characterization of Bacillus anthracis 17 JB strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Seyed-Mohamadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Bacillus anthracis is one of the most homogenous bacteria ever described. Bacillus anthracis 17JB is a laboratory strain. It is broadly used as a challenge strain in guinea pigs for potency test of anthrax vaccine.Material and Methods: This work describes genetic characterization of B. anthracis 17 JB strain using the SNPs and MLVA genotyping.Results and Conclusion: In SNPs typing, the originally French 17JB strain represented the A. Br. 008/009 subgroup. In Levy's genotyping method, 843, 451 and 864 bp long fragments were identified at AA03, AJ03 and AA07 loci, respectively. In the vaccine manufacturer perspective these findings are much valuable on their own account, but similar research is required to extend molecular knowledge of B. anthracis epidemiology in Persia.Keywords: Bacillus anthracis 17JB, Genetic characterization, SNPs typing

  1. Genotyping of Bacillus cereus strains by microarray-based resequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Zwick

    Full Text Available The ability to distinguish microbial pathogens from closely related but nonpathogenic strains is key to understanding the population biology of these organisms. In this regard, Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes inhalational anthrax, is of interest because it is closely related and often difficult to distinguish from other members of the B. cereus group that can cause diverse diseases. We employed custom-designed resequencing arrays (RAs based on the genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis to generate 422 kb of genomic sequence from a panel of 41 Bacillus cereus sensu lato strains. Here we show that RAs represent a "one reaction" genotyping technology with the ability to discriminate between highly similar B. anthracis isolates and more divergent strains of the B. cereus s.l. Clade 1. Our data show that RAs can be an efficient genotyping technology for pre-screening the genetic diversity of large strain collections to selected the best candidates for whole genome sequencing.

  2. Cyclic LIPopeptides from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 elicit defense-related gene expression in citrus fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waewthongrak, Waewruedee; Leelasuphakul, Wichitra; McCollum, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Effects of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) obtained from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 on eliciting defense-related gene transcription and activity of defense-related enzymes; glucanase (GLU), chitinase (CHI), peroxidase (POX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in Citrus sinensis cv. Valencia fruit were determined. The maximum level of GLU transcripts induced in fruit treated with fengycin was significantly greatest among treatments at 48 h. Surfactin enhanced the LOX and POX transcripts. In parallel, corresponding enzyme activities were correlated with changes in gene expression observed in fruit inoculated with Penicillium digitatum following treatment with individual CLPs. Synergistic effects of fengycin and iturin A, fengycin and surfactin were shown in gene transcript of GLU and CHI, respectively, and surfactin induced POX and LOX gene expression of citrus flavedo without pathogen infection. These results suggest that fengycin and surfactin act as elicitors of defense-related gene expression in "Valencia" fruit following infection. PMID:25329301

  3. Cyclic LIPopeptides from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 elicit defense-related gene expression in citrus fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waewruedee Waewthongrak

    Full Text Available Effects of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs obtained from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 on eliciting defense-related gene transcription and activity of defense-related enzymes; glucanase (GLU, chitinase (CHI, peroxidase (POX and lipoxygenase (LOX in Citrus sinensis cv. Valencia fruit were determined. The maximum level of GLU transcripts induced in fruit treated with fengycin was significantly greatest among treatments at 48 h. Surfactin enhanced the LOX and POX transcripts. In parallel, corresponding enzyme activities were correlated with changes in gene expression observed in fruit inoculated with Penicillium digitatum following treatment with individual CLPs. Synergistic effects of fengycin and iturin A, fengycin and surfactin were shown in gene transcript of GLU and CHI, respectively, and surfactin induced POX and LOX gene expression of citrus flavedo without pathogen infection. These results suggest that fengycin and surfactin act as elicitors of defense-related gene expression in "Valencia" fruit following infection.

  4. Cyclic Lipopeptides from Bacillus subtilis ABS–S14 Elicit Defense-Related Gene Expression in Citrus Fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waewthongrak, Waewruedee; Leelasuphakul, Wichitra; McCollum, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Effects of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) obtained from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 on eliciting defense-related gene transcription and activity of defense-related enzymes; glucanase (GLU), chitinase (CHI), peroxidase (POX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in Citrus sinensis cv. Valencia fruit were determined. The maximum level of GLU transcripts induced in fruit treated with fengycin was significantly greatest among treatments at 48 h. Surfactin enhanced the LOX and POX transcripts. In parallel, corresponding enzyme activities were correlated with changes in gene expression observed in fruit inoculated with Penicillium digitatum following treatment with individual CLPs. Synergistic effects of fengycin and iturin A, fengycin and surfactin were shown in gene transcript of GLU and CHI, respectively, and surfactin induced POX and LOX gene expression of citrus flavedo without pathogen infection. These results suggest that fengycin and surfactin act as elicitors of defense-related gene expression in “Valencia” fruit following infection. PMID:25329301

  5. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Celandroni

    Full Text Available The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance.

  6. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna Aissatou; Mazzantini, Diletta; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption—ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance. PMID:27031639

  7. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis by Gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Natalia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of Bacillus anthracis as a biological weapon heighlightened awareness of the need for validated methods for the inactivation of B. anthracis spores. Ionizing radiation is capable of causing a variety of chemical changes and biological effects on bacteria which can be due both to direct interactions with critical cell components and to indirect actions on bacteria by molecular entities formed as a result of radiolysis of other molecules in the bacterial cell. This study determined the gamma irradiation dose for inactivating B. anthracis spores and its biological effects on the bacterial characteristics. Gamma irradiation was conducted at the IRKA irradiator at the National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jakarta and cobalt-60 was used as the source of ionizing radiation (capacity of ca. 134,044 Kci. Freeze dried culture of B. anthracis in glass ampoules was irradiated using variable doses of 30, 20 and 10 KGy. Viability, biochemical and protease enzyme characteristics of B. anthracis were evaluated before and after irradiation. The ability of B. anthracis to degrade gelatin, haemoglobin and bovine immunoglobulin G was also tested. The results showed that ionizing radiation was able to inactivate or kill 11,05 x 108 cfu B. anthracis by 95.37%, 99.58% and 99.99 at respective doses of 10, 20 and 30 KGy. Bacterial spores appear to be less susceptible to irradiation than the vegetative cells, because of their specific structure. The survive spores irradiated at 30kGy shows some biochemical characteristic changes. The survivors failed to degrade methyl -D-glucopyranoside and arbutine. The ability of B. anthracis protease to degrade gelatin, haemoglobin and bovine immunoglobulin G was not affected by irradiation. These findings showed that a gamma irradiation at 30 KGy effectively inactivates B. anthracis spores without changing the protease activities.

  8. Production and Characterization of Bacillus firmus pectinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Roosdiana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pectinase is enzyme which functions to hydrolyze pectin become D-galacturonic acid unit. This enzyme is potential in various industries, especially in fruit juice industry.  Pectinase can be derived from various microorganisms resulting in different pectinase character. The aims of this research were to determine the optimum condition of pectinase production and to characterize the resulted pectinase including optimum condition of pectinase activity and the influence of metal ion.  The optimum condition of pectinase production was carried out by growing Bacillus firmus on basal media containing pectin as inducer at various  pH (5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, temperature (30, 35, 40, 45, 50 oC and fermentation time (6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36 hours. while the optimum pectinase activity was done at various pH ( 4, 6, 7, 8, 10 , temperature (30, 35, 40, 45, 50 oC and reaction time (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 minutes. The influence of Zn2+, Mg2+, K+ at 2-10 mM to pectinase activity were also investigated. The result showed that optimum condition of pectinase production occurred at pH7-8, temperature 40-50 oC and fermentation time 18hours, while the optimum condition of pectinase activity was pH 7, temperature 50 oC and reaction time 30 minutes. The existence of Zn2+, Mg2+, K+ ions  affected significantly to pectinase activity.  Mg2+ acted as non competitive inhibitor; however K+ and Zn2+ acted as un competitive inhibitor.

  9. Cerebral infarctions due to CNS infection with Enterobacter sakazakii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent reports have implicated Enterobacter sakazakii, a gram-negative enteric bacillus, in neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Cases of severe central nervous system involvement, including ventriculitis, brain abscess, infarction, and cyst formation, have been described. We present serial head CT findings in a case of neonatal E. sakazakii meningitis complicated by a ring enhancing cerebral infarction which mimicked abscess formation. In meningitis secondary to this agent, a recognized pattern of cerebral hypodensity with or without cystic degeneration late in the course of the infection is likely to represent cerebral infarction rather than an abscess especially if there is a lack of culture evidence of a bacterial infection. (orig.)

  10. Characterization of an L-arabinose isomerase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jin-Ha; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Jeya, Marimuthu;

    2010-01-01

    An isolated gene from Bacillus subtilis str. 168 encoding a putative isomerase was proposed as an L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI), cloned into Escherichia coli, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 1,491 bp, capable of encoding a polypep......An isolated gene from Bacillus subtilis str. 168 encoding a putative isomerase was proposed as an L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI), cloned into Escherichia coli, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 1,491 bp, capable of encoding...

  11. Study of the Bacillus flora of Nigerian spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antai, S P

    1988-05-01

    Bacteriological examination of 230 samples of five different unprocessed spices (aligator pepper, red pepper, black pepper, thyme and curry powder) collected randomly from Port Harcourt main markets revealed that the spices were highly contaminated, with bacterial counts ranging from 1.8 x 10(4) to 1.1 x 10(8) per gram. Bacillus cereus was isolated in high numbers in the majority of the 230 samples examined. It was also observed that other Bacillus spp. including B. subtilis, B. polymyxa and B. coagulans occurred in significant numbers. PMID:3275301

  12. Enhancement of Cellulase Production by Cellulomonas Fimi and Bacillus Subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two bacterial strains identified as Cellulomonas fimi and Baciliius subtilus are cosidered as highly active cellulytic bacteria. Trials for maximizing the cellulolytic activites of the two strains were conducted. A maximum cellulase production was achieved at 1 and 1.5%carboxy methyl cellulose as carbon source, sodium nitrate and yeast as nitrogen source for Cellulomonas fimi and Bacillus subtilis, respectively. Incubation temprature at 30 and 45 degree C, ph at 6 and 7 achieved the highest activity of cellulase for Cellulomonas fimi and bacillus subtilis, respectively

  13. Conjugation by Mosquito Pathogenic Strains of Bacillus sphaericus

    OpenAIRE

    Correa Margarita; Yousten Allan A

    1997-01-01

    A mosquito pathogenic strain of Bacillus sphaericus carried out the conjugal transfer of plasmid pAMß1 to other strains of its own and two other serotypes. However, it was unable to conjugate with mosquito pathogens from three other serotypes, with B. sphaericus of other DNA homology groups or with three other species of Bacillus. Conjugation frequency was highest with a strain having an altered surface layer (S layer). Conjugal transfer of pAMß1 was not detected in mosquito larval cadavers. ...

  14. Aerobic granulation of pure bacterial strain Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil S ADAV; Duu-Jong LEE

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to cultivate aer-obic granules by pure bacterial strain, Bacillus thuringien-sis, in a sequencing batch reactor. Stable granules sized 2.0-2.2 mm were formed in the reactor after a five-week cultivation. These granules exhibited excellent settling attributes, and degraded phenol at rates of 1.49 and concentration, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopic test results show that Bacillus thuringiensis was distributed over the initial small aggregates, and the outer edge of the granule was away from the core regime in the following stage.

  15. Developments in the use of Bacillus species for industrial production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallmey, Marcus; Singh, Ajay; Ward, Owen P

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus species continue to be dominant bacterial workhorses in microbial fermentations. Bacillus subtilis (natto) is the key microbial participant in the ongoing production of the soya-based traditional natto fermentation, and some Bacillus species are on the Food and Drug Administration's GRAS (generally regarded as safe) list. The capacity of selected Bacillus strains to produce and secrete large quantities (20-25 g/L) of extracellular enzymes has placed them among the most important industrial enzyme producers. The ability of different species to ferment in the acid, neutral, and alkaline pH ranges, combined with the presence of thermophiles in the genus, has lead to the development of a variety of new commercial enzyme products with the desired temperature, pH activity, and stability properties to address a variety of specific applications. Classical mutation and (or) selection techniques, together with advanced cloning and protein engineering strategies, have been exploited to develop these products. Efforts to produce and secrete high yields of foreign recombinant proteins in Bacillus hosts initially appeared to be hampered by the degradation of the products by the host proteases. Recent studies have revealed that the slow folding of heterologous proteins at the membrane-cell wall interface of Gram-positive bacteria renders them vulnerable to attack by wall-associated proteases. In addition, the presence of thiol-disulphide oxidoreductases in B. subtilis may be beneficial in the secretion of disulphide-bond-containing proteins. Such developments from our understanding of the complex protein translocation machinery of Gram-positive bacteria should allow the resolution of current secretion challenges and make Bacillus species preeminent hosts for heterologous protein production. Bacillus strains have also been developed and engineered as industrial producers of nucleotides, the vitamin riboflavin, the flavor agent ribose, and the supplement poly

  16. Effect of oral administration of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9 strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopamudra Haldar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the effect of oral administration of two Bacillus strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model. Materials and Methods: An in vivo experiment was conducted for 49-day period on 36 adult male albino Wister rats divided equally into to four groups. After 7-day adaptation period, one group (T1 was fed on sterile skim milk along with basal diet for the next 28 days. Second (T2 and (T3 groups received spore biomass of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9, respectively, suspended in sterilized skim milk at 8-9 log colony-forming units/ml plus basal diet for 28 days, while control group (T4 was supplied with clean water along with basal diet. There was a 14-day post-treatment period. A total of 288 fecal samples (8 fecal collections per rat were collected at every 7-day interval starting from 0 to 49 days and subjected to the enumeration of the counts of coliforms and lactobacilli and Bacillus spores using respective agar media. In vitro acid and bile tolerance tests on both the strains were performed. Results: The rats those (T2 and T3 received either B. coagulans B37 or B. pumilus B9 spore along with non-fermented skim milk showed decrease (p<0.01 in fecal coliform counts and increase (p<0.05 in both fecal lactobacilli and Bacillus spore counts as compared to the control group (T4 and the group fed only skim milk (T1. In vitro study indicated that both the strains were found to survive at pH 2.0 and 3.0 even up to 3 h and tolerate bile up to 2.0% concentration even after 12 h of exposure. Conclusions: This study revealed that oral administration of either B. coagulans B37 or B. pumilus B9 strains might be useful in reducing coliform counts accompanied by concurrent increase in lactobacilli counts in the intestinal flora in rats.

  17. Heat resistance of spore-forming microorganisms (Bacillus sporothermodurans, Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus stearothermophilus) under isothermal and non-iiothermal conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Jódar, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    [SPA]El principal género de microorganismos esporulados altamente resistentes al calor involucrados en el deterioro de alimentos es Bacillus. Este género causa problemas de no esterilidad en alimentos enlatados y reduce la vida comercial de muchos alimentos procesados. En este estudio se determinó la termorresistencia de Bacillus sporothermodurans IIC65, Bacillus subtilis IC9 y Geobacillus stearothermophilus T26 mediante un termorresistómetro Mastia (Conesa et al., 2009). Las determinaciones ...

  18. Ecological aspects of Bacillus thuringiensis in an Oxisol Ecologia do Bacillus thuringiensis num Latossolo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessandra Heck Paes Leme Ferreira

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram positive, sporangial bacterium, known for its insecticidal habilities. Survival and conjugation ability of B. thuringiensis strains were investigated; vegetative cells were evaluated in non-sterile soil. Vegetative cells decreased rapidly in number, and after 48 hours the population was predominantly spores. No plasmid transfer was observed in non-sterile soil, probably because the cells died and the remaining cells sporulated quickly. Soil is not a favorable environment for B. thuringiensis multiplication and conjugation. The fate of purified B. thuringiensis toxin was analyzed by extractable toxin quantification using ELISA. The extractable toxin probably declined due to binding on surface-active particles in the soil.O comportamento de células vegetativas do Bacillus thuringiensis foi estudado em solo não esterilizado. Após o inóculo grande parte das células morrem e o restante esporula em 24 horas. Não foi observada conjugação provavelmente porque poucas células sobrevivem no solo e rapidamente esporulam, mostrando que este não é o ambiente propício para a multiplicação e conjugação desta bactéria. A toxina purificada, portanto livre de células, diminui rapidamente sua quantidade em solo não esterilizado. Provavelmente a ligação da toxina na fração argilosa do solo é a principal responsável por este fenômeno.

  19. The Pathology of Infection in the Department of Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Dong a University Medical Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Yeong [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    This study was performed to understand the bacteriologic contamination level of radiological equipment which have frequent contacts with patients in the Department of Radiology of an university hospital in Busan area. Before sterilizing in-patient of the radiology rooms, MRSA, VRE, acinetobacter baumannii, candida albicans, and enterococcus sp. were detected. After sterilization, all the bacteria were not found. As examine times become longer, more bacteria were detected and after 7 hours, bacillus sp.(GPR), CNS, acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterococcus sp. were detected. After examining infected patients, bacillus sp.(GPR), VRE, enterococcus sp. CNS, and micrococcus sp. were detected and on the hands of radiological technologists, CNS, enterococcus sp. escherichia coli, and enterobacter sp. were detected. Similar species of bacteria were detected from each radiology room, but pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected on the handles of portable radiological equipment and the chair in the waiting room. Therefore, it is the most important to regularly sterilize radiological equipment and devices which have frequent contacts with patients and to sterilize them right after the use of infected patients in order to prevent the spread of infection. Also, thorough hand washing, education on infection and management for the characteristics of Department of Radiology should be performed for the systematic prevention of infection.

  20. The Pathology of Infection in the Department of Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to understand the bacteriologic contamination level of radiological equipment which have frequent contacts with patients in the Department of Radiology of an university hospital in Busan area. Before sterilizing in-patient of the radiology rooms, MRSA, VRE, acinetobacter baumannii, candida albicans, and enterococcus sp. were detected. After sterilization, all the bacteria were not found. As examine times become longer, more bacteria were detected and after 7 hours, bacillus sp.(GPR), CNS, acinetobacter baumannii, and Enterococcus sp. were detected. After examining infected patients, bacillus sp.(GPR), VRE, enterococcus sp. CNS, and micrococcus sp. were detected and on the hands of radiological technologists, CNS, enterococcus sp. escherichia coli, and enterobacter sp. were detected. Similar species of bacteria were detected from each radiology room, but pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected on the handles of portable radiological equipment and the chair in the waiting room. Therefore, it is the most important to regularly sterilize radiological equipment and devices which have frequent contacts with patients and to sterilize them right after the use of infected patients in order to prevent the spread of infection. Also, thorough hand washing, education on infection and management for the characteristics of Department of Radiology should be performed for the systematic prevention of infection.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiansong; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Chen, Zhiwei

    2016-05-01

    Following HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) continues to be the second most deadly infectious disease in humans. The global TB prevalence has become worse in recent years due to the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug resistant (XDR) strains, as well as co-infection with HIV. Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has nearly been used for a century in many countries, it does not protect adult pulmonary tuberculosis and even causes disseminated BCG disease in HIV-positive population. It is impossible to use BCG to eliminate the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection or to prevent TB onset and reactivation. Consequently, novel vaccines are urgently needed for TB prevention and immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the TB prevalence, interaction between M. tb and host immune system, as well as recent progress of TB vaccine research and development. PMID:27156616

  2. Bacillus anthracis spore interactions with mammalian cells: Relationship between germination state and the outcome of in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojkovic Bojana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During inhalational anthrax, internalization of Bacillus anthracis spores by host cells within the lung is believed to be a key step for initiating the transition from the localized to disseminated stages of infection. Despite compelling in vivo evidence that spores remain dormant within the bronchioalveolar spaces of the lungs, and germinate only after uptake into host cells, most in vitro studies of infection have been conducted under conditions that promote rapid germination of spores within the culture medium. Results Using an in vitro model of infection, we evaluated the influence of the germination state of B. anthracis spores, as controlled by defined culture conditions, on the outcome of infection. Spores prepared from B. anthracis Sterne 7702 germinated in a variety of common cell culture media supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS while, in the absence of FBS, germination was strictly dependent on medium composition. RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells internalized spores to the same extent in either germinating or non-germinating media. However, significantly more viable, intracellular B. anthracis were recovered from cells infected under non-germinating conditions compared to germinating conditions. At the same time, RAW264.7 cells demonstrated a significant loss in viability when infected under non-germinating conditions. Conclusions These results suggest that the outcome of host cell infection is sensitive to the germination state of spores at the time of uptake. Moreover, this study demonstrates the efficacy of studying B. anthracis spore infection of host cells within a defined, non-germinating, in vitro environment.

  3. Sigma A recognition sites in the Bacillus subtilis genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard; Larsen, Thomas Schou; Krogh, Anders Stærmose;

    2001-01-01

    A hidden Markov model of sigma (A) RNA polymerase cofactor recognition sites in Bacillus subtilis, containing either the common or the extended -10 motifs, has been constructed based on experimentally verified sigma (A) recognition sites. This work suggests that more information exists at the ini...

  4. Electrotransformation of Bacillus mojavensis with fluorescent protein markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram-positive endophytic bacteria are difficult to transform. To study endophytic interactions between Bacillus mojavensis and maize, a method was developed to transform this species by electroporation with three fluorescent protein expressing integrative plasmids: pSG1154, pSG1192, and pSG1193. The...

  5. Thermostable, Raw-Starch-Digesting Amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaeyoung; Nanmori, Takashi; Shinke, Ryu

    1989-01-01

    An endospore-forming thermophilic bacterium, which produced amylase and was identified as Bacillus stearothermophilus, was isolated from soil. The amylase had an optimum temperature of 70°C and strongly degraded wheat starch granules (93%) and potato starch granules (80%) at 60°C.

  6. Bacillus cereus: emetic toxin production and gamma hypothesis for growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesta-Peters, E.G.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a food spoilage microorganism and a pathogen. Growth of B. cereus can be prevented or delayed by adding growth limiting compounds to the food product or by altered storage conditions. Combinations of growth limiting factors

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Nine Bacillus cereus Group Phages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    We report the sequences of nine novel Bacillus cereus group bacteriophages: DIGNKC, Juglone, Nemo, Nigalana, NotTheCreek, Phrodo, SageFayge, Vinny, and Zuko. These bacteriophages are double-stranded DNA-containing Myoviridae isolated from soil samples using B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki as the host bacterium. PMID:27417827

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Agent Bacillus cereus UW85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Gabriel L; Holt, Jonathan; Ravel, Jacques; Rasko, David A; Thomas, Michael G; Handelsman, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus UW85 was isolated from a root of a field-grown alfalfa plant from Arlington, WI, and identified for its ability to suppress damping off, a disease caused by Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. medicaginis on alfalfa. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cereus UW85, obtained by a combination of Sanger and Illumina sequencing. PMID:27587823

  9. Molecular physiology of weak organic acid stress in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Brul, S.; Beilen, van, J.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which weak organic acid (WOA) preservatives inhibit growth of microorganisms may differ between different WOAs and these differences are not well understood. The aim of this thesis has been to obtain a better understanding of the mode of action of these preservatives by which they inhibit the growth of spore-forming bacteria (more specifically Bacillus subtilis).

  10. Decolorization of Distillery Effluent by Thermotolerant Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Ethanol production from sugarcane molasses generate large volume of effluent containing high Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD along with melanoidin, a color compound generally produced by Millard reaction. Melanodin is a recalcitrant compound degraded by specific microorganisms having ability to produce mono and di-oxygenases peroxidases, phenoxidases and laccases, are mainly responsible for degradation of complex aromatic hydrocarbons like color compound. These compounds causes several toxic effects on living system, therefore may be treated before disposal. Approach: The purpose of this study was to isolate a potential thermotolerant melanoidin decolorizing bacterium from natural resources for treatment of distillery effluent at industrial level. Results: Total 10 isolates were screened on solid medium containing molasses pigments. Three potential melanoidin decolorizing thermotolerant bacterial isolates identified as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas sp. were further optimized for decolorization at different physico-chemical and nutritional level. Out of these three, Bacillus subtilis showed maximum decolorization (85% at 45°C using (w/v 0.1%, glucose; 0.1%, peptone; 0.05%, MgSO4; 0.01%, KH2PO4; pH-6.0 within 24h of incubation under static condition. Conclusion/Recommendations: The strain of Bacillus subtilis can tolerate higher temperature and required very less carbon (0.1%, w/v and nitrogen sources (0.1%, w/v in submerged fermentation. It can be utilized for melanoidin decolorization of distillery effluent at industrial scale.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain KATMIRA1933

    OpenAIRE

    Karlyshev, Andrey V.; Melnikov, Vyacheslav G.; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we present a draft sequence of Bacillus subtilis KATMIRA1933. Previous studies demonstrated probiotic properties of this strain partially attributed to production of an antibacterial compound, subtilosin. Comparative analysis of this strain’s genome with that of a commercial probiotic strain, B. subtilis Natto, is presented.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage BMBtp2

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zhaoxia; Peng, Donghai; Wang, Yueying; Zhu, Lei; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen which has been widely used for biocontrol. During B. thuringiensis fermentation, lysogenic bacteriophages cause severe losses of yield. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of a bacteriophage, BMBtp2, which is induced from B. thuringiensis strain YBT-1765, which may be helpful to clarify the mechanism involved in bacteriophage contamination.

  13. Characterization of the parasporal inclusion of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kyushuensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Held, G. A.; Kawanishi, C. Y.; Huang, Y. S.

    1990-01-01

    Electron microscopy of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kyushuensis revealed that the parasporal inclusions are composed of a homogeneous center surrounded by a thick, electron-dense coating. Antibodies directed against the 135- and 65-kilodalton B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis peptides cross-reacted with the 70- and 26-kilodalton peptides, respectively, of B. thuringiensis subsp. kyushuensis.

  14. Structural relatedness between mosquitocidal endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Garduno, F; Thorne, L.; Walfield, A M; Pollock, T J

    1988-01-01

    A mosquitocidal toxin gene, cloned from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, was introduced into mutant crystal-negative B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis cells. Partial toxicity to mosquitos was restored. The 58-kilodalton cloned gene product is a minor protein component of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis crystals and is structurally related to a major, 135-kilodalton crystal toxin.

  15. Biodestruction and deferritization of quartz sands by Bacillus species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štyriaková, I.; Štyriak, I.; Kraus, I.; Hradil, David; Grygar, Tomáš; Bezdička, Petr

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 8 (2003), s. 709-713. ISSN 0892-6875 Grant ostatní: Slovak Academy of Sciences(SK) VEGA 2/2107/22 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : bacteria * Bacillus spp. * bioleaching Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.438, year: 2003

  16. Manipulating the autolytic pathway of a Bacillus protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VandenBurg, B; Eijsink, VGH; Vriend, G; Veltman, OR; Venema, G; HopsuHavu, VK; Jarvinen, M; Kirschke, H

    1997-01-01

    Autolytic degradation of Bacillus subtilis thermolysin-like proteinase (TLP-sub) is responsible for the irreversible inactivation of the enzyme at elevated temperatures. Previously, we reported five autolysis sites in B. subtilis neutral protease (Van den Burg et al., 1990, Biochem. J. 272:93-97). I

  17. A New Saponin Transformed from Ginsenoside Rhl by Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hong LI; Yue Mao SHEN; Ke Qin ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    A novel saponin was isolated from the transformed products of ginsenoside Rh1 by Bacillus subtilis. It's structure was determined to be 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-6-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-20 (S)-protopanaxatriol on the basis of the spectral data.

  18. The transcriptionally active regions in the genome of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    The majority of all genes have so far been identified and annotated systematically through in silico gene finding. Here we report the finding of 3662 strand-specific transcriptionally active regions (TARs) in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by the use of tiling arrays. We have measured the genome...

  19. Impact of Entomopathogens on Pest Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaptation by pest insects to the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) can alter their susceptibility to other pathogens. As the number of acres planted in crops engineered to produce Bt toxin increases, many key agricultural pests undergo strong selection to evolve resistance to Bt. In conjuncti...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain 407 Cry-

    OpenAIRE

    Poehlein, Anja; Liesegang, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen that has been used widely as a biopesticide. Here, we report the genome sequence of strain 407 Cry-, which is used to study the genetic determinants of pathogenicity. The genome consists of a 5.5-Mb chromosome and nine plasmids, including a novel 502-kb megaplasmid.

  1. Interactions of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crops with spiders (Araneae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetically modified crops expressing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have dramatically increased in acreage since their introduction in the mid-1990’s. Although the insecticidal mechanisms of Bt target specific pests, concerns persist regarding direct and indirect effects on...

  2. Sigma A recognition sites in the Bacillus subtilis genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard; Larsen, Thomas Schou; Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Saxild, Hans Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Knudsen, Steen

    2001-01-01

    A hidden Markov model of sigma (A) RNA polymerase cofactor recognition sites in Bacillus subtilis, containing either the common or the extended -10 motifs, has been constructed based on experimentally verified sigma (A) recognition sites. This work suggests that more information exists at the...

  3. Fungicidal effect of bacteriocins harvested from Bacillus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetunji, V. O.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study investigated the ability of bacteriocins isolated from Bacillus spp. (Bacillus species to inhibit fourdifferent yeast isolates obtained from common food products (nono, yoghurt, ogi and cheese commonly consumed byNigerians with minimal heat treatment.Methodology and results: Forty-five Bacillus spp. was isolated and identified from common food products usingcultural, morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. These isolates were tested for antimicrobialactivity against Salmonella enteritidis (3, Micrococcus luteus (1 and Staphylococcus aureus (2. Eight bacteriocinproducing strains were identified from an over- night broth culture centrifugated at 3500 revolutions for five minutes.Fungicidal effects of these bacteriocins were tested against four yeast strains using the Agar Well Diffusion method. Thebacteriocins produced wide zones of inhibition ranging from 5.9±0.000 to 24.00±0.000 mm against the 4 yeast strainstested. There was a significant difference (at p<0.05 between the yeast organisms and the bacteriocins from theBacillus spp.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The study reveals the antifungal property of bacteriocins from Bacillusspp. and serves therefore as a base for further studies in its use in the control of diseases and extension of shelf-life ofproducts prone to fungi contamination.

  4. Autoinducer 2 Affects Biofilm Formation by Bacillus cereus

    OpenAIRE

    Auger, Sandrine; Krin, Evelyne; Aymerich, Stéphane; Gohar, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Cell-free supernatants from growing Bacillus cereus strain ATCC 10987 induced luminescence in a Photorhabdus luminescens ΔluxS mutant, indicating the production of functional autoinducer 2 (AI-2). The exogenous addition of in vitro synthesized AI-2 had an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation by B. cereus and promoted release of the cells from a preformed biofilm.

  5. Capsule Production in Bacillus cereus Strains Associated with Severe Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Sue, David; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Popovic, Tanja; Wilkins, Patricia P.

    2006-01-01

    We identified three encapsulated Bacillus cereus strains, isolated from patients with severe pneumonia, in a collection of B. cereus isolates associated with human illness. We found that the extent of capsule expression was influenced by culturing conditions. Our findings highlight consequent clinical and laboratory diagnostic challenges posed by such isolates.

  6. Transformation of Bacillus subtilis by single-stranded plasmid DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph, C F; Schmidt, B J; Saunders, C W

    1986-01-01

    The single-stranded form of a pE194-based plasmid transformed Bacillus subtilis protoplasts at least as efficiently as did the double-stranded plasmid, but the single-stranded form did not detectably transform B. subtilis competent cells.

  7. Class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases and PHA-producing Bacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Takeharu; Hyakutake, Manami; Mizuno, Kouhei

    2015-08-01

    This review highlights the recent investigations of class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases, the newest classification of PHA synthases. Class IV synthases are prevalent in organisms of the Bacillus genus and are composed of a catalytic subunit PhaC (approximately 40 kDa), which has a PhaC box sequence ([GS]-X-C-X-[GA]-G) at the active site, and a second subunit PhaR (approximately 20 kDa). The representative PHA-producing Bacillus strains are Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus; the nucleotide sequence of phaC and the genetic organization of the PHA biosynthesis gene locus are somewhat different between these two strains. It is generally considered that class IV synthases favor short-chain-length monomers such as 3-hydroxybutyrate (C4) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (C5) for polymerization, but can polymerize some unusual monomers as minor components. In Escherichia coli expressing PhaRC from B. cereus YB-4, the biosynthesized PHA undergoes synthase-catalyzed alcoholytic cleavage using endogenous and exogenous alcohols. This alcoholysis is thought to be shared among class IV synthases, and this reaction is useful not only for the regulation of PHA molecular weight but also for the modification of the PHA carboxy terminus. The novel properties of class IV synthases will open up the possibility for the design of new PHA materials. PMID:26135986

  8. [A sepsis case caused by a rare opportunistic pathogen: Bacillus pumilus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, Barış Ata; Aldağ, Mehmet Ersoy; Tunalı, Birsen; Dinç, Uğur; Güngördü Dalar, Zeynep; Özalp, Veli Cengiz

    2016-07-01

    The high prevalence of Bacillus species in nature and the detection of these bacteria as contaminant in cultures may lead diagnostic dilemma, however they should still be considered as a pathogen particularly in case of repeated positive cultures from patients with risk factors. Bacillus pumilus is a bacteria, though rarely, been reported as the causative agent of various infections such as sepsis, endocarditis, skin infections and food poisoning in human. In this report, a sepsis case in an immunocompetent patient caused by B.pumilus was presented. A 38-year-old female patient was admitted to emergency service of our hospital with the complaints of headache, dizziness and diarrhea. She had not any risk factors except a history of heart valve replacement operation two years ago. In physical examination, she had abdominal retention, high fever and hypotension, together with the high levels of sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The patient was hospitalized with the preliminary diagnosis of sepsis. Three sets of blood samples at two different periods were taken for the culture. All blood culture vials had a positive signal at the second day of incubation in BD BACTEC™ 9050 system, therefore subcultures were performed in sheep blood agar, chocolate agar and MacConkey agar, and incubated in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Beta-haemolytic, gray-colored large colonies were isolated from anaerobic culture at the end of 18-24 hours incubation, and Gram staining from colonies showed gram-positive rods. The isolate was identified as B.pumilus with 99% accuracy rate by using BD Phoenix™ 100 identification system. This result was also confirmed by MALDI-TOF based VITEK® MS system and 16S rRNA sequencing by Illumina MiSeq® platform. Antibiotic susceptibility test performed by BD Phoenix™ 100 system and the isolate was found to be resistant against penicillin, while it was susceptible to vancomycin, erythromycin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and

  9. Isolation and identification of local Bacillus isolates for xylanase biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ammoneh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus species are attractive industrial organisms due to their rapid growth rates leading to a short fermentation cycle and for their capacity to secrete important enzymes and proteins such as xylanase into the extracellular medium. Considering the industrial importance of xylanase, in this current study, Bacillus spp. were isolated from different soils and were screened for their xylanase production.Bacillus isolates used in this study were obtained from a national screening program carried out during 2006-2007 in which soil samples that covered areas throughout the interior of Syria were collected. The prepared inoculum from each of Bacillus isolates was aliquoted onto xylan agar plates, incubated at 30°C for 72 h and screened for xylanase synthesis.Xylanolytic isolates were selected depending on the clear zones of xylan hydrolysis. Fifteen isolates having the highest clearing zone were determined and grown in a solid state fermentation. Of the 15 isolates, three bacilli namely SY30A, SY185C and SY190E that showed maximum xylanase production, were identified using the 16S rDNA sequencing method. According to 16S rDNA gene sequence data, the closest phylogenetic neighbor for SY30A was Bacillus pumilus and for SY185C and SY190E isolates was Bacillus subtilis. Optimal pH and temperature for xylanase activity was 7.0 and 55ºC for SY30A and 6.0 and 60ºC for SY185C and SY190E, respectively. Under these conditions, the following activities were found to be around 1157 ± 58, 916 ± 46 and 794 ± 39 (U/g for SY30A, SY185C and SY190E, respectivly.Selected local Bacillus isolates were found to be a potential source of xylanase which was proven to be quite suitable for multiple biotechnological applications. These isolates might after extensive optimization steps be an alternative to commercially available strains.

  10. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized as...... being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections such as...... diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well as...

  11. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst; Høiby, Niels

    being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections such as......A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized as...... diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well as...

  12. Modeling the potential distribution of Bacillus anthracis under multiple climate change scenarios for Kazakhstan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Andrew Joyner

    Full Text Available Anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is a zoonotic disease that persists throughout much of the world in livestock, wildlife, and secondarily infects humans. This is true across much of Central Asia, and particularly the Steppe region, including Kazakhstan. This study employed the Genetic Algorithm for Rule-set Prediction (GARP to model the current and future geographic distribution of Bacillus anthracis in Kazakhstan based on the A2 and B2 IPCC SRES climate change scenarios using a 5-variable data set at 55 km(2 and 8 km(2 and a 6-variable BioClim data set at 8 km(2. Future models suggest large areas predicted under current conditions may be reduced by 2050 with the A2 model predicting approximately 14-16% loss across the three spatial resolutions. There was greater variability in the B2 models across scenarios predicting approximately 15% loss at 55 km(2, approximately 34% loss at 8 km(2, and approximately 30% loss with the BioClim variables. Only very small areas of habitat expansion into new areas were predicted by either A2 or B2 in any models. Greater areas of habitat loss are predicted in the southern regions of Kazakhstan by A2 and B2 models, while moderate habitat loss is also predicted in the northern regions by either B2 model at 8 km(2. Anthrax disease control relies mainly on livestock vaccination and proper carcass disposal, both of which require adequate surveillance. In many situations, including that of Kazakhstan, vaccine resources are limited, and understanding the geographic distribution of the organism, in tandem with current data on livestock population dynamics, can aid in properly allocating doses. While speculative, contemplating future changes in livestock distributions and B. anthracis spore promoting environments can be useful for establishing future surveillance priorities. This study may also have broader applications to global public health surveillance relating to other diseases in addition to B

  13. Modulation of the Bacillus anthracis secretome by the immune inhibitor A1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflughoeft, Kathryn J; Swick, Michelle C; Engler, David A; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Koehler, Theresa M

    2014-01-01

    The Bacillus anthracis secretome includes protective antigen, lethal factor, and edema factor, which are the components of anthrax toxin, and other proteins with known or potential roles in anthrax disease. Immune inhibitor A1 (InhA1) is a secreted metalloprotease that is unique to pathogenic members of the Bacillus genus and has been associated with cleavage of host proteins during infection. Here, we report the effect of InhA1 on the B. anthracis secretome. Differential in-gel electrophoresis of proteins present in culture supernatants from a parent strain and an isogenic inhA1-null mutant revealed multiple differences. Of the 1,340 protein spots observed, approximately one-third were less abundant and one-third were more abundant in the inhA1 secretome than in the parent strain secretome. Proteases were strongly represented among those proteins exhibiting a 9-fold or greater change. InhA1 purified from a B. anthracis culture supernatant directly cleaved each of the anthrax toxin proteins as well as an additional secreted protease, Npr599. The conserved zinc binding motif HEXXH of InhA1 (HEYGH) was critical for its proteolytic activity. Our data reveal that InhA1 directly and indirectly modulates the form and/or abundance of over half of all the secreted proteins of B. anthracis. The proteolytic activity of InhA1 on established secreted virulence factors, additional proteases, and other secreted proteins suggests that this major protease plays an important role in virulence not only by cleaving mammalian substrates but also by modulating the B. anthracis secretome itself. PMID:24214942

  14. [Bacillus Calmette-Guérin osteomyelitis. A case report in a former preterm baby].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milleret, A; Bost-Bru, C; Bustamante, J; Durand, C; Recule, C

    2016-07-01

    Postvaccination osteo-articular mycobacterial infectious disease is a rare and potentially serious complication after Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. We report on a case of a former preterm baby born at 30 weeks of gestation who was vaccinated with BCG Copenhagen strain at 2 months of age. He presented 6 months later with a painful limp, which was found to be a mono-articular osteitis of the right ankle. Histology of the biopsy showed signs of mycobacterial infection and molecular analysis confirmed a BCG infection. Blood tests did not reveal any immunodeficiency associated with the disease (IFN-gamma levels were normal). The course of the disease was favorable with 9 months of antibiotic therapy against mycobacteria. BCG complications should lead to screening for immunodeficiency. The prognosis of BCG osteitis is excellent if the disease is localized. No link between prematurity and BCG complications has been found to date. BCG vaccination of premature infant should be the same as for the general population. PMID:27265583

  15. Characterization of Bacteriophage Specific to Bacillus pumilus from Ciapus River in Bogor, West Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anik Kusmiatun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus pumilus is a spore-forming bacteria that is rod-shaped, gram positive, and aerobic. B. pumilus produced pumilacidins, known to have toxic effects on epithelial cells. Antibiotics were usually used to treat the disease caused by bacteria. Antibiotic typing test of B. pumilus indigenous from sewage water showed that this isolate was resistant to ampicillin and clindamycin. An alternative way was by application of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents to reduce B. pumilus in environment. The aim of this study were to isolate and characterize B. pumilus bacteriophage isolated from Ciapus River in Bogor, West Java. Bacteriophages infecting B. pumilus were isolated from river water using the double agar overlay method. Phages were defined by plaque morphology, structure, host range, and characteristic of molecular weight protein phage. Phage FBa1, FBa2, and FBa3 had narrow host range and they were specific for infecting B. pumilus. Electron microscope observation showed that phage FBa1 had icosahedral head without tail (166.67 nm in diameter, so it is called phage-like particles. Characterization of phage FBa1 by SDS-PAGE showed five proteins band. Molecular weight of FBa1 proteins was 70.9, 54.9, 33.8, 28.3, and 21.4 kDa.

  16. Structural Analysis of a Putative Aminoglycoside N-Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimecka, Maria M.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Font, Jose; Skarina, Tatiana; Shumilin, Igor; Onopryienko, Olena; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Cymborowski, Marcin; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Hasseman, Jeremy; Glomski, Ian J.; Lebioda, Lukasz; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek (SC); (Toronto); (UV)

    2012-02-15

    For the last decade, worldwide efforts for the treatment of anthrax infection have focused on developing effective vaccines. Patients that are already infected are still treated traditionally using different types of standard antimicrobial agents. The most popular are antibiotics such as tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. While aminoglycosides appear to be less effective antimicrobial agents than other antibiotics, synthetic aminoglycosides have been shown to act as potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor and may have potential application as antitoxins. Here, we present a structural analysis of the BA2930 protein, a putative aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, which may be a component of the bacterium's aminoglycoside resistance mechanism. The determined structures revealed details of a fold characteristic only for one other protein structure in the Protein Data Bank, namely, YokD from Bacillus subtilis. Both BA2930 and YokD are members of the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily (PF02522). Sequential and structural analyses showed that residues conserved throughout the Antibiotic-NAT superfamily are responsible for the binding of the cofactor acetyl coenzyme A. The interaction of BA2930 with cofactors was characterized by both crystallographic and binding studies.

  17. Lipopeptides from Bacillus strain AR2 inhibits biofilm formation by Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautela, Ria; Singh, Anil Kumar; Shukla, Abha; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2014-05-01

    The ability of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to reversibly switch between different morphological forms and establish biofilms is crucial for establishing infection. Targeting phenotypic plasticity and biofilm formation in C. albicans represents a new concept for antifungal drug discovery. The present study evaluated the influence of cyclic lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain AR2 on C. albicans biofilms. The biosurfactant was characterized as a mixture of iturin and fengycin by MALDI-TOF and amino acid analysis. The biosurfactant exhibited concentration dependent growth inhibition and fungicidal activity. The biosurfactant at sub-minimum growth inhibition concentration decreased cell surface hydrophobicity, hindered germ tube formation and reduced the mRNA expression of hyphae-specific gene HWP1 and ALS3 without exhibiting significant growth inhibition. The biosurfactants inhibited biofilm formation in the range of 46-100 % depending upon the concentration and Candida strains. The biosurfactant treatment dislodged 25-100 % of preformed biofilm from polystyrene plates. The biosurfactant retained its antifungal and antibiofilm activity even after exposure to extreme temperature. By virtue of the ability to inhibit germ tube and biofilm formation, two important traits of C. albicans involved in establishing infection, lipopeptides from strain AR2 may represent a potential candidate for developing heat stable anti-Candida drugs. PMID:24623107

  18. Inflammatory cytokine response to Bacillus anthracis peptidoglycan requires phagocytosis and lysosomal trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Janaki K; Khurana, Taruna; Langer, Marybeth; West, Christopher M; Ballard, Jimmy D; Metcalf, Jordan P; Merkel, Tod J; Coggeshall, K Mark

    2010-06-01

    During advanced stages of inhalation anthrax, Bacillus anthracis accumulates at high levels in the bloodstream of the infected host. This bacteremia leads to sepsis during late-stage anthrax; however, the mechanisms through which B. anthracis-derived factors contribute to the pathology of infected hosts are poorly defined. Peptidoglycan, a major component of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria, can provoke symptoms of sepsis in animal models. We have previously shown that peptidoglycan of B. anthracis can induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines by cells in human blood. Here, we show that biologically active peptidoglycan is shed from an active culture of encapsulated B. anthracis strain Ames in blood. Peptidoglycan is able to bind to surfaces of responding cells, and internalization of peptidoglycan is required for the production of inflammatory cytokines. We also show that the peptidoglycan traffics to lysosomes, and lysosomal function is required for cytokine production. We conclude that peptidoglycan of B. anthracis is initially bound by an unknown extracellular receptor, is phagocytosed, and traffics to lysosomes, where it is degraded to a product recognized by an intracellular receptor. Binding of the peptidoglycan product to the intracellular receptor causes a proinflammatory response. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism by which B. anthracis triggers sepsis during a critical stage of anthrax disease. PMID:20308305

  19. Antiviral activity of a Bacillus sp: P34 peptide against pathogenic viruses of domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Scopel e Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available P34 is an antimicrobial peptide produced by a Bacillus sp. strain isolated from the intestinal contents of a fish in the Brazilian Amazon basin with reported antibacterial activity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the peptide P34 for its in vitro antiviral properties against canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2, canine coronavirus (CCoV, canine distemper virus (CDV, canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2, equine arteritis virus (EAV, equine influenza virus (EIV, feline calicivirus (FCV and feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1. The results showed that the peptide P34 exhibited antiviral activity against EAV and FHV-1. The peptide P34 inhibited the replication of EAV by 99.9% and FHV-1 by 94.4%. Virucidal activity was detected only against EAV. When P34 and EAV were incubated for 6 h at 37 °C the viral titer reduced from 10(4.5 TCID50 to 10(2.75 TCID50, showing a percent of inhibition of 98.6%. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that P34 inhibited EAV and FHV-1 replication in infected cell cultures and it showed virucidal activity against EAV. Since there is documented resistance to the current drugs used against herpesviruses and there is no treatment for equine viral arteritis, it is advisable to search for new antiviral compounds to overcome these infections.

  20. Phylogeny and Molecular Taxonomy of the Bacillus subtilis species Complex and the Description of Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum subsp. nov

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bacillus subtilis species complex is a tight assemblage of closely related species. For many years, it has been recognized that these species cannot be differentiated on the basis of phenotypic characteristics. Recently, it has been shown that phylogenetic analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gen...

  1. Glycosylation of BclA Glycoprotein from Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis Exosporium Is Domain-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Emmanuel; Krzewinski, Frederic; Garenaux, Estelle; Lequette, Yannick; Coddeville, Bernadette; Trivelli, Xavier; Ronse, Annette; Faille, Christine; Guerardel, Yann

    2016-04-29

    The spores of the Bacillus cereus group (B. cereus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus thuringiensis) are surrounded by a paracrystalline flexible yet resistant layer called exosporium that plays a major role in spore adhesion and virulence. The major constituent of its hairlike surface, the trimerized glycoprotein BclA, is attached to the basal layer through an N-terminal domain. It is then followed by a repetitive collagen-like neck bearing a globular head (C-terminal domain) that promotes glycoprotein trimerization. The collagen-like region of B. anthracis is known to be densely substituted by unusual O-glycans that may be used for developing species-specific diagnostics of B. anthracis spores and thus targeted therapeutic interventions. In the present study, we have explored the species and domain specificity of BclA glycosylation within the B. cereus group. First, we have established that the collagen-like regions of both B. anthracis and B. cereus are similarly substituted by short O-glycans that bear the species-specific deoxyhexose residues anthrose and the newly observed cereose, respectively. Second we have discovered that the C-terminal globular domains of BclA from both species are substituted by polysaccharide-like O-linked glycans whose structures are also species-specific. The presence of large carbohydrate polymers covering the surface of Bacillus spores may have a profound impact on the way that spores regulate their interactions with biotic and abiotic surfaces and represents potential new diagnostic targets. PMID:26921321

  2. Comparative genomics analysis of the companion mechanisms of Bacillus thuringiensis Bc601 and Bacillus endophyticus Hbe603 in bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Nan; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus endophyticus both act as the companion bacteria, which cooperate with Ketogulonigenium vulgare in vitamin C two-step fermentation. Two Bacillus species have different morphologies, swarming motility and 2-keto-L-gulonic acid productivities when they co-culture with K. vulgare. Here, we report the complete genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis Bc601 and eight plasmids of B. endophyticus Hbe603, and carry out the comparative genomics analysis. Consequently, B. thuringiensis Bc601, with greater ability of response to the external environment, has been found more two-component system, sporulation coat and peptidoglycan biosynthesis related proteins than B. endophyticus Hbe603, and B. endophyticus Hbe603, with greater ability of nutrients biosynthesis, has been found more alpha-galactosidase, propanoate, glutathione and inositol phosphate metabolism, and amino acid degradation related proteins than B. thuringiensis Bc601. Different ability of swarming motility, response to the external environment and nutrients biosynthesis may reflect different companion mechanisms of two Bacillus species. Comparative genomic analysis of B. endophyticus and B. thuringiensis enables us to further understand the cooperative mechanism with K. vulgare, and facilitate the optimization of bacterial consortium. PMID:27353048

  3. Ear Infections in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Ear Infections in Children On this page: What is an ear infection? ... their hearing. How can I tell if my child has an ear infection? Most ear infections happen ...

  4. Isolation and characterization of protease from Bacillus subtilis 1012M15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELFI SUSANTI

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A local strain of Bacillus sp. BAC4, is known to produce penicillin G acylase (PGA enzyme with relatively high activity. This strain secretes the PGA into the culture medium. However, it has been reported that PGA activity fall and rise during culture, and the activity plummets during storege at –200C, which probably due to usage protease activity of Bacillus sp. BAC4. To study the possible use of Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 as a host cell for cloning the pga gene from Bacillus sp. BAC4, the protease activity of Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 were studied. Protease activity was determined by Horikoshi method. In this experiment, maximum protease activity in Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 culture was obsereved after 8 hours. At this optimum condition, protease activity of Bacillus sp. BAC4 is five time higher than that of Bacillus subtilis 1012M15. This situation promised the possible usage of Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 as a host cell for pga expression. For protease characterization, the bacterial culture had been separated from the cell debris by centrifugation. The filtrate was concentrated by freeze drying, fractionated by ammonium sulphate, dialyzed in selovan tube, and then fractionated by ion exchance chromatography employing DEAE-cellulose. The five peaks resulted indicated the presence of five protease. Based on inhibitor and activator influence analysis, it could be concluded that proteases from Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 contained of serin protease as well as metalloprotease and serin protease mixture.

  5. Bacillus thuringiensis: legado para el siglo XXI Bacillus thuringiensis: the legacy to the XXI century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orduz S.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Los insecticidas basados en la bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis son el principal renglón productivo del mercado mundial de biopesticidas. La investigación dedicada a esta área, promovida por la urgente necesidad de resolver problemas agrícolas y de salud pública, ha dado lugar a un conocimiento exhaustivo de su biología. La diversidad de cepas diferentes de B. thuringiensis ha permitido desarrollar productos principalmente, pero no exclusivamente, para el control de insectos. Con los nuevos desarrollos de la biología molecular, se ha logrado comprender su mecanismo de acción a nivel molecular y también se ha logrado extender sus capacidades entomopatógenas. Como producto de su amplio uso en muchos países, se han presentado casos de resistencia en poblaciones de insectos susceptibles. Con esta revisión se pretende elaborar un contexto teórico del estado actual de la investigación sobre B. thuringiensis, describiendo brevemente el conocimiento sobre esta bacteria, haciendo hincapié en los fenómenos biológicos que subyacen su actividad tóxica y la problemática que se avecina en el próximo siglo con los fenómenos de resistencia cada vez más comunes, todo esto analizado desde una perspectiva biotecnológica.

    Bacillus thuringiensis-based insecticides are the main production line of the biopesticides world market. The research devoted to this area, promoted by the necessity to solve problems in agriculture and public health has resulted in an exhaustive knowledge of its biology. The diversity of the B. thuringiensis strains has permitted to develop several products mainly, but not exclusively, for insect control. With the new developments in the field of molecular biology, it has been possible to understand the molecular basis of the mode of action and to increase the range of activity as well. As a result

  6. Produktion von poly- und monoklonalen Antikörpern gegen Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus und Sporen von Bacillus cereus zur Entwicklung eines bioaffinitätschromatographischen Schnellnachweises

    OpenAIRE

    Wiescher, Fabian Mathias Moritz

    2013-01-01

    Produktion von poly- und monoklonalen Antikörpern gegen Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus und Sporen von Bacillus cereus in Mäusen und Kaninchen, Charakterisierung der Antikörper mittels Enzym-Immunoassays, Immunfluoreszenz, Immunoblots etc., Einsatz der Antikörper in einem bioaffinitätschromatographischen Schnellnachweis mittels monolithischem Säulenmaterial.

  7. Response of bacillus cereus to heat and or Bacillus cereus Irradiation Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of bacillus cereus spores to gamma radiation gave D10 value of 1.59 kGy. The combined effect of heating prior or post irradiation revealed that the latter treatment was more effective than the former in reducing the viable count of the pathogenic bacterial spores. Irradiation of B. cereus spores. in Koshari (initial count of 4 X 105 CFU-ml) followed by heating totally arrested growth of the bacterium. It reduced the total count from 2 X 107 to 0.83 X 10 CFU/ml. Coupling 10% garlic with irradiation and heating completely stopped spore germination and reduced the total bacterial count from 2 107 to 0.16 X 10 CFU/ml. combining pH with irradiation and heating completely hampered the viable count for B. cereus and total bacterial count. The combined effect of garlic extract (10% v/v) and ph 4 on b. cereus in koshari, was a reduction in the viable count from 3.6 X 105 to 1.9 X 105 CFU/ml and the total bacterial count from 1 X 107 to 3.5 X 105 CFU/ml. 1 fig., 4 tab

  8. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  9. Application of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Rollins

    Full Text Available In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT is an immuno-screening technique that identifies bacterial antigens expressed during infection and not during standard in vitro culturing conditions. We applied IVIAT to Bacillus anthracis and identified PagA, seven members of a N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase autolysin family, three P60 family lipoproteins, two transporters, spore cortex lytic protein SleB, a penicillin binding protein, a putative prophage holin, respiratory nitrate reductase NarG, and three proteins of unknown function. Using quantitative real-time PCR comparing RNA isolated from in vitro cultured B. anthracis to RNA isolated from BALB/c mice infected with virulent Ames strain B. anthracis, we confirmed induced expression in vivo for a subset of B. anthracis genes identified by IVIAT, including L-alanine amidases BA3767, BA4073, and amiA (pXO2-42; the bacteriophage holin gene BA4074; and pagA (pXO1-110. The exogenous addition of two purified putative autolysins identified by IVIAT, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases BA0485 and BA2446, to vegetative B. anthracis cell suspensions induced a species-specific change in bacterial morphology and reduction in viable bacterial cells. Many of the proteins identified in our screen are predicted to affect peptidoglycan re-modeling, and our results support significant cell wall structural remodeling activity during B. anthracis infection. Identification of L-alanine amidases with B. anthracis specificity may suggest new potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill K Terra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT, as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  11. The ComP-ComA quorum system is essential for "Trojan horse" like pathogenesis in Bacillus nematocida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xidan Deng

    Full Text Available Bacillus nematocida B16 has been shown to use "Trojan horse" mechanism in pathogenesis that has characteristics of "social" behavior. The ComP-ComA system, a conserved quorum sensing system in the genus Bacillus, functions in many physiological processes including competence development, lipopeptide antibiotic surfactin production, degradative enzyme production and even some unknown functions. Here we investigated the requirement of ComP-ComA system in B. nematocida B16 for its pathogenicity against nematodes. The ΔcomP mutant displayed deficiencies in attracting and killing nematodes, due to the absence of attractive signal molecules and the decreased expressions of virulence factors, respectively. Contrarily, a complemented comP mutant at least partially resumed its pathogenicity. Our data from transcriptional analysis further confirmed that this signaling system directly or indirectly regulated the expressions of two major virulence proteases in the infection of B. nematocida B16. Bioinformatics analyses from comparative genomics also suggested that the potential target genes of transcription factor ComA were involved in the processes such as the synthesis of attractants, production of extracellular degradative enzymes and sortase, secondary metabolites biosynthesis, regulation of transcription factors, mobility, as well as transporters, most of which were different from a saprophytic relative B. subtilis 168. Therefore, our investigation firstly revealed that the participation and necessity of ComP-ComA signaling system in bacterial pathogenesis.

  12. Isolation and characterization of glacier VMY22, a novel lytic cold-active bacteriophage of Bacillus cereus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuling; Ji; Chunjing; Zhang; Yuan; Fang; Qi; Zhang; Lianbing; Lin; Bing; Tang; Yunlin; Wei

    2015-01-01

    As a unique ecological system with low temperature and low nutrient levels, glaciers are considered a "living fossil" for the research of evolution. In this work, a lytic cold-active bacteriophage designated VMY22 against Bacillus cereus MYB41-22 was isolated from Mingyong Glacier in China, and its characteristics were studied. Electron microscopy revealed that VMY22 has an icosahedral head(59.2 nm in length, 31.9 nm in width) and a tail(43.2 nm in length). Bacteriophage VMY22 was classified as a Podoviridae with an approximate genome size of 18 to 20 kb. A one-step growth curve revealed that the latent and the burst periods were 70 and 70 min, respectively, with an average burst size of 78 bacteriophage particles per infected cell. The pH and thermal stability of bacteriophage VMY22 were also investigated. The maximum stability of the bacteriophage was observed to be at pH 8.0 and it was comparatively stable at p H 5.0–9.0. As VMY22 is a cold-active bacteriophage with low production temperature, its characterization and the relationship between MYB41-22 and Bacillus cereus bacteriophage deserve further study.

  13. Production of Protocatechuic Acid in Bacillus Thuringiensis ATCC33679

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca L. Garner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Protocatechuic acid, or 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, is produced by both soil and marine bacteria in the free form and as the iron binding component of the siderophore petrobactin. The soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki ATCC 33679, contains the asb operon, but does not produce petrobactin. Iron restriction resulted in diminished B. thuringiensis kurstaki ATCC 33679 growth and the production of catechol(s. The gene product responsible for protocatechuic acid (asbF and its receptor (fatB were expressed during stationary phase growth. Gene expression varied with growth temperature, with optimum levels occurring well below the Bacillus anthracis virulence temperature of 37 °C. Regulation of protocatechuic acid suggests a possible role for this compound during soil growth cycles.

  14. Enhanced hydrocarbon biodegradation by a newly isolated bacillus subtilis strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relation between hydrocarbon degradation and biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by a new bacillus subtilis 22BN strain was investigated. The strain was isolated for its capacity to utilize n-hexadecane and naphthalene and at the same time to produce surface-active compound at high concentrations (1.5 - 2.0 g l-1). Biosurfactant production was detected by surface tension lowering and emulsifying activity. The strain is a good degrader of both hydrocarbons used with degradability of 98.3 ± 1% and 75 ± 2% for n-hexadecane and naphthalene, respectively. Measurement of cell hydrophobicity showed that the combination of slightly soluble substrate and rhamnolipid developed higher hydrophobicity correlated with increased utilization of both hydrocarbon substrates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bacillus subtilis strain that degrades hydrophobic compounds and at the same time produces rhamnolipid biosurfactant. (orig.)

  15. Bacillus atrophaeus Outer Spore Coat Assembly and Ultrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Pitesky, M E; Malkin, A J

    2005-11-21

    Our previous atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies successfully visualized native Bacillus atrophaeus spore coat ultrastructure and surface morphology. We have shown that the outer spore coat surface is formed by a crystalline array of {approx}11 nm thick rodlets, having a periodicity of {approx}8 nm. We present here further AFM ultrastructural investigations of air-dried and fully hydrated spore surface architecture. In the rodlet layer, planar and point defects, as well as domain boundaries, similar to those described for inorganic and macromolecular crystals, were identified. For several Bacillus species, rodlet structure assembly and architectural variation appear to be a consequence of species-specific nucleation and crystallization mechanisms that regulate the formation of the outer spore coat. We propose a unifying mechanism for nucleation and self-assembly of this crystalline layer on the outer spore coat surface.

  16. BIOACCUMULATION OF HEAVY METALS BY BACILLUS MEGATERIUM FROM PHOSPHOGYPSUM WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOANA ADRIANA STEFANESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to characterize the bioaccumulation capacity of heavy metals by Bacillus megaterium from phosphogypsum waste. The Bacillus megaterium strain (BM30 was isolated from soil near the phosphogypsum (PG dump. For the bioaccumulation quantification produced by BM30 strain were used three experimental treatments respectively with 2, 6 and 10 gL-1 PG. Cellular biomass samples were collected punctually at ages corresponding to the three stages of the development cycle of the microorganism: exponential phase, stationary phase and decline phase and the heavy metals concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The bioaccumulation yields in cell biomass, relative to the total amount of analyte introduced in the reaction medium were between 20 - 80 %, the lowest value was recorded by Cu and highest by Mn. The study results indicated that the isolated strain near the dump PG, BM30, bioaccumulate heavy metals monitored in cell biomass in the order Cu > Fe > Zn = Mn.

  17. Proteins that interact with GTP during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During sporulation of Bacillus subtilis, several proteins were shown to interact with GTP in specific ways. UV light was used to cross-link [α-32P]GTP to proteins in cell extracts at different stages of growth. After electrophoresis, 11 bands of radioactivity were found in vegetative cells, 4 more appeared during sporulation, and only 9 remained in mature spores. Based on the labeling pattern with or without UV light to cross-link either [α-32P]GTP or [γ-32P]GTP, 11 bands of radioactivity were apparent guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, and 5 bands appeared to be phosphorylated and/or guanylated. Similar results were found with Bacillus megaterium. Assuming the GTP might be a type of signal for sporulation, it could interact with and regulate proteins by at least three mechanisms

  18. Naphthalene degradation and biosurfactant activity by Bacillus cereus 28BN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuleva, B.; Christova, N. [Inst. of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Jordanov, B.; Nikolova-Damyanova, B. [Inst. of Organic Chemistry, Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrov, P. [National Center of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2005-08-01

    Biosurfactant activity and naphthalene degradation by a new strain identified as Bacillus cereus 28BN were studied. The strain grew well and produced effective biosurfactants in the presence of n-alkanes, naphthalene, crude oil and vegetable oils. The biosurfactants were detected by the surface tension lowering of the medium, thin layer chromatography and infrared spectra analysis. With (2%) naphthalene as the sole carbon source, high levels of rhamnolipids at a concentration of 2.3 g l{sup -1} were determined in the stationary growth. After 20 d of incubation 72 {+-} 4% of the initial naphthalene was degraded. This is the first report for a Bacillus cereus rhamnolipid producing strain that utilized naphthalene under aerobic conditions. The strain looks promising for application in environmental technologies. (orig.)

  19. Conjugation by Mosquito Pathogenic Strains of Bacillus sphaericus

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    Correa Margarita

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A mosquito pathogenic strain of Bacillus sphaericus carried out the conjugal transfer of plasmid pAMß1 to other strains of its own and two other serotypes. However, it was unable to conjugate with mosquito pathogens from three other serotypes, with B. sphaericus of other DNA homology groups or with three other species of Bacillus. Conjugation frequency was highest with a strain having an altered surface layer (S layer. Conjugal transfer of pAMß1 was not detected in mosquito larval cadavers. B. sphaericus 2362 was unable to mobilize pUB110 for transfer to strains that had served as recipients of pAMß1. These observations suggest that it is unlikely that genetically engineered B. sphaericus carrying a recombinant plasmid could pass that plasmid to other bacteria

  20. Novel routes for improving biocontrol activity of Bacillus based bioinoculants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming eWu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biocontrol formulations prepared from plant-growth-promoting bacteria are increasingly applied in sustainable agriculture. Especially inoculants prepared from endospore-forming Bacillus strains have been proven as efficient and environmental-friendly alternative to chemical pesticides due to their long shelf life, which is comparable with that of agrochemicals. However, these formulations of the first generation are sometimes hampered in their action and do not fulfill in each case the expectations of the appliers. In this review we use the well-known plant-associated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens type strain FZB42 as example for the successful application of different techniques offered today by comparative, evolutionary and functional genomics, site-directed mutagenesis and strain construction including marker removal, for paving the way for preparing a novel generation of biocontrol agents.

  1. ANOTHER NITROGEN-FIXING MICROORGANISM IN SUGARCANE STALKS: Bacillus brevis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorelí de los A. Mirabal

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de identificar un microorganismo formador de colonias blancas en medio de cultivo LGI, prove- niente de savia apoplástica del tallo de la caña de azúcar, se realizaron diferentes experimentos en los que se utilizó la variedad ML-318. De la misma se extrajo savia apoplástica, de la cual se aisló el microorganismo de interés, al que se le realizaron pruebas morfológicas, culturales y bioquímicas, las que revelaron un 65 % de probabilidad de que el microorganismo de interés se corresponde con Bacillus brevis. Se detectó actividad nitrogenasa por la reducción de acetileno a etileno. Además, los resultados indican interacción entre Acetobacter diazotrophicus y el microorganismo formador de colonias blancas identificado como Bacillus brevis.

  2. Lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009188 Multi-slice spiral CT appearances of pulmonary infections after liver transplantation.XIE Lixuan(谢丽璇),et al.Dept Imaging,Changzheng Hosp,2nd Milit Med Univ,Shanghai 200003.Chin J Radiol,2009;43(1):8-11.

  3. Staphylococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days. Impetigo is a common and contagious skin infection in young children, developing most often during hot, humid summers and usually appearing on the face around the nose, mouth, and ears. It can be caused by staphylococcal or streptococcal bacteria. (More often, it is caused by a ...

  4. Baylisascaris Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-08-27

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing baylisascariasis and on providing patients at risk of Baylisascaris infection with prevention messages.  Created: 8/27/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 8/28/2012.

  5. Vaginal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ll know that you’re drinking enough if your urine (pee) is light yellow or almost clear. Avoid scented hygiene products like bubble bath, sprays, scented pads, and scented tampons. They can be irritating. Having sex may increase your odds of some infections even if they’re ...

  6. Karakterizacija novoga soja Bacillus circulans, izoliranog iz uljnoga škriljevca

    OpenAIRE

    Dragutinović, Vesna; MIROSLAV M. VRVIĆ; Swiecicka, Izabela; Cvetković, Olga; Berić, Tanja; Stanković, Slaviša

    2012-01-01

    Novi soj vrste Bacillus otkriven je tijekom demineralizacije uljnoga škriljevca radi dobivanja kerogena. Učinak demineralizacije izoliranoga soja bio je kudikamo veći od učinka soja Bacillus circulans Jordan 1890. Prema biokemijskim značajkama, sastavu i strukturi proteina, sastavu masnih kiselina, kao i profilu genoma te sekvencija 16S rDNA novi je soj identificiran kao Bacillus circulans VD01.

  7. Pengaruh Sumber Karbon dan Nitrogen Terhadap Pertumbuhan dan Pembentukan Spora Bacillus sp. Bk17

    OpenAIRE

    Rachmi

    2014-01-01

    Study of the effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on the growth and sporulation of Bacillus sp. BK17 has been conducted. Bacillus sp. BK17 was cultured in broth medium containing different carbon and nitrogen sources, and incubated for 6 days. The highest growth of Bacillus sp. BK17 was obtained on molasses-tryptone medium incubated during 3 days and the lowest growth obtained on whey-sodium nitrate. The highest spore formation was also obtained from molasses-tryptone mediu...

  8. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthase Gene Clusters for Lipopeptide Biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis 916 and Their Phenotypic Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Chuping; Liu, Xuehui; Zhou, Huafei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Zhiyi

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus cyclic lipopeptides (LPs) have been well studied for their phytopathogen-antagonistic activities. Recently, research has shown that these LPs also contribute to the phenotypic features of Bacillus strains, such as hemolytic activity, swarming motility, biofilm formation, and colony morphology. Bacillus subtilis 916 not only coproduces the three families of well-known LPs, i.e., surfactins, bacillomycin Ls (iturin family), and fengycins, but also produces a new family of LP called loc...

  9. Optimization Conditions of Production Fibrinolytic Enzyme from Bacillus lichniformis B4 Local Isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Essam F. Al-Juamily; Bushra H. Al-Zaidy

    2012-01-01

    The study was conducted with the aim to found local isolate belongs to Bacillus lichniformis to produce fibrinolytic enzyme with highest activity under optimal conditions. Forty-five local isolates belongs to the genus Bacillus lichniformis were selected for production of fibrinolytic enzyme (E.C. 3.4.). The isolate Bacillus lichniformis B4 was selected due to its high productivity of fibrinolytic enzyme. The optimal conditions for fibrinolytic enzyme production were determined, using a solid...

  10. Identification and analysis of the antigens detected by two commercial Bacillus cereus diarrheal enterotoxin immunoassay kits.

    OpenAIRE

    Beecher, D J; Wong, A C

    1994-01-01

    The usefulness of two commercial immunoassays for the detection of diarrheal enterotoxin of Bacillus cereus is unclear because the identity of the enterotoxin(s) has not been proven and the kits detect different proteins. We found that the Bacillus cereus Enterotoxin-Reversed Passive Latex Agglutination kit (Oxoid) detects the L2 component from hemolysin BL, and the Bacillus Diarrhoeal Enterotoxin Visual Immunoassay (Tecra) detects two apparently nontoxic proteins.

  11. Rapid Ped-2E9 Cell-Based Cytotoxicity Analysis and Genotyping of Bacillus Species

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Kristen M.; Banada, Padmapriya P.; O'Neal, Erin; Arun K. Bhunia

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus species causing food-borne disease produce multiple toxins eliciting gastroenteritis. Toxin assays with mammalian cell cultures are reliable but may take 24 to 72 h to complete and also lack sensitivity. Here, a sensitive and rapid assay was developed using a murine hybridoma Ped-2E9 cell model. Bacillus culture supernatants containing toxins were added to a Ped-2E9 cell line and analyzed for cytotoxicity with an alkaline phosphatase release assay. Most Bacillus cereus strains produc...

  12. Structure-function correlation in glycine oxidase from Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Mörtl, Mario; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram; Molla, Gianluca; Motteran, Laura; Andriolo, Gabriella; Pilone, Mirella S.; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2004-01-01

    Structure-function relationships of the flavoprotein glycine oxidase (GO), which was recently proposed as the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of thiamine in Bacillus subtilis, has been investigated by a combination of structural and functional studies. The structure of the GO-glycolate complex was determined at 1.8 Å, a resolution at which a sketch of the residues involved in FAD binding and in substrate interaction can be depicted. GO can be considered a member of the amine oxidase class ...

  13. Immunological analysis of cell-associated antigens of Bacillus anthracis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ezzell, J W; Abshire, T. G.

    1988-01-01

    Sera from Hartley guinea pigs vaccinated with a veterinary live spore anthrax vaccine were compared with sera from guinea pigs vaccinated with the human anthrax vaccine, which consists of aluminum hydroxide-adsorbed culture proteins of Bacillus anthracis V770-NP-1R. Sera from animals vaccinated with the spore vaccine recognized two major B. anthracis vegetative cell-associated proteins that were either not recognized or poorly recognized by sera from animals that received the human vaccine. T...

  14. Resistance of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores to melt extrusion process conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ciera, Lucy Wanjiru; Beladjal, Lynda; Almeras, Xavier; Gheysens, Tom; Nierstrasz, Vincent; Van Langenhove, Lieva; Mertens, Johan

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing demand for functionalised textile materials, industry is focusing on research that will add novel properties to textiles. Bioactive compounds and their benefits have been and are still considered as a possible source of unique functionalities to be explored. However, incorporating bioactive compounds into textiles and their resistance to textile process parameters has not yet been studied. In this study, we developed a system to study the resistance of Bacillus amyloliquef...

  15. Identification of Bacillus Strains for Biological Control of Catfish Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Ran, Chao; Carrias, Abel; Williams, Malachi A.; Capps, Nancy; Dan, Bui C. T.; Newton, Joseph C.; Joseph W Kloepper; Ooi, Ei L.; Browdy, Craig L.; Terhune, Jeffery S.; Liles, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus strains isolated from soil or channel catfish intestine were screened for their antagonism against Edwardsiella ictaluri and Aeromonas hydrophila, the causative agents of enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) and motile aeromonad septicaemia (MAS), respectively. Twenty one strains were selected and their antagonistic activity against other aquatic pathogens was also tested. Each of the top 21 strains expressed antagonistic activity against multiple aquatic bacterial pathogens including...

  16. Expression of alpha-amylase in Bacillus licheniformis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothstein, D. M.; Devlin, P E; Cate, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In Bacillus licheniformis, alpha-amylase production varied more than 100-fold depending on the presence or absence of a catabolite-repressing carbon source in the growth medium. alpha-Amylase was produced during the growth phase and not at the onset of the stationary phase. Induction of alpha-amylase correlated with synthesis of mRNA initiating at the promoter of the alpha-amylase gene.

  17. Respiratory systems of the Bacillus cereus mother cell and forespore.

    OpenAIRE

    Escamilla, J E; R. Ramírez; Del-Arenal, P; Aranda, A.

    1986-01-01

    The respiratory systems of the mother cells and forespores of Bacillus cereus were compared throughout the maturation stages (III to VI) of sporulation. The results indicated that both cell compartments contain the same assortment of oxidoreductases and cytochromes. However membrane fractions from young forespores were clearly distinct from those of the mother cell, i.e., lower content of cytochrome aa3, lower cytochrome c oxidase activity, higher concentration of cytochrome o, and a lower se...

  18. Molecular analysis of adenylyl cyclase: Bacillus anthracis edema factor exotoxin

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Hesham Hamada Taha

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis causes anthrax disease and exerts its deleterious effects by the release of three exotoxins, i.e. lethal factor, protective antigen and edema factor EF), a highly active calmodulin-dependent adenylyl cyclase (AC). However, conventional antibiotic treatment is ineffective against either toxemia or antibiotic- resistant strains. Thus, more effective drugs for anthrax treatment are needed. We successfully purified the recombinant full-length EF and EF3(F586A) from E. coli with...

  19. Biodegradation of Eugenol by Bacillus Cereus Strain PN24

    OpenAIRE

    Kadakol, Jagannath C.; Kamanavalli, Chandrappa M.

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus PN24 was isolated from soil by a conventional enrichment culture method using eugenol as a sole source of carbon and energy. The organism also utilized eugenol, 4-vinyl guaiacol, vanillin, vanillic acid and protocatechuic acid as growth substrates. The organism degraded eugenol to protocatechuic acid, which was further metabolized by a β-ketoadipate pathway. On the other hand, the intermediate of the eugenol-degrading pathway, such as ferulic acid was not detected in the cultu...

  20. Siderophore-Mediated Aluminum Uptake by Bacillus megaterium ATCC 19213

    OpenAIRE

    X. Hu; Boyer, G. L.

    1996-01-01

    The bacterium Bacillus megaterium ATCC 19213 is known to produce two hydroxamate siderophores, schizokinen and N-deoxyschizokinen, under iron-limited conditions. In addition to their high affinity for ferric ions, these siderophores chelate aluminum. Aluminum was absorbed by B. megaterium ATCC 19213 through the siderophore transport receptor, providing an extra pathway for aluminum accumulation into iron-deficient bacteria. At low concentrations of the metal, siderophore-mediated uptake was t...

  1. Studies on the fermentation of bacillus thuringiensis var israelensis

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Dermot

    1985-01-01

    During this work the fermentation of Bacillus thuringiensis var israelensis under industrial conditions was studied with respect to the development of a process for the production of a mosquitocidal insecticide elaborated by this organism. This was done by the development of a two-stage inoculum protocol which produced a high biomass-containing inoculum of vegetative cells which were found to be preferable to free spores for use as an inoculum source. In order to optimize the production st...

  2. Production of recombinant antibody fragments in Bacillus megaterium

    OpenAIRE

    Jahn Dieter; Schirrmann Thomas; Biedendieck Rebekka; Roth Andreas; Hust Michael; Jordan Eva; Dübel Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Recombinant antibodies are essential reagents for research, diagnostics and therapy. The well established production host Escherichia coli relies on the secretion into the periplasmic space for antibody synthesis. Due to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, only a fraction of this material reaches the medium. Recently, the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium was shown to efficiently secrete recombinant proteins into the growth medium. Here we evaluated B. ...

  3. Maltose- und Maltodextrin-Verwertung in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Schönert, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    In seinem natürlichen Habitat findet das Gram - positive Bodenbakterium Bacillus subtilis hauptsächlich polymere Zuckerformen als Kohlenstoffquelle vor, die aus den von anderen Organismen synthetisierten Speicherstoffen, z.B. Stärke und Glykogen, stammen. Jedoch müssen diese Polysaccharide zuerst extrazellulär zu Maltose und Maltodextrinen hydrolysiert werden, bevor sie aufgenommen werden können.Im Gegensatz zu der sehr gut untersuchten Maltose - und Maltodextrin - Aufnahme in Escherichia col...

  4. Novel Routes for Improving Biocontrol Activity of Bacillus Based Bioinoculants

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liming; Wu, Hui-Jun; Qiao, Junqing; Gao, XueWen; Borriss, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Biocontrol (BC) formulations prepared from plant-growth-promoting bacteria are increasingly applied in sustainable agriculture. Especially inoculants prepared from endospore-forming Bacillus strains have been proven as efficient and environmental-friendly alternative to chemical pesticides due to their long shelf life, which is comparable with that of agrochemicals. However, these formulations of the first generation are sometimes hampered in their action and do not fulfill in each case the e...

  5. Biocontrol: Bacillus penetrans and Related Parasites of Nematodes

    OpenAIRE

    Sayre, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus penetrans Mankau, 1975, previously described as Duboscqia penetrans Thorne 1940, is a candidate agent for biocontrol of nematodes. This review considers the life stages of this bacterium: vegetative growth phase, colony fragmentation, sporogenesis, soil phase, spore attachment, and penetration into larvae of root-knot nematodes. The morphology of the microthallus colonies and the unusual external features of the spore are discussed. Taxonomic affinities with the actinomycetes, partic...

  6. The Phylloplane as a Source of Bacillus thuringiensis Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Robert A.; Couche, Graham A.

    1991-01-01

    Novel variants of Bacillus thuringiensis were isolated from the phylloplane of deciduous and conifer trees as well as of other plants. These isolates displayed a range of toxicity towards Trichoplusia ni. Immunoblot and toxin protein analysis indicate that these strains included representatives of the three principal B. thuringiensis pathotypes active against larvae of the orders Lepidoptera, Diptera, and Coleoptera. We propose that B. thuringiensis be considered part of the common leaf micro...

  7. Worldwide Abundance and Distribution of Bacillus thuringiensis Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Phyllis A. W.; Travers, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    We found the insect control agent Bacillus thuringiensis to be a ubiquitous soil microorganism. Using acetate selection to screen soil samples, we isolated B. thuringiensis in 785 of 1,115 soil samples. These samples were obtained in the United States and 29 other countries. A total of 48% of the B. thuringiensis isolates (8,916 isolates) fit the biochemical description of known varieties, while 52% represented undescribed B. thuringiensis types. Over 60% (1,052 isolates) of the isolates test...

  8. Functional Comparison of the Two Bacillus anthracis Glutamate Racemases▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Dylan; Reese, Joseph G.; Louer, Craig R.; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Spies, M. Ashley; Blanke, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate racemase activity in Bacillus anthracis is of significant interest with respect to chemotherapeutic drug design, because l-glutamate stereoisomerization to d-glutamate is predicted to be closely associated with peptidoglycan and capsule biosynthesis, which are important for growth and virulence, respectively. In contrast to most bacteria, which harbor a single glutamate racemase gene, the genomic sequence of B. anthracis predicts two genes encoding glutamate racemases, racE1 and rac...

  9. Defensive strategies of Bacillus anthracis that promote a fatal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mogridge, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes anthrax. Bacterial spores that enter the host germinate into metabolically active bacilli that disseminate throughout the body and replicate to high numbers. Two virulence factors are essential for this unrestrained growth. The first is a weakly immunogenic poly γ-D-glutamic acid capsule that surrounds the bacilli and confers resistance to phagocytosis. The second virulence factor, anthrax toxin, disrupts multiple host functions to d...

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Bacillus anthracis: Determining the Correct Origin▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pilo, Paola; Perreten, Vincent; Frey, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed and compared strains of Bacillus anthracis isolated from husbandry and industrial anthrax cases in Switzerland between 1952 and 1981 with published data using multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis. Strains isolated from autochthonous cases of anthrax in cattle belong to genotype B2, together with strains from continental Europe, while human B. anthracis strains clustered with genotype A4. These strains could be traced back to outbreaks of human anthrax that occurre...

  11. Water surface tension modulates the swarming mechanics of Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Many Bacillus subtilis strains swarm, often forming colonies with tendrils on agar medium. It is known that B. subtilis swarming requires flagella and a biosurfactant, surfactin. In this study, we find that water surface tension plays a role in swarming dynamics. B. subtilis colonies were found to contain water, and when a low amount of surfactin is produced, the water surface tension of the colony restricts expansion, causing bacterial density to rise. The increased density induces a quorum ...

  12. Cytolytic Toxin and Related Genes in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Dong-lai; LI Yi-dan; GAO Ji-guo

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a ubiquitous gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium that forms parasporal crystal during the stationary phase of its growth cycle. These crystal proteins, including Cry and Cyt protein, are toxic to certain insects. Lately, some problems about Cyt classification, structural characteristic, action mechanism and resistance to Cyt toxin are becoming new hotspots. We review the progress of above problems in several foreign labs.

  13. Midgut bacteria required for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal activity

    OpenAIRE

    Broderick, Nichole A.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Handelsman, Jo

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is the most widely applied biological insecticide and is used to manage insects that affect forestry and agriculture and transmit human and animal pathogens. This ubiquitous spore-forming bacterium kills insect larvae largely through the action of insecticidal crystal proteins and is commonly deployed as a direct bacterial spray. Moreover, plants engineered with the cry genes encoding the B. thuringiensis crystal proteins are the most widely cultivated transgenic crops....

  14. Use of bacillus subtilis strains to inhibit postharvest pathogenic fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isolate (87) of the bacillus subtilis strains isolated from cold stored citrus fruit 13 proved to inhibit the growth in vitro of the penicillium italicum used in the experiment (from 50.6% to 92.2%) and to inhibit botrytis cinerea (from 65.3% to 95.9%). A further test, superimposing on plates containing PDA strains Nos. 13, 173, and 160, totally inhibited the fungi. Tested in vivo on artificially bruised oranges, they significantly inhibited two fungi

  15. Historical Distribution and Molecular Diversity of Bacillus anthracis, Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Aikembayev, Alim M.; Lukhnova, Larissa; Temiraliyeva, Gulnara; Meka-Mechenko, Tatyana; Pazylov, Yerlan; Zakaryan, Sarkis; Denissov, Georgiy; Easterday, W. Ryan; Matthew N. Van Ert; Keim, Paul; Francesconi, Stephen C.; Jason K Blackburn; Hugh-Jones, Martin; Hadfield, Ted

    2010-01-01

    To map the distribution of anthrax outbreaks and strain subtypes in Kazakhstan during 1937–2005, we combined geographic information system technology and genetic analysis by using archived cultures and data. Biochemical and genetic tests confirmed the identity of 93 archived cultures in the Kazakhstan National Culture Collection as Bacillus anthracis. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis genotyping identified 12 genotypes. Cluster analysis comparing these genotypes with previousl...

  16. Production and purification of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) plays crucial roles in the pathogenicity and virulence of Bacillus anthracis. Animals or human immunised with the protein acquire a complete protection against the disease. In addition to vaccine, PA can also be developed into a sensitive diagnostic test for anthrax. The purpose of this study was to produce PA using a culture medium easily obtained, and to develop a simple and effective technique for purification of the protein. To produce PA, B. anthracis Sterne 34F2 ...

  17. Glycerol Monolaurate Inhibits Virulence Factor Production in Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Vetter, Sara M; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2005-01-01

    Anthrax, caused by Bacillus anthracis, has been brought to the public's attention because of the 2001 bioterrorism attacks. However, anthrax is a disease that poses agricultural threats in the United States as well as human populations in Europe, China, Africa, and Australia. Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a compound that has been shown to inhibit exotoxin production by Staphylococcus aureus and other gram-positive bacteria. Here, we study the effects of GML on growth and toxin production in B...

  18. Biosynthetic Analysis of the Petrobactin Siderophore Pathway from Bacillus anthracis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung Yeop; Janes, Brian K.; Passalacqua, Karla D; Pfleger, Brian F.; Bergman, Nicholas H; Liu, Haichuan; Håkansson, Kristina; Somu, Ravindranadh V.; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Cendrowski, Stephen; Hanna, Philip C.; Sherman, David H.

    2006-01-01

    The asbABCDEF gene cluster from Bacillus anthracis is responsible for biosynthesis of petrobactin, a catecholate siderophore that functions in both iron acquisition and virulence in a murine model of anthrax. We initiated studies to determine the biosynthetic details of petrobactin assembly based on mutational analysis of the asb operon, identification of accumulated intermediates, and addition of exogenous siderophores to asb mutant strains. As a starting point, in-frame deletions of each of...

  19. Extracellular and membrane-bound proteases from Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mäntsälä, P; Zalkin, H

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis YY88 synthesizes increased amounts of extracellular and membrane-bound proteases. More than 99% of the extracellular protease activity is accounted for by an alkaline serine protease and a neutral metalloprotease. An esterase having low protease activity accounts for less than 1% of the secreted protease. These enzymes were purified to homogeneity. Molecular weights of approximately 28,500 and 39,500 were determined for the alkaline and neutral proteases, respectively. The e...

  20. Live-imaging of Bacillus subtilis spore germination and outgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, R

    2014-01-01

    Spores of Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus and Clostridium cause huge economic losses to the food industry. In food products, spores survive under food preservation conditions and subsequent germination and outgrowth eventually causes food spoilage. Therefore efforts are being made to eliminate or inactivate these bacterial spores in foods. In this regard food industry uses different preservation methods such as thermal-treatment, weak acids, antimicrobial compounds etc. Complete therm...

  1. Transformation of Bacillus thuringiensis protoplasts by plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, P A; Lohr, J. R.; Dean, D H

    1981-01-01

    A method has been developed to transform plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid into protoplasts of the insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis. Protoplasts were formed by treatment of cells with lysozyme. The efficiency of formation of protoplasts was affected by the strain, the media, and the cell density. Deoxyribonucleic acid uptake was induced by polyethylene glycol. Deoxyribonucleic acid from the Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pC194 was used for transformation. Although this plasmid could not be i...

  2. Culture Conditions for Production of Thermostable Amylase by Bacillus stearothermophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, R. A. K.; Baruah, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    Bacillus stearothermophilus grew better on complex and semisynthetic medium than on synthetic medium supplemented with amino acids. Amylase production on the complex medium containing beef extract or corn steep liquor was higher than on semisynthetic medium containing peptone (0.4%). The synthetic medium, however, did not provide a good yield of extracellular amylase. Among the carbohydrates which favored the production of amylase are, in order starch > dextrin > glycogen > cellobiose > malto...

  3. Effect of supplemental Bacillus culture on rumen fermentation and performance in dairy cattle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two parts were involved in this experiment. In experiment 1, 32 Chinese Holstein cows with relatively similar body condition, lactation number and days in milk were selected. The cows were assigned in a randomized complete block design trial to determine the effect of supplemental Bacillus cultures to diet on production performance in dairy cattle. Four treatments, i.e., Bacillus licheniformis (strain number 1.813) group, Bacillus subtilis (strain number 1.1086) group, Bacillus cereus var. mycoides (strain number 1.260) group and control group. Each treatment had eight replicates, each replicate had one cow, 50 g per head per day. Results showed that Bacillus licheniformis group increased the milk yield (P0.05). In experiment 2, 3 Chinese Holstein cows with permanent fistulas were used. 3×3 Latin squares were assigned to three diets: Bacillus lincheniformis culture, Bacillus subtilis culture and control. Bacillus licheniformis culture increased total rumen microorganism (P0.05), increased the rate of acetic acid to propionic acid (P>0.05). Bacillus licheniformis culture decreased the methane production (P>0.05).

  4. Inhibitory effect of novobiocin on ribonucleic acid synthesis during germination of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, M; Kameyama, T

    1980-01-01

    Novobiocin inhibited ribonculeic acid synthesis during germination of Bacillus subtilis spores. Transcription of certain kinds of genes probably required a preceding conformational change in deoxyribonucleic acid.

  5. Unusual Biosynthesis and Structure of Locillomycins from Bacillus subtilis 916

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chuping; Liu, Xuehui; Zhou, Xian; Guo, Junyao; Truong, John; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Huafei

    2015-01-01

    Three families of Bacillus cyclic lipopeptides—surfactins, iturins, and fengycins—have well-recognized potential uses in biotechnology and biopharmaceutical applications. This study outlines the isolation and characterization of locillomycins, a novel family of cyclic lipopeptides produced by Bacillus subtilis 916. Elucidation of the locillomycin structure revealed several molecular features not observed in other Bacillus lipopeptides, including a unique nonapeptide sequence and macrocyclization. Locillomycins are active against bacteria and viruses. Biochemical analysis and gene deletion studies have supported the assignment of a 38-kb gene cluster as the locillomycin biosynthetic gene cluster. Interestingly, this gene cluster encodes 4 proteins (LocA, LocB, LocC, and LocD) that form a hexamodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase to biosynthesize cyclic nonapeptides. Genome analysis and the chemical structures of the end products indicated that the biosynthetic pathway exhibits two distinct features: (i) a nonlinear hexamodular assembly line, with three modules in the middle utilized twice and the first and last two modules used only once and (ii) several domains that are skipped or optionally selected. PMID:26162886

  6. Multigeneration Cross-Contamination of Mail with Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Edmonds

    Full Text Available The release of biological agents, including those which could be used in biowarfare or bioterrorism in large urban areas, has been a concern for governments for nearly three decades. Previous incidents from Sverdlosk and the postal anthrax attack of 2001 have raised questions on the mechanism of spread of Bacillus anthracis spores as an aerosol or contaminant. Prior studies have demonstrated that Bacillus atrophaeus is easily transferred through simulated mail handing, but no reports have demonstrated this ability with Bacillus anthracis spores, which have morphological differences that may affect adhesion properties between spore and formite. In this study, equipment developed to simulate interactions across three generations of envelopes subjected to tumbling and mixing was used to evaluate the potential for cross-contamination of B. anthracis spores in simulated mail handling. In these experiments, we found that the potential for cross-contamination through letter tumbling from one generation to the next varied between generations while the presence of a fluidizer had no statistical impact on the transfer of material. Likewise, the presence or absence of a fluidizer had no statistically significant impact on cross-contamination levels or reaerosolization from letter opening.

  7. Multigeneration Cross-Contamination of Mail with Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Jason; Lindquist, H D Alan; Sabol, Jonathan; Martinez, Kenneth; Shadomy, Sean; Cymet, Tyler; Emanuel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The release of biological agents, including those which could be used in biowarfare or bioterrorism in large urban areas, has been a concern for governments for nearly three decades. Previous incidents from Sverdlosk and the postal anthrax attack of 2001 have raised questions on the mechanism of spread of Bacillus anthracis spores as an aerosol or contaminant. Prior studies have demonstrated that Bacillus atrophaeus is easily transferred through simulated mail handing, but no reports have demonstrated this ability with Bacillus anthracis spores, which have morphological differences that may affect adhesion properties between spore and formite. In this study, equipment developed to simulate interactions across three generations of envelopes subjected to tumbling and mixing was used to evaluate the potential for cross-contamination of B. anthracis spores in simulated mail handling. In these experiments, we found that the potential for cross-contamination through letter tumbling from one generation to the next varied between generations while the presence of a fluidizer had no statistical impact on the transfer of material. Likewise, the presence or absence of a fluidizer had no statistically significant impact on cross-contamination levels or reaerosolization from letter opening. PMID:27123934

  8. Biodegradation of malathion by Bacillus licheniformis strain ML-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malathion, a well-known organophosphate pesticide, has been used in agriculture over the last two decades for controlling pests of economically important crops. In the present study, a single bacterium, ML-1, was isolated by soil-enrichment technique and identified as Bacillus licheniformis on the basis of the 16S rRNA technique. The bacterium was grown in carbon-free minimal salt medium (MSM and was found to be very efficient in utilizing malathion as the sole source of carbon. Biodegradation experiments were performed in MSM without carbon source to determine the malathion degradation by the selected strain, and the residues of malathion were determined quantitatively using HPLC techniques. Bacillus licheniformis showed very promising results and efficiently consumed malathion as the sole carbon source via malathion carboxylesterase (MCE, and about 78% malathion was degraded within 5 days. The carboxylesterase activity was determined by using crude extract while using malathion as substrate, and the residues were determined by HPLC. It has been found that the MCE hydrolyzed 87% malathion within 96 h of incubation. Characterization of crude MCE revealed that the enzyme is robust in nature in terms of organic solvents, as it was found to be stable in various concentrations of ethanol and acetonitrile. Similarly, and it can work in a wide pH and temperature range. The results of this study highlighted the potential of Bacillus licheniformis strain ML-1 as a biodegrader that can be used for the bioremediation of malathion-contaminated soil.

  9. Fungal nail infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nails - fungal infection; Onychomycosis; Infection - fungal - nails; Tinea unguium ... the hair, nails, and outer skin layers. Common fungal infections include: Athlete's foot Jock itch Ringworm on the ...

  10. The bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility of infected and non-infected dog bite wounds: fifty cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Bruce; Schoeman, Johan P; Goddard, Amelia; Picard, Jackie

    2008-03-18

    Dog bite wounds are a common reason for dogs requiring veterinary care, but there is surprisingly little data on the bacteriology of bite wounds. A prospective study was performed on dogs with various grades of bite wound to identify the bacteria present in these wounds. Swabs were collected from all wounds for bacterial culture and cytology. All swabs were cultured aerobically and anaerobically and all aerobic cultures were evaluated for antibiotic susceptibility using the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion test. Fifty dogs with 104 bite wounds, inflicted within the previous 72h, were included. The victims were predominately intact male small breed dogs. Of the 104 wounds, 21 were judged by cytology to be infected and 83 non-infected. Infected wounds were significantly more likely to culture positive (p=0.02). Sixteen percent of wounds showed no growth. Sixteen percent grew aerobes, 1% anaerobes and 67% a mixture of aerobes and anaerobes. Pasteurella canis and pyogenic streptococci were common in infected wounds, whereas Bacillus spp., Actinomyces spp. and the oral streptococci were usually found in contaminated wounds. Three anaerobic genera were cultured, namely, Prevotella, Clostridium and Peptostreptococcus. One case represented the first isolation of Capnocytophaga canimorsus in an infected dog bite wound. Although no single antibiotic therapy was considered to be effective against all the bacteria, amoxycillin plus clavulanic acid, 1st and 3rd generation cephalosporins ampicillin or amoxycillin and potentiated sulphonamides gave the best in vitro sensitivity results. PMID:18029118

  11. Occurrence of natural Bacillus thuringiensis contaminants and residues of Bacillus thuringiensis-based insecticides on fresh fruits and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristine; Rosenquist, Hanne; Jørgensen, Kirsten;

    2006-01-01

    A total of 128 Bacillus cereus-like strains isolated from fresh fruits and vegetables for sale in retail shops in Denmark were characterized. Of these strains, 39% (50/128) were classified as Bacillus thuringiensis on the basis of their content of cry genes determined by PCR or crystal proteins...... visualized by microscopy. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and plasmid profiling indicated that 23 of the 50 B. thuringiensis strains were of the same subtype as B. thuringiensis strains used as commercial bioinsecticides. Fourteen isolates were indistinguishable from B. thuringiensis subsp....... kurstaki HD1 present in the products Dipel, Biobit, and Foray, and nine isolates grouped with B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai present in Turex. The commercial strains were primarily isolated from samples of tomatoes, cucumbers, and peppers. A multiplex PCR method was developed to simultaneously detect all...

  12. Effects of potential probiotic Bacillus cereus EN25 on growth, immunity and disease resistance of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yancui; Yuan, Lei; Wan, Junli; Sun, Zhenxing; Wang, Yiyan; Sun, Hushan

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine effects of potential probiotic Bacillus cereus EN25 (isolated from mud of sea cucumber culturing water bodies) on growth, immunity and disease resistance against Vibrio splendidus infection in juvenile sea cucumbers Apostichopus japonicus. Animals were respectively fed diets with B. cereus EN25 at 0 (control), 10(5), 10(7) and 10(9) CFU/g for 30 days. Results showed that dietary B. cereus EN25 had no significant effects on growth, total coelomocytes counts and acid phosphatase activity of A. japonicus (P > 0.05). Dietary EN25 at 10(7) CFU/g had significantly improved the phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity and total nitric oxide synthase activity of animals (P japonicus (P > 0.05), whereas dietary EN25 at 10(9) CFU/g had significantly decreased its activity (P japonicus. PMID:26723266

  13. Recombinant Strain of Bacillus thuringiensis Producing Cyt1A, Cry11B, and the Bacillus sphaericus Binary Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun-Woo; Bideshi, Dennis K.; Federici, Brian A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel recombinant Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain that produces the B. sphaericus binary toxin, Cyt1Aa, and Cry11Ba is described. The toxicity of this strain (50% lethal concentration [LC50] = 1.7 ng/ml) against fourth-instar Culex quinquefasciatus was higher than that of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis IPS-82 (LC50 = 7.9 ng/ml) or B. sphaericus 2362 (LC50 = 12.6 ng/ml).

  14. Cytolytic activity and immunological similarity of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. morrisoni isolate PG-14 toxins.

    OpenAIRE

    S S Gill; Hornung, J M; Ibarra, J.E.; Singh, G J; Federici, B A

    1987-01-01

    The parasporal bodies of the mosquitocidal isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and B. thuringiensis subsp. morrisoni isolate PG-14 were compared with regard to their hemolytic and cytolytic activities and the immunological relatedness of the 28- and 65-kilodalton (kDa) proteins that occur in both subspecies. The alkali-solubilized parasporal bodies of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis caused 50% lysis of human erythrocytes at 1.14 micrograms/ml, whereas those of B. thuring...

  15. Bacillus anthracis Virulent Plasmid pX02 Genes Found in Large Plasmids of Two Other Bacillus Species

    OpenAIRE

    Luna, Vicki A.; King, Debra S.; Peak, K. Kealy; Reeves, Frank; Heberlein-Larson, Lea; Veguilla, William; Heller, L.; Duncan, Kathleen E; Cannons, Andrew C.; Amuso, Philip; Cattani, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    In order to cause the disease anthrax, Bacillus anthracis requires two plasmids, pX01 and pX02, which carry toxin and capsule genes, respectively, that are used as genetic targets in the laboratory detection of the bacterium. Clinical, forensic, and environmental samples that test positive by PCR protocols established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for B. anthracis are considered to be potentially B. anthracis until confirmed by culture and a secondary battery of tests. We ...

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis: general characteristics and fermentation
    Bacillus thuringiensis: características gerais e fermentação

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Jorge Hernan Castro-Gómez; Gislayne Trindade Vilas-Bôas; Elisangela Andrade Angelo

    2010-01-01

    The insect control is carried out mostly by chemical products, whose cumulative effects cause serious losses to environmental and human health, highlighting rapid selection of resistant insects. Biological control by entomopathogenic bacteria is an efficient alternative, mainly due to high specificity, absence of resistance in the target insects and low environment residual effect. Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium that produces a parasporal crystal protein tox...

  17. Chronic Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection Mutes Immune Responses to Mycobacterial Infection Distal to the Gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obieglo, Katja; Feng, Xiaogang; Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Dellacasa-Lindberg, Isabel; Classon, Cajsa; Österblad, Markus; Helmby, Helena; Hewitson, James P; Maizels, Rick M; Gigliotti Rothfuchs, Antonio; Nylén, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Helminth infections have been suggested to impair the development and outcome of Th1 responses to vaccines and intracellular microorganisms. However, there are limited data regarding the ability of intestinal nematodes to modulate Th1 responses at sites distal to the gut. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri on Th1 responses to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We found that H. polygyrus infection localized to the gut can mute BCG-specific CD4(+) T cell priming in both the spleen and skin-draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, H. polygyrus infection reduced the magnitude of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD in the skin. Consequently, H. polygyrus-infected mice challenged with BCG had a higher mycobacterial load in the liver compared with worm-free mice. The excretory-secretory product from H. polygyrus (HES) was found to dampen IFN-γ production by mycobacteria-specific CD4(+) T cells. This inhibition was dependent on the TGF-βR signaling activity of HES, suggesting that TGF-β signaling plays a role in the impaired Th1 responses observed coinfection with worms. Similar to results with mycobacteria, H. polygyrus-infected mice displayed an increase in skin parasite load upon secondary infection with Leishmania major as well as a reduction in DTH responses to Leishmania Ag. We show that a nematode confined to the gut can mute T cell responses to mycobacteria and impair control of secondary infections distal to the gut. The ability of intestinal helminths to reduce DTH responses may have clinical implications for the use of skin test-based diagnosis of microbial infections. PMID:26819205

  18. Regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes in Bacillus halodurans: common elements but different strategies than those used by Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigeti, Reka; Milescu, Mirela; Gollnick, Paul

    2004-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, an RNA binding protein called TRAP regulates both transcription and translation of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes. Bacillus halodurans is an alkaliphilic Bacillus species that grows at high pHs. Previous studies of this bacterium have focused on mechanisms of adaptation for growth in alkaline environments. We have characterized the regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes in B. halodurans and compared it to that in B. subtilis. B. halodurans encodes a TRAP protein with 71% sequence identity to the B. subtilis protein. Expression of anthranilate synthetase, the first enzyme in the pathway to tryptophan, is regulated significantly less in B. halodurans than in B. subtilis. Examination of the control of the B. halodurans trpEDCFBA operon both in vivo and in vitro shows that only transcription is regulated, whereas in B. subtilis both transcription of the operon and translation of trpE are controlled. The attenuation mechanism that controls transcription in B. halodurans is similar to that in B. subtilis, but there are some differences in the predicted RNA secondary structures in the B. halodurans trp leader region, including the presence of a potential anti-antiterminator structure. Translation of trpG, which is within the folate operon in both bacilli, is regulated similarly in the two species. PMID:14729709

  19. Bacillus cereus AR156 primes induced systemic resistance by suppressing miR825/825* and activating defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dongdong; Xia, Jing; Jiang, Chunhao; Qi, Beibei; Ling, Xiaoyu; Lin, Siyuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Guo, Jianhua; Jin, Hailing; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    Small RNAs play an important role in plant immune responses. However, their regulatory function in induced systemic resistance (ISR) is nascent. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that induces ISR in Arabidopsis against bacterial infection. Here, by comparing small RNA profiles of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000-infected Arabidopsis with and without AR156 pretreatment, we identified a group of Arabidopsis microRNAs (miRNAs) that are differentially regulated by AR156 pretreatment. miR825 and miR825* are two miRNA generated from a single miRNA gene. Northern blot analysis indicated that they were significantly downregulated in Pst DC3000-infected plants pretreated with AR156, in contrast to the plants without AR156 pretreatment. miR825 targets two ubiquitin-protein ligases, while miR825* targets toll-interleukin-like receptor (TIR)-nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) type resistance (R) genes. The expression of these target genes negatively correlated with the expression of miR825 and miR825*. Moreover, transgenic plants showing reduced expression of miR825 and miR825* displayed enhanced resistance to Pst DC3000 infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing miR825 and miR825* were more susceptible. Taken together, our data indicates that Bacillus cereus AR156 pretreatment primes ISR to Pst infection by suppressing miR825 and miR825* and activating the defense related genes they targeted. PMID:26526683

  20. Infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, José M; Fonseca, Ana Catarina

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease of the endocardium of the heart and cardiac valves, caused by a variety of infectious agents, ranging from streptococci to rickettsia. The proportion of cases associated with rheumatic valvulopathy and dental surgery has decreased in recent years, while endocarditis associated with intravenous drug abuse, prosthetic valves, degenerative valve disease, implanted cardiac devices, and iatrogenic or nosocomial infections has emerged. Endocarditis causes constitutional, cardiac and multiorgan symptoms and signs. The central nervous system can be affected in the form of meningitis, cerebritis, encephalopathy, seizures, brain abscess, ischemic embolic stroke, mycotic aneurysm, and subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke in endocarditis is an ominous prognostic sign. Treatment of endocarditis includes prolonged appropriate antimicrobial therapy and in selected cases, cardiac surgery. In ischemic stroke associated with infective endocarditis there is no indication to start antithrombotic drugs. In previously anticoagulated patients with an ischemic stroke, oral anticoagulants should be replaced by unfractionated heparin, while in intracranial hemorrhage, all anticoagulation should be interrupted. The majority of unruptured mycotic aneurysms can be treated by antibiotics, but for ruptured aneurysms, endovascular or neurosurgical therapy is indicated. PMID:24365290

  1. Fish tapeworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish tapeworm infection is an intestinal infection with the tapeworm parasite found in fish. ... The fish tapeworm ( Diphyllobothrium latum ) is the largest parasite that infects humans. Humans become infected when they eat raw ...

  2. Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Strain KB1, a Potential Biocontrol Agent against Phytopathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Jo, Sung Hee; Hong, Chi Eun; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is the most widely known microbial pesticide used in agricultural applications. Herein, we report a draft genome sequence of the endophytic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis strain KB1, which exhibits antagonism against phytopathogens.

  3. Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Strain KB1, a Potential Biocontrol Agent against Phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Jo, Sung Hee; Hong, Chi Eun; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-01-01

    ITALIC! Bacillus thuringiensisis the most widely known microbial pesticide used in agricultural applications. Herein, we report a draft genome sequence of the endophytic bacterium ITALIC! Bacillus thuringiensisstrain KB1, which exhibits antagonism against phytopathogens. PMID:27103716

  4. Glucose 6P binds and activates HlyIIR to repress Bacillus cereus haemolysin hlyII gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Guillemet

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium causing food poisoning and serious opportunistic infections. These infections are characterized by bacterial accumulation despite the recruitment of phagocytic cells. We have previously shown that B. cereus Haemolysin II (HlyII induces macrophage cell death by apoptosis. In this work, we investigated the regulation of the hlyII gene. We show that HlyIIR, the negative regulator of hlyII expression in B. cereus, is especially active during the early bacterial growth phase. We demonstrate that glucose 6P directly binds to HlyIIR and enhances its activity at a post-transcriptional level. Glucose 6P activates HlyIIR, increasing its capacity to bind to its DNA-box located upstream of the hlyII gene, inhibiting its expression. Thus, hlyII expression is modulated by the availability of glucose. As HlyII induces haemocyte and macrophage death, two cell types that play a role in the sequestration of nutrients upon infection, HlyII may induce host cell death to allow the bacteria to gain access to carbon sources that are essential components for bacterial growth.

  5. Curing of plasmid pXO1 from Bacillus anthracis using plasmid incompatibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiankai Liu

    Full Text Available The large plasmid pXO1 encoding the anthrax toxin is important for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis. It is essential to cure pXO1 from B. anthracis to evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of anthrax infection. Because conventional methods for curing plasmids (e.g., curing agents or growth at elevated temperatures can induce mutations in the host chromosomal DNA, we developed a specific and reliable method to eliminate pXO1 from B. anthracis using plasmid incompatibility. Three putative replication origins of pXO1 were inserted into a temperature-sensitive plasmid to generate three incompatible plasmids. One of the three plasmids successfully eliminated the large plasmid pXO1 from B. anthracis vaccine strain A16R and wild type strain A16. These findings provided additional information about the replication/partitioning of pXO1 and demonstrated that introducing a small incompatible plasmid can generate plasmid-cured strains of B. anthracis without inducing spontaneous mutations in the host chromosome.

  6. Concerted action of sphingomyelinase and non-hemolytic enterotoxin in pathogenic Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria M Doll

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe, which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation.

  7. Bacillus anthracis Co-Opts Nitric Oxide and Host Serum Albumin for Pathogenicity in Hypoxic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eSt John

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is a dangerous pathogen of humans and many animal species. Its virulence has been mainly attributed to the production of Lethal and Edema toxins as well as the antiphagocytic capsule. Recent data indicate that the nitric oxide (NO synthase (baNOS plays an important pathogenic role at the early stage of disease by protecting bacteria from the host reactive species and S-nytrosylating the mitochondrial proteins in macrophages. In this study we for the first time present evidence that bacteria-derived NO participates in the generation of highly reactive oxidizing species which could be abolished by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME, free thiols, and superoxide dismutase but not catalase. The formation of toxicants is likely a result of the simultaneous formation of NO and superoxide leading to a labile peroxynitrite and its stable decomposition product, nitrogen dioxide. The toxicity of bacteria could be potentiated in the presence of bovine serum albumin. This effect is consistent with the property of serum albumin to serves as a trap of a volatile NO accelerating its reactions. Our data suggest that during infection in the hypoxic environment of pre-mortal host the accumulated NO is expected to have a broad toxic impact on host cell functions.

  8. Unraveling Aspects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Mediated Enhanced Production of Rice under Biotic Stress of Rhizoctonia solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Suchi; Bist, Vidisha; Srivastava, Sonal; Singh, Poonam C.; Trivedi, Prabodh K.; Asif, Mehar H.; Chauhan, Puneet S.; Nautiyal, Chandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungi causing sheath blight in rice leading to substantial loss in yield. Excessive and persistent use of preventive chemicals raises human health and environment safety concerns. As an alternative, use of biocontrol agents is highly recommended. In the present study, an abiotic stress tolerant, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (SN13) is demonstrated to act as a biocontrol agent and enhance immune response against R. solani in rice by modulating various physiological, metabolic, and molecular functions. A sustained tolerance by SN13 primed plant over a longer period of time, post R. solani infection may be attributed to several unconventional aspects of the plants’ physiological status. The prolonged stress tolerance observed in presence of SN13 is characterized by (a) involvement of bacterial mycolytic enzymes, (b) sustained maintenance of elicitors to keep the immune system induced involving non-metabolizable sugars such as turanose besides the known elicitors, (c) a delicate balance of ROS and ROS scavengers through production of proline, mannitol, and arabitol and rare sugars like fructopyranose, β-D-glucopyranose and myoinositol and expression of ferric reductases and hypoxia induced proteins, (d) production of metabolites like quinazoline and expression of terpene synthase, and (e) hormonal cross talk. As the novel aspect of biological control this study highlights the role of rare sugars, maintenance of hypoxic conditions, and sucrose and starch metabolism in B. amyloliquefaciens (SN13) mediated sustained biotic stress tolerance in rice. PMID:27200058

  9. Unraveling Aspects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Mediated Enhanced Production of Rice under Biotic Stress of Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Suchi; Bist, Vidisha; Srivastava, Sonal; Singh, Poonam C; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Asif, Mehar H; Chauhan, Puneet S; Nautiyal, Chandra S

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungi causing sheath blight in rice leading to substantial loss in yield. Excessive and persistent use of preventive chemicals raises human health and environment safety concerns. As an alternative, use of biocontrol agents is highly recommended. In the present study, an abiotic stress tolerant, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (SN13) is demonstrated to act as a biocontrol agent and enhance immune response against R. solani in rice by modulating various physiological, metabolic, and molecular functions. A sustained tolerance by SN13 primed plant over a longer period of time, post R. solani infection may be attributed to several unconventional aspects of the plants' physiological status. The prolonged stress tolerance observed in presence of SN13 is characterized by (a) involvement of bacterial mycolytic enzymes, (b) sustained maintenance of elicitors to keep the immune system induced involving non-metabolizable sugars such as turanose besides the known elicitors, (c) a delicate balance of ROS and ROS scavengers through production of proline, mannitol, and arabitol and rare sugars like fructopyranose, β-D-glucopyranose and myoinositol and expression of ferric reductases and hypoxia induced proteins, (d) production of metabolites like quinazoline and expression of terpene synthase, and (e) hormonal cross talk. As the novel aspect of biological control this study highlights the role of rare sugars, maintenance of hypoxic conditions, and sucrose and starch metabolism in B. amyloliquefaciens (SN13) mediated sustained biotic stress tolerance in rice. PMID:27200058

  10. Control of Anthracnose Caused by Colletotrichum musae on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. Using Antagonistic Bacillus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supuk Mahadtanapuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 400 bacterial strains, isolated from leaf surfaces of Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and hot springs in the Chiang Mai province of northern Thailand, were screened in vitro for antagonistic activity against Colletotrichum musae, an anthracnose fungus. Three isolates provided greater than 75% growth inhibition of the fungus in vitro and were identified as Bacillus licheniformis, B. amyloliquefaciens and B. subtilis. Using in planta tests, B. amyloliquefaciens and B. subtilis were shown to efficiently colonize the curcuma bracts, provide a statistically significant growth suppression of C. musae over that of B. licheniformis, and all three isolates could provide 100% inhibition of conidial fungal germination. When B. licheniformis was co-inoculated in combination with either of the other two bacteria, the ability of B. amyloliquefaciens and B. subtilis to suppress the fungal disease was dramatically reduced. Both B. amyloliquefaciens and B. subtilis were found to contain an isoform of iturin A with antifungal activity against C. musae. As a preventative measure to control the spread of C. musae and reduce the severity of fungal infections, B. amyloliquefaciens could be used to inoculate curcuma flowers cost effectively and reduce the need for the toxic synthetic fungicides currently in use.

  11. In Vitro Antibiofilm Activity of an Exopolysaccharide from the Marine Thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis T14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Antonio; Laganà, Pasqualina; Visalli, Giuseppa; Maugeri, Teresa L; Gugliandolo, Concetta

    2016-05-01

    The development of antibiofilm strategies is of major interest in contrasting bacterial pathogenic biofilms. A novel fructose and fucose rich exopolysaccharide (EPS1-T14) produced by the recently described thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis T14, isolated from a shallow hydrothermal vent of Panarea Island (Eolian Island, Italy), was evaluated for its effects on biofilm formation by multiresistant clinical strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. The antibiofilm activity of EPS1-T14 was assessed by microtiter plate assays and visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopic images. EPS1-T14, with molecular weight of 1000 kDa, reduced biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces without affecting bacterial vitality. The novel EPS1-T14 is a water-soluble, noncytotoxic exopolymer able to prevent biofilm formation and its use may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for combating bacterial biofilm-associated infections. EPS1-T14 as antiadhesive biomolecule could be useful for novel prospective in medical and nonmedical applications. PMID:26750122

  12. L-asparaginase production by mangrove derived Bacillus cereus MAB5:optimization by response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ThenmozhiC; SankarR; KaruppiahV; SampathkumarP

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To isolate marine bacteria, statistically optimize them for maximum asparaginase production. Methods:In the present study, statistically based experimental designs were applied to maximize the production of L-asparaginase from bacterial strain of Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) MAB5 (HQ675025) isolated and identified by 16S rDNA sequencing from mangroves rhizosphere sediment. Results:Plackett-Barman design was used to identify the interactive effect of the eight variables viz. yeast extract, soyabean meal, glucose, magnesium sulphate, KH2PO4, wood chips, aspargine and sodium chloride. All the variables are denoted as numerical factors and investigated at two widely spaced intervals designated as-1 (low level) and+1 (high level). The effect of individual parameters on L-asparaginase production was calculated. Soyabean meal, aspargine, wood chips and sodium chloride were found to be the significant among eight variables. The maximum amount of L-asparaginase produced (51.54 IU/mL) from the optimized medium containing soyabean meal (6.282 8 g/L), aspargine (5.5 g/L), wood chips (1.383 8 g/L) and NaCl (4.535 4 g/L). Conclusions:The study revealed that, it is useful to produce the maximum amount of L-asparaginase from B. cereus MAB5 for the treatment of various infections and diseases.

  13. Antifungal potential of Bacillus vallismortis R2 against different phytopathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preet K. Kaur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The cash crops grown in an agro-climatic region are prone to infection by various fungal pathogens. The use of chemical fungicides over the years has resulted in emergence of resistant fungal strains, thereby necessitating the development of effective and environmental friendly alternatives. The natural antagonistic interactions among different microbial populations have been exploited as an eco-friendly approach for controlling fungal pathogens resistant to synthetic chemicals. Morphologically distinct bacterial cultures (150, isolated from rhizospheric soils of wheat, rice, onion and tomato plants were screened for their antifungal potential against seven phytopathogenic fungi prevalent in the State of Punjab (India. The bacterial isolate R2, identified as Bacillus vallismortis, supported more than 50% inhibition of different phytopathogenic fungi (Alternaria alternata, Rhizoctonia oryzae, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium moniliforme, Colletotrichum sp, Helminthosporium sp and Magnaporthe griseain dual culture plate assay. The thin layer chromatography based bio-autography of acid-precipitated biomolecules (APB indicated the presence of more than one type of antifungal molecule, as evidenced from zones of inhibition against the respective fungal pathogen. The initial analytical studies indicated the presence of surfactin, iturin A and fengycin-like compounds in APB. The antifungal activity of whole cells and APB of isolate R2 was evaluated by light and scanning electron microscopy. The wheat grains treated with APB and exposed to spores of A. alternata showed resistance to the development of black point disease, thereby indicating the potential application of R2 and its biomolecules at field scale level.

  14. Bacillus anthracis interacts with plasmin(ogen to evade C3b-dependent innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Chul Chung

    Full Text Available The causative agent of anthrax, Bacillus anthracis, is capable of circumventing the humoral and innate immune defense of the host and modulating the blood chemistry in circulation to initiate a productive infection. It has been shown that the pathogen employs a number of strategies against immune cells using secreted pathogenic factors such as toxins. However, interference of B. anthracis with the innate immune system through specific interaction of the spore surface with host proteins such as the complement system has heretofore attracted little attention. In order to assess the mechanisms by which B. anthracis evades the defense system, we employed a proteomic analysis to identify human serum proteins interacting with B. anthracis spores, and found that plasminogen (PLG is a major surface-bound protein. PLG efficiently bound to spores in a lysine- and exosporium-dependent manner. We identified α-enolase and elongation factor tu as PLG receptors. PLG-bound spores were capable of exhibiting anti-opsonic properties by cleaving C3b molecules in vitro and in rabbit bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, resulting in a decrease in macrophage phagocytosis. Our findings represent a step forward in understanding the mechanisms involved in the evasion of innate immunity by B. anthracis through recruitment of PLG resulting in the enhancement of anti-complement and anti-opsonization properties of the pathogen.

  15. Over-expression, purification, and confirmation of Bacillus anthracis transcriptional regulator NprR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Amy J; Woo, Jerry K; Khan, Attiya; Szypulinski, Michael Z; Johnson, Michael E; Lee, Hyunwoo; Lee, Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has been recognized as an important biological phenomenon in which bacterial cells communicate and coordinate their gene expression and cellular processes with respect to population density. Bacillus anthracis is the etiological agent of fatal pulmonary anthrax infections, and the NprR/NprX QS system may be involved in its pathogenesis. NprR, renamed as aqsR for anthrax quorum sensing Regulator, is a transcriptional regulator that may control the expression of genes required for proliferation and survival. Currently, there is no protocol reported to over-express and purify B. anthracis AqsR. In this study, we describe cloning, purification, and confirmation of functional full-length B. anthracis AqsR protein. The AqsR gene was cloned into the pQE-30 vector with an HRV 3C protease recognition site between AqsR and the N-terminal His6-tag in order to yield near native AqsR after the His-tag cleavage, leaving only two additional amino acid residues at the N-terminus. PMID:26344899

  16. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and multiple brain abscesses during acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Jordan R; Phillips, Marianne; Cole, Catherine; Francis, Joshua; Blyth, Christopher C; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious infections in immunosuppressed patients. This population may be susceptible to B. cereus pneumonia, bacteremia, cellulitis, and rarely cerebral abscess. Here we report an 8-year-old boy undergoing induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed multifocal B. cereus cerebral abscesses, highlighting the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscesses. A review of the literature over the past 25 years identified another 11 cases (3 children and 8 adults) of B. cereus cerebral abscess in patients undergoing cancer therapy. B. cereus cerebral abscesses were associated with a high mortality rate (42%) and significant morbidity. Notably, B. cereus bacteremia with concomitant cerebral abscess was associated with induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia in both children and adults (10 of 12 case reports). Our case report and review of the literature highlights the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscess(es). Therefore, early consideration for neuroimaging should be given for any neutropenic cancer patient identified with B. cereus bacteremia, in particular those with acute leukemia during induction therapy. PMID:23619116

  17. Resistance to antimicrobials and acid and bile tolerance of Bacillus spp isolated from Bikalga, fermented seeds of Hibiscus sabdariffa

    OpenAIRE

    Compaore, Clarisse S.; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Diawara, Brehima; Ouedraogo, Georges A.; Jakobsen, Mogens; Ouoba, Labia I. I.

    2013-01-01

    In the aim of selecting starter cultures, thirteen species of Bacillus spp. including six Bacillus subtilis ssp. subtilis, four Bacillus licheniformis and three Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ssp. plantarum isolated from traditional Bikalga were investigated. The study included, for all isolates, genes, determination of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for 24 antimicrobials and detection of resistance by PCR using specific primers. The isolates were also examined for their resistance to pH ...

  18. Topraktan İzole Edilen Bacillus Türlerinin Tanımlanması ve Bakteriosin Üretimlerinin Belirlenmesi

    OpenAIRE

    Topçal, Fadime; Dığrak, Metin; Gündoğan, Recep

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Bacillus sp. was isolated from the soil seeded with Hordeum sp. and Vicia sp. and was identified. 121 Bacillus isolates were derived from soil samples. It was determined that 114 isolates gave 16SrRNA pcr products with primers specific for Bacillus genus. Classical methods were used to identify the species: Bacillus subtilis, B. mycoides, B. megaterium and B. amyloliquefaciens species. It was determined that metabolic products of four isolates inhibited Escherichia coli and Mic...

  19. Active Mycobacterium Infection Due to Intramuscular BCG Administration Following Multi-Steps Medication Errors

    OpenAIRE

    MohammadReza Rafati; Bizhan Kouchaki

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is indicated for treatment of primary or relapsing flat urothelial cell carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the urinary bladder. Disseminated infectious complications occasionally occur due to BCG as a vaccine and intravesical therapy.  Intramuscular (IM) or Intravenous (IV) administrations of BCG are rare medication errors which are more probable to produce systemic infections. This report presents 13 years old case that several steps medication errors occurred conseque...

  20. Bacterial Isolation and their antibiogram from non-specific infection in poultry of Marathwada region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.Siddiqui

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 103 samples of poultry of different age groups of non specific infections were tested. The cultural examination revealed presence of the organisms in descending order E. coli, Staphylococci, Enterobactor, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Streptococci and Klebsiella. Antibiogram of these samples showed Chloramphenicol, Gentamicin and Ampicillin as most effective antibiotics while Doxycycline, Streptomycin and Oxytetracycline are moderately effective. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(2.000: 52-53

  1. The Physiologic Responses of Dutch Belted Rabbits Infected with Inhalational Anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, William S.; Hardcastle, Jason M; Brining, Douglas L; Weaver, Lori E; Ponce, Cindy; Whorton, Elbert B.; Johnny W. Peterson

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a category A priority pathogen that causes extensive damage in humans. For this reason, B. anthracis has been the focus of numerous studies using various animal models. In this study, we explored physiologic parameters in Dutch belted rabbits with inhalation anthrax to characterize the disease progression in this model. To this end, we infected Dutch belted rabbits with 100 LD50 B. anthracis Ames spores by nasal instillation and continuou...

  2. Genetic diversity of clinical isolates of Bacillus cereus using multilocus sequence typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruckler James M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus cereus is most commonly associated with foodborne illness (diarrheal and emetic but is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe and fatal infections. Several multilocus sequence typing (MLST schemes have recently been developed to genotype B. cereus and analysis has suggested a clonal or weakly clonal population structure for B. cereus and its close relatives B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis. In this study we used MLST to determine if B. cereus isolates associated with illnesses of varying severity (e.g., severe, systemic vs. gastrointestinal (GI illness were clonal or formed clonal complexes. Results A retrospective analysis of 55 clinical B. cereus isolates submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1954 and 2004 was conducted. Clinical isolates from severe infections (n = 27, gastrointestinal (GI illness (n = 18, and associated isolates from food (n = 10 were selected for analysis using MLST. The 55 isolates were diverse and comprised 38 sequence types (ST in two distinct clades. Of the 27 isolates associated with serious illness, 13 clustered in clade 1 while 14 were in clade 2. Isolates associated with GI illness were also found throughout clades 1 and 2, while no isolates in this study belonged to clade 3. All the isolates from this study belonging to the clade 1/cereus III lineage were associated with severe disease while isolates belonging to clade1/cereus II contained isolates primarily associated with severe disease and emetic illness. Only three STs were observed more than once for epidemiologically distinct isolates. Conclusion STs of clinical B. cereus isolates were phylogenetically diverse and distributed among two of three previously described clades. Greater numbers of strains will need to be analyzed to confirm if specific lineages or clonal complexes are more likely to contain clinical isolates or be associated with specific illness, similar to B. anthracis and

  3. In planta reduction of maize seedling stalk lesions by the bacterial endophyte Bacillus mojavensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles W; Hinton, Dorothy M

    2011-06-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is susceptible to infection by Fusarium verticillioides through autoinfection and alloinfection, resulting in diseases and contamination of maize kernels with the fumonisin mycotoxins. Attempts at controlling this fungus are currently being done with biocontrol agents such as bacteria, and this includes bacterial endophytes, such as Bacillus mojavensis . In addition to producing fumonisins, which are phytotoxic and mycotoxic, F. verticillioides also produces fusaric acid, which acts both as a phytotoxin and as an antibiotic. The question now is Can B. mojavensis reduce lesion development in maize during the alloinfection process, simulated by internode injection of the fungus? Mutant strains of B. mojavensis that tolerate fusaric acid were used in a growth room study to determine the development of stalk lesions, indicative of maize seedling blight, by co-inoculations with a wild-type strain of F. verticillioides and with non-fusaric acid producing mutants of F. verticillioides. Lesions were measured on 14-day-old maize stalks consisting of treatment groups inoculated with and without mutants and wild-type strains of bacteria and fungi. The results indicate that the fusaric-acid-tolerant B. mojavensis mutant reduced stalk lesions, suggesting an in planta role for this substance as an antibiotic. Further, lesion development occurred in maize infected with F. verticillioides mutants that do not produce fusaric acid, indicating a role for other phytotoxins, such as the fumonisins. Thus, additional pathological components should be examined before strains of B. mojavensis can be identified as being effective as a biocontrol agent, particularly for the control of seedling disease of maize. PMID:21635192

  4. Rapid Detection of Viable Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Samples by Using Engineered Reporter Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Natasha J; Molineux, Ian J; Page, Martin A; Schofield, David A

    2016-04-15

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, was utilized as a bioterrorism agent in 2001 when spores were distributed via the U.S. postal system. In responding to this event, the Federal Bureau of Investigation used traditional bacterial culture viability assays to ascertain the extent of contamination of the postal facilities within 24 to 48 h of environmental sample acquisition. Here, we describe a low-complexity, second-generation reporter phage assay for the rapid detection of viableB. anthracisspores in environmental samples. The assay uses an engineeredB. anthracisreporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-2) which transduces bioluminescence to infected cells. To facilitate low-level environmental detection and maximize the signal response, expression ofluxABin an earlier version of the reporter phage (Wβ::luxAB-1) was optimized. These alterations prolonged signal kinetics, increased light output, and improved assay sensitivity. Using Wβ::luxAB-2, detection ofB. anthracisspores was 1 CFU in 8 h from pure cultures and as low as 10 CFU/g in sterile soil but increased to 10(5)CFU/g in unprocessed soil due to an unstable signal and the presence of competing bacteria. Inclusion of semiselective medium, mediated by a phage-expressed antibiotic resistance gene, maintained signal stability and enabled the detection of 10(4)CFU/g in 6 h. The assay does not require spore extraction and relies on the phage infecting germinating cells directly in the soil sample. This reporter phage displays promise for the rapid detection of low levels of spores on clean surfaces and also in grossly contaminated environmental samples from complex matrices such as soils. PMID:26873316

  5. Characterizing CMN1308, a Novel Strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, for Potential Biological Control Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehua ZHANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungal diseases of plants continue to contribute to heavy crop losses in spite of the best control efforts of plant pathologists. Breeding for disease-resistant varieties and the application of synthetic chemical fungicides are the most widely accepted approaches in plant disease management. CMN1308 strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens was isolated from healthy Chinese chestnut fruit, which has antibiosis and induced resistance to the prevention mechanism of pathogenic bacterium after picking. In order to evaluate the antibiosis mechanism, CMN1308 was fostered with the method of confront culture. The antimicrobial components were also isolated from the culture of CMN1308, and their stability and antimicrobial activity was tested under different treatments such as temperature, pH and UV. The results showed that CMN1308 displays advantages in regard to spatial competition against the major pathogens of chestnut, Rhizopus stolonifer, Fusarium solani, Stachybotrys chartarum, Cryphonectria parasitica, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger. Among this, CMN1308 had the best antimicrobial activity against P. expansum, with the inhibition zone diameter of 27.1 mm. The antimicrobial material isolated from CMN1308 culture showed a strong inhibition to the growth of P. expansum hyphal and also had a good stability to high temperature, alkali media and UV, but was sensitive to acidic conditions. Furthermore, CMN1308 increased the peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase activity and reduced the MDA content in chestnuts after infecting by pathogenic fungi. Thus, producing antibiotic compounds and inducible resistance are the main factors that may explain the antibacterial mechanism of CMN1308 on chestnut pathogenic. The results of this study might help to optimize the practical use of CMN1308 in the biological control of chestnut rot or other fruit rot infected by pathogenic fungi.

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Cyclodextrin-Producing Alkaliphilic Bacillus Strains JCM 19045, JCM 19046, and JCM 19047

    OpenAIRE

    Kudo, Toshiaki; Sakamoto, Kazuaki; Akinaga, Masashi; Kawauchi, Ayumi; Nakahara, Tomomi; Zhang, Xiaochi; Yamada, Akinori; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Nogi, Yuichi; Kitamura, Keiko; Yuki, Masahiro; Iida, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus strains JCM 19045, JCM 19046, and JCM 19047 are alkaliphiles that produce β-cyclodextrin from starch. They are related to Bacillus xiaoxiensis and Bacillus lehensis. The genome information for these three strains will be useful for studies of the physiological role of cyclodextrin and cyclodextrin production.

  7. 77 FR 6471 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae Protein in Cotton; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... Register. September 10, 2008. (73 FR 52591) (FRL-8380-1). Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae in Cotton... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 174 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae Protein in Cotton; Exemption from the Requirement of... residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton under the FFDCA. DATES: This regulation...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1181 - Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1181 Bacillus cereus strain BPO1; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the Bacillus...

  9. Complete Genome Sequence and Methylome Analysis of Bacillus globigii ATCC 49760

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis (Ehrenburg) Cohn ATCC 49760, deposited as Bacillus globigii, is the source strain for the restriction enzymes BglI and BglII. Its complete sequence and full methylome were determined using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. PMID:27231364

  10. Characterization of Emetic Bacillus weihenstephanensis, a New Cereulide-Producing Bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Line; Munk Hansen, Bjarne; Nielsen, Kristian Fog;

    2006-01-01

    Cereulide production has until now been restricted to the species Bacillus cereus. Here we report on two psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis strains, MC67 and MC118, that produce cereulide. The strains are atypical with regard to pheno- and genotypic characteristics normally used for iden...

  11. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-González, Ismael L.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus genus have been extensively studied because of their ability to produce enzymes with high biotechnological value. Here, we report the draft of the whole-genome sequence of the type strain Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719, an alkali-tolerant strain. PMID:27417833

  12. Role of enzymes of homologous recombination in illegitimate plasmid recombination in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meima, R; Haijema, BJ; Haan, GJ; Venema, G; Bron, S

    1997-01-01

    The structural stability of plasmid pGP1, which encodes a fusion between the penicillinase gene (penP) of Bacillus licheniformis and the Escherichia coli lacZ gene, was investigated in Bacillus subtilis strains expressing mutated subunits of the ATP-dependent nuclease, AddAB, and strains lacking the

  13. The expression of a plasmid-specified exported protein causes structural plasmid instability in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, C.; Meima, R; Twiest, B; Kazemier, B; Venema, G; vanDijl, JM; Bron, S

    1996-01-01

    The rolling-circle plasmid pGP1 was used to study the effects of the expression of a plasmid-specified exported protein on structural plasmid stability in Bacillus subtilis. pGP1 contains a fusion between the Bacillus licheniformis penP gene, encoding a C-terminally truncated penicillinase, and the

  14. Transformation of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleria protoplasts by plasmid pBC16.

    OpenAIRE

    Alikhanian, S. I.; Ryabchenko, N F; Bukanov, N O; Sakanyan, V A

    1981-01-01

    Protoplasts of the entomopathogenic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleria were transformed by plasmid pBC16. The frequency of transformation was much lower than that of Bacillus subtilis. All isolated B. thuringiensis transformants were characterized by increased sensitivity to lysozyme as compared with the original strain.

  15. Macrophage-Enhanced Germination of Bacillus anthracis Endospores Requires gerS

    OpenAIRE

    Ireland, John A. W.; Hanna, Philip C.

    2002-01-01

    Germination of Bacillus anthracis Sterne and plasmidless Δ-Sterne endospores was dramatically enhanced in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells, while germination of nonpathogenic Bacillus endospores was not. Elimination of gerS, a germinant receptor locus, caused a complete loss of cell-enhanced germination, implicating gerS in the breaking of endospore dormancy in vivo.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki Strain HD73

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guiming; Song, Lai; Shu, Changlong; Wang, Pinshu; Deng, Chao; Peng, Qi; Lereclus, Didier; Wang, Xumin; Huang, Dafang; Zhang, Jie; Song, Fuping

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram-positive bacterium that produces intracellular protein crystals toxic to a wide variety of insect larvae. We report the complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain HD73 from the Centre OILB (Institut Pasteur, France), which belongs to serotype 3ab and is toxic to lepidopteran larvae.

  17. Bacillus caldolyticus prs gene encoding phosphoribosyldiphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, Britta N.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    The prs gene, encoding phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase, as well as the flanking DNA sequences were cloned and sequenced from the Gram-positive thermophile, Bacillus caldolyticus. Comparison with the homologous sequences from the mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, revealed a gene (gca...

  18. In Vitro Assessment of Marine Bacillus for Use as Livestock Probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luz Prieto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Six antimicrobial-producing seaweed-derived Bacillus strains were evaluated in vitro as animal probiotics, in comparison to two Bacillus from an EU-authorized animal probiotic product. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated on solid media against porcine Salmonella and E. coli. The marine isolates were most active against the latter, had better activity than the commercial probiotics and Bacillus pumilus WIT 588 also reduced E. coli counts in broth. All of the marine Bacillus tolerated physiological concentrations of bile, with some as tolerant as one of the probiotics. Spore counts for all isolates remained almost constant during incubation in simulated gastric and ileum juices. All of the marine Bacillus grew anaerobically and the spores of all except one isolate germinated under anaerobic conditions. All were sensitive to a panel of antibiotics and none harbored Bacillus enterotoxin genes but all, except B. pumilus WIT 588, showed some degree of β-hemolysis. However, trypan blue dye exclusion and xCELLigence assays demonstrated a lack of toxicity in comparison to two pathogens; in fact, the commercial probiotics appeared more cytotoxic than the majority of the marine Bacillus. Overall, some of the marine-derived Bacillus, in particular B. pumilus WIT 588, demonstrate potential for use as livestock probiotics.

  19. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus sp. Strain 916

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Luo, Chuping; Chen, Zhiyi

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain 916, isolated from the soil, showed strong activity against Rhizoctonia solani. Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. strain 916. Its 3.9-Mb genome reveals a number of genes whose products are possibly involved in promotion of plant growth or antibiosis.

  20. Lead biotransformation potential of allochthonous Bacillus sp. SKK11 with sesame oil cake in mine soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was aimed at assessing the potential of allochthonous Bacillus sp. SKK11 and sesame oil cake extract for transformation of Pb in mine soil. The bacteria were isolated from a brackish environment and identified as Bacillus sp. based on partial 16S rDNA sequences. The isolate SKK11 exhibite...