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Sample records for bac array cgh

  1. A new look towards BAC-based array CGH through a comprehensive comparison with oligo-based array CGH

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    Schalken Jack A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, two main technologies are used for screening of DNA copy number; the BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome and the recently developed oligonucleotide-based CGH (Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization arrays which are capable of detecting small genomic regions with amplification or deletion. The correlation as well as the discriminative power of these platforms has never been compared statistically on a significant set of human patient samples. Results In this paper, we present an exhaustive comparison between the two CGH platforms, undertaken at two independent sites using the same batch of DNA from 19 advanced prostate cancers. The comparison was performed directly on the raw data and a significant correlation was found between the two platforms. The correlation was greatly improved when the data were averaged over large chromosomic regions using a segmentation algorithm. In addition, this analysis has enabled the development of a statistical model to discriminate BAC outliers that might indicate microevents. These microevents were validated by the oligo platform results. Conclusion This article presents a genome-wide statistical validation of the oligo array platform on a large set of patient samples and demonstrates statistically its superiority over the BAC platform for the Identification of chromosomic events. Taking advantage of a large set of human samples treated by the two technologies, a statistical model has been developed to show that the BAC platform could also detect microevents.

  2. Comparative analysis of copy number detection by whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide array CGH

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    Bejjani Bassem A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH is a powerful diagnostic tool for the detection of DNA copy number gains and losses associated with chromosome abnormalities, many of which are below the resolution of conventional chromosome analysis. It has been presumed that whole-genome oligonucleotide (oligo arrays identify more clinically significant copy-number abnormalities than whole-genome bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays, yet this has not been systematically studied in a clinical diagnostic setting. Results To determine the difference in detection rate between similarly designed BAC and oligo arrays, we developed whole-genome BAC and oligonucleotide microarrays and validated them in a side-by-side comparison of 466 consecutive clinical specimens submitted to our laboratory for aCGH. Of the 466 cases studied, 67 (14.3% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome BAC array, and 73 (15.6% had a copy-number imbalance of potential clinical significance detectable by the whole-genome oligo array. However, because both platforms identified copy number variants of unclear clinical significance, we designed a systematic method for the interpretation of copy number alterations and tested an additional 3,443 cases by BAC array and 3,096 cases by oligo array. Of those cases tested on the BAC array, 17.6% were found to have a copy-number abnormality of potential clinical significance, whereas the detection rate increased to 22.5% for the cases tested by oligo array. In addition, we validated the oligo array for detection of mosaicism and found that it could routinely detect mosaicism at levels of 30% and greater. Conclusions Although BAC arrays have faster turnaround times, the increased detection rate of oligo arrays makes them attractive for clinical cytogenetic testing.

  3. A new normalizing algorithm for BAC CGH arrays with quality control metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C; Gaile, Daniel P; Liu, Song; Shepherd, Lori; Nowak, Norma

    2011-01-01

    The main focus in pin-tip (or print-tip) microarray analysis is determining which probes, genes, or oligonucleotides are differentially expressed. Specifically in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) experiments, researchers search for chromosomal imbalances in the genome. To model this data, scientists apply statistical methods to the structure of the experiment and assume that the data consist of the signal plus random noise. In this paper we propose "SmoothArray", a new method to preprocess comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays and we show the effects on a cancer dataset. As part of our R software package "aCGHplus," this freely available algorithm removes the variation due to the intensity effects, pin/print-tip, the spatial location on the microarray chip, and the relative location from the well plate. removal of this variation improves the downstream analysis and subsequent inferences made on the data. Further, we present measures to evaluate the quality of the dataset according to the arrayer pins, 384-well plates, plate rows, and plate columns. We compare our method against competing methods using several metrics to measure the biological signal. With this novel normalization algorithm and quality control measures, the user can improve their inferences on datasets and pinpoint problems that may arise in their BAC aCGH technology.

  4. A New Normalizing Algorithm for BAC CGH Arrays with Quality Control Metrics

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    Jeffrey C. Miecznikowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main focus in pin-tip (or print-tip microarray analysis is determining which probes, genes, or oligonucleotides are differentially expressed. Specifically in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH experiments, researchers search for chromosomal imbalances in the genome. To model this data, scientists apply statistical methods to the structure of the experiment and assume that the data consist of the signal plus random noise. In this paper we propose “SmoothArray”, a new method to preprocess comparative genomic hybridization (CGH bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays and we show the effects on a cancer dataset. As part of our R software package “aCGHplus,” this freely available algorithm removes the variation due to the intensity effects, pin/print-tip, the spatial location on the microarray chip, and the relative location from the well plate. removal of this variation improves the downstream analysis and subsequent inferences made on the data. Further, we present measures to evaluate the quality of the dataset according to the arrayer pins, 384-well plates, plate rows, and plate columns. We compare our method against competing methods using several metrics to measure the biological signal. With this novel normalization algorithm and quality control measures, the user can improve their inferences on datasets and pinpoint problems that may arise in their BAC aCGH technology.

  5. De novo complex intra chromosomal rearrangement after ICSI: characterisation by BACs micro array-CGH

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    Quimsiyeh Mazin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In routine Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART men with severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia should be informed about the risk of de novo congenital or chromosomal abnormalities in ICSI program. Also the benefits of preimplantation or prenatal genetic diagnosis practice need to be explained to the couple. Methods From a routine ICSI attempt, using ejaculated sperm from male with severe oligozoospermia and having normal karyotype, a 30 years old pregnant woman was referred to prenatal diagnosis in the 17th week for bichorionic biamniotic twin gestation. Amniocentesis was performed because of the detection of an increased foetal nuchal translucency for one of the fetus by the sonographic examination during the 12th week of gestation (WG. Chromosome and DNA studies of the fetus were realized on cultured amniocytes Results Conventional, molecular cytogenetic and microarray CGH experiments allowed us to conclude that the fetus had a de novo pericentromeric inversion associated with a duplication of the 9p22.1-p24 chromosomal region, 46,XY,invdup(9(p22.1p24 [arrCGH 9p22.1p24 (RP11-130C19 → RP11-87O1x3]. As containing the critical 9p22 region, our case is in coincidence with the general phenotype features of the partial trisomy 9p syndrome with major growth retardation, microcephaly and microretrognathia. Conclusion This de novo complex chromosome rearrangement illustrates the possible risk of chromosome or gene defects in ICSI program and the contribution of array-CGH for mapping rapidly de novo chromosomal imbalance.

  6. Detecting single DNA copy number variations in complex genomes using one nanogram of starting DNA and BAC-array CGH.

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    Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Valent, Alexander; Soularue, Pascal; Perot, Christine; Inda, Maria Mar; Receveur, Aline; Smaïli, Sadek; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Bénard, Jean; Bernheim, Alain; Gidrol, Xavier; Danglot, Gisèle

    2004-07-29

    Comparative genomic hybridization to bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-arrays (array-CGH) is a highly efficient technique, allowing the simultaneous measurement of genomic DNA copy number at hundreds or thousands of loci, and the reliable detection of local one-copy-level variations. We report a genome-wide amplification method allowing the same measurement sensitivity, using 1 ng of starting genomic DNA, instead of the classical 1 microg usually necessary. Using a discrete series of DNA fragments, we defined the parameters adapted to the most faithful ligation-mediated PCR amplification and the limits of the technique. The optimized protocol allows a 3000-fold DNA amplification, retaining the quantitative characteristics of the initial genome. Validation of the amplification procedure, using DNA from 10 tumour cell lines hybridized to BAC-arrays of 1500 spots, showed almost perfectly superimposed ratios for the non-amplified and amplified DNAs. Correlation coefficients of 0.96 and 0.99 were observed for regions of low-copy-level variations and all regions, respectively (including in vivo amplified oncogenes). Finally, labelling DNA using two nucleotides bearing the same fluorophore led to a significant increase in reproducibility and to the correct detection of one-copy gain or loss in >90% of the analysed data, even for pseudotriploid tumour genomes.

  7. BAC array CGH in patients with Velocardiofacial syndrome-like features reveals genomic aberrations on chromosome region 1q21.1

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    Estivill Xavier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microdeletion of the chromosome 22q11.2 region is the most common genetic aberration among patients with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS but a subset of subjects do not show alterations of this chromosome region. Methods We analyzed 18 patients with VCFS-like features by comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH array and performed a face-to-face slide hybridization with two different arrays: a whole genome and a chromosome 22-specific BAC array. Putative rearrangements were confirmed by FISH and MLPA assays. Results One patient carried a combination of rearrangements on 1q21.1, consisting in a microduplication of 212 kb and a close microdeletion of 1.15 Mb, previously reported in patients with variable phenotypes, including mental retardation, congenital heart defects (CHD and schizophrenia. While 326 control samples were negative for both 1q21.1 rearrangements, one of 73 patients carried the same 212-kb microduplication, reciprocal to TAR microdeletion syndrome. Also, we detected four copy number variants (CNVs inherited from one parent (a 744-kb duplication on 10q11.22; a 160 kb duplication and deletion on 22q11.21 in two cases; and a gain of 140 kb on 22q13.2, not present in control subjects, raising the potential role of these CNVs in the VCFS-like phenotype. Conclusions Our results confirmed aCGH as a successful strategy in order to characterize additional submicroscopic aberrations in patients with VCF-like features that fail to show alterations in 22q11.2 region. We report a 212-kb microduplication on 1q21.1, detected in two patients, which may contribute to CHD.

  8. Spatial normalization of array-CGH data

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    Brennetot Caroline

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH is a recently developed technique for analyzing changes in DNA copy number. As in all microarray analyses, normalization is required to correct for experimental artifacts while preserving the true biological signal. We investigated various sources of systematic variation in array-CGH data and identified two distinct types of spatial effect of no biological relevance as the predominant experimental artifacts: continuous spatial gradients and local spatial bias. Local spatial bias affects a large proportion of arrays, and has not previously been considered in array-CGH experiments. Results We show that existing normalization techniques do not correct these spatial effects properly. We therefore developed an automatic method for the spatial normalization of array-CGH data. This method makes it possible to delineate and to eliminate and/or correct areas affected by spatial bias. It is based on the combination of a spatial segmentation algorithm called NEM (Neighborhood Expectation Maximization and spatial trend estimation. We defined quality criteria for array-CGH data, demonstrating significant improvements in data quality with our method for three data sets coming from two different platforms (198, 175 and 26 BAC-arrays. Conclusion We have designed an automatic algorithm for the spatial normalization of BAC CGH-array data, preventing the misinterpretation of experimental artifacts as biologically relevant outliers in the genomic profile. This algorithm is implemented in the R package MANOR (Micro-Array NORmalization, which is described at http://bioinfo.curie.fr/projects/manor and available from the Bioconductor site http://www.bioconductor.org. It can also be tested on the CAPweb bioinformatics platform at http://bioinfo.curie.fr/CAPweb.

  9. Weighted clustering of called array CGH data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wieringen, W.N.; van de Wiel, M.A.; Ylstra, B.

    2008-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a laboratory technique to measure chromosomal copy number changes. A clear biological interpretation of the measurements is obtained by mapping these onto an ordinal scale with categories loss/normal/gain of a copy. The pattern of gains and losses

  10. Weighted clustering of called array CGH data.

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    Van Wieringen, Wessel N; Van De Wiel, Mark A; Ylstra, Bauke

    2008-07-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a laboratory technique to measure chromosomal copy number changes. A clear biological interpretation of the measurements is obtained by mapping these onto an ordinal scale with categories loss/normal/gain of a copy. The pattern of gains and losses harbors a level of tumor specificity. Here, we present WECCA (weighted clustering of called aCGH data), a method for weighted clustering of samples on the basis of the ordinal aCGH data. Two similarities to be used in the clustering and particularly suited for ordinal data are proposed, which are generalized to deal with weighted observations. In addition, a new form of linkage, especially suited for ordinal data, is introduced. In a simulation study, we show that the proposed cluster method is competitive to clustering using the continuous data. We illustrate WECCA using an application to a breast cancer data set, where WECCA finds a clustering that relates better with survival than the original one.

  11. CGHPRO – A comprehensive data analysis tool for array CGH

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    Lenzner Steffen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array CGH (Comparative Genomic Hybridisation is a molecular cytogenetic technique for the genome wide detection of chromosomal imbalances. It is based on the co-hybridisation of differentially labelled test and reference DNA onto arrays of genomic BAC clones, cDNAs or oligonucleotides, and after correction for various intervening variables, loss or gain in the test DNA can be indicated from spots showing aberrant signal intensity ratios. Now that this technique is no longer confined to highly specialized laboratories and is entering the realm of clinical application, there is a need for a user-friendly software package that facilitates estimates of DNA dosage from raw signal intensities obtained by array CGH experiments, and which does not depend on a sophisticated computational environment. Results We have developed a user-friendly and versatile tool for the normalization, visualization, breakpoint detection and comparative analysis of array-CGH data. CGHPRO is a stand-alone JAVA application that guides the user through the whole process of data analysis. The import option for image analysis data covers several data formats, but users can also customize their own data formats. Several graphical representation tools assist in the selection of the appropriate normalization method. Intensity ratios of each clone can be plotted in a size-dependent manner along the chromosome ideograms. The interactive graphical interface offers the chance to explore the characteristics of each clone, such as the involvement of the clones sequence in segmental duplications. Circular Binary Segmentation and unsupervised Hidden Markov Model algorithms facilitate objective detection of chromosomal breakpoints. The storage of all essential data in a back-end database allows the simultaneously comparative analysis of different cases. The various display options facilitate also the definition of shortest regions of overlap and simplify the

  12. CGHcall: calling aberrations for array CGH tumor profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wiel, M.A.; Kim, K.I.; Vosse, S.; van Wieringen, W.N.; Wilting, S.M.; Ylstra, B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: CGHcall achieves high calling accuracy for array CGH data by effective use of breakpoint information from segmentation and by inclusion of several biological concepts that are ignored by existing algorithms. The algorithm is validated for simulated and verified real array CGH data. By

  13. Automated array-CGH optimized for archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor material

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    Nederlof Petra M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH is a rapidly evolving technology that still lacks complete standardization. Yet, it is of great importance to obtain robust and reproducible data to enable meaningful multiple hybridization comparisons. Special difficulties arise when aCGH is performed on archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue due to its variable DNA quality. Recently, we have developed an effective DNA quality test that predicts suitability of archival samples for BAC aCGH. Methods In this report, we first used DNA from a cancer cell-line (SKBR3 to optimize the aCGH protocol for automated hybridization, and subsequently optimized and validated the procedure for FFPE breast cancer samples. We aimed for highest throughput, accuracy, and reproducibility applicable to FFPE samples, which can also be important in future diagnostic use. Results Our protocol of automated array-CGH on archival FFPE ULS-labeled DNA showed very similar results compared with published data and our previous manual hybridization method. Conclusion This report combines automated aCGH on unamplified archival FFPE DNA using non-enzymatic ULS labeling, and describes an optimized protocol for this combination resulting in improved quality and reproducibility.

  14. Array-CGH detection of three cryptic submicroscopic imbalances in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    patient with a language disorder and mild mental retardation by array-CGH. Am. J. Med. Genet. Part A 129A, 254–260. Zwaigenbaum L., Sonnenberg L. K., Heshka T., Eastwood S. and. Xu J. 2005 A girl with pervasive developmental disorder and complex chromosome rearrangement involving 8p and 10p. J. Autism. Dev.

  15. Rapid prenatal diagnosis of cytogenetic abnormalities by array CGH analysis

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    Array CGH analysis has been shown to be highly accurate for rapid detection of chromosomal aneuploidies and submicroscopic deletions or duplications on fetal DNA samples in a clinical prenatal diagnostic setting. The objective of this study is to present our "post-validation phase" experience with ...

  16. Array CGH analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia reveals frequent cryptic monoallelic and biallelic deletions of chromosome 22q11 that include the PRAME gene

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    Gunn, Shelly R.; Bolla, Aswani R.; Barron, Lynn L.; Gorre, Mercedes E.; Mohammed, Mansoor S.; Bahler, David W.; Mellink, Clemens H. M.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Keating, Michael J.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Coombes, Kevin R.; Abruzzo, Lynne V.; Robetorye, Ryan S.

    2009-01-01

    We used BAC array-based CGH to detect genomic imbalances in 187 CLL cases. Submicroscopic deletions of chromosome 22q11 were observed in 28 cases (15%), and the frequency of these deletions was second only to loss of the 13q14 region, the most common genomic aberration in CLL. Oligonucleotide-based

  17. Whole genome amplification and its impact on CGH array profiles

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    Meldrum Cliff

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH platforms require a minimum of micrograms of DNA for the generation of reliable and reproducible data. For studies where there are limited amounts of genetic material, whole genome amplification (WGA is an attractive method for generating sufficient quantities of genomic material from miniscule amounts of starting material. A range of WGA methods are available and the multiple displacement amplification (MDA approach has been shown to be highly accurate, although amplification bias has been reported. In the current study, WGA was used to amplify DNA extracted from whole blood. In total, six array CGH experiments were performed to investigate whether the use of whole genome amplified DNA (wgaDNA produces reliable and reproducible results. Four experiments were conducted on amplified DNA compared to unamplified DNA and two experiments on unamplified DNA compared to unamplified DNA. Findings All the experiments involving wgaDNA resulted in a high proportion of losses and gains of genomic material. Previously, amplification bias has been overcome by using amplified DNA in both the test and reference DNA. Our data suggests that this approach may not be effective, as the gains and losses introduced by WGA appears to be random and are not reproducible between different experiments using the same DNA. Conclusion In light of these findings, the use of both amplified test and reference DNA on CGH arrays may not provide an accurate representation of copy number variation in the DNA.

  18. Smoothing waves in array CGH tumor profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wiel, Mark A.; Brosens, Rebecca; Eilers, Paul H. C.; Kumps, Candy; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Menten, Bjorn; Sistermans, Erik; Speleman, Frank; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Ylstra, Bauke

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Many high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization tumor profiles contain a wave bias, which makes accurate detection of breakpoints in such profiles more difficult. Results: An efficient and highly effective algorithm that largely removes the wave bias from tumor profiles by

  19. The development of a mini-array for estimating the disease state of gastric adenocarcinoma by array CGH

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    Oga Atsunori

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment strategy usually depends on the disease state in the individual patient. However, it is difficult to estimate the disease state before treatment in many patients. The purpose of this study was to develop a BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome mini-array allowing for the estimation of node metastasis, liver metastasis, peritoneal dissemination and the depth of tumor invasion in gastric cancers. Methods Initially, the DNA copy number aberrations (DCNAs were analyzed by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH in 83 gastric adenocarcinomas as a training-sample set. Next, two independent analytical methods were applied to the aCGH data to identify the BAC clones with DNA copy number aberrations that were linked with the disease states. One of the methods, a decision-tree model classifier, identified 6, 4, 4, 4, and 7 clones for estimating lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, depth of tumor invasion, and histological type, respectively. In the other method, a clone-by-clone comparison of the frequency of the DNA copy number aberrations selected 26 clones to estimate the disease states. Results By spotting these 50 clones together with 26 frequently or rarely involved clones and 62 reference clones, a mini-array was made to estimate the above parameters, and the diagnostic performance of the mini-array was evaluated for an independent set of 30 gastric cancers (blinded – sample set. In comparison to the clinicopathological features, the overall accuracy was 66.7% for node metastasis, 86.7% for liver metastasis, 86.7% for peritoneal dissemination, and 96.7% for depth of tumor invasion. The intratumoral heterogeneity barely affected the diagnostic performance of the mini-array. Conclusion These results suggest that the mini-array makes it possible to determine an optimal treatment for each of the patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.

  20. Estimation of tumor heterogeneity using CGH array data

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    Li Shengting

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is a commonly-used approach to detect DNA copy number variation in whole genome-wide screens. Several statistical methods have been proposed to define genomic segments with different copy numbers in cancer tumors. However, most tumors are heterogeneous and show variation in DNA copy numbers across tumor cells. The challenge is to reveal the copy number profiles of the subpopulations in a tumor and to estimate the percentage of each subpopulation. Results We describe a relation between experimental data and exact DNA copy number and develop a statistical method to reveal the heterogeneity of tumors containing a mixture of different-stage cells. Furthermore, we validate the method on simulated data and apply the method to 29 pairs of breast primary tumors and their matched lymph node metastases. Conclusion We demonstrate a new method for CGH array analysis that allows a tumor sample to be classified according to its heterogeneity. The method gives an interpretable series of copy number profiles, one for each major subpopulation in a tumor. The profiles facilitate identification of copy number alterations in cancer development.

  1. Design Considerations for Array CGH to OligonucleotideArrays

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    Baldocchi, R.A.; Glynne, R.J.; Chin, K.; Kowbel, D.; Collins, C.; Mack, D.H.; Gray, J.W.

    2005-03-04

    Background: Representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis has been developed for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or for genome copy number changes. In this process, the intensity of hybridization to oligonucleotides arrays is increased by hybridizing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified representation of reduced genomic complexity. However, hybridization to some oligonucleotides is not sufficiently high to allow precise analysis of that portion of the genome. Methods: In an effort to identify aspects of oligonucleotide hybridization affecting signal intensity, we explored the importance of the PCR product strand to which each oligonucleotide is homologous and the sequence of the array oligonucleotides. We accomplished this by hybridizing multiple PCR-amplified products to oligonucleotide arrays carrying two sense and two antisense 50-mer oligonucleotides for each PCR amplicon. Results: In some cases, hybridization intensity depended more strongly on the PCR amplicon strand (i.e., sense vs. antisense) than on the detection oligonucleotide sequence. In other cases, the oligonucleotide sequence seemed to dominate. Conclusion: Oligonucleotide arrays for analysis of DNA copy number or for single nucleotide polymorphism content should be designed to carry probes to sense and antisense strands of each PCR amplicon to ensure sufficient hybridization and signal intensity.

  2. Detection of Genetic Alterations in Breast Sentinel Lymph Node by Array-CGH

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavalli, Luciane R

    2006-01-01

    .... The purpose of our study is to identify specific genetic alterations using array-CGH in the metastatic sentinel lymph node lesions, in comparison to the one observed in the corresponding primary...

  3. Whole-genome array CGH evaluation for replacing prenatal karyotyping in Hong Kong.

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    Anita S Y Kan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH in prenatal diagnosis in Hong Kong. METHODS: Array CGH was performed on 220 samples recruited prospectively as the first-tier test study. In addition 150 prenatal samples with abnormal fetal ultrasound findings found to have normal karyotypes were analyzed as a 'further-test' study using NimbleGen CGX-135K oligonucleotide arrays. RESULTS: Array CGH findings were concordant with conventional cytogenetic results with the exception of one case of triploidy. It was found in the first-tier test study that aCGH detected 20% (44/220 clinically significant copy number variants (CNV, of which 21 were common aneuploidies and 23 had other chromosomal imbalances. There were 3.2% (7/220 samples with CNVs detected by aCGH but not by conventional cytogenetics. In the 'further-test' study, the additional diagnostic yield of detecting chromosome imbalance was 6% (9/150. The overall detection for CNVs of unclear clinical significance was 2.7% (10/370 with 0.9% found to be de novo. Eleven loci of common CNVs were found in the local population. CONCLUSION: Whole-genome aCGH offered a higher resolution diagnostic capacity than conventional karyotyping for prenatal diagnosis either as a first-tier test or as a 'further-test' for pregnancies with fetal ultrasound anomalies. We propose replacing conventional cytogenetics with aCGH for all pregnancies undergoing invasive diagnostic procedures after excluding common aneuploidies and triploidies by quantitative fluorescent PCR. Conventional cytogenetics can be reserved for visualization of clinically significant CNVs.

  4. High-resolution SNP array analysis of patients with developmental disorder and normal array CGH results

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    Siggberg Linda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnostic analysis of patients with developmental disorders has improved over recent years largely due to the use of microarray technology. Array methods that facilitate copy number analysis have enabled the diagnosis of up to 20% more patients with previously normal karyotyping results. A substantial number of patients remain undiagnosed, however. Methods and Results Using the Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0, we analyzed 35 patients with a developmental disorder of unknown cause and normal array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH results, in order to characterize previously undefined genomic aberrations. We detected no seemingly pathogenic copy number aberrations. Most of the vast amount of data produced by the array was polymorphic and non-informative. Filtering of this data, based on copy number variant (CNV population frequencies as well as phenotypically relevant genes, enabled pinpointing regions of allelic homozygosity that included candidate genes correlating to the phenotypic features in four patients, but results could not be confirmed. Conclusions In this study, the use of an ultra high-resolution SNP array did not contribute to further diagnose patients with developmental disorders of unknown cause. The statistical power of these results is limited by the small size of the patient cohort, and interpretation of these negative results can only be applied to the patients studied here. We present the results of our study and the recurrence of clustered allelic homozygosity present in this material, as detected by the SNP 6.0 array.

  5. Phenotype in patients with intellectual disability and pathological results in array CGH.

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    Caballero Pérez, V; López Pisón, F J; Miramar Gallart, M D; González Álvarez, A; García Jiménez, M C; García Iñiguez, J P; Orden Rueda, C; Gil Hernández, I; Fuertes Rodrigo, C; Fernando Martínez, R; Rodríguez Valle, A; Alcaine Villarroya, M J

    Global developmental delay (GDD) and intellectual disability (ID) are frequent reasons for consultation in paediatric neurology departments. Nowadays, array comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH) is one of the most widely used techniques for diagnosing these disorders. Our purpose was to determine the phenotypic features associated with pathological results in this genetic test. We conducted a blind study of the epidemiological, clinical, anthropometric, and morphological features of 80 patients with unexplained ID to determine which features were associated with pathological results in array-CGH. Pathological results were found in 27.5% of the patients. Factors associated with pathological results in array-CGH were a family history of GDD/ID (OR = 12.1), congenital malformations (OR = 5.33), having more than 3 facial dysmorphic features (OR = 20.9), and hypotonia (OR = 3.25). Our findings are consistent with those reported by other published series. We therefore conclude that the probability of having pathological results in array-CGH increases with the presence of any of the features mentioned above in patients with ID/GDD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of Array-CGH Data Using the R and Bioconductor Software Suite

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    Winfried A. Hofmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH is an emerging high-resolution and high-throughput molecular genetic technique that allows genome-wide screening for chromosome alterations. DNA copy number alterations (CNAs are a hallmark of somatic mutations in tumor genomes and congenital abnormalities that lead to diseases such as mental retardation. However, accurate identification of amplified or deleted regions requires a sequence of different computational analysis steps of the microarray data. Results. We have developed a user-friendly and versatile tool for the normalization, visualization, breakpoint detection, and comparative analysis of array-CGH data which allows the accurate and sensitive detection of CNAs. Conclusion. The implemented option for the determination of minimal altered regions (MARs from a series of tumor samples is a step forward in the identification of new tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes.

  7. Reliable single cell array CGH for clinical samples.

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    Zbigniew T Czyż

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated cancer cells (DCCs and circulating tumor cells (CTCs are extremely rare, but comprise the precursors cells of distant metastases or therapy resistant cells. The detailed molecular analysis of these cells may help to identify key events of cancer cell dissemination, metastatic colony formation and systemic therapy escape. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Ampli1™ whole genome amplification (WGA technology and high-resolution oligonucleotide aCGH microarrays we optimized conditions for the analysis of structural copy number changes. The protocol presented here enables reliable detection of numerical genomic alterations as small as 0.1 Mb in a single cell. Analysis of single cells from well-characterized cell lines and single normal cells confirmed the stringent quantitative nature of the amplification and hybridization protocol. Importantly, fixation and staining procedures used to detect DCCs showed no significant impact on the outcome of the analysis, proving the clinical usability of our method. In a proof-of-principle study we tracked the chromosomal changes of single DCCs over a full course of high-dose chemotherapy treatment by isolating and analyzing DCCs of an individual breast cancer patient at four different time points. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The protocol enables detailed genome analysis of DCCs and thereby assessment of the clonal evolution during the natural course of the disease and under selection pressures. The results from an exemplary patient provide evidence that DCCs surviving selective therapeutic conditions may be recruited from a pool of genomically less advanced cells, which display a stable subset of specific genomic alterations.

  8. Isoderivative of deleted chromosome 20 in primary myelofibrosis (PMF) characterized by molecular cytogenetics and array CGH

    OpenAIRE

    Douet-Guilbert, N.; Andrieux, J.; Laï, J. L.; Morice, P.; Demory, J. L.; Basinko, A.; Ugo, V.; Gueganic, N.; Bris, M. J.; Morel, F.; Braekeleer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Isoderivative of deleted chromosome 20 in primary myelofibrosis (PMF) characterized by molecular cytogenetics and array CGH phone: +33-298-016476 (Braekeleer, M.) (Braekeleer, M.) Laboratoire d?Histologie, d?Embryologie et de Cytogenetique, Faculte de Medecine et des Sciences de la Sante, Universite de Brest - 29238 - Brest - FRANCE (Douet-Guilbert, N.) Laboratoire de Cytogenetique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Brest - 29609 - Brest - FRAN...

  9. Array-CGH detection of three cryptic submicroscopic imbalances in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, we describe a phenotypically normal prenatal case who was found to carry an apparently balanced CCR on the basis of G-banding and FISH. The rearrangement, which in- volved three chromosomes and three breakpoints, was stud- ied by high-resolution genomic array, and three cryptic im- balances were detected.

  10. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities by CGH-array in patients with dysmorphic and intellectual disability with normal karyotype

    OpenAIRE

    Pratte-Santos, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Katyanne Heringer; Santos, Thainá Altoe; Cintra, Terezinha Sarquis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate chromosomal abnormalities by CGH-array in patients with dysmorphic features and intellectual disability with normal conventional karyotype. Methods Retrospective study, carried out from January 2012 to February 2014, analyzing the CGH-array results of 39 patients. Results Twenty-six (66.7%) patients had normal results and 13 (33.3%) showed abnormal results - in that, 6 (15.4%) had pathogenic variants, 6 (15.4%) variants designated as uncertain and 1 (2....

  11. Identification of genome-wide copy number variations among diverse pig breeds by array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that copy number variation (CNV in mammalian genomes contributes to phenotypic diversity, including health and disease status. In domestic pigs, CNV has been catalogued by several reports, but the extent of CNV and the phenotypic effects are far from clear. The goal of this study was to identify CNV regions (CNVRs in pigs based on array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH. Results Here a custom-made tiling oligo-nucleotide array was used with a median probe spacing of 2506 bp for screening 12 pigs including 3 Chinese native pigs (one Chinese Erhualian, one Tongcheng and one Yangxin pig, 5 European pigs (one Large White, one Pietrain, one White Duroc and two Landrace pigs, 2 synthetic pigs (Chinese new line DIV pigs and 2 crossbred pigs (Landrace × DIV pigs with a Duroc pig as the reference. Two hundred and fifty-nine CNVRs across chromosomes 1–18 and X were identified, with an average size of 65.07 kb and a median size of 98.74 kb, covering 16.85 Mb or 0.74% of the whole genome. Concerning copy number status, 93 (35.91% CNVRs were called as gains, 140 (54.05% were called as losses and the remaining 26 (10.04% were called as both gains and losses. Of all detected CNVRs, 171 (66.02% and 34 (13.13% CNVRs directly overlapped with Sus scrofa duplicated sequences and pig QTLs, respectively. The CNVRs encompassed 372 full length Ensembl transcripts. Two CNVRs identified by aCGH were validated using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. Conclusions Using 720 K array CGH (aCGH we described a map of porcine CNVs which facilitated the identification of structural variations for important phenotypes and the assessment of the genetic diversity of pigs.

  12. Cost Effectiveness of Using Array-CGH for Diagnosing Learning Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagoo, G S; Mohammed, S; Barton, G; Norbury, G; Ahn, J W; Ogilvie, C M; Kroese, M

    2015-08-01

    To undertake a cost-effectiveness analysis of using microarray comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH) as a first-line test versus as a second-line test for the diagnosis of causal chromosomal abnormalities in patients referred to a NHS clinical genetics service in the U.K. with idiopathic learning disability, developmental delay and/or congenital anomalies. A cost-effectiveness study was conducted. The perspective is that of a U.K. NHS clinical genetics service provider (with respect to both costs and outcomes). A cohort of patients (n = 1590) referred for array-CGH testing of undiagnosed learning disability and developmental delay by a single NHS regional clinical genetics service (South East Thames Regional Genetics Service), were split into a before-and-after design where 742 patients had array-CGH as a second-line test (before group-comparator intervention) and 848 patients had array-CGH as a first-line test (after group-evaluated intervention). The mean costs were calculated from the clinical genetics testing pathway constructed for each patient including the costs of genetic testing undertaken and clinical appointments scheduled. The outcome was the number of diagnoses each intervention produced so that a mean cost-per-diagnosis could be calculated. The cost effectiveness of the two interventions was calculated as an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio to produce an incremental cost-per-diagnosis (in 2013 GBP). Sensitivity analyses were conducted by altering both costs and effects to check the validity of the outcome. The incremental mean cost of testing patients using the first-line testing strategy was -GBP241.56 (95% CIs -GBP256.93 to -GBP226.19) and the incremental mean gain in the percentage diagnoses was 0.39% (95% CIs -2.73 to 3.51%), which equates to an additional 1 diagnosis per 256 patients tested. This cost-effectiveness study comparing these two strategies estimates that array-CGH first-line testing dominates second-line testing because it

  13. Targeted array comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) identifies genomic imbalances associated with isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Brady, Paul D; Devriendt, Koenraad; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Cruz-Martinez, Rogelio; Gratacos, Eduard; Deprest, Jan A; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2010-12-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a congenital birth defect affecting around 1/3000 births. We propose that a significant number of isolated CDH cases have an underlying genetic cause, and that a subset of these result from copy number variations (CNVs) identifiable by array CGH. We have designed a custom array targeted at genes and genomic loci associated with CDH. A total of 79 isolated CDH patients were screened using this targeted array. In three patients, we detected genomic imbalances associated with the observed diaphragmatic hernia; a deletion of 8p22-p23.3, 14.2 Mb in size, a 340 kb duplication of Xq13.1 including the ephrin-B1 gene (EFNB1), and mosaicism for trisomy 2. Using this approach, we detected genomic imbalances associated with CDH in 3/79 (4%) isolated CDH patients. Our findings further implicate 8p deletions as being associated with CDH. The duplication of EFNB1 further highlights this gene as a potential candidate involved in diaphragm development. Mosaicism for trisomy 2 is a rare event and unlikely to be a common cause of CDH. Further investigations of isolated CDH patients by array CGH will continue to identify novel submicroscopic loci and refine genomic regions associated with CDH. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Multiple Break-Points Detection in Array CGH Data via the Cross-Entropy Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshana, W J R M; Sofronov, Georgy

    2015-01-01

    Array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) is a widely used methodology to detect copy number variations of a genome in high resolution. Knowing the number of break-points and their corresponding locations in genomic sequences serves different biological needs. Primarily, it helps to identify disease-causing genes that have functional importance in characterizing genome wide diseases. For human autosomes the normal copy number is two, whereas at the sites of oncogenes it increases (gain of DNA) and at the tumour suppressor genes it decreases (loss of DNA). The majority of the current detection methods are deterministic in their set-up and use dynamic programming or different smoothing techniques to obtain the estimates of copy number variations. These approaches limit the search space of the problem due to different assumptions considered in the methods and do not represent the true nature of the uncertainty associated with the unknown break-points in genomic sequences. We propose the Cross-Entropy method, which is a model-based stochastic optimization technique as an exact search method, to estimate both the number and locations of the break-points in aCGH data. We model the continuous scale log-ratio data obtained by the aCGH technique as a multiple break-point problem. The proposed methodology is compared with well established publicly available methods using both artificially generated data and real data. Results show that the proposed procedure is an effective way of estimating number and especially the locations of break-points with high level of precision. Availability: The methods described in this article are implemented in the new R package breakpoint and it is available from the Comprehensive R Archive Network at http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=breakpoint.

  15. A robust method to analyze copy number alterations of less than 100 kb in single cells using oligonucleotide array CGH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birte Möhlendick

    Full Text Available Comprehensive genome wide analyses of single cells became increasingly important in cancer research, but remain to be a technically challenging task. Here, we provide a protocol for array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH of single cells. The protocol is based on an established adapter-linker PCR (WGAM and allowed us to detect copy number alterations as small as 56 kb in single cells. In addition we report on factors influencing the success of single cell aCGH downstream of the amplification method, including the characteristics of the reference DNA, the labeling technique, the amount of input DNA, reamplification, the aCGH resolution, and data analysis. In comparison with two other commercially available non-linear single cell amplification methods, WGAM showed a very good performance in aCGH experiments. Finally, we demonstrate that cancer cells that were processed and identified by the CellSearch® System and that were subsequently isolated from the CellSearch® cartridge as single cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS could be successfully analyzed using our WGAM-aCGH protocol. We believe that even in the era of next-generation sequencing, our single cell aCGH protocol will be a useful and (cost- effective approach to study copy number alterations in single cells at resolution comparable to those reported currently for single cell digital karyotyping based on next generation sequencing data.

  16. Genomic profiling of myeloma: the best approach, a comparison of cytogenetics, FISH and array-CGH of 112 myeloma cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, Katrina; Vidrequin, Sébastien; Dargent, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities are important prognostic factors in myeloma allowing risk stratification of patients. Different techniques are available for their detection including cytogenetics, Fluorescent In Situ Hybridisation (FISH) and array Competitive Genomic Hybridisation (CGH). This study aimed to assess the validity and usefulness of each technique in a diagnostic setting. 112 myeloma cases were analysed by whole bone marrow cytogenetics and by FISH and array CGH performed on purified plasma cell populations. Clonal abnormalities were identified in 30% of cases by cytogenetics and 97% by FISH and array CGH. By combining array and FISH results abnormalities were detected in 99% of cases and, if cytogenetic analysis was also considered, abnormalities were detected in 100% of cases. Cytogenetic analysis is of limited value in myeloma. Array CGH and FISH are highly specific tests allowing the identification of aberrations in virtually all cases. The two techniques are complementary and need to be combined in order to provide a comprehensive analysis of all clinically relevant aberrations in myeloma. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Array-CGH analysis of cell-free fetal DNA in 10 mL of amniotic fluid supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapaire, Olav; Lu, Xin-Yan; Johnson, Kirby L; Jarrah, Zina; Stroh, Helene; Cowan, Janet M; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Bianchi, Diana W

    2007-07-01

    Previously, we showed that analysis of amniotic fluid (AF) supernatant cell-free fetal (cff) DNA using DNA microarrays (array-CGH) allows for detection of whole chromosome differences between test and reference DNA. Subsequent technical advances have increased both the yield and quality of extracted cffDNA. Here we determined whether array-CGH using smaller volumes of both fresh and frozen AF cffDNA could identify fetal aneuploidy. CffDNA was extracted from 10 mL of residual AF supernatant. The test AF samples (n = 10) included one with a normal karyotype, and nine with the following fetal aneuploidies: trisomies 13 (n = 1), 18 (n = 3), 21 (n = 2), trisomy 9 mosaicism (47,XX,+ 9[18]/46,XX[2]), triploidy (69,XXY) and Turner syndrome (45,X). Array-CGH using AF cffDNA from aneuploid fetuses, compared to euploid reference AF cffDNA, detected whole chromosome aneuploidy in 8 of 9 cases tested, including the case of trisomy 9 mosaicism. The case of triploidy was not detected. CffDNA extracted from 10 mL AF supernatant can be analyzed using array-CGH to correctly identify human chromosome abnormalities. This technology allows for rapid screening of AF samples for whole chromosomal changes by using routinely discarded supernatant, and may augment standard prenatal karyotyping techniques by providing additional molecular information.

  18. CGH and SNP array using DNA extracted from fixed cytogenetic preparations and long-term refrigerated bone marrow specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKinnon Ruth N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of nucleic acids is limited by the availability of archival specimens and the quality and amount of the extracted material. Archived cytogenetic preparations are stored in many laboratories and are a potential source of total genomic DNA for array karyotyping and other applications. Array CGH using DNA from fixed cytogenetic preparations has been described, but it is not known whether it can be used for SNP arrays. Diagnostic bone marrow specimens taken during the assessment of hematological malignancies are also a potential source of DNA, but it is generally assumed that DNA must be extracted, or the specimen frozen, within a day or two of collection, to obtain DNA suitable for further analysis. We have assessed DNA extracted from these materials for both SNP array and array CGH. Results We show that both SNP array and array CGH can be performed on genomic DNA extracted from cytogenetic specimens stored in Carnoy's fixative, and from bone marrow which has been stored unfrozen, at 4°C, for at least 36 days. We describe a procedure for extracting a usable concentration of total genomic DNA from cytogenetic suspensions of low cellularity. Conclusions The ability to use these archival specimens for DNA-based analysis increases the potential for retrospective genetic analysis of clinical specimens. Fixed cytogenetic preparations and long-term refrigerated bone marrow both provide DNA suitable for array karyotyping, and may be suitable for a wider range of analytical procedures.

  19. CGHregions: Dimension Reduction for Array CGH Data with Minimal Information Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. van de Wiel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm to reduce multi-sample array CGH data from thousands of clones to tens or hundreds of clone regions is introduced. This reduction of the data is performed such that little information is lost, which is possible due to the high dependencies between neighboring clones. The algorithm is explained using a small example. The potential beneficial effects of the algorithm for downstream analysis are illustrated by re-analysis of previously published colorectal cancer data. Using multiple testing corrections suitable for these data, we provide statistical evidence for genomic differences on several clone regions between MSI+ and CIN+ tumors. The algorithm, named CGHregions, is available as an easy-to-use script in R.

  20. Implementation of High Resolution Whole Genome Array CGH in the Prenatal Clinical Setting: Advantages, Challenges, and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Evangelidou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization analysis is replacing postnatal chromosomal analysis in cases of intellectual disabilities, and it has been postulated that it might also become the first-tier test in prenatal diagnosis. In this study, array CGH was applied in 64 prenatal samples with whole genome oligonucleotide arrays (BlueGnome, Ltd. on DNA extracted from chorionic villi, amniotic fluid, foetal blood, and skin samples. Results were confirmed with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization or Real-Time PCR. Fifty-three cases had normal karyotype and abnormal ultrasound findings, and seven samples had balanced rearrangements, five of which also had ultrasound findings. The value of array CGH in the characterization of previously known aberrations in five samples is also presented. Seventeen out of 64 samples carried copy number alterations giving a detection rate of 26.5%. Ten of these represent benign or variables of unknown significance, giving a diagnostic capacity of the method to be 10.9%. If karyotype is performed the additional diagnostic capacity of the method is 5.1% (3/59. This study indicates the ability of array CGH to identify chromosomal abnormalities which cannot be detected during routine prenatal cytogenetic analysis, therefore increasing the overall detection rate. In addition a thorough review of the literature is presented.

  1. Array CGH Analysis and Developmental Delay: A Diagnostic Tool for Neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, F; Xu, J; Jung, J; Prasad, C

    2013-11-01

    Developmental delay occurs in 1-3% of the population, with unknown etiology in approximately 50% of cases. Initial genetic work up for developmental delay previously included chromosome analysis and subtelomeric FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization). Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) has emerged as a tool to detect genetic copy number changes and uniparental disomy and is the most sensitive test in providing etiological diagnosis in developmental delay. aCGH allows for the provision of prognosis and recurrence risks, improves access to resources, helps limit further investigations and may alter medical management in many cases. aCGH has led to the delineation of novel genetic syndromes associated with developmental delay. An illustrative case of a 31-year-old man with long standing global developmental delay and recently diagnosed 4q21 deletion syndrome with a deletion of 20.8 Mb genomic interval is provided. aCGH is now recommended as a first line test in children and adults with undiagnosed developmental delay and congenital anomalies. Puce d'hybridation génomique comparative et retard de développement : un outil diagnostic pour les neurologues. Le retard de développement survient chez 1 à 3% de la population et son étiologie est inconnue chez à peu près 50% des cas. L'évaluation génétique initiale pour un retard de développement incluait antérieurement une analyse chromosomique et une analyse par FISH (hybridation in situ en fluorescence) de régions subtélomériques. La puce d'hybridation génomique comparative (CGHa) est devenue un outil de détection des changements du nombre de copies géniques ainsi que de la disomie uniparentale et elle est le test le plus sensible pour fournir un diagnostic étiologique dans le retard de développement. Le CGHa permet d'offrir un pronostic et un risque de récurrence, améliore l'accès aux ressources, aide à limiter les évaluations et peut modifier le traitement médical dans bien des cas

  2. Identification of novel genomic aberrations in AML-M5 in a level of array CGH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    Full Text Available To assess the possible existence of unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities and delineate the characterization of copy number alterations (CNAs of acute myeloid leukemia-M5 (AML-M5, R-banding karyotype, oligonucelotide array CGH and FISH were performed in 24 patients with AML-M5. A total of 117 CNAs with size ranging from 0.004 to 146.263 Mb was recognized in 12 of 24 cases, involving all chromosomes other than chromosome 1, 4, X and Y. Cryptic CNAs with size less than 5 Mb accounted for 59.8% of all the CNAs. 12 recurrent chromosomal alterations were mapped. Seven out of them were described in the previous AML studies and five were new candidate AML-M5 associated CNAs, including gains of 3q26.2-qter and 13q31.3 as well as losses of 2q24.2, 8p12 and 14q32. Amplication of 3q26.2-qter was the sole large recurrent chromosomal anomaly and the pathogenic mechanism in AML-M5 was possibly different from the classical recurrent 3q21q26 abnormality in AML. As a tumor suppressor gene, FOXN3, was singled out from the small recurrent CNA of 14q32, however, it is proved that deletion of FOXN3 is a common marker of myeloid leukemia rather than a specific marker for AML-M5 subtype. Moreover, the concurrent amplication of MLL and deletion of CDKN2A were noted and it might be associated with AML-M5. The number of CNA did not show a significant association with clinico-biological parameters and CR number of the 22 patients received chemotherapy. This study provided the evidence that array CGH served as a complementary platform for routine cytogenetic analysis to identify those cryptic alterations in the patients with AML-M5. As a subtype of AML, AML-M5 carries both common recurrent CNAs and unique CNAs, which may harbor novel oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Clarifying the role of these genes will contribute to the understanding of leukemogenic network of AML-M5.

  3. DNA copy number changes in high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors by array CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjerkehagen Bodil

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs are rare and highly aggressive soft tissue tumors showing complex chromosomal aberrations. In order to identify recurrent chromosomal regions of gain and loss, and thereby novel gene targets of potential importance for MPNST development and/or progression, we have analyzed DNA copy number changes in seven high-grade MPNSTs using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH. Results Considerable more gains than losses were observed, and the most frequent minimal recurrent regions of gain included 1q24.1-q24.2, 1q24.3-q25.1, 8p23.1-p12, 9q34.11-q34.13 and 17q23.2-q25.3, all gained in five of seven samples. The 17q23.2-q25.3 region was gained in all five patients with poor outcome and not in the two patients with disease-free survival. cDNA microarray analysis and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR were used to investigate expression of genes located within these regions. The gene lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2 was identified as a candidate target for the 8p23.1-p12 gain. Within 17q, the genes topoisomerase II-α (TOP2A, ets variant gene 4 (E1A enhancer binding protein, E1AF (ETV4 and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (survivin (BIRC5 showed increased expression in all samples compared to two benign tumors. Increased expression of these genes has previously been associated with poor survival in other malignancies, and for TOP2A, in MPNSTs as well. In addition, we have analyzed the expression of five micro RNAs located within the 17q23.2-q25.3 region, but none of them showed high expression levels compared to the benign tumors. Conclusion Our study shows the potential of using DNA copy number changes obtained by array CGH to predict the prognosis of MPNST patients. Although no clear correlations between the expression level and patient outcome were observed, the genes TOP2A, ETV4 and BIRC5 are interesting candidate targets for the 17q gain associated

  4. Comparative cytogenetic characterization of primary canine melanocytic lesions using array CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Kelsey; Borst, Luke; Moroff, Scott; Roy, Siddharth; Labelle, Philippe; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Breen, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Melanocytic lesions originating from the oral mucosa or cutaneous epithelium are common in the general dog population, with up to 100,000 diagnoses each year in the USA. Oral melanoma is the most frequent canine neoplasm of the oral cavity, exhibiting a highly aggressive course. Cutaneous melanocytomas occur frequently, but rarely develop into a malignant form. Despite the differential prognosis, it has been assumed that subtypes of melanocytic lesions represent the same disease. To address the relative paucity of information about their genomic status, molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed on the three recognized subtypes of canine melanocytic lesions. Using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis, highly aberrant distinct copy number status across the tumor genome for both of the malignant melanoma subtypes was revealed. The most frequent aberrations included gain of dog chromosome (CFA) 13 and 17 and loss of CFA 22. Melanocytomas possessed fewer genome wide aberrations, yet showed a recurrent gain of CFA 20q15.3-17. A distinctive copy number profile, evident only in oral melanomas, displayed a sigmoidal pattern of copy number loss followed immediately by a gain, around CFA 30q14. Moreover, when assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), copy number aberrations of targeted genes, such as gain of c-MYC (80 % of cases) and loss of CDKN2A (68 % of cases), were observed. This study suggests that in concordance with what is known for human melanomas, canine melanomas of the oral mucosa and cutaneous epithelium are discrete and initiated by different molecular pathways.

  5. Genome-Wide Screening of Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Multiple Myeloma Patients Using Array-CGH Technique: A Czech Multicenter Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Smetana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic recurrent copy number aberrations (CNAs play a key role in multiple myeloma (MM pathogenesis and have important prognostic significance for MM patients. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH provides a powerful tool for genome-wide classification of CNAs and thus should be implemented into MM routine diagnostics. We demonstrate the possibility of effective utilization of oligonucleotide-based aCGH in 91 MM patients. Chromosomal aberrations associated with effect on the prognosis of MM were initially evaluated by I-FISH and were found in 93.4% (85/91. Incidence of hyperdiploidy was 49.5% (45/91; del(13(q14 was detected in 57.1% (52/91; gain(1(q21 occurred in 58.2% (53/91; del(17(p13 was observed in 15.4% (14/91; and t(4;14(p16;q32 was found in 18.6% (16/86. Genome-wide screening using Agilent 44K aCGH microarrays revealed copy number alterations in 100% (91/91. Most common deletions were found at 13q (58.9%, 1p (39.6%, and 8p (31.1%, whereas gain of whole 1q was the most often duplicated region (50.6%. Furthermore, frequent homozygous deletions of genes playing important role in myeloma biology such as TRAF3, BIRC1/BIRC2, RB1, or CDKN2C were observed. Taken together, we demonstrated the utilization of aCGH technique in clinical diagnostics as powerful tool for identification of unbalanced genomic abnormalities with prognostic significance for MM patients.

  6. Characterization of genomic alterations in radiation-associated breast cancer among childhood cancer survivors, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong R Yang

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies of radiation-exposed cohorts have been primarily descriptive; molecular events responsible for the development of radiation-associated breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH to characterize genome-wide copy number changes in breast tumors collected in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS. Array-CGH data were obtained from 32 cases who developed a second primary breast cancer following chest irradiation at early ages for the treatment of their first cancers, mostly Hodgkin lymphoma. The majority of these cases developed breast cancer before age 45 (91%, n = 29, had invasive ductal tumors (81%, n = 26, estrogen receptor (ER-positive staining (68%, n = 19 out of 28, and high proliferation as indicated by high Ki-67 staining (77%, n = 17 out of 22. Genomic regions with low-copy number gains and losses and high-level amplifications were similar to what has been reported in sporadic breast tumors, however, the frequency of amplifications of the 17q12 region containing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 was much higher among CCSS cases (38%, n = 12. Our findings suggest that second primary breast cancers in CCSS were enriched for an "amplifier" genomic subgroup with highly proliferative breast tumors. Future investigation in a larger irradiated cohort will be needed to confirm our findings.

  7. Investigation of the diagnostic value of chromosome analysis and bacterial artificial chromosome-based array comparative genomic hybridization in prenatal diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    SAVLI, HAKAN; KESKİN, SEDA EREN; ÇİNE, NACİ

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: To investigate the diagnostic value of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and chromosome analysis in prenatal diagnosis. Materials and methods: This study included the chromosome analysis and BAC-based array CGH analysis of 140 amniocentesis samples with prenatal diagnosis indications. Results: Karyotype analysis showed trisomy 21 in 4 patients, trisomy 18 in 5 patients, monosomy X in 1 patient, and other anomalies in 3 ...

  8. Array-CGH analysis in Rwandan patients presenting development delay/intellectual disability with multiple congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwineza, Annette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Hitayezu, Janvier; Hellin, Anne Cecile; Jamar, Mauricette; Dideberg, Vinciane; Rusingiza, Emmanuel K; Bours, Vincent; Mutesa, Leon

    2014-07-12

    Array-CGH is considered as the first-tier investigation used to identify copy number variations. Right now, there is no available data about the genetic etiology of patients with development delay/intellectual disability and congenital malformation in East Africa. Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed in 50 Rwandan patients with development delay/intellectual disability and multiple congenital abnormalities, using the Agilent's 180 K microarray platform. Fourteen patients (28%) had a global development delay whereas 36 (72%) patients presented intellectual disability. All patients presented multiple congenital abnormalities. Clinically significant copy number variations were found in 13 patients (26%). Size of CNVs ranged from 0,9 Mb to 34 Mb. Six patients had CNVs associated with known syndromes, whereas 7 patients presented rare genomic imbalances. This study showed that CNVs are present in African population and show the importance to implement genetic testing in East-African countries.

  9. A 91 kb microdeletion at Xq26.2 involving the GPC3 gene in a female fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome detected by prenatal arrayCGH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsing, Mette; Becher, Naja Helene; Christensen, Rikke

    A 91 kb microdeletion at Xq26.2 involving the GPC3 gene in a female fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome detected by prenatal arrayCGH......A 91 kb microdeletion at Xq26.2 involving the GPC3 gene in a female fetus with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome detected by prenatal arrayCGH...

  10. [Accidental finding of a cri du chat syndrome in an adult patient by means of array-CGH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; López-Manzanares, Lydia; Alonso-Cerezo, Concepción

    2014-07-16

    The cri du chat syndrome (CDCS) come from a partial or total deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5, being one of the most common deletion syndromes in human beings. The great majority of patients are diagnosed between the first month and first year of life, but herein we report a finding of a CDCS in a woman with a suspect of spinocerebellar ataxia, and a family medical record of ataxia and bipolar disorder. We pay special attention to the clinical features as well as the diagnostics tests, used to identify the CDCS. We report a case of a 46 years-old woman showing a borderline intelligence and bilateral cataract surgery at the age of 43. Beginning of symptoms in childhood included hypoacusia, ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, depression, cognitive impairment and bipolar disorder. Physical examination showed microcephaly, micrognathia, talipes equinovarus and ataxia. Karyotype and array-CGH were carried out on peripheral blood. The patient showed a rearrangement involving chromosomes 5 and 15, as well as an inversion of chromosome 9: 45,XX,inv9(p11q13);t(5,15)(p15.33;q11.2). Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed showing a 2.91 Mb deletion at 5p15.33, genomic formula arr 5p15.33 (151537-3057771)x1. The deletion involved 20 genes, including TERT gene. The multiple gene deletions confirmed the CDCS diagnosis, being responsible for the patient phenotype. It has been showed up the importance of using the correct diagnosis techniques (array-CGH, peripheral blood karyotype) as well as their appropriate choice.

  11. Different Array CGH profiles within hereditary breast cancer tumors associated to BRCA1 expression and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Carolina; Aravena, Andrés; Tapia, Teresa; Rozenblum, Ester; Solís, Luisa; Corvalán, Alejandro; Camus, Mauricio; Alvarez, Manuel; Munroe, David; Maass, Alejandro; Carvallo, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Array CGH analysis of breast tumors has contributed to the identification of different genomic profiles in these tumors. Loss of DNA repair by BRCA1 functional deficiency in breast cancer has been proposed as a relevant contribution to breast cancer progression for tumors with no germline mutation. Identifying the genomic alterations taking place in BRCA1 not expressing tumors will lead us to a better understanding of the cellular functions affected in this heterogeneous disease. Moreover, specific genomic alterations may contribute to the identification of potential therapeutic targets and offer a more personalized treatment to breast cancer patients. Forty seven tumors from hereditary breast cancer cases, previously analyzed for BRCA1 expression, and screened for germline BRCA1 and 2 mutations, were analyzed by Array based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) using Agilent 4x44K arrays. Overall survival was established for tumors in different clusters using Log-rank (Mantel-Cox) Test. Gene lists obtained from aCGH analysis were analyzed for Gene Ontology enrichment using GOrilla and DAVID tools. Genomic profiling of the tumors showed specific alterations associated to BRCA1 or 2 mutation status, and BRCA1 expression in the tumors, affecting relevant cellular processes. Similar cellular functions were found affected in BRCA1 not expressing and BRCA1 or 2 mutated tumors. Hierarchical clustering classified hereditary breast tumors in four major, groups according to the type and amount of genomic alterations, showing one group with a significantly poor overall survival (p = 0.0221). Within this cluster, deletion of PLEKHO1, GDF11, DARC, DAG1 and CD63 may be associated to the worse outcome of the patients. These results support the fact that BRCA1 lack of expression in tumors should be used as a marker for BRCAness and to select these patients for synthetic lethality approaches such as treatment with PARP inhibitors. In addition, the identification of specific

  12. Age dependence of tumor genetics in unfavorable neuroblastoma: arrayCGH profiles of 34 consecutive cases, using a Swedish 25-year neuroblastoma cohort for validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetinkaya, Cihan; Martinsson, Tommy; Sandgren, Johanna; Träger, Catarina; Kogner, Per; Dumanski, Jan; Díaz de Ståhl, Teresita; Hedborg, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive neuroblastoma remains a significant cause of childhood cancer death despite current intensive multimodal treatment protocols. The purpose of the present work was to characterize the genetic and clinical diversity of such tumors by high resolution arrayCGH profiling. Based on a 32K BAC whole-genome tiling path array and using 50-250K Affymetrix SNP array platforms for verification, DNA copy number profiles were generated for 34 consecutive high-risk or lethal outcome neuroblastomas. In addition, age and MYCN amplification (MNA) status were retrieved for 112 unfavorable neuroblastomas of the Swedish Childhood Cancer Registry, representing a 25-year neuroblastoma cohort of Sweden, here used for validation of the findings. Statistical tests used were: Fisher’s exact test, Bayes moderated t-test, independent samples t-test, and correlation analysis. MNA or segmental 11q loss (11q-) was found in 28/34 tumors. With two exceptions, these aberrations were mutually exclusive. Children with MNA tumors were diagnosed at significantly younger ages than those with 11q- tumors (mean: 27.4 vs. 69.5 months; p=0.008; n=14/12), and MNA tumors had significantly fewer segmental chromosomal aberrations (mean: 5.5 vs. 12.0; p<0.001). Furthermore, in the 11q- tumor group a positive correlation was seen between the number of segmental aberrations and the age at diagnosis (Pearson Correlation 0.606; p=0.037). Among nonMNA/non11q- tumors (n=6), one tumor displayed amplicons on 11q and 12q and three others bore evidence of progression from low-risk tumors due to retrospective evidence of disease six years before diagnosis, or due to tumor profiles with high proportions of numerical chromosomal aberrations. An early age at diagnosis of MNA neuroblastomas was verified by registry data, with an average of 29.2 months for 43 cases that were not included in the present study. MNA and segmental 11q loss define two major genetic variants of unfavorable neuroblastoma with apparent

  13. Development of a novel ozone- and photo-stable HyPer5 red fluorescent dye for array CGH and microarray gene expression analysis with consistent performance irrespective of environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kille Peter

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and gene expression profiling have become vital techniques for identifying molecular defects underlying genetic diseases. Regardless of the microarray platform, cyanine dyes (Cy3 and Cy5 are one of the most widely used fluorescent dye pairs for microarray analysis owing to their brightness and ease of incorporation, enabling high level of assay sensitivity. However, combining both dyes on arrays can become problematic during summer months when ozone levels rise to near 25 parts per billion (ppb. Under such conditions, Cy5 is known to rapidly degrade leading to loss of signal from either "homebrew" or commercial arrays. Cy5 can also suffer disproportionately from dye photobleaching resulting in distortion of (Cy5/Cy3 ratios used in copy number analysis. Our laboratory has been active in fluorescent dye research to find a suitable alternative to Cy5 that is stable to ozone and resistant to photo-bleaching. Here, we report on the development of such a dye, called HyPer5, and describe its' exceptional ozone and photostable properties on microarrays. Results Our results show HyPer5 signal to be stable to high ozone levels. Repeated exposure of mouse arrays hybridized with HyPer5-labeled cDNA to 300 ppb ozone at 5, 10 and 15 minute intervals resulted in no signal loss from the dye. In comparison, Cy5 arrays showed a dramatic 80% decrease in total signal during the same interval. Photobleaching experiments show HyPer5 to be resistant to light induced damage with 3- fold improvement in dye stability over Cy5. In high resolution array CGH experiments, HyPer5 is demonstrated to detect chromosomal aberrations at loci 2p21-16.3 and 15q26.3-26.2 from three patient sample using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays. The photostability of HyPer5 is further documented by repeat array scanning without loss of detection. Additionally, HyPer5 arrays are shown to preserve sensitivity and

  14. Selection of single blastocysts for fresh transfer via standard morphology assessment alone and with array CGH for good prognosis IVF patients: results from a randomized pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhihong

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single embryo transfer (SET remains underutilized as a strategy to reduce multiple gestation risk in IVF, and its overall lower pregnancy rate underscores the need for improved techniques to select one embryo for fresh transfer. This study explored use of comprehensive chromosomal screening by array CGH (aCGH to provide this advantage and improve pregnancy rate from SET. Methods First-time IVF patients with a good prognosis (age Results For patients in Group A (n = 55, 425 blastocysts were biopsied and analyzed via aCGH (7.7 blastocysts/patient. Aneuploidy was detected in 191/425 (44.9% of blastocysts in this group. For patients in Group B (n = 48, 389 blastocysts were microscopically examined (8.1 blastocysts/patient. Clinical pregnancy rate was significantly higher in the morphology + aCGH group compared to the morphology-only group (70.9 and 45.8%, respectively; p = 0.017; ongoing pregnancy rate for Groups A and B were 69.1 vs. 41.7%, respectively (p = 0.009. There were no twin pregnancies. Conclusion Although aCGH followed by frozen embryo transfer has been used to screen at risk embryos (e.g., known parental chromosomal translocation or history of recurrent pregnancy loss, this is the first description of aCGH fully integrated with a clinical IVF program to select single blastocysts for fresh SET in good prognosis patients. The observed aneuploidy rate (44.9% among biopsied blastocysts highlights the inherent imprecision of SET when conventional morphology is used alone. Embryos randomized to the aCGH group implanted with greater efficiency, resulted in clinical pregnancy more often, and yielded a lower miscarriage rate than those selected without aCGH. Additional studies are needed to verify our pilot data and confirm a role for on-site, rapid aCGH for IVF patients contemplating fresh SET.

  15. Screening of 50 Cypriot Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders or Autistic Features Using 400K Custom Array-CGH

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    Ludmila Kousoulidou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs comprise a distinct entity of neurodevelopmental disorders with a strong genetic component. Despite the identification of several candidate genes and causative genomic copy number variations (CNVs, the majority of ASD cases still remain unresolved. We have applied microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH using Agilent 400K custom array in the first Cyprus population screening for identification of ASD-associated CNVs. A cohort of 50 ASD patients (G1, their parents (G2, 50 ethnically matched normal controls (G3, and 80 normal individuals having children with various developmental and neurological conditions (G4 were tested. As a result, 14 patients were found to carry 20 potentially causative aberrations, two of which were de novo. Comparison of the four population groups revealed an increased rate of rare disease-associated variants in normal parents of children with autism. The above data provided additional evidence, supporting the complexity of ASD aetiology in comparison to other developmental disorders involving cognitive impairment. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the rationale of a more targeted approach combining accurate clinical description with high-resolution population-oriented genomic screening for defining the role of CNVs in autism and identifying meaningful associations on the molecular level.

  16. Array-CGH analysis in Rwandan patients presenting development delay/intellectual disability with multiple congenital anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Array-CGH is considered as the first-tier investigation used to identify copy number variations. Right now, there is no available data about the genetic etiology of patients with development delay/intellectual disability and congenital malformation in East Africa. Methods Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed in 50 Rwandan patients with development delay/intellectual disability and multiple congenital abnormalities, using the Agilent’s 180 K microarray platform. Results Fourteen patients (28%) had a global development delay whereas 36 (72%) patients presented intellectual disability. All patients presented multiple congenital abnormalities. Clinically significant copy number variations were found in 13 patients (26%). Size of CNVs ranged from 0,9 Mb to 34 Mb. Six patients had CNVs associated with known syndromes, whereas 7 patients presented rare genomic imbalances. Conclusion This study showed that CNVs are present in African population and show the importance to implement genetic testing in East-African countries. PMID:25016475

  17. Genome-wide detection of copy number variations among diverse horse breeds by array CGH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available Recent studies have found that copy number variations (CNVs are widespread in human and animal genomes. CNVs are a significant source of genetic variation, and have been shown to be associated with phenotypic diversity. However, the effect of CNVs on genetic variation in horses is not well understood. In the present study, CNVs in 6 different breeds of mare horses, Mongolia horse, Abaga horse, Hequ horse and Kazakh horse (all plateau breeds and Debao pony and Thoroughbred, were determined using aCGH. In total, seven hundred CNVs were identified ranging in size from 6.1 Kb to 0.57 Mb across all autosomes, with an average size of 43.08 Kb and a median size of 15.11 Kb. By merging overlapping CNVs, we found a total of three hundred and fifty-three CNV regions (CNVRs. The length of the CNVRs ranged from 6.1 Kb to 1.45 Mb with average and median sizes of 38.49 Kb and 13.1 Kb. Collectively, 13.59 Mb of copy number variation was identified among the horses investigated and accounted for approximately 0.61% of the horse genome sequence. Five hundred and eighteen annotated genes were affected by CNVs, which corresponded to about 2.26% of all horse genes. Through the gene ontology (GO, genetic pathway analysis and comparison of CNV genes among different breeds, we found evidence that CNVs involving 7 genes may be related to the adaptation to severe environment of these plateau horses. This study is the first report of copy number variations in Chinese horses, which indicates that CNVs are ubiquitous in the horse genome and influence many biological processes of the horse. These results will be helpful not only in mapping the horse whole-genome CNVs, but also to further research for the adaption to the high altitude severe environment for plateau horses.

  18. Detection of Genetic Alterations in Breast Sentinel Lymph Node by Array-CGH

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavalli, Luciane R

    2005-01-01

    .... The purpose of our study is to identify specific genetic alterations using array-OGH in the metastatic sentinel lymph node lesions, in comparison to the ones observed in the corresponding primary...

  19. Analysis of myelodysplastic syndromes with complex karyotypes by high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization and subtelomeric CGH array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Ramirez, A; Urioste, M; Melchor, L; Blesa, D; Valle, L; de Andres, SA; Kok, K; Calasanz, MJ; Cigudosa, JC; Benitez, J

    Molecular cytogenetic techniques enabled us to clarify numerical and structural alterations previously detected by conventional cytogenetic techniques in 37 patients who had myelodysplastic syndromes with complex karyotypes. Using high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (HR-CGH), we found

  20. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    hybridization (CGH) platform of 60mer oligonucleotides. The 4 x 44 K array format provides high-resolution coverage (200-300 bp) of 400-700 kb genomic regions surrounding six cancer susceptibility genes. We evaluate its performance to accurately detect and precisely map earlier described or novel large germline...... of primers for sequence determination of the breakpoints. The array platform can be streamlined for a particular application, e.g., focusing on breast cancer susceptibility genes, with increased capacity using multiformat design, and represents a valuable new tool and complement for genetic screening...

  1. New insights in the interpretation of array-CGH: autism spectrum disorder and positive family history for intellectual disability predict the detection of pathogenic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Gerarda; Vitiello, Francesco; Casertano, Alberto; Fontana, Paolo; Genesio, Rita; Bruzzese, Dario; Ginocchio, Virginia Maria; Mormile, Angela; Nitsch, Lucio; Andria, Generoso; Melis, Daniela

    2016-04-12

    Array-CGH (aCGH) is presently used into routine clinical practice for diagnosis of patients with intellectual disability (ID), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ACGH could detect small chromosomal imbalances, copy number variations (CNVs), and closely define their size and gene content. ACGH detects pathogenic imbalances in 14-20 % of patients with ID. The aims of this study were: to establish clinical clues potentially associated with pathogenic CNVs and to identify cytogenetic indicators to predict the pathogenicity of the variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) in a large cohort of paediatric patients. We enrolled 214 patients referred for either: ID, and/or ASD and/or MCA to genetic services at the Federico II University of Naples, Department of Translational Medicine. For each patient we collected clinical and imaging data. All the patients were tested with aCGH or as first-tier test or as part of a wider diagnostic work-up. Pathologic data were detected in 65 individuals (30 %) and 46 CNVs revealed a known syndrome. The pathological CNVs were usually deletions showing the highest gene-dosage content. The positive family history for ID/ASD/MCA and ASD were good indicators for detecting pathological chromosomal rearrangements. Other clinical features as eyes anomalies, hearing loss, neurological signs, cutaneous dyscromia and endocrinological problems seem to be potential predictors of pathological CNVs. Among patients carrying VOUS we analyzed genetic features including CNVs size, presence of deletion or duplication, genic density, multiple CNVs, to clinical features. Higher gene density was found in patients affected by ID. This result suggest that higher gene content has more chances to include pathogenic gene involved and causing ID in these patients. Our study suggest the use of aCGH as first-tier test in patients with neurdevelopmental phenotypes. The inferred results have been used for building a flow-chart to be

  2. Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma derived from recurrent pleomorphic adenoma shows important difference by array CGH compared to recurrent pleomorphic adenoma without malignant transformation

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    Fernanda Viviane Mariano

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: A key step of cancer development is the progressive accumulation of genomic changes resulting in disruption of several biological mechanisms. Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA is an aggressive neoplasm that arises from a pleomorphic adenoma. CXPA derived from a recurrent PA (RPA has been rarely reported, and the genomic changes associated with these tumors have not yet been studied. Objective: We analyzed CXPA from RPAs and RPAs without malignant transformation using array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH to identify somatic copy number alterations and affected genes. Methods: DNA samples extracted from FFPE tumors were submitted to array-CGH investigation, and data was analyzed by Nexus Copy Number Discovery Edition v.7. Results: No somatic copy number alterations were found in RPAs without malignant transformation. As for CXPA from RPA, although genomic profiles were unique for each case, we detected some chromosomal regions that appear to be preferentially affected by copy number alterations. The first case of CXPA-RPA (frankly invasive myoepithelial carcinoma showed copy number alterations affecting 1p36.33p13, 5p and chromosomes 3 and 8. The second case of CXPA-RPA (frankly invasive epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma showed several alterations at chromosomes 3, 8, and 16, with two amplifications at 8p12p11.21 and 12q14.3q21.2. The third case of CXPA-RPA (minimally invasive epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma exhibited amplifications at 12q13.3q14.1, 12q14.3, and 12q15. Conclusion: The occurrence of gains at chromosomes 3 and 8 and genomic amplifications at 8p and 12q, mainly those encompassing the HMGA2, MDM2, WIF1, WHSC1L1, LIRG3, CDK4 in CXAP from RPA can be a significant promotional factor in malignant transformation.

  3. Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma derived from recurrent pleomorphic adenoma shows important difference by array CGH compared to recurrent pleomorphic adenoma without malignant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Fernanda Viviane; Giovanetti, Karina; Saccomani, Luis Fernando Vidal; Del Negro, André; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Krepischi, Ana Cristina Victorino; Altemani, Albina

    A key step of cancer development is the progressive accumulation of genomic changes resulting in disruption of several biological mechanisms. Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is an aggressive neoplasm that arises from a pleomorphic adenoma. CXPA derived from a recurrent PA (RPA) has been rarely reported, and the genomic changes associated with these tumors have not yet been studied. We analyzed CXPA from RPAs and RPAs without malignant transformation using array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to identify somatic copy number alterations and affected genes. DNA samples extracted from FFPE tumors were submitted to array-CGH investigation, and data was analyzed by Nexus Copy Number Discovery Edition v.7. No somatic copy number alterations were found in RPAs without malignant transformation. As for CXPA from RPA, although genomic profiles were unique for each case, we detected some chromosomal regions that appear to be preferentially affected by copy number alterations. The first case of CXPA-RPA (frankly invasive myoepithelial carcinoma) showed copy number alterations affecting 1p36.33p13, 5p and chromosomes 3 and 8. The second case of CXPA-RPA (frankly invasive epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma) showed several alterations at chromosomes 3, 8, and 16, with two amplifications at 8p12p11.21 and 12q14.3q21.2. The third case of CXPA-RPA (minimally invasive epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma) exhibited amplifications at 12q13.3q14.1, 12q14.3, and 12q15. The occurrence of gains at chromosomes 3 and 8 and genomic amplifications at 8p and 12q, mainly those encompassing the HMGA2, MDM2, WIF1, WHSC1L1, LIRG3, CDK4 in CXAP from RPA can be a significant promotional factor in malignant transformation. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. A de novo atypical ring sSMC(22) characterized by array CGH in a boy with cat-eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltrich, Irén; Pikó, Henriett; Kiss, Eszter; Tóth, Zsuzsa; Karcagi, Veronika; Fekete, György

    2014-01-01

    Microduplications 22q11 have been characterized as a genomic duplication syndrome mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination between region-specific low-copy repeats. Here we report on a 19 years old boy with intellectual disability having an unexpected structurally complex ring small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC) originated from a larger trisomy and a smaller tetrasomy of proximal 22q11 harboring additional copies of cat eye syndrome critical regions genes. PRINCIPAL CLINICAL FEATURES WERE: anorectal and urogenital malformations, total anomalous pulmonary venous return with secundum ASD, hearing defect, preauricular pits, seizure and eczema. The proband also presented some rare or so far not reported clinical findings such as hyperinsulinaemia, severe immunodeficiency and grave cognitive deficits. Chromosome analysis revealed a mosaic karyotype with the presence of a small ring-like marker in 60% of cells. Array CGH detected approximately an 1,2 Mb single and a 0,2 Mb double copy gain of the proximal long arm of chromosome 22. The 1,3 Mb intervening region of chromosome 22 from centromere to the breakpoints showed no copy alteration. The karyotype of the patient was defined as 47,XY,+mar[60]/46,XY[40].ish idic r(22)(q11.1.q11.21) × 4.arr 22q11(17,435, 645-18,656,678) × 3,(17,598,642-17,799,783) × 4 dn. The present report is the first one with a detailed description of clinical presentation in a patient carrying an atypical size ring sSMC (22) analyzed by array CGH. The specialty of the finding is emphasized by the fact that although the patient had a mosaic sSMC and the amplified region was smaller than in typical cat eye syndrome cases, the clinical presentation was severe.

  5. Tiling array-CGH for the assessment of genomic similarities among synchronous unilateral and bilateral invasive breast cancer tumor pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringnér Markus

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, no objective criteria exist to differentiate between individual primary tumors and intra- or intermammary dissemination respectively, in patients diagnosed with two or more synchronous breast cancers. To elucidate whether these tumors most likely arise through clonal expansion, or whether they represent individual primary tumors is of tumor biological interest and may have clinical implications. In this respect, high resolution genomic profiling may provide a more reliable approach than conventional histopathological and tumor biological factors. Methods 32 K tiling microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH was used to explore the genomic similarities among synchronous unilateral and bilateral invasive breast cancer tumor pairs, and was compared with histopathological and tumor biological parameters. Results Based on global copy number profiles and unsupervised hierarchical clustering, five of ten (p = 1.9 × 10-5 unilateral tumor pairs displayed similar genomic profiles within the pair, while only one of eight bilateral tumor pairs (p = 0.29 displayed pair-wise genomic similarities. DNA index, histological type and presence of vessel invasion correlated with the genomic analyses. Conclusion Synchronous unilateral tumor pairs are often genomically similar, while synchronous bilateral tumors most often represent individual primary tumors. However, two independent unilateral primary tumors can develop synchronously and contralateral tumor spread can occur. The presence of an intraductal component is not informative when establishing the independence of two tumors, while vessel invasion, the presence of which was found in clustering tumor pairs but not in tumor pairs that did not cluster together, supports the clustering outcome. Our data suggest that genomically similar unilateral tumor pairs may represent a more aggressive disease that requires the addition of more severe treatment modalities, and

  6. PanCGH: a genotype-calling algorithm for pangenome CGH data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayjanov, J.; Sanders, M.W.W.; Starrenburg, M.; Hylckama Vlieg, J.E. van; Siezen, R.J.; Molenaar, D

    2009-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Pangenome arrays contain DNA oligomers targeting several sequenced reference genomes from the same species. In microbiology, these can be employed to investigate the often high genetic variability within a species by comparative genome hybridization (CGH). The biological interpretation

  7. Assessing copy number from exome sequencing and exome array CGH based on CNV spectrum in a large clinical cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retterer, Kyle; Scuffins, Julie; Schmidt, Daniel; Lewis, Rachel; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel; Stafford, Amanda; Schmidt, Lindsay; Warren, Stephanie; Gibellini, Federica; Kondakova, Anastasia; Blair, Amanda; Bale, Sherri; Matyakhina, Ludmila; Meck, Jeanne; Aradhya, Swaroop; Haverfield, Eden

    2015-08-01

    Detection of copy-number variation (CNV) is important for investigating many genetic disorders. Testing a large clinical cohort by array comparative genomic hybridization provides a deep perspective on the spectrum of pathogenic CNV. In this context, we describe a bioinformatics approach to extract CNV information from whole-exome sequencing and demonstrate its utility in clinical testing. Exon-focused arrays and whole-genome chromosomal microarray analysis were used to test 14,228 and 14,000 individuals, respectively. Based on these results, we developed an algorithm to detect deletions/duplications in whole-exome sequencing data and a novel whole-exome array. In the exon array cohort, we observed a positive detection rate of 2.4% (25 duplications, 318 deletions), of which 39% involved one or two exons. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified 3,345 CNVs affecting single genes (18%). We demonstrate that our whole-exome sequencing algorithm resolves CNVs of three or more exons. These results demonstrate the clinical utility of single-exon resolution in CNV assays. Our whole-exome sequencing algorithm approaches this resolution but is complemented by a whole-exome array to unambiguously identify intragenic CNVs and single-exon changes. These data illustrate the next advancements in CNV analysis through whole-exome sequencing and whole-exome array.Genet Med 17 8, 623-629.

  8. Small regions of overlapping deletions on 6q26 in human astrocytic tumours identified using chromosome 6 tile path array CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Koichi; Mungall, Andrew J; Fiegler, Heike; Pearson, Danita M.; Dunham, Ian; Carter, Nigel P; Collins, V. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 6 are a common abnormality in diverse human malignancies including astrocytic tumours, suggesting the presence of tumour suppressor genes (TSG). In order to help identify candidate TSGs, we have constructed a chromosome 6 tile path microarray. The array contains 1780 clones (778 PACs and 1002 BACs) that cover 98.3% of the published chromosome 6 sequences. A total of 104 adult astrocytic tumours (10 diffuse astrocytomas, 30 anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), 64 glioblastomas (GB)) were analysed using this array. Single copy number change was successfully detected and the result was in general concordant with a microsatellite analysis. The pattern of copy number change was complex with multiple interstitial deletions/gains. However, a predominance of telomeric 6q deletions was seen. Two small common and overlapping regions of deletion at 6q26 were identified. One was 1002 kb in size and contained PACRG and QKI, while the second was 199 kb and harbours a single gene, ARID1B. The data show that the chromosome 6 tile path array is useful in mapping copy number changes with high resolution and accuracy. We confirmed the high frequency of chromosome 6 deletions in AA and GB, and identified two novel commonly deleted regions that may harbour TSGs. PMID:16205629

  9. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis reveals YRF1 gene copy number variation that modulates genetic stability in distillery yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-10-13

    Industrial yeasts, economically important microorganisms, are widely used in diverse biotechnological processes including brewing, winemaking and distilling. In contrast to a well-established genome of brewer's and wine yeast strains, the comprehensive evaluation of genomic features of distillery strains is lacking. In the present study, twenty two distillery yeast strains were subjected to electrophoretic karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). The strains analyzed were assigned to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex and grouped into four species categories: S. bayanus, S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii. The genomic diversity was mainly revealed within subtelomeric regions and the losses and/or gains of fragments of chromosomes I, III, VI and IX were the most frequently observed. Statistically significant differences in the gene copy number were documented in six functional gene categories: 1) telomere maintenance via recombination, DNA helicase activity or DNA binding, 2) maltose metabolism process, glucose transmembrane transporter activity; 3) asparagine catabolism, cellular response to nitrogen starvation, localized in cell wall-bounded periplasmic space, 4) siderophore transport, 5) response to copper ion, cadmium ion binding and 6) L-iditol 2- dehydrogenase activity. The losses of YRF1 genes (Y' element ATP-dependent helicase) were accompanied by decreased level of Y' sequences and an increase in DNA double and single strand breaks, and oxidative DNA damage in the S. paradoxus group compared to the S. bayanus group. We postulate that naturally occurring diversity in the YRF1 gene copy number may promote genetic stability in the S. bayanus group of distillery yeast strains.

  10. arrayCGHbase: an analysis platform for comparative genomic hybridization microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Yves

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of the human genome sequence as well as the large number of physically accessible oligonucleotides, cDNA, and BAC clones across the entire genome has triggered and accelerated the use of several platforms for analysis of DNA copy number changes, amongst others microarray comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH. One of the challenges inherent to this new technology is the management and analysis of large numbers of data points generated in each individual experiment. Results We have developed arrayCGHbase, a comprehensive analysis platform for arrayCGH experiments consisting of a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment supportive database using MySQL underlying a data mining web tool, to store, analyze, interpret, compare, and visualize arrayCGH results in a uniform and user-friendly format. Following its flexible design, arrayCGHbase is compatible with all existing and forthcoming arrayCGH platforms. Data can be exported in a multitude of formats, including BED files to map copy number information on the genome using the Ensembl or UCSC genome browser. Conclusion ArrayCGHbase is a web based and platform independent arrayCGH data analysis tool, that allows users to access the analysis suite through the internet or a local intranet after installation on a private server. ArrayCGHbase is available at http://medgen.ugent.be/arrayCGHbase/.

  11. Clinical Utility of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization for Detection of Chromosomal Abnormalities in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Karen R.; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Yu, Alexander; Folsom, Matthew R.; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Rao, Pulivarthi H.; Plon, Sharon E.; Naeem, Rizwan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate detection of recurrent chromosomal abnormalities is critical to assign patients to risk-based therapeutic regimens for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Procedure We investigated the utility of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) for detection of chromosomal abnormalities compared to standard clinical evaluation with karyotype and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH). Fifty pediatric ALL diagnostic bone marrows were analyzed by bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array, and findings compared to standard clinical evaluation. Results Sensitivity of aCGH was 79% to detect karyotypic findings other than balanced translocations, which cannot be detected by aCGH because they involve no copy number change. aCGH also missed abnormalities occurring in subclones constituting less than 25% of cells. aCGH detected 44 additional abnormalities undetected or misidentified by karyotype, 21 subsequently validated by FISH, including abnormalities in 4 of 10 cases with uninformative cytogenetics. aCGH detected concurrent terminal deletions of both 9p and 20q in three cases, in two of which the 20q deletion was undetected by karyotype. A narrow region of loss at 7p21 was detected in two cases. Conclusions An array with increased BAC density over regions important in ALL, combined with PCR for fusion products of balanced translocations, could minimize labor- and time-intensive cytogenetic assays and provide key prognostic information in the approximately 35% of cases with uninformative cytogenetics. PMID:18253961

  12. High-resolution array CGH profiling identifies Na/K transporting ATPase interacting 2 (NKAIN2 as a predisposing candidate gene in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Romania

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB, the most common solid cancer in early childhood, usually occurs sporadically but also its familial occurance is known in 1-2% of NB patients. Germline mutations in the ALK and PHOX2B genes have been found in a subset of familial NBs. However, because some individuals harbouring mutations in these genes do not develop this tumor, additional genetic alterations appear to be required for NB pathogenesis. Herein, we studied an Italian family with three NB patients, two siblings and a first cousin, carrying an ALK germline-activating mutation R1192P, that was inherited from their unaffected mothers and with no mutations in the PHOX2B gene. A comparison between somatic and germline DNA copy number changes in the two affected siblings by a high resolution array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH analysis revealed a germline gain at NKAIN2 (Na/K transporting ATPase interacting 2 locus in one of the sibling, that was inherited from the parent who does not carry the ALK mutation. Surprisingly, NKAIN2 was expressed at high levels also in the affected sibling that lacks the genomic gain at this locus, clearly suggesting the existance of other regulatory mechanisms. High levels of NKAIN2 were detected in the MYCN-amplified NB cell lines and in the most aggressive NB lesions as well as in the peripheral blood of a large cohort of NB patients. Consistent with a role of NKAIN2 in NB development, NKAIN2 was down-regulated during all-trans retinoic acid differentiation in two NB cell lines. Taken together, these data indicate a potential role of NKAIN2 gene in NB growth and differentiation.

  13. Increasing live birth rate by preimplantation genetic screening of pooled polar bodies using array comparative genomic hybridization.

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    Michael Feichtinger

    Full Text Available Meiotic errors during oocyte maturation are considered the major contributors to embryonic aneuploidy and failures in human IVF treatment. Various technologies have been developed to screen polar bodies, blastomeres and trophectoderm cells for chromosomal aberrations. Array-CGH analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC arrays is widely applied for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD using single cells. Recently, an increase in the pregnancy rate has been demonstrated using array-CGH to evaluate trophectoderm cells. However, in some countries, the analysis of embryonic cells is restricted by law. Therefore, we used BAC array-CGH to assess the impact of polar body analysis on the live birth rate. A disadvantage of polar body aneuploidy screening is the necessity of the analysis of both the first and second polar bodies, resulting in increases in costs for the patient and complex data interpretation. Aneuploidy screening results may sometimes be ambiguous if the first and second polar bodies show reciprocal chromosomal aberrations. To overcome this disadvantage, we tested a strategy involving the pooling of DNA from both polar bodies before DNA amplification. We retrospectively studied 351 patients, of whom 111 underwent polar body array-CGH before embryo transfer. In the group receiving pooled polar body array-CGH (aCGH analysis, 110 embryos were transferred, and 29 babies were born, corresponding to live birth rates of 26.4% per embryo and 35.7% per patient. In contrast, in the control group, the IVF treatment was performed without preimplantation genetic screening (PGS. For this group, 403 embryos were transferred, and 60 babies were born, resulting in live birth rates of 14.9% per embryo and 22.7% per patient. In conclusion, our data show that in the aCGH group, the use of aneuploidy screening resulted in a significantly higher live birth rate compared with the control group, supporting the benefit of PGS for IVF couples in

  14. Custom CGH array profiling of copy number variations (CNVs on chromosome 6p21.32 (HLA locus in patients with venous malformations associated with multiple sclerosis

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    Salvi Fabrizio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex disorder thought to result from an interaction between environmental and genetic predisposing factors which have not yet been characterised, although it is known to be associated with the HLA region on 6p21.32. Recently, a picture of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI, consequent to stenosing venous malformation of the main extra-cranial outflow routes (VM, has been described in patients affected with MS, introducing an additional phenotype with possible pathogenic significance. Methods In order to explore the presence of copy number variations (CNVs within the HLA locus, a custom CGH array was designed to cover 7 Mb of the HLA locus region (6,899,999 bp; chr6:29,900,001-36,800,000. Genomic DNA of the 15 patients with CCSVI/VM and MS was hybridised in duplicate. Results In total, 322 CNVs, of which 225 were extragenic and 97 intragenic, were identified in 15 patients. 234 known polymorphic CNVs were detected, the majority of these being situated in non-coding or extragenic regions. The overall number of CNVs (both extra- and intragenic showed a robust and significant correlation with the number of stenosing VMs (Spearman: r = 0.6590, p = 0.0104; linear regression analysis r = 0.6577, p = 0.0106. The region we analysed contains 211 known genes. By using pathway analysis focused on angiogenesis and venous development, MS, and immunity, we tentatively highlight several genes as possible susceptibility factor candidates involved in this peculiar phenotype. Conclusions The CNVs contained in the HLA locus region in patients with the novel phenotype of CCSVI/VM and MS were mapped in detail, demonstrating a significant correlation between the number of known CNVs found in the HLA region and the number of CCSVI-VMs identified in patients. Pathway analysis revealed common routes of interaction of several of the genes involved in angiogenesis and immunity contained within this region

  15. Investigation of the diagnostic value of chromosome analysis and bacterial artificial chromosome-based array comparative genomic hybridization in prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savli, Hakan; Keskin, Seda Eren; Cine, Naci

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and chromosome analysis in prenatal diagnosis. This study included the chromosome analysis and BAC-based array CGH analysis of 140 amniocentesis samples with prenatal diagnosis indications. Karyotype analysis showed trisomy 21 in 4 patients, trisomy 18 in 5 patients, monosomy X in 1 patient, and other anomalies in 3 patients. The BAC-based array CGH analysis showed 4 patients with trisomy 21, 4 patients with trisomy 18, and 1 patient with monosomy X as a numerical chromosome anomaly, while partial duplication was observed in chromosome 14 in 1 case as a structural anomaly. The array CGH is the most effective method available to complement cases where chromosome analysis, a gold standard in prenatal diagnosis, proves to be insufficient. Considering the inherent limitations of both methods, complementary features should be introduced in order to be able to give the most accurate data at the right time.

  16. High-resolution array-CGH in patients with oculocutaneous albinism identifies new deletions of the TYR, OCA2, and SLC45A2 genes and a complex rearrangement of the OCA2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice-Picard, Fanny; Lasseaux, Eulalie; Cailley, Dorothée; Gros, Audrey; Toutain, Jérome; Plaisant, Claudio; Simon, Delphine; François, Stéphane; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Kaplan, Josseline; Rooryck, Caroline; Lacombe, Didier; Arveiler, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is caused by mutations in six different genes, and their molecular diagnosis encompasses the search for point mutations and intragenic rearrangements. Here, we used high-resolution array-comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to search for rearrangements across exons, introns and regulatory sequences of four OCA genes: TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and SLC45A2. We identified a total of ten new deletions in TYR, OCA2, and SLC45A2. A complex rearrangement of OCA2 was found in two unrelated patients. Whole-genome sequencing showed deletion of a 184-kb fragment (identical to a deletion previously found in Polish patients), whereby a large portion of the deleted sequence was re-inserted after severe reshuffling into intron 1 of OCA2. The high-resolution array-CGH presented here is a powerful tool to detect gene rearrangements. Finally, we review all known deletions of the OCA1-4 genes reported so far in the literature and show that deletions or duplications account for 5.6% of all mutations identified in the OCA1-4 genes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Analysis of human HPRT- deletion mutants by the microarray-CGH (comparative genomic hybridization)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, M.; Sasaki, K.; Tagawa, H.; Omine, H.; Kushiro, J.; Takahashi, N.; Katayama, H.

    2003-01-01

    We are trying to evaluate genetic effects of radiation on human using mutation frequency as an indicator. For the efficient detection of mutations, it is important to understand the mechanism and the characteristics of radiation-induced mutations. We have started the analysis of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants induced by X-ray in order to clarify the deletion size and the mutation-distribution. We analyzed 39 human X-ray induced HPRT-deletion mutants by using the microarray-CGH. The array for this analysis contains 57 BAC clones covering as much as possible of the 4Mb of the 5' side and 10Mb of the 3' side of the HPRT gene based on the NCBI genome database. DNA from parent strain and each HPRT-mutant strain are labeled with Cy5 and Cy3 respectively, and were mixed and hybridized on the array. Fluorescent intensity ratio of the obtained spots was analyzed using software we developed to identify clones corresponding to the deletion region. The deletion in these strains ranged up to 3.5 Mb on the 5' side and 6 Mb on the 3' side of the HPRT gene. Deletions in 13 strains ended around BAC clones located at about 3 Mb on the 5' side. On the 3' side, deletions extended up to the specific clones located at 1.5 Mb in 11 strains. The mutations seem to be complex on the 3' end of deletion; some accompanied duplications with deletions and others could not be explained by one mutation event. We need to confirm these results, taking into account the experimental reproducibility and the accuracy of the published genetic map. The results of the research using the microarray-CGH help us to search the regions where deletions are easily induced and to identify the factors affecting the range of deletions

  18. Array-based gene expression, CGH and tissue data defines a 12q24 gain in neuroblastic tumors with prognostic implication

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    Kilpinen Sami

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroblastoma has successfully served as a model system for the identification of neuroectoderm-derived oncogenes. However, in spite of various efforts, only a few clinically useful prognostic markers have been found. Here, we present a framework, which integrates DNA, RNA and tissue data to identify and prioritize genetic events that represent clinically relevant new therapeutic targets and prognostic biomarkers for neuroblastoma. Methods A single-gene resolution aCGH profiling was integrated with microarray-based gene expression profiling data to distinguish genetic copy number alterations that were strongly associated with transcriptional changes in two neuroblastoma cell lines. FISH analysis using a hotspot tumor tissue microarray of 37 paraffin-embedded neuroblastoma samples and in silico data mining for gene expression information obtained from previously published studies including up to 445 healthy nervous system samples and 123 neuroblastoma samples were used to evaluate the clinical significance and transcriptional consequences of the detected alterations and to identify subsequently activated gene(s. Results In addition to the anticipated high-level amplification and subsequent overexpression of MYCN, MEIS1, CDK4 and MDM2 oncogenes, the aCGH analysis revealed numerous other genetic alterations, including microamplifications at 2p and 12q24.11. Most interestingly, we identified and investigated the clinical relevance of a previously poorly characterized amplicon at 12q24.31. FISH analysis showed low-level gain of 12q24.31 in 14 of 33 (42% neuroblastomas. Patients with the low-level gain had an intermediate prognosis in comparison to patients with MYCN amplification (poor prognosis and to those with no MYCN amplification or 12q24.31 gain (good prognosis (P = 0.001. Using the in silico data mining approach, we identified elevated expression of five genes located at the 12q24.31 amplicon in neuroblastoma (DIABLO, ZCCHC

  19. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...... of primers for sequence determination of the breakpoints. The array platform can be streamlined for a particular application, e.g., focusing on breast cancer susceptibility genes, with increased capacity using multiformat design, and represents a valuable new tool and complement for genetic screening...

  20. High resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridisation of medulloblastomas and supra-tentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Martin Gerard; Ichimura, Koichi; Liu, Lu; Plant, Karen; Bäcklund, L Magnus; Pearson, Danita M; Collins, Vincent Peter

    2010-01-01

    Medulloblastomas and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours are aggressive childhood tumours. We report our findings using array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) on a whole-genome BAC/PAC/cosmid array with a median clone separation of 0.97Mb to study 34 medulloblastomas and 7 supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours. Array CGH allowed identification and mapping of numerous novel small regions of copy number change to genomic sequence, in addition to the large regions already known from previous studies. Novel amplifications were identified, some encompassing oncogenes, MYCL1, PDGFRA, KIT and MYB, not previously reported to show amplification in these tumours. In addition, one supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumour had lost both copies of the tumour suppressor genes CDKN2A & CDKN2B. Ten medulloblastomas had findings suggestive of isochromosome 17q. In contrast to previous reports using conventional CGH, array CGH identified three distinct breakpoints in these cases: Ch 17: 17940393-19251679 (17p11.2, n=6), Ch 17: 20111990-23308272 (17p11.2-17q11.2, n=4) and Ch 17: 38425359-39091575 (17q21.31, n=1). Significant differences were found in the patterns of copy number change between medulloblastomas and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours, providing further evidence that these tumours are genetically distinct despite their morphological and behavioural similarities. PMID:16783165

  1. Array CGH characterization of an unbalanced X-autosome translocation associated with Xq27.2-qter deletion, 11q24.3-qter duplication and Xq22.3-q27.1 duplication in a girl with primary amenorrhea and mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Chern, Schu-Rern; Kuo, Yu-Ling; Wu, Peih-Shan; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lee, Meng-Shan; Wang, Wayseen

    2014-02-01

    We present array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) characterization of an unbalanced X-autosome translocation with an Xq interstitial segmental duplication in a 16-year-old girl with primary ovarian failure, mental retardation, attention deficit disorder, learning difficulty and facial dysmorphism. aCGH analysis revealed an Xq27.2-q28 deletion, an 11q24.3-q25 duplication, and an inverted duplication of Xq22.3-q27.1. The karyotype was 46,X,der(X)t(X;11)(q27.2;q24.3) dup(X)(q27.1q22.3). We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation in this case. Our case provides evidence for an association of primary amenorrhea and mental retardation with concomitant unbalanced X-autosome translocation and X chromosome rearrangement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Array-CGH in patients with Kabuki-like phenotype: Identification of two patients with complex rearrangements including 2q37 deletions and no other recurrent aberration

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    González Eva

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kabuki syndrome (KS is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by specific facial features, mild to moderate mental retardation, postnatal growth delay, skeletal abnormalities, and unusual dermatoglyphic patterns with prominent fingertip pads. A 3.5 Mb duplication at 8p23.1-p22 was once reported as a specific alteration in KS but has not been confirmed in other patients. The molecular basis of KS remains unknown. Methods We have studied 16 Spanish patients with a clinical diagnosis of KS or KS-like to search for genomic imbalances using genome-wide array technologies. All putative rearrangements were confirmed by FISH, microsatellite markers and/or MLPA assays, which also determined whether the imbalance was de novo or inherited. Results No duplication at 8p23.1-p22 was observed in our patients. We detected complex rearrangements involving 2q in two patients with Kabuki-like features: 1 a de novo inverted duplication of 11 Mb with a 4.5 Mb terminal deletion, and 2 a de novo 7.2 Mb-terminal deletion in a patient with an additional de novo 0.5 Mb interstitial deletion in 16p. Additional copy number variations (CNV, either inherited or reported in normal controls, were identified and interpreted as polymorphic variants. No specific CNV was significantly increased in the KS group. Conclusion Our results further confirmed that genomic duplications of 8p23 region are not a common cause of KS and failed to detect other recurrent rearrangement causing this disorder. The detection of two patients with 2q37 deletions suggests that there is a phenotypic overlap between the two conditions, and screening this region in the Kabuki-like patients should be considered.

  3. A robust Correntropy-based method for analyzing multisample aCGH data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Majid; Hodtani, Ghosheh Abed; Yassi, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a new method for analyzing array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on Correntropy. A new formulation based on low-rank aCGH data and Correntropy is proposed and its solution is presented based on Half-Quadratic method. Compared to existing methods, the proposed method is more robust to high corruptions and various kinds of noise. Moreover, it analyzes all aCGH profiles relating to a data set simultaneously. Experimental results illustrate the robustness of the proposed method when the noise is non-Gaussian and show its excellent performance in other cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oligo-based High-resolution aCGH Analysis Enhances Routine Cytogenetic Diagnostics in Haematological Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the detection rate of genomic aberrations in haematological malignancies using oligobased array-CGH (oaCGH) analysis in combination with karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, and its feasibility in a clinical pragmatic approach. The 4x180K Cancer Cytochip array was applied in 96 patients with various haematological malignancies in a prospective setting and in 41 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients retrospectively. Combined use of oaCGH analysis and karyotyping improved the overall detection rate in comparison to karyotyping-alone and vice versa. In cases with normal karyotypes oaCGH analysis detected genomic aberrations in 66% (39/60) of cases. In the group of simple karyotypes oaCGH analysis extended karyotypic findings in 39% (12/31) while oaCGH analysis extended the karyotypic findings in 89% (39/44) of cases with complex karyotypes. In 7% (5/75) of cases oaCGH analysis failed in detecting the observed abnormalities by karyotyping. oaCGH analysis is a valuable asset in routine cytogenetics of haematological malignancies. Copyright© 2015, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. ADaCGH: A parallelized web-based application and R package for the analysis of aCGH data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Díaz-Uriarte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Copy number alterations (CNAs in genomic DNA have been associated with complex human diseases, including cancer. One of the most common techniques to detect CNAs is array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. The availability of aCGH platforms and the need for identification of CNAs has resulted in a wealth of methodological studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ADaCGH is an R package and a web-based application for the analysis of aCGH data. It implements eight methods for detection of CNAs, gains and losses of genomic DNA, including all of the best performing ones from two recent reviews (CBS, GLAD, CGHseg, HMM. For improved speed, we use parallel computing (via MPI. Additional information (GO terms, PubMed citations, KEGG and Reactome pathways is available for individual genes, and for sets of genes with altered copy numbers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ADACGH represents a qualitative increase in the standards of these types of applications: a all of the best performing algorithms are included, not just one or two; b we do not limit ourselves to providing a thin layer of CGI on top of existing BioConductor packages, but instead carefully use parallelization, examining different schemes, and are able to achieve significant decreases in user waiting time (factors up to 45x; c we have added functionality not currently available in some methods, to adapt to recent recommendations (e.g., merging of segmentation results in wavelet-based and CGHseg algorithms; d we incorporate redundancy, fault-tolerance and checkpointing, which are unique among web-based, parallelized applications; e all of the code is available under open source licenses, allowing to build upon, copy, and adapt our code for other software projects.

  6. Breakpoint identification and smoothing of array comparative genomic hybridization data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.; Marchiori, E.; Meijer, G.J.; van der Vaart, A.W.; Ylstra, B.

    2004-01-01

    Summary: We describe a tool, called aCGH-Smooth, for the automated identification of breakpoints and smoothing of microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) data. aCGH-Smooth is written in visual C++, has a user-friendly interface including a visualization of the results and

  7. Evaluation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia by BAC-based microarray analysis

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    McDaniel Lisa D

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is a highly variable disease with life expectancies ranging from months to decades. Cytogenetic findings play an integral role in defining the prognostic significance and treatment for individual patients. Results We have evaluated 25 clinical cases from a tertiary cancer center that have an established diagnosis of CLL and for which there was prior cytogenetic and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH data. We performed microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC-based microarray designed for the detection of known constitutional genetic syndromes. In 15 of the 25 cases, aCGH detected all copy number imbalances identified by prior cytogenetic and/or FISH studies. For the majority of those not detected, the aberrations were present at low levels of mosaicism. Furthermore, for 15 of the 25 cases, additional abnormalities were detected. Four of those cases had deletions that mapped to intervals implicated in inherited predisposition to CLL. For most cases, aCGH was able to detect abnormalities present in as few as 10% of cells. Although changes in ploidy are not easily discernable by aCGH, results for two cases illustrate the detection of additional copy gains and losses present within a mosaic tetraploid cell population. Conclusions Our results illustrate the successful evaluation of CLL using a microarray optimized for the interrogation of inherited disorders and the identification of alterations with possible relevance to CLL susceptibility.

  8. Genetic profiling of yeast industrial strains using in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, Maciej; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Magda, Michal; Deregowska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Lewinska, Anna

    2015-09-20

    The genetic differences and changes in genomic stability may affect fermentation processes involving baker's, brewer's and wine yeast strains. Thus, it seems worthwhile to monitor the changes in genomic DNA copy number of industrial strains. In the present study, we developed an in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate the ploidy and genetic differences between selected industrial yeast strains. The CGH-based system was validated using the laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (haploid BY4741 and diploid BY4743). DNA isolated from BY4743 cells was considered a reference DNA. The ploidy and DNA gains and losses of baker's, brewer's and wine strains were revealed. Taken together, the in situ CGH was shown a helpful molecular tool to identify genomic differences between yeast industrial strains. Moreover, the in situ CGH-based system may be used at the single-cell level of analysis to supplement array-based techniques and high-throughput analyses at the population scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization for the differential diagnosis of renal cell cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelm, M.; Veltman, J.A.; Olshen, A.B.; Jain, A.N.; Moore, D.H.; Presti Jr, J.C.; Kovacs, G.; Waldman, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) uses multiple genomic clones arrayed on a slide to detect relative copy number of tumor DNA sequences. Application of array CGH to tumor specimens makes genetic diagnosis of cancers possible and may help to differentiate relevant subsets of tumors,

  10. A robust aCGH data recovery framework based on half quadratic minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Majid; Abed Hodtani, Ghosheh

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a general half quadratic framework for simultaneous analysis of the whole array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) profiles in a data set. The proposed framework accommodates different M-estimation loss functions and two underlying assumptions for aCGH profiles of a data set: sparsity and low rank. Using M-estimation loss functions, this framework is more robust to various types of noise and outliers. The solution of the proposed framework is given by half quadratic (HQ) minimization. To hasten this procedure, accelerated proximal gradient (APG) is utilized. Experimental results support the robustness of the proposed framework in comparison to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical alignment using a CGH and an autostigmatic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Robert E.

    2017-08-01

    We show how custom computer generated holograms (CGH) are used along with an autostigmatic microscope (ASM) to align both optical and mechanical components relative to the CGH. The patterns in the CGHs define points and lines in space when interrogated with the focus of the ASM. Once the ASM is aligned to the CGH, an optical or mechanical component such as a lens, a well-polished ball or a cylinder can be aligned to the ASM in 3 or 4 degrees of freedom and thus to the CGH. In this case we show how a CGH is used to make a fixture for cementing a doublet lens without the need for a rotary table or a precision vertical stage.

  12. Whole-genome scanning by array comparative genomic hybridization as a clinical tool for risk assessment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Mohammed, Mansoor S.; Gorre, Mercedes E.; Cotter, Philip D.; Kim, Jaeweon; Bahler, David W.; Preobrazhensky, Sergey N.; Higgins, Russell A.; Bolla, Aswani R.; Ismail, Sahar H.; de Jong, Daphne; Eldering, Eric; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Mellink, Clemens H. M.; Keating, Michael J.; Schlette, Ellen J.; Abruzzo, Lynne V.; Robetorye, Ryan S.

    2008-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) provides a powerful method for simultaneous genome-wide scanning and prognostic marker assessment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In the current study, commercially available bacterial artificial chromosome and oligonucleotide array

  13. DNA copy number aberrations in breast cancer by array comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, J.; Wang, K.; Li, S.

    2009-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been popularly used for analyzing DNA copy number variations in diseases like cancer. In this study, we investigated 82 sporadic samples from 49 breast cancer patients using 1-Mb resolution bacterial artificial chromosome CGH arrays. A number...

  14. Improved analysis of bacterial CGH data beyond the log-ratio paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakra Ågot

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing methods for analyzing bacterial CGH data from two-color arrays are based on log-ratios only, a paradigm inherited from expression studies. We propose an alternative approach, where microarray signals are used in a different way and sequence identity is predicted using a supervised learning approach. Results A data set containing 32 hybridizations of sequenced versus sequenced genomes have been used to test and compare methods. A ROC-analysis has been performed to illustrate the ability to rank probes with respect to Present/Absent calls. Classification into Present and Absent is compared with that of a gaussian mixture model. Conclusion The results indicate our proposed method is an improvement of existing methods with respect to ranking and classification of probes, especially for multi-genome arrays.

  15. An integrative CGH, MSI and candidate genes methylation analysis of colorectal tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Brim

    Full Text Available Different DNA aberrations processes can cause colorectal cancer (CRC. Herein, we conducted a comprehensive molecular characterization of 27 CRCs from Iranian patients.Array CGH was performed. The MSI phenotype and the methylation status of 15 genes was established using MSP. The CGH data was compared to two established lists of 41 and 68 cancer genes, respectively, and to CGH data from African Americans. A maximum parsimony cladogram based on global aberrations was established.The number of aberrations seem to depend on the MSI status. MSI-H tumors displayed the lowest number of aberrations. MSP revealed that most markers were methylated, except RNF182 gene. P16 and MLH1 genes were primarily methylated in MSI-H tumors. Seven markers with moderate to high frequency of methylation (SYNE1, MMP2, CD109, EVL, RET, LGR and PTPRD had very low levels of chromosomal aberrations. All chromosomes were targeted by aberrations with deletions more frequent than amplifications. The most amplified markers were CD248, ERCC6, ERGIC3, GNAS, MMP2, NF1, P2RX7, SFRS6, SLC29A1 and TBX22. Most deletions were noted for ADAM29, CHL1, CSMD3, FBXW7, GALNS, MMP2, NF1, PRKD1, SMAD4 and TP53. Aberrations targeting chromosome X were primarily amplifications in male patients and deletions in female patients. A finding similar to what we reported for African American CRC patients.This first comprehensive analysis of CRC Iranian tumors reveals a high MSI rate. The MSI tumors displayed the lowest level of chromosomal aberrations but high frequency of methylation. The MSI-L were predominantly targeted with chromosomal instability in a way similar to the MSS tumors. The global chromosomal aberration profiles showed many similarities with other populations but also differences that might allow a better understanding of CRC's clinico-pathological specifics in this population.

  16. An integrative CGH, MSI and candidate genes methylation analysis of colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brim, Hassan; Abu-Asab, Mones S; Nouraie, Mehdi; Salazar, Jose; Deleo, Jim; Razjouyan, Hadi; Mokarram, Pooneh; Schaffer, Alejandro A; Naghibhossaini, Fakhraddin; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Different DNA aberrations processes can cause colorectal cancer (CRC). Herein, we conducted a comprehensive molecular characterization of 27 CRCs from Iranian patients. Array CGH was performed. The MSI phenotype and the methylation status of 15 genes was established using MSP. The CGH data was compared to two established lists of 41 and 68 cancer genes, respectively, and to CGH data from African Americans. A maximum parsimony cladogram based on global aberrations was established. The number of aberrations seem to depend on the MSI status. MSI-H tumors displayed the lowest number of aberrations. MSP revealed that most markers were methylated, except RNF182 gene. P16 and MLH1 genes were primarily methylated in MSI-H tumors. Seven markers with moderate to high frequency of methylation (SYNE1, MMP2, CD109, EVL, RET, LGR and PTPRD) had very low levels of chromosomal aberrations. All chromosomes were targeted by aberrations with deletions more frequent than amplifications. The most amplified markers were CD248, ERCC6, ERGIC3, GNAS, MMP2, NF1, P2RX7, SFRS6, SLC29A1 and TBX22. Most deletions were noted for ADAM29, CHL1, CSMD3, FBXW7, GALNS, MMP2, NF1, PRKD1, SMAD4 and TP53. Aberrations targeting chromosome X were primarily amplifications in male patients and deletions in female patients. A finding similar to what we reported for African American CRC patients. This first comprehensive analysis of CRC Iranian tumors reveals a high MSI rate. The MSI tumors displayed the lowest level of chromosomal aberrations but high frequency of methylation. The MSI-L were predominantly targeted with chromosomal instability in a way similar to the MSS tumors. The global chromosomal aberration profiles showed many similarities with other populations but also differences that might allow a better understanding of CRC's clinico-pathological specifics in this population.

  17. Cross-platform array comparative genomic hybridization meta-analysis separates hematopoietic and mesenchymal from epithelial tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.; Marchiori, E.; van der Vaart, A.W.; Chin, S.F.; Carvalho, B; Tijssen, M.; Eijk, P.P.; van den IJssel, P.; Grabsch, H.; Quirke, P.; Oudejans, J.J.; Meijer, G.J.; Caldas, C.; Ylstra, B.

    2007-01-01

    A series of studies have been published that evaluate the chromosomal copy number changes of different tumor classes using array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH); however, the chromosomal aberrations that distinguish the different tumor classes have not been fully characterized.

  18. A piggyBac transposon- and gateway-enhanced system for efficient BAC transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Ng, Ee Ting; Koopman, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) have become increasingly popular vectors for making transgenic mice, as they are able to carry large genomic DNA fragments that in many cases are needed to reproduce the endogenous gene expression pattern. However, the efficiency of BAC transgenesis is generally low, and gene transfer to BAC vectors by recombination-mediated engineering (recombineering) is time-consuming and technically demanding. We present an enhanced system, comprising a BAC vector retrofitted with piggyBac DNA transposon elements and attL (Gateway) docking sites, that obviates these problems. Using this system, a gene-of-interest (such as a reporter gene) is transferred to the vector in a one-step in vitro reaction, and piggyBac transposition mediates transgene integration at high efficiency when microinjected into mouse zygotes with piggyBac transposase mRNA. We establish proof-of-principle for this system using a Wilms tumour-1 (Wt1) BAC to drive expression of an mCherry-2A-EGFP (RG) reporter gene, which yielded transgenic mice at a frequency of 33%, and recapitulated endogenous WT1 expression in developing gonads, kidneys and heart. The system we describe is applicable to any BAC transgenesis strategy. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. CGH Celebrates Take Your Child To Work Day 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady Grove celebrated Take Your Child To Work Day this year with a variety of activities and sessions aimed at inspiring school-aged children to explore career paths in science and public service. CGH hosted its inaugural Take Your Child To Work Day session: An Introduction to Global Health.

  20. Asterias: A Parallelized Web-based Suite for the Analysis of Expression and aCGH Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Díaz-Uriarte

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of expression and CGH arrays plays a central role in the study of complex diseases, especially cancer, including finding markers for early diagnosis and prognosis, choosing an optimal therapy, or increasing our understanding of cancer development and metastasis. Asterias (http://www.asterias.info is an integrated collection of freely-accessible web tools for the analysis of gene expression and aCGH data. Most of the tools use parallel computing (via MPI and run on a server with 60 CPUs for computation; compared to a desktop or server-based but not parallelized application, parallelization provides speed ups of factors up to 50. Most of our applications allow the user to obtain additional information for user-selected genes (chromosomal location, PubMed ids, Gene Ontology terms, etc. by using clickable links in tables and/or fi gures. Our tools include: normalization of expression and aCGH data (DNMAD; converting between different types of gene/clone and protein identifi ers (IDconverter/IDClight; fi ltering and imputation (preP; finding differentially expressed genes related to patient class and survival data (Pomelo II; searching for models of class prediction (Tnasas; using random forests to search for minimal models for class prediction or for large subsets of genes with predictive capacity (GeneSrF; searching for molecular signatures and predictive genes with survival data (SignS; detecting regions of genomic DNA gain or loss (ADaCGH. The capability to send results between different applications, access to additional functional information, and parallelized computation make our suite unique and exploit features only available to web-based applications.

  1. A comparative study of genome-wide SNP, CGH microarray and protein expression analysis to explore genotypic and phenotypic mechanisms of acquired antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil; Speirs, Valerie; Curtin, Nicola J; Hall, Andrew G

    2008-09-01

    Allelic imbalance is a common feature of many malignancies. We have measured allelic imbalance in genomic DNA from the breast cancer cell lines T47D, MDA-MB-231, two antiestrogen sensitive (MCF7N and MCF7L) and two resistant MCF7 cell lines (MMU2 and LCC9) using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) oligonucleotide microarrays. DNA from MCF7(L) and MMU2 cells was also analysed by comparative genome hybridisation (CGH) to compare with SNP microarray data. Proteins previously determined to be involved in disease progression were quantified by Western blot and compared to array data. The SNP and CGH array both detected cytogenetic abnormalities commonly found in breast cancer: amplification of chromosomes 11q13-14.1, 17q and 20q containing cyclin D1, BCAS1 and 3 (Breast Cancer Amplified Sequence) and AIB1 (Amplified in Breast cancer) genes; losses at 6q, 9p and X chromosomes, which included ERalpha (Estrogen Receptor alpha) and p16 ( INK4A ) genes. However the SNP chip array data additionally identified regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) followed by duplication of the remaining allele-uniparental disomy (UPD). Good concordance between SNP arrays and CGH analyses was observed, however there was poor correlation between gene copy number and protein levels between the cell lines. There were reductions in ERalpha, cyclin D1 and p27 protein levels whilst p21 protein levels were elevated in antiestrogen resistant MCF7 cell lines. Although protein levels varied there was no difference in gene copy number. This study shows SNP and CGH array analysis are powerful tools for analysis of allelic imbalance in breast cancer. However, the antiestrogen resistant phenotype was likely to be due to changes in gene expression and protein degradation rather than in altered gene copy number.

  2. As Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) Increases, So Does Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking As Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) Increases, So Does Impairment Past Issues / ... of Contents For purposes of law enforcement, blood alcohol content (BAC) is used to define intoxication and ...

  3. Genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis in Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicardi syndrome is characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, chorioretinal lacunae, severe seizures (starting as infantile spasms), neuronal migration defects, mental retardation, costovertebral defects, and typical facial features. Because Aicardi syndrome is sporadic and affects only fem...

  4. End Sequencing and Finger Printing of Human & Mouse BAC Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, C

    2005-09-27

    This project provided for continued end sequencing of existing and new BAC libraries constructed to support human sequencing as well as to initiate BAC end sequencing from the mouse BAC libraries constructed to support mouse sequencing. The clones, the sequences, and the fingerprints are now an available resource for the community at large. Research and development of new metaodologies for BAC end sequencing have reduced costs and increase throughput.

  5. Transposon-mediated BAC transgenesis in zebrafish and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suster, Maximiliano L; Sumiyama, Kenta; Kawakami, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are among the most widely used tools for studies of gene regulation and function in model vertebrates, yet methods for predictable delivery of BAC transgenes to the genome are currently limited. This is because BAC transgenes are usually microinjected as naked DNA into fertilized eggs and are known to integrate as multi-copy concatamers in the genome. Although conventional methods for BAC transgenesis have been very fruitful, complementary methods for generating single copy BAC integrations would be desirable for many applications. Results We took advantage of the precise cut-and-paste behavior of a natural transposon, Tol2, to develop a new method for BAC transgenesis. In this new method, the minimal sequences of the Tol2 transposon were used to deliver precisely single copies of a ~70 kb BAC transgene to the zebrafish and mouse genomes. We mapped the BAC insertion sites in the genome by standard PCR methods and confirmed transposase-mediated integrations. Conclusion The Tol2 transposon has a surprisingly large cargo capacity that can be harnessed for BAC transgenesis. The precise delivery of single-copy BAC transgenes by Tol2 represents a useful complement to conventional BAC transgenesis, and could aid greatly in the production of transgenic fish and mice for genomics projects, especially those in which single-copy integrations are desired. PMID:19832998

  6. Isolation of Specific Clones from Nonarrayed BAC Libraries through Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Nefedov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new approach to screen bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries by recombination selection. To test this method, we constructed an orangutan BAC library using an E. coli strain (DY380 with temperature inducible homologous recombination (HR capability. We amplified one library segment, induced HR at 42∘C to make it recombination proficient, and prepared electrocompetent cells for transformation with a kanamycin cassette to target sequences in the orangutan genome through terminal recombineering homologies. Kanamycin-resistant colonies were tested for the presence of BACs containing the targeted genes by the use of a PCR-assay to confirm the presence of the kanamycin insertion. The results indicate that this is an effective approach for screening clones. The advantage of recombination screening is that it avoids the high costs associated with the preparation, screening, and archival storage of arrayed BAC libraries. In addition, the screening can be conceivably combined with genetic engineering to create knockout and reporter constructs for functional studies.

  7. [Advanced Treatment of Incineration Leachate with O3-BAC and Double O3-BAC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, An-jing; Fan, Ju-hong; Liu, Rui; Qiu, Song-kai; Wen, Xiao-gang; Chen, Lü-jun

    2015-11-01

    Ozone-biological activated carbon (O3-BAC) process and double O3-BAC process were respectively used for advanced treatment of the biologically treated effluent of incineration leachate, and their pollutant removal performances were compared. The results showed that the double O3-BAC removed 75.9% ± 2.1% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 78.8% ± 2.9% of UV254 and 96.8% ± 0.9% of color at ozone dosage of 200 mg x L(-1). The treated effluent was with COD of below 100 mg x L(-1) and color of below 40 times, meeting the emission requirements of GB 16889-2008. At the same ozone dosage, however, the O3-BAC removed 68.2% ± 1.3% of COD, 69.7% ± 0.5% of UV254 and 92.5% ± 1.1% of color. The treated effluent was with COD of around 150 mg x L(-1) and color of about 60 times, failing to meet the emission requirements. Namely, ozone of 290 mg x L(-1) was required by O3-BAC in order to achieve similar pollutant removals as those in double O3-BAC at O3 dosage of 200 mg x L(-1). In double O3-BAC at ozone dosage of 200 mg x L(-1), total phosphorus was removed by 63.5% ± 4.4%, and the phosphorus concentration in the effluent was remained 1 mg x L(-1) or less, directly meeting the emission requirement of GB 16889-2008.

  8. Combined array-comparative genomic hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphism-loss of heterozygosity analysis reveals complex changes and multiple forms of chromosomal instability in colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaasenbeek, Michelle; Howarth, Kimberley; Rowan, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    (CGH) for copy number changes and single-copy number polymorphism (SNP) microarrays for allelic loss (LOH). Many array-based CGH changes were not found by LOH because they did not cause true reduction-to-homozygosity. Conversely, many regions of SNP-LOH occurred in the absence of copy number change...

  9. CGH and OCC Announce a New, Two-Year Funding Opportunity for NCI-designated Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH and OCC announce a new funding opportunity available from CGH for cancer prevention and control (CPC) researchers at NCI-designated cancer centers: Administrative Supplements to Promote Cancer Prevention and Control Research in Low and Middle Income Countries.

  10. Generation of BAC transgenic epithelial organoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Schwank

    Full Text Available Under previously developed culture conditions, mouse and human intestinal epithelia can be cultured and expanded over long periods. These so-called organoids recapitulate the three-dimensional architecture of the gut epithelium, and consist of all major intestinal cell types. One key advantage of these ex vivo cultures is their accessibility to live imaging. So far the establishment of transgenic fluorescent reporter organoids has required the generation of transgenic mice, a laborious and time-consuming process, which cannot be extended to human cultures. Here we present a transfection protocol that enables the generation of recombinant mouse and human reporter organoids using BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome technology.

  11. Prognostic impact of array-based genomic profiles in esophageal squamous cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carneiro, Ana; Isinger, Anna; Karlsson, Anna

    2008-01-01

    applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to obtain a whole genome copy number profile relevant for identifying deranged pathways and clinically applicable markers. METHODS: A 32 k aCGH platform was used for high resolution mapping of copy number changes in 30 stage I-IV ESCC. Potential......p13.3 independently predicted poor survival in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: aCGH profiling verified genetic complexity in ESCC and herein identified imbalances of multiple central tumorigenic pathways. Distinct gains correlate with clinicopathological variables and independently predict...

  12. Fast CGH computation using S-LUT on GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuechao; Xu, Xuewu; Solanki, Sanjeev; Liang, Xinan; Tanjung, Ridwan Bin Adrian; Tan, Chiwei; Chong, Tow-Chong

    2009-10-12

    In computation of full-parallax computer-generated hologram (CGH), balance between speed and memory usage is always the core of algorithm development. To solve the speed problem of coherent ray trace (CRT) algorithm and memory problem of look-up table (LUT) algorithm without sacrificing reconstructed object quality, we develop a novel algorithm with split look-up tables (S-LUT) and implement it on graphics processing unit (GPU). Our results show that S-LUT on GPU has the fastest speed among all the algorithms investigated in this paper, while it still maintaining low memory usage. We also demonstrate high quality objects reconstructed from CGHs computed with S-LUT on GPU. The GPU implementation of our new algorithm may enable real-time and interactive holographic 3D display in the future.

  13. Findings from aCGH in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH): a possible locus for Fryns syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, S; Casavant, D; Prada, C; Russell, M; Byrne, J; Haug, L Wilkins; Jennings, R; Manning, S; Boyd, T K; Fryns, J P; Holmes, L B; Donahoe, P K; Lee, C; Kimonis, V; Pober, B R

    2006-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common and often devastating birth defect that can occur in isolation or as part of a malformation complex. Considerable progress is being made in the identification of genetic causes of CDH. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) of approximately 1Mb resolution to 29 CDH patients with prior normal karyotypes who had been recruited into our multi-site study. One patient, clinically diagnosed with Fryns syndrome, demonstrated a de novo 5Mb deletion at chromosome region 1q41-q42.12 that was confirmed by FISH. Given prior reports of CDH in association with cytogenetic abnormalities in this region, we propose that this represents a locus for Fryns syndrome, a Fryns syndrome phenocopy, or CDH. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Chromosomal aberrations in bladder cancer: fresh versus formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue and targeted FISH versus wide microarray-based CGH analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Panzeri

    Full Text Available Bladder carcinogenesis is believed to follow two alternative pathways driven by the loss of chromosome 9 and the gain of chromosome 7, albeit other nonrandom copy number alterations (CNAs were identified. However, confirmation studies are needed since many aspects of this model remain unclear and considerable heterogeneity among cases has emerged. One of the purposes of this study was to evaluate the performance of a targeted test (UroVysion assay widely used for the detection of Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC of the bladder, in two different types of material derived from the same tumor. We compared the results of UroVysion test performed on Freshly Isolated interphasic Nuclei (FIN and on Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE tissues from 22 TCCs and we didn't find substantial differences. A second goal was to assess the concordance between array-CGH profiles and the targeted chromosomal profiles of UroVysion assay on an additional set of 10 TCCs, in order to evaluate whether UroVysion is an adequately sensitive method for the identification of selected aneuploidies and nonrandom CNAs in TCCs. Our results confirmed the importance of global genomic screening methods, that is array based CGH, to comprehensively determine the genomic profiles of large series of TCCs tumors. However, this technique has yet some limitations, such as not being able to detect low level mosaicism, or not detecting any change in the number of copies for a kind of compensatory effect due to the presence of high cellular heterogeneity. Thus, it is still advisable to use complementary techniques such as array-CGH and FISH, as the former is able to detect alterations at the genome level not excluding any chromosome, but the latter is able to maintain the individual data at the level of single cells, even if it focuses on few genomic regions.

  15. Engineering BAC reporter gene constructs for mouse transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Maye, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A culmination of large-scale ideas and efforts has truly allowed for the use of large genomic DNA clones housed in Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) vectors for biological research. Fundamental advances that have allowed this to happen include (1) the completion of genome sequencing projects and the establishment of highly annotated web-accessible databases allowing for the rapid identity and purchase of BAC clones containing genes of interest. (2) The generation of methodologies to modify BACs genetically, allowing for the rapid creation of gene targeting constructs or transgenic reporter gene constructs using homologous recombination in bacteria.Recent efforts on our part have capitalized on these advances by using BACs and bacterial recombination methods to generate fluorescent protein reporter transgenic mice to study skeletal biology. The rationale for using BAC genomic DNA clones to engineer reporter gene constructs is based on their much larger size, thus increasing the likelihood that most, if not all, of a gene's respective cis regulator elements are present, giving a truer representation of the endogenous gene's expression. In a relatively short amount of time, we have become extremely proficient at generating BAC reporters. Contrary to the widely perceived notion that working with BACs is complex and difficult, we decided to write this chapter to encourage laboratories that are currently using traditional molecular cloning methods to engineer transgenic DNA constructs to strongly consider learning BAC methodologies. As an example, we walk through the steps we took to generate the transgenic reporter mouse line, Tenascin C (TNC)-mCherry.

  16. Annotation and BAC/PAC localization of nonredundant ESTs from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-04-25

    Apr 25, 2002 ... Putative functions were assigned at a stringency E value of 10–6 in. BLASTN and BLASTX algorithms. To understand the gene structure and function further, we have utilized the publicly available finished and unfinished rice BAC/PAC (BAC, bacterial artificial chromosome; PAC, P1 artificial chromosome) ...

  17. Genetic stability of pestivirus genomes cloned into BACs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, Ilona; Uttenthal, Åse

    pestivirus genomes to demonstrate the suitability of the BAC vector for harbouring pestivirus genomes. Two BAC clones, comprising the complete genomes of BDV Gifhorn (pBeloGif3) and CSFV Paderborn (pBeloPader10) were passaged 15 times in E.coli representing at least 360 bacteria generations. From 15th...

  18. Application of high resolution SNP arrays in patients with congenital ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TING-YING LEI

    lent oligonucleotide-based array-CGH to determine the exact breakpoints in 14 patients with partial deletions of chromo- some 13q21.1-qter. They were able to refine the smallest deletion region linked to cleft lip/palate (13q31.3–13q33.1). Except for the arrays that measure DNA copy number differ- ences only, SNP arrays, ...

  19. Enhancing genome investigations in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus via BAC library construction and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saski Christopher A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Culex quinquefasciatus (Say is a major species in the Culex pipiens complex and an important vector for several human pathogens including West Nile virus and parasitic filarial nematodes causing lymphatic filariasis. It is common throughout tropical and subtropical regions and is among the most geographically widespread mosquito species. Although the complete genome sequence is now available, additional genomic tools are needed to improve the sequence assembly. Findings We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library using the pIndigoBAC536 vector and HindIII partially digested DNA isolated from Cx. quinquefasciatus pupae, Johannesburg strain (NDJ. Insert size was estimated by NotI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of 82 randomly selected clones. To estimate genome coverage, each 384-well plate was pooled for screening with 29 simple sequence repeat (SSR and five gene markers. The NDJ library consists of 55,296 clones arrayed in 144 384-well microplates. Fragment insert size ranged from 50 to 190 kb in length (mean = 106 kb. Based on a mean insert size of 106 kb and a genome size of 579 Mbp, the BAC library provides ~10.1-fold coverage of the Cx. quinquefasciatus genome. PCR screening of BAC DNA plate pools for SSR loci from the genetic linkage map and for four genes associated with reproductive diapause in Culex pipiens resulted in a mean of 9.0 positive plate pools per locus. Conclusion The NDJ library represents an excellent resource for genome assembly enhancement and characterization in Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes.

  20. A multi-sample based method for identifying common CNVs in normal human genomic structure using high-resolution aCGH data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihyun Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is difficult to identify copy number variations (CNV in normal human genomic data due to noise and non-linear relationships between different genomic regions and signal intensity. A high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH containing 42 million probes, which is very large compared to previous arrays, was recently published. Most existing CNV detection algorithms do not work well because of noise associated with the large amount of input data and because most of the current methods were not designed to analyze normal human samples. Normal human genome analysis often requires a joint approach across multiple samples. However, the majority of existing methods can only identify CNVs from a single sample. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a multi-sample-based genomic variations detector (MGVD that uses segmentation to identify common breakpoints across multiple samples and a k-means-based clustering strategy. Unlike previous methods, MGVD simultaneously considers multiple samples with different genomic intensities and identifies CNVs and CNV zones (CNVZs; CNVZ is a more precise measure of the location of a genomic variant than the CNV region (CNVR. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We designed a specialized algorithm to detect common CNVs from extremely high-resolution multi-sample aCGH data. MGVD showed high sensitivity and a low false discovery rate for a simulated data set, and outperformed most current methods when real, high-resolution HapMap datasets were analyzed. MGVD also had the fastest runtime compared to the other algorithms evaluated when actual, high-resolution aCGH data were analyzed. The CNVZs identified by MGVD can be used in association studies for revealing relationships between phenotypes and genomic aberrations. Our algorithm was developed with standard C++ and is available in Linux and MS Windows format in the STL library. It is freely available at: http://embio.yonsei.ac.kr/~Park/mgvd.php.

  1. A multi-sample based method for identifying common CNVs in normal human genomic structure using high-resolution aCGH data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chihyun; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Yoon, Youngmi; Park, Sanghyun

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to identify copy number variations (CNV) in normal human genomic data due to noise and non-linear relationships between different genomic regions and signal intensity. A high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) containing 42 million probes, which is very large compared to previous arrays, was recently published. Most existing CNV detection algorithms do not work well because of noise associated with the large amount of input data and because most of the current methods were not designed to analyze normal human samples. Normal human genome analysis often requires a joint approach across multiple samples. However, the majority of existing methods can only identify CNVs from a single sample. We developed a multi-sample-based genomic variations detector (MGVD) that uses segmentation to identify common breakpoints across multiple samples and a k-means-based clustering strategy. Unlike previous methods, MGVD simultaneously considers multiple samples with different genomic intensities and identifies CNVs and CNV zones (CNVZs); CNVZ is a more precise measure of the location of a genomic variant than the CNV region (CNVR). We designed a specialized algorithm to detect common CNVs from extremely high-resolution multi-sample aCGH data. MGVD showed high sensitivity and a low false discovery rate for a simulated data set, and outperformed most current methods when real, high-resolution HapMap datasets were analyzed. MGVD also had the fastest runtime compared to the other algorithms evaluated when actual, high-resolution aCGH data were analyzed. The CNVZs identified by MGVD can be used in association studies for revealing relationships between phenotypes and genomic aberrations. Our algorithm was developed with standard C++ and is available in Linux and MS Windows format in the STL library. It is freely available at: http://embio.yonsei.ac.kr/~Park/mgvd.php.

  2. Bridging the gap from prenatal karyotyping to whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization in Hong Kong: survey on knowledge and acceptance of health-care providers and pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hiu Yee Heidi; Kan, Anita Sik-Yau; Hui, Pui Wah; Lee, Chin Peng; Tang, Mary Hoi Yin

    2017-12-01

    The use of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been increasingly widespread. The challenge of integration of this technology into prenatal diagnosis was the interpretation of results and communicating findings of unclear clinical significance. This study assesses the knowledge and acceptance of prenatal aCGH in Hong Kong obstetricians and pregnant women. The aim is to identify the needs and gaps before implementing the replacement of karyotyping with aCGH. Questionnaires with aCGH information in the form of pamphlets were sent by post to obstetrics and gynecology doctors. For the pregnant women group, a video presentation, pamphlets on aCGH and a self-administered questionnaire were provided at the antenatal clinic. The perception of aCGH between doctors and pregnant women was similar. Doctors not choosing aCGH were more concerned about the difficulty in counseling of variants of unknown significance and adult-onset disease in pregnant women, whereas pregnant women not choosing aCGH were more concerned about the increased waiting time leading to increased anxiety. Prenatal aCGH is perceived as a better test by both doctors and patients. Counseling support, training, and better understanding and communication of findings of unclear clinical significance are necessary to improve doctor-patient experience.

  3. Identification of novel candidate genes associated with cleft lip and palate using array comparative genomic hybridisation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osoegawa, K.; Vessere, G.M.; Utami, K.H.; Mansilla, M.A.; Johnson, M.K.; Riley, B.M.; L'Heureux, J.; Pfundt, R.P.; Staaf, J.; Vliet, W.A. van der; Lidral, A.C.; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Borg, A.; Schutte, B.C.; Lammer, E.J.; Murray, J.C.; Jong, PJ de

    2008-01-01

    AIM AND METHOD: We analysed DNA samples isolated from individuals born with cleft lip and cleft palate to identify deletions and duplications of candidate gene loci using array comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH). RESULTS: Of 83 syndromic cases analysed we identified one subject with a

  4. Array Comparative Genomic Hybridizations: Assessing the ability to recapture evolutionary relationships using an in silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasuga Takao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH with DNA microarrays has many biological applications including surveys of copy number changes in tumorogenesis, species detection and identification, and functional genomics studies among related organisms. Array CGH has also been used to infer phylogenetic relatedness among species or strains. Although the use of the entire genome can be seen as a considerable advantage for use in phylogenetic analysis, few such studies have questioned the reliability of array CGH to correctly determine evolutionary relationships. A potential flaw in this application lies in the fact that all comparisons are made to a single reference species. This situation differs from traditional DNA sequence, distance-based phylogenetic analyses where all possible pairwise comparisons are made for the isolates in question. By simulating array data based on the Neurospora crassa genome, we address this potential flaw and other questions regarding array CGH phylogeny. Results Our simulation data indicates that having a single reference can, in some cases, be a serious limitation when using this technique. Additionally, the tree building process with a single reference is sensitive to many factors including tree topology, choice of tree reconstruction method, and the distance metric used. Conclusions Without prior knowledge of the topology and placement of the reference taxon in the topology, the outcome is likely to be wrong and the error undetected. Given these limitations, using CGH to reveal phylogeny based on sequence divergence does not offer a robust alternative to traditional phylogenetic analysis.

  5. Transposon-mediated BAC transgenesis in human ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostovskaya, Maria; Fu, Jun; Obst, Mandy; Baer, Isabell; Weidlich, Stefanie; Wang, Hailong; Smith, Andrew J H; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis

    2012-10-01

    Transgenesis is a cornerstone of molecular biology. The ability to integrate a specifically engineered piece of DNA into the genome of a living system is fundamental to our efforts to understand life and exploit its implications for medicine, nanotechnology and bioprospecting. However, transgenesis has been hampered by position effects and multi-copy integration problems, which are mainly due to the use of small, plasmid-based transgenes. Large transgenes based on native genomic regions cloned into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) circumvent these problems but are prone to fragmentation. Herein, we report that contrary to widely held notions, large BAC-sized constructs do not prohibit transposition. We also report the first reliable method for BAC transgenesis in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposon inverted repeats were integrated into BAC vectors by recombineering, followed by co-lipofection with the corresponding transposase in hESCs to generate robust fluorescent protein reporter lines for OCT4, NANOG, GATA4 and PAX6. BAC transposition delivers several advantages, including increased frequencies of single-copy, full-length integration, which will be useful in all transgenic systems but especially in difficult venues like hESCs.

  6. Array-CGH diagnosis in ovarian failure: identification of new molecular actors for ovarian physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Jaillard, Sylvie; Akloul, Linda; Beaumont, Marion; Hamdi-Roze, Houda; Dubourg, Christele; Odent, Sylvie; Duros, Sol?ne; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Ravel, C?lia

    2016-01-01

    Background Ovarian failure (OF) is considered premature if it occurs before the age of 40. This study investigates the genetic aetiology underlying OF in women under the age of 40?years. Methods We conducted an experimental prospective study performing all genome microarrays in 60 patients younger than 40?years presenting an OF revealed by a decrease of circulating Anti-M?llerian Hormone (AMH) and leading to an oocyte donation program. Results We identified nine significant copy number variat...

  7. Fine-tiling array CGH to improve diagnostics for alpha- and beta-thalassemia rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phylipsen, M.; Chaibunruang, A.; Vogelaar, I.P.; Balak, J.R.; Schaap, R.A.; Ariyurek, Y.; Fucharoen, S.; den Dunnen, J.T.; Giordano, P.C.; Bakker, E.; Harteveld, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for thalassemia causing deletions has lead to the detection of new rearrangements. Knowledge of the exact breakpoint sequences should give more insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying these rearrangements, and would

  8. Matching of array CGH and gene expression microarray features for the purpose of integrative genomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Wieringen Wessel N

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of genomic studies interrogating more than one molecular level is published. Bioinformatics follows biological practice, and recent years have seen a surge in methodology for the integrative analysis of genomic data. Often such analyses require knowledge of which elements of one platform link to those of another. Although important, many integrative analyses do not or insufficiently detail the matching of the platforms. Results We describe, illustrate and discuss six matching procedures. They are implemented in the R-package sigaR (available from Bioconductor. The principles underlying the presented matching procedures are generic, and can be combined to form new matching approaches or be applied to the matching of other platforms. Illustration of the matching procedures on a variety of data sets reveals how the procedures differ in the use of the available data, and may even lead to different results for individual genes. Conclusions Matching of data from multiple genomics platforms is an important preprocessing step for many integrative bioinformatic analysis, for which we present six generic procedures, both old and new. They have been implemented in the R-package sigaR, available from Bioconductor.

  9. Comparative cytogenetic characterization of primary canine melanocytic lesions using array CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Poorman, Kelsey; Borst, Luke; Moroff, Scott; Roy, Siddharth; Labelle, Philippe; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Breen, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytic lesions originating from the oral mucosa or cutaneous epithelium are common in the general dog population, with up to 100,000 diagnoses each year in the USA. Oral melanoma is the most frequent canine neoplasm of the oral cavity, exhibiting a highly aggressive course. Cutaneous melanocytomas occur frequently, but rarely develop into a malignant form. Despite the differential prognosis, it has been assumed that subtypes of melanocytic lesions represent the same disease. To address t...

  10. Definition of a critical region on chromosome 18 for congenital aural atresia by arrayCGH.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Jonkers, Y.M.H.; Nuijten, I.; Janssen, I.M.; Vliet, W. van der; Huys, E.; Vermeesch, J.; Buggenhout, G.J.C.M. van; Fryns, J.P.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Terhal, P.; Lacombe, D.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van

    2003-01-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 occur in approximately 1 in 10,000 live births. Congenital aural atresia (CAA), or narrow external auditory canals, occurs in approximately 66% of all patients who have a terminal deletion 18q. The present report describes a series of 20 patients with CAA,

  11. Definition of a critical region on chromosome 18 for congenital aural atresia by arrayCGH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, JA; Jonkers, Y; Nuijten, [No Value; Janssen, [No Value; van der Vliet, W; Huys, E; Vermeesch, J; Van Buggenhout, G; Fryns, JP; Admiraal, R; Terhal, P; Lacombe, D; van Kessel, AG; Smeets, D; Schoenmakers, EFPM; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, CM

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 occur in similar to1 in 10,000 live births. Congenital aural atresia (CAA), or narrow external auditory canals, occurs in similar to66% of all patients who have a terminal deletion 18q. The present report describes a series of 20 patients with CAA, of whom

  12. Phenotype and 244k array-CGH characterization of chromosome 13q deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Maria; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Stoeva, Radka

    2009-01-01

    malformations (13q33.1-qter), Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) (13q32.2-q33.1), corpus callosum agenesis (CCA) (13q32.3-q33.1), meningocele/encephalocele (13q31.3-qter), DWM, CCA, and neural tube defects (NTDs) taken together (13q32.3-q33.1), ano-/microphthalmia (13q31.3-13qter), cleft lip/palate (13q31.3-13q33...

  13. Salivary gland carcinosarcoma: oligonucleotide array CGH reveals similar genomic profiles in epithelial and mesenchymal components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vékony, H.; Leemans, C.R.; Ylstra, B.; Meijer, G.A.; van der Waal, I.; Bloemena, E.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present a case of parotid gland de novo carcinosarcoma. Salivary gland carcinosarcoma (or true malignant mixed tumor) is a rare biphasic neoplasm, composed of both malignant epithelial and malignant mesenchymal components. It is yet unclear whether these two phenotypes occur by

  14. Molecular Karyotyping by Array CGH. Linking gene dosage alterations to disease phenotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, L.E.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements can lead to various serious clinical manifestations, including mental retardation and congenital malformation syndromes. Chromosomal rearrangements larger than 5-10 Mb in size can be detected by conventional karyotyping. A considerable number of clinical disorders,

  15. A BAC end view of the Musa acuminata genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Town Christopher D

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musa species contain the fourth most important crop in developing countries. Here, we report the analysis of 6,252 BAC end-sequences, in order to view the sequence composition of the Musa acuminata genome in a cost effective and efficient manner. Results BAC end sequencing generated 6,252 reads representing 4,420,944 bp, including 2,979 clone pairs with an average read length after cleaning and filtering of 707 bp. All sequences have been submitted to GenBank, with the accession numbers DX451975 – DX458350. The BAC end-sequences, were searched against several databases and significant homology was found to mitochondria and chloroplast (2.6%, transposons and repetitive sequences (36% and proteins (11%. Functional interpretation of the protein matches was carried out by Gene Ontology assignments from matches to Arabidopsis and was shown to cover a broad range of categories. From protein matching regions of Musa BAC end-sequences, it was determined that the GC content of coding regions was 47%. Where protein matches encompassed a start codon, GC content as a function of position (5' to 3' across 129 bp sliding windows generates a "rice-like" gradient. A total of 352 potential SSR markers were discovered. The most abundant simple sequence repeats in four size categories were AT-rich. After filtering mitochondria and chloroplast matches, thousands of BAC end-sequences had a significant BLASTN match to the Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis genome sequence. Of these, a small number of BAC end-sequence pairs were shown to map to neighboring regions of the Oryza sativa genome representing regions of potential microsynteny. Conclusion Database searches with the BAC end-sequences and ab initio analysis identified those reads likely to contain transposons, repeat sequences, proteins and simple sequence repeats. Approximately 600 BAC end-sequences contained protein sequences that were not found in the existing available Musa expressed

  16. An efficient approach to BAC based assembly of complex genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visendi, Paul; Berkman, Paul J; Hayashi, Satomi; Golicz, Agnieszka A; Bayer, Philipp E; Ruperao, Pradeep; Hurgobin, Bhavna; Montenegro, Juan; Chan, Chon-Kit Kenneth; Staňková, Helena; Batley, Jacqueline; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Edwards, David

    2016-01-01

    There has been an exponential growth in the number of genome sequencing projects since the introduction of next generation DNA sequencing technologies. Genome projects have increasingly involved assembly of whole genome data which produces inferior assemblies compared to traditional Sanger sequencing of genomic fragments cloned into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). While whole genome shotgun sequencing using next generation sequencing (NGS) is relatively fast and inexpensive, this method is extremely challenging for highly complex genomes, where polyploidy or high repeat content confounds accurate assembly, or where a highly accurate 'gold' reference is required. Several attempts have been made to improve genome sequencing approaches by incorporating NGS methods, to variable success. We present the application of a novel BAC sequencing approach which combines indexed pools of BACs, Illumina paired read sequencing, a sequence assembler specifically designed for complex BAC assembly, and a custom bioinformatics pipeline. We demonstrate this method by sequencing and assembling BAC cloned fragments from bread wheat and sugarcane genomes. We demonstrate that our assembly approach is accurate, robust, cost effective and scalable, with applications for complete genome sequencing in large and complex genomes.

  17. Array-komparativ genomisk hybridisering er en ny og lovende metode til prænatal kromosomundersøgelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Lone Nikoline; Ekelund, Charlotte; Fagerberg, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a very sensitive method for identifying chromosomal imbalances and is now used on a clinical basis for prenatal diagnosis. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of the method, the ethical considerations and the current...

  18. Computer holography: 3D digital art based on high-definition CGH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, K; Arima, Y; Nishi, H; Yamashita, H; Yoshizaki, Y; Ogawa, K; Nakahara, S

    2013-01-01

    Our recent works of high-definition computer-generated holograms (CGH) and the techniques used for the creation, such as the polygon-based method, silhouette method and digitized holography, are summarized and reviewed in this paper. The concept of computer holography is proposed in terms of integrating and crystalizing the techniques into novel digital art.

  19. Chromosomal aberrations detected by comparative genomic hybridization technique (CGH in invasive ductal carcinoma of breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshiravanpour P

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nonlethal genetic damage is the basis for carcinogenesis. As various gene aberrations accumulate, malignant tumors are formed, regardless of whether the genetic damage is subtle or large enough to be distinguished in a karyotype. The study of chromosomal changes in tumor cells is important in the identification of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes by molecular cloning of genes in the vicinity of chromosomal aberrations. Furthermore, some specific aberrations can be of great diagnostic and prognostic value. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is used to screen the entire genome for the detection and/or location chromosomal copy number changes.Methods: In this study, frozen sections of 20 primary breast tumors diagnosed as invasive ductal carcinoma from the Cancer Institute of Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran, were studied by CGH to detect chromosomal aberrations. We compared histopathological and immunohistochemical findings.Results: Hybridization in four of the cases was not optimal for CGH analysis and they were excluded from the study. DNA copy number changes were detected in 12 (75% of the remaining 16 cases. Twenty-one instances of chromosomal aberrations were detected in total, including: +1q, +17q, +8q, +20q, -13q, -11q, -22q, -1p, -16q, -8p. The most frequent were +1q, +17q, +8q, -13q, similar to other studies. In three cases, we detected -13q, which is associated with axillary lymph node metastasis and was reported in one previous study. The mean numbers of chromosomal aberrations per tumor in metastatic and nonmetastatic tumors was 1.5 and 1, respectively. No other association between detected chromosomal aberrations and histopathological and immunohistochemical findings were seen.Conclusion: Since intermediately to widely invasive carcinomas are more likely to have chromosomal aberrations, CGH can be a valuable prognostic tool. Furthermore, CGH can be used to detect targeting molecules within novel amplifications

  20. Genome-wide mapping of copy number variation in humans: comparative analysis of high resolution array platforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini R Haraksingh

    Full Text Available Accurate and efficient genome-wide detection of copy number variants (CNVs is essential for understanding human genomic variation, genome-wide CNV association type studies, cytogenetics research and diagnostics, and independent validation of CNVs identified from sequencing based technologies. Numerous, array-based platforms for CNV detection exist utilizing array Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP genotyping or both. We have quantitatively assessed the abilities of twelve leading genome-wide CNV detection platforms to accurately detect Gold Standard sets of CNVs in the genome of HapMap CEU sample NA12878, and found significant differences in performance. The technologies analyzed were the NimbleGen 4.2 M, 2.1 M and 3×720 K Whole Genome and CNV focused arrays, the Agilent 1×1 M CGH and High Resolution and 2×400 K CNV and SNP+CGH arrays, the Illumina Human Omni1Quad array and the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. The Gold Standards used were a 1000 Genomes Project sequencing-based set of 3997 validated CNVs and an ultra high-resolution aCGH-based set of 756 validated CNVs. We found that sensitivity, total number, size range and breakpoint resolution of CNV calls were highest for CNV focused arrays. Our results are important for cost effective CNV detection and validation for both basic and clinical applications.

  1. Characterizing a novel strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BAC03 for potential biological control application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Identify and characterize a bacterial strain from suppressive soil, BAC03, evaluate its antimicrobial activity against Streptomyces scabies and other microorganisms, and characterize an antimicrobial substance produced by this strain. Methods and Results: Bacterial strain BAC03 (isolated from ...

  2. Microdeletion and microduplication analysis of chinese conotruncal defects patients with targeted array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Gong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to develop a reliable targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH to detect microdeletions and microduplications in congenital conotruncal defects (CTDs, especially on 22q11.2 region, and for some other chromosomal aberrations, such as 5p15-5p, 7q11.23 and 4p16.3. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with CTDs, including 12 pulmonary atresia (PA, 10 double-outlet right ventricle (DORV, 3 transposition of great arteries (TGA, 1 tetralogy of Fallot (TOF and one ventricular septal defect (VSD, were enrolled in this study and screened for pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs, using Agilent 8 x 15K targeted aCGH. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was performed to test the molecular results of targeted aCGH. RESULTS: Four of 27 patients (14.8% had 22q11.2 CNVs, 1 microdeletion and 3 microduplications. qPCR test confirmed the microdeletion and microduplication detected by the targeted aCGH. CONCLUSION: Chromosomal abnormalities were a well-known cause of multiple congenital anomalies (MCA. This aCGH using arrays with high-density coverage in the targeted regions can detect genomic imbalances including 22q11.2 and other 10 kinds CNVs effectively and quickly. This approach has the potential to be applied to detect aneuploidy and common microdeletion/microduplication syndromes on a single microarray.

  3. An efficient approach to BAC based assembly of complex genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Visendi, P.; Berkman, P.J.; Hayashi, S.; Golicz, A.A.; Bayer, P.E.; Ruperao, P.; Hurgobin, B.; Montenegro, J.; Chan, C.K.K.; Staňková, Helena; Batley, J.; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Edwards, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, JAN 20 (2016), s. 2 ISSN 1746-4811 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2554 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Next-generation sequencing * SASSY * BAC Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.510, year: 2016

  4. Annotation and BAC/PAC localization of nonredundant ESTs from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-04-25

    Apr 25, 2002 ... (IRGSP) group isolated 29,000 cDNA clones from japo- nica rice (Yamamoto and Sasaki 1997), partially ..... BI305502 brain-specific protein. D16140. Chr 3 BAC OSJNBa0018H01 .... BI305853 putative mitochondrial carrier protein AF372957 Chr 5 clone OJ1045C06. AC104272 0.0. 313. BI305566 rd22.

  5. The need for blood alcohol concentration (BAC) legislation in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Patrick O Erah

    In Nigeria, the correlation between alcohol abuse and incidence of drink-driving and alcohol- related motor task and road trauma has been recognised. Unrestricted availability of alcohol and ignorance, coupled with the absence of Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) threshold to act as a legal reference point for controlling ...

  6. The need for blood alcohol concentration (BAC) legislation in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Nigeria, the correlation between alcohol abuse and incidence of drink-driving and alcohol-related motor task and road trauma has been recognised. Unrestricted availability of alcohol and ignorance, coupled with the absence of Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) threshold to act as a legal reference point for controlling ...

  7. Creation of BAC genomic resources for cocoa ( Theobroma cacao L.) for physical mapping of RGA containing BAC clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, D; Lanaud, C; Sabau, X; Fouet, O; Le Cunff, L; Ruiz, E; Risterucci, A M; Glaszmann, J C; Piffanelli, P

    2004-05-01

    We have constructed and validated the first cocoa ( Theobroma cacao L.) BAC library, with the aim of developing molecular resources to study the structure and evolution of the genome of this perennial crop. This library contains 36,864 clones with an average insert size of 120 kb, representing approximately ten haploid genome equivalents. It was constructed from the genotype Scavina-6 (Sca-6), a Forastero clone highly resistant to cocoa pathogens and a parent of existing mapping populations. Validation of the BAC library was carried out with a set of 13 genetically-anchored single copy and one duplicated markers. An average of nine BAC clones per probe was identified, giving an initial experimental estimation of the genome coverage represented in the library. Screening of the library with a set of resistance gene analogues (RGAs), previously mapped in cocoa and co-localizing with QTL for resistance to Phytophthora traits, confirmed at the physical level the tight clustering of RGAs in the cocoa genome and provided the first insights into the relationships between genetic and physical distances in the cocoa genome. This library represents an available BAC resource for structural genomic studies or map-based cloning of genes corresponding to important QTLs for agronomic traits such as resistance genes to major cocoa pathogens like Phytophthora spp ( palmivora and megakarya), Crinipellis perniciosa and Moniliophthora roreri.

  8. Can genome array screening replace FISH as a front-line test in multiple myeloma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneva, Temenushka; Brazma, Diana; Gancheva, Katya; Howard-Reeves, Julie; Raynov, Julian; Grace, Colin; Nacheva, Elisabeth P

    2014-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant disorder characterized by neoplastic transformation of mature B cells in the bone marrow (BM), accompanied by complex genetic changes. The disease is heterogeneous at both the clinical and genomic levels. Molecular genetics and genomic investigations have demonstrated that disease evolution is associated with an accumulation of specific aberrations, mostly genome imbalances, which not only shed light on the disease pathogenesis but also allow risk assessment and treatment monitoring. We used a catalogue version of the Agilent 8x60K oligo-array with immuno-magnetically isolated CD138(+) cells from BM samples of 50 patients with myeloma to evaluate the merit of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) as a diagnostic tool. We demonstrate the ability of aCGH to detect clonal imbalances to a level well below established clinically significant thresholds. aCGH, combined with target enrichment and complemented with tests for IGH rearrangements offers a cost neutral alternative to multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization screening. While we recognize the limitations of the standard version of the 8x60k array we demonstrate the value of aCGH as a first tier test in the diagnostic workup of MM. The array technology enables high-risk disease stratification with the added benefit of providing whole genome data to assist in establishing clinically relevant predicative markers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Comparison of chromosomal and array-based comparative genomic hybridization for the detection of genomic imbalances in primary prostate carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Marianne

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to gain new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer, we performed array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH on a series of 46 primary prostate carcinomas using a 1 Mbp whole-genome coverage platform. As chromosomal comparative genomic hybridization (cCGH data was available for these samples, we compared the sensitivity and overall concordance of the two methodologies, and used the combined information to infer the best of three different aCGH scoring approaches. Results Our data demonstrate that the reliability of aCGH in the analysis of primary prostate carcinomas depends to some extent on the scoring approach used, with the breakpoint estimation method being the most sensitive and reliable. The pattern of copy number changes detected by aCGH was concordant with that of cCGH, but the higher resolution technique detected 2.7 times more aberrations and 15.2% more carcinomas with genomic imbalances. We additionally show that several aberrations were consistently overlooked using cCGH, such as small deletions at 5q, 6q, 12p, and 17p. The latter were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting TP53, although only one carcinoma harbored a point mutation in this gene. Strikingly, homozygous deletions at 10q23.31, encompassing the PTEN locus, were seen in 58% of the cases with 10q loss. Conclusion We conclude that aCGH can significantly improve the detection of genomic aberrations in cancer cells as compared to previously established whole-genome methodologies, although contamination with normal cells may influence the sensitivity and specificity of some scoring approaches. Our work delineated recurrent copy number changes and revealed novel amplified loci and frequent homozygous deletions in primary prostate carcinomas, which may guide future work aimed at identifying the relevant target genes. In particular, biallelic loss seems to be a frequent mechanism of inactivation

  10. An application of CART algorithm in genetics: IGFs and cGH polymorphisms in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Selçuk

    2017-04-01

    The avian insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGFs) and avian growth hormone (cGH) genes are the most important genes that can affect bird performance traits because of its important function in growth and metabolism. Understanding the molecular genetic basis of variation in growth-related traits is of importance for continued improvement and increased rates of genetic gain. The objective of the present study was to identify polymorphisms of cGH and IGFs genes in Japanese quail using conventional least square method (LSM) and CART algorithm. Therefore, this study was aimed to demonstrate at determining the polymorphisms of two genes related growth characteristics via CART algorithm. A simulated data set was generated to analyze by adhering the results of some poultry genetic studies which it includes live weights at 5 weeks of age, 3 alleles and 6 genotypes of cGH and 2 alleles and 3 genotypes of IGFs. As a result, it has been determined that the CART algorithm has some advantages as for that LSM.

  11. Library Resources for Bac End Sequencing. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieter J. de Jong

    2000-10-01

    Studies directed towards the specific aims outlined for this research award are summarized. The RPCI II Human Bac Library has been expanded by the addition of 6.9-fold genomic coverage. This segment has been generated from a MBOI partial digest of the same anonymous donor DNA used for the rest of the library. A new cloning vector, pTARBAC1, has been constructed and used in the construction of RPCI-II segment 5. This new cloning vector provides a new strategy in identifying targeted genomic regions and will greatly facilitate a large-scale analysis for positional cloning. A new maleCS7BC/6J mouse BAC library has been constructed. RPCI-23 contain 576 plates (approx 210,000 clones) and represents approximately 11-fold coverage of the mouse genome.

  12. Chromosomal minimal critical regions in therapy-related leukemia appear different from those of de novo leukemia by high-resolution aCGH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Itzhar

    Full Text Available Therapy-related acute leukemia (t-AML, is a severe complication of cytotoxic therapy used for primary cancer treatment. The outcome of these patients is poor, compared to people who develop de novo acute leukemia (p-AML. Cytogenetic abnormalities in t-AML are similar to those found in p-AML but present more frequent unfavorable karyotypes depending on the inducting agent. Losses of chromosome 5 or 7 are observed after alkylating agents while balanced translocations are found after topoisomerase II inhibitors. This study compared t-AML to p-AML using high resolution array CGH in order to find copy number abnormalities (CNA at a higher resolution than conventional cytogenetics. More CNAs were observed in 30 t-AML than in 36 p-AML: 104 CNAs were observed with 63 losses and 41 gains (mean number 3.46 per case in t-AML, while in p-AML, 69 CNAs were observed with 32 losses and 37 gains (mean number of 1.9 per case. In primary leukemia with a previously "normal" karyotype, 18% exhibited a previously undetected CNA, whereas in the (few t-AML with a normal karyotype, the rate was 50%. Several minimal critical regions (MCRs were found in t-AML and p-AML. No common MCRs were found in the two groups. In t-AML a 40 kb deleted MCR pointed to RUNX1 on 21q22, a gene coding for a transcription factor implicated in frequent rearrangements in leukemia and in familial thrombocytopenia. In de novo AML, a 1 Mb MCR harboring ERG and ETS2 was observed from patients with complex aCGH profiles. High resolution cytogenomics obtained by aCGH and similar techniques already published allowed us to characterize numerous non random chromosome abnormalities. This work supports the hypothesis that they can be classified into several categories: abnormalities common to all AML; those more frequently found in t-AML and those specifically found in p-AML.

  13. Prognostic impact of array-based genomic profiles in esophageal squamous cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carneiro, Ana; Isinger, Anna; Karlsson, Anna

    2008-01-01

    p13.3 independently predicted poor survival in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: aCGH profiling verified genetic complexity in ESCC and herein identified imbalances of multiple central tumorigenic pathways. Distinct gains correlate with clinicopathological variables and independently predict......BACKGROUND: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a genetically complex tumor type and a major cause of cancer related mortality. Although distinct genetic alterations have been linked to ESCC development and prognosis, the genetic alterations have not gained clinical applicability. We...... applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to obtain a whole genome copy number profile relevant for identifying deranged pathways and clinically applicable markers. METHODS: A 32 k aCGH platform was used for high resolution mapping of copy number changes in 30 stage I-IV ESCC. Potential...

  14. Clinical significance of previously cryptic copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome determined using combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jin Ok; Seo, Eul Ju; Lee, Seong Wook; Suh, Jin Kyung; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong Jin

    2014-07-01

    The combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray (CGH+SNP microarray) platform can simultaneously detect copy number alterations (CNA) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Eighteen children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n=15) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=3) were studied using CGH+SNP microarray to evaluate the clinical significance of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations. CGH+SNP microarray revealed CNAs at 14 regions in 9 patients, while metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis detected CNAs in 11 regions in 8 patients. Using CGH+SNP microarray, LOHs>10 Mb involving terminal regions or the whole chromosome were detected in 3 of 18 patients (17%). CGH+SNP microarray revealed cryptic LOHs with or without CNAs in 3 of 5 patients with normal karyotypes. CGH+SNP microarray detected additional cryptic CNAs (n=2) and LOHs (n=5) in 6 of 13 patients with abnormal MC. In total, 9 patients demonstrated additional aberrations, including CNAs (n=3) and/or LOHs (n=8). Three of 15 patients with AML and terminal LOH>10 Mb demonstrated a significantly inferior relapse-free survival rate (P=0.041). This study demonstrates that CGH+SNP microarray can simultaneously detect previously cryptic CNAs and LOH, which may demonstrate prognostic implications.

  15. Germ-line transformation of the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, using a piggyBac vector in the presence of endogenous piggyBac elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, K A; Shearman, D C A; Streamer, K; Morrow, J L; Handler, A M; Frommer, M

    2011-01-01

    We report the heritable germ-line transformation of the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, using a piggyBac vector marked with either the fluorescent protein DsRed or EGFP. A transformation frequency of 5-10% was obtained. Inheritance of the transgenes has remained stable over more than 15 generations despite the presence of endogenous piggyBac sequences in the B. tryoni genome. The sequence of insertion sites shows the usual canonical pattern of piggyBac integraton into TTAA target sites. An investigation of endogenous piggyBac elements in the B. tryoni genome reveals the presence of sequences almost identical to those reported recently for the B. dorsalis complex of fruit flies and two noctuid moths, suggesting a common origin of piggyBac sequences in these species. The availability of transformation protocols for B. tryoni has the potential to deliver improvements in the performance of the Sterile Insect Technique for this pest species.

  16. Exome sequencing of germline DNA from non-BRCA1/2 familial breast cancer cases selected on the basis of aCGH tumor profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentine S Hilbers

    Full Text Available The bulk of familial breast cancer risk (∼70% cannot be explained by mutations in the known predisposition genes, primarily BRCA1 and BRCA2. Underlying genetic heterogeneity in these cases is the probable explanation for the failure of all attempts to identify further high-risk alleles. While exome sequencing of non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cases is a promising strategy to detect new high-risk genes, rational approaches to the rigorous pre-selection of cases are needed to reduce heterogeneity. We selected six families in which the tumours of multiple cases showed a specific genomic profile on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Linkage analysis in these families revealed a region on chromosome 4 with a LOD score of 2.49 under homogeneity. We then analysed the germline DNA of two patients from each family using exome sequencing. Initially focusing on the linkage region, no potentially pathogenic variants could be identified in more than one family. Variants outside the linkage region were then analysed, and we detected multiple possibly pathogenic variants in genes that encode DNA integrity maintenance proteins. However, further analysis led to the rejection of all variants due to poor co-segregation or a relatively high allele frequency in a control population. We concluded that using CGH results to focus on a sub-set of families for sequencing analysis did not enable us to identify a common genetic change responsible for the aggregation of breast cancer in these families. Our data also support the emerging view that non-BRCA1/2 hereditary breast cancer families have a very heterogeneous genetic basis.

  17. Time to Detection with BacT/Alert FA Plus Compared to BacT/Alert FA Blood Culture Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutman, A; Fisher Even-Tsur, S; Shapiro, G; Braun, T; Schwartz, D; Carmeli, Y

    2016-09-01

    Rapid identification of the causative pathogen in patients with bacteremia allows adjustment of antibiotic therapy and improves patient outcomes. We compared in vitro and real-life time to detection (TTD) of two blood culture media, BacT/Alert FA (FA) and BacT/Alert FA Plus (FA Plus), for the nine most common species of bacterial pathogens recovered from blood samples. Experimental data from simulated cultures was compared with microbiology records of TTD for both culture media with growth of the species of interest in clinical blood cultures. In the experimental conditions, median TTD was 3.8 hours (23.9 %) shorter using FA Plus media. The magnitude of reduction differed between species. Similarly, in real life data, FA Plus had shorter TTD than FA media; however, the difference between culture media was smaller, and median TTD was only 1 hour (8.5 %) less. We found shorter TTD with BacT/Alert FA Plus culture media, both experimentally and in real-life conditions and unrelated to antibiotic neutralization, highlighting the importance of appropriate blood culture media selection.

  18. Characterization of a deep-coverage carrot (Daucus carota L.) BAC library and initial analysis of BAC-end sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, Pablo F; Chung, Sang-Min; Szklarczyk, Marek; Grzebelus, Dariusz; Senalik, Douglas; Atkins, Anne E; Simon, Philipp W

    2009-03-01

    Carrot is the most economically important member of the Apiaceae family and a major source of provitamin A carotenoids in the human diet. However, carrot molecular resources are relatively underdeveloped, hampering a number of genetic studies. Here, we report on the synthesis and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of carrot. The library is 17.3-fold redundant and consists of 92,160 clones with an average insert size of 121 kb. To provide an overview of the composition and organization of the carrot nuclear genome we generated and analyzed 2,696 BAC-end sequences (BES) from nearly 2,000 BACs, totaling 1.74 Mb of BES. This analysis revealed that 14% of the BES consists of known repetitive elements, with transposable elements representing more than 80% of this fraction. Eleven novel carrot repetitive elements were identified, covering 8.5% of the BES. Analysis of microsatellites showed a comparably low frequency for these elements in the carrot BES. Comparisons of the translated BES with protein databases indicated that approximately 10% of the carrot genome represents coding sequences. Moreover, among eight dicot species used for comparison purposes, carrot BES had highest homology to protein-coding sequences from tomato. This deep-coverage library will aid carrot breeding and genetics.

  19. Evaluation of Real-Time Quantitative PCR as a Standard Cytogenetic Diagnostic Tool for Confirmation of Microarray (aCGH) Results and Determination of Inheritance

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rubin; Carter, Jenny; Lench, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the use of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) as a diagnostic tool for follow up of abnormal microarray (aCGH) results. Method: qPCR was performed on 207 samples with known aCGH results to detect chromosomal abnormality and determine the capability of qPCR. Eighty-four samples were processed and the results compared with the original aCGH result and with one or more of the alternative follow-up methods: aCGH, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), or karyotyping. A separat...

  20. Protection of specific maternal messenger RNAs by the P body protein CGH-1 (Dhh1/RCK) during Caenorhabditis elegans oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boag, Peter R.; Atalay, Arzu; Robida, Stacey; Reinke, Valerie; Blackwell, T. Keith

    2008-01-01

    During oogenesis, numerous messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are maintained in a translationally silenced state. In eukaryotic cells, various translation inhibition and mRNA degradation mechanisms congregate in cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies). The P body protein Dhh1 inhibits translation and promotes decapping-mediated mRNA decay together with Pat1 in yeast, and has been implicated in mRNA storage in metazoan oocytes. Here, we have investigated in Caenorhabditis elegans whether Dhh1 and Pat1 generally function together, and how they influence mRNA sequestration during oogenesis. We show that in somatic tissues, the Dhh1 orthologue (CGH-1) forms Pat1 (patr-1)-dependent P bodies that are involved in mRNA decapping. In contrast, during oogenesis, CGH-1 forms patr-1–independent mRNA storage bodies. CGH-1 then associates with translational regulators and a specific set of maternal mRNAs, and prevents those mRNAs from being degraded. Our results identify somatic and germ cell CGH-1 functions that are distinguished by the involvement of PATR-1, and reveal that during oogenesis, numerous translationally regulated mRNAs are specifically protected by a CGH-1–dependent mechanism. PMID:18695045

  1. GenMapDB: a database of mapped human BAC clones

    OpenAIRE

    Morley, Michael; Arcaro, Melissa; Burdick, Joshua; Yonescu, Raluca; Reid, Thomas; Kirsch, Ilan R.; Cheung, Vivian G.

    2001-01-01

    GenMapDB (http://genomics.med.upenn.edu/genmapdb) is a repository of human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones mapped by our laboratory to sequence-tagged site markers. Currently, GenMapDB contains over 3000 mapped clones that span 19 chromosomes, chromosomes 2, 4, 5, 9–22, X and Y. This database provides positional information about human BAC clones from the RPCI-11 human male BAC library. It also contains restriction fragment analysis data and end sequen...

  2. Identification of chromosome aberrations in sporadic microsatellite stable and unstable colorectal cancers using array comparative genomic hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Dyrsø; Li, Jian; Wang, Kai

    2011-01-01

    cancers constitute approximately 85% of sporadic cases, whereas microsatellite unstable (MSI) cases constitute the remaining 15%. In this study, we used array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify genomic hotspot regions that harbor recurrent copy number changes. The study material...

  3. Genome-wide oligonucleotide-based array comparative genome hybridization analysis of non-isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Scott; M. Klaassens; A.M. Holder (Ashley); K.P. Lally (Kevin); C.J. Fernandes (Caraciolo); R-J.H. Galjaard (Robert-Jan); D. Tibboel (Dick); J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies); B. Lee (Brendan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractNon-isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH+) is a severe birth defect that is often caused by de novo chromosomal anomalies. In this report, we use genome-wide oligonucleotide-based array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) followed by rapid real-time quantitative PCR analysis

  4. A Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei BAC library - contig building and microsynteny studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Wu, B.; Giese, H.

    2002-01-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei, containing 12,000 clones with an average insert size of 41 kb, was constructed. The library represents about three genome equivalents and BAC-end sequencing showed a high content of repetitive sequences, making...... contigs, at or close to avirulence loci, were constructed. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were developed from BAC-end sequences to link the contigs to the genetic maps. Two other BAC contigs were used to study microsynteny between B. graminis and two other ascomycetes, Neurospora crassa...

  5. Genomic imbalances in 5918 malignant epithelial tumors: an explorative meta-analysis of chromosomal CGH data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baudis Michael

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with most human malignancies, with gains and losses on some genomic regions associated with particular entities. Methods Of the 15429 cases collected for the Progenetix molecular-cytogenetic database, 5918 malignant epithelial neoplasias analyzed by chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH were selected for further evaluation. For the 22 clinico-pathological entities with more than 50 cases, summary profiles for genomic imbalances were generated from case specific data and analyzed. Results With large variation in overall genomic instability, recurring genomic gains and losses were prominent. Most entities showed frequent gains involving 8q2, while gains on 20q, 1q, 3q, 5p, 7q and 17q were frequent in different entities. Loss "hot spots" included 3p, 4q, 13q, 17p and 18q among others. Related average imbalance patterns were found for clinically distinct entities, e.g. hepatocellular carcinomas (ca. and ductal breast ca., as well as for histologically related entities (squamous cell ca. of different sites. Conclusion Although considerable case-by-case variation of genomic profiles can be found by CGH in epithelial malignancies, a limited set of variously combined chromosomal imbalances may be typical for carcinogenesis. Focus on the respective regions should aid in target gene detection and pathway deduction.

  6. Computer-generated holograms (CGH) realization: the integration of dedicated software tool with digital slides printer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Vittorio; Francini, Franco

    1997-12-01

    Last generation of digital printer is usually characterized by a spatial resolution enough high to allow the designer to realize a binary CGH directly on a transparent film avoiding photographic reduction techniques. These devices are able to produce slides or offset prints. Furthermore, services supplied by commercial printing company provide an inexpensive method to rapidly verify the validity of the design by means of a test-and-trial process. Notably, this low-cost approach appears to be suitable for a didactical environment. On the basis of these considerations, a set of software tools able to design CGH's has been developed. The guidelines inspiring the work have been the following ones: (1) ray-tracing approach, considering the object to be reproduced as source of spherical waves; (2) Optimization and speed-up of the algorithms used, in order to produce a portable code, runnable on several hardware platforms. In this paper calculation methods to obtain some fundamental geometric functions (points, lines, curves) are described. Furthermore, by the juxtaposition of these primitives functions it is possible to produce the holograms of more complex objects. Many examples of generated CGHs are presented.

  7. A non-autonomous insect piggyBac trasposable element is mobile in tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    The piggyBac transposable element, originally isolated from a virus in an insect cell line, is a valuable molecular tool for transgenesis and mutagenesis of invertebrates. For heterologous transgenesis in a variety of mammals, transfer of the piggyBac transposable element from an ectopic plasmid onl...

  8. Transgenesis of Tol2-mediated seamlessly constructed BAC mammary gland expression vectors in Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaohui; Wang, Wenyuan; Huang, Tian; Ruan, Weimin; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-01-20

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are vectors that are capable of carrying gene fragments of up to 300 kb in size, and in theory, harbor cis-regulatory elements that are necessary for the expression of specific genes. Therefore, BACs can effectively alleviate or even eliminate the position effect induced by gene-integration, rendering these as ideal expression vectors of exogenous genes. However, the number of relevant studies involving BACs as vectors of exogenous genes are limited. In the present study, we converted the BAC regulatory region of the Mus musculus Wap gene into a mammary gland-specific expression vector. Using the galK-based positive-negative selection method, we seamlessly replaced the Wap gene in a BAC with Homo sapiens GPX3, MT2, and Luc genes while keeping the original mammary gland-specific regulatory sequence intact, without introducing any extra sequences (Loxp/Frt). To improve the efficiency of creating BAC transgenic mice, we used a Tol2 transposon system optimized for mammalian codons and eliminated 100 kb of sequence from the BAC 5' end (173 kb), which resulted in an 8.5% rate of successful gene transmission via pronuclear injection. The results of the present study indicate that seamlessly constructed BAC expression vectors can be used for the transmission of the GPX3 gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sperm-mediated transgenesis in chicken using a PiggyBac transposon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towards development of transgenic chickens without the use of viral vectors, factors affecting sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) using a piggyBac vector are being studied. The piggyBac pPBCAG-LacZ contains 13bp terminal inverted repeats flanking a LacZ gene driven by the CAG promoter. A helper pla...

  10. A general method to modify BACs to generate large recombinant DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Huang, Yue; Tang, Yi; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) has the capacity to clone DNA fragments in excess of 300 kb. It also has the considerable advantages of stable propagation and ease of purification. These features make BAC suitable in genetic research, such as library construction, transgenic mice production, and gene targeting constructs. Homologous recombination in Escherichia coli, a process named recombineering, has made the modification of BACs easy and reliable. We report here a modified recombineering method that can efficiently mediate the fusion of large DNA fragments from two or more different BACs. With the introduction of kanamycin-resistant gene and proposed rare-cutting restriction endonuclease (RCRE) sites into two BACs, a 82.6-kb DNA fragment containing the inverted human alpha-globin genes (theta, alpha1, alpha2, and zeta) from BAC191K2 and the locus control region (LCR) of human beta-globin gene locus (from the BAC186D7) was reconstructed. This approach for combining different BAC DNA fragments should facilitate many kinds of genomic experiments.

  11. Analysis of genomic imbalances and gene expression changes in transformed follicular lymphoma (FL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, G.; Farinha, P.; Lam, W.

    2005-01-01

    American patients with transformed FL. Methods: High-resolution BAC-array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) was used to detect genomic imbalances. Gene expression profiling was performed using cDNA microarrays (Affymetrix). Results: Of 9 biopsy pairs identified so far, analysis results of the first 4......: The combined use of array-CGH and gene expression analysis will provide a more comprehensive picture of the transformation process in FL....

  12. A Plasmid Set for Efficient Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Fernando; Reynolds, Eric; Lewellis, Stephen W; Venkiteswaran, Gayatri; Knaut, Holger

    2016-04-07

    Transgenesis of large DNA constructs is essential for gene function analysis. Recently, Tol2 transposase-mediated transgenesis has emerged as a powerful tool to insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNA constructs into the genome of zebrafish. For efficient transgenesis, the genomic DNA piece in the BAC construct needs to be flanked by Tol2 transposon sites, and the constructs should contain a transgenesis marker for easy identification of transgenic animals. We report a set of plasmids that contain targeting cassettes that allow the insertion of Tol2 sites and different transgenesis markers into BACs. Using BACs containing these targeting cassettes, we show that transgenesis is as efficient as iTol2, that preselecting for expression of the transgenesis marker increases the transgenesis rate, and that BAC transgenics faithfully recapitulate the endogenous gene expression patterns and allow for the estimation of the endogenous gene expression levels. Copyright © 2016 Fuentes et al.

  13. Preparation of high molecular weight gDNA and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biradar, Siddanagouda S; Nie, Xiaojun; Feng, Kewei; Weining, Song

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries are extremely valuable large-insert DNA libraries for physical mapping, positional cloning, comparative genomic analysis, complete genome sequencing, and evolutionary studies. Due to their stability and relative simplicity BAC libraries are most preferred over other approaches for cloning large genomic DNA fragments for large-insert libraries. Isolation of intact high molecular weight (HMW) DNA is a critical step underlying the success of large-insert genomic DNA library construction. It requires the isolation of purified nuclei, embedding them into LMP agarose plugs, restriction digestion of the plugs, and quite often size selection using PFGE and electro-elution of insert DNA. The construction of BAC libraries is complex and challenging for most molecular laboratories. To facilitate the construction of BAC libraries, we present a step-by-step protocol for isolation of HMW DNA and construction of plant BAC libraries.

  14. Chromosomes of Iberian Leuciscinae (Cyprinidae) Revisited: Evidence of Genome Restructuring in Homoploid Hybrids Using Dual-Color FISH and CGH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pereira, C. S.; Ráb, Petr; Collares-Pereira, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 141, 2/3 (2013), s. 143-152 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-37277S Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : CGH/GISH * Chondrostoma s.I. * genome reshuffling hybridization Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.905, year: 2013

  15. L’iconostase de Rădeana-Bacău

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sabados

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available L’analyse complexe (peinture et sculpture décorative, iconographie et style de l’iconostase de Rădeana, dans le département de Bacău, un ensemble presque inconnu, donation du voïvode Gheorghe Ştefan de 1658, relève sa place singulière dans l’histoire moldave du genre. Au sujet de la peinture, les conclusions mènent vers un atelier galicien, tandis que la sculpture décorative à la manière baroque s’avère précoce par rapport aux ensembles contemporains (ceux ruthènes y compris et pourrait représenter le modèle, en tant qu’architecture et ornementation, des iconostases moldaves du XVIIIe siècle.

  16. Analyses of Genotypes and Phenotypes of Ten Chinese Patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Xu Yang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The combined use of MLPA and array CGH is an effective and specific means to diagnose WHS and allows for the precise identification of the breakpoints and sizes of deletions. The deletion of genes in the WHS candidate region is closely correlated with the core WHS phenotype.

  17. Conversion of BAC clones into binary BAC (BIBAC) vectors and their delivery into basidiomycete fungal cells using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shawkat; Bakkeren, Guus

    2015-01-01

    The genetic transformation of certain organisms, required for gene function analysis or complementation, is often not very efficient, especially when dealing with large gene constructs or genomic fragments. We have adapted the natural DNA transfer mechanism from the soil pathogenic bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens, to deliver intact large DNA constructs to basidiomycete fungi of the genus Ustilago where they stably integrated into their genome. To this end, Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones containing large fungal genomic DNA fragments were converted via a Lambda phage-based recombineering step to Agrobacterium transfer-competent binary vectors (BIBACs) with a Ustilago-specific selection marker. The fungal genomic DNA fragment was subsequently successfully delivered as T-DNA through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation into Ustilago species where an intact copy stably integrated into the genome. By modifying the recombineering vector, this method can theoretically be adapted for many different fungi.

  18. Conversion of BAC Clones into Binary BAC (BIBAC) Vectors and Their Delivery into Basidiomycete Fungal Cells Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Shawkat

    2014-09-19

    The genetic transformation of certain organisms, required for gene function analysis or complementation, is often not very efficient, especially when dealing with large gene constructs or genomic fragments. We have adapted the natural DNA transfer mechanism from the soil pathogenic bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens, to deliver intact large DNA constructs to basidiomycete fungi of the genus Ustilago where they stably integrated into their genome. To this end, Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones containing large fungal genomic DNA fragments were converted via a Lambda phage-based recombineering step to Agrobacterium transfer-competent binary vectors (BIBACs) with a Ustilago-specific selection marker. The fungal genomic DNA fragment was subsequently successfully delivered as T-DNA through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation into Ustilago species where an intact copy stably integrated into the genome. By modifying the recombineering vector, this method can theoretically be adapted for many different fungi.

  19. Polar body array CGH for prediction of the status of the corresponding oocyte. Part II: technical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magli, M. Cristina; Montag, Markus; Köster, Maria; Muzi, Luigi; Geraedts, Joep; Collins, John; Goossens, Veerle; Handyside, Alan H.; Harper, Joyce; Repping, Sjoerd; Schmutzler, Andreas; Vesela, Katerina; Gianaroli, Luca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the technical aspects related to polar body (PB) biopsy, which might have an influence on the results of the microarray comparative genomic hybridization analysis. Furthermore, a comparison was made between two biopsy methods (mechanical and laser). Biopsy of

  20. Polar body array CGH for prediction of the status of the corresponding oocyte. Part I: clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraedts, Joep; Montag, Markus; Magli, M. Cristina; Repping, Sjoerd; Handyside, Alan; Staessen, Catherine; Harper, Joyce; Schmutzler, Andreas; Collins, John; Goossens, Veerle; van der Ven, Hans; Vesela, Katerina; Gianaroli, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Several randomized controlled trials have not shown a benefit from preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) biopsy of cleavage-stage embryos and assessment of up to 10 chromosomes for aneuploidy. Therefore, a proof-of-principle study was planned to determine the reliability of alternative form of

  1. Genotype-phenotype correlation in 21 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome using high resolution array comparative genome hybridisation (CGH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, N. M. C.; Van Buggenhout, G.; Hannes, F.; Thienpont, B.; Sanlaville, D.; Kok, K.; Midro, A.; Andrieux, J.; Anderlid, B-M; Schoumans, J.; Hordijk, R.; Devriendt, K.; Fryns, J-P; Vermeesch, J. R.

    Background: The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is usually caused by terminal deletions of the short arm of chromosome 4 and is phenotypically defined by growth and mental retardation, seizures, and specific craniofacial manifestations. Large variation is observed in phenotypic expression of these

  2. Toward an Integrated BAC Library Resource for Genome Sequencing and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, M. I.; Kim, U.-J.

    2002-02-26

    We developed a great deal of expertise in building large BAC libraries from a variety of DNA sources including humans, mice, corn, microorganisms, worms, and Arabidopsis. We greatly improved the technology for screening these libraries rapidly and for selecting appropriate BACs and mapping BACs to develop large overlapping contigs. We became involved in supplying BACs and BAC contigs to a variety of sequencing and mapping projects and we began to collaborate with Drs. Adams and Venter at TIGR and with Dr. Leroy Hood and his group at University of Washington to provide BACs for end sequencing and for mapping and sequencing of large fragments of chromosome 16. Together with Dr. Ian Dunham and his co-workers at the Sanger Center we completed the mapping and they completed the sequencing of the first human chromosome, chromosome 22. This was published in Nature in 1999 and our BAC contigs made a major contribution to this sequencing effort. Drs. Shizuya and Ding invented an automated highly accurate BAC mapping technique. We also developed long-term collaborations with Dr. Uli Weier at UCSF in the design of BAC probes for characterization of human tumors and specific chromosome deletions and breakpoints. Finally the contribution of our work to the human genome project has been recognized in the publication both by the international consortium and the NIH of a draft sequence of the human genome in Nature last year. Dr. Shizuya was acknowledged in the authorship of that landmark paper. Dr. Simon was also an author on the Venter/Adams Celera project sequencing the human genome that was published in Science last year.

  3. Toward an Integrated BAC Library Resource for Genome Sequencing and Analysis; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, M. I.; Kim, U.-J.

    2002-01-01

    We developed a great deal of expertise in building large BAC libraries from a variety of DNA sources including humans, mice, corn, microorganisms, worms, and Arabidopsis. We greatly improved the technology for screening these libraries rapidly and for selecting appropriate BACs and mapping BACs to develop large overlapping contigs. We became involved in supplying BACs and BAC contigs to a variety of sequencing and mapping projects and we began to collaborate with Drs. Adams and Venter at TIGR and with Dr. Leroy Hood and his group at University of Washington to provide BACs for end sequencing and for mapping and sequencing of large fragments of chromosome 16. Together with Dr. Ian Dunham and his co-workers at the Sanger Center we completed the mapping and they completed the sequencing of the first human chromosome, chromosome 22. This was published in Nature in 1999 and our BAC contigs made a major contribution to this sequencing effort. Drs. Shizuya and Ding invented an automated highly accurate BAC mapping technique. We also developed long-term collaborations with Dr. Uli Weier at UCSF in the design of BAC probes for characterization of human tumors and specific chromosome deletions and breakpoints. Finally the contribution of our work to the human genome project has been recognized in the publication both by the international consortium and the NIH of a draft sequence of the human genome in Nature last year. Dr. Shizuya was acknowledged in the authorship of that landmark paper. Dr. Simon was also an author on the Venter/Adams Celera project sequencing the human genome that was published in Science last year

  4. Cross-species comparison of aCGH data from mouse and human BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstege, Henne; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Nederlof, Petra M; Jonkers, Jos; Beers, Erik van; Velds, Arno; Liu, Xiaoling; Joosse, Simon A; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; Schut, Eva; Kerkhoven, Ron; Klijn, Christiaan N

    2010-01-01

    Genomic gains and losses are a result of genomic instability in many types of cancers. BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers are associated with increased amounts of chromosomal aberrations, presumably due their functions in genome repair. Some of these genomic aberrations may harbor genes whose absence or overexpression may give rise to cellular growth advantage. So far, it has not been easy to identify the driver genes underlying gains and losses. A powerful approach to identify these driver genes could be a cross-species comparison of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data from cognate mouse and human tumors. Orthologous regions of mouse and human tumors that are commonly gained or lost might represent essential genomic regions selected for gain or loss during tumor development. To identify genomic regions that are associated with BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutated breast cancers we compared aCGH data from 130 mouse Brca1 Δ/Δ ;p53 Δ/Δ , Brca2 Δ/Δ ;p53 Δ/Δ and p53 Δ/Δ mammary tumor groups with 103 human BRCA1-mutated, BRCA2-mutated and non-hereditary breast cancers. Our genome-wide cross-species analysis yielded a complete collection of loci and genes that are commonly gained or lost in mouse and human breast cancer. Principal common CNAs were the well known MYC-associated gain and RB1/INTS6-associated loss that occurred in all mouse and human tumor groups, and the AURKA-associated gain occurred in BRCA2-related tumors from both species. However, there were also important differences between tumor profiles of both species, such as the prominent gain on chromosome 10 in mouse Brca2 Δ/Δ ;p53 Δ/Δ tumors and the PIK3CA associated 3q gain in human BRCA1-mutated tumors, which occurred in tumors from one species but not in tumors from the other species. This disparity in recurrent aberrations in mouse and human tumors might be due to differences in tumor cell type or genomic organization between both species. The selection of the oncogenome during

  5. BacPP: a web-based tool for Gram-negative bacterial promoter prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avila E Silva, S; Notari, D L; Neis, F A; Ribeiro, H G; Echeverrigaray, S

    2016-04-04

    Bacterial Promoter Prediction (BacPP) is a tool used to predict given sequences as promoters of Gram-negative bacteria according to the σ factor that recognizes it. The first version of BacPP was implemented in Python language in a desktop version without a friendly interface. For this reason, a web version of BacPP is now available with the purpose of improving its usability and availability. The present paper describes the implementation of the web version of this tool, focusing on its software architecture and user functionalities. The software is available at www.bacpp.bioinfoucs.com/home.

  6. Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization as the First-line Investigation for Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease: Experience in a Single Tertiary Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Geum; Hwang, Su Kyung; Kwon, Jung Eun; Kim, Yeo Hyang

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of verifying genetic abnormalities using array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) immediately after diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD). Among neonates under the age of 28 days who underwent echocardiography from January 1, 2014 to April 30, 2016, neonates whose chromosomal and genomic abnormalities were tested using a-CGH in cases of an abnormal finding on echocardiography were enrolled. Of the 166 patients diagnosed with CHD, 81 underwent a-CGH and 11 patients (11/81, 13.5%) had abnormal findings on a-CGH. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome was the most common (4/11, 36.4%). On the first a-CGH, 4 patients were negative (4/81, 5%). Three of them were finally diagnosed with Williams syndrome using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), 1 patient was diagnosed with Noonan syndrome through exome sequencing. All of them exhibited diffuse pulmonary artery branch hypoplasia, as well as increased velocity of blood flow, on repeated echocardiography. Five patients started rehabilitation therapy at mean 6 months old age in outpatient clinics and epilepsy was diagnosed in 2 patients. Parents of 2 patients (22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Patau syndrome) refused treatment due to the anticipated prognosis. Screening tests for genetic abnormalities using a-CGH in neonates with CHD has the advantage of early diagnosis of genetic abnormality during the neonatal period in which there is no obvious symptom of genetic abnormality. However, there are disadvantages that some genetic abnormalities cannot be identified on a-CGH. Copyright © 2018. The Korean Society of Cardiology.

  7. Chromosomal Aberrations in ETV6/RUNX1-positive Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia using 244K Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Zubaidah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a heterogeneous form of hematological cancer consisting of various subtypes. We are interested to study the genetic aberration in precursor B-cell ALL with specific t(12;21 translocation in childhood ALL patients. A high resolution 244K array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH was used to study eleven ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients. Result 155 chromosomal aberrations (119 losses, 36 gains were reported in the array findings, corresponding to 76.8% deletions and 23.2% amplifications. The ETV6 gene deletion occurred in 4 of the patients, corresponding to 45% of the sample. The most common alterations above 1 Mb were deletion 6q (13%, 12p (12% and 9p (8%, and duplication 4q (6% and Xq (4%. Other genes important in ALL were also identified in this study including RUNX1, CDKN2A, FHIT, and PAX5. The array-CGH technique was able to detect microdeletion as small as 400 bp. Conclusion The results demonstrate the usefulness of high resolution array-CGH as a complementary tool in the investigation of ALL.

  8. Is BAC transgenesis obsolete? State of the art in the era of designer nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, J; Fairbairn, L; Pelczar, P; Buch, T

    2012-01-01

    DNA constructs based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are frequently used to generate transgenic animals as they reduce the influence of position effects and allow predictable expression patterns for genes whose regulatory sequences are not fully identified. Despite these advantages BAC transgenics suffer from drawbacks such as complicated vector construction, low efficiency of transgenesis, and some remaining expression variegation. The recent development of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) has resulted in new transgenic techniques which do not have the drawbacks associated with BAC transgenesis. Initial reports indicate that such designer nucleases (DNs) allow the targeted insertion of transgenes into endogenous loci by direct injection of the targeting vector and mRNA/DNA encoding the predesigned nucleases into oocytes. This results in the transgene being inserted at a specific locus in the mouse genome, thus circumventing the drawbacks associated with BAC transgenesis.

  9. BAC-Dkk3-EGFP Transgenic Mouse: An In Vivo Analytical Tool for Dkk3 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Muranishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dickkopf (DKK family proteins are secreted modulators of the Wnt signaling pathway and are capable of regulating the development of many organs and tissues. We previously identified Dkk3 to be a molecule predominantly expressed in the mouse embryonic retina. However, which cell expresses Dkk3 in the developing and mature mouse retina remains to be elucidated. To examine the precise expression of the Dkk3 protein, we generated BAC-Dkk3-EGFP transgenic mice that express EGFP integrated into the Dkk3 gene in a BAC plasmid. Expression analysis using the BAC-Dkk3-EGFP transgenic mice revealed that Dkk3 is expressed in retinal progenitor cells (RPCs at embryonic stages and in Müller glial cells in the adult retina. Since Müller glial cells may play a potential role in retinal regeneration, BAC-Dkk3-EGFP mice could be useful for retinal regeneration studies.

  10. Gene Cloning of Penicillin V Acylase from Bacillus sp BAC4 by Genomic Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELFI SUSANTI VH

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to clone and identify penicillin V acylase (PVA gene of Bacillus sp. BAC4 by genomic library. Chromosome DNA of Bacillus sp. BAC4 was isolated by Wang method. pHB201 of E. coli was isolated by alkali lyses method. Recombinant DNA of Bacillus sp. BAC4 chromosome fragment and pHB201 was made by ligase process using T4 DNA ligase. Transformation of E. coli using this recombinant plasmid was carried out according to Mandel-Higa method. The results indicated that chromosome DNA fragment of Bacillus sp. BAC4 was bigger 23 kb with purity 1,3. Plasmid DNA fragment of E coli was 6,5 kb. Transformants laboring pHB201 recombinant plasmid was screen as blue-white colonies in a medium containing IPTG/X-gal and chloramphenicol.

  11. High resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridisation analysis using spotted oligonucleotides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, B; Ouwerkerk, E; Meijer, G.A.; Ylstra, B.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, comparative genomic hybridisation array (array CGH) is the method of choice for studying genome wide DNA copy number changes. To date, either amplified representations of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs)/phage artificial chromosomes (PACs) or cDNAs have been spotted as

  12. Uncertainty of Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC Results as Related to Instrumental Conditions: Optimization and Robustness of BAC Analysis Headspace Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleigh A. Boswell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of blood alcohol concentration is a routine analysis performed in many forensic laboratories. This analysis commonly utilizes static headspace sampling, followed by gas chromatography combined with flame ionization detection (GC-FID. Studies have shown several “optimal” methods for instrumental operating conditions, which are intended to yield accurate and precise data. Given that different instruments, sampling methods, application specific columns and parameters are often utilized, it is much less common to find information on the robustness of these reported conditions. A major problem can arise when these “optimal” conditions may not also be robust, thus producing data with higher than desired uncertainty or potentially inaccurate results. The goal of this research was to incorporate the principles of quality by design (QBD in the adjustment and determination of BAC (blood alcohol concentration instrumental headspace parameters, thereby ensuring that minor instrumental variations, which occur as a matter of normal work, do not appreciably affect the final results of this analysis. This study discusses both the QBD principles as well as the results of the experiments, which allow for determination of more favorable instrumental headspace conditions. Additionally, method detection limits will also be reported in order to determine a reporting threshold and the degree of uncertainty at the common threshold value of 0.08 g/dL. Furthermore, the comparison of two internal standards, n-propanol and t-butanol, will be investigated. The study showed that an altered parameter of 85 °C headspace oven temperature and 15 psi headspace vial pressurization produces the lowest percent relative standard deviation of 1.3% when t-butanol is implemented as an internal standard, at least for one very common platform. The study also showed that an altered parameter of 100 °C headspace oven temperature and 15-psi headspace vial pressurization

  13. Magnetic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  14. Magnetic arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumper, David L. (Plaistow, NH); Kim, Won-jong (Cambridge, MA); Williams, Mark E. (Pelham, NH)

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  15. The Functionality of Minimal PiggyBac Transposons in Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Troyanovsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimal piggyBac vectors are a modified single-plasmid version of the classical piggyBac delivery system that can be used for stable transgene integration. These vectors have a truncated terminal domain in the delivery cassette and thus, integrate significantly less flanking transposon DNA into host cell chromatin than classical piggyBac vectors. Herein, we test various characteristics of this modified transposon. The integration efficiency of minimal piggyBac vectors was inversely related to the size of both the transposon and the entire plasmid, but inserts as large as 15 kb were efficiently integrated. Open and super-coiled vectors demonstrated the same integration efficiency while DNA methylation decreased the integration efficiency and silenced the expression of previously integrated sequences in some cell types. Importantly, the incidence of plasmid backbone integration was not increased above that seen in nontransposon control vectors. In BALB/c mice, we demonstrated prolonged expression of two transgenes (intracellular mCherry and secretable Gaussia luciferase when delivered by the minimal piggyBac that resulted in a more sustained antibody production against the immunogenic luciferase than when delivered by a transient (nontransposon vector plasmid. We conclude that minimal piggyBac vectors are an effective alternative to other integrative systems for stable DNA delivery in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Mini-lambda: a tractable system for chromosome and BAC engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Donald L; Swaminathan, Srividya; Yu, Daiguan; Wilson, Helen; Baker, Teresa; Bubunenko, Mikail; Sawitzke, James; Sharan, Shyam K

    2003-10-02

    The bacteriophage lambda (lambda) recombination system Red has been used for engineering large DNA fragments cloned into P1 and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC or PAC) vectors. So far, this recombination system has been utilized by transferring the BAC or PAC clones into bacterial cells that harbor a defective lambda prophage. Here we describe the generation of a mini-lambda DNA that can provide the Red recombination functions and can be easily introduced by electroporation into any E. coli strain, including the DH10B-carrying BACs or PACs. The mini-lambda DNA integrates into the bacterial chromosome as a defective prophage. In addition, since it retains attachment sites, it can be excised out to cure the cells of the phage DNA. We describe here the use of the mini-lambda recombination system for BAC modification by introducing a selectable marker into the vector sequence of a BAC clone. In addition, using the mini-lambda, we create a single missense mutation in the human BRCA2 gene cloned in a BAC without the use of any selectable marker. The ability to generate recombinants very efficiently demonstrates the usefulness of the mini-lambda as a very simple mobile system for in vivo genome engineering by homologous recombination, a process named recombineering.

  17. Identification of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) chromosomes using the BAC-FISH system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R; Miao, H; Song, W; Chen, C; Zhang, H

    2018-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.; Pedaliaceae) is a commercially valuable oilseed crop with high oil content. Its small genome size favours the genomic analysis of key biological processes, such as oil synthesis and metabolism. However, the 13 chromosome pairs of sesame have not been characterised because of technological limitations and their small size. We constructed a BAC library comprising 57,600 BAC clones for sesame. The estimated genome coverage of the sesame BAC library was 13.8×. The successive double colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) for sesame was established in this study. Subsequently, the 13 sesame chromosome pairs were individually differentiated using 17 specific BACs for the first time. The schematic of the sesame chromosome set was drawn according to the chromosome relative length and relative position of the BAC signal. The cytogenetic characteristics of sesame chromosomes were also explored. The results provide the technical background required for further cytogenetic map construction, genome assembly and localisation of the DNA sequence in sesame. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  18. Distribution of Genes and Repetitive Elements in the Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Genome Estimated Using BAC Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad S. Coates

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Feeding damage caused by the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is destructive to corn plants in North America and Europe where control remains challenging due to evolution of resistance to chemical and transgenic toxins. A BAC library, DvvBAC1, containing 109,486 clones with 104±34.5 kb inserts was created, which has an ~4.56X genome coverage based upon a 2.58 Gb (2.80 pg flow cytometry-estimated haploid genome size. Paired end sequencing of 1037 BAC inserts produced 1.17 Mb of data (~0.05% genome coverage and indicated ~9.4 and 16.0% of reads encode, respectively, endogenous genes and transposable elements (TEs. Sequencing genes within BAC full inserts demonstrated that TE densities are high within intergenic and intron regions and contribute to the increased gene size. Comparison of homologous genome regions cloned within different BAC clones indicated that TE movement may cause haplotype variation within the inbred strain. The data presented here indicate that the D. virgifera virgifera genome is large in size and contains a high proportion of repetitive sequence. These BAC sequencing methods that are applicable for characterization of genomes prior to sequencing may likely be valuable resources for genome annotation as well as scaffolding.

  19. Sequencing of BAC pools by different next generation sequencing platforms and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Uwe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing of BACs is a viable option for deciphering the sequence of even large and highly repetitive genomes. In order to optimize this strategy, we examined the influence of read length on the quality of Roche/454 sequence assemblies, to what extent Illumina/Solexa mate pairs (MPs improve the assemblies by scaffolding and whether barcoding of BACs is dispensable. Results Sequencing four BACs with both FLX and Titanium technologies revealed similar sequencing accuracy, but showed that the longer Titanium reads produce considerably less misassemblies and gaps. The 454 assemblies of 96 barcoded BACs were improved by scaffolding 79% of the total contig length with MPs from a non-barcoded library. Assembly of the unmasked 454 sequences without separation by barcodes revealed chimeric contig formation to be a major problem, encompassing 47% of the total contig length. Masking the sequences reduced this fraction to 24%. Conclusion Optimal BAC pool sequencing should be based on the longest available reads, with barcoding essential for a comprehensive assessment of both repetitive and non-repetitive sequence information. When interest is restricted to non-repetitive regions and repeats are masked prior to assembly, barcoding is non-essential. In any case, the assemblies can be improved considerably by scaffolding with non-barcoded BAC pool MPs.

  20. Increased nuchal translucency with normal karyotype: a follow-up study of 100 cases supplemented with CGH and MLPA analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, K V; Kirchhoff, M; Nygaard, U

    2009-01-01

    karyotype on conventional karyotyping. METHODS: Chorionic villus samples from 100 fetuses with NT > or = 99(th) percentile and normal G-banding analysis and MLPA for detection of aneuploidies for chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y were included. Examinations were supplemented by HR-CGH and MLPA for syndromes...... disease, which supports the current approach of repeated ultrasound examinations in these high-risk pregnancies....

  1. A rendering method of background reflections on a specular surface for CGH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, T; Sakamoto, Y

    2013-01-01

    Computer-generated holograms (CGHs) are remarked as ideal three-dimensional displays. There are a lot of problems have to be overcome, and we focused on the rendering techniques to reconstruct realistic images. In particular, there is almost no calculation method that correctly expresses depth information. Reflected images are necessary to express complex realistic scenes. In this paper, we introduce a calculation method that generates reconstructed images with background reflections. Proposed method calculates intersections between virtual objects and rays by the ray tracing method. Then intersections are assumed as a point light source group, and light waves on a hologram plane are calculated. In the ray tracing process, when a ray hits the specular object, a ray is additionally casted to the specular direction from the intersection. If the ray hits other diffuse objects or background, the length of light path from a viewpoint to the diffuse object is calculated. By calculating light waves from a point light source on the diffuse surface distant from the light path, reflected images are expressed in the CGH. To express the quality of materials, we adopted the Cook-Torrance reflection model. In the experiment, we conducted the computer simulation to confirm that the depth of reflected images is correctly calculated. And results of optical reconstructions show that our proposed method is able to make CGHs of various qualities of material.

  2. Calculation method of CGH for Binocular Eyepiece-Type Electro Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chanyoung; Yoneyama, Takuo; Sakamoto, Yuji; Okuyama, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    We had researched about eyepiece-type electro holography to display 3-D images of larger objects at wider angle. We had enlarged visual field considering depth of object with Fourier optical system using two lenses. In this paper, we extend our system for binocular. In the binocular system, we use two different holograms for each eye. The 3-D image for left eye should be observed like the real object observed using left eye and the same for right eye. So, we propose a method of calculation of computer-generated hologram (CGH) transforming the coordinate system of the model data to make two holograms for binocular eyepiece-type electro holography. The coordinate system of original model data is called the world coordinate system. The left and the right coordinate system are transformed from the world coordinate system. We also propose the method for correcting the installation error that occurs when placing the electronic and optical devices. The installation error is calculated and the model data is corrected using the distance between measured position and setup position of the reconstructed image Optical reconstruction experiments were carried out to verify the proposed method.

  3. Improved pFastBac™ donor plasmid vectors for higher protein production using the Bac-to-Bac® baculovirus expression vector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hui; Garretson, Tyler A; Kumar, C M Senthil; Dieter, Robert F; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2017-08-10

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV)-based Bac-to-Bac ® expression system consists of a bacmid and five pFastBac™ donor transfer vectors. It has been widely used for eukaryotic gene expression in insect cells to elucidate gene function in biotechnology laboratories. The pFastBac™ vectors contain a 50bp AcMNPV polyhedrin (polh) promoter and a 127bp SV40 polyadenylation (pA) signal for cloning a gene of interest into the bacmid, resulting in unsolved lower gene expression levels than the wild type (wt) AcMNPV in insect cells. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to understand why the Bac-to-Bac system produces lower gene expression levels. Here, we determined that bacmids transposed with pFastBac™ vectors produced 3-4 fold lower levels of certain proteins than the wt AcMNPV. We found that an 80bp cis element 147bp upstream of the 50bp polh promoter and a 134bp polh pA signal are required in pFastBac™ to achieve bacmid protein expression levels equivalent to wt AcMNPV in High Five insect cells. Therefore, researchers currently using pFastBac™ vectors for protein expression can transfer their genes of interest into the improved vectors in this report to elevate protein expression yields in insect cells to reduce protein production costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial efficacy and mechanical properties of BAC-modified hard and soft denture liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinci, Pinar; Mutluay, Murat; Söderling, Eva; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial efficacy and mechanical strength of hard and soft denture liners modified with benzalkonium chloride (BAC). The specimens (1 mm thickness, 8 mm diameter) were prepared by mixing 0.5, 1, 2 and 5 wt% BAC with soft (Sofreliner Medium, Tokuyama) and hard (Rebase II, Tokuyama) denture liners (n = 5/group). BAC was not added to the controls. Candida albicans ATCC 28366 (A 550  = 0.5) and Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt suspensions (A 550  = 0.35) were pipetted onto the specimens, and incubated for 4 h. The viable cells were collected, and determined by plate-culturing (CFU). The tests were repeated after the specimens were soaked in distilled water for 7 days. The mechanical strengths were evaluated by tear and 4-point flexural strength tests for soft and hard liners, respectively. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests at p = 0.05. C. albicans viability was lost in all groups of BAC-modified soft liners (p  0.05). For the hard liner, BAC 5 wt% killed the C. albicans and S. mutans cells both before and after soaked in water (p  0.05). BAC did not reduce the flexural strength of the hard liner (p > 0.05), except of BAC 5 wt% group (p denture liner surfaces.

  5. Computational analysis of ordering in non-liquid crystalline versus liquid crystalline materials with special reference to nBAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmi Praveen, P.; Veera Bhadra Reddy, K.; Ajeetha, N.; Ojha, D. P., E-mail: durga_ojha@hotmail.com [Andhra Loyola College, Liquid Crystal Research Laboratory, Post-Graduate Department of Physics (India)

    2009-12-15

    A computational analysis of ordering in non-liquid crystalline p-n-alkyl benzoic acid, having 1 (1BAC), 2 (2BAC) and 3(3BAC) carbon atoms in the alkyl chain has been carried out with respect to translatory and orientational motions, but detailed results are reported only for 3BAC. The evaluation of net atomic charges and dipole moments at each atomic center has been carried out using complete neglect differential overlap (CNDO/2) method. The modified Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory along with the multicentered-multipole expansion method has been employed to evaluate long-range interactions, while a '6-exp' potential function has been assumed for short-range interactions. On the basis of stacking, in-plane and terminal interaction energy calculations, all possible arrangements of a molecular pair have been considered. A comparative picture of molecular parameters, such as total energy, binding energy, and total dipole moment of 3BAC with higher homologous series liquid crystalline compounds having 4(4BAC), 5(5BAC), and 6(6BAC) alkyl chain carbon atoms, has been given. It is found that, if a suitable functional group is attached to 3BAC, so that the length to breadth ratio is increased, the molecule will show a change in the long-range order, the phase transition temperature and other liquid crystalline properties.

  6. Aneuploidy screening by array comparative genomic hybridization improves success rates of in vitro fertilization: A multicenter Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Kotdawala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective, multicenter study including 235 PGS cycles following intracytoplasmic sperm injection performed at six different infertility centers from September 2013 to June 2015. Patients were divided as per maternal age in several groups (40 years and as per indication for undergoing PGS. Indications for performing PGS were recurrent miscarriage, repetitive implantation failure, severe male factor, previous trisomic pregnancy, and advanced maternal age (≥35. Day 3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day 5 embryo transfer in the same cycle or the following cycle. Outcomes such as pregnancy rates (PRs/transfer, implantation rates, miscarriage rates, percentage of abnormal embryos, and number of embryos with more than one aneuploidy and chaotic patterns were recorded for all the treated subjects based on different age and indication groups. Results: aCGH helped in identifying aneuploid embryos, thus leading to consistent implantation (range: 33.3%-42.9% and PRs per transfer (range: 31.8%-54.9% that were obtained for all the indications in all the age groups, after performing PGS. Conclusion: Aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation. aCGH can be successfully employed for screening of aneuploid embryos. When euploid embryos are transferred, an increase in PRs can be achieved irrespective of the age or the indication.

  7. Insertional Mutagenesis by a Hybrid PiggyBac and Sleeping Beauty Transposon in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furushima, Kenryo; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Diane W.; Xiao, Ningna; Overbeek, Paul A.; Behringer, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid piggyBac/Sleeping Beauty transposon-based insertional mutagenesis system that can be mobilized by simple breeding was established in the rat. These transposons were engineered to include gene trap sequences and a tyrosinase (Tyr) pigmentation reporter to rescue the albinism of the genetic background used in the mutagenesis strategy. Single-copy transposon insertions were transposed into the rat genome by co-injection of plasmids carrying the transposon and RNA encoding piggyBac transposase into zygotes. The levels of transgenic Tyr expression were influenced by chromosomal context, leading to transgenic rats with different pigmentation that enabled visual genotyping. Transgenic rats designed to ubiquitously express either piggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase were generated by standard zygote injection also on an albino background. Bigenic rats carrying single-copy transposons at known loci and transposase transgenes exhibited coat color mosaicism, indicating somatic transposition. PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase bigenic rats bred with wild-type albino rats yielded offspring with pigmentation distinct from the initial transposon insertions as a consequence of germline transposition to new loci. The germline transposition frequency for Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac was ∼10% or about one new insertion per litter. Approximately 50% of the insertions occurred in introns. Chimeric transcripts containing endogenous and gene trap sequences were identified in Gabrb1 mutant rats. This mutagenesis system based on simple crosses and visual genotyping can be used to generate a collection of single-gene mutations in the rat. PMID:23023007

  8. Bacterial contamination of platelet components not detected by BacT/ALERT®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, M A; Fenning, S; Maguire, K A; Morris, K G

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the possible causes for false negative results in BacT/ALERT ® 3D Signature System despite bacterial contamination of platelet units. The Northern Ireland Blood Transfusion Service (NIBTS) routinely extends platelet component shelf life to 7 days. Components are sampled and screened for bacterial contamination using an automated microbial detection system, the BacT/ALERT ® 3D Signature System. We report on three platelet components with confirmed bacterial contamination, which represent false negative BacT/ALERT ® results and near-miss serious adverse events. NIBTS protocols for risk reduction of bacterial contamination of platelet components are described. The methodology for bacterial detection using BacT/ALERT ® is outlined. Laboratory tests, relevant patient details and relevant follow-up information are analysed. In all three cases, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the platelet residue and confirmed on terminal sub-culture using BacT/ALERT ® . In two cases, S. aureus with similar genetic makeup was isolated from the donors. Risk reduction measures for bacterial contamination of platelet components are not always effective. Automated bacterial culture detection does not eliminate the risk of bacterial contamination. Visual inspection of platelet components prior to release, issue and administration remains an important last line of defence. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  9. Properties of Bac W42, a bacteriocin produced by Bacillus subtilis W42 isolated from Cheonggukjang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindoli, Salum; Lee, Hwang A; Kim, Jeong Hwan

    2012-08-01

    Ten Bacillus strains with antimicrobial activities were isolated from Cheonggukjang produced at different parts in Korea. They all inhibited Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19111 and nine inhibited Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. Four isolates (W42, H27, SKE 12, and K21) showing strong inhibiting activities were identified as B. subtilis. B. subtilis W42 was the most inhibiting strain. The antimicrobial activity of culture supernatant from B. subtilis W42 was destroyed completely by proteinase K treatment, indicating that a bacteriocin was the responsible agent. The bacteriocin, Bac W42, was most stable at pH 7 and stable between pH 3-6 and 8-9. Bac W42 was stable up to 80°C. BHI (brain heart infusion) and TSB (tryptic soy broth) were the best media for the activity (320 AU/ml) followed by LB (160 AU/ml). Bac W42 was partially purified by column chromatographies. The specific activity was increased from 1,151.2 AU/ml to 9,043.5 AU/ml and the final yield was 26.3%. Bac W42 was 5.4 kDa in size as determined by SDS-PAGE. Bac W42 showed bactericidal activity against L. monocytogenes ATCC 19111.

  10. Development of genomic resources for Citrus clementina: Characterization of three deep-coverage BAC libraries and analysis of 46,000 BAC end sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talon Manuel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citrus species constitute one of the major tree fruit crops of the subtropical regions with great economic importance. However, their peculiar reproductive characteristics, low genetic diversity and the long-term nature of tree breeding mostly impair citrus variety improvement. In woody plants, genomic science holds promise of improvements and in the Citrus genera the development of genomic tools may be crucial for further crop improvements. In this work we report the characterization of three BAC libraries from Clementine (Citrus clementina, one of the most relevant citrus fresh fruit market cultivars, and the analyses of 46.000 BAC end sequences. Clementine is a diploid plant with an estimated haploid genome size of 367 Mb and 2n = 18 chromosomes, which makes feasible the use of genomics tools to boost genetic improvement. Results Three genomic BAC libraries of Citrus clementina were constructed through EcoRI, MboI and HindIII digestions and 56,000 clones, representing an estimated genomic coverage of 19.5 haploid genome-equivalents, were picked. BAC end sequencing (BES of 28,000 clones produced 28.1 Mb of genomic sequence that allowed the identification of the repetitive fraction (12.5% of the genome and estimation of gene content (31,000 genes of this species. BES analyses identified 3,800 SSRs and 6,617 putative SNPs. Comparative genomic studies showed that citrus gene homology and microsyntheny with Populus trichocarpa was rather higher than with Arabidopsis thaliana, a species phylogenetically closer to citrus. Conclusion In this work, we report the characterization of three BAC libraries from C. clementina, and a new set of genomic resources that may be useful for isolation of genes underlying economically important traits, physical mapping and eventually crop improvement in Citrus species. In addition, BAC end sequencing has provided a first insight on the basic structure and organization of the citrus genome and has

  11. Application of the BacT/ALERTR 3D system for sterility testing of injectable products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bugno

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sterility testing as described in the pharmacopoeia compendia requires a 14-day incubation period to obtain an analytical result. Alternative methods that could be applied to evaluating product sterility are especially interesting due to the possibility of reducing this incubation period and thus the associated costs. The aims of this study were to evaluate the performance of the BacT/ALERTR 3D system in detecting microorganisms in large-volume parenteral solutions that were intentionally contaminated and to compare this system to pharmacopoeia sterility testing using the membrane filtration method. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the methods regarding the ability to detect microbial contamination; however, detection with the BacT/ALERTR 3D system was faster compared to the pharmacopoeia method. Therefore, the BacT/ALERTR 3D system is a viable alternative for assessing the sterility of injectable products.

  12. Application of the BacT/ALERTR 3D system for sterility testing of injectable products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno, Adriana; Lira, Rodolfo Santos; Oliveira, Wesley Anderson; Almodovar, Adriana Aparecida Buzzo; Saes, Deborah Pita Sanches; de Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha

    2015-01-01

    Sterility testing as described in the pharmacopoeia compendia requires a 14-day incubation period to obtain an analytical result. Alternative methods that could be applied to evaluating product sterility are especially interesting due to the possibility of reducing this incubation period and thus the associated costs. The aims of this study were to evaluate the performance of the BacT/ALERTR 3D system in detecting microorganisms in large-volume parenteral solutions that were intentionally contaminated and to compare this system to pharmacopoeia sterility testing using the membrane filtration method. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the methods regarding the ability to detect microbial contamination; however, detection with the BacT/ALERTR 3D system was faster compared to the pharmacopoeia method. Therefore, the BacT/ALERTR 3D system is a viable alternative for assessing the sterility of injectable products. PMID:26413055

  13. A BAC-based physical map of Zhikong scallop (Chlamys farreri Jones et Preston.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Zhang

    Full Text Available Zhikong scallop (Chlamys farreri is one of the most economically important aquaculture species in China. Physical maps are crucial tools for genome sequencing, gene mapping and cloning, genetic improvement and selective breeding. In this study, we have developed a genome-wide, BAC-based physical map for the species. A total of 81,408 clones from two BAC libraries of the scallop were fingerprinted using an ABI 3130xl Genetic Analyzer and a fingerprinting kit developed in our laboratory. After data processing, 63,641 (∼5.8× genome coverage fingerprints were validated and used in the physical map assembly. A total of 3,696 contigs were assembled for the physical map. Each contig contained an average of 10.0 clones, with an average physical size of 490 kb. The combined total physical size of all contigs was 1.81 Gb, equivalent to approximately 1.5 fold of the scallop haploid genome. A total of 10,587 BAC end sequences (BESs and 167 markers were integrated into the physical map. We evaluated the physical map by overgo hybridization, BAC-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization, contig BAC pool screening and source BAC library screening. The results have provided evidence of the high reliability of the contig physical map. This is the first physical map in mollusc; therefore, it provides an important platform for advanced research of genomics and genetics, and mapping of genes and QTL of economical importance, thus facilitating the genetic improvement and selective breeding of the scallop and other marine molluscs.

  14. Bioreactor scale up and protein product quality characterization of piggyBac transposon derived CHO pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra, Yashas; Balasubramanian, Sowmya; Peery, Robert B; Swartling, James R; McCracken, Neil A; Norris, Dawn L; Frye, Christopher C; Barnard, Gavin C

    2017-03-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells remain the most popular host for the production of biopharmaceutical drugs, particularly monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), bispecific antibodies, and Fc-fusion proteins. Creating and characterizing the stable CHO clonally-derived cell lines (CDCLs) needed to manufacture these therapeutic proteins is a lengthy and laborious process. Therefore, CHO pools have increasingly been used to rapidly produce protein to support and enable preclinical drug development. We recently described the generation of CHO pools yielding mAb titers as high as 7.6 g/L in a 16 day bioprocess using piggyBac transposon-mediated gene integration. In this study, we wanted to understand why the piggyBac pool titers were significantly higher (2-10 fold) than the control CHO pools. Higher titers were the result of a combination of increased average gene copy number, significantly higher messenger RNA levels and the homogeneity (i.e. less diverse population distribution) of the piggyBac pools, relative to the control pools. In order to validate the use of piggyBac pools to support preclinical drug development, we then performed an in-depth product quality analysis of purified protein. The product quality of protein obtained from the piggyBac pools was very similar to the product quality profile of protein obtained from the control pools. Finally, we demonstrated the scalability of these pools from shake flasks to 36L bioreactors. Overall, these results suggest that gram quantities of therapeutic protein can be rapidly obtained from piggyBac CHO pools without significantly changing product quality attributes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:534-540, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. The complexity of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus genome characterised through detailed analysis of two BAC clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Manuel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Rmi a major cattle ectoparasite and tick borne disease vector, impacts on animal welfare and industry productivity. In arthropod research there is an absence of a complete Chelicerate genome, which includes ticks, mites, spiders, scorpions and crustaceans. Model arthropod genomes such as Drosophila and Anopheles are too taxonomically distant for a reference in tick genomic sequence analysis. This study focuses on the de-novo assembly of two R. microplus BAC sequences from the understudied R microplus genome. Based on available R. microplus sequenced resources and comparative analysis, tick genomic structure and functional predictions identify complex gene structures and genomic targets expressed during tick-cattle interaction. Results In our BAC analyses we have assembled, using the correct positioning of BAC end sequences and transcript sequences, two challenging genomic regions. Cot DNA fractions compared to the BAC sequences confirmed a highly repetitive BAC sequence BM-012-E08 and a low repetitive BAC sequence BM-005-G14 which was gene rich and contained short interspersed elements (SINEs. Based directly on the BAC and Cot data comparisons, the genome wide frequency of the SINE Ruka element was estimated. Using a conservative approach to the assembly of the highly repetitive BM-012-E08, the sequence was de-convoluted into three repeat units, each unit containing an 18S, 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA encoding gene sequence (rDNA, related internal transcribed spacer and complex intergenic region. In the low repetitive BM-005-G14, a novel gene complex was found between to 2 genes on the same strand. Nested in the second intron of a large 9 Kb papilin gene was a helicase gene. This helicase overlapped in two exonic regions with the papilin. Both these genes were shown expressed in different tick life stage important in ectoparasite interaction with the host. Tick specific sequence

  16. Genetic transformation of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella L., with piggyBac EGFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Holly J; Neven, Lisa G; Thibault, Stephen T; Mohammed, Ahmed; Fraser, Malcolm

    2011-02-01

    Genetic transformation of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, was accomplished through embryo microinjection with a plasmid-based piggyBac vector containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. Sequencing of the flanking regions around the inserted construct resulted in identification of insect genomic sequences, not plasmid sequences, thus providing evidence that the piggyBac EGFP cassette had integrated into the codling moth genome. EGFP-positive moths were confirmed in the 28th and earlier generations post injection through PCR and Southern blot analyses, indicating heritability of the transgene.

  17. Identification of Multiple Bacteriocins in Enterococcus spp. Using an Enterococcus-Specific Bacteriocin PCR Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Henning

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-two bacteriocin-producing Enterococcus isolates obtained from food and animal sources, and demonstrating activity against Listeria monocytogenes, were screened for bacteriocin-related genes using a bacteriocin PCR array based on known enterococcal bacteriocin gene sequences in the NCBI GenBank database. The 22 bacteriocin-positive (Bac+ enterococci included En. durans (1, En. faecalis (4, En. faecium (12, En. hirae (3, and En. thailandicus (2. Enterocin A (entA, enterocins mr10A and mr10B (mr10AB, and bacteriocin T8 (bacA were the most commonly found structural genes in order of decreasing prevalence. Forty-five bacteriocin genes were identified within the 22 Bac+ isolates, each containing at least one of the screened structural genes. Of the 22 Bac+ isolates, 15 possessed two bacteriocin genes, seven isolates contained three different bacteriocins, and three isolates contained as many as four different bacteriocin genes. These results may explain the high degree of bactericidal activity observed with various Bac+ Enterococcus spp. Antimicrobial activity against wild-type L. monocytogenes and a bacteriocin-resistant variant demonstrated bacteriocins having different modes-of-action. Mixtures of bacteriocins, especially those with different modes-of-action and having activity against foodborne pathogens, such as L. monocytogenes, may play a promising role in the preservation of food.

  18. State Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) Testing and Reporting for Drivers Involved in Fatal Crashes : Current Practices, Results, and Strategies, 1997-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This report documents current State blood alcohol concentration (BAC) testing and reporting practices and results for drivers involved in fatal crashes. It summarizes known BAC results by State for the years 1997 to 2009 for both fatally injured and ...

  19. Analyses of Genotypes and Phenotypes of Ten Chinese Patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Xu; Pan, Hong; Li, Lin; Wu, Hai-Rong; Wang, Song-Tao; Bao, Xin-Hua; Jiang, Yu-Wu; Qi, Yu

    2016-03-20

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene syndrome that is typically caused by a deletion of the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 4. However, there are few reports about the features of Chinese WHS patients. This study aimed to characterize the clinical and molecular cytogenetic features of Chinese WHS patients using the combination of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Clinical information was collected from ten patients with WHS. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of the patients. The deletions were analyzed by MLPA and array CGH. All patients exhibited the core clinical symptoms of WHS, including severe growth delay, a Greek warrior helmet facial appearance, differing degrees of intellectual disability, and epilepsy or electroencephalogram anomalies. The 4p deletions ranged from 2.62 Mb to 17.25 Mb in size and included LETM1, WHSC1, and FGFR3. The combined use of MLPA and array CGH is an effective and specific means to diagnose WHS and allows for the precise identification of the breakpoints and sizes of deletions. The deletion of genes in the WHS candidate region is closely correlated with the core WHS phenotype.

  20. Array capabilities and future arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, D.

    1993-01-01

    Early results from the new third-generation instruments GAMMASPHERE and EUROGAM are confirming the expectation that such arrays will have a revolutionary effect on the field of high-spin nuclear structure. When completed, GAMMASHPERE will have a resolving power am order of magnitude greater that of the best second-generation arrays. When combined with other instruments such as particle-detector arrays and fragment mass analysers, the capabilites of the arrays for the study of more exotic nuclei will be further enhanced. In order to better understand the limitations of these instruments, and to design improved future detector systems, it is important to have some intelligible and reliable calculation for the relative resolving power of different instrument designs. The derivation of such a figure of merit will be briefly presented, and the relative sensitivities of arrays currently proposed or under construction presented. The design of TRIGAM, a new third-generation array proposed for Chalk River, will also be discussed. It is instructive to consider how far arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors could be taken. For example, it will be shown that an idealised open-quote perfectclose quotes third-generation array of 1000 detectors has a sensitivity an order of magnitude higher again than that of GAMMASPHERE. Less conventional options for new arrays will also be explored

  1. The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of the narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasprzak, A.; Šafář, Jan; Janda, Jaroslav; Doležel, Jaroslav; Wolko, B.; Naganowska, B.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2006), s. 396-407 ISSN 1425-8153 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC * genomic DNA library * Lupinus angustifolius L. Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.238, year: 2006

  2. Comparative physical maps derived from BAC end sequences of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindblad-Toh Kerstin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nile tilapia is the second most important fish in aquaculture. It is an excellent laboratory model, and is closely related to the African lake cichlids famous for their rapid rates of speciation. A suite of genomic resources has been developed for this species, including genetic maps and ESTs. Here we analyze BAC end-sequences to develop comparative physical maps, and estimate the number of genome rearrangements, between tilapia and other model fish species. Results We obtained sequence from one or both ends of 106,259 tilapia BACs. BLAST analysis against the genome assemblies of stickleback, medaka and pufferfish allowed identification of homologies for approximately 25,000 BACs for each species. We calculate that rearrangement breakpoints between tilapia and these species occur about every 3 Mb across the genome. Analysis of 35,000 clones previously assembled into contigs by restriction fingerprints allowed identification of longer-range syntenies. Conclusions Our data suggest that chromosomal evolution in recent teleosts is dominated by alternate loss of gene duplicates, and by intra-chromosomal rearrangements (~one per million years. These physical maps are a useful resource for comparative positional cloning of traits in cichlid fishes. The paired BAC end sequences from these clones will be an important resource for scaffolding forthcoming shotgun sequence assemblies of the tilapia genome.

  3. Chromosome walking with BAC clones as a method of genome mapping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubát, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 10 (2007), s. 440-443 ISSN 1214-1178. [4. Metodické dny. Srní, 01.10.2006-04.10.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : BAC library * sequencing * physical mapping Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  4. Measuring brain activity cycling (BAC) in long term EEG monitoring of preterm babies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, Nathan J; Palmu, Kirsi; Wikström, Sverre; Hellström-Westas, Lena; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2014-01-01

    Measuring fluctuation of vigilance states in early preterm infants undergoing long term intensive care holds promise for monitoring their neurological well-being. There is currently, however, neither objective nor quantitative methods available for this purpose in a research or clinical environment. The aim of this proof-of-concept study was, therefore, to develop quantitative measures of the fluctuation in vigilance states or brain activity cycling (BAC) in early preterm infants. The proposed measures of BAC were summary statistics computed on a frequency domain representation of the proportional duration of spontaneous activity transients (SAT%) calculated from electroencephalograph (EEG) recordings. Eighteen combinations of three statistics and six frequency domain representations were compared to a visual interpretation of cycling in the SAT% signal. Three high performing measures (band energy/periodogram: R = 0.809, relative band energy/nonstationary frequency marginal: R = 0.711, g-statistic/nonstationary frequency marginal: R = 0.638) were then compared to a grading of sleep wake cycling based on the visual interpretation of the amplitude-integrated EEG trend. These measures of BAC are conceptually straightforward, correlate well with the visual scores of BAC and sleep wake cycling, are robust enough to cope with the technically compromised monitoring data available in intensive care units, and are recommended for further validation in prospective studies. (paper)

  5. A critical discourse analysis of Rev. Fr. Prof. B.A.C. Obiefuna's “Let's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On Tuesday, 30th September, 2014, lecturers of the Faculty of Arts, NnamdiAzikiwe University, Awka voted Rev. Fr. Prof. B.A.C. Obiefuna in as the Dean for a two-year tenure. The speech under analysis is his inaugural address in which he enlightens members of the Faculty Board on his dreams and agenda for the Faculty.

  6. A PiggyBac-mediated approach for muscle gene transfer or cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Ley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An emerging therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the transplantation of autologous myogenic progenitor cells genetically modified to express dystrophin. The use of this approach is challenged by the difficulty in maintaining these cells ex vivo while keeping their myogenic potential, and ensuring sufficient transgene expression following their transplantation and myogenic differentiation in vivo. We investigated the use of the piggyBac transposon system to achieve stable gene expression when transferred to cultured mesoangioblasts and into murine muscles. Without selection, up to 8% of the mesoangioblasts expressed the transgene from 1 to 2 genomic copies of the piggyBac vector. Integration occurred mostly in intergenic genomic DNA and transgene expression was stable in vitro. Intramuscular transplantation of mouse Tibialis anterior muscles with mesoangioblasts containing the transposon led to sustained myofiber GFP expression in vivo. In contrast, the direct electroporation of the transposon-donor plasmids in the mouse Tibialis muscles in vivo did not lead to sustained transgene expression despite molecular evidence of piggyBac transposition in vivo. Together these findings provide a proof-of-principle that piggyBac transposon may be considered for mesoangioblast cell-based therapies of muscular dystrophies.

  7. BAC and Beer: Operationalizing Drunk Driving Laws in a Research Methods Course Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ralph B.; McConnell, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on an exercise utilized in a research methods class and based on social problems that invites student interest. Explains the exercise has students determine their blood alcohol level (BAC) by asking them to estimate the number of beers it would take to have them just reach driving under the influence (DUI) status. (CMK)

  8. Advancing Eucalyptus genomics: identification and sequencing of lignin biosynthesis genes from deep-coverage BAC libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudrna David

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eucalyptus species are among the most planted hardwoods in the world because of their rapid growth, adaptability and valuable wood properties. The development and integration of genomic resources into breeding practice will be increasingly important in the decades to come. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries are key genomic tools that enable positional cloning of important traits, synteny evaluation, and the development of genome framework physical maps for genetic linkage and genome sequencing. Results We describe the construction and characterization of two deep-coverage BAC libraries EG_Ba and EG_Bb obtained from nuclear DNA fragments of E. grandis (clone BRASUZ1 digested with HindIII and BstYI, respectively. Genome coverages of 17 and 15 haploid genome equivalents were estimated for EG_Ba and EG_Bb, respectively. Both libraries contained large inserts, with average sizes ranging from 135 Kb (Eg_Bb to 157 Kb (Eg_Ba, very low extra-nuclear genome contamination providing a probability of finding a single copy gene ≥ 99.99%. Libraries were screened for the presence of several genes of interest via hybridizations to high-density BAC filters followed by PCR validation. Five selected BAC clones were sequenced and assembled using the Roche GS FLX technology providing the whole sequence of the E. grandis chloroplast genome, and complete genomic sequences of important lignin biosynthesis genes. Conclusions The two E. grandis BAC libraries described in this study represent an important milestone for the advancement of Eucalyptus genomics and forest tree research. These BAC resources have a highly redundant genome coverage (> 15×, contain large average inserts and have a very low percentage of clones with organellar DNA or empty vectors. These publicly available BAC libraries are thus suitable for a broad range of applications in genetic and genomic research in Eucalyptus and possibly in related species of Myrtaceae

  9. Paradoxical bronchospasm from benzalkonium chloride (BAC preservative in albuterol nebulizer solution in a patient with acute severe asthma. A case report and literature review of airway effects of BAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew George, MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nebulized bronchodilator solutions are available in the United States as both nonsterile and sterile-filled products. Sulfites, benzalkonium chloride (BAC, or chlorobutanol are added to nonsterile products to prevent bacterial growth. Bronchoconstriction from inhaled BAC is cumulative, prolonged, and correlates directly with basal airway responsiveness. The multi-dose dropper bottle of albuterol sulfate solution contains 50 μg BAC per/2.5 mg of albuterol, which may be below or at the lower limit of the threshold dose for bronchoconstriction. However, with repeated albuterol nebulization, the effect can be additive and cumulative, often exceeding the bronchoconstriction threshold. We report a case of a 17 years old patient, who received 32 mg of BAC via nebulization over a period of 3.5 days that probably caused persistent bronchospasm evidenced by failure to improve clinically and to increase peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR from 125 L/min (27% of predicted value to 300 L/min (68% of predicted value within 2 hours of withdrawing BAC. The patient's respiratory status and PEFR improved dramatically once the nebulization solution was switched to BAC free lev-albuterol solution. The pediatric providers, particularly the emergency department physicians, intensivists and pulmonologists need to be aware of this rare albeit possible toxicity to the respiratory system caused by BAC used as a preservative in albuterol nebulizer solution.

  10. A BAC/BIBAC-based physical map of chickpea, Cicer arietinum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbo Shahal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. is the third most important pulse crop worldwide. Despite its importance, relatively little is known about its genome. The availability of a genome-wide physical map allows rapid fine mapping of QTL, development of high-density genome maps, and sequencing of the entire genome. However, no such a physical map has been developed in chickpea. Results We present a genome-wide, BAC/BIBAC-based physical map of chickpea developed by fingerprint analysis. Four chickpea BAC and BIBAC libraries, two of which were constructed in this study, were used. A total of 67,584 clones were fingerprinted, and 64,211 (~11.7 × of the fingerprints validated and used in the physical map assembly. The physical map consists of 1,945 BAC/BIBAC contigs, with each containing an average of 28.3 clones and having an average physical length of 559 kb. The contigs collectively span approximately 1,088 Mb. By using the physical map, we identified the BAC/BIBAC contigs containing or closely linked to QTL4.1 for resistance to Didymella rabiei (RDR and QTL8 for days to first flower (DTF, thus further verifying the physical map and confirming its utility in fine mapping and cloning of QTL. Conclusion The physical map represents the first genome-wide, BAC/BIBAC-based physical map of chickpea. This map, along with other genomic resources previously developed in the species and the genome sequences of related species (soybean, Medicago and Lotus, will provide a foundation necessary for many areas of advanced genomics research in chickpea and other legume species. The inclusion of transformation-ready BIBACs in the map greatly facilitates its utility in functional analysis of the legume genomes.

  11. 454 sequencing of pooled BAC clones on chromosome 3H of barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaji Nami

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing of barley has been delayed due to its large genome size (ca. 5,000Mbp. Among the fast sequencing systems, 454 liquid phase pyrosequencing provides the longest reads and is the most promising method for BAC clones. Here we report the results of pooled sequencing of BAC clones selected with ESTs genetically mapped to chromosome 3H. Results We sequenced pooled barley BAC clones using a 454 parallel genome sequencer. A PCR screening system based on primer sets derived from genetically mapped ESTs on chromosome 3H was used for clone selection in a BAC library developed from cultivar "Haruna Nijo". The DNA samples of 10 or 20 BAC clones were pooled and used for shotgun library development. The homology between contig sequences generated in each pooled library and mapped EST sequences was studied. The number of contigs assigned on chromosome 3H was 372. Their lengths ranged from 1,230 bp to 58,322 bp with an average 14,891 bp. Of these contigs, 240 showed homology and colinearity with the genome sequence of rice chromosome 1. A contig annotation browser supplemented with query search by unique sequence or genetic map position was developed. The identified contigs can be annotated with barley cDNAs and reference sequences on the browser. Homology analysis of these contigs with rice genes indicated that 1,239 rice genes can be assigned to barley contigs by the simple comparison of sequence lengths in both species. Of these genes, 492 are assigned to rice chromosome 1. Conclusions We demonstrate the efficiency of sequencing gene rich regions from barley chromosome 3H, with special reference to syntenic relationships with rice chromosome 1.

  12. SNP Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Louhelainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays.

  13. Using expression arrays for copy number detection: an example from E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stitzer Michael E

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequencing of many genomes and tiling arrays consisting of millions of DNA segments spanning entire genomes have made high-resolution copy number analysis possible. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH has enabled the high-resolution detection of DNA copy number aberrations. While many of the methods and algorithms developed for the analysis microarrays have focused on expression analysis, the same technology can be used to detect genetic alterations, using for example standard commercial Affymetrix arrays. Due to the nature of the resultant data, standard techniques for processing GeneChip expression experiments are inapplicable. Results We have developed a robust and flexible methodology for high-resolution analysis of DNA copy number of whole genomes, using Affymetrix high-density expression oligonucleotide microarrays. Copy number is obtained from fluorescence signals after processing with novel normalization, spatial artifact correction, data transformation and deletion/duplication detection. We applied our approach to identify deleted and amplified regions in E. coli mutants obtained after prolonged starvation. Conclusion The availability of Affymetrix expression chips for a wide variety of organisms makes the proposed array CGH methodology useful more generally.

  14. Construction of a BAC library and identification of Dmrt1 gene of the rice field eel, Monopterus albus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang Songhun; Zhou Fang; Xia Laixin; Zhao Wei; Cheng Hanhua; Zhou Rongjia

    2006-01-01

    A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed using nuclear DNA from the rice field eel (Monopterus albus). The BAC library consists of a total of 33,000 clones with an average insert size of 115 kb. Based on the rice field eel haploid genome size of 600 Mb, the BAC library is estimated to contain approximately 6.3 genome equivalents and represents 99.8% of the genome of the rice field eel. This is first BAC library constructed from this species. To estimate the possibility of isolating a specific clone, high-density colony hybridization-based library screening was performed using Dmrt1 cDNA of the rice field eel as a probe. Both library screening and PCR identification results revealed three positive BAC clones which were overlapped, and formed a contig covering the Dmrt1 gene of 195 kb. By sequence comparisons with the Dmrt1 cDNA and sequencing of first four intron-exon junctions, Dmrt1 gene of the rice field eel was predicted to contain four introns and five exons. The sizes of first and second intron are 1.5 and 2.6 kb, respectively, and the sizes of last two introns were predicted to be about 20 kb. The Dmrt1 gene structure was conserved in evolution. These results also indicate that the BAC library is a useful resource for BAC contig construction and molecular isolation of functional genes

  15. The first insight into the salvia (lamiaceae) genome via bac library construction and high-throughput sequencing of target bac clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, D.C.; Vautrin, S.; Berges, H.; Chen, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Salvia is a representative genus of Lamiaceae, a eudicot family with significant species diversity and population adaptibility. One of the key goals of Salvia genomics research is to identify genes of adaptive significance. This information may help to improve the conservation of adaptive genetic variation and the management of medicinal plants to increase their health and productivity. Large-insert genomic libraries are a fundamental tool for achieving this purpose. We report herein the construction, characterization and screening of a gridded BAC library for Salvia officinalis (sage). The S. officinalis BAC library consists of 17,764 clones and the average insert size is 107 Kb, corresponding to 3 haploid genome equivalents. Seventeen positive clones (average insert size 115 Kb) containing five terpene synthase (TPS) genes were screened out by PCR and 12 of them were subject to Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing, which yielded 28,097,480 90-bp raw reads (2.53 Gb). Scaffolds containing sabinene synthase (Sab), a Sab homolog, TPS3 (kaurene synthase-like 2), copalyl diphosphate synthase 2 and one cytochrome P450 gene were retrieved via de novo assembly and annotation, which also have flanking noncoding sequences, including predicted promoters and repeat sequences. Among 2,638 repeat sequences, there are 330 amplifiable microsatellites. This BAC library provides a new resource for Lamiaceae genomic studies, including microsatellite marker development, physical mapping, comparative genomics and genome sequencing. Characterization of positive clones provided insights into the structure of the Salvia genome. These sequences will be used in the assembly of a future genome sequence for S. officinalis. (author)

  16. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis of stage 4 neuroblastoma reveals high frequency of 11q deletion in tumors lacking MYCN amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantaz, D.; Vandesompele, J.; van Roy, N.; Lastowska, M.; Bown, N.; Combaret, V.; Favrot, M. C.; Delattre, O.; Michon, J.; Bénard, J.; Hartmann, O.; Nicholson, J. C.; Ross, F. M.; Brinkschmidt, C.; Laureys, G.; Caron, H.; Matthay, K. K.; Feuerstein, B. G.; Speleman, F.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the occurrence and association of 11q deletions with other chromosomal imbalances in Stage 4 neuroblastomas. To this purpose we have performed comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis on 50 Stage 4 neuroblastomas and these data were analyzed together with those from 33

  17. Trisomy 7 mosaicism at amniocentesis: Interphase FISH, QF-PCR, and aCGH analyses on uncultured amniocytes for rapid distinguishing of true mosaicism from pseudomosaicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Interphase FISH, QF-PCR, and aCGH analyses on uncultured amniocytes are useful for rapid distinguishing of true mosaicism from pseudomosaicism for trisomy 7 at amniocentesis. Cord blood sampling for confirmation of fetal trisomy 7 mosaicism is not practical.

  18. Begin at the beginning: A BAC-end view of the passion fruit (Passiflora) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Anselmo Azevedo; Penha, Helen Alves; Bellec, Arnaud; Munhoz, Carla de Freitas; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea; Bergès, Hélène; Vieira, Maria Lucia Carneiro

    2014-09-26

    The passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) is a tropical crop of economic importance both for juice production and consumption as fresh fruit. The juice is also used in concentrate blends that are consumed worldwide. However, very little is known about the genome of the species. Therefore, improving our understanding of passion fruit genomics is essential and to some degree a pre-requisite if its genetic resources are to be used more efficiently. In this study, we have constructed a large-insert BAC library and provided the first view on the structure and content of the passion fruit genome, using BAC-end sequence (BES) data as a major resource. The library consisted of 82,944 clones and its levels of organellar DNA were very low. The library represents six haploid genome equivalents, and the average insert size was 108 kb. To check its utility for gene isolation, successful macroarray screening experiments were carried out with probes complementary to eight Passiflora gene sequences available in public databases. BACs harbouring those genes were used in fluorescent in situ hybridizations and unique signals were detected for four BACs in three chromosomes (n=9). Then, we explored 10,000 BES and we identified reads likely to contain repetitive mobile elements (19.6% of all BES), simple sequence repeats and putative proteins, and to estimate the GC content (~42%) of the reads. Around 9.6% of all BES were found to have high levels of similarity to plant genes and ontological terms were assigned to more than half of the sequences analysed (940). The vast majority of the top-hits made by our sequences were to Populus trichocarpa (24.8% of the total occurrences), Theobroma cacao (21.6%), Ricinus communis (14.3%), Vitis vinifera (6.5%) and Prunus persica (3.8%). We generated the first large-insert library for a member of Passifloraceae. This BAC library provides a new resource for genetic and genomic studies, as well as it represents a valuable tool for future whole genome

  19. Genetic transformation of Drosophila willistoni using piggyBac transposon and GFP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Finokiet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out on the use of piggyBac transposable element as vector and the green fluorescent protein (EGFP from the jellyfish, Aquorea victoria, as a genetic marker for the transformation of Drosophila willistoni. Preblastoderm embryos of D. willistoni white mutant were microinjected with a plasmid containing the EGFP marker and the piggyBac ITRs, together with a helper plasmid containing the piggyBac transposase placed under the control of the D. melanogaster hsp70 promoter. G0 adults transformants were recovered at a frequency of approximately 67%. Expression of EGFP in larvae, pupae and adults was observed up to the third generation, suggesting that this transposon was not stable in D. willistoni. Transformed individuals displayed high levels of EGFP expression during larvae and adult stages in the eye, abdomen, thorax and legs, suggesting a wide expression pattern in this species than reported to other species of Drosophilidae.Descrevemos neste trabalho a transformação genética de Drosophila willistoni empregando o elemento transponível piggyBac como vetor e o gene EGFP (green fluorescent protein retirado da água-viva Aquorea victoria, como marcador de transformação. Embriões de D. willistoni em estágio pré-blastoderme, mutantes para o gene white, foram microinjetados com plasmídio contendo o marcador EGFP e as regiões ITRs do transposon piggyBac concomitantemente com um plasmídio auxiliar possuindo o gene da transposase de piggyBac sobre o controle do promotor do gene hsp70 de Drosophila melanogaster. Adultos transformantes Go foram gerados em uma taxa de 67%. A expressão de GFP em larvas, pupas e adultos foi observada somente até a terceira geração, sugerindo que este transposon não é estável em D. willistoni. Os indivíduos transformados exigem um alto nível de expressão de EGFP durante os estágios de larva e, também em adultos o gene marcador é expresso nos olhos, abdome, tórax e patas, mostrando um

  20. BRCA1-mutated and basal-like breast cancers have similar aCGH profiles and a high incidence of protein truncating TP53 mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstege, Henne; Horlings, Hugo M; Velds, Arno; Langerød, Anita; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Vijver, Marc J van de; Nederlof, Petra M; Jonkers, Jos

    2010-01-01

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBC) are aggressive breast cancers for which, so far, no targeted therapy is available because they typically lack expression of hormone receptors and HER2. Phenotypic features of BLBCs, such as clinical presentation and early age of onset, resemble those of breast tumors from BRCA1-mutation carriers. The genomic instability of BRCA1-mutated tumors can be effectively targeted with DNA-damaging agents and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors. Molecular similarities between BLBCs and BRCA1-mutated tumors may therefore provide predictive markers for therapeutic response of BLBCs. There are several known molecular features characteristic for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors: 1) increased numbers of genomic aberrations, 2) a distinct pattern of genomic aberrations, 3) a high frequency of TP53 mutations and 4) a high incidence of complex, protein-truncating TP53 mutations. We compared the frequency of TP53 mutations and the pattern and amount of genomic aberrations between BRCA1-mutated breast tumors, BLBCs and luminal breast tumors by TP53 gene sequencing and array-based comparative genomics hybridization (aCGH) analysis. We found that the high incidence of protein truncating TP53 mutations and the pattern and amount of genomic aberrations specific for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors are also characteristic for BLBCs and different from luminal breast tumors. Complex, protein truncating TP53 mutations in BRCA1-mutated tumors may be a direct consequence of genomic instability caused by BRCA1 loss, therefore, the presence of these types of TP53 mutations in sporadic BLBCs might be a hallmark of BRCAness and a potential biomarker for sensitivity to PARP inhibition. Also, our data suggest that a small subset of genomic regions may be used to identify BRCA1-like BLBCs. BLBCs share molecular features that were previously found to be specific for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors. These features might be useful for the identification of tumors with

  1. Bacteriocin protein BacL1 of Enterococcus faecalis targets cell division loci and specifically recognizes L-Ala2-cross-bridged peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurushima, Jun; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriocin 41 (Bac41) is produced from clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and consists of two extracellular proteins, BacL1 and BacA. We previously reported that BacL1 protein (595 amino acids, 64.5 kDa) is a bacteriolytic peptidoglycan D-isoglutamyl-L-lysine endopeptidase that induces cell lysis of E. faecalis when an accessory factor, BacA, is copresent. However, the target of BacL1 remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the targeting specificity of BacL1. Fluorescence microscopy analysis using fluorescent dye-conjugated recombinant protein demonstrated that BacL1 specifically localized at the cell division-associated site, including the equatorial ring, division septum, and nascent cell wall, on the cell surface of target E. faecalis cells. This specific targeting was dependent on the triple repeat of the SH3 domain located in the region from amino acid 329 to 590 of BacL1. Repression of cell growth due to the stationary state of the growth phase or to treatment with bacteriostatic antibiotics rescued bacteria from the bacteriolytic activity of BacL1 and BacA. The static growth state also abolished the binding and targeting of BacL1 to the cell division-associated site. Furthermore, the targeting of BacL1 was detectable among Gram-positive bacteria with an L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridging peptidoglycan, including E. faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not among bacteria with alternate peptidoglycan structures, such as Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus aureus, or Listeria monocytogenes. These data suggest that BacL1 specifically targets the L-Ala-L-Ala-cross-bridged peptidoglycan and potentially lyses the E. faecalis cells during cell division. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Comparison of 'time to detection' values between BacT/ALERT VIRTUO and BacT/ALERT 3D instruments for clinical blood culture samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestrì, Francesco; Pedna, Maria Federica; Fantini, Michela; Samuelli, Michela; Schiavone, Pasqua; Torri, Arianna; Bertini, Stefania; Sambri, Vittorio

    2017-09-01

    The early detection of bacteraemia and fungemia is of paramount importance to guide antimicrobial therapy in septic patients. In this study the 'time to detection' (TTD) value for the new blood culture system BacT/ALERT VIRTUO (VIRTUO) was evaluated in 1462 positive clinical bottles and compared with the TTD for 1601 positive clinical bottles incubated in the BacT/ALERT 3D system (BTA-3D). The most representative microorganisms isolated from bottles incubated in both blood culture systems were divided into eight categories (in order of frequency): coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae (other than E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, viridans group streptococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida spp. The comparison of TTD values for the two blood culture systems strongly indicated that growth of the first five groups listed above was detected earlier with VIRTUO than with BTA-3D (p culture system can reduce the TTD for more than 75% of isolated microorganisms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Pig transgenesis by piggyBac transposition in combination with somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenfang; Xu, Zhiqian; Zou, Xian; Zeng, Fang; Shi, Junsong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Li, Zicong

    2013-12-01

    The production of animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is inefficient, with approximately 2% of micromanipulated oocytes going to term and resulting in live births. However, it is the most commonly used method for the generation of cloned transgenic livestock as it facilitates the attainment of transgenic animals once the nuclear donor cells are stably transfected and more importantly as alternatives methods of transgenesis in farm animals have proven even less efficient. Here we describe piggyBac-mediated transposition of a transgene into porcine primary cells and use of these genetically modified cells as nuclear donors for the generation of transgenic pigs by SCNT. Gene transfer by piggyBac transposition serves to provide an alternative approach for the transfection of nuclear donor cells used in SCNT.

  4. Quantitative proteomics combined with BAC TransgeneOmics reveals in vivo protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Nina C; Bird, Alexander W; Cox, Jürgen; Splettstoesser, Bianca; Bandilla, Peter; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony; Mann, Matthias

    2010-05-17

    Protein interactions are involved in all cellular processes. Their efficient and reliable characterization is therefore essential for understanding biological mechanisms. In this study, we show that combining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) TransgeneOmics with quantitative interaction proteomics, which we call quantitative BAC-green fluorescent protein interactomics (QUBIC), allows specific and highly sensitive detection of interactions using rapid, generic, and quantitative procedures with minimal material. We applied this approach to identify known and novel components of well-studied complexes such as the anaphase-promoting complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate second generation interaction proteomics by incorporating directed mutational transgene modification and drug perturbation into QUBIC. These methods identified domain/isoform-specific interactors of pericentrin- and phosphorylation-specific interactors of TACC3, which are necessary for its recruitment to mitotic spindles. The scalability, simplicity, cost effectiveness, and sensitivity of this method provide a basis for its general use in small-scale experiments and in mapping the human protein interactome.

  5. Identification of chromosomal fusion sites in Arabidopsis mutants using sequential bicolour BAC-FISH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mokroš, Petr; Vrbský, Jan; Široký, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 8 (2006), s. 1036-1042 ISSN 0831-2796 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/06/0380; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/05/H505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : Arabidopsis * BAC probes * bicolour FISH Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.972, year: 2006

  6. Development of Chromosome-Specific BAC Resources for Genomics of Bread Wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Suchánková, Pavla; Bartoš, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 129, 1-3 (2010), s. 211-223 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/07/1573; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant - others:European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme(XE) FP7/2007–2013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC library * Chromosome * DNA markers Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding Impact factor: 1.783, year: 2010

  7. Chromosomal mapping of canine-derived BAC clones to the red fox and American mink genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukekova, Anna V; Vorobieva, Nadegda V; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Johnson, Jennifer L; Temnykh, Svetlana V; Yudkin, Dmitry V; Trut, Lyudmila N; Andre, Catherine; Galibert, Francis; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2009-01-01

    High-quality sequencing of the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) genome has enabled enormous progress in genetic mapping of canine phenotypic variation. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes), another canid species, also exhibits a wide range of variation in coat color, morphology, and behavior. Although the fox genome has not yet been sequenced, canine genomic resources have been used to construct a meiotic linkage map of the red fox genome and begin genetic mapping in foxes. However, a more detailed gene-specific comparative map between the dog and fox genomes is required to establish gene order within homologous regions of dog and fox chromosomes and to refine breakpoints between homologous chromosomes of the 2 species. In the current study, we tested whether canine-derived gene-containing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones can be routinely used to build a gene-specific map of the red fox genome. Forty canine BAC clones were mapped to the red fox genome by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Each clone was uniquely assigned to a single fox chromosome, and the locations of 38 clones agreed with cytogenetic predictions. These results clearly demonstrate the utility of FISH mapping for construction of a whole-genome gene-specific map of the red fox. The further possibility of using canine BAC clones to map genes in the American mink (Mustela vison) genome was also explored. Much lower success was obtained for this more distantly related farm-bred species, although a few BAC clones were mapped to the predicted chromosomal locations.

  8. Carcinome sébacé de la glande parotide | Mahfoudhi | Pan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Une population faite de cellules à petits noyaux arrondis avec un cytoplasme éosinophile et une autre correspondant à des cellules à cytoplasme vacuolaire avec des anomalies nucléaires associées. Le diagnostic d'un carcinome sébacé de la glande parotide droite a été retenu. La recherche d'une autre localisation ...

  9. BacMam immunization partially protects pigs against sublethal challenge with African swine fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argilaguet, Jordi M; Pérez-Martín, Eva; López, Sergio; Goethe, Martin; Escribano, J M; Giesow, Katrin; Keil, Günther M; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Lack of vaccines and efficient control measures complicate the control and eradication of African swine fever (ASF). Limitations of conventional inactivated and attenuated virus-based vaccines against African swine fever virus (ASFV) highlight the need to use new technologies to develop efficient and safe vaccines against this virus. With this aim in mind, in this study we have constructed BacMam-sHAPQ, a baculovirus based vector for gene transfer into mammalian cells, expressing a fusion protein comprising three in tandem ASFV antigens: p54, p30 and the extracellular domain of the viral hemagglutinin (secretory hemagglutinin, sHA), under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (CMVie). Confirming its correct in vitro expression, BacMam-sHAPQ induced specific T-cell responses directly after in vivo immunization. Conversely, no specific antibody responses were detectable prior to ASFV challenge. The protective potential of this recombinant vaccine candidate was tested by a homologous sublethal challenge with ASFV following immunization. Four out of six immunized pigs remained viremia-free after ASFV infection, while the other two pigs showed similar viremic titres to control animals. The protection afforded correlated with the presence of a large number of virus-specific IFNγ-secreting T-cells in blood at 17 days post-infection. In contrast, the specific antibody levels observed after ASFV challenge in sera from BacMam-sHAPQ immunized pigs were indistinguishable from those found in control pigs. These results highlight the importance of the cellular responses in protection against ASFV and point towards BacMam vectors as potential tools for future vaccine development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cytogenetic Analysis of Populus trichocarpa - Ribosomal DNA, Telomere Repeat Sequence, and Marker-selected BACs

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.N. lslam-Faridi; C.D. Nelson; S.P. DiFazio; L.E. Gunter; G.A. Tuskan

    2009-01-01

    The 185-285 rDNA and 55 rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 185-285 rDNA sites and one 55 rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones...

  11. Versatile P(acman) BAC Libraries for Transgenesis Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venken, Koen J.T.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Schulze, Karen L.; Pan, Hongling; He, Yuchun; Spokony, Rebecca; Wan, Kenneth H.; Koriabine, Maxim; de Jong, Pieter J.; White, Kevin P.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2009-04-21

    We constructed Drosophila melanogaster BAC libraries with 21-kb and 83-kb inserts in the P(acman) system. Clones representing 12-fold coverage and encompassing more than 95percent of annotated genes were mapped onto the reference genome. These clones can be integrated into predetermined attP sites in the genome using Phi C31 integrase to rescue mutations. They can be modified through recombineering, for example to incorporate protein tags and assess expression patterns.

  12. Filter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  13. Neutralization of endotoxin in vitro and in vivo by Bac7(1-35), a proline-rich antibacterial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiselli, Roberto; Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Circo, Raffaella; Mocchegiani, Federico; Skerlavaj, Barbara; D'Amato, Giuseppina; Scalise, Giorgio; Zanetti, Margherita; Saba, Vittorio

    2003-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), or endotoxins, are structural components of gram-negative bacteria implicated in the pathogenesis of septic shock. In this study the antiendotoxin activity of Bac7(1-35), a synthetic peptide based on the sequence of a proline-rich antibacterial peptide from bovine neutrophils, was investigated in vitro and in an experimental rat model of gram-negative septic shock. The ability of Bac7(1-35) to bind LPS from Escherichia coli O111:B4 was determined using a sensitive Limulus chromogenic assay. In the in vivo study, adult male Wistar rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 x 10(9) colony-forming units of E. coli ATCC 25922. All animals were randomized to receive intraperitoneally 1 mg/kg Bac7(1-35), or isotonic sodium chloride solution (control group C1), 60 mg/kg of piperacillin and 1 mg/kg polymyxin B, 1 mg/kg of polymyxin B plus 60 mg/kg of piperacillin, and 1 mg/kg of Bac7(1-35) plus 60 mg/kg of piperacillin. Each group included 15 animals. Bac7(1-35) was found to completely inhibit the LPS procoagulant activity at approximately 10 microM peptide concentration, as determined by in vitro LAL chromogenic assay. Treatment with Bac7(1-35) resulted in significant decrease in plasma endotoxin levels and lethality rates compared with saline injected control animals. No statistically significant differences were noted between Bac7(1-35) and polymyxin B in reducing all variables measured. These results provide evidence for the ability of Bac7(1-35) to effectively bind LPS and protect animals from lethal effects of this molecule, and point to its potential use for the treatment of endotoxin-induced septic shock.

  14. A BAC-based physical map of the Nile tilapia genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Justin E

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes, particularly tilapias, are an important source of animal protein in tropical countries around the world. To support selective breeding of these species we are constructing genetic and physical maps of the tilapia genome. Physical maps linking collections of BAC clones are a critical resource for both positional cloning and assembly of whole genome sequences. Results We constructed a genome-wide physical map of the tilapia genome by restriction fingerprinting 35,245 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones using high-resolution capillary polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The map consists of 3,621 contigs and is estimated to span 1.752 Gb in physical length. An independent analysis of the marker content of four contigs demonstrates the reliability of the assembly. Conclusion This physical map is a powerful tool for accelerating genomic studies in cichlid fishes, including comparative mapping among fish species, long-range assembly of genomic shotgun sequences, and the positional cloning of genes underlying important phenotypic traits. The tilapia BAC fingerprint database is freely available at http://hcgs.unh.edu/fpc/image.php.

  15. A BAC-based physical map of the Nile tilapia genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Takayuki; Kidd, Celeste; Tomasino, Elizabeth; Davis, Jesse T; Wishon, Cassandra; Stern, Justin E; Carleton, Karen L; Howe, Aimee E; Kocher, Thomas D

    2005-01-01

    Background Cichlid fishes, particularly tilapias, are an important source of animal protein in tropical countries around the world. To support selective breeding of these species we are constructing genetic and physical maps of the tilapia genome. Physical maps linking collections of BAC clones are a critical resource for both positional cloning and assembly of whole genome sequences. Results We constructed a genome-wide physical map of the tilapia genome by restriction fingerprinting 35,245 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones using high-resolution capillary polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The map consists of 3,621 contigs and is estimated to span 1.752 Gb in physical length. An independent analysis of the marker content of four contigs demonstrates the reliability of the assembly. Conclusion This physical map is a powerful tool for accelerating genomic studies in cichlid fishes, including comparative mapping among fish species, long-range assembly of genomic shotgun sequences, and the positional cloning of genes underlying important phenotypic traits. The tilapia BAC fingerprint database is freely available at . PMID:15946383

  16. Isolation of high molecular weight DNA from marine sponge bacteria for BAC library construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yongchang; Dai, Shikun; Xie, Lianwu; Ravi Kumar, M S; Sun, Wei; Sun, Huimin; Tang, Danling; Li, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Metagenomics is a powerful tool for mining the genetic repositories from environmental microorganisms. Bacteria associated with marine sponges (phylum Porifera) are rich sources of biologically active natural products. However, to date, few compounds are discovered from the sponge metagenomic libraries, and the main reason might be the difficulties in recovery of high molecular weight (HMW) DNA from sponge symbionts to construct large insert libraries. Here, we describe a method to recover HMW bacterial DNA from diverse sponges with high quality for bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library construction. Microorganisms concentrated from sponges by differential centrifugation were embedded in agarose plugs to lyse out the HMW DNA for recovery. DNA fragments over 436 kb size were recovered from three different types of sponges, Halichondria sp., Haliclona sp., and Xestospongia sp. To evaluate the recovered DNA quality, the diversity of bacterial DNA comprised in the HMW DNA derived from sponge Halichondria sp. was analyzed, and this HMW DNA sample was also cloned into a shuttle BAC vector between Escherichia coli and Streptomyces sp. The results showed that more than five types of bacterial DNA, i.e., Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, and unidentified bacteria, had been recovered by this method, and an average 100 kb size insert DNA in a constructed BAC library demonstrated that the recovered HMW DNA is suitable for metagenomic library construction.

  17. A BAC-based physical map of the Drosophila buzzatii genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Josefa; Nefedov, Michael; Bosdet, Ian; Casals, Ferran; Calvete, Oriol; Delprat, Alejandra; Shin, Heesun; Chiu, Readman; Mathewson, Carrie; Wye, Natasja; Hoskins, Roger A.; Schein, JacquelineE.; de Jong, Pieter; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2005-03-18

    Large-insert genomic libraries facilitate cloning of large genomic regions, allow the construction of clone-based physical maps and provide useful resources for sequencing entire genomes. Drosophilabuzzatii is a representative species of the repleta group in the Drosophila subgenus, which is being widely used as a model in studies of genome evolution, ecological adaptation and speciation. We constructed a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic library of D. buzzatii using the shuttle vector pTARBAC2.1. The library comprises 18,353 clones with an average insert size of 152 kb and a {approx}18X expected representation of the D. buzzatii euchromatic genome. We screened the entire library with six euchromatic gene probes and estimated the actual genome representation to be {approx}23X. In addition, we fingerprinted by restriction digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis a sample of 9,555 clones, and assembled them using Finger Printed Contigs (FPC) software and manual editing into 345 contigs (mean of 26 clones per contig) and 670singletons. Finally, we anchored 181 large contigs (containing 7,788clones) to the D. buzzatii salivary gland polytene chromosomes by in situ hybridization of 427 representative clones. The BAC library and a database with all the information regarding the high coverage BAC-based physical map described in this paper are available to the research community.

  18. Targeted isolation, sequence assembly and characterization of two white spruce (Picea glauca BAC clones for terpenoid synthase and cytochrome P450 genes involved in conifer defence reveal insights into a conifer genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritland Carol

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conifers are a large group of gymnosperm trees which are separated from the angiosperms by more than 300 million years of independent evolution. Conifer genomes are extremely large and contain considerable amounts of repetitive DNA. Currently, conifer sequence resources exist predominantly as expressed sequence tags (ESTs and full-length (FLcDNAs. There is no genome sequence available for a conifer or any other gymnosperm. Conifer defence-related genes often group into large families with closely related members. The goals of this study are to assess the feasibility of targeted isolation and sequence assembly of conifer BAC clones containing specific genes from two large gene families, and to characterize large segments of genomic DNA sequence for the first time from a conifer. Results We used a PCR-based approach to identify BAC clones for two target genes, a terpene synthase (3-carene synthase; 3CAR and a cytochrome P450 (CYP720B4 from a non-arrayed genomic BAC library of white spruce (Picea glauca. Shotgun genomic fragments isolated from the BAC clones were sequenced to a depth of 15.6- and 16.0-fold coverage, respectively. Assembly and manual curation yielded sequence scaffolds of 172 kbp (3CAR and 94 kbp (CYP720B4 long. Inspection of the genomic sequences revealed the intron-exon structures, the putative promoter regions and putative cis-regulatory elements of these genes. Sequences related to transposable elements (TEs, high complexity repeats and simple repeats were prevalent and comprised approximately 40% of the sequenced genomic DNA. An in silico simulation of the effect of sequencing depth on the quality of the sequence assembly provides direction for future efforts of conifer genome sequencing. Conclusion We report the first targeted cloning, sequencing, assembly, and annotation of large segments of genomic DNA from a conifer. We demonstrate that genomic BAC clones for individual members of multi-member gene

  19. Prostate cancer: body-array versus endorectal coil MR imaging at 3 T--comparison of image quality, localization, and staging performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Futterer, J.J.; Hambrock, T.; Takahashi, S.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Huisman, H.J.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Knipscheer, B.C.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively compare image quality and accuracy of prostate cancer localization and staging with body-array coil (BAC) versus endorectal coil (ERC) T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3 T, with histopathologic findings as the reference standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After

  20. Genome mapping on nanochannel arrays for structural variation analysis and sequence assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Ernest T; Hastie, Alex; Lin, Chin; Ehrlich, Dean; Das, Somes K; Austin, Michael D; Deshpande, Paru; Cao, Han; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Xiao, Ming; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2012-01-01

    We describe genome mapping on nanochannel arrays. In this approach, specific sequence motifs in single DNA molecules are fluorescently labeled, and the DNA molecules are uniformly stretched in thousands of silicon channels on a nanofluidic device. Fluorescence imaging allows the construction of maps of the physical distances between occurrences of the sequence motifs. We demonstrate the analysis, individually and as mixtures, of 95 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that cover the 4...

  1. A first generation BAC-based physical map of the rainbow trout genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorgaard Gary H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss are the most-widely cultivated cold freshwater fish in the world and an important model species for many research areas. Coupling great interest in this species as a research model with the need for genetic improvement of aquaculture production efficiency traits justifies the continued development of genomics research resources. Many quantitative trait loci (QTL have been identified for production and life-history traits in rainbow trout. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC physical map is needed to facilitate fine mapping of QTL and the selection of positional candidate genes for incorporation in marker-assisted selection (MAS for improving rainbow trout aquaculture production. This resource will also facilitate efforts to obtain and assemble a whole-genome reference sequence for this species. Results The physical map was constructed from DNA fingerprinting of 192,096 BAC clones using the 4-color high-information content fingerprinting (HICF method. The clones were assembled into physical map contigs using the finger-printing contig (FPC program. The map is composed of 4,173 contigs and 9,379 singletons. The total number of unique fingerprinting fragments (consensus bands in contigs is 1,185,157, which corresponds to an estimated physical length of 2.0 Gb. The map assembly was validated by 1 comparison with probe hybridization results and agarose gel fingerprinting contigs; and 2 anchoring large contigs to the microsatellite-based genetic linkage map. Conclusion The production and validation of the first BAC physical map of the rainbow trout genome is described in this paper. We are currently integrating this map with the NCCCWA genetic map using more than 200 microsatellites isolated from BAC end sequences and by identifying BACs that harbor more than 300 previously mapped markers. The availability of an integrated physical and genetic map will enable detailed comparative genome

  2. A highly redundant BAC library of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar: an important tool for salmon projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koop Ben F

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As farming of Atlantic salmon is growing as an aquaculture enterprise, the need to identify the genomic mechanisms for specific traits is becoming more important in breeding and management of the animal. Traits of importance might be related to growth, disease resistance, food conversion efficiency, color or taste. To identify genomic regions responsible for specific traits, genomic large insert libraries have previously proven to be of crucial importance. These large insert libraries can be screened using gene or genetic markers in order to identify and map regions of interest. Furthermore, large-scale mapping can utilize highly redundant libraries in genome projects, and hence provide valuable data on the genome structure. Results Here we report the construction and characterization of a highly redundant bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library constructed from a Norwegian aquaculture strain male of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar. The library consists of a total number of 305 557 clones, in which approximately 299 000 are recombinants. The average insert size of the library is 188 kbp, representing 18-fold genome coverage. High-density filters each consisting of 18 432 clones spotted in duplicates have been produced for hybridization screening, and are publicly available 1. To characterize the library, 15 expressed sequence tags (ESTs derived overgos and 12 oligo sequences derived from microsatellite markers were used in hybridization screening of the complete BAC library. Secondary hybridizations with individual probes were performed for the clones detected. The BACs positive for the EST probes were fingerprinted and mapped into contigs, yielding an average of 3 contigs for each probe. Clones identified using genomic probes were PCR verified using microsatellite specific primers. Conclusion Identification of genes and genomic regions of interest is greatly aided by the availability of the CHORI-214 Atlantic salmon BAC

  3. Generation of a BAC-based physical map of the melon genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puigdomènech Pere

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cucumis melo (melon belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family, whose economic importance among horticulture crops is second only to Solanaceae. Melon has high intra-specific genetic variation, morphologic diversity and a small genome size (450 Mb, which make this species suitable for a great variety of molecular and genetic studies that can lead to the development of tools for breeding varieties of the species. A number of genetic and genomic resources have already been developed, such as several genetic maps and BAC genomic libraries. These tools are essential for the construction of a physical map, a valuable resource for map-based cloning, comparative genomics and assembly of whole genome sequencing data. However, no physical map of any Cucurbitaceae has yet been developed. A project has recently been started to sequence the complete melon genome following a whole-genome shotgun strategy, which makes use of massive sequencing data. A BAC-based melon physical map will be a useful tool to help assemble and refine the draft genome data that is being produced. Results A melon physical map was constructed using a 5.7 × BAC library and a genetic map previously developed in our laboratories. High-information-content fingerprinting (HICF was carried out on 23,040 BAC clones, digesting with five restriction enzymes and SNaPshot labeling, followed by contig assembly with FPC software. The physical map has 1,355 contigs and 441 singletons, with an estimated physical length of 407 Mb (0.9 × coverage of the genome and the longest contig being 3.2 Mb. The anchoring of 845 BAC clones to 178 genetic markers (100 RFLPs, 76 SNPs and 2 SSRs also allowed the genetic positioning of 183 physical map contigs/singletons, representing 55 Mb (12% of the melon genome, to individual chromosomal loci. The melon FPC database is available for download at http://melonomics.upv.es/static/files/public/physical_map/. Conclusions Here we report the construction

  4. Construction of an American mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC library and sequencing candidate genes important for the fur industry

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    Christensen Knud

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries continue to be invaluable tools for the genomic analysis of complex organisms. Complemented by the newly and fast growing deep sequencing technologies, they provide an excellent source of information in genomics projects. Results Here, we report the construction and characterization of the CHORI-231 BAC library constructed from a Danish-farmed, male American mink (Neovison vison. The library contains approximately 165,888 clones with an average insert size of 170 kb, representing approximately 10-fold coverage. High-density filters, each consisting of 18,432 clones spotted in duplicate, have been produced for hybridization screening and are publicly available. Overgo probes derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs, representing 21 candidate genes for traits important for the mink industry, were used to screen the BAC library. These included candidate genes for coat coloring, hair growth and length, coarseness, and some receptors potentially involved in viral diseases in mink. The extensive screening yielded positive results for 19 of these genes. Thirty-five clones corresponding to 19 genes were sequenced using 454 Roche, and large contigs (184 kb in average were assembled. Knowing the complete sequences of these candidate genes will enable confirmation of the association with a phenotype and the finding of causative mutations for the targeted phenotypes. Additionally, 1577 BAC clones were end sequenced; 2505 BAC end sequences (80% of BACs were obtained. An excess of 2 Mb has been analyzed, thus giving a snapshot of the mink genome. Conclusions The availability of the CHORI-321 American mink BAC library will aid in identification of genes and genomic regions of interest. We have demonstrated how the library can be used to identify specific genes of interest, develop genetic markers, and for BAC end sequencing and deep sequencing of selected clones. To our knowledge, this is the

  5. Validation of the French version of the BACS (the brief assessment of cognition in schizophrenia) among 50 French schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bralet, Marie-Cécile; Falissard, Bruno; Neveu, Xavier; Lucas-Ross, Margaret; Eskenazi, Anne-Marie; Keefe, Richard S E

    2007-09-01

    Schizophrenic patients demonstrate impairments in several key dimensions of cognition. These impairments are correlated with important aspects of functional outcome. While assessment of these cognition disorders is increasingly becoming a part of clinical and research practice in schizophrenia, there is no standard and easily administered test battery. The BACS (Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia) has been validated in English language [Keefe RSE, Golberg TE, Harvey PD, Gold JM, Poe MP, Coughenour L. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia: reliability, sensibility, and comparison with a standard neurocognitive battery. Schizophr. Res 2004;68:283-97], and was found to be as sensitive to cognitive dysfunction as a standard battery of tests, with the advantage of requiring less than 35 min to complete. We developed a French adaptation of the BACS and this study tested its ease of administration and concurrent validity. Correlation analyses between the BACS (version A) and a standard battery were performed. A sample of 50 stable schizophrenic patients received the French Version A of the BACS in a first session, and in a second session a standard battery. All the patients completed each of the subtests of the French BACS . The mean duration of completion for the BACS French version was 36 min (S.D.=5.56). A correlation analysis between the BACS (version A) global score and the standard battery global score showed a significant result (r=0.81, p<0.0001). The correlation analysis between the BACS (version A) sub-scores and the standard battery sub-scores showed significant results for verbal memory, working memory, verbal fluency, attention and speed of information processing and executive functions (p<0.001) and for motor speed (p<0.05). The French Version of the BACS is easier to use in French schizophrenic patients compared to a standard battery (administration shorter and completion rate better) and its good psychometric properties suggest

  6. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  7. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  8. Identification of novel candidate target genes in amplicons of Glioblastoma multiforme tumors detected by expression and CGH microarray profiling

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    Hernández-Moneo Jose-Luis

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cytogenetic and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH studies in brain malignancies have shown that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by complex structural and numerical alterations. However, the limited resolution of these techniques has precluded the precise identification of detailed specific gene copy number alterations. Results We performed a genome-wide survey of gene copy number changes in 20 primary GBMs by CGH on cDNA microarrays. A novel amplicon at 4p15, and previously uncharacterized amplicons at 13q32-34 and 1q32 were detected and are analyzed here. These amplicons contained amplified genes not previously reported. Other amplified regions containg well-known oncogenes in GBMs were also detected at 7p12 (EGFR, 7q21 (CDK6, 4q12 (PDGFRA, and 12q13-15 (MDM2 and CDK4. In order to identify the putative target genes of the amplifications, and to determine the changes in gene expression levels associated with copy number change events, we carried out parallel gene expression profiling analyses using the same cDNA microarrays. We detected overexpression of the novel amplified genes SLA/LP and STIM2 (4p15, and TNFSF13B and COL4A2 (13q32-34. Some of the candidate target genes of amplification (EGFR, CDK6, MDM2, CDK4, and TNFSF13B were tested in an independent set of 111 primary GBMs by using FISH and immunohistological assays. The novel candidate 13q-amplification target TNFSF13B was amplified in 8% of the tumors, and showed protein expression in 20% of the GBMs. Conclusion This high-resolution analysis allowed us to propose novel candidate target genes such as STIM2 at 4p15, and TNFSF13B or COL4A2 at 13q32-34 that could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of these tumors and which would require futher investigations. We showed that overexpression of the amplified genes could be attributable to gene dosage and speculate that deregulation of those genes could be important in the development

  9. A highly efficient Escherichia coli-based chromosome engineering system adapted for recombinogenic targeting and subcloning of BAC DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E C; Yu, D; Martinez de Velasco, J; Tessarollo, L; Swing, D A; Court, D L; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    2001-04-01

    Recently, a highly efficient recombination system for chromosome engineering in Escherichia coli was described that uses a defective lambda prophage to supply functions that protect and recombine a linear DNA targeting cassette with its substrate sequence (Yu et al., 2000, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 5978-5983). Importantly, the recombination is proficient with DNA homologies as short as 30-50 bp, making it possible to use PCR-amplified fragments as the targeting cassette. Here, we adapt this prophage system for use in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) engineering by transferring it to DH10B cells, a BAC host strain. In addition, arabinose inducible cre and flpe genes are introduced into these cells to facilitate BAC modification using loxP and FRT sites. Next, we demonstrate the utility of this recombination system by using it to target cre to the 3' end of the mouse neuron-specific enolase (Eno2) gene carried on a 250-kb BAC, which made it possible to generate BAC transgenic mice that specifically express Cre in all mature neurons. In addition, we show that fragments as large as 80 kb can be subcloned from BACs by gap repair using this recombination system, obviating the need for restriction enzymes or DNA ligases. Finally, we show that BACs can be modified with this recombination system in the absence of drug selection. The ability to modify or subclone large fragments of genomic DNA with precision should facilitate many kinds of genomic experiments that were difficult or impossible to perform previously and aid in studies of gene function in the postgenomic era. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Toward a molecular cytogenetic map for cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by landed BAC/BIBAC clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiuhuan; Liu, Zhao; Cai, Xiwen; Jan, Chao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Conventional karyotypes and various genetic linkage maps have been established in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n = 34). However, the relationship between linkage groups and individual chromosomes of sunflower remains unknown and has considerable relevance for the sunflower research community. Recently, a set of linkage group-specific bacterial /binary bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC/BIBAC) clones was identified from two complementary BAC and BIBAC libraries constructed for cultivated sunflower cv. HA89. In the present study, we used these linkage group-specific clones (~100 kb in size) as probes to in situ hybridize to HA89 mitotic chromosomes at metaphase using the BAC-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Because a characteristic of the sunflower genome is the abundance of repetitive DNA sequences, a high ratio of blocking DNA to probe DNA was applied to hybridization reactions to minimize the background noise. As a result, all sunflower chromosomes were anchored by one or two BAC/BIBAC clones with specific FISH signals. FISH analysis based on tandem repetitive sequences, such as rRNA genes, has been previously reported; however, the BAC-FISH technique developed here using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-derived BAC/BIBAC clones as probes to apply genome-wide analysis is new for sunflower. As chromosome-specific cytogenetic markers, the selected BAC/BIBAC clones that encompass the 17 linkage groups provide a valuable tool for identifying sunflower cytogenetic stocks (such as trisomics) and tracking alien chromosomes in interspecific crosses. This work also demonstrates the potential of using a large-insert DNA library for the development of molecular cytogenetic resources.

  11. A dense genetic linkage map for common carp and its integration with a BAC-based physical map.

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    Lan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Common carp (Cyprinus carpio is one of the most important aquaculture species with an annual global production of 3.4 million metric tons. It is also an important ornamental species as well as an important model species for aquaculture research. To improve the economically important traits of this fish, a number of genomic resources and genetic tools have been developed, including several genetic maps and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC-based physical map. However, integrated genetic and physical maps are not available to study quantitative trait loci (QTL and assist with fine mapping, positional cloning and whole genome sequencing and assembly. The objective of this study was to integrate the currently available BAC-based physical and genetic maps. RESULTS: The genetic map was updated with 592 novel markers, including 312 BAC-anchored microsatellites and 130 SNP markers, and contained 1,209 genetic markers on 50 linkage groups, spanning 3,565.9 cM in the common carp genome. An integrated genetic and physical map of the common carp genome was then constructed, which was composed of 463 physical map contigs and 88 single BACs. Combined lengths of the contigs and single BACs covered a physical length of 498.75 Mb, or around 30% of the common carp genome. Comparative analysis between common carp and zebrafish genomes was performed based on the integrated map, providing more insights into the common carp specific whole genome duplication and segmental rearrangements in the genome. CONCLUSION: We integrated a BAC-based physical map to a genetic linkage map of common carp by anchoring BAC-associated genetic markers. The density of the genetic linkage map was significantly increased. The integrated map provides a tool for both genetic and genomic studies of common carp, which will help us to understand the genomic architecture of common carp and facilitate fine mapping and positional cloning of economically important traits for

  12. Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) reveals a neo-X chromosome and biased gene movement in stalk-eyed flies (genus Teleopsis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard H; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2010-09-16

    Chromosomal location has a significant effect on the evolutionary dynamics of genes involved in sexual dimorphism, impacting both the pattern of sex-specific gene expression and the rate of duplication and protein evolution for these genes. For nearly all non-model organisms, however, knowledge of chromosomal gene content is minimal and difficult to obtain on a genomic scale. In this study, we utilized Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH), using probes designed from EST sequence, to identify genes located on the X chromosome of four species in the stalk-eyed fly genus Teleopsis. Analysis of log(2) ratio values of female-to-male hybridization intensities from the CGH microarrays for over 3,400 genes reveals a strongly bimodal distribution that clearly differentiates autosomal from X-linked genes for all four species. Genotyping of 33 and linkage mapping of 28 of these genes in Teleopsis dalmanni indicate the CGH results correctly identified chromosomal location in all cases. Syntenic comparison with Drosophila indicates that 90% of the X-linked genes in Teleopsis are homologous to genes located on chromosome 2L in Drosophila melanogaster, suggesting the formation of a nearly complete neo-X chromosome from Muller element B in the dipteran lineage leading to Teleopsis. Analysis of gene movement both relative to Drosophila and within Teleopsis indicates that gene movement is significantly associated with 1) rates of protein evolution, 2) the pattern of gene duplication, and 3) the evolution of eyespan sexual dimorphism. Overall, this study reveals that diopsids are a critical group for understanding the evolution of sex chromosomes within Diptera. In addition, we demonstrate that CGH is a useful technique for identifying chromosomal sex-linkage and should be applicable to other organisms with EST or partial genomic information.

  13. Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH reveals a neo-X chromosome and biased gene movement in stalk-eyed flies (genus Teleopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Baker

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal location has a significant effect on the evolutionary dynamics of genes involved in sexual dimorphism, impacting both the pattern of sex-specific gene expression and the rate of duplication and protein evolution for these genes. For nearly all non-model organisms, however, knowledge of chromosomal gene content is minimal and difficult to obtain on a genomic scale. In this study, we utilized Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH, using probes designed from EST sequence, to identify genes located on the X chromosome of four species in the stalk-eyed fly genus Teleopsis. Analysis of log(2 ratio values of female-to-male hybridization intensities from the CGH microarrays for over 3,400 genes reveals a strongly bimodal distribution that clearly differentiates autosomal from X-linked genes for all four species. Genotyping of 33 and linkage mapping of 28 of these genes in Teleopsis dalmanni indicate the CGH results correctly identified chromosomal location in all cases. Syntenic comparison with Drosophila indicates that 90% of the X-linked genes in Teleopsis are homologous to genes located on chromosome 2L in Drosophila melanogaster, suggesting the formation of a nearly complete neo-X chromosome from Muller element B in the dipteran lineage leading to Teleopsis. Analysis of gene movement both relative to Drosophila and within Teleopsis indicates that gene movement is significantly associated with 1 rates of protein evolution, 2 the pattern of gene duplication, and 3 the evolution of eyespan sexual dimorphism. Overall, this study reveals that diopsids are a critical group for understanding the evolution of sex chromosomes within Diptera. In addition, we demonstrate that CGH is a useful technique for identifying chromosomal sex-linkage and should be applicable to other organisms with EST or partial genomic information.

  14. PAB-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans poly(A-binding protein, regulates mRNA metabolism in germline by interacting with CGH-1 and CAR-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunhee Ko

    Full Text Available Poly(A-binding proteins are highly conserved among eukaryotes and regulate stability of mRNA and translation. Among C. elegans homologues, pab-1 mutants showed defects in germline mitotic proliferation. Unlike pab-1 mutants, pab-1 RNAi at every larval stage caused arrest of germline development at the following stage, indicating that pab-1 is required for the entire postembryonic germline development. This idea is supported by the observations that the mRNA level of pab-1 increased throughout postembryonic development and its protein expression was germline-enriched. PAB-1 localized to P granules and the cytoplasm in the germline. PAB-1 colocalized with CGH-1 and CAR-1 and affected their localization, suggesting that PAB-1 is a component of processing (P-bodies that interacts with them. The mRNA and protein levels of representative germline genes, rec-8, GLP-1, rme-2, and msp-152, were decreased after pab-1 RNAi. Although the mRNA level of msp-152 was increased in cgh-1 mutant, it was also significantly reduced by pab-1 RNAi. Our results suggest that PAB-1 positively regulates the mRNA levels of germline genes, which is likely facilitated by the interaction of PAB-1 with other P-body components, CGH-1 and CAR-1.

  15. The relationship of normal body temperature, end-expired breath temperature, and BAC/BrAC ratio in 98 physically fit human test subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, J Mack; Burris, James M; Hughes, James R; Cunningham, Margaret P

    2010-06-01

    The relationship between normal body temperature, end-expired breath temperature, and blood alcohol concentration (BAC)/breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) ratio was studied in 98 subjects (84 men, 14 women). Subjects consumed alcohol sufficient to produce a BrAC of at least 0.06 g/210 L 45-75 min after drinking. Breath samples were analyzed using an Intoxilyzer 8000 specially equipped to measure breath temperature. Venous blood samples and body temperatures were then taken. The mean body temperature of the men (36.6 degrees C) was lower than the women (37.0 degrees C); however, their mean breath temperatures were virtually identical (men: 34.5 degrees C; women: 34.6 degrees C). The BAC exceeded the BrAC for every subject. BAC/BrAC ratios were calculated from the BAC and BrAC analytical results. There was no difference in the BAC/BrAC ratios for men (1:2379) and women (1:2385). The correlation between BAC and BrAC was high (r = 0.938, p body temperature and end-expired breath temperature, body temperature and BAC/BrAC ratio, and breath temperature and BAC/BrAC ratio were much lower. Neither normal body temperature nor end-expired breath temperature was strongly associated with BAC/BrAC ratio.

  16. The first generation of a BAC-based physical map of Brassica rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Brassica includes the most extensively cultivated vegetable crops worldwide. Investigation of the Brassica genome presents excellent challenges to study plant genome evolution and divergence of gene function associated with polyploidy and genome hybridization. A physical map of the B. rapa genome is a fundamental tool for analysis of Brassica "A" genome structure. Integration of a physical map with an existing genetic map by linking genetic markers and BAC clones in the sequencing pipeline provides a crucial resource for the ongoing genome sequencing effort and assembly of whole genome sequences. Results A genome-wide physical map of the B. rapa genome was constructed by the capillary electrophoresis-based fingerprinting of 67,468 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC clones using the five restriction enzyme SNaPshot technique. The clones were assembled into contigs by means of FPC v8.5.3. After contig validation and manual editing, the resulting contig assembly consists of 1,428 contigs and is estimated to span 717 Mb in physical length. This map provides 242 anchored contigs on 10 linkage groups to be served as seed points from which to continue bidirectional chromosome extension for genome sequencing. Conclusion The map reported here is the first physical map for Brassica "A" genome based on the High Information Content Fingerprinting (HICF technique. This physical map will serve as a fundamental genomic resource for accelerating genome sequencing, assembly of BAC sequences, and comparative genomics between Brassica genomes. The current build of the B. rapa physical map is available at the B. rapa Genome Project website for the user community.

  17. Accelerated computation of CGH using inter-line and temporal-redundancy data of 3D video image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Kwon, Min-Woo; Kim, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a new method for efficient generation of video hologram for 3-D video is proposed by combined use of redundant data of 3-D video and look-up table techniques. That is, temporal redundant data in inter-frame of 3-D video image is removed using differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) method between frames then inter-line redundant data in intra-frame of 3-D video image is also removed using DPCM algorithm between lines. Experimental results show that, in the proposed method, the average number of calculated object points for 3-D objects have been reduced by 23.3% for top-down scanning scheme, compared to the conventional TR_NLUT method. And, the average calculation time for one object point has been also reduced by 21.0%, compared to the conventional TR_NLUT. Good experimental results with 3-D test moving pictures finally confirmed the feasibility of the proposed method in fast generation of CGH patterns for 3-D videos.

  18. Hyperactive self-inactivating piggyBac for transposase-enhanced pronuclear microinjection transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marh, Joel; Stoytcheva, Zoia; Urschitz, Johann; Sugawara, Atsushi; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Owens, Jesse B; Stoytchev, Ilko; Pelczar, Pawel; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Moisyadi, Stefan

    2012-11-20

    We have developed a unique method for mouse transgenesis. The transposase-enhanced pronuclear microinjection (PNI) technique described herein uses the hyperactive piggyBac transposase to insert a large transgene into the mouse genome. This procedure increased transgene integration efficiency by fivefold compared with conventional PNI or intracytoplasmic sperm injection-mediated transgenesis. Our data indicate that the transposase-enhanced PNI technique additionally requires fewer embryos to be microinjected than traditional methods to obtain transgenic animals. This transposase-mediated approach is also very efficient for single-cell embryo cytoplasmic injections, offering an easy-to-implement transgenesis method to the scientific community.

  19. Germline transformation of Aedes fluviatilis (Diptera:Culicidae with the piggyBac transposable element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Guimarães Rodrigues

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The technique to generate transgenic mosquitoes requires adaptation for each target species because of aspects related to species biology, sensitivity to manipulation and rearing conditions. Here we tested different parameters on the microinjection procedure in order to obtain a transgenic Neotropical mosquito species. By using a transposon-based strategy we were able to successfully transform Aedes fluviatilis (Lutz, which can be used as an avian malaria model. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the piggyBac transposable element as a transformation vector for Neotropical mosquito species and opens up new research frontiers for South American mosquito vectors.

  20. Expression of Human CAR Splicing Variants in BAC-Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a key regulator for drug metabolism in liver. Human CAR (hCAR) transcripts are subjected to alternative splicing. Some hCAR splicing variants (SVs) have been shown to encode functional proteins by reporter assays. However, in vivo research on the activity of these hCAR SVs has been impeded by the absence of a valid model. This study engineered an hCAR-BAC-transgenic (hCAR-TG) mouse model by integrating the 8.5-kbp hCAR gene as wel...

  1. A comparative, BAC end sequence enabled map of the genome of the American mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benkel, Bernhard F.; Smith, Amanda; Christensen, Knud

    2012-01-01

    In this report we present the results of the analysis of approximately 2.7 Mb of genomic information for the American mink (Neovison vison) derived through BAC end sequencing. Our study, which encompasses approximately 1/1000th of the mink genome, suggests that simple sequence repeats (SSRs......) are less common in the mink than in the human genome, whereas the average GC content of the mink genome is slightly higher than that of its human counterpart. The 2.7 Mb mink genomic dataset also contained 2,416 repeat elements (retroids and DNA transposons) occupying almost 31% of the sequence space...

  2. BACS: The Brussels Artificial Character Sets for studies in cognitive psychology and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Camille; Content, Alain; Chetail, Fabienne

    2017-12-01

    Written symbols such as letters have been used extensively in cognitive psychology, whether to understand their contributions to written word recognition or to examine the processes involved in other mental functions. Sometimes, however, researchers want to manipulate letters while removing their associated characteristics. A powerful solution to do so is to use new characters, devised to be highly similar to letters, but without the associated sound or name. Given the growing use of artificial characters in experimental paradigms, the aim of the present study was to make available the Brussels Artificial Character Sets (BACS): two full, strictly controlled, and portable sets of artificial characters for a broad range of experimental situations.

  3. Reframing Nationality through Local and Regional Social Practices – Europe Direct Bacău Relay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Cmeciu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Paraphrasing the famous European syntagm “unity in diversity”, we will introduce anothersyntagm, namely “nationality in diversity”, thus laying an emphasis on the strategies (social practicesadopted by each of the thirty one Europe Direct relays in Romania in order to achieve their goals.Having as theoretical background the four semiotic systems (represented participants, interactiveparticipants, composition, modality of social semiotics (van Leeuwen, Kress, 2001, 2005, we willinterpret the 2009 campaign promoted by Europe Direct Bacău as an alternative interweaving ofcognitive, affective and behavioural effects.

  4. Genomic Analyses Reveal Global Functional Alterations That Promote Tumor Growth and Novel Tumor Suppressor Genes in Natural Killer-Cell Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucuk, Can; Iqbal, Javeed; J. deLeeuw, Ronald

    in the gene expression profile, we performed GEP and array-CGH studies on seven clinically well defined cases and eight well characterized cell lines derived from NKL patients. Methods: Array-CGH was performed on a tiling BAC array and GEP on an Affymetrix 133 plus2 array.The two data sets were correlated...... to identify functional alterations associated with the genetic abnormalities.Candidate genes on del 6q21 were identified and further studied for mutations and promoter methylation. Results: Our aCGH study identified frequent recurrent gains (> 25 %) in 1q, 2p, 7q, 13q, 17q and 20pter-qter. Regions of loss...

  5. Flip-Flop HSV-BAC: bacterial artificial chromosome based system for rapid generation of recombinant herpes simplex virus vectors using two independent site-specific recombinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todo Tomoki

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV vectors that specifically replicate in and kill tumor cells sparing normal cells are a promising cancer therapy. Traditionally, recombinant HSV vectors have been generated through homologous recombination between the HSV genome and a recombination plasmid, which usually requires laborious screening or selection and can take several months. Recent advances in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology have enabled cloning of the whole HSV genome as a BAC plasmid and subsequent manipulation in E. coli. Thus, we sought a method to generate recombinant oncolytic HSV vectors more easily and quickly using BAC technology. Results We have developed an HSV-BAC system, termed the Flip-Flop HSV-BAC system, for the rapid generation of oncolytic HSV vectors. This system has the following features: (i two site-specific recombinases, Cre and FLPe, are used sequentially to integrate desired sequences and to excise the BAC sequences, respectively; and (ii the size of the HSV-BAC-insert genome exceeds the packaging limit of HSV so only correctly recombined virus grows efficiently. We applied this to the construction of an HSV-BAC plasmid that can be used for the generation of transcriptionally-targeted HSV vectors. BAC sequences were recombined into the UL39 gene of HSV ICP4-deletion mutant d120 to generate M24-BAC virus, from which HSV-BAC plasmid pM24-BAC was isolated. An ICP4 expression cassette driven by an exogenous promoter was re-introduced to pM24-BAC by Cre-mediated recombination and nearly pure preparations of recombinant virus were obtained typically in two weeks. Insertion of the ICP4 coding sequence alone did not restore viral replication and was only minimally better than an ICP4-null construct, whereas insertion of a CMVIE promoter-ICP4 transgene (bM24-CMV efficiently drove viral replication. The levels of bM24-CMV replication in tumor cells varied considerably compared to hrR3 (UL39

  6. Application of EDTA-functionalized bamboo activated carbon (BAC) for Pb(II) and Cu(II) removal from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Dan; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Jiasheng; Yang, Kunlun; Lou, Zimo; Baig, Shams Ali; Xu, Xinhua

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a novel bamboo activated carbon (BAC) with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) functionality was prepared by direct grafting in the presence of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as a crosslinking agent. The BAC@SiO2-EDTA was characterized by SEM, TEM, TGA, FTIR, XPS and its adsorption property for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) under various experimental conditions was also investigated. The characterization results reflected that EDTA was successfully assembled on the surface of the BAC and average pore size increased from 4.10 to 4.83 nm as BAC grafted with EDTA. Adsorption data fitted very well in Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model. As compared with the raw BAC, the maximum adsorption capacities of BAC@SiO2-EDTA for the Pb(II) and Cu(II) increased from 45.45 to 123.45 mg g-1 and from 6.85 to 42.19 mg g-1, since the existence of EDTA on modified BAC promoted the formation of chemical complex. The removal of heavy metal ions mainly depended on the complexation with EDTA and the electrostatic attractions with negatively charged surface of BAC@SiO2-EDTA. The adsorption of Pb(II)/Cu(II) on the BAC@SiO2-EDTA was pH dependent and pH 5-6 was considered an optimum. However, lower temperature favored the adsorption and the maximum adsorption was recorded at 20 °C. In addition, BAC@SiO2-EDTA had an excellent reusability with about 40% decline in the adsorption capacity for Pb(II) after fifth reuse. Insignificant influences of co-existing cations and natural organic matter (NOM) were found on the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II). All the results demonstrate that BAC@SiO2-EDTA is a potential adsorbent for metal ions in wastewater.

  7. Genome-wide target profiling of piggyBac and Tol2 in HEK 293: pros and cons for gene discovery and gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA transposons have emerged as indispensible tools for manipulating vertebrate genomes with applications ranging from insertional mutagenesis and transgenesis to gene therapy. To fully explore the potential of two highly active DNA transposons, piggyBac and Tol2, as mammalian genetic tools, we have conducted a side-by-side comparison of the two transposon systems in the same setting to evaluate their advantages and disadvantages for use in gene therapy and gene discovery. Results We have observed that (1) the Tol2 transposase (but not piggyBac) is highly sensitive to molecular engineering; (2) the piggyBac donor with only the 40 bp 3'-and 67 bp 5'-terminal repeat domain is sufficient for effective transposition; and (3) a small amount of piggyBac transposases results in robust transposition suggesting the piggyBac transpospase is highly active. Performing genome-wide target profiling on data sets obtained by retrieving chromosomal targeting sequences from individual clones, we have identified several piggyBac and Tol2 hotspots and observed that (4) piggyBac and Tol2 display a clear difference in targeting preferences in the human genome. Finally, we have observed that (5) only sites with a particular sequence context can be targeted by either piggyBac or Tol2. Conclusions The non-overlapping targeting preference of piggyBac and Tol2 makes them complementary research tools for manipulating mammalian genomes. PiggyBac is the most promising transposon-based vector system for achieving site-specific targeting of therapeutic genes due to the flexibility of its transposase for being molecularly engineered. Insights from this study will provide a basis for engineering piggyBac transposases to achieve site-specific therapeutic gene targeting. PMID:21447194

  8. Genome-wide target profiling of piggyBac and Tol2 in HEK 293: pros and cons for gene discovery and gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Robert K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA transposons have emerged as indispensible tools for manipulating vertebrate genomes with applications ranging from insertional mutagenesis and transgenesis to gene therapy. To fully explore the potential of two highly active DNA transposons, piggyBac and Tol2, as mammalian genetic tools, we have conducted a side-by-side comparison of the two transposon systems in the same setting to evaluate their advantages and disadvantages for use in gene therapy and gene discovery. Results We have observed that (1 the Tol2 transposase (but not piggyBac is highly sensitive to molecular engineering; (2 the piggyBac donor with only the 40 bp 3'-and 67 bp 5'-terminal repeat domain is sufficient for effective transposition; and (3 a small amount of piggyBac transposases results in robust transposition suggesting the piggyBac transpospase is highly active. Performing genome-wide target profiling on data sets obtained by retrieving chromosomal targeting sequences from individual clones, we have identified several piggyBac and Tol2 hotspots and observed that (4 piggyBac and Tol2 display a clear difference in targeting preferences in the human genome. Finally, we have observed that (5 only sites with a particular sequence context can be targeted by either piggyBac or Tol2. Conclusions The non-overlapping targeting preference of piggyBac and Tol2 makes them complementary research tools for manipulating mammalian genomes. PiggyBac is the most promising transposon-based vector system for achieving site-specific targeting of therapeutic genes due to the flexibility of its transposase for being molecularly engineered. Insights from this study will provide a basis for engineering piggyBac transposases to achieve site-specific therapeutic gene targeting.

  9. Genome-wide target profiling of piggyBac and Tol2 in HEK 293: pros and cons for gene discovery and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Yaa-Jyuhn J; Weirauch, Matthew T; Yang, Herng-Shing; Chung, Pei-Cheng; Yu, Robert K; Wu, Sareina C-Y

    2011-03-30

    DNA transposons have emerged as indispensible tools for manipulating vertebrate genomes with applications ranging from insertional mutagenesis and transgenesis to gene therapy. To fully explore the potential of two highly active DNA transposons, piggyBac and Tol2, as mammalian genetic tools, we have conducted a side-by-side comparison of the two transposon systems in the same setting to evaluate their advantages and disadvantages for use in gene therapy and gene discovery. We have observed that (1) the Tol2 transposase (but not piggyBac) is highly sensitive to molecular engineering; (2) the piggyBac donor with only the 40 bp 3'-and 67 bp 5'-terminal repeat domain is sufficient for effective transposition; and (3) a small amount of piggyBac transposases results in robust transposition suggesting the piggyBac transpospase is highly active. Performing genome-wide target profiling on data sets obtained by retrieving chromosomal targeting sequences from individual clones, we have identified several piggyBac and Tol2 hotspots and observed that (4) piggyBac and Tol2 display a clear difference in targeting preferences in the human genome. Finally, we have observed that (5) only sites with a particular sequence context can be targeted by either piggyBac or Tol2. The non-overlapping targeting preference of piggyBac and Tol2 makes them complementary research tools for manipulating mammalian genomes. PiggyBac is the most promising transposon-based vector system for achieving site-specific targeting of therapeutic genes due to the flexibility of its transposase for being molecularly engineered. Insights from this study will provide a basis for engineering piggyBac transposases to achieve site-specific therapeutic gene targeting.

  10. Genotype-phenotype mapping of chromosome 18q deletions by high-resolution array CGH : An update of the phenotypic map

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, Ilse; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Orsel, Mirjam; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Brunner, Han G.; Veltman, Joris A.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 lead to variable phenotypes. Common clinical features include a characteristic face, short stature, congenital aural atresia (CAA), abnormalities of the feet, and mental retardation (MR). The presence or absence of these clinical features may depend

  11. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...

  12. Distinctive Skeletal Abnormalities With No Microdeletions or Microduplications on Array-CGH in a Boy With Mohr Syndrome (Oro-Facial-Digital Type II)

    OpenAIRE

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Pospischill, Renata; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    We describe a constellation of distinctive skeletal abnormalities in an 8-year-old boy who presented with the full clinical criteria of oro-facial-digital (OFD) type II (Mohr syndrome): bony changes of obtuse mandibular angle, bimanual hexadactyly and unilateral synostosis of the metacarpo-phalanges of 3-4, bilateral coxa valga associated with moderate hip subluxation, over-tubulation of the long bones, vertical talus of the left foot and talipes equinovarus of the right foot respectively. In...

  13. piggyBac transposon-mediated cellular transgenesis in mammalian forebrain by in utero electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuyi; Maher, Brady J; LoTurco, Joseph J

    2014-07-01

    In utero electroporation (IUE) is an effective transfection method for delivering plasmid DNA into neural progenitor cells and neurons of mammalian neocortex in vivo. Although IUE is effective at delivering multiple DNA plasmids into populations of cells, unfortunately plasmids delivered into neural progenitor cells remain largely episomal and often get inactivated or lost after cell division. This results in a form of "birthdate" labeling in which only the cell types that do not undergo a second cell division continue to express the transfected plasmids. This limits the application of IUE with standard plasmids and precludes its use in experiments where manipulating or labeling the complete cell lineage of a progenitor is desired. To circumvent this episomal loss of plasmid in IUE, we have used a binary piggyBac transposon system to induce nonviral genomic integration of transgenes. These transgenes do not appear to inactivate after cell division, and this results in stable somatic cellular transgenesis of neurons and glia. Like standard IUE, the system can be used with multiple combinations of plasmids to achieve multicolor labeling and both loss-of-function and gain-of-function manipulations. In this protocol, we describe the method for delivering a binary piggyBac transposon plasmid system by IUE. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. Cellular dissection of the spinal cord motor column by BAC transgenesis and gene trapping in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Kazuhide; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis and gene/enhancer trapping are effective approaches for identification of genetically defined neuronal populations in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we applied these techniques to zebrafish (Danio rerio) in order to obtain insights into the cellular architecture of the axial motor column in vertebrates. First, by using the BAC for the Mnx class homeodomain protein gene mnr2b/mnx2b, we established the mnGFF7 transgenic line expressing the Gal4FF transcriptional activator in a large part of the motor column. Single cell labeling of Gal4FF-expressing cells in the mnGFF7 line enabled a detailed investigation of the morphological characteristics of individual spinal motoneurons, as well as the overall organization of the motor column in a spinal segment. Secondly, from a large-scale gene trap screen, we identified transgenic lines that marked discrete subpopulations of spinal motoneurons with Gal4FF. Molecular characterization of these lines led to the identification of the ADAMTS3 gene, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved ADAMTS family of peptidases and is dynamically expressed in the ventral spinal cord. The transgenic fish established here, along with the identified gene, should facilitate an understanding of the cellular and molecular architecture of the spinal cord motor column and its connection to muscles in vertebrates.

  15. BacHbpred: Support Vector Machine Methods for the Prediction of Bacterial Hemoglobin-Like Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MuthuKrishnan Selvaraj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent upsurge in microbial genome data has revealed that hemoglobin-like (HbL proteins may be widely distributed among bacteria and that some organisms may carry more than one HbL encoding gene. However, the discovery of HbL proteins has been limited to a small number of bacteria only. This study describes the prediction of HbL proteins and their domain classification using a machine learning approach. Support vector machine (SVM models were developed for predicting HbL proteins based upon amino acid composition (AC, dipeptide composition (DC, hybrid method (AC + DC, and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM. In addition, we introduce for the first time a new prediction method based on max to min amino acid residue (MM profiles. The average accuracy, standard deviation (SD, false positive rate (FPR, confusion matrix, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC were analyzed. We also compared the performance of our proposed models in homology detection databases. The performance of the different approaches was estimated using fivefold cross-validation techniques. Prediction accuracy was further investigated through confusion matrix and ROC curve analysis. All experimental results indicate that the proposed BacHbpred can be a perspective predictor for determination of HbL related proteins. BacHbpred, a web tool, has been developed for HbL prediction.

  16. MUTATION ON Bacillus subtilis BAC4 USING ACRIDINE ORANGE AS AN EFFORT FOR INCREASING ANTIBIOTIC PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supartono Supartono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The efforts to get a new antibiotic require to be done continuously, because infection diseases still become the main health problems in Indonesia. A new local strain of Bacillus subtilis BAC4 has been known producing an antibiotic that inhibites Serratia marcescens ATCC 27117 growth. Nevertheless, the optimum conditions have not been studied seriously. The objective of this research was to conduct mutation on B. subtilis BAC4 in order to obtain a mutant cell that overproduct in producing antibiotic. The mutation process was performed by using acridine orange of 1 g.L-1 randomly at various volumes. The production of antibiotic was conducted using batch fermentation and antibiotic assay was performed with agar absorption method using S.  marcescens ATCC 27117 as bacteria assay. Research result provided a B. subtilis M10 mutant with overproduction of antibiotic. Characterization of B. subtilis M10 mutant showed that the mutant cell has size of (0.5-1.0 µm x (1.85-2.5 µm; spore has the form of ellipse with thick wavy wall, positive reaction for catalase, and forming acid from glucose and xylose.   Keywords: mutant, Bacillus, acridin, and antibiotics

  17. Extracting gene function from protein-protein interactions using Quantitative BAC InteraCtomics (QUBIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Nina C; Mann, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Large-scale proteomic screens are increasingly employed for placing genes into specific pathways. Therefore generic methods providing a physiological context for protein-protein interaction studies are of great interest. In recent years many protein-protein interactions have been determined by affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP-MS). Among many different AP-MS approaches, the recently developed Quantitative BAC InteraCtomics (QUBIC) approach is particularly attractive as it uses tagged, full-length baits that are expressed under endogenous control. For QUBIC large cell line collections expressing tagged proteins from BAC transgenes or gene trap loci have been developed and are freely available. Here we describe detailed workflows on how to obtain specific protein binding partners with high confidence under physiological conditions. The methods are based on fast, streamlined and generic purification procedures followed by single run liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis. Quantification is achieved either by the stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) method or by a 'label-free' procedure. In either case data analysis is performed by using the freely available MaxQuant environment. The QUBIC approach enables biologists with access to high resolution mass spectrometry to perform small and large-scale protein interactome mappings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytogenetical anchoring of sheep linkage map and syntenic groups using a sheep BAC library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribiu Edmond-Paul

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to simultaneously integrate linkage and syntenic groups to the ovine chromosomal map, a sheep bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library was screened with previously assigned microsatellites using a sheep-hamster hybrid panel and genetic linkage. Thirty-three BACs were obtained, fluorescently labelled and hybridised on sheep-goat hybrid metaphases (2n = 57. This study allowed us, (i, to anchor all linkage groups on sheep chromosomes, (ii, to give information on the probable position of the centromere on the linkage map for the centromeric chromosomes, (iii, to contradict the previous orientation of the ovine × linkage group by the mapping of BMS1008 on OARXq38. Concerning our somatic cell hybrid panel, this study resulted in the assignment of all the previously unassigned groups to ovine chromosomes and a complete characterisation of the hybrid panel. In addition, since hybridisations were performed on a sheep-goat hybrid, new marker/anchoring points were added to the caprine cytogenetic map.

  19. Construction of a nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library and a preliminary genome survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoko Hidetoshi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharks are members of the taxonomic class Chondrichthyes, the oldest living jawed vertebrates. Genomic studies of this group, in comparison to representative species in other vertebrate taxa, will allow us to theorize about the fundamental genetic, developmental, and functional characteristics in the common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Aims In order to obtain mapping and sequencing data for comparative genomics, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library for the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. Results The BAC library consists of 313,344 clones with an average insert size of 144 kb, covering ~4.5 × 1010 bp and thus providing an 11-fold coverage of the haploid genome. BAC end sequence analyses revealed, in addition to LINEs and SINEs commonly found in other animal and plant genomes, two new groups of nurse shark-specific repetitive elements, NSRE1 and NSRE2 that seem to be major components of the nurse shark genome. Screening the library with single-copy or multi-copy gene probes showed 6–28 primary positive clones per probe of which 50–90% were true positives, demonstrating that the BAC library is representative of the different regions of the nurse shark genome. Furthermore, some BAC clones contained multiple genes, making physical mapping feasible. Conclusion We have constructed a deep-coverage, high-quality, large insert, and publicly available BAC library for a cartilaginous fish. It will be very useful to the scientific community interested in shark genomic structure, comparative genomics, and functional studies. We found two new groups of repetitive elements specific to the nurse shark genome, which may contribute to the architecture and evolution of the nurse shark genome.

  20. Aerobic biodegradation of a sulfonated phenylazonaphthol dye by a bacterial community immobilized in a multistage packed-bed BAC reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Arias, Alfredo; Juárez-Ramírez, Cleotilde; de los Cobos-Vasconcelos, Daniel; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Salmerón-Alcocer, Angélica; Ahuatzi-Chacón, Deifilia; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio

    2010-11-01

    A microbial community able to aerobically degrade the azo dye Acid Orange 7 was selected from riparian or lacustrine sediments collected at sites receiving textile wastewaters. Three bacterial strains, pertaining to the genera Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, and Rhizobium, constitute the selected community. The biodegradation of AO7 was carried out in batch-suspended cell culture and in a continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor. The rapid decolorization observed in batch culture, joined to a delay of about 24 h in COD removal and cell growth, suggests that enzymes involved in biodegradation of the aromatic amines generated after AO7 azo-bond cleavage (1-amino-2-naphthol [1-A2N] and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid [4-ABS]), are inducible in this microbial consortium. After this presumptive induction period, the accumulated byproducts, measured through COD, were partially metabolized and transformed in cell mass. At all azo dye loading rates used, complete removal of AO7 and 1-A2N was obtained in the multistage packed-bed BAC reactor (PBR).; however, the overall COD (eta ( COD )) and 4-ABS (eta ( ABS )) removal efficiencies obtained in steady state continuous culture were about 90%. Considering the toxicity of 1-A2N, its complete removal has particular relevance. In the first stages of the packed-bed BAC reactor (Fig. 4a-c), major removal was observed. In the last stage, only a slight removal of COD and 4-ABS was obtained. Comparing to several reported studies, the continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor showed similar or superior results. In addition, the operation of large-packed-bed BAC reactors could be improved by using several shallow BAC bed stages, because the pressure drop caused by bed compaction of a support material constituted by small and fragile particles can be reduced.

  1. Giant panda BAC library construction and assembly of a 650-kb contig spanning major histocompatibility complex class II region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hui-Juan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giant panda is rare and endangered species endemic to China. The low rates of reproductive success and infectious disease resistance have severely hampered the development of captive and wild populations of the giant panda. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC plays important roles in immune response and reproductive system such as mate choice and mother-fetus bio-compatibility. It is thus essential to understand genetic details of the giant panda MHC. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library will provide a new tool for panda genome physical mapping and thus facilitate understanding of panda MHC genes. Results A giant panda BAC library consisting of 205,800 clones has been constructed. The average insert size was calculated to be 97 kb based on the examination of 174 randomly selected clones, indicating that the giant panda library contained 6.8-fold genome equivalents. Screening of the library with 16 giant panda PCR primer pairs revealed 6.4 positive clones per locus, in good agreement with an expected 6.8-fold genomic coverage of the library. Based on this BAC library, we constructed a contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX spanning about 650 kb by a three-step method: (1 PCR-based screening of the BAC library with primers from homologous MHC class II gene loci, end sequences and BAC clone shotgun sequences, (2 DNA sequencing validation of positive clones, and (3 restriction digest fingerprinting verification of inter-clone overlapping. Conclusion The identifications of genes and genomic regions of interest are greatly favored by the availability of this giant panda BAC library. The giant panda BAC library thus provides a useful platform for physical mapping, genome sequencing or complex analysis of targeted genomic regions. The 650 kb sequence-ready BAC contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX, verified by the three-step method, offers a

  2. Construction of an Americn mink Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) library and sequencing candidate genes important for the fur industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Hallers, Boudewijn ten; Nefedov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    consisting of 18,432 clones spotted in duplicate, have been produced for hybridization screening and are publicly available. Overgo probes derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs), representing 21 candidate genes for traits important for the mink industry, were used to screen the BAC library...... of genes of interest in small genomics projects. The BAC end sequences described in this paper have been deposited in the GenBank data library [HN339419-HN341884, HN604664-HN604702]. The 454 produced contigs derived from selected clones are deposited with reference numbers [GenBank: JF288166-JF288183 &JF...

  3. Brucella detection in blood: comparison of the BacT/Alert standard aerobic bottle, BacT/Alert FAN aerobic bottle and BacT/Alert enhanced FAN aerobic bottle in simulated blood culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümerkan, B; Gökahmetoglu, S; Esel, D

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performances of the standard aerobic bottle (StAe), FAN aerobic (FANAe) and enhanced FAN aerobic (E-FANAe) (the charcoal component of the FANAe was revised recently to improve the feasibility of Gram smear interpretation) blood culture bottles for BacT/Alert system for the detection of Brucella melitensis in simulated blood culture. Triplicate strains of eight clinical isolates of B. melitensis were studied. Each bottle was inoculated with 5 mL of freshly collected human blood at three different targeted bacterial inocula (10(1), 10(2) and 10(3) CFU/bottle). All bottles were monitored for up to 21 days or until they became positive. The results of time to detection (TTD) on the eight B. melitensis samples were as follows: at 10(1) CFU/bottle, the E-FANAe had a mean TTD significantly shorter than the StAe (48 h vs. 56.2 h, P StAe (41.2 h and 40 h vs. 45.6 h, P StAe, FANAe and E-FANAe were 96, 83 and 58%, respectively. At 10(3) CFU/bottle, the reproducibilities of StAe, FANAe and E-FANAe were 95, 95 and 91%, respectively. Positive results for the presence of bacteria in Gram smears were confirmed in 68% of StAe, 54% of FANAe and 90% of E-FANAe. In case of suspected brucellosis, the combination of one StAe bottle and one E-FANAe bottle seems to provide the highest and fastest recovery of the organism.

  4. Intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements between cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) revealed by BAC-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Emanuelle Varão; de Andrade Fonsêca, Artur Fellipe; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea; de Andrade Bortoleti, Kyria Cilene; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; da Costa, Antônio Félix; Brasileiro-Vidal, Ana Christina

    2015-06-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is an annual legume grown in tropical and subtropical regions, which is economically relevant due to high protein content in dried beans, green pods, and leaves. In this work, a comparative cytogenetic study between V. unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) was conducted using BAC-FISH. Sequences previously mapped in P. vulgaris chromosomes (Pv) were used as probes in V. unguiculata chromosomes (Vu), contributing to the analysis of macrosynteny between both legumes. Thirty-seven clones from P. vulgaris 'BAT93' BAC library, corresponding to its 11 linkage groups, were hybridized in situ. Several chromosomal rearrangements were identified, such as translocations (between BACs from Pv1 and Pv8; Pv2 and Pv3; as well as Pv2 and Pv11), duplications (BAC from Pv3), as well as paracentric and pericentric inversions (BACs from Pv3, and Pv4, respectively). Two BACs (from Pv2 and Pv7), which hybridized at terminal regions in almost all P. vulgaris chromosomes, showed single-copy signal in Vu. Additionally, 17 BACs showed no signal in V. unguiculata chromosomes. The present results demonstrate the feasibility of using BAC libraries in comparative chromosomal mapping and karyotype evolution studies between Phaseolus and Vigna species, and revealed several macrosynteny and collinearity breaks among both legumes.

  5. Genome-wide BAC-end sequencing of Musa acuminata DH Pahang reveals further insights into the genome organization of banana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnago, R.E.; Togawa, R.C.; Carpentier, S.C.; Lintel Hekkert, te B.; Kema, G.H.J.; Souza, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    Banana and plantain (Musa spp.) are grown in more than 120 countries in tropical and subtropical regions and constitute an important staple food for millions of people. A Musa acuminata ssp. malaccencis DH Pahang bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library (MAMB) was submitted for BAC-end

  6. An overview of the Phalaenopsis orchid genome through BAC end sequence analysis

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    Hsiao Yu-Yun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phalaenopsis orchids are popular floral crops, and development of new cultivars is economically important to floricultural industries worldwide. Analysis of orchid genes could facilitate orchid improvement. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC end sequences (BESs can provide the first glimpses into the sequence composition of a novel genome and can yield molecular markers for use in genetic mapping and breeding. Results We used two BAC libraries (constructed using the BamHI and HindIII restriction enzymes of Phalaenopsis equestris to generate pair-end sequences from 2,920 BAC clones (71.4% and 28.6% from the BamHI and HindIII libraries, respectively, at a success rate of 95.7%. A total of 5,535 BESs were generated, representing 4.5 Mb, or about 0.3% of the Phalaenopsis genome. The trimmed sequences ranged from 123 to 1,397 base pairs (bp in size, with an average edited read length of 821 bp. When these BESs were subjected to sequence homology searches, it was found that 641 (11.6% were predicted to represent protein-encoding regions, whereas 1,272 (23.0% contained repetitive DNA. Most of the repetitive DNA sequences were gypsy- and copia-like retrotransposons (41.9% and 12.8%, respectively, whereas only 10.8% were DNA transposons. Further, 950 potential simple sequence repeats (SSRs were discovered. Dinucleotides were the most abundant repeat motifs; AT/TA dimer repeats were the most frequent SSRs, representing 253 (26.6% of all identified SSRs. Microsynteny analysis revealed that more BESs mapped to the whole-genome sequences of poplar than to those of grape or Arabidopsis, and even fewer mapped to the rice genome. This work will facilitate analysis of the Phalaenopsis genome, and will help clarify similarities and differences in genome composition between orchids and other plant species. Conclusion Using BES analysis, we obtained an overview of the Phalaenopsis genome in terms of gene abundance, the presence of repetitive

  7. A successful use of a new shuttle cloning vector pA13 for the cloning of the bacteriocins BacSJ and acidocin 8912

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić Milan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to research the molecular cloning of genes encoding the novel bacteriocin BacSJ from Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei BGSJ2-8 by using a newly constructed shuttle cloning vector pA13. A new shuttle-cloning vector, pA13, was constructed and successfully introduced into Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Lactococcus strains, showing a high segregational and structural stability in all three hosts. The natural plasmid pSJ2-8 from L. paracasei subsp. paracasei BGSJ2-8 was cloned in the pA13 using BamHI, obtaining the construct pB5. Sequencing and in silico analysis of the pB5 revealed 15 open reading frames (ORF. Plasmid pSJ2-8 harbors the genes encoding the production of two bacteriocins, BacSJ and acidocin 8912. The combined N-terminal amino acid sequencing of BacSJ in combination with DNA sequencing of the bacSJ2-8 gene enabled the determination of the primary structure of a bacteriocin BacSJ. The production and functional expression of BacSJ in homologous and heterologous hosts suggest that bacSJ2-8 and bacSJ2-8i together with the genes encoding the ABC transporter and accessory protein are the minimal requirement for the production of BacSJ. Biochemical and genetic analyses showed that BacSJ belongs to the class II bacteriocins. The shuttle cloning vector pA13 could be used as a tool for genetic manipulations in lactobacilli and lactococci.

  8. Construction of an integrated genetic linkage map for the A genome of Brassica napus using SSR markers derived from sequenced BACs in B. rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Graham J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Multinational Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP has developed valuable genomic resources, including BAC libraries, BAC-end sequences, genetic and physical maps, and seed BAC sequences for Brassica rapa. An integrated linkage map between the amphidiploid B. napus and diploid B. rapa will facilitate the rapid transfer of these valuable resources from B. rapa to B. napus (Oilseed rape, Canola. Results In this study, we identified over 23,000 simple sequence repeats (SSRs from 536 sequenced BACs. 890 SSR markers (designated as BrGMS were developed and used for the construction of an integrated linkage map for the A genome in B. rapa and B. napus. Two hundred and nineteen BrGMS markers were integrated to an existing B. napus linkage map (BnaNZDH. Among these mapped BrGMS markers, 168 were only distributed on the A genome linkage groups (LGs, 18 distrubuted both on the A and C genome LGs, and 33 only distributed on the C genome LGs. Most of the A genome LGs in B. napus were collinear with the homoeologous LGs in B. rapa, although minor inversions or rearrangements occurred on A2 and A9. The mapping of these BAC-specific SSR markers enabled assignment of 161 sequenced B. rapa BACs, as well as the associated BAC contigs to the A genome LGs of B. napus. Conclusion The genetic mapping of SSR markers derived from sequenced BACs in B. rapa enabled direct links to be established between the B. napus linkage map and a B. rapa physical map, and thus the assignment of B. rapa BACs and the associated BAC contigs to the B. napus linkage map. This integrated genetic linkage map will facilitate exploitation of the B. rapa annotated genomic resources for gene tagging and map-based cloning in B. napus, and for comparative analysis of the A genome within Brassica species.

  9. Prognostic Impact of Array-based Genomic Profiles in Esophageal Squamous Cell Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Ana; Isinger, Anna; Karlsson, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Jönsson, Göran; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Falkenback, Dan; Halvarsson, Britta; Nilbert, Mef

    2008-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a genetically complex tumor type and a major cause of cancer related mortality. Although distinct genetic alterations have been linked to ESCC development and prognosis, the genetic alterations have not gained clinical applicability. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to obtain a whole genome copy number profile relevant for identifying deranged pathways and clinically applicable markers. A 32 k aCGH platform was used for high resolution mapping of copy number changes in 30 stage I-IV ESCC. Potential interdependent alterations and deranged pathways were identified and copy number changes were correlated to stage, differentiation and survival. Copy number alterations affected median 19% of the genome and included recurrent gains of chromosome regions 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 10q, 11q, 12p, 14q, 16p, 17p, 19p, 19q, and 20q and losses of 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p and 11q. High-level amplifications were observed in 30 regions and recurrently involved 7p11 (EGFR), 11q13 (MYEOV, CCND1, FGF4, FGF3, PPFIA, FAD, TMEM16A, CTTS and SHANK2) and 11q22 (PDFG). Gain of 7p22.3 predicted nodal metastases and gains of 1p36.32 and 19p13.3 independently predicted poor survival in multivariate analysis. aCGH profiling verified genetic complexity in ESCC and herein identified imbalances of multiple central tumorigenic pathways. Distinct gains correlate with clinicopathological variables and independently predict survival, suggesting clinical applicability of genomic profiling in ESCC

  10. True 3q chromosomal amplification in squamous cell lung carcinoma by FISH and aCGH molecular analysis: impact on targeted drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Matteo; Bria, Emilio; Nottegar, Alessia; Cingarlini, Sara; Simionato, Francesca; Caliò, Anna; Eccher, Albino; Parolini, Claudia; Iannucci, Antonio; Gilioli, Eliana; Pedron, Serena; Massari, Francesco; Tortora, Giampaolo; Borze, Ioana; Knuutila, Sakari; Gobbo, Stefano; Santo, Antonio; Tondulli, Luca; Calabrò, Francesco; Martignoni, Guido; Chilosi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Squamous lung carcinoma lacks specific "ad hoc" therapies. Amplification of chromosome 3q is the most common genomic aberration and this region harbours genes having role as novel targets for therapeutics. There is no standard definition on how to score and report 3q amplification. False versus true 3q chromosomal amplification in squamous cell lung carcinoma may have tremendous impact on trials involving drugs which target DNA zones mapping on 3q. Forty squamous lung carcinomas were analyzed by FISH to assess chromosome 3q amplification. aCGH was performed as gold-standard to avoid false positive amplifications. Three clustered patterns of fluorescent signals were observed. Eight cases out of 40 (20%) showed ≥8 3q signals. Twenty out of 40 (50%) showed from 3 to 7 signals. The remaining showed two fluorescent signals (30%). When corrected by whole chromosome 3 signals, only cases with ≥8 signals maintained a LSI 3q/CEP3 ratio >2. Only the cases showing 3q amplification by aCGH (+3q25.3-3q27.3) showed ≥8 fluorescent signals at FISH evidencing a 3q/3 ratio >2. The remaining cases showed flat genomic portrait at aCGH on chromosome 3. We concluded that: 1) absolute copy number of 3q chromosomal region may harbour false positive interpretation of 3q amplification in squamous cell carcinoma; 2) a case results truly "amplified for chromosome 3q" when showing ≥8 fluorescent 3q signals; 3) trials involving drugs targeting loci on chromosome 3q in squamous lung carcinoma therapy have to consider false versus true 3q chromosomal amplification.

  11. True 3q chromosomal amplification in squamous cell lung carcinoma by FISH and aCGH molecular analysis: impact on targeted drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Brunelli

    Full Text Available Squamous lung carcinoma lacks specific "ad hoc" therapies. Amplification of chromosome 3q is the most common genomic aberration and this region harbours genes having role as novel targets for therapeutics. There is no standard definition on how to score and report 3q amplification. False versus true 3q chromosomal amplification in squamous cell lung carcinoma may have tremendous impact on trials involving drugs which target DNA zones mapping on 3q. Forty squamous lung carcinomas were analyzed by FISH to assess chromosome 3q amplification. aCGH was performed as gold-standard to avoid false positive amplifications. Three clustered patterns of fluorescent signals were observed. Eight cases out of 40 (20% showed ≥8 3q signals. Twenty out of 40 (50% showed from 3 to 7 signals. The remaining showed two fluorescent signals (30%. When corrected by whole chromosome 3 signals, only cases with ≥8 signals maintained a LSI 3q/CEP3 ratio >2. Only the cases showing 3q amplification by aCGH (+3q25.3-3q27.3 showed ≥8 fluorescent signals at FISH evidencing a 3q/3 ratio >2. The remaining cases showed flat genomic portrait at aCGH on chromosome 3. We concluded that: 1 absolute copy number of 3q chromosomal region may harbour false positive interpretation of 3q amplification in squamous cell carcinoma; 2 a case results truly "amplified for chromosome 3q" when showing ≥8 fluorescent 3q signals; 3 trials involving drugs targeting loci on chromosome 3q in squamous lung carcinoma therapy have to consider false versus true 3q chromosomal amplification.

  12. Creation of a BAC resource to study the structure and evolution of the banana (Musa balbisiana) genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafář, Jan; Noa-Carrazana, J. C.; Vrána, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Alkhimova, Olena; Lheureux, F.; Šimková, Hana; Caruana, M. L.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Piffanelli, P.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 47, - (2004), 1182ů1191 E-ISSN 1480-3321 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6038201 Grant - others:research contract IAEA(FR) 12230/RBF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : bacterial artificial chromosome library * banana * BAC-FISH Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  13. Development of a Set of Chromosome-Specific Cytogenetic DNA Markers in Sunflower Using BAC-FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    In diploid sunflower (2n=34), conventional karyotypes and various genetic linkage maps have been established. However, the relationship between genetic linkage groups and individual chromosomes of sunflower remains unknown. Recently, a set of linkage group-specific BAC and BIBAC clones were identifi...

  14. Germline transformation of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi)(Diptera:Tephritidae) with a piggyBac transposon vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is a highly significant pest in olive growing countries whose control may be enhanced by the use of genetically-modified strains, especially for sterile insect technique programs. To improve and expand this technology, piggyBac-mediated germline transformation ...

  15. Sequencing of 15622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munoz-Amatriain, M.; Lonardi, S.; Luo, M.C.; Madishetty, K.; Svensson, J.T.; Moscou, M. J.; Wanamaker, S.; Kudrna, D.; Zheng, J.; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, J.; Mammadov, J.; Close, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 1 (2015), s. 216-227 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Barley * Hordeum vulgare L * BAC sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.468, year: 2015

  16. A PiggyBac-based recessive screening method to identify pluripotency regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Guo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenotype driven genetic screens allow unbiased exploration of the genome to discover new biological regulators. Bloom syndrome gene (Blm deficient embryonic stem (ES cells provide an opportunity for recessive screening due to frequent loss of heterozygosity. We describe a strategy for isolating regulators of mammalian pluripotency based on conversion to homozygosity of PiggyBac gene trap insertions combined with stringent selection for differentiation resistance. From a screen of 2000 mutants we obtained a disruptive integration in the Tcf3 gene. Homozygous Tcf3 mutants showed impaired differentiation and enhanced self-renewal. This phenotype was reverted in a dosage sensitive manner by excision of one or both copies of the gene trap. These results provide new evidence confirming that Tcf3 is a potent negative regulator of pluripotency and validate a forward screening methodology to identify modulators of pluripotent stem cell biology.

  17. Co-oxidation of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with some biologically active compounds (BAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubergrits, M.Y.

    1978-09-01

    Oxidation of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) initiated by UV or gamma irradiation was promoted by benz(a)anthracene and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and inhibited by pyrene, dibenz(a,c)anthracene, and asymmetric benz(a)antharacene. The effects of these BAC commonly occurring together with BP in industrial wastes, increased with their concentrations. Phenol and 3-methylcholanthrene strongly promoted BP oxidation when present at low concentrations and inhibited it at high concentrations. Consistent promoting effect was also observed in BP co-oxidation with adipic acid, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavon, and vitamin E, whereas succinic, azelaic, ferulic, gallic, and chlorogenic acids, rutin, and vitamin C acted as inhibitors. Most saturated dicarboxylic acids studied did not affect BP oxidation at 1:1 acid-BP molar ratio. The kinetics of 7,12-DMBA photooxidation inhibition by some metabolic intermediates, e.g., DMBA endo-peroxide, were also studied.

  18. A BAC transgenic Hes1-EGFP reporter reveals novel expression domains in mouse embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinck, Rasmus; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Expression of the basic helix-loop-helix factor Hairy and Enhancer of Split-1 (Hes1) is required for normal development of a number of tissues during embryonic development. Depending on context, Hes1 may act as a Notch signalling effector which promotes the undifferentiated and proliferative state...... of progenitor cells, but increasing evidence also points to Notch independent regulation of Hes1 expression. Here we use high resolution confocal scanning of EGFP in a novel BAC transgenic mouse reporter line, Tg(Hes1-EGFP)(1Hri), to analyse Hes1 expression from embryonic day 7.0 (e7.0). Our data recapitulates...... the role of Hes1 in a number of different research areas including organ specification, development and regeneration....

  19. Generation of a transgenic cashmere goat using the piggyBac transposition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ding-Ping; Yang, Ming-Ming; Qu, Lei; Chen, Yu-Lin

    2017-04-15

    The development of transgenic technologies in the Cashmere goat (Capra hircus) has the potential to improve the quality of the meat and wool. The piggyBac (PB) transposon system is highly efficient and can be used to transpose specific target genes into the genome. Here, we developed a PB transposon system to produce transgenic Cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts (GFFs) with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). We then used the genetically modified GFFs as nuclear donors to generate transgenic embryos by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The embryos (n = 40) were implanted into female goats (n = 20). One transgenic kid that expressed EGFP throughout the surface features of its body was born. This result demonstrated the usefulness of PB transposon system in generating transgenic Cashmere goats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating the biosafety of conventional and O3-BAC process and its relationship with NOM characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaobin; Zou, Rusen; Chen, Chao; Yuan, Baoling; Zhou, Zhenming; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2018-01-01

    It is the priority to guarantee biosafety for drinking water treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of widely applied conventional and ozone-biological activated carbon (O 3 -BAC) advanced treatment technology on biosafety of drinking water. The items, including assimilable organic carbon (AOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC), heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs) and the microorganism community structures, were used to evaluate the biosafety. Moreover, their relationships with molecular weights (MWs) and fluorescence intensity of dissolved organic matter were investigated. The results indicated that the technology provided a considerable gain in potable water quality by decreasing dissolved organic carbon (DOC, from 5.05 to 1.71 mg/L), AOC (from 298 to 131 μg/L), BDOC (from 1.39 to 0.24 mg/L) and HPCs (from 275 to 10 CFU/mL). Ozone brought an increase in DOC with low MW water.

  1. Microbial Community Structures and Dynamics in the O3/BAC Drinking Water Treatment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jian; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jian-Cheng; Sun, Li-Chen; Hu, Zhang-Li

    2014-01-01

    Effectiveness of drinking water treatment, in particular pathogen control during the water treatment process, is always a major public health concern. In this investigation, the application of PCR-DGGE technology to the analysis of microbial community structures and dynamics in the drinking water treatment process revealed several dominant microbial populations including: α-Proteobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria Firmicutes and Cyanobacteria. α-Proteobacteria and β-Proteobacteria were the dominant bacteria during the whole process. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the dominant bacteria before and after treatment, respectively. Firmicutes showed season-dependent changes in population dynamics. Importantly, γ-Proteobacteria, which is a class of medically important bacteria, was well controlled by the O3/biological activated carbon (BAC) treatment, resulting in improved effluent water bio-safety. PMID:24937529

  2. Construction and sequence sampling of deep-coverage, large-insert BAC libraries for three model lepidopteran species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Shaying

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manduca sexta, Heliothis virescens, and Heliconius erato represent three widely-used insect model species for genomic and fundamental studies in Lepidoptera. Large-insert BAC libraries of these insects are critical resources for many molecular studies, including physical mapping and genome sequencing, but not available to date. Results We report the construction and characterization of six large-insert BAC libraries for the three species and sampling sequence analysis of the genomes. The six BAC libraries were constructed with two restriction enzymes, two libraries for each species, and each has an average clone insert size ranging from 152–175 kb. We estimated that the genome coverage of each library ranged from 6–9 ×, with the two combined libraries of each species being equivalent to 13.0–16.3 × haploid genomes. The genome coverage, quality and utility of the libraries were further confirmed by library screening using 6~8 putative single-copy probes. To provide a first glimpse into these genomes, we sequenced and analyzed the BAC ends of ~200 clones randomly selected from the libraries of each species. The data revealed that the genomes are AT-rich, contain relatively small fractions of repeat elements with a majority belonging to the category of low complexity repeats, and are more abundant in retro-elements than DNA transposons. Among the species, the H. erato genome is somewhat more abundant in repeat elements and simple repeats than those of M. sexta and H. virescens. The BLAST analysis of the BAC end sequences suggested that the evolution of the three genomes is widely varied, with the genome of H. virescens being the most conserved as a typical lepidopteran, whereas both genomes of H. erato and M. sexta appear to have evolved significantly, resulting in a higher level of species- or evolutionary lineage-specific sequences. Conclusion The high-quality and large-insert BAC libraries of the insects, together

  3. Genomic insight into the common carp (Cyprinus carpio genome by sequencing analysis of BAC-end sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jintu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common carp is one of the most important aquaculture teleost fish in the world. Common carp and other closely related Cyprinidae species provide over 30% aquaculture production in the world. However, common carp genomic resources are still relatively underdeveloped. BAC end sequences (BES are important resources for genome research on BAC-anchored genetic marker development, linkage map and physical map integration, and whole genome sequence assembling and scaffolding. Result To develop such valuable resources in common carp (Cyprinus carpio, a total of 40,224 BAC clones were sequenced on both ends, generating 65,720 clean BES with an average read length of 647 bp after sequence processing, representing 42,522,168 bp or 2.5% of common carp genome. The first survey of common carp genome was conducted with various bioinformatics tools. The common carp genome contains over 17.3% of repetitive elements with GC content of 36.8% and 518 transposon ORFs. To identify and develop BAC-anchored microsatellite markers, a total of 13,581 microsatellites were detected from 10,355 BES. The coding region of 7,127 genes were recognized from 9,443 BES on 7,453 BACs, with 1,990 BACs have genes on both ends. To evaluate the similarity to the genome of closely related zebrafish, BES of common carp were aligned against zebrafish genome. A total of 39,335 BES of common carp have conserved homologs on zebrafish genome which demonstrated the high similarity between zebrafish and common carp genomes, indicating the feasibility of comparative mapping between zebrafish and common carp once we have physical map of common carp. Conclusion BAC end sequences are great resources for the first genome wide survey of common carp. The repetitive DNA was estimated to be approximate 28% of common carp genome, indicating the higher complexity of the genome. Comparative analysis had mapped around 40,000 BES to zebrafish genome and established over 3

  4. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization analysis reveals distinct amplifications in osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, Tsz-Kwong; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Lu, Xin-Yan; Jaeweon, Kim; Perlaky, Laszlo; Harris, Charles P; Shah, Shishir; Ladanyi, Marc; Gorlick, Richard; Lau, Ching C

    2004-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a highly malignant bone neoplasm of children and young adults. It is characterized by extremely complex karyotypes and high frequency of chromosomal amplifications. Currently, only the histological response (degree of necrosis) to therapy represent gold standard for predicting the outcome in a patient with non-metastatic osteosarcoma at the time of definitive surgery. Patients with lower degree of necrosis have a higher risk of relapse and poor outcome even after chemotherapy and complete resection of the primary tumor. Therefore, a better understanding of the underlying molecular genetic events leading to tumor initiation and progression could result in the identification of potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets. We used a genome-wide screening method – array based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) to identify DNA copy number changes in 48 patients with osteosarcoma. We applied fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to validate some of amplified clones in this study. Clones showing gains (79%) were more frequent than losses (66%). High-level amplifications and homozygous deletions constitute 28.6% and 3.8% of tumor genome respectively. High-level amplifications were present in 238 clones, of which about 37% of them showed recurrent amplification. Most frequently amplified clones were mapped to 1p36.32 (PRDM16), 6p21.1 (CDC5L, HSPCB, NFKBIE), 8q24, 12q14.3 (IFNG), 16p13 (MGRN1), and 17p11.2 (PMP22 MYCD, SOX1,ELAC27). We validated some of the amplified clones by FISH from 6p12-p21, 8q23-q24, and 17p11.2 amplicons. Homozygous deletions were noted for 32 clones and only 7 clones showed in more than one case. These 7 clones were mapped to 1q25.1 (4 cases), 3p14.1 (4 cases), 13q12.2 (2 cases), 4p15.1 (2 cases), 6q12 (2 cases), 6q12 (2 cases) and 6q16.3 (2 cases). This study clearly demonstrates the utility of array CGH in defining high-resolution DNA copy number changes and refining amplifications. The resolution of array CGH

  5. Analysis of BAC end sequences in oak, a keystone forest tree species, providing insight into the composition of its genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Provost Grégoire

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the key goals of oak genomics research is to identify genes of adaptive significance. This information may help to improve the conservation of adaptive genetic variation and the management of forests to increase their health and productivity. Deep-coverage large-insert genomic libraries are a crucial tool for attaining this objective. We report herein the construction of a BAC library for Quercus robur, its characterization and an analysis of BAC end sequences. Results The EcoRI library generated consisted of 92,160 clones, 7% of which had no insert. Levels of chloroplast and mitochondrial contamination were below 3% and 1%, respectively. Mean clone insert size was estimated at 135 kb. The library represents 12 haploid genome equivalents and, the likelihood of finding a particular oak sequence of interest is greater than 99%. Genome coverage was confirmed by PCR screening of the library with 60 unique genetic loci sampled from the genetic linkage map. In total, about 20,000 high-quality BAC end sequences (BESs were generated by sequencing 15,000 clones. Roughly 5.88% of the combined BAC end sequence length corresponded to known retroelements while ab initio repeat detection methods identified 41 additional repeats. Collectively, characterized and novel repeats account for roughly 8.94% of the genome. Further analysis of the BESs revealed 1,823 putative genes suggesting at least 29,340 genes in the oak genome. BESs were aligned with the genome sequences of Arabidopsis thaliana, Vitis vinifera and Populus trichocarpa. One putative collinear microsyntenic region encoding an alcohol acyl transferase protein was observed between oak and chromosome 2 of V. vinifera. Conclusions This BAC library provides a new resource for genomic studies, including SSR marker development, physical mapping, comparative genomics and genome sequencing. BES analysis provided insight into the structure of the oak genome. These sequences will be

  6. Single-molecule study of full-length NaChBac by planar lipid bilayer recording.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jo

    Full Text Available Planar lipid bilayer device, alternatively known as BLM, is a powerful tool to study functional properties of conducting membrane proteins such as ion channels and porins. In this work, we used BLM to study the prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav NaChBac in a well-defined membrane environment. Navs are an essential component for the generation and propagation of electric signals in excitable cells. The successes in the biochemical, biophysical and crystallographic studies on prokaryotic Navs in recent years has greatly promoted the understanding of the molecular mechanism that underlies these proteins and their eukaryotic counterparts. In this work, we investigated the single-molecule conductance and ionic selectivity behavior of NaChBac. Purified NaChBac protein was first reconstituted into lipid vesicles, which is subsequently incorporated into planar lipid bilayer by fusion. At single-molecule level, we were able to observe three distinct long-lived conductance sub-states of NaChBac. Change in the membrane potential switches on the channel mainly by increasing its opening probability. In addition, we found that individual NaChBac has similar permeability for Na+, K+, and Ca2+. The single-molecule behavior of the full-length protein is essentially highly stochastic. Our results show that planar lipid bilayer device can be used to study purified ion channels at single-molecule level in an artificial environment, and such studies can reveal new protein properties that are otherwise not observable in in vivo ensemble studies.

  7. Coupling in reflector arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1968-01-01

    In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present communic......In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present...

  8. CGH Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looking ahead, we have three major future directions that we believe will help us push forward in achieving NCI’s goal of advancing global cancer research, building expertise, and leveraging resources across nations to address the challenges of cancer and reduce cancer deaths worldwide.

  9. A healthy HLA-matched baby born by using a combination of aCGH and Karyomapping: the first latin american case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Andrea; Llerena, Guillermo; Lopez, Rosmary; Portella, Jimmy; Inoue, Naomi; Noriega-Hoces, Luis; Guzman, Luis

    2017-01-01

    PGD for HLA typing is a procedure that can be performed when an affected child requires a transplant to treat a non-hereditary disorder related to the hematopoietic and/or immune system. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-identical donor provides the best treatment option. Three conventional ovarian stimulation procedures for IVF were performed in a couple with a 10-year-old child diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia of high risk. Trophectoderm biopsy and aCGH examination were performed on 15 blastocysts, three on the first IVF procedure, four on the second cycle, and eight on the third. Three euploid blastocysts HLA-compatible with the genome of the affected child were identified. One euploid blastocyst HLA-compatible with the affected child was warmed and transferred, resulting in an HLA-matched live birth. In conclusion, combined aCGH for aneuploidy screening and Karyomapping may be performed in a single biopsy procedure. PMID:29120571

  10. New Tools for Embryo Selection: Comprehensive Chromosome Screening by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. The study included 1420 CCS cycles for recurrent miscarriage (n=203; repetitive implantation failure (n=188; severe male factor (n=116; previous trisomic pregnancy (n=33; and advanced maternal age (n=880. CCS was performed in cycles with fresh oocytes and embryos (n=774; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified oocytes (n=320; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-2 embryos (n=235; and mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-3 embryos (n=91. Day-3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day-5 embryo transfer. Consistent implantation (range: 40.5–54.2% and pregnancy rates per transfer (range: 46.0–62.9% were obtained for all the indications and independently of the origin of the oocytes or embryos. However, a lower delivery rate per cycle was achieved in women aged over 40 years (18.1% due to the higher percentage of aneuploid embryos (85.3% and lower number of cycles with at least one euploid embryo available per transfer (40.3%. We concluded that aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation.

  11. Biopreservative Efficacy of Bacteriocin BacFL31 in Raw Ground Turkey Meat in terms of Microbiological, Physicochemical, and Sensory Qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakchouk-Mtibaa, Ahlem; Smaoui, Slim; Ktari, Naourez; Sellem, Imen; Najah, Soumaya; Karray-Rebai, Ines; Mellouli, Lotfi

    2017-01-01

     The effect of the semi purified bacteriocin BacFL31 at 200 and 400 AU/g on the shelf life of refrigerated raw ground turkey meat was investigated. The microbiological, physicochemical, and sensory properties of the meat samples were examined during refrigerated storage. The findings indicated that BacFL31 treatments were effective (pturkey meat samples during refrigerated storage. These results suggest that BacFL31 could be considered a promising candidate for future application as an additive to preserve the raw turkey meat during storage at 4℃.

  12. A genome-wide BAC-end sequence survey provides first insights into sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) genome composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Zengzhi; Du, Bing; Huo, Jinxi; He, Shaozhen; Liu, Qingchang; Zhai, Hong

    2016-11-21

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., is an important food crop widely grown in the world. However, little is known about the genome of this species because it is a highly heterozygous hexaploid. Gaining a more in-depth knowledge of sweetpotato genome is therefore necessary and imperative. In this study, the first bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of sweetpotato was constructed. Clones from the BAC library were end-sequenced and analyzed to provide genome-wide information about this species. The BAC library contained 240,384 clones with an average insert size of 101 kb and had a 7.93-10.82 × coverage of the genome, and the probability of isolating any single-copy DNA sequence from the library was more than 99%. Both ends of 8310 BAC clones randomly selected from the library were sequenced to generate 11,542 high-quality BAC-end sequences (BESs), with an accumulative length of 7,595,261 bp and an average length of 658 bp. Analysis of the BESs revealed that 12.17% of the sweetpotato genome were known repetitive DNA, including 7.37% long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, 1.15% Non-LTR retrotransposons and 1.42% Class II DNA transposons etc., 18.31% of the genome were identified as sweetpotato-unique repetitive DNA and 10.00% of the genome were predicted to be coding regions. In total, 3,846 simple sequences repeats (SSRs) were identified, with a density of one SSR per 1.93 kb, from which 288 SSRs primers were designed and tested for length polymorphism using 20 sweetpotato accessions, 173 (60.07%) of them produced polymorphic bands. Sweetpotato BESs had significant hits to the genome sequences of I. trifida and more matches to the whole-genome sequences of Solanum lycopersicum than those of Vitis vinifera, Theobroma cacao and Arabidopsis thaliana. The first BAC library for sweetpotato has been successfully constructed. The high quality BESs provide first insights into sweetpotato genome composition, and have significant hits to the genome

  13. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  14. A Bac Library and Paired-PCR Approach to Mapping and Completing the Genome Sequence of Sulfolobus Solfataricus P2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    She, Qunxin; Confalonieri, F.; Zivanovic, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The original strategy used in the Sulfolobus solfatnricus genome project was to sequence non overlapping, or minimally overlapping, cosmid or lambda inserts without constructing a physical map. However, after only about two thirds of the genome sequence was completed, this approach became counter...... selected for walking over small gaps and preparing template libraries for larger ones. It is concluded that an optimal strategy for sequencing microorganism genomes involves construction of a high-resolution physical map by BAC end analyses, PCR screening and paired-PCR chromosome walking after about half......-productive because there was a high sequence bias in the cosmid and lambda libraries. Therefore, a new approach was devised for linking the sequenced regions which may be generally applicable. BAC libraries were constructed and terminal sequences of the clones were determined and used for both end mapping and PCR...

  15. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubells, Joseph F; Schroeder, Jason P; Barrie, Elizabeth S; Manvich, Daniel F; Sadee, Wolfgang; Berg, Tiina; Mercer, Kristina; Stowe, Taylor A; Liles, L Cameron; Squires, Katherine E; Mezher, Andrew; Curtin, Patrick; Perdomo, Dannie L; Szot, Patricia; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115) is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/- background. Second, we compared human DBH mRNA abundance between transgenic lines carrying either a "C" or a "T" at position -970. The BAC transgene drove human DBH mRNA expression in a pattern indistinguishable from the endogenous gene, restored normal catecholamine levels to the peripheral organs and brain of Dbh -/- mice, and fully rescued embryonic lethality, delayed growth, ptosis, reduced exploratory activity, and seizure susceptibility. In some cases, transgenic rescue was superior to DOPS. However, allelic variation at the rs1611115 SNP had no impact on mRNA levels in any tissue. These results indicate that the human BAC contains all of the genetic information required for tissue-specific, functional expression of DBH and can rescue all measured Dbh deficiency

  16. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F Cubells

    Full Text Available Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH converts dopamine (DA to norepinephrine (NE in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/- mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115 is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS, which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/- background. Second, we compared human DBH mRNA abundance between transgenic lines carrying either a "C" or a "T" at position -970. The BAC transgene drove human DBH mRNA expression in a pattern indistinguishable from the endogenous gene, restored normal catecholamine levels to the peripheral organs and brain of Dbh -/- mice, and fully rescued embryonic lethality, delayed growth, ptosis, reduced exploratory activity, and seizure susceptibility. In some cases, transgenic rescue was superior to DOPS. However, allelic variation at the rs1611115 SNP had no impact on mRNA levels in any tissue. These results indicate that the human BAC contains all of the genetic information required for tissue-specific, functional expression of DBH and can rescue all measured Dbh

  17. Driving performance on the descending limb of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in undergraduate students: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Mathieu; Gallant, François; Lavallière, Martin; Chiasson, Martine; Silvey, Dustin; Behm, David; Albert, Wayne J; Johnson, Michel J

    2015-01-01

    Young drivers are overrepresented in collisions resulting in fatalities. It is not uncommon for young drivers to socially binge drink and decide to drive a vehicle a few hours after consumption. To better understand the risks that may be associated with this behaviour, the present study has examined the effects of a social drinking bout followed by a simulated drive in undergraduate students on the descending limb of their BAC (blood alcohol concentration) curve. Two groups of eight undergraduate students (n = 16) took part in this study. Participants in the alcohol group were assessed before drinking, then at moderate and low BAC as well as 24 hours post-acute consumption. This group consumed an average of 5.3 ± 1.4 (mean ± SD) drinks in an hour in a social context and were then submitted to a driving and a predicted crash risk assessment. The control group was assessed at the same time points without alcohol intake or social context.; at 8 a.m., noon, 3 p.m. and 8 a.m. the next morning. These multiple time points were used to measure any potential learning effects from the assessment tools (i.e. driving simulator and useful field of view test (UFOV)). Diminished driving performance at moderate BAC was observed with no increases in predicted crash risk. Moderate correlations between driving variables were observed. No association exists between driving variables and UFOV variables. The control group improved measures of selective attention after the third assessment. No learning effect was observed from multiple sessions with the driving simulator. Our results show that a moderate BAC, although legal, increases the risky behaviour. Effects of alcohol expectancy could have been displayed by the experimental group. UFOV measures and predicted crash risk categories were not sensitive enough to predict crash risk for young drivers, even when intoxicated.

  18. Generating resources for genomics of wheat homoeologous chromosome group 3: 3AS- and 3DS-specific BAC libraries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Bartoš, Jan; Fiocchetti, F.; Roselli, M.; Gill, B. S.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Lucretti, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, 1-2 (2009), s. 151-160 ISSN 0394-9257 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA ČR GA521/06/1723; GA ČR GA521/07/1573; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA MŠk OC08025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC library * Flow sorting * Homoeologous chromosomes Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding

  19. Tissue-specific and neural activity-regulated expression of human BDNF gene in BAC transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palm Kaia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small secreted protein that has important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Altered expression or changes in the regulation of the BDNF gene have been implicated in a variety of human nervous system disorders. Although regulation of the rodent BDNF gene has been extensively investigated, in vivo studies regarding the human BDNF gene are largely limited to postmortem analysis. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mice harboring the human BDNF gene and its regulatory flanking sequences constitute a useful tool for studying human BDNF gene regulation and for identification of therapeutic compounds modulating BDNF expression. Results In this study we have generated and analyzed BAC transgenic mice carrying 168 kb of the human BDNF locus modified such that BDNF coding sequence was replaced with the sequence of a fusion protein consisting of N-terminal BDNF and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The human BDNF-BAC construct containing all BDNF 5' exons preceded by different promoters recapitulated the expression of endogenous BDNF mRNA in the brain and several non-neural tissues of transgenic mice. All different 5' exon-specific BDNF-EGFP alternative transcripts were expressed from the transgenic human BDNF-BAC construct, resembling the expression of endogenous BDNF. Furthermore, BDNF-EGFP mRNA was induced upon treatment with kainic acid in a promotor-specific manner, similarly to that of the endogenous mouse BDNF mRNA. Conclusion Genomic region covering 67 kb of human BDNF gene, 84 kb of upstream and 17 kb of downstream sequences is sufficient to drive tissue-specific and kainic acid-induced expression of the reporter gene in transgenic mice. The pattern of expression of the transgene is highly similar to BDNF gene expression in mouse and human. This is the first study to show that human BDNF gene is regulated by neural activity.

  20. A BAC-based physical map of Brachypodium distachyon and its comparative analysis with rice and wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yong Q; Ma, Yaqin; Huo, Naxin; Vogel, John P; You, Frank M; Lazo, Gerard R; Nelson, William M; Soderlund, Carol; Dvorak, Jan; Anderson, Olin D; Luo, Ming-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) has been recognized as a new model species for comparative and functional genomics of cereal and bioenergy crops because it possesses many biological attributes desirable in a model, such as a small genome size, short stature, self-pollinating habit, and short generation cycle. To maximize the utility of Brachypodium as a model for basic and applied research it is necessary to develop genomic resources for it. A BAC-based physical map is one of them. A physical map will facilitate analysis of genome structure, comparative genomics, and assembly of the entire genome sequence. Results A total of 67,151 Brachypodium BAC clones were fingerprinted with the SNaPshot HICF fingerprinting method and a genome-wide physical map of the Brachypodium genome was constructed. The map consisted of 671 contigs and 2,161 clones remained as singletons. The contigs and singletons spanned 414 Mb. A total of 13,970 gene-related sequences were detected in the BAC end sequences (BES). These gene tags aligned 345 contigs with 336 Mb of rice genome sequence, showing that Brachypodium and rice genomes are generally highly colinear. Divergent regions were mainly in the rice centromeric regions. A dot-plot of Brachypodium contigs against the rice genome sequences revealed remnants of the whole-genome duplication caused by paleotetraploidy, which were previously found in rice and sorghum. Brachypodium contigs were anchored to the wheat deletion bin maps with the BES gene-tags, opening the door to Brachypodium-Triticeae comparative genomics. Conclusion The construction of the Brachypodium physical map, and its comparison with the rice genome sequence demonstrated the utility of the SNaPshot-HICF method in the construction of BAC-based physical maps. The map represents an important genomic resource for the completion of Brachypodium genome sequence and grass comparative genomics. A draft of the physical map and its comparisons with rice and wheat

  1. BAC-recombineering for studying plant gene regulation: developmental control and cellular localization of SnRK1 kinase subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitrián, Marta; Roodbarkelari, Farshad; Horváth, Mihály; Koncz, Csaba

    2011-03-01

    Recombineering, permitting precise modification of genes within bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) through homologous recombination mediated by lambda phage-encoded Red proteins, is a widely used powerful tool in mouse, Caenorhabditis and Drosophila genetics. As Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of large DNA inserts from binary BACs and TACs into plants occurs at low frequency, recombineering is so far seldom exploited in the analysis of plant gene functions. We have constructed binary plant transformation vectors, which are suitable for gap-repair cloning of genes from BACs using recombineering methods previously developed for other organisms. Here we show that recombineering facilitates PCR-based generation of precise translational fusions between coding sequences of fluorescent reporter and plant proteins using galK-based exchange recombination. The modified target genes alone or as part of a larger gene cluster can be transferred by high-frequency gap-repair into plant transformation vectors, stably maintained in Agrobacterium and transformed without alteration into plants. Versatile application of plant BAC-recombineering is illustrated by the analysis of developmental regulation and cellular localization of interacting AKIN10 catalytic and SNF4 activating subunits of Arabidopsis Snf1-related (SnRK1) protein kinase using in vivo imaging. To validate full functionality and in vivo interaction of tagged SnRK1 subunits, it is demonstrated that immunoprecipitated SNF4-YFP is bound to a kinase that phosphorylates SnRK1 candidate substrates, and that the GFP- and YFP-tagged kinase subunits co-immunoprecipitate with endogenous wild type AKIN10 and SNF4. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Driving performance on the descending limb of blood alcohol concentration (BAC in undergraduate students: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Tremblay

    Full Text Available Young drivers are overrepresented in collisions resulting in fatalities. It is not uncommon for young drivers to socially binge drink and decide to drive a vehicle a few hours after consumption. To better understand the risks that may be associated with this behaviour, the present study has examined the effects of a social drinking bout followed by a simulated drive in undergraduate students on the descending limb of their BAC (blood alcohol concentration curve. Two groups of eight undergraduate students (n = 16 took part in this study. Participants in the alcohol group were assessed before drinking, then at moderate and low BAC as well as 24 hours post-acute consumption. This group consumed an average of 5.3 ± 1.4 (mean ± SD drinks in an hour in a social context and were then submitted to a driving and a predicted crash risk assessment. The control group was assessed at the same time points without alcohol intake or social context.; at 8 a.m., noon, 3 p.m. and 8 a.m. the next morning. These multiple time points were used to measure any potential learning effects from the assessment tools (i.e. driving simulator and useful field of view test (UFOV. Diminished driving performance at moderate BAC was observed with no increases in predicted crash risk. Moderate correlations between driving variables were observed. No association exists between driving variables and UFOV variables. The control group improved measures of selective attention after the third assessment. No learning effect was observed from multiple sessions with the driving simulator. Our results show that a moderate BAC, although legal, increases the risky behaviour. Effects of alcohol expectancy could have been displayed by the experimental group. UFOV measures and predicted crash risk categories were not sensitive enough to predict crash risk for young drivers, even when intoxicated.

  3. PLE-wu, a new member of piggyBac transposon family from insect, is active in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2014-10-01

    piggyBac, a highly active transposon in insect and mammalian cells, is a very useful tool in genome manipulation. A new piggyBac-like element (PLE), named PLE-wu, was identified from a mutant baculovirus cultured in sf9 insect cells. This new transposon is 2931 bp in length and encodes two active forms of transposase, a 708-amino acid-long transposase and a short 576-residue-long transposase translated from a downstream in-frame initiation codon. PLE-wu has asymmetric terminal structures, containing 6-bp inverted terminal repeats, 32-bp imperfect inverted and direct sub-terminal repeats. Similar to piggyBac, PLE-wu exhibits traceless excision activity in both insect and mammalian cells, restoring the original TTAA target sequence upon excision. It also retains the insertion activity in mammalian cells with a plasmid to chromosome transposition rate about 10-fold higher than random integration. Plasmid rescue assays revealed that the TTAA target sequence was duplicated at the junctions of the insertion site. Deletion of the terminal sequences including the sub-terminal repeats decreased the transposition activity of the 708-residue-long transposase, while the transposition activity of the short form of transposase was not affected. With its low sequence similarity to piggyBac, PLE-wu will contribute to the understanding the mechanism of PLE transposition, as well as design of new transposon systems with higher activity. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. BAC-derived markers converted from RFLP linked to Phytophthora capsici resistance in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoun-Joung; Nahm, Seok-Hyeon; Lee, Heung-Ryul; Yoon, Gi-Bo; Kim, Ki-Taek; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Choi, Doil; Kweon, Oh Yeol; Cho, Myeong-Cheoul; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Han, Jung-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Park, Minkyu; Ahn, Jong Hwa; Choi, Soon Ho; Her, Nam Han; Sung, Joo-Hee; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2008-12-01

    Phytophthora capsici Leonian, an oomycete pathogen, is a serious problem in pepper worldwide. Its resistance in pepper is controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTL). To detect QTL associated with P. capsici resistance, a molecular linkage map was constructed using 100 F(2) individuals from a cross between Capsicum annuum 'CM334' and C. annuum 'Chilsungcho'. This linkage map consisted of 202 restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), 6 WRKYs and 1 simple sequence repeat (SSR) covering 1482.3 cM, with an average interval marker distance of 7.09 cM. QTL mapping of Phytophthora root rot and damping-off resistance was performed in F(2:3) originated from a cross between resistant Mexican landrace C. annuum 'CM334' and susceptible Korean landrace C. annuum 'Chilsungcho' using composite interval mapping (CIM) analysis. Four QTL explained 66.3% of the total phenotypic variations for root rot resistance and three 44.9% for damping-off resistance. Of these QTL loci, two were located close to RFLP markers CDI25 on chromosome 5 (P5) and CT211A on P9. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library from C. annuum 'CM334' was screened with these two RFLP probes to obtain sequence information around the RFLP marker loci for development of PCR-based markers. CDI25 and CT211 probes identified seven and eight BAC clones, respectively. Nine positive BAC clones containing probe regions were sequenced and used for cytogenetic analysis. One single-nucleotide amplified polymorphism (SNAP) for the CDI25 locus, and two SSRs and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) for CT211 were developed using sequences of the positive BAC clones. These markers will be valuable for rapid selection of genotypes and map-based cloning for resistance genes against P. capsici.

  5. Reevaluation of the Coding Potential and Proteomic Analysis of the BAC Derived Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Strain 68-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malouli, Daniel; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Camp, David G.; Chang, W. L.; Barry, Peter A.; Smith, Richard D.; Fruh, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    Cytomegaloviruses are highly host restricted resulting in co-speciation with their hosts. As a natural pathogen of rhesus macaques (RM), Rhesus Cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) has therefore emerged as a highly relevant experimental model for pathogenesis and vaccine development due to its close evolutionary relationship to human CMV (HCMV). To date, most in vivo experiments performed with RhCMV employed strain 68-1 cloned as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). However, the complete genome sequence of the 68-1 BAC has not been determined. Furthermore, the gene content of the RhCMV genome is unknown and previous open reading frame (ORF) predictions relied solely on uninterrupted ORFs with an arbitrary cutoff of 300bp. To obtain a more precise picture of the actual proteins encoded by the most commonly used molecular clone of RhCMV we re-evaluated the RhCMV 68-1 BAC-genome by whole genome shotgun sequencing and determined the protein content of the resulting RhCMV virions by proteomics. By additionally comparing the RhCMV genome to that of several closely related Old World Monkey (OWM) CMVs we were able to filter out many unlikely ORFs and obtain a simplified map of the RhCMV genome. This comparative genomics analysis eliminated many genes previously characterized as RhCMV-specific while consolidating a high conservation of ORFs among OWM-CMVs and between RhCMV and HCMV. Moreover, virion proteomics independently validated the revised ORF predictions since only proteins encoded by predicted ORFs could be detected. Taken together these data suggest a much higher conservation of genome and virion structure between CMVs of humans, apes and OWMs than previously assumed. Remarkably, BAC-derived RhCMV is able to establish and maintain persistent infection despite the lack of multiple genes homologous to HCMV genes involved in tissue tropism.

  6. Vector modifications to eliminate transposase expression following piggyBac-mediated transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Ji, HaYeun; Chen, Jack; Gersbach, Charles A; Leong, Kam W

    2014-12-10

    Transgene insertion plays an important role in gene therapy and in biological studies. Transposon-based systems that integrate transgenes by transposase-catalyzed "cut-and-paste" mechanism have emerged as an attractive system for transgenesis. Hyperactive piggyBac transposon is particularly promising due to its ability to integrate large transgenes with high efficiency. However, prolonged expression of transposase can become a potential source of genotoxic effects due to uncontrolled transposition of the integrated transgene from one chromosomal locus to another. In this study we propose a vector design to decrease post-transposition expression of transposase and to eliminate the cells that have residual transposase expression. We design a single plasmid construct that combines the transposase and the transpositioning transgene element to share a single polyA sequence for termination. Consequently, the separation of the transposase element from the polyA sequence after transposition leads to its deactivation. We also co-express Herpes Simplex Virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) with the transposase. Therefore, cells having residual transposase expression can be eliminated by the administration of ganciclovir. We demonstrate the utility of this combination transposon system by integrating and expressing a model therapeutic gene, human coagulation Factor IX, in HEK293T cells.

  7. Geotechnical aspects for the optimization of dump design at Chinh Bac Mine waste dump in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchsschwanz, M.; Ziegler, M. [Aachen Univ., Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Geotechnical Engineering; Ahmad, S.; Fernandez, J.B.P.; Martens, P.N. [Aachen Univ., Aachen (Germany). Inst. of Mining Engineering; Deissmann, G. [Brenk Systemplanung GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Vietnam's Quang Ninh province is one of the country's most important coal producing regions. Several open pit mines are being operated in the area by Nui Beo Coal Company (NBCC). The construction of large waste dumps for overburden removed by blasting have led to environmental problems at the mining sites, including dust emissions from mining and dumping operations; ground and surface water contamination by acid mine drainage; and slope stability problems caused by heavy rainfall and dump movements. This paper discussed investigations regarding the influence of the dump layout on slope stability and erosion. The paper described the project site and ongoing activities for the development of optimized stabilization and rehabilitation concepts with a particular focus on geotechnical aspects. The site was described in terms of coal and waste rock production; Chinh Bac waste rock dump; crack mapping; material properties of dumped material; density; and settlements. Ongoing activities focus on the effect of benches on slope stability; influence of benches on erosion; and layered dumping. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  8. A first generation BAC-based physical map of the channel catfish genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldbieser Geoffrey C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, is the leading species in North American aquaculture. Genetic improvement of catfish is performed through selective breeding, and genomic tools will help improve selection efficiency. A physical map is needed to integrate the genetic map with the karyotype and to support fine mapping of phenotypic trait alleles such as Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL and the effective positional cloning of genes. Results A genome-wide physical map of the channel catfish was constructed by High-Information-Content Fingerprinting (HICF of 46,548 Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BAC clones using the SNaPshot technique. The clones were assembled into contigs with FPC software. The resulting assembly contained 1,782 contigs and covered an estimated physical length of 0.93 Gb. The validity of the assembly was demonstrated by 1 anchoring 19 of the largest contigs to the microsatellite linkage map 2 comparing the assembly of a multi-gene family to Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP patterns seen in Southern blots, and 3 contig sequencing. Conclusion This is the first physical map for channel catfish. The HICF technique allowed the project to be finished with a limited amount of human resource in a high throughput manner. This physical map will greatly facilitate the detailed study of many different genomic regions in channel catfish, and the positional cloning of genes controlling economically important production traits.

  9. Compare the influence of several methods dehydrate of cajuput (Melaleuca cajuputi) honey from Bac Lieu - Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Nguyen Xuan; Phuc, Nguyen Chi; Oanh, Huynh Ngoc; Hien, Phan Phuoc

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this research was exhaustive to valuate the effects of 5 methods used to dehydrate of cajuput honey from Bac Lieu - Vietnam include thermal, microwave, ultrasonic wave, silicagel, vacuum processing on water content of honey. Beside that, comparing the effects on honey quality with the industrial-scale processing. The main honey quality paramenters (reducing sugar (RS), hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), diastase number (DN), water and colour) of cajuput honey were analyzed. RS content were analyzed by DNS method, HMF under AOAC 980.23, diastase activity based on AOAC 958.09, water content according to AOAC 969.38B and colour parameters (L*, a*, b*) were established in the CIE system. The physico-chemical characteristics of fresh honey was as follows: water content 23.18%, RS 717.42 mg/g, HMF 4.24 mg/kg, DN 4.85 mg/kg, colour parameters L*a*b* 39.51-10.51-31.81. The results of the analysis showed that excepts ultrasonic wave processing (22.93%), the other methods allowed to dehydrate of cajuput honey (thermal - 18.73%, microwave - 16.87%, silicagel - 17.86%, vacuum - 17.35% and industrial-scale processing - 16.85%).

  10. piggyBac transposons expressing full-length human dystrophin enable genetic correction of dystrophic mesoangioblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loperfido, Mariana; Jarmin, Susan; Dastidar, Sumitava; Di Matteo, Mario; Perini, Ilaria; Moore, Marc; Nair, Nisha; Samara-Kuko, Ermira; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Dickson, George; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Chuah, Marinee K.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic neuromuscular disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. We developed a novel gene therapy approach based on the use of the piggyBac (PB) transposon system to deliver the coding DNA sequence (CDS) of either full-length human dystrophin (DYS: 11.1 kb) or truncated microdystrophins (MD1: 3.6 kb; MD2: 4 kb). PB transposons encoding microdystrophins were transfected in C2C12 myoblasts, yielding 65±2% MD1 and 66±2% MD2 expression in differentiated multinucleated myotubes. A hyperactive PB (hyPB) transposase was then deployed to enable transposition of the large-size PB transposon (17 kb) encoding the full-length DYS and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Stable GFP expression attaining 78±3% could be achieved in the C2C12 myoblasts that had undergone transposition. Western blot analysis demonstrated expression of the full-length human DYS protein in myotubes. Subsequently, dystrophic mesoangioblasts from a Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dog were transfected with the large-size PB transposon resulting in 50±5% GFP-expressing cells after stable transposition. This was consistent with correction of the differentiated dystrophic mesoangioblasts following expression of full-length human DYS. These results pave the way toward a novel non-viral gene therapy approach for DMD using PB transposons underscoring their potential to deliver large therapeutic genes. PMID:26682797

  11. Sur la filabilité d'une laine teinte en bac-ouvert et d'une laine teinte à la continue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werker, W.; Mulder, D.; Stomph, J.; Schartman, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    Afin de constater, si la teinture selon le procédé à la continue ou selon le procédé en bac-ouvert influence les résultats dans Ia filature, on a teint deux lots homogènes à 18OO kg par lot en quatre parties: 450 kg, procédé à la continue, teints en rouge, 450 kg, procédé bac-ouvert, teints en

  12. Construction of a 7-fold BAC library and cytogenetic mapping of 10 genes in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ying

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The giant panda, one of the most primitive carnivores, is an endangered animal. Although it has been the subject of many interesting studies during recent years, little is known about its genome. In order to promote research on this genome, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library of the giant panda was constructed in this study. Results This BAC library contains 198,844 clones with an average insert size of 108 kb, which represents approximately seven equivalents of the giant panda haploid genome. Screening the library with 15 genes and 8 microsatellite markers demonstrates that it is representative and has good genome coverage. Furthermore, ten BAC clones harbouring AGXT, GHR, FSHR, IRBP, SOX14, TTR, BDNF, NT-4, LH and ZFX1 were mapped to 8 pairs of giant panda chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Conclusion This is the first large-insert genomic DNA library for the giant panda, and will contribute to understanding this endangered species in the areas of genome sequencing, physical mapping, gene cloning and comparative genomic studies. We also identified the physical locations of ten genes on their relative chromosomes by FISH, providing a preliminary framework for further development of a high resolution cytogenetic map of the giant panda.

  13. BacPP: bacterial promoter prediction--a tool for accurate sigma-factor specific assignment in enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avila E Silva, Scheila; Echeverrigaray, Sergio; Gerhardt, Günther J L

    2011-10-21

    Promoter sequences are well known to play a central role in gene expression. Their recognition and assignment in silico has not consolidated into a general bioinformatics method yet. Most previously available algorithms employ and are limited to σ70-dependent promoter sequences. This paper presents a new tool named BacPP, designed to recognize and predict Escherichia coli promoter sequences from background with specific accuracy for each σ factor (respectively, σ24, 86.9%; σ28, 92.8%; σ32, 91.5%; σ38, 89.3%, σ54, 97.0%; and σ70, 83.6%). BacPP is hence outstanding in recognition and assignment of sequences according to σ factor and provide circumstantial information about upstream gene sequences. This bioinformatic tool was developed by weighing rules extracted from neural networks trained with promoter sequences known to respond to a specific σ factor. Furthermore, when challenged with promoter sequences belonging to other enterobacteria BacPP maintained 76% accuracy overall. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Toxicity and genotoxicity of the quaternary ammonium compound benzalkonium chloride (BAC) using Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia as model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorgna, Margherita; Russo, Chiara; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Parrella, Alfredo; Isidori, Marina

    2016-03-01

    The toxicity and genotoxicity of the cationic surfactant benzalkonium chloride (BAC) were studied using Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia as model systems. Acute and chronic toxicity testing were performed according to the international standard guidelines and the genotoxicity was detected through the comet assay on cells from whole organisms in vivo exposed. Acute effects occurred at concentrations in the order of tens of μg/L in D. magna and hundreds of μg/L in C. dubia. Chronic effects were found at one order of magnitude less than short-term effects maintaining the same difference in sensitivity between D. magna and C. dubia. BAC induced relevant DNA damage, in both cladocerans; the lowest adverse effect levels were 0.4 and 4 ng/L for D. magna and C. dubia, respectively. As these effective concentrations are far lower than BAC occurrence in surface waters (units of μg/L) a concerning environmental risk cannot be excluded. The findings of this study showed that D. magna and C. dubia, could be used as model organisms to detect acute and chronic toxicity as well as genotoxicity at the whole organism level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An aCGH classifier derived from BRCA1-mutated breast cancer and benefit of high-dose platinum-based chemotherapy in HER2-negative breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollebergh, M. A.; Lips, E. H.; Nederlof, P. M.; Wessels, L. F. A.; Schmidt, M. K.; van Beers, E. H.; Cornelissen, S.; Holtkamp, M.; Froklage, F. E.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Schrama, J. G.; Wesseling, J.; van de Vijver, M. J.; van Tinteren, H.; de Bruin, Michiel; Hauptmann, M.; Rodenhuis, S.; Linn, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer cells deficient for BRCA1 are hypersensitive to agents inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), such as bifunctional alkylators and platinum agents. Earlier, we had developed a comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) classifier based on BRCA1-mutated breast cancers. We hypothesised

  16. Fiber Laser Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...., field-dependent, loss within the coupled laser array. During this program, Jaycor focused on the construction and use of an experimental apparatus that can be used to investigate the coherent combination of an array of fiber lasers...

  17. Parkinson-related LRRK2 mutation R1441C/G/H impairs PKA phosphorylation of LRRK2 and disrupts its interaction with 14-3-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Kathrin; Bertinetti, Daniela; Gesellchen, Frank; Hermann, Jennifer Sarah; von Zweydorf, Felix; Geerlof, Arie; Jacob, Anette; Ueffing, Marius; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Herberg, Friedrich W

    2014-01-07

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a multidomain protein implicated in Parkinson disease (PD); however, the molecular mechanism and mode of action of this protein remain elusive. cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), along with other kinases, has been suggested to be an upstream kinase regulating LRRK2 function. Using MS, we detected several sites phosphorylated by PKA, including phosphorylation sites within the Ras of complex proteins (ROC) GTPase domain as well as some previously described sites (S910 and S935). We systematically mapped those sites within LRRK2 and investigated their functional consequences. S1444 in the ROC domain was confirmed as a target for PKA phosphorylation using ROC single-domain constructs and through site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation at S1444 is strikingly reduced in the major PD-related LRRK2 mutations R1441C/G/H, which are part of a consensus PKA recognition site ((1441)RASpS(1444)). Furthermore, our work establishes S1444 as a PKA-regulated 14-3-3 docking site. Experiments of direct binding to the three 14-3-3 isotypes gamma, theta, and zeta with phosphopeptides encompassing pS910, pS935, or pS1444 demonstrated the highest affinities to phospho-S1444. Strikingly, 14-3-3 binding to phospho-S1444 decreased LRRK2 kinase activity in vitro. Moreover, substitution of S1444 by alanine or by introducing the mutations R1441C/G/H, abrogating PKA phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding, resulted in increased LRRK2 kinase activity. In conclusion, these data clearly demonstrate that LRRK2 kinase activity is modulated by PKA-mediated binding of 14-3-3 to S1444 and suggest that 14-3-3 interaction with LRRK2 is hampered in R1441C/G/H-mediated PD pathogenesis.

  18. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  19. Array-MAPH: a methodology for the detection of locus copy-number changes in complex genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Männik, Katrin; Sismani, Carolina; Zilina, Olga; Parkel, Sven; Puusepp, Helen; Tõnisson, Neeme; Palta, Priit; Remm, Maido; Kurg, Ants; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2008-01-01

    High-throughput genome-wide screening methods to detect subtle genomic imbalances are extremely important for diagnostic genetics and genomics. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for a microarray-based technique, applying the principle of multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH). Methodology and software have been developed for designing unique PCR-amplifiable sequences (400-600 bp) covering any genomic region of interest. These sequences are amplified, cloned and spotted onto arrays (targets). A mixture of the same sequences (probes) is hybridized to genomic DNA immobilized on a membrane. Bound probes are recovered and quantitatively amplified by PCR, labeled and hybridized to the array. The procedure can be completed in 4-5 working days, excluding microarray preparation. Unlike array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), test DNA of specifically reduced complexity is hybridized to an array of identical small amplifiable target sequences, resulting in increased hybridization specificity and higher potential for increasing resolution. Array-MAPH can be used for detection of small-scale copy-number changes in complex genomes, leading to genotype-phenotype correlations and the discovery of new genes.

  20. Proteomics, pathway array and signaling network-based medicine in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer is a multifaceted disease that results from dysregulated normal cellular signaling networks caused by genetic, genomic and epigenetic alterations at cell or tissue levels. Uncovering the underlying protein signaling network changes, including cell cycle gene networks in cancer, aids in understanding the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and identifies the characteristic signaling network signatures unique for different cancers and specific cancer subtypes. The identified signatures can be used for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment. During the past several decades, the available technology to study signaling networks has significantly evolved to include such platforms as genomic microarray (expression array, SNP array, CGH array, etc. and proteomic analysis, which globally assesses genetic, epigenetic, and proteomic alterations in cancer. In this review, we compared Pathway Array analysis with other proteomic approaches in analyzing protein network involved in cancer and its utility serving as cancer biomarkers in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic target identification. With the advent of bioinformatics, constructing high complexity signaling networks is possible. As the use of signaling network-based cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment is anticipated in the near future, medical and scientific communities should be prepared to apply these techniques to further enhance personalized medicine.

  1. Sequencing of a QTL-rich region of the Theobroma cacao genome using pooled BACs and the identification of trait specific candidate genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmon Barbara P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAC-based physical maps provide for sequencing across an entire genome or a selected sub-genomic region of biological interest. Such a region can be approached with next-generation whole-genome sequencing and assembly as if it were an independent small genome. Using the minimum tiling path as a guide, specific BAC clones representing the prioritized genomic interval are selected, pooled, and used to prepare a sequencing library. Results This pooled BAC approach was taken to sequence and assemble a QTL-rich region, of ~3 Mbp and represented by twenty-seven BACs, on linkage group 5 of the Theobroma cacao cv. Matina 1-6 genome. Using various mixtures of read coverages from paired-end and linear 454 libraries, multiple assemblies of varied quality were generated. Quality was assessed by comparing the assembly of 454 reads with a subset of ten BACs individually sequenced and assembled using Sanger reads. A mixture of reads optimal for assembly was identified. We found, furthermore, that a quality assembly suitable for serving as a reference genome template could be obtained even with a reduced depth of sequencing coverage. Annotation of the resulting assembly revealed several genes potentially responsible for three T. cacao traits: black pod disease resistance, bean shape index, and pod weight. Conclusions Our results, as with other pooled BAC sequencing reports, suggest that pooling portions of a minimum tiling path derived from a BAC-based physical map is an effective method to target sub-genomic regions for sequencing. While we focused on a single QTL region, other QTL regions of importance could be similarly sequenced allowing for biological discovery to take place before a high quality whole-genome assembly is completed.

  2. Comparative BAC-based mapping in the white-throated sparrow, a novel behavioral genomics model, using interspecies overgo hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonser Rusty A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomics era has produced an arsenal of resources from sequenced organisms allowing researchers to target species that do not have comparable mapping and sequence information. These new "non-model" organisms offer unique opportunities to examine environmental effects on genomic patterns and processes. Here we use comparative mapping as a first step in characterizing the genome organization of a novel animal model, the white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis, which occurs as white or tan morphs that exhibit alternative behaviors and physiology. Morph is determined by the presence or absence of a complex chromosomal rearrangement. This species is an ideal model for behavioral genomics because the association between genotype and phenotype is absolute, making it possible to identify the genomic bases of phenotypic variation. Findings We initiated a genomic study in this species by characterizing the white-throated sparrow BAC library via filter hybridization with overgo probes designed for the chicken, turkey, and zebra finch. Cross-species hybridization resulted in 640 positive sparrow BACs assigned to 77 chicken loci across almost all macro-and microchromosomes, with a focus on the chromosomes associated with morph. Out of 216 overgos, 36% of the probes hybridized successfully, with an average number of 3.0 positive sparrow BACs per overgo. Conclusions These data will be utilized for determining chromosomal architecture and for fine-scale mapping of candidate genes associated with phenotypic differences. Our research confirms the utility of interspecies hybridization for developing comparative maps in other non-model organisms.

  3. INTERACTION BETWEEN DIFFERENT MOLECULAR FORMS OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN A AND RECOMBINANT DERIVATIVES POLYPEPTIDES OF BAC RECEPTOR PROTEINS FROM GROUP B STREPTOCOCCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Korzhueva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The article concerns interactions between immunoglobulin A and recombinant P6, P7, P8 polypeptides, designed on the basis of externally localized Bac protein of the Group B streptococci, possessing IgA-binding activity.There is a current demand for immunochemical reagents that are strictly specific for IgA, in order to develop antigenic standards for detection of IgA levels in biological fluids, as well as for affinity purification of IgA and its fragments.To analyze an opportunity of the abovementioned application ways for these proteins, a special study was performed to assay an interaction capability of recombinant P6, P7, P8 polypeptides binding to Fc regions of different IgA forms (serum IgA, secretory IgA, subclasses of serum IgA – IgA1, IgA2. Selectivity of ligand binding was specially confirmed.It was found out that, among three presented polypeptides, the structure of recombinant P6 derivative proved to be optimal for IgA-binding ability of Bac protein.Structural features of IgA-binding fragments of Bac protein, i.e., binding site position on the IgA molecule (proximity to epitopes for three monoclonal antibodies, variability of the site structure, as well as resistance of binding site for P6, P7, P8 in IgA molecule against partial disulfide bonds reduction. (Med. Immunol., vol. 10, N 4-5, pp 327-336.

  4. piggyBac as a high-capacity transgenesis and gene-therapy vector in human cells and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongbo; Zhuang, Yuan; Han, Min; Xu, Tian; Wu, Xiaohui

    2013-05-01

    The stable genomic integration and expression of a large transgene is a major hurdle in gene therapy. We show that the modified piggyBac (PB) transposon system can be used to introduce a 207 kb genomic DNA fragment containing the RORγ/γt locus into human cells and mice. PB-mediated transgenesis results in a single copy of a stably inherited and expressed transgene. These results indicate that PB could serve as an effective high-capacity vector for functional analysis of the mammalian genome and for gene therapy in human cells.

  5. piggyBac as a high-capacity transgenesis and gene-therapy vector in human cells and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongbo Li

    2013-05-01

    The stable genomic integration and expression of a large transgene is a major hurdle in gene therapy. We show that the modified piggyBac (PB transposon system can be used to introduce a 207 kb genomic DNA fragment containing the RORγ/γt locus into human cells and mice. PB-mediated transgenesis results in a single copy of a stably inherited and expressed transgene. These results indicate that PB could serve as an effective high-capacity vector for functional analysis of the mammalian genome and for gene therapy in human cells.

  6. New genomic resources for switchgrass: a BAC library and comparative analysis of homoeologous genomic regions harboring bioenergy traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feltus Frank A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Switchgrass, a C4 species and a warm-season grass native to the prairies of North America, has been targeted for development into an herbaceous biomass fuel crop. Genetic improvement of switchgrass feedstock traits through marker-assisted breeding and biotechnology approaches calls for genomic tools development. Establishment of integrated physical and genetic maps for switchgrass will accelerate mapping of value added traits useful to breeding programs and to isolate important target genes using map based cloning. The reported polyploidy series in switchgrass ranges from diploid (2X = 18 to duodecaploid (12X = 108. Like in other large, repeat-rich plant genomes, this genomic complexity will hinder whole genome sequencing efforts. An extensive physical map providing enough information to resolve the homoeologous genomes would provide the necessary framework for accurate assembly of the switchgrass genome. Results A switchgrass BAC library constructed by partial digestion of nuclear DNA with EcoRI contains 147,456 clones covering the effective genome approximately 10 times based on a genome size of 3.2 Gigabases (~1.6 Gb effective. Restriction digestion and PFGE analysis of 234 randomly chosen BACs indicated that 95% of the clones contained inserts, ranging from 60 to 180 kb with an average of 120 kb. Comparative sequence analysis of two homoeologous genomic regions harboring orthologs of the rice OsBRI1 locus, a low-copy gene encoding a putative protein kinase and associated with biomass, revealed that orthologous clones from homoeologous chromosomes can be unambiguously distinguished from each other and correctly assembled to respective fingerprint contigs. Thus, the data obtained not only provide genomic resources for further analysis of switchgrass genome, but also improve efforts for an accurate genome sequencing strategy. Conclusions The construction of the first switchgrass BAC library and comparative analysis of

  7. Comparison of BacT/Alert FAN and FAN Plus Bottles with Conventional Medium for Culturing Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, In Young; Chun, Sejong; Song, Dong Joon; Huh, Hee Jae; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-11-01

    We compared the BacT/Alert system FAN and FAN Plus media to conventional media for culturing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with 2,545 samples. FAN/FAN Plus bottles showed better performance for isolating microorganisms in CSF than conventional media (positive rate, 7.2% [182/2,545] versus 3.1% [80/2,545]). The incremental recovery rate of Cryptococcus neoformans from FAN Plus bottles was higher than that from FAN bottles. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Characterization of Growth and Reproduction Performance, Transgene Integration, Expression, and Transmission Patterns in Transgenic Pigs Produced by piggyBac Transposition-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Cai, Gengyuan; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2016-10-01

    Previously we successfully produced a group of EGFP-expressing founder transgenic pigs by a newly developed efficient and simple pig transgenesis method based on cytoplasmic injection of piggyBac plasmids. In this study, we investigated the growth and reproduction performance and characterized the transgene insertion, transmission, and expression patterns in transgenic pigs generated by piggyBac transposition. Results showed that transgene has no injurious effect on the growth and reproduction of transgenic pigs. Multiple copies of monogenic EGFP transgene were inserted at noncoding sequences of host genome, and passed from founder transgenic pigs to their transgenic offspring in segregation or linkage manner. The EGFP transgene was ubiquitously expressed in transgenic pigs, and its expression intensity was associated with transgene copy number but not related to its promoter DNA methylation level. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that fully described the growth and reproduction performance, transgene insertion, expression, and transmission profiles in transgenic pigs produced by piggyBac system. It not only demonstrates that piggyBac transposition-mediated gene transfer is an effective and favorable approach for pig transgenesis, but also provides scientific information for understanding the transgene insertion, expression and transmission patterns in transgenic animals produced by piggyBac transposition.

  9. Unexpected instability of family of repeats (FR, the critical cis-acting sequence required for EBV latent infection, in EBV-BAC systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teru Kanda

    Full Text Available A group of repetitive sequences, known as the Family of Repeats (FR, is a critical cis-acting sequence required for EBV latent infection. The FR sequences are heterogeneous among EBV strains, and they are sometimes subject to partial deletion when subcloned in E. coli-based cloning vectors. However, the FR stability in EBV-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome system has never been investigated. We found that the full length FR of the Akata strain EBV was not stably maintained in a BAC vector. By contrast, newly obtained BAC clones of the B95-8 strain of EBV stably maintained the full length FR during recombinant virus production and B-cell transformation. Investigation of primary DNA sequences of Akata-derived EBV-BAC clones indicates that the FR instability is most likely due to a putative secondary structure of the FR region. We conclude that the FR instability in EBV-BAC clones can be a pitfall in E. coli-mediated EBV genetics.

  10. Spatial attributes of the four-helix bundle group of bacteriocins – The high-resolution structure of BacSp222 in solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nowakowski, Michał

    2017-11-01

    BacSp222 is a multifunctional bacteriocin produced by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius strain 222, an opportunistic pathogen of domestic animals. At micromolar concentrations, BacSp222 kills Gram-positive bacteria and is cytotoxic toward mammalian cells, while at nanomolar doses, it acts as an immunomodulatory factor, enhancing nitric oxide release in macrophage-like cell lines. The bacteriocin is a cationic, N-terminally formylated, 50-amino-acid-long linear peptide that is rich in tryptophan residues.In this study, the solution structure of BacSp222 was determined and compared to the currently known structures of similar bacteriocins. BacSp222 was isolated from a liquid culture medium in a uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled form, and NMR data were collected. The structure was calculated based on NMR-derived constraints and consists of a rigid and tightly packed globular bundle of four alpha-helices separated by three short turns.Although the amino acid sequence of BacSp222 has no significant similarity to any known peptide or protein, a 3D structure similarity search indicates a close relation to other four-helix bundle-motif bacteriocins, such as aureocin A53, lacticin Q and enterocins 7A/7B. Assuming similar functions, biology, structure and physicochemical properties, we propose to distinguish the four-helix bundle bacteriocins as a new Type A in subclass IId of bacteriocins, containing linear, non-pediocin-like peptides.

  11. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  12. Phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  13. Screening of 20 patients with X-linked mental retardation using chromosome X-specific array-MAPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Parkel, Sven; Zilina, Olga; Palta, Priit; Puusepp, Helen; Remm, Maido; Turner, Gillian; Boyle, Jackie; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Gecz, Jozef; Kurg, Ants; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2007-01-01

    The rapid advancement of high-resolution DNA copy number assessment methods revealed the significant contribution of submicroscopic genetic imbalances to abnormal phenotypes, including mental retardation. In order to detect submicroscopic genetic imbalances, we have screened 20 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) using a chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform with median resolution of 238kb. Among the 20 families, 18 were experimental, as they were not previously screened with any microarray method, and two were blind controls with known aberrations, as they were previously screened by array-CGH. This study presents the first clinical application of chromosome X-specific array-MAPH methodology. The screening of 20 affected males from 20 unrelated XLMR families resulted in the detection of an unknown deletion, spanning a region of 7-23kb. Family studies and population screening demonstrated that the detected deletion is an unknown rare copy number variant. One of the control samples, carrying approximately 6-Mb duplication was correctly identified, moreover it was found to be interrupted by a previously unknown 19kb region of normal copy number. The second control 50kb deletion was not identified, as this particular region was not covered by array-MAPH probes. This study demonstrates that the chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform is a valuable tool for screening patients with XLMR, or other X-linked disorders, and emerges the need for introducing new high-resolution screening methods for the detection of genetic imbalances.

  14. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  15. Cover array string reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Crochemore, Maxime; S. Iliopoulos, Costas; P. Pissis, Solon; Tischler, German

    2010-01-01

    International audience; A proper factor u of a string y is a cover of y if every letter of y is within some occurrence of u in y. The concept generalises the notion of periods of a string. An integer array C is the minimal-cover (resp. maximal-cover) array of y if C[i] is the minimal (resp. maximal) length of covers of y[0.. i], or zero if no cover exists. In this paper, we present a constructive algorithm checking the validity of an array as a minimal-cover or maximal-cover array of some str...

  16. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water reflected (i.e., surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established. When evaluating arrays, it has become more common for analysts to use calculations to demonstrate the safety of the array configuration. In performing these calculations, the analyst has considerable freedom concerning the assumptions made for modeling the reflection of the array. Considerations are given for the physical layout of the array with little or no discussion (or demonstration) of what conditions are bounded by the assumed reflection conditions. For example, an array may be generically evaluated by placing it in a corner of a room in which the opposing walls are far away. Typically, it is believed that complete flooding of the room is incredible, so the array is evaluated for various levels of water mist interspersed among array containers. This paper discusses some assumptions that are made regarding storage array reflection

  17. A forward-backward fragment assembling algorithm for the identification of genomic amplification and deletion breakpoints using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Dione K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA copy number aberration (CNA is one of the key characteristics of cancer cells. Recent studies demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping arrays to detect CNA. Compared with the two-color array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH, the SNP arrays offer much higher probe density and lower signal-to-noise ratio at the single SNP level. To accurately identify small segments of CNA from SNP array data, segmentation methods that are sensitive to CNA while resistant to noise are required. Results We have developed a highly sensitive algorithm for the edge detection of copy number data which is especially suitable for the SNP array-based copy number data. The method consists of an over-sensitive edge-detection step and a test-based forward-backward edge selection step. Conclusion Using simulations constructed from real experimental data, the method shows high sensitivity and specificity in detecting small copy number changes in focused regions. The method is implemented in an R package FASeg, which includes data processing and visualization utilities, as well as libraries for processing Affymetrix SNP array data.

  18. Solar array stepping to minimize array excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Mahabaleshwar K. P. (Inventor); Liu, Tung Y. (Inventor); Plescia, Carl T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical oscillations of a mechanism containing a stepper motor, such as a solar-array powered spacecraft, are reduced and minimized by the execution of step movements in pairs of steps, the period between steps being equal to one-half of the period of torsional oscillation of the mechanism. Each pair of steps is repeated at needed intervals to maintain desired continuous movement of the portion of elements to be moved, such as the solar array of a spacecraft. In order to account for uncertainty as well as slow change in the period of torsional oscillation, a command unit may be provided for varying the interval between steps in a pair.

  19. Mobilization and integration of bacterial phenotypic data-Enabling next generation biodiversity analysis through the BacDive metadatabase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Lorenz C; Söhngen, Carola; Vetcininova, Anna; Overmann, Jörg

    2017-11-10

    Microbial data and metadata are scattered throughout the scientific literature, databases and unpublished lab notes and thereby often are difficult to access. Hot spots of (meta)data are internal descriptions of culture collections and initial descriptions of novel taxa in primary literature. Here we describe three exemplary mobilization projects which yielded metadata published through the prokaryotic metadatabase BacDive. The Reichenbach collection of myxobacteria includes information on 12,535 typewritten index cards which were digitized. A total of 37,156 data points were extracted by text mining. In the second mobilization project, Analytical Profile Index (API) tests on paper forms were targeted. Overall 6820 API tests were digitized, which provide physiological data of 4524 microbial strains. Thirdly, the extraction of metadata from 523 new species descriptions of the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, yielding 35,651 data points, is described. All data sets were integrated and published in BacDive. Thereby these metadata not only became accessible and searchable but were also linked to strain taxonomy, isolation source, cultivation condition, and molecular biology data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transposon Invasion of the Paramecium Germline Genome Countered by a Domesticated PiggyBac Transposase and the NHEJ Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Emeline; Bischerour, Julien; Marmignon, Antoine; Mathy, Nathalie; Régnier, Vinciane; Bétermier, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Sequences related to transposons constitute a large fraction of extant genomes, but insertions within coding sequences have generally not been tolerated during evolution. Thanks to their unique nuclear dimorphism and to their original mechanism of programmed DNA elimination from their somatic nucleus (macronucleus), ciliates are emerging model organisms for the study of the impact of transposable elements on genomes. The germline genome of the ciliate Paramecium, located in its micronucleus, contains thousands of short intervening sequences, the IESs, which interrupt 47% of genes. Recent data provided support to the hypothesis that an evolutionary link exists between Paramecium IESs and Tc1/mariner transposons. During development of the macronucleus, IESs are excised precisely thanks to the coordinated action of PiggyMac, a domesticated piggyBac transposase, and of the NHEJ double-strand break repair pathway. A PiggyMac homolog is also required for developmentally programmed DNA elimination in another ciliate, Tetrahymena. Here, we present an overview of the life cycle of these unicellular eukaryotes and of the developmentally programmed genome rearrangements that take place at each sexual cycle. We discuss how ancient domestication of a piggyBac transposase might have allowed Tc1/mariner elements to spread throughout the germline genome of Paramecium, without strong counterselection against insertion within genes. PMID:22888464

  1. Transposon Invasion of the Paramecium Germline Genome Countered by a Domesticated PiggyBac Transposase and the NHEJ Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeline Dubois

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequences related to transposons constitute a large fraction of extant genomes, but insertions within coding sequences have generally not been tolerated during evolution. Thanks to their unique nuclear dimorphism and to their original mechanism of programmed DNA elimination from their somatic nucleus (macronucleus, ciliates are emerging model organisms for the study of the impact of transposable elements on genomes. The germline genome of the ciliate Paramecium, located in its micronucleus, contains thousands of short intervening sequences, the IESs, which interrupt 47% of genes. Recent data provided support to the hypothesis that an evolutionary link exists between Paramecium IESs and Tc1/mariner transposons. During development of the macronucleus, IESs are excised precisely thanks to the coordinated action of PiggyMac, a domesticated piggyBac transposase, and of the NHEJ double-strand break repair pathway. A PiggyMac homolog is also required for developmentally programmed DNA elimination in another ciliate, Tetrahymena. Here, we present an overview of the life cycle of these unicellular eukaryotes and of the developmentally programmed genome rearrangements that take place at each sexual cycle. We discuss how ancient domestication of a piggyBac transposase might have allowed Tc1/mariner elements to spread throughout the germline genome of Paramecium, without strong counterselection against insertion within genes.

  2. Enhanced Expression of Anti-CD19 Chimeric Antigen Receptor in piggyBac Transposon-Engineered T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Morita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-modified T cells is a promising cancer immunotherapy. We previously developed a non-viral method of gene transfer into T cells using a piggyBac transposon system to improve the cost-effectiveness of CAR-T cell therapy. Here, we have further improved our technology by a novel culture strategy to increase the transfection efficiency and to reduce the time of T cell manufacturing. Using a CH2CH3-free CD19-specific CAR transposon vector and combining irradiated activated T cells (ATCs as feeder cells and virus-specific T cell receptor (TCR stimulation, we achieved 51.4% ± 14% CAR+ T cells and 2.8-fold expansion after 14 culture days. Expanded CD19.CAR-T cells maintained a significant fraction of CD45RA+CCR7+ T cells and demonstrated potent antitumor activity against CD19+ leukemic cells both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, piggyBac-based gene transfer may provide an alternative to viral gene transfer for CAR-T cell therapy.

  3. Construction of BAC libraries from two apomictic grasses to study the microcolinearity of their apospory-specific genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, D.; Conner, A.; Budiman, A.; Frisch, D.; Wing, R.; Hanna, W.; Ozias-Akins, P.

    2002-04-01

    We have constructed bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries from two grass species that reproduce by apospory, a form of gametophytic apomixis. The library of an apomictic polyhaploid genotype (line MS228-20, with a 2C genome size of approximately 4,500 Mbp) derived from a cross between the obligate apomict, Pennisetum squamulatum, and pearl millet ( P. glaucum) comprises 118,272 clones with an average insert size of 82 kb. The library of buffelgrass ( Cenchrus ciliaris, apomictic line B-12-9, with a 2C genome size of approximately 3,000 Mbp) contains 68,736 clones with an average insert size of 109 kb. Based on the genome sizes of these two lines and correcting for the number for false-positive and organellar clones, library coverages were found to be 3.7 and 4.8 haploid genome equivalents for MS 228-20 and B12-9, respectively. Both libraries were screened by hybridization with six SCARs (sequence-characterized amplified regions), whose tight linkage in a single apospory-specific genomic region had been previously demonstrated in both species. Analysis of these BAC clones indicated that some of the SCAR markers are actually amplifying duplicated regions linked in coupling in both genomes and that restriction enzyme mapping will be necessary to sort out the duplications.

  4. piggyBac transposon-derived targeting shRNA interference against the Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Chen, Rui-ting; Lu, Yan; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Mei-xian; Miao, Yun-gen

    2014-12-01

    The Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is one of the most destructive diseases in silkworm, which has caused the main damage to sericulture industry. In this study, we developed a system of RNAi to prevent the BmNPV infection using the piggyBac transposon-derived targeting short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference. The shRNAs targeting the genes of i.e.-1, lef-1, lef-2 and lef-3 of BmNPV were designed and used to inhibit the intracellular replication or multiplication of BmNPV in Bm cells. The highest activity was presented in the shRNA targeting the i.e.-1c of BmNPV, of which the inhibition rate reached 94.5 % in vitro. Further a stable Bm cell line of piggyBac transposon-derived targeting shRNA interference against BmNPV was established, which has a highly efficacious suppression on virus proliferation. These results indicated that the recombinant shRNA expression system was a useful tool for resistance to BmNPV in vitro. The approach by recombinant shRNAs opens a door of RNAi technology as a strategy that offering technically simpler, cheaper, and quicker gene knockdown for promising research and biotechnology application on silkworm lethal diseases.

  5. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  6. Micromirror array for protein micro array fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kook-Nyung; Shin, Dong-Sik; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2003-05-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized a micromirror array for protein microarray fabrication that has a simple structure, and the straightforward fabrication process for the mirror will allow the use of low-cost mirrors in protein pattern applications. The characteristics of an exposure system utilizing the micromirror array have been demonstrated by means of an experiment employing a photoresist that is in general use in the semiconductor industry. The micromirror dimensions were 54 × 54 mum2, with a 30 mum separation between mirrors, and a 5.5 mum gap from the bottom electrode so that the mirror had an approximately 10° deflection angle. The size and separation of the mirror were designed in consideration of the protein pattern size and pitch, in contrast with the commercial Texas Instruments Digital Light Processor, which is utilized in the components of projection display systems. The exposure system combined with the micromirror has been used in the photochemical synthesis of chemical ligands via protein immobilization on a chip. Several photosynthesis experiments for peptide array synthesis have been carried out using the micromirror array. Parallel experiments on photochemical ligand synthesis on a chip can easily be performed in the laboratory using this exposure system.

  7. Triggering the GRANDE array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.L.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, J.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of the Gamma Ray And Neutrino Detector Experiment (GRANDE) is presented. The detector elements and electronics are described. The trigger logic for the array is then examined. The triggers for the Gamma Ray and the Neutrino portions of the array are treated separately. (orig.)

  8. A 4 Mb High Resolution BAC Contig on Bovine Chromosome 1q12 and Comparative Analysis With Human Chromosome 21q22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottmar Distl

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The bovine RPCI-42 BAC library was screened to construct a sequence-ready ~4 Mb single contig of 92 BAC clones on BTA 1q12. The contig covers the region between the genes KRTAP8P1 and CLIC6. This genomic segment in cattle is of special interest as it contains the dominant gene responsible for the hornless or polled phenotype in cattle. The construction of the BAC contig was initiated by screening the bovine BAC library with heterologous cDNA probes derived from 12 human genes of the syntenic region on HSA 21q22. Contig building was facilitated by BAC end sequencing and chromosome walking. During the construction of the contig, 165 BAC end sequences and 109 single-copy STS markers were generated. For comparative mapping of 25 HSA 21q22 genes, genomic PCR primers were designed from bovine EST sequences and the gene-associated STSs mapped on the contig. Furthermore, bovine BAC end sequence comparisons against the human genome sequence revealed significant matches to HSA 21q22 and allowed the in silico mapping of two new genes in cattle. In total, 31 orthologues of human genes located on HSA 21q22 were directly mapped within the bovine BAC contig, of which 16 genes have been cloned and mapped for the first time in cattle. In contrast to the existing comparative bovine–human RH maps of this region, these results provide a better alignment and reveal a completely conserved gene order in this 4 Mb segment between cattle, human and mouse. The mapping of known polled linked BTA 1q12 microsatellite markers allowed the integration of the physical contig map with existing linkage maps of this region and also determined the exact order of these markers for the first time. Our physical map and transcript map may be useful for positional cloning of the putative polled gene in cattle. The nucleotide sequence data reported in this paper have been submitted to EMBL and have been assigned Accession Numbers AJ698510–AJ698674.

  9. Third-Generation Sequencing and Analysis of Four Complete Pig Liver Esterase Gene Sequences in Clones Identified by Screening BAC Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongqiong; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Xiyan; Wang, Xiliang; Xiao, Yuncai; Bi, Dingren; Yin, Jingdong; Shi, Deshi

    2016-01-01

    Pig liver carboxylesterase (PLE) gene sequences in GenBank are incomplete, which has led to difficulties in studying the genetic structure and regulation mechanisms of gene expression of PLE family genes. The aim of this study was to obtain and analysis of complete gene sequences of PLE family by screening from a Rongchang pig BAC library and third-generation PacBio gene sequencing. After a number of existing incomplete PLE isoform gene sequences were analysed, primers were designed based on conserved regions in PLE exons, and the whole pig genome used as a template for Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Specific primers were then selected based on the PCR amplification results. A three-step PCR screening method was used to identify PLE-positive clones by screening a Rongchang pig BAC library and PacBio third-generation sequencing was performed. BLAST comparisons and other bioinformatics methods were applied for sequence analysis. Five PLE-positive BAC clones, designated BAC-10, BAC-70, BAC-75, BAC-119 and BAC-206, were identified. Sequence analysis yielded the complete sequences of four PLE genes, PLE1, PLE-B9, PLE-C4, and PLE-G2. Complete PLE gene sequences were defined as those containing regulatory sequences, exons, and introns. It was found that, not only did the PLE exon sequences of the four genes show a high degree of homology, but also that the intron sequences were highly similar. Additionally, the regulatory region of the genes contained two 720bps reverse complement sequences that may have an important function in the regulation of PLE gene expression. This is the first report to confirm the complete sequences of four PLE genes. In addition, the study demonstrates that each PLE isoform is encoded by a single gene and that the various genes exhibit a high degree of sequence homology, suggesting that the PLE family evolved from a single ancestral gene. Obtaining the complete sequences of these PLE genes provides the necessary foundation for

  10. Species and gene divergence in Littorina snails detected by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panova, Marina; Johansson, Tomas; Canbäck, Björn; Bentzer, Johan; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Johannesson, Kerstin; Tunlid, Anders; André, Carl

    2014-08-18

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is commonly used to screen different types of genetic variation in humans and model species. Here, we performed aCGH using an oligonucleotide gene-expression array for a non-model species, the intertidal snail Littorina saxatilis. First, we tested what types of genetic variation can be detected by this method using direct re-sequencing and comparison to the Littorina genome draft. Secondly, we performed a genome-wide comparison of four closely related Littorina species: L. fabalis, L. compressa, L. arcana and L. saxatilis and of populations of L. saxatilis found in Spain, Britain and Sweden. Finally, we tested whether we could identify genetic variation underlying "Crab" and "Wave" ecotypes of L. saxatilis. We could reliably detect copy number variations, deletions and high sequence divergence (i.e. above 3%), but not single nucleotide polymorphisms. The overall hybridization pattern and number of significantly diverged genes were in close agreement with earlier phylogenetic reconstructions based on single genes. The trichotomy of L. arcana, L. compressa and L. saxatilis could not be resolved and we argue that these divergence events have occurred recently and very close in time. We found evidence for high levels of segmental duplication in the Littorina genome (10% of the transcripts represented on the array and up to 23% of the analyzed genomic fragments); duplicated genes and regions were mostly the same in all analyzed species. Finally, this method discriminated geographically distant populations of L. saxatilis, but we did not detect any significant genome divergence associated with ecotypes of L. saxatilis. The present study provides new information on the sensitivity and the potential use of oligonucleotide arrays for genotyping of non-model organisms. Applying this method to Littorina species yields insights into genome evolution following the recent species radiation and supports earlier single-gene based

  11. Micromachined electrode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  12. CGH microarray studies in idiopathic developmental/cognitive impairment: association of historical and clinical features and the De Vries Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promilla Perattur

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Studies have confirmed that copy number variations (CNV in the human genome contribute to the etiology of mental retardation/ development delay/ congenital anomalies. We sought to evaluate the use of a microarray in the context of a clinical genetics practice, to determine if there were any specific clinical findings that predict the discovery of a CNV. Patients and methods. 334 cases with idiopathic mental retardation/impairment/development delay/disability or a combination of these findings were studied using array comparative genomic hybridization (Signature Chip Version 4. The subjects had previously had a non diagnostic medical genetics evaluation. Clinical findings were collated by a chart review. Each patient was scored according to a previously published clinical checklist by de Vries and colleagues. Results. Of 334 patients, 8 were excluded due to a syndromic diagnosis being established by clinical and/or microarray testing. Out of the remaining 326 patients, 33 (10% showed CNVs, of which 5 were maternally inherited, 4 paternally inherited, 11 were de novo, and the origin of 13 remained unknown. The mean de Vries score was greater in the CNV group than in the non CNV group (4.17 and 3.95, respectively. No patient in the CNV group had a score of less than 3, while in the non CNV group, 12% of patients had scores less than 3. Conclusions. The De Vries clinical score was higher in CNV cases compared to those with no CNV (p=0.04 but this difference is unlikely to be clinically meaningful. Several features reached statistical significance of p<0.05 but we were unable to delineate patterns of features that might increase the yield of positive CNV results.

  13. Enhancing the genome editing toolbox: genome wide CRISPR arrayed libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Strong, Alex; Iyer, Vivek; Hodgkins, Alex; Tzelepis, Konstantinos; Antunes, Liliana; Friedrich, Mathias J; Kang, Qiaohua; Davidson, Teresa; Lamberth, Jacob; Hoffmann, Christina; Davis, Gregory D; Vassiliou, George S; Skarnes, William C; Bradley, Allan

    2017-05-22

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has accelerated biological research becoming routine for many laboratories. It is rapidly replacing conventional gene editing techniques and has high utility for both genome-wide and gene-focussed applications. Here we present the first individually cloned CRISPR-Cas9 genome wide arrayed sgRNA libraries covering 17,166 human and 20,430 mouse genes at a complexity of 34,332 sgRNAs for human and 40,860 sgRNAs for the mouse genome. For flexibility in generating stable cell lines the sgRNAs have been cloned in a lentivirus backbone containing PiggyBac transposase recognition elements together with fluorescent and drug selection markers. Over 95% of tested sgRNA induced specific DNA cleavage as measured by CEL-1 assays. Furthermore, sgRNA targeting GPI anchor protein pathway genes induced loss of function mutations in human and mouse cell lines measured by FLAER labelling. These arrayed libraries offer the prospect for performing screens on individual genes, combinations as well as larger gene sets. They also facilitate rapid deconvolution of signals from genome-wide screens. This set of vectors provide an organized comprehensive gene editing toolbox of considerable scientific value.

  14. Optimal control and analysis of two-color genomotyping experiments using bacterial multistrain arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez Mário

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH evaluates the distribution of genes of sequenced bacterial strains among unsequenced strains of the same or related species. As genomic sequences from multiple strains of the same species become available, multistrain microarrays are designed, containing spots for every unique gene in all sequenced strains. To perform two-color aCGH experiments with multistrain microarrays, the choice of control sample can be the genomic DNA of one strain or a mixture of all the strains used in the array design. This important problem has no universally accepted solution. Results We performed a comparative study of the two control sample options with a Streptococcus pneumoniae microarray designed with three fully sequenced strains. We separately hybridized two of these strains (R6 and G54 as test samples using the third strain alone (TIGR4 or a mixture of the three strains as control. We show that for both types of control it is advantageous to analyze spots in separate sets according to their expected control channel signal (5–15% AUC increase. Following this analysis, the use of a mix control leads to higher accuracies (5% increase. This enhanced performance is due to gains in sensitivity (21% increase, p = 0.001 that compensate minor losses in specificity (5% decrease, p = 0.014. Conclusion The use of a single strain control increases the error rate in genes that are part of the accessory genome, where more variation across unsequenced strains is expected, further justifying the use of the mix control.

  15. Molecular characterization by array comparative genomic hybridization and DNA sequencing of 194 desmoid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Sébastien; Chibon, Frederic; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Terrier, Philippe; Ranchere-Vince, Dominique; Lagarde, Pauline; Benard, Jean; Forget, Sébastien; Blanchard, Camille; Dômont, Julien; Bonvalot, Sylvie; Guillou, Louis; Leroux, Agnès; Mechine-Neuville, Agnes; Schöffski, Patrick; Laë, Marik; Collin, Françoise; Verola, Olivier; Carbonnelle, Amelie; Vescovo, Laure; Bui, Binh; Brouste, Véronique; Sobol, Hagay; Aurias, Alain; Coindre, Jean-Michel

    2010-06-01

    Desmoid tumors are fibroblastic/myofibroblastic proliferations. Previous studies reported that CTNNB1 mutations were detected in 84% and that mutations of the APC gene were found in several cases of sporadic desmoid tumors lacking CTNNB1 mutations. Forty tumors were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed a nonrandom occurrence of trisomy 8 associated with an increased risk of recurrence. We report the first molecular characterization including a large series of patients. We performed array CGH on frozen samples of 194 tumors, and we screened for APC mutations in patients without CNNTB1 mutation. A high frequency of genomically normal tumors was observed. Four relevant and recurrent alterations (loss of 6q, loss of 5q, gain of 20q, and gain of Chromosome 8) were found in 40 out of 46 tumors with chromosomal changes. Gain of Chromosomes 8 and 20 was not associated with an increased risk of recurrence. Cases with loss of 5q had a minimal common region in 5q22.5 including the APC locus. Alterations of APC, including loss of the entire locus, and CTNNB1 mutation could explain the tumorigenesis in 89% of sporadic desmoids tumors and desmoids tumors occurring in the context of Gardner's syndrome. A better understanding of the pathogenetic pathways in the initiation and progression of desmoid tumors requires studies of 8q and 20q gains, as well as of 6q and 5q losses, and study of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Sensor array signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Prabhakar S

    2009-01-01

    Chapter One: An Overview of Wavefields 1.1 Types of Wavefields and the Governing Equations 1.2 Wavefield in open space 1.3 Wavefield in bounded space 1.4 Stochastic wavefield 1.5 Multipath propagation 1.6 Propagation through random medium 1.7 ExercisesChapter Two: Sensor Array Systems 2.1 Uniform linear array (ULA) 2.2 Planar array 2.3 Distributed sensor array 2.4 Broadband sensor array 2.5 Source and sensor arrays 2.6 Multi-component sensor array2.7 ExercisesChapter Three: Frequency Wavenumber Processing 3.1 Digital filters in the w-k domain 3.2 Mapping of 1D into 2D filters 3.3 Multichannel Wiener filters 3.4 Wiener filters for ULA and UCA 3.5 Predictive noise cancellation 3.6 Exercises Chapter Four: Source Localization: Frequency Wavenumber Spectrum4.1 Frequency wavenumber spectrum 4.2 Beamformation 4.3 Capon's w-k spectrum 4.4 Maximum entropy w-k spectrum 4.5 Doppler-Azimuth Processing4.6 ExercisesChapter Five: Source Localization: Subspace Methods 5.1 Subspace methods (Narrowband) 5.2 Subspace methods (B...

  17. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of a piezoelectric micro-speaker. The speaker is an array of micro-machined piezoelectric membranes, fabricated on silicon wafer using advanced micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT), a top electrode of 300nm and a structural layer of 50

  18. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  19. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Stevens and its application to physically map the Sw-5 locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassova, MI; Prins, M; Stevens, MR; Hille, J; Goldbach, RW; Spassova, Mariana I.; Stevens, Mikel R.; Goldbach, Rob W.

    1999-01-01

    The Sw-5 gene is a dominantly inherited resistance gene in tomato and functional against a number of tospovirus species. The gene has been mapped on chromosome 9, tightly linked to RFLP markers CT220 and SCAR421. To analyse the Sw-5 locus, a BAC genomic library was constructed of tomato cv. Stevens,

  20. Molecular cytogenetics and DNA sequence analysis of an apomixis-linked BAC in Paspalum simplex reveal a non pericentromere location and partial microcolinearity with rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calderini, O.; Chang, S.B.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Busti, A.; Paolocci, F.; Arcioni, S.; Vries, de S.C.; Abma-Henkens, M.H.C.; Klein Lankhorst, R.M.; Donnison, I.S.; Pupilli, F.

    2006-01-01

    Apomixis in plants is a form of clonal reproduction through seeds. A BAC clone linked to apomictic reproduction in Paspalum simplex was used to locate the apomixis locus on meiotic chromosome preparations. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation revealed the existence of a single locus embedded in a

  1. Physical Analysis of the Complex Rye (Secale cereale L.) Alt4 Aluminium (Aluminum) Tolerance Locus Using a Whole-Genome BAC Library of Rye cv. Blanco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye is a diploid crop species with many outstanding qualities, and is also important as a source of new traits for wheat and triticale improvement. Here we describe a BAC library of rye cv. Blanco, representing a valuable resource for rye molecular genetic studies. The library provides a 6 × genome ...

  2. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altug, Hatice; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    We recently proposed two-dimensional coupled photonic crystal nanocavity arrays as a route to achieve a slow-group velocity of light in all crystal directions, thereby enabling numerous applications...

  3. Flexible retinal electrode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat [Albuquerque, NM; Wessendorf, Kurt O [Albuquerque, NM; Christenson, Todd R [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  4. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  5. Expandable LED array interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  6. Direct subcloning of target region from BAC insert using restriction enzymes that produce non-identical cohesive ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Sato, Masahiro; Ohtsuka, Masato

    2004-01-01

    Type IIS or interrupted palindrome restriction endonuclease digestion produces unique cohesive ends. Utilization of this feature of BglI, SfiI and BstXI has led to direct subcloning of 28.5-kb and 22.9-kb regions, which contains candidate genes for medaka Double anal fin (Da) mutant, from a 229-kb BAC insert. This method does not contain gel-fractionation of the fragments and time-consuming screening process using hybridization. Non-recombinant backgrounds were distinguished from recombinant clones by introducing GFPuv gene into the subcloning vector. This strategy was successfully applicable even when the target region was cut into three fragments by these enzymes.

  7. Jícuri y bacánowa: Rituales de vida y muerte en la sierra tarahumara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Acuña Delgado

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available En base a los datos obtenidos durante los once meses de experiencia de campo, entre 2001 y 2005, en varias comunidades rarámuris de la Alta y Baja Tarahumara, al suroeste del estado de Chihuahua (México, en el presente trabajo centramos la atención en dos rituales y al mismo tiempo formas de danza, ambos de carácter privado, que ocupan un papel esencial en la cosmovisión rarámuri. El hecho de haber participado como espectador invitado en tales prácticas nos permitirá describir el contexto etnográfico de primera mano; para finalizar destacando especialmente las funciones y significados que llevan asociados. Antes ofreceremos, no obstante, una serie de referencias bibliográficas que sitúan al jícuri y al bacánowa entre la historia y la leyenda.

  8. The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay: Rapid, Sensitive and Culture-Independent Identification of Bacteria and Candida in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Richard E.; Peterson, Stephen; Carroll, Karen C.; Zhang, Sean X.; Avornu, Gideon D.; Rounds, Megan A.; Carolan, Heather E.; Toleno, Donna M.; Moore, David; Hall, Thomas A.; Massire, Christian; Richmond, Gregory S.; Gutierrez, Jose R.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Ecker, David J.; Blyn, Lawrence B.

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) and sepsis are rising in incidence throughout the developed world. The spread of multi-drug resistant organisms presents increasing challenges to treatment. Surviving BSI is dependent on rapid and accurate identification of causal organisms, and timely application of appropriate antibiotics. Current culture-based methods used to detect and identify agents of BSI are often too slow to impact early therapy and may fail to detect relevant organisms in many positive cases. Existing methods for direct molecular detection of microbial DNA in blood are limited in either sensitivity (likely the result of small sample volumes) or in breadth of coverage, often because the PCR primers and probes used target only a few specific pathogens. There is a clear unmet need for a sensitive molecular assay capable of identifying the diverse bacteria and yeast associated with BSI directly from uncultured whole blood samples. We have developed a method of extracting DNA from larger volumes of whole blood (5 ml per sample), amplifying multiple widely conserved bacterial and fungal genes using a mismatch- and background-tolerant PCR chemistry, and identifying hundreds of diverse organisms from the amplified fragments on the basis of species-specific genetic signatures using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS). We describe the analytical characteristics of the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay and compare its pre-clinical performance to current standard-of-care methods in a collection of prospectively collected blood specimens from patients with symptoms of sepsis. The assay generated matching results in 80% of culture-positive cases (86% when common contaminants were excluded from the analysis), and twice the total number of positive detections. The described method is capable of providing organism identifications directly from uncultured blood in less than 8 hours. Disclaimer: The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay is not available in the United States. PMID:27384540

  9. BAC-end sequences analysis provides first insights into coffee (Coffea canephora P.) genome composition and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereeper, Alexis; Guyot, Romain; Tranchant-Dubreuil, Christine; Anthony, François; Argout, Xavier; de Bellis, Fabien; Combes, Marie-Christine; Gavory, Frederick; de Kochko, Alexandre; Kudrna, Dave; Leroy, Thierry; Poulain, Julie; Rondeau, Myriam; Song, Xiang; Wing, Rod; Lashermes, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Coffee is one of the world's most important agricultural commodities. Coffee belongs to the Rubiaceae family in the euasterid I clade of dicotyledonous plants, to which the Solanaceae family also belongs. Two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of a homozygous doubled haploid plant of Coffea canephora were constructed using two enzymes, HindIII and BstYI. A total of 134,827 high quality BAC-end sequences (BESs) were generated from the 73,728 clones of the two libraries, and 131,412 BESs were conserved for further analysis after elimination of chloroplast and mitochondrial sequences. This corresponded to almost 13 % of the estimated size of the C. canephora genome. 6.7 % of BESs contained simple sequence repeats, the most abundant (47.8 %) being mononucleotide motifs. These sequences allow the development of numerous useful marker sites. Potential transposable elements (TEs) represented 11.9 % of the full length BESs. A difference was observed between the BstYI and HindIII libraries (14.9 vs. 8.8 %). Analysis of BESs against known coding sequences of TEs indicated that 11.9 % of the genome corresponded to known repeat sequences, like for other flowering plants. The number of genes in the coffee genome was estimated at 41,973 which is probably overestimated. Comparative genome mapping revealed that microsynteny was higher between coffee and grapevine than between coffee and tomato or Arabidopsis. BESs constitute valuable resources for the first genome wide survey of coffee and provide new insights into the composition and evolution of the coffee genome.

  10. The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay: Rapid, Sensitive and Culture-Independent Identification of Bacteria and Candida in Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzgar, David; Frinder, Mark W; Rothman, Richard E; Peterson, Stephen; Carroll, Karen C; Zhang, Sean X; Avornu, Gideon D; Rounds, Megan A; Carolan, Heather E; Toleno, Donna M; Moore, David; Hall, Thomas A; Massire, Christian; Richmond, Gregory S; Gutierrez, Jose R; Sampath, Rangarajan; Ecker, David J; Blyn, Lawrence B

    2016-01-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) and sepsis are rising in incidence throughout the developed world. The spread of multi-drug resistant organisms presents increasing challenges to treatment. Surviving BSI is dependent on rapid and accurate identification of causal organisms, and timely application of appropriate antibiotics. Current culture-based methods used to detect and identify agents of BSI are often too slow to impact early therapy and may fail to detect relevant organisms in many positive cases. Existing methods for direct molecular detection of microbial DNA in blood are limited in either sensitivity (likely the result of small sample volumes) or in breadth of coverage, often because the PCR primers and probes used target only a few specific pathogens. There is a clear unmet need for a sensitive molecular assay capable of identifying the diverse bacteria and yeast associated with BSI directly from uncultured whole blood samples. We have developed a method of extracting DNA from larger volumes of whole blood (5 ml per sample), amplifying multiple widely conserved bacterial and fungal genes using a mismatch- and background-tolerant PCR chemistry, and identifying hundreds of diverse organisms from the amplified fragments on the basis of species-specific genetic signatures using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS). We describe the analytical characteristics of the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay and compare its pre-clinical performance to current standard-of-care methods in a collection of prospectively collected blood specimens from patients with symptoms of sepsis. The assay generated matching results in 80% of culture-positive cases (86% when common contaminants were excluded from the analysis), and twice the total number of positive detections. The described method is capable of providing organism identifications directly from uncultured blood in less than 8 hours. The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay is not available in the United States.

  11. The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay: Rapid, Sensitive and Culture-Independent Identification of Bacteria and Candida in Blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metzgar

    Full Text Available Bloodstream infection (BSI and sepsis are rising in incidence throughout the developed world. The spread of multi-drug resistant organisms presents increasing challenges to treatment. Surviving BSI is dependent on rapid and accurate identification of causal organisms, and timely application of appropriate antibiotics. Current culture-based methods used to detect and identify agents of BSI are often too slow to impact early therapy and may fail to detect relevant organisms in many positive cases. Existing methods for direct molecular detection of microbial DNA in blood are limited in either sensitivity (likely the result of small sample volumes or in breadth of coverage, often because the PCR primers and probes used target only a few specific pathogens. There is a clear unmet need for a sensitive molecular assay capable of identifying the diverse bacteria and yeast associated with BSI directly from uncultured whole blood samples. We have developed a method of extracting DNA from larger volumes of whole blood (5 ml per sample, amplifying multiple widely conserved bacterial and fungal genes using a mismatch- and background-tolerant PCR chemistry, and identifying hundreds of diverse organisms from the amplified fragments on the basis of species-specific genetic signatures using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS. We describe the analytical characteristics of the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay and compare its pre-clinical performance to current standard-of-care methods in a collection of prospectively collected blood specimens from patients with symptoms of sepsis. The assay generated matching results in 80% of culture-positive cases (86% when common contaminants were excluded from the analysis, and twice the total number of positive detections. The described method is capable of providing organism identifications directly from uncultured blood in less than 8 hours.The IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay is not available in the United States.

  12. Effective Targeted Gene Knockdown in Mammalian Cells Using the piggyBac Transposase-based Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse B Owens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonviral gene delivery systems are rapidly becoming a desirable and applicable method to overexpress genes in various types of cells. We have recently developed a piggyBac transposase-based, helper-independent and self-inactivating delivery system (pmGENIE-3 capable of high-efficiency transfection of mammalian cells including human cells. In the following study, we have assessed the potential of this delivery system to drive the expression of short hairpin RNAs to knock down genes in human cells. Two independent pmGENIE-3 vectors were developed to specifically target knockdown of an endogenous gene, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, in telomerase-positive human immortalized cell lines. As compared with a transposase-deficient vector, pmGENIE-3 showed significantly improved short-term transfection efficiency (~4-fold enhancement, 48 hours posttransfection and long-term integration efficiency (~5-fold enhancement following antibiotic selection. We detected a significant reduction of both TERT expression and telomerase activity in both HEK293 and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells transfected with two pmGENIE-3 construct targeting distinct regions of TERT. Importantly, this knockdown of expression was sufficient to abrogate telomerase function since telomeres were significantly shortened (3–4 Kb, P < 0.001 in both TERT-targeted cell lines following antibiotic selection of stable integrants. Together, these data show the capacity of the piggyBac nonviral delivery system to stably knockdown gene expression in mammalian cells and indicate the potential to develop novel tumor-targeting therapies.

  13. Prenatal diagnosis and array comparative genomic hybridization characterization of interstitial deletions of 8q23.3-q24.11 and 8q24.13 associated with Langer-Giedion syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and haploinsufficiency of TRPS1, RAD21 and EXT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Lin, Ming-Huei; Chen, Yi-Yung; Chern, Schu-Rern; Chen, Yen-Ni; Wu, Peih-Shan; Pan, Chen-Wen; Lee, Meng-Shan; Wang, Wayseen

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this research was to present prenatal diagnosis of Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS/TRPS type II) and Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4 (CDLS4). A 36-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 17 weeks of gestation because of advanced maternal age. Conventional cytogenetic analysis of amniocentesis revealed an interstitial deletion of chromosome 8q or del(8)(q23.3q24.13). Level II prenatal ultrasound examination revealed craniofacial dysmorphism. The pregnancy was terminated, and a malformed fetus was delivered with characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism of LGS/TRPS type II and CDLS4. Whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on the DNA extracted from cultured amniocytes was performed. The analysis by aCGH revealed a result of arr 8q23.3q24.11 (116,087,006-118,969,399)×1, 8q24.13 (123,086,851-124,470,847)×1 (NCBI build 37) with a 2.88-Mb deletion of 8q23.3-q24.11 encompassing six OMIM genes, TRPS1, EIF3H, RAD21, SLC30A8, MED30, and EXT1, and a 1.383-Mb deletion of 8q24.13 encompassing four OMIM genes, ZHX2, DERL1, ZHX1, and ATAD2. In the present case, the conventional cytogenetic analysis of cultured amniocytes revealed del(8)(q23.3q24.13), whereas aCGH analysis of cultured amniocytes showed the deletions of 8q23.3-q24.11 and 8q24.13 with the presence of the segment 8q24.12. Therefore, aCGH provides the advantage of better understanding of the nature of interstitial deletion and genotype-phenotype correlation in this case. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effect of Bac8c on major bacteria associated with dental caries and Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yonglin; Wang, Wei; Fan, Meng; Tong, Zhongchun; Kuang, Rong; Jiang, WenKai; Ni, Longxing

    2014-02-01

    Dental caries is a common oral bacterial infectious disease. Its prevention and treatment requires control of the causative pathogens within dental plaque, especially Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), one of the promising substitutes for conventional antibiotics, have been widely tested and used for controlling bacterial infections. The present study focuses on evaluating the potential of the novel AMPs cyclic bactenecin and its derivatives against bacteria associated with dental caries. The results indicate that Bac8c displayed highest activity against the bacteria tested, whereas both cyclic and linear bactenecin had weak antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity assay showed that Bac8c did not cause detectable toxicity at concentrations of 32-128μg/ml for 5min or 32-64μg/ml for 60min. S. mutans and Lactobacillus fermenti treated with Bac8c showed variable effects on bacterial structure via scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. There appeared to be a large amount of extracellular debris and obvious holes on the cell surface, as well as loss of cell wall and nucleoid condensation. The BioFlux system was employed to generate S. mutans biofilms under a controlled flow, which more closely resemble the formation process of natural biofilms. Bac8c remarkably reduced the viability of cells in biofilms formed in the BioFlux system. This phenomenon was further analyzed and verified by real-time PCR results of a significant suppression of the genes involved in S. mutans biofilm formation. Taken together, this study suggests that Bac8c has a potential clinical application in preventing and treating dental caries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Removing organic and nitrogen content from a highly saline municipal wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate by UV/H2O2-BAC treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Shovana; Fan, Linhua; Roddick, Felicity A

    2015-10-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate (ROC) streams generated from RO-based municipal wastewater reclamation processes pose potential health and environmental risks on their disposal to confined water bodies such as bays. A UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process followed by a biological activated carbon (BAC) treatment was evaluated at lab-scale for the removal of organic and nutrient content from a highly saline ROC (TDS 16 g L(-1), EC 23.5 mS cm(-1)) for its safe disposal to the receiving environment. Over the 230-day operation of the UV/H2O2-BAC process, the colour and UV absorbance (254 nm) of the ROC were reduced to well below those of the influent to the reclamation process. The concentrations of DOC and total nitrogen (TN) were reduced by approximately 60% at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 60 min. The reduction in ammonia nitrogen by the BAC remained high under all conditions tested (>90%). Further investigation confirmed that the presence of residual peroxide in the UV/H2O2 treated ROC was beneficial for DOC removal, but markedly inhibited the activities of the nitrifying bacteria (i.e., nitrite oxidising bacteria) in the BAC system and hence compromised total nitrogen removal. This work demonstrated that the BAC treatment could be acclimated to the very high salinity environment, and could be used as a robust method for the removal of organic matter and nitrogen from the pre-oxidised ROC under optimised conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Validation of the BacT/ALERT®3D automated culture system for the detection of microbial contamination of epithelial cell culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantamura, E; Huyghe, G; Panterne, B; Delesalle, N; Thépot, A; Reverdy, M E; Damour, O; Auxenfans, Céline

    2012-08-01

    Living tissue engineering for regenerative therapy cannot withstand the usual pharmacopoeia methods of purification and terminal sterilization. Consequently, these products must be manufactured under aseptic conditions at microbiologically controlled environment facilities. This study was proposed to validate BacT/ALERT(®)3D automated culture system for microbiological control of epithelial cell culture medium (ECCM). Suspensions of the nine microorganisms recommended by the European Pharmacopoeia (Chap. 2.6.27: "Microbiological control of cellular products"), plus one species from oral mucosa and two negative controls with no microorganisms were prepared in ECCM. They were inoculated in FA (anaerobic) and SN (aerobic) culture bottles (Biomérieux, Lyon, France) and incubated in a BacT/ALERT(®)3D automated culture system. For each species, five sets of bottles were inoculated for reproducibility testing: one sample was incubated at the French Health Products Agency laboratory (reference) and the four others at Cell and Tissue Bank of Lyon, France. The specificity of the positive culture bottles was verified by Gram staining and then subcultured to identify the microorganism grown. The BacT/ALERT(®)3D system detected all the inoculated microorganisms in less than 2 days except Propionibacterium acnes which was detected in 3 days. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the BacT/ALERT(®)3D system can detect both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial and fungal contamination of an epithelial cell culture medium consistent with the European Pharmacopoeia chapter 2.6.27 recommendations. It showed the specificity, sensitivity, and precision of the BacT/ALERT(®)3D method, since all the microorganisms seeded were detected in both sites and the uncontaminated medium ECCM remained negative at 7 days.

  17. Non-invasive preimplantation genetic screening using array comparative genomic hybridization on spent culture media: a proof-of-concept pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtinger, Michael; Vaccari, Enrico; Carli, Luca; Wallner, Elisabeth; Mädel, Ulrike; Figl, Katharina; Palini, Simone; Feichtinger, Wilfried

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess if array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), non-invasive preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) on blastocyst culture media is feasible. Therefore, aCGH analysis was carried out on 22 spent blastocyst culture media samples after polar body PGS because of advanced maternal age. All oocytes were fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection and all embryos underwent assisted hatching. Concordance of polar body analysis and culture media genetic results was assessed. Thirteen out of 18 samples (72.2%) revealed general concordance of ploidy status (euploid or aneuploid). At least one chromosomal aberration was found concordant in 10 out of 15 embryos found to be aneuploid by both polar body and culture media analysis. Overall, 17 out of 35 (48.6%) single chromosomal aneuploidies were concordant between the culture media and polar body analysis. By analysing negative controls (oocytes with fertilization failure), notable maternal contamination was observed. Therefore, non-invasive PGS could serve as a second matrix after polar body or cleavage stage PGS; however, in euploid results, maternal contamination needs to be considered and results interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome confirmed by comparative genomic hybridization array: report of two cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sifakis Stavros

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS is a well known genetic condition caused by a partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4. The great variability in the extent of the 4p deletion and the possible contribution of additional genetic rearrangements lead to a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The majority of the reports of prenatally diagnosed WHS cases are associated with large 4p deletions identified by conventional chromosome analysis; however, the widespread clinical use of novel molecular techniques such as array comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH has increased the detection rate of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations associated with WHS phenotype. We provide a report of two fetuses with WHS presenting with intrauterine growth restriction as an isolated finding or combined with oligohydramnios and abnormal Doppler waveform in umbilical artery and uterine arteries. Standard karyotyping demonstrated a deletion on chromosome 4 in both cases [del(4(p15.33 and del(4(p15.31, respectively] and further application of a-CGH confirmed the diagnosis and offered a precise characterization of the genetic defect. A detailed review of the currently available literature on the prenatal diagnostic approach of WHS in terms of fetal sonographic assessment and molecular cytogenetic investigation is also provided.

  19. Testing of focal plane arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriam, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Problems associated with the testing of focal plane arrays are briefly examined with reference to the instrumentation and measurement procedures. In particular, the approach and instrumentation used as the Naval Ocean Systems Center is presented. Most of the measurements are made with flooded illumination on the focal plane array. The array is treated as an ensemble of individual pixels, data being taken on each pixel and array averages and standard deviations computed for the entire array. Data maps are generated, showing the pixel data in the proper spatial position on the array and the array statistics

  20. Photovoltaic array reliability optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the photovoltaic array reliability problem is presented, and a high reliability/minimum cost approach to this problem is presented. Design areas covered are cell failure, interconnect fatigue, and electrical insulation breakdown, and three solution strategies are discussed. The first involves controlling component failures in the solar cell (cell cracking, cell interconnects) and at the module level (must be statistically treated). Second, a fault tolerant circuit is designed which reduces array degradation, improves module yield losses, and controls hot-spot heating. Third, cost optimum module replacement strategies are also effective in reducing array degradation. This can be achieved by minimizing the life-cycle energy cost of the photovoltaic system. The integration of these solutions is aimed at reducing the 0.01% failure rate.

  1. Coaxial phased array antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  2. Micromachined droplet ejector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perçin, Gökhan; Yaralioglu, Göksenin G.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present a micromachined flextensional droplet ejector array used to eject liquids. By placing a fluid behind one face of a vibrating circular plate that has an orifice at its center, we achieve continuous ejection of the fluid. We present results of ejection of water and isopropanol. The ejector is harmless to sensitive fluids and can be used to eject fuels, organic polymers, photoresists, low-k dielectrics, adhesives, and chemical and biological samples. Micromachined two-dimensional array flextensional droplet ejectors were realized using planar silicon micromachining techniques. Typical resonant frequency of the micromachined device ranges from 400 kHz to 4.5 MHz. The ejections of water through a 4 μm diameter orifice at 3.45 MHz and a 10 μm diameter orifice at 2.15 MHz were demonstrated by using the developed micromachined two-dimensional array ejectors.

  3. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  4. Re-annotation of the physical map of Glycine max for polyploid-like regions by BAC end sequence driven whole genome shotgun read assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shultz Jeffry

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the world's most important food crops have either polyploid genomes or homeologous regions derived from segmental shuffling following polyploid formation. The soybean (Glycine max genome has been shown to be composed of approximately four thousand short interspersed homeologous regions with 1, 2 or 4 copies per haploid genome by RFLP analysis, microsatellite anchors to BACs and by contigs formed from BAC fingerprints. Despite these similar regions,, the genome has been sequenced by whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS. Here the aim was to use BAC end sequences (BES derived from three minimum tile paths (MTP to examine the extent and homogeneity of polyploid-like regions within contigs and the extent of correlation between the polyploid-like regions inferred from fingerprinting and the polyploid-like sequences inferred from WGS matches. Results Results show that when sequence divergence was 1–10%, the copy number of homeologous regions could be identified from sequence variation in WGS reads overlapping BES. Homeolog sequence variants (HSVs were single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 89% and single nucleotide indels (SNIs 10%. Larger indels were rare but present (1%. Simulations that had predicted fingerprints of homeologous regions could be separated when divergence exceeded 2% were shown to be false. We show that a 5–10% sequence divergence is necessary to separate homeologs by fingerprinting. BES compared to WGS traces showed polyploid-like regions with less than 1% sequence divergence exist at 2.3% of the locations assayed. Conclusion The use of HSVs like SNPs and SNIs to characterize BACs wil improve contig building methods. The implications for bioinformatic and functional annotation of polyploid and paleopolyploid genomes show that a combined approach of BAC fingerprint based physical maps, WGS sequence and HSV-based partitioning of BAC clones from homeologous regions to separate contigs will allow reliable de

  5. Molecular characterization of the t(3;9) associated with immortalization in the MCF10A cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, John K; LaDuca, Jeffrey; Rossi, Michael R; Burkhardt, Tania; Nowak, Norma J; Matsui, Sei-ichi

    2005-11-01

    The t(3;9)(p14;p21) in the MCF10A human mammary gland epithelial cell line was the single cytogenetic event that accompanied the transition from primary culture to immortalized cell line, suggesting that it is related to the development of the immortalization phenotype. To study the molecular consequences of the breakpoints in this rearrangement, we used a combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The 3p14 translocation breakpoint occurs within BAC RP11-795e22, which accommodates only the TAFA1 gene, a novel cysteine-rich secreted protein thought to be involved in cytokine signaling. TAFA1 is expressed in normal breast tissue, not in MCF10A, and shows differential expression in a range of breast cancer cell lines. The 9p translocation breakpoint results in a deletion of approximately 4 megabases on the derivative chromosome 9, which includes the CDKN2A (p16) gene. Array CGH and FISH analysis demonstrated that BAC 149i22, which contains the CDKN2A/B genes, is also deleted specifically on the apparently normal copy of chromosome 9, making MCF10A null for the p16/p15 genes. The exact extent of gains and losses of chromosome regions resulting from rearrangements involving chromosomes 1q, 5q, and 8q have also been characterized using the BAC arrays.

  6. A review of array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1981-10-01

    Achievements in the area of array radars are illustrated by such activities as the operational deployment of the large high-power, high-range-resolution Cobra Dane; the operational deployment of two all-solid-state high-power, large UHF Pave Paws radars; and the development of the SAM multifunction Patriot radar. This paper reviews the following topics: array radars steered in azimuth and elevation by phase shifting (phase-phase steered arrays); arrays steered + or - 60 deg, limited scan arrays, hemispherical coverage, and omnidirectional coverage arrays; array radars steering electronically in only one dimension, either by frequency or by phase steering; and array radar antennas which use no electronic scanning but instead use array antennas for achieving low antenna sidelobes.

  7. A customized high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization to explore copy number variations in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cognata, Valentina; Morello, Giovanna; Gentile, Giulia; D'Agata, Velia; Criscuolo, Chiara; Cavalcanti, Francesca; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder, was long believed to be a non-genetic sporadic syndrome. Today, only a small percentage of PD cases with genetic inheritance patterns are known, often complicated by reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. The few well-characterized Mendelian genes, together with a number of risk factors, contribute to the major sporadic forms of the disease, thus delineating an intricate genetic profile at the basis of this debilitating and incurable condition. Along with single nucleotide changes, gene-dosage abnormalities and copy number variations (CNVs) have emerged as significant disease-causing mutations in PD. However, due to their size variability and to the quantitative nature of the assay, CNV genotyping is particularly challenging. For this reason, innovative high-throughput platforms and bioinformatics algorithms are increasingly replacing classical CNV detection methods. Here, we report the design strategy, development, validation and implementation of NeuroArray, a customized exon-centric high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) tailored to detect single/multi-exon deletions and duplications in a large panel of PD-related genes. This targeted design allows for a focused evaluation of structural imbalances in clinically relevant PD genes, combining exon-level resolution with genome-wide coverage. The NeuroArray platform may offer new insights in elucidating inherited potential or de novo structural alterations in PD patients and investigating new candidate genes.

  8. Array Theory and Nial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Peter; Jenkins, Michael

    1999-01-01

    This report is the result of collaboration between the authors during the first 8 months of 1999 when M. Jenkins was visiting professor at DTU. The report documents the development of a tool for the investigation of array theory concepts and in particular presents various approaches to choose...

  9. Bio-preservative effect of the essential oil of the endemic Mentha piperita used alone and in combination with BacTN635 in stored minced beef meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaoui, Slim; Hsouna, Anis Ben; Lahmar, Aida; Ennouri, Karim; Mtibaa-Chakchouk, Ahlem; Sellem, Imen; Najah, Soumaya; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Mellouli, Lotfi

    2016-07-01

    The major compounds in Mentha piperita essential oil (EOMP) were menthol (33.59%) and iso-menthone (33%). The biopreservative effect of EOMP used alone at 0.25 or 0.5% and in combination with the semi-purified bacteriocin BacTN635 at 500 or 1000AU/g, on minced beef meat was evaluated by microbiological, physicochemical and sensory analyses during storage at 4°C for 21days. EOMP used alone limited the microbial deterioration of minced meat (Pmeat beef by approximately 7days. On the basis of these results, physicochemical and sensorial parameters could be used for constructing regression models to predict overall acceptability. Overall, the strongest preservative effect was achieved by using the combination of EOMP at 0.5% with BacTN535 at 1000AU/g. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA isolation from PAC and BAC clones of Escherichia coli and subsequent visualization of B-globin gene by FISH techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galiová-Šustáčková, Gabriela; Bártová, Eva; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 1, Suppl. 1 (2003), s. S7-S8 ISSN 1214-021X. [Cells /5./. 08.09.2003-10.09.2003, České Bidějovice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/01/0186; GA AV ČR IAB5004102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : Escherichia Coli * FISH * BAC Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  11. A first survey of the rye (Secale cereale) genome composition through BAC end sequencing of the short arm of chromosome 1R

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoš, Jan; Paux, E.; Kofler, R.; Havránková, Miroslava; Kopecký, David; Suchánková, Pavla; Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Town, C.D.; Lelley, T.; Feuillet, C.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 95 (2008), s. 1-12 ISSN 1471-2229 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP521/06/P412; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC libraries * flow-sorted chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.030, year: 2008

  12. Identification of an extensive gene cluster among a family of PPOs in Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) using a large insert BAC library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ana; Heywood, Sue; Farrar, Kerrie; Donnison, Iain; Thomas, Ann; Webb, K Judith

    2009-07-20

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in plants is a trait with potential economic, agricultural and environmental impact. In relation to the food industry, PPO-induced browning causes unacceptable discolouration in fruit and vegetables: from an agriculture perspective, PPO can protect plants against pathogens and environmental stress, improve ruminant growth by increasing nitrogen absorption and decreasing nitrogen loss to the environment through the animal's urine. The high PPO legume, red clover, has a significant economic and environmental role in sustaining low-input organic and conventional farms. Molecular markers for a range of important agricultural traits are being developed for red clover and improved knowledge of PPO genes and their structure will facilitate molecular breeding. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library comprising 26,016 BAC clones with an average 135 Kb insert size, was constructed from Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), a diploid legume with a haploid genome size of 440-637 Mb. Library coverage of 6-8 genome equivalents ensured good representation of genes: the library was screened for polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes.Two single copy PPO genes, PPO4 and PPO5, were identified to add to a family of three, previously reported, paralogous genes (PPO1-PPO3). Multiple PPO1 copies were identified and characterised revealing a subfamily comprising three variants PPO1/2, PPO1/4 and PPO1/5. Six PPO genes clustered within the genome: four separate BAC clones could be assembled onto a predicted 190-510 Kb single BAC contig. A PPO gene family in red clover resides as a cluster of at least 6 genes. Three of these genes have high homology, suggesting a more recent evolutionary event. This PPO cluster covers a longer region of the genome than clusters detected in rice or previously reported in tomato. Full-length coding sequences from PPO4, PPO5, PPO1/5 and PPO1/4 will facilitate functional studies and provide genetic markers for plant breeding.

  13. Reasoned opinion on the dietary risk assessment for proposed temporary maximum residue levels (MRLs) of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) and benzalkonium chloride (BAC)

    OpenAIRE

    European Food Safety Authority

    2014-01-01

    EFSA was requested by the European Commission to perform a dietary exposure assessment for the proposed temporary maximum residue levels (MRLs) for didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) and benzalkonium chloride (BAC) (0.1 mg/kg, respectively, for all food commodities covered by the EU MRL legislation). Based on the information, EFSA did not identify potential consumer health risks for these proposed MRLs. Thus, the proposed MRLs are considered to be sufficiently protective. However, due to...

  14. Generation of Transgenic Pigs by Cytoplasmic Injection of piggyBac Transposase-Based pmGENIE-3 Plasmids1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zicong; Zeng, Fang; Meng, Fanming; Xu, Zhiqian; Zhang, Xianwei; Huang, Xiaoling; Tang, Fei; Gao, Wenchao; Shi, Junsong; He, Xiaoyan; Liu, Dewu; Wang, Chong; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The process of transgenesis involves the introduction of a foreign gene, the transgene, into the genome of an animal. Gene transfer by pronuclear microinjection (PNI) is the predominant method used to produce transgenic animals. However, this technique does not always result in germline transgenic offspring and has a low success rate for livestock. Alternate approaches, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer using transgenic fibroblasts, do not show an increase in efficiency compared to PNI, while viral-based transgenesis is hampered by issues regarding transgene size and biosafety considerations. We have recently described highly successful transgenesis experiments with mice using a piggyBac transposase-based vector, pmhyGENIE-3. This construct, a single and self-inactivating plasmid, contains all the transpositional elements necessary for successful gene transfer. In this series of experiments, our laboratories have implemented cytoplasmic injection (CTI) of pmGENIE-3 for transgene delivery into in vivo-fertilized pig zygotes. More than 8.00% of the injected embryos developed into transgenic animals containing monogenic and often single transgenes in their genome. However, the CTI technique was unsuccessful during the injection of in vitro-fertilized pig zygotes. In summary, here we have described a method that is not only easy to implement, but also demonstrated the highest efficiency rate for nonviral livestock transgenesis. PMID:24671876

  15. Tβ4-overexpression based on the piggyBac transposon system in cashmere goats alters hair fiber characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bingbo; Ding, Qiang; He, Xiaolin; Zhu, Haijing; Niu, Yiyuan; Cai, Bei; Cai, Jiao; Lei, Anming; Kang, Danju; Yan, Hailong; Ma, Baohua; Wang, Xiaolong; Qu, Lei; Chen, Yulin

    2017-02-01

    Increasing cashmere yield is one of the vital aims of cashmere goats breeding. Compared to traditional breeding methods, transgenic technology is more efficient and the piggyBac (PB) transposon system has been widely applied to generate transgenic animals. For the present study, donor fibroblasts were stably transfected via a PB donor vector containing the coding sequence of cashmere goat thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) and driven by a hair follicle-specific promoter, the keratin-associated protein 6.1 (KAP6.1) promoter. To obtain genetically modified cells as nuclear donors, we co-transfected donor vectors into fetal fibroblasts of cashmere goats. Five transgenic cashmere goats were generated following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Via determination of the copy numbers and integration sites, the Tβ4 gene was successfully inserted into the goat genome. Histological examination of skin tissue revealed that Tβ4-overexpressing, transgenic goats had a higher secondary to primary hair follicle (S/P) ratio compared to wild type goats. This indicates that Tβ4-overexpressing goats possess increased numbers of secondary hair follicles (SHF). Our results indicate that Tβ4-overexpression in cashmere goats could be a feasible strategy to increase cashmere yield.

  16. Genome analysis reveals insights of the endophytic Bacillus toyonensis BAC3151 as a potentially novel agent for biocontrol of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ralf; Cerdeira, Louise; Tavares, Grace S; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Blom, Jochen; Horácio, Elvira C A; Mantovani, Hilário C; Queiroz, Marisa Vieira de

    2017-09-25

    Diseases caused by phytopathogenic microorganisms account for enormous losses for agribusiness. Although Bacillus species are recognized as being antimicrobial producers and some may provide benefits to plants, the association between Bacillus toyonensis and plants has not been studied. In this study, the whole-genome sequenced endophytic B. toyonensis BAC3151, which has demonstrated antimicrobial activity and quorum sensing inhibition of phytopathogenic bacteria, was investigated for its potential for the production of compounds for biocontrol of plant pathogens. Four whole-genome sequenced B. toyonensis strains shared 3811 protein-coding DNA sequences (CDSs), while strain-specific CDSs, such as biosynthetic gene clusters of antimicrobials, were associated with specific chromosomal regions and mobile genetic elements of the strains. B. toyonensis strains had a higher frequency of putative bacteriocins gene clusters than that of Bacillus species traditionally used for the production of antimicrobials. In addition, gene clusters potentially involved in the production of novel bacteriocins were found in BAC3151, as well as biosynthetic genes of several other compounds, including non-ribosomal peptides, N-acyl homoserine lactonase and chitinases, revealing a genetic repertoire for antimicrobial synthesis greater than that of other Bacillus strains that have demonstrated effective activity against phytopathogens. This study showed for the first time that B. toyonensis has potential to produce various antimicrobials, and the analyses performed indicated that the endophytic strain BAC3151 can be useful for the development of new strategies to control microbial diseases in plants that are responsible for large damages in agricultural crops.

  17. De novo 454 sequencing of barcoded BAC pools for comprehensive gene survey and genome analysis in the complex genome of barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Uwe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background De novo sequencing the entire genome of a large complex plant genome like the one of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. is a major challenge both in terms of experimental feasibility and costs. The emergence and breathtaking progress of next generation sequencing technologies has put this goal into focus and a clone based strategy combined with the 454/Roche technology is conceivable. Results To test the feasibility, we sequenced 91 barcoded, pooled, gene containing barley BACs using the GS FLX platform and assembled the sequences under iterative change of parameters. The BAC assemblies were characterized by N50 of ~50 kb (N80 ~31 kb, N90 ~21 kb and a Q40 of 94%. For ~80% of the clones, the best assemblies consisted of less than 10 contigs at 24-fold mean sequence coverage. Moreover we show that gene containing regions seem to assemble completely and uninterrupted thus making the approach suitable for detecting complete and positionally anchored genes. By comparing the assemblies of four clones to their complete reference sequences generated by the Sanger method, we evaluated the distribution, quality and representativeness of the 454 sequences as well as the consistency and reliability of the assemblies. Conclusion The described multiplex 454 sequencing of barcoded BACs leads to sequence consensi highly representative for the clones. Assemblies are correct for the majority of contigs. Though the resolution of complex repetitive structures requires additional experimental efforts, our approach paves the way for a clone based strategy of sequencing the barley genome.

  18. Applicability of LIVE/DEAD BacLight stain with glutaraldehyde fixation for the measurement of bacterial abundance and viability in rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Murata, Kotaro; Zhang, Daizhou

    2017-01-01

    Rainwater contains substantial bacteria and rain is an efficient pathway for the dissemination of bacteria from the atmosphere to land and water surfaces. However, quantitative information on rainwater bacteria is very limited due to the lack of a reliable method. In this study, the epifluorescence microscopy enumeration with the LIVE/DEAD BacLight Bacterial Viability Kit stain was verified to quantify the abundance of viable and non-viable bacterial cells in rainwater, with the 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) stain for the reference of total cell counts. Results showed that the total counts of bacterial cells by LIVE/DEAD BacLight staining were consistent with those by DAPI staining, and the average detection efficiency was (109±29)%. The ratio of cell count with glutaraldehyde fixation to that without fixation was (106±5)% on average. The bacterial concentration in negative control was usually an order of magnitude lower than that in rainwater samples. However, in case of small precipitation, the abundance in negative control could be more than that in rainwater samples. These results indicate that the enumeration with LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability assay coupled with glutaraldehyde fixation and careful negative control investigation is an approach applicable to the measurement of the concentration and viability of bacterial cells in rainwater. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Spectrum of Cytogenomic Abnormalities Revealed by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization on Products of Conception Culture Failure and Normal Karyotype Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Wu, Shen-Yin; Amato, Katherine; DiAdamo, Autumn; Li, Peining

    2016-03-20

    Approximately 30% of pregnancies after implantation end up in spontaneous abortions, and 50% of them are caused by chromosomal abnormalities. However, the spectrum of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in products of conception (POC) and the underlying gene-dosage-sensitive mechanisms causing spontaneous abortions remain largely unknown. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was performed as a salvage procedure for 128 POC culture failure (POC-CF) samples and as a supplemental procedure for 106 POC normal karyotype (POC-NK) samples. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 10% of POC-CF and pathogenic CNVs were detected in 3.9% of POC-CF and 5.7% of POC-NK samples. Compiled results from this study and relevant case series through a literature review demonstrated an abnormality detection rate (ADR) of 35% for chromosomal abnormalities in POC-CF samples, 3.7% for pathogenic CNVs in POC-CF samples, and 4.6% for pathogenic CNVs in POC-NK samples. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was performed on the genes from pathogenic CNVs found in POC samples. The denoted primary gene networks suggested that apoptosis and cell proliferation pathways are involved in miscarriage. In summary, a similar spectrum of cytogenomic abnormalities was observed in POC culture success and POC-CF samples. A threshold effect correlating the number of dosage-sensitive genes in a chromosome with the observed frequency of autosomal trisomy is proposed. A rationalized approach using firstly fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing with probes of chromosomes X/Y/18, 13/21, and 15/16/22 for common aneuploidies and polyploidies and secondly aCGH for other cytogenomic abnormalities is recommended for POC-CF samples. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  1. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  2. Clinical array-based karyotyping of breast cancer with equivocal HER2 status resolves gene copy number and reveals chromosome 17 complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zadeh Soheila

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER2 gene copy status, and concomitant administration of trastuzumab (Herceptin, remains one of the best examples of targeted cancer therapy based on understanding the genomic etiology of disease. However, newly diagnosed breast cancer cases with equivocal HER2 results present a challenge for the oncologist who must make treatment decisions despite the patient's unresolved HER2 status. In some cases both immunohistochemistry (IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH are reported as equivocal, whereas in other cases IHC results and FISH are discordant for positive versus negative results. The recent validation of array-based, molecular karyotyping for clinical oncology testing provides an alternative method for determination of HER2 gene copy number status in cases remaining unresolved by traditional methods. Methods In the current study, DNA extracted from 20 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissue samples from newly diagnosed cases of invasive ductal carcinoma referred to our laboratory with unresolved HER2 status, were analyzed using a clinically validated genomic array containing 127 probes covering the HER2 amplicon, the pericentromeric regions, and both chromosome 17 arms. Results Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH analysis of chromosome 17 resolved HER2 gene status in [20/20] (100% of cases and revealed additional chromosome 17 copy number changes in [18/20] (90% of cases. Array CGH analysis also revealed two false positives and one false negative by FISH due to "ratio skewing" caused by chromosomal gains and losses in the centromeric region. All cases with complex rearrangements of chromosome 17 showed genome-wide chromosomal instability. Conclusions These results illustrate the analytical power of array-based genomic analysis as a clinical laboratory technique for resolution of HER2 status in breast cancer cases with equivocal results. The frequency of complex chromosome 17

  3. Seismometer array station processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, F.A.; Lea, T.G.; Douglas, A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the design, construction and initial testing of two types of Seismometer Array Station Processor (SASP), one to work with data stored on magnetic tape in analogue form, the other with data in digital form. The purpose of a SASP is to detect the short period P waves recorded by a UK-type array of 20 seismometers and to edit these on to a a digital library tape or disc. The edited data are then processed to obtain a rough location for the source and to produce seismograms (after optimum processing) for analysis by a seismologist. SASPs are an important component in the scheme for monitoring underground explosions advocated by the UK in the Conference of the Committee on Disarmament. With digital input a SASP can operate at 30 times real time using a linear detection process and at 20 times real time using the log detector of Weichert. Although the log detector is slower, it has the advantage over the linear detector that signals with lower signal-to-noise ratio can be detected and spurious large amplitudes are less likely to produce a detection. It is recommended, therefore, that where possible array data should be recorded in digital form for input to a SASP and that the log detector of Weichert be used. Trial runs show that a SASP is capable of detecting signals down to signal-to-noise ratios of about two with very few false detections, and at mid-continental array sites it should be capable of detecting most, if not all, the signals with magnitude above msub(b) 4.5; the UK argues that, given a suitable network, it is realistic to hope that sources of this magnitude and above can be detected and identified by seismological means alone. (author)

  4. Solar collector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  5. Array processor architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor); Lundstrom, Stephen F. (Inventor); Shafer, Philip E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high speed parallel array data processing architecture fashioned under a computational envelope approach includes a data base memory for secondary storage of programs and data, and a plurality of memory modules interconnected to a plurality of processing modules by a connection network of the Omega gender. Programs and data are fed from the data base memory to the plurality of memory modules and from hence the programs are fed through the connection network to the array of processors (one copy of each program for each processor). Execution of the programs occur with the processors operating normally quite independently of each other in a multiprocessing fashion. For data dependent operations and other suitable operations, all processors are instructed to finish one given task or program branch before all are instructed to proceed in parallel processing fashion on the next instruction. Even when functioning in the parallel processing mode however, the processors are not locked-step but execute their own copy of the program individually unless or until another overall processor array synchronization instruction is issued.

  6. Spaceborne Processor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edward T.; Schatzel, Donald V.; Whitaker, William D.; Sterling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A Spaceborne Processor Array in Multifunctional Structure (SPAMS) can lower the total mass of the electronic and structural overhead of spacecraft, resulting in reduced launch costs, while increasing the science return through dynamic onboard computing. SPAMS integrates the multifunctional structure (MFS) and the Gilgamesh Memory, Intelligence, and Network Device (MIND) multi-core in-memory computer architecture into a single-system super-architecture. This transforms every inch of a spacecraft into a sharable, interconnected, smart computing element to increase computing performance while simultaneously reducing mass. The MIND in-memory architecture provides a foundation for high-performance, low-power, and fault-tolerant computing. The MIND chip has an internal structure that includes memory, processing, and communication functionality. The Gilgamesh is a scalable system comprising multiple MIND chips interconnected to operate as a single, tightly coupled, parallel computer. The array of MIND components shares a global, virtual name space for program variables and tasks that are allocated at run time to the distributed physical memory and processing resources. Individual processor- memory nodes can be activated or powered down at run time to provide active power management and to configure around faults. A SPAMS system is comprised of a distributed Gilgamesh array built into MFS, interfaces into instrument and communication subsystems, a mass storage interface, and a radiation-hardened flight computer.

  7. Lectin-Array Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Raquel; Echevarria, Juan; Hernandez, Alvaro; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2017-09-01

    Aberrant protein glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune or neurodegenerative disorders. Unlocking the potential of glycans as disease markers will require rapid and unbiased glycoproteomics methods for glycan biomarker discovery. The present method is a facile and rapid protocol for qualitative analysis of protein glycosylation in complex biological mixtures. While traditional lectin arrays only provide an average signal for the glycans in the mixture, which is usually dominated by the most abundant proteins, our method provides individual lectin binding profiles for all proteins separated in the gel electrophoresis step. Proteins do not have to be excised from the gel for subsequent analysis via the lectin array but are transferred by contact diffusion from the gel to a glass slide presenting multiple copies of printed lectin arrays. Fluorescently marked glycoproteins are trapped by the printed lectins via specific carbohydrate-lectin interactions and after a washing step their binding profile with up to 20 lectin probes is analyzed with a fluorescent scanner. The method produces the equivalent of 20 lectin blots in a single experiment, giving detailed insight into the binding epitopes present in the fractionated proteins. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. 4p16.1-p15.31 duplication and 4p terminal deletion in a 3-years old Chinese girl: Array-CGH, genotype-phenotype and neurological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, Maria; Salzano, Emanuela; Vecchio, Davide; Ferrara, Dante; Malacarne, Michela; Pierluigi, Mauro; Ferrara, Ines; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Microscopically chromosome rearrangements of the short arm of chromosome 4 include the two known clinical entities: partial trisomy 4p and deletions of the Wolf-Hirschhorn critical regions 1 and 2 (WHSCR-1 and WHSCR-2, respectively), which cause cranio-facial anomalies, congenital malformations and developmental delay/intellectual disability. We report on clinical findings detected in a Chinese patient with a de novo 4p16.1-p15.32 duplication in association with a subtle 4p terminal deletion of 6 Mb in size. This unusual chromosome imbalance resulted in WHS classical phenotype, while clinical manifestations of 4p trisomy were practically absent. This observation suggests the hypothesis that haploinsufficiency of sensitive dosage genes with regulatory function placed in WHS critical region, is more pathogenic than concomitant 4p duplicated segment. Additionally clinical findings in our patient confirm a variable penetrance of major malformations and neurological features in Chinese children despite of WHS critical region's deletion. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A variant Cri du Chat phenotype and autism spectrum disorder in a subject with de novo cryptic microdeletions involving 5p15.2 and 3p24.3-25 detected using whole genomic array CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard, C; Malenfant, P; Koochek, M; Creighton, S; Mickelson, E C R; Holden, J J A; Lewis, M E S; Rajcan-Separovic, E

    2005-04-01

    Cri du Chat syndrome (CdCs) is a well-defined clinical entity, with an incidence of 1/15,000 to 1/50,000. The critical region for CdCs has been mapped to 5p15, with the hallmark cat-like cry sublocalized to 5p15.3 and the remaining clinical features to 5p15.2. We report findings in a subject with a de novo t(5;7)(p15.2;p12.2) and an inv(3)(p24q24), who was found to have a cryptic microdeletion in the critical region for CdCs detected using a 1-Mb genomic microarray. In addition to 5p deletion, the proband had a de novo single clone loss at the 3p breakpoint of inv(3)(p24q24) and a familial single clone deletion at 18q12. Deletions were confirmed using microsatellite analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The 5p deletion encompasses approximately 3 Mb, mapping to the border between bands 5p15.2 and 5p15.31. The single clone deletion on chromosome 3 maps to 3p24.3-3p25, for which there is no known phenotype. The clinical features of our proband differ from the characteristic CdC phenotype, which may reflect the combined effect of the two de novo microdeletions and/or may further refine the critical region for CdCs. Typical features of CdCs that are present in the proband include moderate intellectual disability, speech, and motor delay as well as dysmorphic features (e.g. broad and high nasal root, hypertelorism, and coarse facies). Expected CdCs features that are not present are growth delay, microcephaly, round facies, micrognathia, epicanthal folds, and the signature high-pitched cry. Behavioral traits in this subject included autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and unmanageable behavior including aggression, tantrums, irritability, and self-destructive behavior. Several of these behaviors have been previously reported in patients with 5p deletion syndrome. Although most agree on the cat-cry critical region (5p15.3), there is discrepancy in the precise location and size of the region associated with the more severe manifestations of CdCs. The clinical description of this proband and the characterization of his 5p deletion may help to further refine the phenotype-genotype associations in CdCs and autism spectrum disorder.

  10. Complex chromosome rearrangement in a child with microcephaly, dysmorphic facial features and mosaicism for a terminal deletion del(18(q21.32-qter investigated by FISH and array-CGH: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokotas Haris

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a 7 years and 4 months old Greek boy with mild microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. He was a sociable child with maxillary hypoplasia, epicanthal folds, upslanting palpebral fissures with long eyelashes, and hypertelorism. His ears were prominent and dysmorphic, he had a long philtrum and a high arched palate. His weight was 17 kg (25th percentile and his height 120 cm (50th percentile. High resolution chromosome analysis identified in 50% of the cells a normal male karyotype, and in 50% of the cells one chromosome 18 showed a terminal deletion from 18q21.32. Molecular cytogenetic investigation confirmed a del(18(q21.32-qter in the one chromosome 18, but furthermore revealed the presence of a duplication in q21.2 in the other chromosome 18. The case is discussed concerning comparable previously reported cases and the possible mechanisms of formation.

  11. piggyBac transposon somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker (PB-SMART for genetic screens in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean F Landrette

    Full Text Available Somatic forward genetic screens have the power to interrogate thousands of genes in a single animal. Retroviral and transposon mutagenesis systems in mice have been designed and deployed in somatic tissues for surveying hematopoietic and solid tumor formation. In the context of cancer, the ability to visually mark mutant cells would present tremendous advantages for identifying tumor formation, monitoring tumor growth over time, and tracking tumor infiltrations and metastases into wild-type tissues. Furthermore, locating mutant clones is a prerequisite for screening and analyzing most other somatic phenotypes. For this purpose, we developed a system using the piggyBac (PB transposon for somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker, called PB-SMART. The PB-SMART mouse genetic screening system can simultaneously induce somatic mutations and mark mutated cells using bioluminescence or fluorescence. The marking of mutant cells enable analyses that are not possible with current somatic mutagenesis systems, such as tracking cell proliferation and tumor growth, detecting tumor cell infiltrations, and reporting tissue mutagenesis levels by a simple ex vivo visual readout. We demonstrate that PB-SMART is highly mutagenic, capable of tumor induction with low copy transposons, which facilitates the mapping and identification of causative insertions. We further integrated a conditional transposase with the PB-SMART system, permitting tissue-specific mutagenesis with a single cross to any available Cre line. Targeting the germline, the system could also be used to conduct F1 screens. With these features, PB-SMART provides an integrated platform for individual investigators to harness the power of somatic mutagenesis and phenotypic screens to decipher the genetic basis of mammalian biology and disease.

  12. The piggyBac-Based Gene Delivery System Can Confer Successful Production of Cloned Porcine Blastocysts with Multigene Constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Sato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of multigene constructs into single cells is important for improving the performance of domestic animals, as well as understanding basic biological processes. In particular, multigene constructs allow the engineering and integration of multiple genes related to xenotransplantation into the porcine genome. The piggyBac (PB transposon system allows multiple genes to be stably integrated into target genomes through a single transfection event. However, to our knowledge, no attempt to introduce multiple genes into a porcine genome has been made using this system. In this study, we simultaneously introduced seven transposons into a single porcine embryonic fibroblast (PEF. PEFs were transfected with seven transposons containing genes for five drug resistance proteins and two (red and green fluorescent proteins, together with a PB transposase expression vector, pTrans (experimental group. The above seven transposons (without pTrans were transfected concomitantly (control group. Selection of these transfected cells in the presence of multiple selection drugs resulted in the survival of several clones derived from the experimental group, but not from the control. PCR analysis demonstrated that approximately 90% (12/13 tested of the surviving clones possessed all of the introduced transposons. Splinkerette PCR demonstrated that the transposons were inserted through the TTAA target sites of PB. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT using a PEF clone with multigene constructs demonstrated successful production of cloned blastocysts expressing both red and green fluorescence. These results indicate the feasibility of this PB-mediated method for simultaneous transfer of multigene constructs into the porcine cell genome, which is useful for production of cloned transgenic pigs expressing multiple transgenes.

  13. piggyBac transposon somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker (PB-SMART) for genetic screens in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrette, Sean F; Cornett, Jonathan C; Ni, Thomas K; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Xu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    Somatic forward genetic screens have the power to interrogate thousands of genes in a single animal. Retroviral and transposon mutagenesis systems in mice have been designed and deployed in somatic tissues for surveying hematopoietic and solid tumor formation. In the context of cancer, the ability to visually mark mutant cells would present tremendous advantages for identifying tumor formation, monitoring tumor growth over time, and tracking tumor infiltrations and metastases into wild-type tissues. Furthermore, locating mutant clones is a prerequisite for screening and analyzing most other somatic phenotypes. For this purpose, we developed a system using the piggyBac (PB) transposon for somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker, called PB-SMART. The PB-SMART mouse genetic screening system can simultaneously induce somatic mutations and mark mutated cells using bioluminescence or fluorescence. The marking of mutant cells enable analyses that are not possible with current somatic mutagenesis systems, such as tracking cell proliferation and tumor growth, detecting tumor cell infiltrations, and reporting tissue mutagenesis levels by a simple ex vivo visual readout. We demonstrate that PB-SMART is highly mutagenic, capable of tumor induction with low copy transposons, which facilitates the mapping and identification of causative insertions. We further integrated a conditional transposase with the PB-SMART system, permitting tissue-specific mutagenesis with a single cross to any available Cre line. Targeting the germline, the system could also be used to conduct F1 screens. With these features, PB-SMART provides an integrated platform for individual investigators to harness the power of somatic mutagenesis and phenotypic screens to decipher the genetic basis of mammalian biology and disease.

  14. Radiation from waveguide arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1977-07-01

    The theory of phased waveguide arrays (the 'Grill'), developed in view of Lower Hybrid Heating of toroidal plasmas, is applied to two simple cases, in order to gain insight on field distributions and power flow. First, the far-field radiation pattern of the Grill towards an empty half-space is evaluated. Next, the excitation of a passive waveguide by a Grill mounted in a T configuration is considered. These results constitue two examples of exact solutions of Maxwell's equations in relatively complex geometry

  15. Molecular logic gate arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, A Prasanna

    2011-03-01

    Chemists are now able to emulate the ideas and instruments of mathematics and computer science with molecules. The integration of molecular logic gates into small arrays has been a growth area during the last few years. The design principles underlying a collection of these cases are examined. Some of these computing molecules are applicable in medical- and biotechnologies. Cases of blood diagnostics, 'lab-on-a-molecule' systems, and molecular computational identification of small objects are included. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The Long Wavelength Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlström, Ylva

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open-skies, user-oriented aperture synthesis instrument dedicated to explore frequencies between 20 and 80 MHz. The LWA will provide high temporal (millisecond or better) and high spatial resolution (arcsecond) and mJy-level sensitivity. The LWA key science areas include acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM; the high-redshift Universe; planetary, solar and space science; and the transient universe at radio wavelengths. In addition, key goals of the LWA are as a training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers and to re-invigorate radio astronomy in the US at the university level. The LWA will be operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC), thereby providing opportunities for students within the fields of astronomy, computer science and electrical engineering. Currently, in its first year of construction funding, the LWA team is now bringing up the first station near the Very Large Array site in the southwest US.

  17. Selecting Sums in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2008-01-01

    In an array of n numbers each of the \\binomn2+nUnknown control sequence '\\binom' contiguous subarrays define a sum. In this paper we focus on algorithms for selecting and reporting maximal sums from an array of numbers. First, we consider the problem of reporting k subarrays inducing the k largest...... sums among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u. For this problem we design an optimal O(n + k) time algorithm. Secondly, we consider the problem of selecting a subarray storing the k’th largest sum. For this problem we prove a time bound of Θ(n · max {1,log(k/n)}) by describing...... an algorithm with this running time and by proving a matching lower bound. Finally, we combine the ideas and obtain an O(n· max {1,log(k/n)}) time algorithm that selects a subarray storing the k’th largest sum among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u....

  18. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  19. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally tunable superconductor hole array with active control over their resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons . The array was lithographically fabricated on high temperature YBCO superconductor and characterized by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from the virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to the real surface plasmon mode. The highly tunable superconducting plasmonic hole arrays may have promising applicatio...

  20. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  1. BAC-end microsatellites from intra and inter-genic regions of the common bean genome and their correlation with cytogenetic features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Wohlgemuth Blair

    Full Text Available Highly polymorphic markers such as simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites are very useful for genetic mapping. In this study novel SSRs were identified in BAC-end sequences (BES from non-contigged, non-overlapping bacterial artificial clones (BACs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. These so called "singleton" BACs were from the G19833 Andean gene pool physical map and the new BES-SSR markers were used for the saturation of the inter-gene pool, DOR364×G19833 genetic map. A total of 899 SSR loci were found among the singleton BES, but only 346 loci corresponded to the single di- or tri-nucleotide motifs that were likely to be polymorphic (ATT or AG motifs, principally and useful for primer design and individual marker mapping. When these novel SSR markers were evaluated in the DOR364×G19833 population parents, 136 markers revealed polymorphism and 106 were mapped. Genetic mapping resulted in a map length of 2291 cM with an average distance between markers of 5.2 cM. The new genetic map was compared to the most recent cytogenetic analysis of common bean chromosomes. We found that the new singleton BES-SSR were helpful in filling peri-centromeric spaces on the cytogenetic map. Short genetic distances between some new singleton-derived BES-SSR markers was common showing suppressed recombination in these regions compared to other parts of the genome. The correlation of singleton-derived SSR marker distribution with other cytogenetic features of the bean genome is discussed.

  2. Heterogeneous transgene expression in the retinas of the TH-RFP, TH-Cre, TH-BAC-Cre and DAT-Cre mouse lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, H E; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, L; Hardi, C N; McMahon, D G; Brecha, N C

    2015-10-29

    Transgenic mouse lines are essential tools for understanding the connectivity, physiology and function of neuronal circuits, including those in the retina. This report compares transgene expression in the retina of a tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-red fluorescent protein (RFP) mouse line with three catecholamine-related Cre recombinase mouse lines [TH-bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-, TH-, and dopamine transporter (DAT)-Cre] that were crossed with a ROSA26-tdTomato reporter line. Retinas were evaluated and immunostained with commonly used antibodies including those directed to TH, GABA and glycine to characterize the RFP or tdTomato fluorescent-labeled amacrine cells, and an antibody directed to RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing to identify ganglion cells. In TH-RFP retinas, types 1 and 2 dopamine (DA) amacrine cells were identified by their characteristic cellular morphology and type 1 DA cells by their expression of TH immunoreactivity. In the TH-BAC-, TH-, and DAT-tdTomato retinas, less than 1%, ∼ 6%, and 0%, respectively, of the fluorescent cells were the expected type 1 DA amacrine cells. Instead, in the TH-BAC-tdTomato retinas, fluorescently labeled AII amacrine cells were predominant, with some medium diameter ganglion cells. In TH-tdTomato retinas, fluorescence was in multiple neurochemical amacrine cell types, including four types of polyaxonal amacrine cells. In DAT-tdTomato retinas, fluorescence was in GABA immunoreactive amacrine cells, including two types of bistratified and two types of monostratified amacrine cells. Although each of the Cre lines was generated with the intent to specifically label DA cells, our findings show a cellular diversity in Cre expression in the adult retina and indicate the importance of careful characterization of transgene labeling patterns. These mouse lines with their distinctive cellular labeling patterns will be useful tools for future studies of retinal function and visual processing. Published by Elsevier

  3. A novel resource for genomics of Triticeae: BAC library specific for the short arm of rye (Secale cereale L. chromosome 1R (1RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Číhalíková Jarmila

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomics of rye (Secale cereale L. is impeded by its large nuclear genome (1C~7,900 Mbp with prevalence of DNA repeats (> 90%. An attractive possibility is to dissect the genome to small parts after flow sorting particular chromosomes and chromosome arms. To test this approach, we have chosen 1RS chromosome arm, which represents only 5.6% of the total rye genome. The 1RS arm is an attractive target as it carries many important genes and because it became part of the wheat gene pool as the 1BL.1RS translocation. Results We demonstrate that it is possible to sort 1RS arm from wheat-rye ditelosomic addition line. Using this approach, we isolated over 10 million of 1RS arms using flow sorting and used their DNA to construct a 1RS-specific BAC library, which comprises 103,680 clones with average insert size of 73 kb. The library comprises two sublibraries constructed using HindIII and EcoRI and provides a deep coverage of about 14-fold of the 1RS arm (442 Mbp. We present preliminary results obtained during positional cloning of the stem rust resistance gene SrR, which confirm a potential of the library to speed up isolation of agronomically important genes by map-based cloning. Conclusion We present a strategy that enables sorting short arms of several chromosomes of rye. Using flow-sorted chromosomes, we have constructed a deep coverage BAC library specific for the short arm of chromosome 1R (1RS. This is the first subgenomic BAC library available for rye and we demonstrate its potential for positional gene cloning. We expect that the library will facilitate development of a physical contig map of 1RS and comparative genomics of the homoeologous chromosome group 1 of wheat, barley and rye.

  4. Efficient array design for sonotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, Douglas N; Kruse, Dustin E; Ferrara, Katherine W; Ergun, Arif S; Barnes, Stephen; Lu, X Ming

    2008-01-01

    New linear multi-row, multi-frequency arrays have been designed, constructed and tested as fully operational ultrasound probes to produce confocal imaging and therapeutic acoustic intensities with a standard commercial ultrasound imaging system. The triple-array probes and imaging system produce high quality B-mode images with a center row imaging array at 5.3 MHz and sufficient acoustic power with dual therapeutic arrays to produce mild hyperthermia at 1.54 MHz. The therapeutic array pair in the first probe design (termed G3) utilizes a high bandwidth and peak pressure, suitable for mechanical therapies. The second multi-array design (termed G4) has a redesigned therapeutic array pair which is optimized for a high time-averaged power output suitable for mild hyperthermia applications. The 'thermal therapy' design produces more than 4 W of acoustic power from the low-frequency arrays with only a 10.5 deg. C internal rise in temperature after 100 s of continuous use with an unmodified conventional imaging system or substantially longer operation at lower acoustic power. The low-frequency arrays in both probe designs were examined and contrasted for real power transfer efficiency with a KLM model which includes all lossy contributions in the power delivery path from system transmitters to the tissue load. Laboratory verification was successfully performed for the KLM-derived estimates of transducer parallel model acoustic resistance and dissipation resistance, which are the critical design factors for acoustic power output and undesired internal heating, respectively

  5. Compact dynamic microfluidic iris array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmle, Christina; Doering, Christoph; Steuer, Anna; Fouckhardt, Henning

    2011-09-01

    A dynamic microfluidic iris is realized. Light attenuation is achieved by absorption of an opaque liquid (e.g. black ink). The adjustment of the iris diameter is achieved by fluid displacement via a transparent elastomer (silicone) half-sphere. This silicone calotte is hydraulically pressed against a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate as the bottom window, such that the opaque liquid is squeezed away, this way opening the iris. With this approach a dynamic range of more than 60 dB can be achieved with response times in the ms to s regime. The design allows the realization of a single iris as well as an iris array. So far the master for the molded silicone structure was fabricated by precision mechanics. The aperture diameter was changed continuously from 0 to 8 mm for a single iris and 0 to 4 mm in case of a 3 x 3 iris array. Moreover, an iris array was combined with a PMMA lens array into a compact module, the distance of both arrays equaling the focal length of the lenses. This way e.g. spatial frequency filter arrays can be realized. The possibility to extend the iris array concept to an array with many elements is demonstrated. Such arrays could be applied e.g. in light-field cameras.

  6. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelton, William G [Sandia Park, NM; Siegal, Michael P [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  7. MixHMM: inferring copy number variation and allelic imbalance using SNP arrays and tumor samples mixed with stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zongzhi; Li, Ao; Schulz, Vincent; Chen, Min; Tuck, David

    2010-06-01

    Genotyping platforms such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays are powerful tools to study genomic aberrations in cancer samples. Allele specific information from SNP arrays provides valuable information for interpreting copy number variation (CNV) and allelic imbalance including loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) beyond that obtained from the total DNA signal available from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) platforms. Several algorithms based on hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been designed to detect copy number changes and copy-neutral LOH making use of the allele information on SNP arrays. However heterogeneity in clinical samples, due to stromal contamination and somatic alterations, complicates analysis and interpretation of these data. We have developed MixHMM, a novel hidden Markov model using hidden states based on chromosomal structural aberrations. MixHMM allows CNV detection for copy numbers up to 7 and allows more complete and accurate description of other forms of allelic imbalance, such as increased copy number LOH or imbalanced amplifications. MixHMM also incorporates a novel sample mixing model that allows detection of tumor CNV events in heterogeneous tumor samples, where cancer cells are mixed with a proportion of stromal cells. We validate MixHMM and demonstrate its advantages with simulated samples, clinical tumor samples and a dilution series of mixed samples. We have shown that the CNVs of cancer cells in a tumor sample contaminated with up to 80% of stromal cells can be detected accurately using Illumina BeadChip and MixHMM. The MixHMM is available as a Python package provided with some other useful tools at http://genecube.med.yale.edu:8080/MixHMM.

  8. MixHMM: inferring copy number variation and allelic imbalance using SNP arrays and tumor samples mixed with stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongzhi Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genotyping platforms such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays are powerful tools to study genomic aberrations in cancer samples. Allele specific information from SNP arrays provides valuable information for interpreting copy number variation (CNV and allelic imbalance including loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH beyond that obtained from the total DNA signal available from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH platforms. Several algorithms based on hidden Markov models (HMMs have been designed to detect copy number changes and copy-neutral LOH making use of the allele information on SNP arrays. However heterogeneity in clinical samples, due to stromal contamination and somatic alterations, complicates analysis and interpretation of these data. METHODS: We have developed MixHMM, a novel hidden Markov model using hidden states based on chromosomal structural aberrations. MixHMM allows CNV detection for copy numbers up to 7 and allows more complete and accurate description of other forms of allelic imbalance, such as increased copy number LOH or imbalanced amplifications. MixHMM also incorporates a novel sample mixing model that allows detection of tumor CNV events in heterogeneous tumor samples, where cancer cells are mixed with a proportion of stromal cells. CONCLUSIONS: We validate MixHMM and demonstrate its advantages with simulated samples, clinical tumor samples and a dilution series of mixed samples. We have shown that the CNVs of cancer cells in a tumor sample contaminated with up to 80% of stromal cells can be detected accurately using Illumina BeadChip and MixHMM. AVAILABILITY: The MixHMM is available as a Python package provided with some other useful tools at http://genecube.med.yale.edu:8080/MixHMM.

  9. A novel resource for genomics of Triticeae: BAC library specific for the short arm of rye (Secale cereale L.) chromosome 1R (1RS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimková, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Janda, Jaroslav; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Mago, R.; Lelley, T.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 237 (2008), s. 101-109 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : flow cytometry * flow-sorted chromosomes * BAC library Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.926, year: 2008

  10. Identification of an extensive gene cluster among a family of PPOs in Trifolium pratense L. (red clover using a large insert BAC library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ann

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyphenol oxidase (PPO activity in plants is a trait with potential economic, agricultural and environmental impact. In relation to the food industry, PPO-induced browning causes unacceptable discolouration in fruit and vegetables: from an agriculture perspective, PPO can protect plants against pathogens and environmental stress, improve ruminant growth by increasing nitrogen absorption and decreasing nitrogen loss to the environment through the animal's urine. The high PPO legume, red clover, has a significant economic and environmental role in sustaining low-input organic and conventional farms. Molecular markers for a range of important agricultural traits are being developed for red clover and improved knowledge of PPO genes and their structure will facilitate molecular breeding. Results A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library comprising 26,016 BAC clones with an average 135 Kb insert size, was constructed from Trifolium pratense L. (red clover, a diploid legume with a haploid genome size of 440–637 Mb. Library coverage of 6–8 genome equivalents ensured good representation of genes: the library was screened for polyphenol oxidase (PPO genes. Two single copy PPO genes, PPO4 and PPO5, were identified to add to a family of three, previously reported, paralogous genes (PPO1–PPO3. Multiple PPO1 copies were identified and characterised revealing a subfamily comprising three variants PPO1/2, PPO1/4 and PPO1/5. Six PPO genes clustered within the genome: four separate BAC clones could be assembled onto a predicted 190–510 Kb single BAC contig. Conclusion A PPO gene family in red clover resides as a cluster of at least 6 genes. Three of these genes have high homology, suggesting a more recent evolutionary event. This PPO cluster covers a longer region of the genome than clusters detected in rice or previously reported in tomato. Full-length coding sequences from PPO4, PPO5, PPO1/5 and PPO1/4 will facilitate

  11. Printed glycan array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shilova, Nadezhda; Navakouski, Maxim; Khasbiullina, Nailya

    2012-01-01

    Using printed glycan array (PGA) we compared the results of antibody profiling in undiluted, moderately (1:15) and highly (1:100) diluted human blood serum. Undiluted serum is suitable for studying blood as a tissue in its native state, whereas to study the serum of newborns or small animals one...... usually has to dilute the starting material in order to have sufficient volume for PGA experimentation. The PGA used in this study allows for the use of whole serum without modifications to the protocol, and the background is surprisingly low. Antibodies profiles observed in undiluted serum versus 1......:15 dilution were similar, with only a limited number of new signals identified in the undiluted serum. However, unexpected irregularities were found when IgG and IgM are measured separately, namely, at a 1:15 dilution more intensive IgG signals for many glycans are observed. We believe that in conditions...

  12. Scintillator detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusano, D.A.; Dibianca, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a scintillator detector array for use in computerized tomography and comprises a housing including a plurality of chambers, the said housing having a front wall transmissive to x-rays and side walls opaque to x-rays, such as of tungsten and tantalum, a liquid scintillation medium including a soluble fluor, the solvent for the fluor being disposed in the chambers. The solvent comprises either an intrinsically high Z solvent or a solvent which has dissolved therein a high Z compound e.g. iodo or bromonaphthalene; or toluene, xylene or trimethylbenzene with a lead or tin alkyl dissolved therein. Also disposed about the chambers are a plurality of photoelectric devices. (author)

  13. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakes Leighcraft A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP gene that is central to Alzheimer’s disease (AD shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28–31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Results Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at −31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at −31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription

  14. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakes, Leighcraft A; Du, Hansen; Wolf, Hope M; Hatcher, Charles; Norford, Derek C; Precht, Patricia; Sen, Ranjan; Chatterjee, Pradeep K

    2012-09-04

    Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) gene that is central to Alzheimer's disease (AD) shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28-31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at -31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at -31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription factors. The results suggest that the clock

  15. Cascading Constrained 2-D Arrays using Periodic Merging Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Laursen, Torben Vaarby

    2003-01-01

    We consider a method for designing 2-D constrained codes by cascading finite width arrays using predefined finite width periodic merging arrays. This provides a constructive lower bound on the capacity of the 2-D constrained code. Examples include symmetric RLL and density constrained codes...

  16. BacMet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pal, Chandan; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Rensing, Christopher Günther T

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a major human health concern due to widespread use, misuse and overuse of antibiotics. In addition to antibiotics, antibacterial biocides and metals can contribute to the development and maintenance of antibiotic resistance in bacterial communities through co...

  17. The OncoArray Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common cancers develop through a multistep process often including inherited susceptibility. Collaboration among multiple institutions, and funding from multiple sources, has allowed the development of an inexpensive genotyping microarray, the OncoArray. The array includes a genome-wi...

  18. Submillimeter heterodyne arrays for APEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güsten, R.; Baryshev, A.; Bell, A.; Belloche, A.; Graf, U.; Hafok, H.; Heyminck, S.; Hochgürtel, S.; Honingh, C. E.; Jacobs, K.; Kasemann, C.; Klein, B.; Klein, T.; Korn, A.; Krämer, I.; Leinz, C.; Lundgren, A.; Menten, K. M.; Meyer, K.; Muders, D.; Pacek, F.; Rabanus, D.; Schäfer, F.; Schilke, P.; Schneider, G.; Stutzki, J.; Wieching, G.; Wunsch, A.; Wyrowski, F.

    2008-01-01

    We report on developments of submillimeter heterodyne arrays for high resolution spectroscopy with APEX. Shortly, we will operate state-of-the-art instruments in all major atmospheric windows accessible from Llano de Chajnantor. CHAMP+, a dual-color 2×7 element heterodyne array for operation in the

  19. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Fang-Yi; Chang, Jer-Wei; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Yann-Jang; Hsu, Han-Shui; Huang, Shiu-Feng Kathy; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Kanteti, Rajani; Nandi, Suvobroto; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2012-06-12

    Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more patients. We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1) functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1) involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3) functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1) involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (P<0.001~P=0.06). In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of PAFAH1B1 protein overexpression was 68

  20. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Fang-Yi; Nandi, Suvobroto; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Yi-Ching; Chang, Jer-Wei; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Yann-Jang; Hsu, Han-Shui; Huang, Shiu-Feng Kathy; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Kanteti, Rajani

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more patients. We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1) functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1) involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3) functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1) involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (P<0.001~P=0.06). In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of PAFAH1B1 protein overexpression was 68

  1. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Methods Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC in more patients. Results We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1 functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1 involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3 functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1 involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (PP=0.06. In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of

  2. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  3. Chunking of Large Multidimensional Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotem, Doron; Otoo, Ekow J.; Seshadri, Sridhar

    2007-02-28

    Data intensive scientific computations as well on-lineanalytical processing applications as are done on very large datasetsthat are modeled as k-dimensional arrays. The storage organization ofsuch arrays on disks is done by partitioning the large global array intofixed size hyper-rectangular sub-arrays called chunks or tiles that formthe units of data transfer between disk and memory. Typical queriesinvolve the retrieval of sub-arrays in a manner that accesses all chunksthat overlap the query results. An important metric of the storageefficiency is the expected number of chunks retrieved over all suchqueries. The question that immediately arises is "what shapes of arraychunks give the minimum expected number of chunks over a query workload?"In this paper we develop two probabilistic mathematical models of theproblem and provide exact solutions using steepest descent and geometricprogramming methods. Experimental results, using synthetic workloads onreal life data sets, show that our chunking is much more efficient thanthe existing approximate solutions.

  4. Functional Restoration of gp91phox-Oxidase Activity by BAC Transgenesis and Gene Targeting in X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsch, Magdalena; Rostovskaya, Maria; Velychko, Sergiy; Richter, Cornelia; Zimmer, Ariane; Klink, Barbara; Schröck, Evelin; Haase, Michael; Neumann, Katrin; Thieme, Sebastian; Roesler, Joachim; Brenner, Sebastian; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited immunodeficiency, caused by the inability of neutrophils to produce functional NADPH oxidase required for fighting microbial infections. The X-linked form of CGD (X-CGD), which is due to mutations in the CYBB (gp91phox) gene, a component of NADPH oxidase, accounts for about two-thirds of CGD cases. We derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from X-CGD patient keratinocytes using a Flp recombinase excisable lentiviral reprogramming vector. For restoring gp91phox function, we applied two strategies: transposon-mediated bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis and gene targeting using vectors with a fixed 5' homology arm (HA) of 8 kb and 3'HA varying in size from 30 to 80 kb. High efficiency of homologous recombination (up to 22%) was observed with increased size of the 3'HA. Both, BAC transgenesis and gene targeting resulted in functional restoration of the gp91phox measured by an oxidase activity assay in X-CGD iPSCs differentiated into the myeloid lineage. In conclusion, we delivered an important milestone towards the use of genetically corrected autologous cells for the treatment of X-CGD and monogenic diseases in general.

  5. [Use of the recombinant baculovirus BacVP6C for the construction of an internal positive control of rotavirus C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid-Ayadi, I; Guix, S; Pintó, R M; Bosch, A

    2011-06-01

    Unlike group A, a few studies have interested other groups of the rotavirus, especially in Tunisia. The role of rotavirus C (RVC) infection is underestimated because of its sporadic nature. The aim of our study was to develop rapid diagnostic procedures of RVC by using an internal positive control of reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The internal positive control (386pb) was designed from the recombinant baculovirus BacVP6C containing the full length cDNA of the Cowden strain gene 5 (1353pb). A fragment of 596pb was amplified by PCR using the BacVP6C DNA ds as template. Then, a central part of 210pb was deleted and the remaining fragment (386pb) was cloned into pGEM-3Zf(+) plasmid between SP6 and T7 RNA polymerase promoters. The obtained recombinant plasmid "pIAM1" was then used for the generation of the internal positive control by in vitro transcription. The sensibility of the RT-PCR was about 3.66×10(5) molecules of RNA/μl. The use of a shorter positive control, as compared to the wild type, allows increased specificity of the RT-PCR reaction, and could be used for efficient diagnostic and surveillance of RVC-caused diseases. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Deletion of the budBAC operon in Klebsiella pneumoniae to understand the physiological role of 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daun; Yang, Jeongmo; Lee, Soojin; Kim, Borim; Um, Youngsoon; Kim, Youngrok; Ha, Kyoung-Su; Lee, Jinwon

    2016-05-18

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is known to produce 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BDO), a valuable chemical. In K. pneumoniae, the 2,3-BDO operon (budBAC) is involved in the production of 2,3-BDO. To observe the physiological role of the 2,3-BDO operon in a mixed acid fermentation, we constructed a budBAC-deleted strain (SGSB109). The production of extracellular metabolites, CO2 emission, carbon distribution, and NADH/NAD(+) balance of SGSB109 were compared with the parent strain (SGSB100). When comparing the carbon distribution at 15 hr, four significant differences were observed: in 2,3-BDO biosynthesis, lactate and acetate production (lactate and acetate production increased 2.3-fold and 4.1-fold in SGSB109 compared to SGSB100), CO2 emission (higher in SGSB100), and carbon substrate uptake (higher in SGSB100). Previous studies on the inactivation of the 2,3-BDO operon were focused on the increase of 1,3-propanediol production. Few studies have been done observing the role of 2,3-BDO biosynthesis. This study provides a prime insight into the role of 2,3-BDO biosynthesis of K. pneumoniae.

  7. Sensitivity of the BacT/ALERT FA-medium for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pre-incubated blood cultures and its temperature-dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegmüller, Irene; Eschenbach, Ursula; Kamereck, Klaus; Miethke, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The BacT/ALERT FA-medium was evaluated to detect Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pre-incubated blood samples. As published previously its predecessor the BacT/ALERT FAN-medium failed to detect P. aeruginosa in delayed entry samples. It is now reported that FA-medium tolerates a longer pre-incubation period at 36 degrees C, i.e. 8 h, before detection of P. aeruginosa fails in experimentally inoculated blood cultures. In clinical blood samples the frequency of false-negative results concerning P. aeruginosa was reduced from 46.9 % (FAN-medium) to 9.1 % (FA-medium). If media inoculated with P. aeruginosa are pre-incubated at room temperature for 24 h, false-negative results are not observed. Various micro-organisms (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida glabrata) were recognized after pre-incubation at room temperature with similar sensitivity compared to pre-incubation at 36 degrees C. It is concluded that FA-medium detects P. aeruginosa in delayed entry samples with increased sensitivity and pre-incubation at room temperature is superior to pre-incubation at 36 degrees C.

  8. BAC-FISH refutes report of an 8p22–8p23.1 inversion or duplication in 8 patients with Kabuki syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hobart Holly H

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kabuki syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome. The syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of mental retardation, postnatal growth retardation, distinct facial characteristics resembling the Kabuki actor's make-up, cleft or high-arched palate, brachydactyly, scoliosis, and persistence of finger pads. The multiple organ involvement suggests that this is a contiguous gene syndrome but no chromosomal anomalies have been isolated as an etiology. Recent studies have focused on possible duplications in the 8p22–8p23.1 region but no consensus has been reached. Methods We used bacterial artificial chromosome-fluorescent in-situ hybridization (BAC-FISH and G-band analysis to study eight patients with Kabuki syndrome. Results Metaphase analysis revealed no deletions or duplications with any of the BAC probes. Interphase studies of the Kabuki patients yielded no evidence of inversions when using three-color FISH across the region. These results agree with other research groups' findings but disagree with the findings of Milunsky and Huang. Conclusion It seems likely that Kabuki syndrome is not a contiguous gene syndrome of the 8p region studied.

  9. Performance of the BacT/Alert Virtuo Microbial Detection System for the culture of sterile body fluids: prospective multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, R C; Romney, M G; Jang, W; Walker, T; Karichu, J K; Richter, S S

    2017-12-20

    Continuous monitoring blood culture systems are commonly used for sterile body fluid cultures. In this multicentre study, we evaluated the performance of the new-generation BacT/Alert Virtuo system compared to the BacT/Alert 3D and conventional culture for the recovery of microorganisms from sterile body fluids. Peritoneal, cerebrospinal, pericardial, pleural and synovial fluids from adult patients submitted for culture were collected from three different centres. Specimens were inoculated into two bottles of the same bottle type (SA, SN, FA Plus or FN Plus) in equal volumes for simultaneous incubation in the Virtuo and 3D instruments. Each specimen was also Gram stained and seeded to solid media. A total of 811 specimens were inoculated to 1257 bottle pairs. The Virtuo and 3D showed equivalent recovery of clinically significant microorganisms (127/155, 81.9%, vs. 126/155, 81.3%, respectively). Solid media cultures recovered fewer pathogens than either continuous monitoring system (95/155, 61.3%, p culture but showed faster detection of growth as a result of design enhancements. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient, footprint-free human iPSC genome editing by consolidation of Cas9/CRISPR and piggyBac technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Luhan; Grishin, Dennis; Rios, Xavier; Ye, Lillian Y; Hu, Yong; Li, Kai; Zhang, Donghui; Church, George M; Pu, William T

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offers unprecedented opportunities for in vitro disease modeling and personalized cell replacement therapy. The introduction of Cas9-directed genome editing has expanded adoption of this approach. However, marker-free genome editing using standard protocols remains inefficient, yielding desired targeted alleles at a rate of ∼1-5%. We developed a protocol based on a doxycycline-inducible Cas9 transgene carried on a piggyBac transposon to enable robust and highly efficient Cas9-directed genome editing, so that a parental line can be expeditiously engineered to harbor many separate mutations. Treatment with doxycycline and transfection with guide RNA (gRNA), donor DNA and piggyBac transposase resulted in efficient, targeted genome editing and concurrent scarless transgene excision. Using this approach, in 7 weeks it is possible to efficiently obtain genome-edited clones with minimal off-target mutagenesis and with indel mutation frequencies of 40-50% and homology-directed repair (HDR) frequencies of 10-20%.

  11. Planning a Global Array of Broadband Seismic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Keith D.; Ammon, Charles J.

    2013-08-01

    A diverse group of more than 70 seismologists met for 2 days in Raleigh, N.C., to report on recent innovations in seismic array methods and to discuss the future of seismic arrays in global seismology. The workshop was sponsored by the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), with U.S. National Science Foundation funding. Participants included representatives of existing array research groups in Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, Norway, and the United States, with individuals from academia, government, and industry. The workshop was organized by the authors of this meeting report, Pablo Ampeuro (California Institute of Technology), and Colleen Dalton (Boston University), along with IRIS staff support.

  12. Sex-linked pheromone receptor genes of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, are in tandem arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yasukochi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuning of the olfactory system of male moths to conspecific female sex pheromones is crucial for correct species recognition; however, little is known about the genetic changes that drive speciation in this system. Moths of the genus Ostrinia are good models to elucidate this question, since significant differences in pheromone blends are observed within and among species. Odorant receptors (ORs play a critical role in recognition of female sex pheromones; eight types of OR genes expressed in male antennae were previously reported in Ostrinia moths. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened an O. nubilalis bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library by PCR, and constructed three contigs from isolated clones containing the reported OR genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis using these clones as probes demonstrated that the largest contig, which contained eight OR genes, was located on the Z chromosome; two others harboring two and one OR genes were found on two autosomes. Sequence determination of BAC clones revealed the Z-linked OR genes were closely related and tandemly arrayed; moreover, four of them shared 181-bp direct repeats spanning exon 7 and intron 7. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of tandemly arrayed sex pheromone receptor genes in Lepidoptera. The localization of an OR gene cluster on the Z chromosome agrees with previous findings for a Z-linked locus responsible for O. nubilalis male behavioral response to sex pheromone. The 181-bp direct repeats might enhance gene duplications by unequal crossovers. An autosomal locus responsible for male response to sex pheromone in Heliothis virescens and H. subflexa was recently reported to contain at least four OR genes. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that generation of additional copies of OR genes can increase the potential for male moths to acquire altered specificity for pheromone components, and accordingly

  13. Dependently typed array programs don't go wrong

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trojahner, K.; Grelck, C.

    2008-01-01

    The array programming paradigm adopts multidimensional arrays as the fundamental data structures of computation. Array operations process entire arrays instead of just single elements. This makes array programs highly expressive and introduces data parallelism in a natural way. Array programming

  14. Dependently typed array programs don’t go wrong

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trojahner, K.; Grelck, C.

    2009-01-01

    The array programming paradigm adopts multidimensional arrays as the fundamental data structures of computation. Array operations process entire arrays instead of just single elements. This makes array programs highly expressive and introduces data parallelism in a natural way. Array programming

  15. ESPRIT And Uniform Linear Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R. H.; Goldburg, M.; Ottersten, B. E.; Swindlehurst, A. L.; Viberg, M.; Kailath, T.

    1989-11-01

    Abstract ¬â€?ESPRIT is a recently developed and patented technique for high-resolution estimation of signal parameters. It exploits an invariance structure designed into the sensor array to achieve a reduction in computational requirements of many orders of magnitude over previous techniques such as MUSIC, Burg's MEM, and Capon's ML, and in addition achieves performance improvement as measured by parameter estimate error variance. It is also manifestly more robust with respect to sensor errors (e.g. gain, phase, and location errors) than other methods as well. Whereas ESPRIT only requires that the sensor array possess a single invariance best visualized by considering two identical but other-wise arbitrary arrays of sensors displaced (but not rotated) with respect to each other, many arrays currently in use in various applications are uniform linear arrays of identical sensor elements. Phased array radars are commonplace in high-resolution direction finding systems, and uniform tapped delay lines (i.e., constant rate A/D converters) are the rule rather than the exception in digital signal processing systems. Such arrays possess many invariances, and are amenable to other types of analysis, which is one of the main reasons such structures are so prevalent. Recent developments in high-resolution algorithms of the signal/noise subspace genre including total least squares (TLS) ESPRIT applied to uniform linear arrays are summarized. ESPRIT is also shown to be a generalization of the root-MUSIC algorithm (applicable only to the case of uniform linear arrays of omni-directional sensors and unimodular cisoids). Comparisons with various estimator bounds, including CramerRao bounds, are presented.

  16. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  17. Fundamentals of ultrasonic phased arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerr, Lester W

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail the physical and mathematical foundations of ultrasonic phased array measurements.?The book uses linear systems theory to develop a comprehensive model of the signals and images that can be formed with phased arrays. Engineers working in the field of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) will find in this approach a wealth of information on how to design, optimize and interpret ultrasonic inspections with phased arrays. The fundamentals and models described in the book will also be of significant interest to other fields, including the medical ultrasound and

  18. Antenna arrays a computational approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2010-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of antenna array topics that are becoming increasingly important in wireless applications, particularly in design and computer modeling. Signal processing and numerical modeling algorithms are explored, and MATLAB computer codes are provided for many of the design examples. Pictures of antenna arrays and components provided by industry and government sources are presented with explanations of how they work. Antenna Arrays is a valuable reference for practicing engineers and scientists in wireless communications, radar, and remote sensing, and an excellent textbook for advanced antenna courses.

  19. Interferometric optical vortex array generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented. These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs.

  20. On the Mesh Array for Matrix Multiplication

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Subhash

    2010-01-01

    This article presents new properties of the mesh array for matrix multiplication. In contrast to the standard array that requires 3n-2 steps to complete its computation, the mesh array requires only 2n-1 steps. Symmetries of the mesh array computed values are presented which enhance the efficiency of the array for specific applications. In multiplying symmetric matrices, the results are obtained in 3n/2+1 steps. The mesh array is examined for its application as a scrambling system.