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Sample records for babybig botulism immune

  1. Trial of Immune Globulin in Infant Botulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the orphan drug Human Botulism Immune Globulin Intravenous (BIG-IV in 122 infants in California with confirmed infant botulism (75 caused by type A Clostridium botulinum toxin, and 47 by type B toxin was conducted at the California Department of Health Services, Richmond, CA; National Botulism Surveillance and Reference Laboratory, CDC and P, Atlanta; and Division of Biostatistics, University of California, Berkeley.

  2. Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause paralysis of the trunk, arms, legs, and respiratory system. In these food-borne infections, symptoms start soon after the contaminated food is eaten—typically within 12 to 48 hours. Infant botulism may range from mild to severe, often ...

  3. Botulizem: Botulism:

    OpenAIRE

    Berginc Dolenšek, Anica; Kapš, Rafael; Ožek, Branka; Patkovič Colarič, Jasmina; Starič, Feliks

    2004-01-01

    Background. Human botulism is a serious, relatively rare and potencial lethal disease, caused by Clostridium botulinum, a gram positive obligat anaerobic spore forming bacili which strain produced seven potent nevrotoksins (type A-G). It can be found in soil and marine sediment troughout the world and alsocolonizes the gastrointestinal tract of fishes, birds and mammals. Human botulism is usually caused by neurotoxin type A, B, E and rerely F. Type C, D and E cause illness in mammals, birds a...

  4. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. If these germs were used to intentionally infect ... the Program Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers Tularemia Note: Parts of this video were adapted ...

  5. Denmark: botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pærregaard, Anders; Angen, O.; Mølbak, Kare;

    2008-01-01

    was noted. Botulism was suspected and confirmed by testing of patient serum in a bioassay. The condition of the patient improved following administration of botulism antiserum. The clinical picture was suggestive of intestinal (infant) botulism. However, botulism acquired from consumption of food...

  6. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emergency Response Guide Reaching At-Risk Populations MedCon Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, ...

  7. Home Canning and Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Home Canning and Botulism Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... list of pH values for foods . Make your home-canned vegetables safe Use a recommended pressure canner ...

  8. Waterfowl botulism in California 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The San Joaquin Valley had the potential for a severe botulism outbreak, but intensive management efforts kept losses to 45,000 birds. Outbreaks in the Sacramento...

  9. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... With You Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Save ... Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for ...

  10. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Save Lives Resources for Emergency Health Professionals Clinician Outreach (COCA) Crisis & Risk Communication (CERC) Laboratory Information Health Alert Network (HAN) Responders ...

  11. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... After a Disaster Evacuees Keep It With You Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety ... Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control ...

  12. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Save Lives ... Public Health Response," co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), ...

  13. Waterfowl botulism--a brief summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, G.; Jensen, W.

    1994-01-01

    Botulism is a food poisoning caused by the ingestion of the toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum of any of six strains, designated A through F. The disease, as it occurs in epidemic proportion in wild birds, is most commonly of the C type, although outbreaks caused by type E botulism have been observed on the Great Lakes.

  14. The Workshop on Animal Botulism in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skarin, H.; Tevell Aberg, A.; Woudstra, C.; Hansen, T.; Löfström, Ch.; Koene, M.G.J.; Bano, L.; Hedeland, M.; Anniballi, F.; Medici, De D.; Olsson Engvall, E.

    2013-01-01

    A workshop on animal botulism was held in Uppsala, Sweden, in June 2012. Its purpose was to explore the current status of the disease in Europe by gathering the European experts in animal botulism and to raise awareness of the disease among veterinarians and others involved in biopreparedness. Anima

  15. The Workshop on Animal Botulism in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarin, Hanna; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Woudstra, Cédric;

    2013-01-01

    A workshop on animal botulism was held in Uppsala, Sweden, in June 2012. Its purpose was to explore the current status of the disease in Europe by gathering the European experts in animal botulism and to raise awareness of the disease among veterinarians and others involved in biopreparedness. An...

  16. An Outbreak of Foodborne Botulism in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona R Loutfy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a rare paralytic illness resulting from a potent neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. Botulism in Canada is predominately due to C botulinum type E and affects mainly the First Nations and Inuit populations. The most recent outbreak of botulism in Ontario was in Ottawa in 1991 and was caused by C botulinum type A. We report an outbreak of foodborne type B botulism in Ontario, which implicated home-canned tomatoes. The outbreak was characterized by mild symptoms in two cases and moderately severe illness in one case. The investigation shows the importance of considering the diagnosis of botulism in patients presenting with cranial nerve and autonomic dysfunction, especially when combined with gastrointestinal complaints; it also highlights the importance of proper home canning technique.

  17. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disaster Evacuees Keep It With You Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Save Lives Resources for Emergency Health Professionals Clinician Outreach ... Health Response," co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food ...

  18. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Keep It With You Drug and Medical Device Safety Immunizations Food & Water Safety and Hand Hygiene Clean Hands Save Lives Resources ... Preventing Chain Saw Injuries During Tree Removal Electrical Safety and Generators Handling Human Remains After a Disaster ...

  19. Disease investigations : Study of waterfowl botulism

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Studies were done to determine the ecology of the botulism organism Clostridium botulinum Type C and the manner of which toxin is ingested by the waterfowl so that...

  20. [Infant botulism: case report and review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada S, Daniela; Wilhelm B, Jan; Donoso F, Alejandro

    2009-04-01

    Botulism is a rare disease in Chile and of the known clinical presentation, infant botulism is the most common. We report the case of a previously healthy seven month old male infant with a two weeks history of rinorrea, cough, fatigue, constipation and progressive weakness after the consumption of honey. Stool cultures were positive for Clostridium botulinum group 1 type A and electromyography was compatible with the diagnosis. The patient evolved with arterial hypertension, interpreted as secondary to autonomic dysfunction, which responded to calcium channel blockers. Muscle tone improved progressively during the following four weeks. Infant botulism is a potentially fatal disease; diagnosis can be difficult given the broad clinical manifestations. Prevention should focus on education of parents of infants as well as medical personnel. PMID:19621149

  1. Fatal outbreak of botulism in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Tóra Hedinsdottir; Jespersen, Sanne; Kanstrup, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    respiratory muscle paralysis. We present five cases of foodborne botulism occurring in Greenland, two with fatal outcome, caused by ingestion of tradionally preserved eider fowl. In the cases of the survivors, antitoxin and supportive care, including mechanical ventilation, were administered. In these cases...

  2. Botulismo de origem alimentar Foodbourne botulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Deboni Cereser

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O botulismo alimentar ocorre pela ingestão de toxinas pré-formadas pelo Clostridium botulinum, consideradas as mais potentes dentre as toxinas conhecidas. Caracteriza-se como uma doença de extrema gravidade, de evolução aguda, provoca distúrbios digestivos e neurológicos, em conseqüência à ingestão de diversos tipos de alimentos. As conservas caseiras estão entre os alimentos que oferecem maior risco à população consumidora. Os produtos de origem animal são frequentemente associados aos surtos da doença, destacando-se os embutidos, tais como salsichas, salames, presuntos e patês. Derivados do leite e enlatados, bem como produtos fermentados, são passíveis de provocar a intoxicação. As outras formas naturais da doença são botulismo por feridas e botulismo infantil, normalmente associado ao consumo de mel contendo esporos do Clostridium botulinum.Foodbourne botulism occurs after ingestion of preformed toxins produced by the Clostridium botulinum, which has been considered one of the most potent known one. The disease, acquired after ingestion of various kinds of foods, has acute character, and provokes gastrointestinal and neurologic symptoms. Homemade canned foods are those that represent higher risk to human health. Processed meat products are frequently associated with botulism outbreaks, mainly sausages, ham and pates. Dairy and canned food, as well as fermented foods, also may be related with this disease. Still, botulism may be caused by toxin production in deep wound, named wound botulism; and after ingestion of honey contaminated with spores by infants, named infant botulism.

  3. Diplopia as the primary presentation of foodborne botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakshoor, Hamid; Moghaddam, Ali Akbar Saber; Vejdani, Amir Hossein; Armstrong, Blair K.; Moshirfar, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Foodborne botulism is a serious condition caused by Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin. Clinically, botulism presents as bilateral cranial nerve neuropathy and descending paralysis. We report a unique presentation of botulism to remind clinicians of this potentially fatal condition. In this observational case report initial evaluation showed only esodeviation. This progressed to unilateral cranial nerve six (CN VI) paresis along with systemic signs. Clinical diagnosis was made based on in-depth history and concurrent symptoms in three other patients. Foodborne botulism presenting as diplopia and unilateral motility deficits is rare and can represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the ophthalmologist. PMID:22993467

  4. Botulinum Neurotoxins and Botulism: A Novel Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanpen Chaicumpa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Specific treatment is not available for human botulism. Current remedial mainstay is the passive administration of polyclonal antibody to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT derived from heterologous species (immunized animal or mouse hybridoma together with supportive and symptomatic management. The antibody works extracellularly, probably by blocking the binding of receptor binding (R domain to the neuronal receptors; thus inhibiting cellular entry of the holo-BoNT. The antibody cannot neutralize the intracellular toxin. Moreover, a conventional antibody with relatively large molecular size (150 kDa is not accessible to the enzymatic groove and, thus, cannot directly inhibit the BoNT zinc metalloprotease activity. Recently, a 15–20 kDa single domain antibody (VHH that binds specifically to light chain of BoNT serotype A was produced from a humanized-camel VH/VHH phage display library. The VHH has high sequence homology (>80% to the human VH and could block the enzymatic activity of the BoNT. Molecular docking revealed not only the interface binding between the VHH and the toxin but also an insertion of the VHH CDR3 into the toxin enzymatic pocket. It is envisaged that, by molecular linking the VHH to a cell penetrating peptide (CPP, the CPP-VHH fusion protein would be able to traverse the hydrophobic cell membrane into the cytoplasm and inhibit the intracellular BoNT. This presents a novel and safe immunotherapeutic strategy for botulism by using a cell penetrating, humanized-single domain antibody that inhibits the BoNT by means of a direct blockade of the groove of the menace enzyme.

  5. Use of sentinel mallards for epizootiologic studies of avian botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Brand, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    Captive-reared mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were used as sentinels to study the epizootiology of avian botulism at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, Willows, California (USA) from 1986 to 1989. Sentinel mallards were wing-clipped, and 40 to 50 birds were confined in 1.6-ha enclosures in 11 selected wetlands (pools). Enclosures were searched intensively three to four times weekly from July through October. Sick and dead wild and sentinel birds were collected, necropsied, and tested for type C botulism toxin. Botulism epizootics occurred in sentinel mallards in 1986, 1987, and 1989, but only a few isolated cases of botulism were detected in 1988. In most epizootics, botulism also was detected simultaneously in wild birds using the same pool outside the enclosure. Epizootics in sentinels were initiated and perpetuated in the absence of vertebrate carcasses. A sex-specific trend in the probability of intoxication was detected, with males contracting botulism at a higher rate than females. Daily mortality rates of sentinels during botulism epizootics ranged from 0.0006 to 0.0600, with a mean of 0.0190. These rates would result in the daily loss of 0.6 to 60 birds per thousand at risk. The use of sentinel birds provided an effective means of gathering site-specific epizootiologic data.

  6. Foodborne Botulism in Canada, 1985–2005

    OpenAIRE

    Leclair, Daniel; Fung, Joe; Isaac-Renton, Judith L.; Proulx, Jean-Francois; May-Hadford, Jennifer; Ellis, Andrea; Ashton, Edie; Bekal, Sadjia; Farber, Jeffrey M.; Blanchfield, Burke; Austin, John W.

    2013-01-01

    During 1985–2005, a total of 91 laboratory-confirmed outbreaks of foodborne botulism occurred in Canada; these outbreaks involved 205 cases and 11 deaths. Of the outbreaks, 75 (86.2%) were caused by Clostridium botulinum type E, followed by types A (7, 8.1%) and B (5, 5.7%). Approximately 85% of the outbreaks occurred in Alaska Native communities, particularly the Inuit of Nunavik in northern Quebec and the First Nations population of the Pacific coast of British Columbia. These populations w...

  7. An Overview of Type E Botulism in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI-WU FU; CHEN-HUAI WANG

    2008-01-01

    The geographical distribution of C. botulinum type E and its associated disease, type E botulism in China, is different from that in other areas of the world. Cases of type E botulism generally arise in costal regions. In China, however, type E botulism is found primarily in the Qinghai-Tibet plateau of northwest China far from the ocean, at an altitude of approximately 4-5 kin. The foods most commonly associated with the disease are fermented grain and beans as well as raw meat. A suspected outbreak of type E botulism poisoning in the central costal region of China in the 1990s prompted the collection and analysis of samples of mud, sand, and fish from the region. The toxin produced by type E botulinum was found in these samples. Surprisingly, though, upon further analysis, the strain isolated from the samples was identified not as type E C. botulinum, but as the neurotoxigenic bacterium Clostridium butyricum.

  8. Avian botulism in the southern San Joaquin valley 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A joint effort of the Department of Fish and' Game and the U. S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife contained botulism losses in the southern San Joaquin Valley...

  9. Historical review of avian botulism at Stillwater Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to review historical information on avian botulism at Stillwater Wildlife Management Area. This report includes incidental reports of...

  10. Waterfowl botulism in the Tulare Lake Basin California 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The possibility of a major outbreak of waterfowl botulism in the Tulare Lake Basin of Kern and Kings County, California was anticipated during the summer and fall...

  11. Avian botulism in the southern San Joaquin Valley 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Dead and sick waterfowl found on the Kern National Wildlife Refuge in late June, 1973, were diagnosed as positive for botulism toxin. Despite immediate control...

  12. Botulism protocols for the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan gives a basic description of what avian botulism is and the locations on the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge where botulism...

  13. FDA Approves First Botulism Antitoxin for Use in Neutralizing All Seven Known Botulinum Nerve Toxin Serotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antitoxin for use in neutralizing all seven known botulinum nerve toxin serotypes Product to be stored in Strategic National ... antibody fragments that neutralize all of the seven botulinum nerve toxin serotypes known to cause botulism. Botulism is a ...

  14. Toxicoinfectious botulism in commercial caponized chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampel, D.W.; Smith, S.R.; Rocke, T.E.

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, two flocks of commercial broiler chickens experienced unusually high death losses following caponizing at 3 wk of age and again between 8 and 14 wk of age. In September, fifteen 11-wk-old live capons were submitted to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for assistance. In both flocks, the second episode of elevated mortality was associated with incoordination, flaccid paralysis of leg, wing, and neck muscles, a recumbent body posture characterized by neck extension, and diarrhea. No macroscopic or microscopic lesions were detected in affected chickens. Hearts containing clotted blood and ceca were submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, WI. Type C botulinum toxin was identified in heart blood and ceca by mouse bioassay tests. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests on heart blood samples were also positive for type C botulinum toxin. Clostridium botulinum was isolated from the ceca and genes encoding type C botulinum toxin were detected in cecal contents by a polymerase chain reaction test. Chickens are less susceptible to botulism as they age, and this disease has not previously been documented in broilers as old as 14 wk of age. Wound contamination by spores of C. botulinum may have contributed to the unusually high death losses following caponizing.

  15. [Botulism after intake of half-fermented fish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, T; Jacobsen, D; von der Lippe, E; Yndestad, M

    1998-11-20

    From 1975 to 1997, 21 cases of foodborn botulism have been reported in Norway. Half-fermented fish is the major cause. We describe one patient with botulism following intake of home-prepared half-fermented fish. Seven people had eaten fish from the same bucket, but only two developed symptoms. The fish was initially stored at 13 degrees C; this probably explains why toxin developed. Type E toxin in moderate concentrations was found in fish samples. The patient was treated with specific antitoxin and made a gradual recovery. He returned to work after eight months. PMID:9889609

  16. Cluster of Botulism among dutch tourists in Turkey, june 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaan, C.M.; Ouwerkerk, van M.; Roest, H.I.J.

    2010-01-01

    In June 2008, three Dutch tourists participating in a mini-cruise in Turkey needed urgent repatriation for antitoxin treatment because of symptoms of botulism. Because there was a shortage of antitoxin in the Netherlands, an emergency delivery was requested from the manufacturer in Germany. An outbr

  17. The 1971 waterfowl botulism outbreak in the Tulare Lake basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The efforts of the Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife held botulism losses in the Tulare Lake region of the Southern...

  18. Serum Antibody Response to Clostridium botulinum Toxin in Infant Botulism

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Lorry G.; Dezfulian, Manuchehr; Yolken, Robert H.

    1982-01-01

    A serum antibody response has not been previously demonstrated after infection with Clostridium botulinum. We developed an enzyme immunoassay for measuring serum antibody to C. botulinum toxins A, B, and E. This assay system detected a specific immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibody response to C. botulinum toxin in two patients with infant botulism.

  19. Management of animal botulism outbreaks: from clinical suspicion to practical countermeasures to prevent or minimize outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anniballi, F.; Fiore, A.; Löfström, Ch.; Skarin, H.; Auricchio, B.; Woudstra, C.; Bano, L.; Segerman, B.; Koene, M.G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Botulism is a severe neuroparalytic disease that affects humans, all warm-blooded animals, and some fishes. The disease is caused by exposure to toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other botulinum toxin–producing clostridia. Botulism in animals represents a severe environmental and economic

  20. Animal Botulism Outcomes in the AniBioThreat Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woudstra, Cédric; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Skarin, Hanna;

    2013-01-01

    and botulinum neurotoxins are considered potential weapons for bioterrorism and have been included in the Australia Group List of Biological Agents. In 2010 the European Commission (DG Justice, Freedom and Security) funded a 3-year project named AniBioThreat to improve the EU's capacity to counter animal...... bioterrorism threats. A detection portfolio with screening methods for botulism agents and incidents was needed to improve tracking and tracing of accidental and deliberate contamination of the feed and food chain with botulinum neurotoxins and other Clostridia. The complexity of this threat required acquiring...

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CHLORIDE UPON EXPERIMENTAL BOTULISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, I C; Davis, N C

    1923-03-31

    1. Calcium chloride given subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or intravenously has been found to have no effect upon the production of botulism following the injection of Bacillus botulinus (Strain 80B) into the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs. 2. Treatment of Bacillus botulinus with alcohol has been found markedly to decrease its toxicity for guinea pigs. This is in conformity with the work of Bronfenbrenner and Schlesinger. 3. Toxin-free spores of Bacillus botulinus have been found pathogenic for guinea pigs. 4. No prejudice as to possible results in rabbits should be based upon the above conclusions.

  2. Wound botulism presenting as a deep neck space infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Christopher; Mookherjee, Somnath; Russell, Matthew S

    2012-12-01

    Otolaryngologists commonly evaluate patients with findings suspicious for deep space soft tissue infections of the neck. In this case, a woman with a history of injection drug use (IDU) presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and neck pain. Multiple neck abscesses, too small to drain, were seen on imaging. Despite broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, she unexpectedly and rapidly developed respiratory failure requiring intubation. Further work-up diagnosed wound botulism (WB). To our knowledge, this is the first report of WB presenting as a deep neck space infection, and illustrates the importance of considering this deadly diagnosis in patients with IDU history and bulbar symptoms.

  3. Cure of experimental botulism and antibotulismic effect of toosendanin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-liang SHI; Zhong-feng WANG

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), a group of bacterial proteins that comprise a light chain disulfide linked aheavy chain, are the most lethal biotoxins known to mankind. By inhibiting neurotransmitter release, BoNTs causesevere neuroparalytic disease, botulism. A series of important findings in the past 10 years which displayed themolecular targets of BoNTs and hence proposed a four-step action mechanism to explain BoNT intoxication greatlyadvanced the study of antibotulismic drug. In this article, we reviewed these progresses and anti-botulismiccompounds found in recent years. These compounds function due to their facilitation on neurotransmitter releaseor to their interference on the binding, internalization, translocation, and endopeptidase activity of the toxins.Toosendanin is a triterpenoid derivative extracted from a digestive tract-parasiticide in Chinese traditional medicine.Chinese scientists have found that the compound is a selective prejunctional blocker. In spite of sharing somesimilar action with BoNT, toosendanin can protect botulism animals that have been administrated with lethal dosesof BoNT/A or BoNT/B for several hours from death and make them restore normal activity. The neuromuscularjunction preparations isolated from the rats that have been injected with toosendanin tolerate BoNT/A challenge.Toosendanin seems to have no effect on endopeptidase activity of BoNT, but blocks the toxin approach to itsenzymatic substrate.

  4. Outbreak of Type C Botulism in Commercial Layer Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuko; Wigle, William L; Gallagher, Susan; Johnson, Amy L; Sweeney, Raymond W; Wakenell, Patricia S

    2016-03-01

    This report describes an outbreak of type C botulism in two organic, free-range commercial layer farms in the Midwest. Hens affected were 64-wk-old Hy-Line brown hens and 34-wk-old Hy-Line brown hens owned by the same company, but housed on different premises, with approximately 20,000 birds per house. Mortality over the 2 wk of investigation was estimated to be up to 8% and 2.8%, respectively, with birds acting listless, lethargic, and depressed. Clinical signs consisted of progressive paralysis, and severely affected birds were moribund and laterally recumbent. Hens had ruffled feathers that easily epilated, with loss of muscular tone in the neck, tail, and wings. Hens had closed eyes and were reluctant to move. There were no significant gross or histopathologic lesions. Intestinal samples were submitted to the University of Pennsylvania Botulism Diagnostic Laboratory for real-time PCR and were positive for Clostridium botulinum organisms containing the Type C neurotoxin gene. Speculations on the source of the botulinum toxins include poor mortality removal leading to cannibalism of decomposing carcasses, as well as birds on the farm having access to putrid carcasses in the compost pile from a hole in their outdoor access fence. PMID:26953952

  5. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008254 Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity of Fba,a novel fibronectin-binding protein of group A streptococcus.MA Cuiqing(马翠柳),et al.Dept Immunol,Basic Med Coll,Hebei Med Univ,Shijiazhuang 050017.Chin J Infect Dis 2008;26(3):146-150.Objective To express the novel fibronectin-binding protein Fba ofgroupAstreptococcus(GAS)and analyze its immunogenicity,so to evaluate the immune responses to GAS infection.Methods fbagene was amplified by

  6. Frozen, Fully-Cooked Products and Botulism--Food Safety Advisory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... Actions ${title} Loading... Frozen, Fully-Cooked Products & Botulism - Food Safety Advisory In August and September 2001, several cases ...

  7. Bioassessment of avian botulism at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Current detection of a botulism outbreak is dependent on the occurrence of dead or sick birds during field surveys (Reed and Rocke 1992). A recently developed...

  8. The recent outbreak of botulism in the Tulare Lake Basin of California's San Joaquin Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Part of Botulism Outbreak in California: Hearing before the subcommittee on fisheries and wildlife conservation of the committee on merchant marine and fisheries...

  9. Botulism in injecting drug users, Dublin, Ireland, November-December 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, M

    2009-01-08

    In November and December 2008, six cases of suspect wound botulism were reported in heroin injecting drug users, all residents in Dublin, Ireland. Patients were aged between 23-42 years of age; four cases were male; one patient died shortly after admission. The patients presented to four different hospitals across the city. Botulism in injecting drug users in Ireland was last reported in 2002.

  10. Type C botulism in swine fed on restaurant waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djeison L. Raymundo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the epidemiologic data of the death of pigs during the period of 2002 to 2009 following the ingestion of botulinum neurotoxin type C. This neurotoxin was present in food residues originating from restaurant and hotel kitchens, stored in barrels without shelter from the sun and administered in a collective trough without prior thermal treatment. Animals which died at different ages showed clinical signs of botulism characterized by flaccid paralysis, weight loss, anorexia, weakness, lack of coordination, locomotion difficulties with the evolution of lateral recumbency with involuntary urination and defecation. No alterations were observed at postmortem and histological examination. The bioassay with serum neutralization in mice was carried out on samples of intestinal contents from pigs affected and revealed the presence of large quantities of botulinum toxin type C.

  11. [Intussusception in infant with diagnostic botulism: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spini, Roxana G; Ferraris, Verónica; Glasman, María P; Orofino, Guillermina; Casanovas, Alejandra; Debaisi, Gustavo

    2015-10-01

    Botulism is an important public health problem in Argentina. It is a potentially fatal disease, and its diagnosis may be difficult. There are rare presentation forms of the disease, such as acute abdomen. We present a 4-month baby with a 3-day constipation condition, associated with weakness and abnormal eating attitude in the last 12 hours. The baby presented preserved muscle tone, with no changes in sucking or deglutition according to the mother's observations. Altered sensorium and acute abdomen were found; the patient was entered into the operating room with presumptive diagnosis of intussusception, which was confirmed by pneumatic desinvagination. During hospitalization, the patient did not make good progress and presented weak cry, progressive hypotonia and respiratory failure requiring intensive care. Clostridium botulinum was isolated from the stool sample and botulinum toxin type A was isolated from serum. The patient was treated with equine botulinum toxin. Twenty five days after admission, he was totally recovered. PMID:26294164

  12. Lobotomies and Botulism Bombs: Beckett's Trilogy and the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Adam

    2016-06-01

    The article argues that Beckett's Trilogy stages the effects of a lobotomy operation on a potentially politically subversive writer, and that the consequences of the operation can be traced in both the retreat of the narrator(s) of the Trilogy into the mind and into comatose mental states and in the detail of the operation itself, based on the 'icepick' lobotomies performed by neurologist Walter Freeman in the late 1940s and early 1950s. To write about extreme psychiatric situations in the post-war period is necessarily to invoke the political uses of psychosurgery with which this article engages. The article goes on to consider the figure of the brain-damaged mind as a Cold War trope in the references to botulism and the motif of the penetrated skull in The Unnamable.

  13. Botulism outbreaks in natural environments — an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari eEspelund

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum comprises a diverse group of botulinum toxin-producing anaerobic rod-shaped spore-forming bacteria that are ubiquitously distributed in soils and aquatic sediments. Decomposition of plants, algae and animals creates anaerobic environments that facilitate growth of C. botulinum, which may then enter into food webs leading to intoxication of animals. Via saprophytic utilization of nutrients, the bacteria rapidly sporulate, creating a reservoir of highly robust spores. In the present review, we focus on the occurrence of C. botulinum in non-clinical environments, and examine factors influencing growth and environmental factors associated with botulism outbreaks. We also outline cases involving specific environments and their biota. In wetlands, it has been found that some C. botulinum strains can associate with toxin-unaffected organisms—including algae, plants, and invertebrates—in which the bacteria appear to germinate and stay in the vegetative form for longer periods of time. We suggest the need for future investigations to resolve issues related to the environments in which C. botulinum spores may accumulate and germinate, and where the vegetative forms may multiply.

  14. Foodborne botulism associated with home-preserved turnip tops in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Anniballi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, foodborne botulism is a rare disease mainly due to home-preserved food. In the case reported here, clinical diagnosis was performed on the basis of clinical signs and referred consumption of home-preserved turnip tops in oil. Definitive diagnosis was performed by detection of botulinum toxin in sera and neuro-toxigenic organisms in stools and leftover food. This case report highlights the need of a high medical awareness, prompt clinical diagnosis, and synergic collaboration among the health authorities for a correct management of botulism as well as disease containment.

  15. Environmental characteristics associated with the occurrence of avian botulism in wetlands of a northern California refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Euliss, Ned H.; Samuel, Michael D.

    1999-01-01

    Avian botulism is an important disease affecting many species of waterbirds in North America, but the environmental conditions that initiate outbreaks are poorly understood. To determine wetland attributes associated with outbreaks of avian botulism in waterbirds at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR), California, we compared environmental characteristics between wetlands where outbreaks occurred (outbreak wetlands) and did not occur (nonoutbreak wetlands). In June through October, 1987 89, we monitored the occurrence of avian botulism via observations for sick or dead sentinel mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) placed in 4 wetland enclosures. During this same time period, we collected environmental data from the water column and sediments of each wetland enclosure at 10 14-day sampling intervals. Multivariate analysis was used to reduce 22 environmental variables to 7 factors for inclusion in subsequent statistical analyses. We found that outbreak wetlands had significantly lower redox potential than nonoutbreak wetlands. The probability of botulism in sentinel mallards was associated with increasing temperature, increasing invertebrate abundance or biomass, and decreasing turbidity. However, because these factors were not consistently higher in outbreak wetlands compared to nonoutbreak wetlands, they may have a more proximate effect in initiating an outbreak.

  16. Animal Botulism Outcomes in the AniBioThreat Project. Biosecur. Bioterror

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, C.; Tevell Aberg, A.; Skarin, H.; Anniballi, F.; Medici, De D.; Bano, L.; Koene, M.G.J.; Löfström, Ch.; Hansen, T.; Hedeland, M.; Fach, P.

    2013-01-01

    Botulism disease in both humans and animals is a worldwide concern. Botulinum neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other Clostridium species are the most potent biological substances known and are responsible for flaccid paralysis leading to a high mortality rate. Clostridium botulinum

  17. Outbreak of botulism in north west England and Wales, June, 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, E M; Hayes, P J; Isaacs, P E

    1989-10-01

    The clinical features of 27 patients identified in an outbreak of botulism in Lancashire, England, and North Wales are reviewed. All but 1 of the patients (age range 14 months to 74 years) were admitted to hospital: 12 were treated in intensive care units, and 8 received positive pressure ventilation. 1 patient died with an aspiration pneumonia. The clinical presentations contained several unusual features, with evidence of segmental demyelination in some patients and drowsiness, sore throats, and fever in others. The widely dispersed source of intoxication with patients presenting singly to several hospitals added to the difficulties of diagnosis. Successful clinical management depends on full and early recognition both of the dangers of impaired oropharyngeal function and of the rapid neurological changes in botulism.

  18. A brief history of botulism in South Africa : historical overview : Onderstepoort and veterinary research in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, C M

    2009-01-01

    When looking back into the history of botulism and contemplating the final understanding of the syndrome and the ultimate solutions, there are four facets that stand out clearly. The first is that much of the solution was guided by astute observations, curious travellers, committed veterinarians and particularly farmers themselves who were able to relate the occurrence of the condition to climatic and grazing conditions. Secondly, there was the identification of the osteophagia and pica...

  19. Two cases of food-borne botulism in Finland caused by conserved olives, October 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalava, K; Selby, K; Pihlajasaari, A; Kolho, E; Dahlsten, E; Forss, N; Bäcklund, T; Korkeala, H; Honkanen-Buzalski, T; Hulkko, T; Derman, Y; Järvinen, A; Kotilainen, H; Kultanen, L; Ruutu, P; Lyytikaïnen, O; Lindström, M

    2011-01-01

    In October 2011 in Finland, two persons fell ill with symptoms compatible with botulism after having eaten conserved olives stuffed with almonds. One of these two died. Clostridium botulinum type B and its neurotoxin were detected in the implicated olives by PCR and mouse bioassay, respectively. The olives were traced back to an Italian manufacturer and withdrawn from the market. The public and other European countries were informed through media and Europe-wide notifications. PMID:22172330

  20. Toxina botulínica como tratamento para fobia social generalizada com hiperidrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa da Rocha Lessa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Enrubescimento, tremores e transpiração excessiva são fenômenos frequentemente observados na fobia social. OBJETIVOS: Descrever a resposta de um paciente com o tipo generalizado de fobia social e hiperidrose à terapia cognitivo-comportamental aliada à toxina botulínica. MÉTODO: Relato de caso único. RESULTADOS: O Sr. A, 20 anos, estudante universitário, procurou tratamento por apresentar sintomas compatíveis com os diagnósticos de fobia social e depressão. O Sr. A também apresentava diagnóstico de hiperidrose palmar, plantar e axilar. Tanto a fobia social quanto a hiperidrose tiveram seu início no começo da adolescência, com a primeira se iniciando quatro anos antes da segunda. A terapia cognitivo-comportamental levou à remissão da depressão, mas o tratamento efetivo da fobia social apenas foi possível após a terapia com a toxina botulínica. CONCLUSÃO: A toxina botulínica, um tratamento que bloqueia fenômenos autonômicos periféricos, também pode proporcionar alívio dos sintomas em pacientes com fobia social.

  1. Documented outbreaks of botulism:the impact of food-borne transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria Rebagliati; Sabrina Chianelli; Mariela Tornese; Laura Rossi; Alcides Troncoso

    2008-01-01

    Botulism is a severe neuroparalytic disease caused by Clostridium botulinum's toxins.Although the disease is uncommon,causes great concern due to its high rate of mortality;foodborne outbreaks of botulism occur world-wide and require immediate public health and acute care resources.This study had a review of outstanding out-breaks published;Journals articles related to the subject.From the outbreaks analysis we found the most in-volved food products were:fermented fish products in Alaska;home canning food,oil preservation and restau-rant sauce in London and USA;home canned vegetables,food airtight packed with inappropriate refrigeration and aerosols in Argentina.In conclusion,the diagnosis is based only on clinical findings matching the disease and previous exposure to suspicious food.Botulism must be immediately identified as one case suggests an epi-demic and should be treated as a public health emergency.Therefore the purpose of the following review is to recognize the associated risks with the consumption of potentially dangerous foods,to help work our way on pre-vention for every public health professional to be aware of the dangers of this potentially lethal disease.

  2. Toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor Toxina botulínica en el tratamiento del dolor Botulinum toxin in pain treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando Carlos Gomes Colhado; Marcelo Boeing; Luciano Bornia Ortega

    2009-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A toxina botulínica (TxB), uma das mais potentes toxinas bacterianas conhecidas, tem reconhecidamente ação terapêutica eficaz no tratamento de algumas síndromes dolorosas. Entretanto, algumas de suas indicações ainda estão em fase de comprovação com relação a sua eficácia. O objetivo deste estudo foi revisar o histórico, propriedades farmacológicas e aplicações clinicas da TxB, quando empregada no tratamento de dores de diferentes origens. CONTEÚDO: A TxB é o produt...

  3. Ineffectiveness of 3,4-diaminopyridine as a therapy for type C botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, L.S.; Price, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins inhibit acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions. Agents stimulating neurotransmitter efflux, such as 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP), could be useful for botulism therapy. Treatment with 3,4-DAP (8 mg/kg hourly, beginning 3 hr after toxin injection) failed to increase the survival times of mice receiving 10, 20 or 40 LD50 type C, but did prolong the survival of those receiving 20 LD50 type A. This difference in 3,4-DAP efficacy may reflect variations in the molecular mechanism of action of types A and C botulinum neurotoxins.

  4. Toxina botulínica como tratamento para fobia social generalizada com hiperidrose

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa da Rocha Lessa; Fontenelle, Leonardo F.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXTO: Enrubescimento, tremores e transpiração excessiva são fenômenos frequentemente observados na fobia social. OBJETIVOS: Descrever a resposta de um paciente com o tipo generalizado de fobia social e hiperidrose à terapia cognitivo-comportamental aliada à toxina botulínica. MÉTODO: Relato de caso único. RESULTADOS: O Sr. A, 20 anos, estudante universitário, procurou tratamento por apresentar sintomas compatíveis com os diagnósticos de fobia social e depressão. O Sr. A também apresentava...

  5. Castleberry's: 2007 Botulism Recall; A Case Study by The Food Industry Center

    OpenAIRE

    Seltzer, Jonathan M.; Rush, Jeff; Kinsey, Jean D.

    2008-01-01

    This case summarizes the available information on the 2007 Castleberry’s recall and food recalls in general, and raises questions prompted by a recall of this magnitude. A massive, nationwide recall of Castleberry’s canned food due to botulism in the summer of 2007 illustrates the complexity of the food industry. Product from a single production line at a single plant, packed under 90 labels (the company’s own store brands and foodservice), spurred a recall of tens of millions of cans of food...

  6. A brief history of botulism in South Africa : historical overview : Onderstepoort and veterinary research in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Cameron

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available When looking back into the history of botulism and contemplating the final understanding of the syndrome and the ultimate solutions, there are four facets that stand out clearly. The first is that much of the solution was guided by astute observations, curious travellers, committed veterinarians and particularly farmers themselves who were able to relate the occurrence of the condition to climatic and grazing conditions. Secondly, there was the identification of the osteophagia and pica syndrome which led to the feeding of bone-meal as a successful mitigating measure as well as the establishment that botulism was not due to a plant poisoning. Thirdly, the solution of the problem depended on the integration of experience and knowledge from diverse disciplines such as soil science, animal behaviour and husbandry, nutrition, botany and ultimately advanced bacteriology and the science of immunology. Finally it required the technical advancement to produce toxoids in large quantities and formulate effective aluminium hydroxide precipitated and oil emulsion vaccines.

  7. Fatal course of foodborne botulism in an eigth-month old Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lonati

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An 8-month old girl, weighing 9 kg, was brought by her parents at 8.15 am to the Emergency Department (ED for a progressive worsening of weakness and acute respiratory failure. On admission, the baby presented with poor oral intake, a weak cry and extremely weak muscular body control. Poor gag and suck, unreactive mydriasis, hypotonia, lethargy and absence of peristalsis were noted. Laboratory data showed severe respiratory acidosis. Chest X-ray, electroencephalography, encephalic CT scan and MRI were all normal, as were cerebrospinal fluid analysis and viral tests. Orotracheal intubation and continuous mechanical ventilation were applied. The patient received fluids, corticosteroids, aerosol therapy, large-spectrum antibiotics and enteral- nutrition. Further investigation revealed ingestion of an improperly prepared homecanned homogenized turkey meal. Type A botulinum neurotoxin was identified. Trivalent botulinum antitoxin, prostigmine and oral activated charcoal were administered. Generalized flaccid paralysis, areflexic bilateral mydriasis, gastric stasis and deep coma persisted for the duration of the hospital stay, and the patient died of severe respiratory failure and cardiac arrest 12 days after ED admission. Botulism poisoning should be suspected in any infant presenting with feeding difficulties, constipation, descendent paralysis or acute respiratory failure. Supportive treatment and antidotal therapy should be performed as soon as a clinical diagnosis is made. We describe a case of foodborne botulism in an 8-month old infant caused by ingestion of an improperly prepared home-canned homogenized turkey meal, representing the youngest fatal case reported in medical literature.

  8. Biodiversity of Clostridium botulinum Type E Associated with a Large Outbreak of Botulism in Wildlife from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hannett, George E.; Stone, Ward B.; Davis, Stephen W.; Wroblewski, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    The genetic relatedness of Clostridium botulinum type E isolates associated with an outbreak of wildlife botulism was studied using random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Specimens were collected from November 2000 to December 2008 during a large outbreak of botulism affecting birds and fish living in and around Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. In our present study, a total of 355 wildlife samples were tested for the presence of botulinum toxin and/or organisms. Type E botulinum toxin was...

  9. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" ... population is immunized, protecting most community members. The principle of community immunity applies to control of a ...

  10. Toxina Botulínica, considerações em Medicina Dentária

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Natacha Betânia Alves

    2014-01-01

    A toxina botulínica (TB) foi durante muito anos considerada um promotor de doença. No presente é considerada um agente terapêutico versátil para o tratamento de distúrbios musculares. O seu mecanismo de ação ocorre ao nível da fenda sináptica do músculo esquelético e leva a uma desnervação parcial e funcional dos neurónios motores, através da inibição da liberação do neurotransmissor de acetilcolina (Ach), juntamente com o bloqueio da libertação de outros neurotransmissores periféricos relaci...

  11. Occurrence of C. botulinum in healthy cattle and their environment following poultry botulism outbreaks in mixed farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souillard, R; Le Maréchal, C; Hollebecque, F; Rouxel, S; Barbé, A; Houard, E; Léon, D; Poëzévara, T; Fach, P; Woudstra, C; Mahé, F; Chemaly, M; Le Bouquin, S

    2015-10-22

    Ten cattle farms located in an area with a recent history of poultry botulism outbreaks were investigated to evaluate the occurrence of toxigenic C. botulinum in healthy cattle. Environmental samples in the 10 cattle farms and bovine fecal contents in farms with a confirmed environmental contamination were collected. Detection of C. botulinum toxin genes C, D, C/D, D/C and E was performed using real-time PCR. 4.9% (7/143) of the environmental samples collected in the 10 investigated cattle farms were positive for C. botulinum type C/D. Theses samples (boot-swabs in stalls and on pasture and water of a stream) were collected in 3 different farms. One cow dung sample and 3 out of 64 fecal contents samples collected in a single farm were also positive for C. botulinum type C/D. This study demonstrates that cattle are probably indirectly contaminated via poultry botulism in the area and that they can be intermittent carrier of C. botulinum type C/D after poultry botulism outbreaks in mixed farms.

  12. A penicillin- and metronidazole-resistant Clostridium botulinum strain responsible for an infant botulism case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuet, C; Yoon, E-J; Boyer, S; Pignier, S; Blanc, T; Doehring, I; Meziane-Cherif, D; Dumant-Forest, C; Sautereau, J; Legeay, C; Bouvet, P; Bouchier, C; Quijano-Roy, S; Pestel-Caron, M; Courvalin, P; Popoff, M R

    2016-07-01

    The clinical course of a case of infant botulism was characterized by several relapses despite therapy with amoxicillin and metronidazole. Botulism was confirmed by identification of botulinum toxin and Clostridium botulinum in stools. A C. botulinum A2 strain resistant to penicillins and with heterogeneous resistance to metronidazole was isolated from stool samples up to 110 days after onset. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by disc agar diffusion and MICs were determined by Etest. Whole genome sequencing allowed detection of a gene cluster composed of blaCBP for a novel penicillinase, blaI for a regulator, and blaR1 for a membrane-bound penicillin receptor in the chromosome of the C. botulinum isolate. The purified recombinant penicillinase was assayed. Resistance to β-lactams was in agreement with the kinetic parameters of the enzyme. In addition, the β-lactamase gene cluster was found in three C. botulinum genomes in databanks and in two of 62 genomes of our collection, all the strains belonging to group I C. botulinum. This is the first report of a C. botulinum isolate resistant to penicillins. This stresses the importance of antibiotic susceptibility testing for adequate therapy of botulism. PMID:27108966

  13. Infant botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that spreads downward Poor feeding and weak suckling Respiratory failure Extreme tiredness (lethargy) Weak cry ... Respiratory insufficiency can develop. This would require assistance with breathing (mechanical ventilation).

  14. THE EFFECT OF ANESTHESIA AND OF SEDATIVES ON THE SERUM THERAPY OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTULISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Weiss, H

    1924-03-31

    When guinea pigs are fed large amounts of botulinus toxin, they develop symptoms of intoxication within 6 hours and die usually within 12 hours after the feeding of toxin. If very large amounts of toxin are introduced intraperitoneally, the animals may show symptoms of intoxication at the end of the 1st hour and die usually within 2 hours following the administration of toxin. If these animals are placed under anesthesia following the administration of toxin, the intoxication proceeds much more slowly. Anesthesia, by ether, is effective in this manner whether the toxin is given per os or intraperitoneally. The life of guinea pigs kept under ether after the administration of lethal amounts of toxin is prolonged by a period approximately equal to that during which the administration of the anesthetic is continued. When anesthesia is discontinued, the intoxication proceeds at its usual rate. It appears, therefore, that administration of ether delays the rate of intoxication but does not alter the toxin or the nature of the mechanism of intoxication. Anesthesia thus delays the progress of intoxication not only when administered immediately after the intake of toxin, but when administered much later after the intoxication has already progressed far enough to cause definite objective symptoms of poisoning. At this late stage of intoxication, the unsupported serum therapy of botulism in guinea pigs usually remains without effect. If, however, the animals are anesthetized at this time and kept under the influence of ether for some time, antitoxin therapy becomes effective. Indeed the antitoxin treatment can be delayed further for several hours, provided the animal is kept under anesthesia during the interval. Results of a similar nature were obtained with luminal sodium, nitrous oxide-oxygen mixture, and morphine used in place of ether. In view of the fact that the published data indicate that botulinus antitoxin has thus far failed to give beneficial results in the

  15. Toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor Toxina botulínica en el tratamiento del dolor Botulinum toxin in pain treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Carlos Gomes Colhado

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A toxina botulínica (TxB, uma das mais potentes toxinas bacterianas conhecidas, tem reconhecidamente ação terapêutica eficaz no tratamento de algumas síndromes dolorosas. Entretanto, algumas de suas indicações ainda estão em fase de comprovação com relação a sua eficácia. O objetivo deste estudo foi revisar o histórico, propriedades farmacológicas e aplicações clinicas da TxB, quando empregada no tratamento de dores de diferentes origens. CONTEÚDO: A TxB é o produto da fermentação do Clostridium Botulinum, uma bactéria anaeróbia Gram-positiva. Comercialmente, as TxB existem nas formas A e B, agentes biológicos obtidos laboratorialmente. A TxB, uma neurotoxina que possui alta afinidade pelas sinapses colinérgicas, ocasiona bloqueio na liberação de acetilcolina pelo terminal nervoso, sem alterar a condução neural de sinais elétricos ou síntese e armazenamento de acetilcolina. Comprovadamente, a TxB pode enfraquecer seletivamente a musculatura dolorosa, interrompendo o ciclo espasmo-dor. Com relação à dor, varias publicações têm demonstrado a eficácia e segurança da TxB-A no tratamento da cefaleia tipo tensão, migrânea, dor lombar crônica e dor miofascial. CONCLUSÕES: A TxB-A é segura e bem tolerada em desordens dolorosas crônicas, onde regimes de farmacoterapia podem sabidamente provocar efeitos colaterais. Outra vantagem é a redução do uso de analgésicos e o tempo de ação de 3 a 4 meses por dose. Entretanto pesquisas futuras serão necessárias para se estabelecer a eficácia da TxB-A em desordens dolorosas crônicas e seu exato mecanismo no alivio da dor, bem como seu potencial em tratamentos multifatoriais.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La toxina botulínica (TxB, una de las más potentes toxinas bacterianas de que se tiene conocimiento, posee una reconocida acción terapéutica eficaz en el tratamiento de algunos síndromes dolorosos. Sin embargo, algunas de sus

  16. Uso de toxina botulínica en neurología: Experiencia en el Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud

    OpenAIRE

    Édgard Rojas; César Castañeda; Roberto Portillo; David Lira

    2004-01-01

    Objetivo: Identificar las principales utilidades de la toxina botulínica en las enfermedades neurológicas. Lugar: Hospital Nacional Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima,Perú. Periodo 2001-2003. Material y Métodos: Se estudió 122 pacientes a quienes se les infiltró toxina botulínica tipo A a nivel de los músculos comprometidos, según el tipo de patología. Se les hizo una evaluación posterior a la aplicación de la toxina. Resultados: El espasmo hemifacial fue el diagnóstico más frecuente ...

  17. Barbiturate ingestion in three adult captive tigers (Panthera tigris and concomitant fatal botulism of one : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Williams

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Zoo animals, including tigers, have been reported to suffer from barbiturate intoxication, with pentabarbitone being most commonly recorded. Clinical signs range from mild ataxia to general anaesthesia with recovery over hours to days with several factors affecting hepatic barbiturate metabolism and tissue partitioning. Botulism is an often fatal intoxication in man, animals, birds and certain fish. The occurrence in carnivores is uncommon to rare, with only 2 reports found of botulism in felids. This report relates to 3 adult captive cohabiting tigers that simultaneously developed signs of abdominal discomfort, progressive ataxia, recumbency and comatose sleep resembling stage 2 anaesthesia, alternating with periods of distracted wakefulness and ataxic movements. These signs occurred 4 days after being fed the carcass of a horse that had ostensibly died of colic and not been euthanased. The male tiger that was the dominant animal in the feeding hierarchy was worst affected and had to be given intravenous fluids. The female that was lowest in hierarchy was unaffected. After 48-72 hours of treatment at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital the females could eat and made an uneventful recovery. The male tiger showed partial recovery but died during the night a few hours after drinking water on his return to the owner. Necropsy revealed severe oesophageal dilation and impaction with decaying grass; some of this material and water were present in the pharynx and trachea, and had been aspirated causing acute widespread bronchopneumonia. Colon content tested negative for common pesticides but, together with liver, tested positive for barbiturate. Serum taken on the day of admission had tested negative for barbiturate and the residual serum from the 3 animals later tested negative for botulinum toxin. Colon and oesophageal content from the male at necropsy were positive for Clostridium botulinum toxin type C by the mouse bioassay

  18. Regional Variations in Home Canning Practices and the Risk of Foodborne Botulism in the Republic of Georgia, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    TARKHASHVILI, N.; CHOKHELI, M.; CHUBINIDZE, M.; ABAZASHVILI, N.; CHAKVETADZE, N.; IMNADZE, P.; KRETSINGER, K.; VARMA, J.; SOBEL, J.

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne botulism is a severe, paralytic illness caused by ingestion of preformed neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum. In 2003, we conducted a population-based household survey of home canning practices to explore marked regional variations in botulism incidence in the Republic of Georgia (ROG). We designed a cluster sampling scheme and subdivided each of the 10 regions of the ROG into a variable number of strata. Households were selected from each stratum using a two-step cluster sampling methodology. We administered a questionnaire about home canning practices to household members responsible for food preparation. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we modeled high (eastern ROG) against low (western ROG) incidence areas. Overall, we surveyed 2,742 households nationwide. Home canning with a capping device hermetically sealing the lid covering the jar was practiced by 1,909 households (65.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 59.8 to 72.1%). Canning was more prevalent in regions of low botulism incidence (34 versus 32%; P 1 tablespoon of salt per liter (aOR = 5.1; 95% CI: 1.2 to 22.6); vinegar (aOR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3 to 3.7), and greens (aOR = 5.6; 95% CI: 1.7 to 18.2). The following practices were associated with a decreased risk in high-botulism areas: >57 jars canned per household annually (aOR = 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3 to 0.9), covering or immersing vegetables in boiling water before placing them into the jar (aOR = 0.3 95% CI: 0.2 to 0.6), covering or immersing vegetables in boiling water after placing them into the jar (aOR = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2 to 0.9), or adding garlic (aOR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1 to 0.5) or aspirin (aOR = 0.1; 95% CI: 0.1 to 0.2) to the jar at the time of preparation. PMID:25836400

  19. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  20. Emergence of suspected type D botulism in ruminants in England and Wales (2001-2009), associated with exposure to broiler litter.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Payne, J.H.; Hogg, R.A.; Otter, A.; Roest, H.I.J.; Livesey, C.T.

    2011-01-01

    Scanning surveillance by the Veterinary Laboratories Agency revealed the emergence of suspected botulism in ruminants in 2003, presented as flaccid paralysis. From 2003 to 2009, 168 cattle and 19 sheep incidents were recorded, with mortality between 5 and 80 per cent. All sheep incidents and 95 per

  1. Whole-Genome Sequence of Clostridium botulinum A2B3 87, a Highly Virulent Strain Involved in a Fatal Case of Foodborne Botulism in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Francesco; Fillo, Silvia; Anselmo, Anna; Palozzi, Anna Maria; Fortunato, Antonella; Gentile, Bernardina; Pittiglio, Valentina; Spagnolo, Ferdinando; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of a rare bivalent strain of Clostridium botulinum, A2B3 87. The strain was isolated from a foodborne botulism case that occurred in Italy in 1995. The case was characterized by rapid evolution of the illness and failure of conventional treatments. PMID:25814616

  2. Toxina botulínica y su empleo en la patología oral y maxilofacial Botulinum toxin and its use in oral and maxillofacial pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martínez-Pérez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Las toxinas botulínicas son exotoxinas de la bacteria formadora de esporas Clostridim botulinum y los agentes causantes del botulismo. Cuando se inyecta en el músculo produce una parálisis flácida. El efecto clínico está directamente relacionado con la dosis y debe ajustarse para cada caso concreto. La Toxina botulínica ha demostrado en los más de veinte años en que se está utilizando que es un fármaco seguro. Las indicaciones de la toxina botulínica en la actualidad incluyen todas aquellas patologías que resultan de la hiperfunción muscular y la disfunción autonómica.Abstract: Botilinum toxins are exotoxins of the bacteria that form the Clostridium botulinum spores and the causative agents of botulism. When injected into the muscle flaccid paralysis is produced. The clinical effect is directly related with the dose and is should be adjusted for each particular case. over the last twenty years that it has been in use, the botulinum toxin has shown itself to be a reliable drug. Current indications for the use of botulinum toxin include all those pathologies which are the results of muscle hyperfunction and autonomic dysfunction.

  3. Botulismo tipo C em ganso ocorrido em Minas Gerais, Brasil Type C botulism in a goose at Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Faria Lobato

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulismo é uma intoxicação causada pela ingestão das toxinas produzidas pelo Clostridium botulinum, que acomete mamíferos e aves, caracterizando-se por um quadro de paralisia flácida. Neste trabalho, é descrito um caso de botulismo em ganso, ocorrido no município de Santa Luzia, região metropolitana de Belo Horizonte, no Estado de Minas Gerais. Ao exame clínico, o animal apresentava-se com um quadro de paralisia flácida dos músculos do pescoço, das pernas e asas, além de apresentar ainda desprendimento de penas. A necropsia não revelou lesões significativas. Foi colhido o soro do animal e submetido ao teste de soroneutralização em camundongo, que identificou a toxina de C. botulinum tipo C.Botulism is an intoxication caused by the ingestion of toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, that affects mammals and birds, characterized by a flaceid paralysis. This report describes a case of botulism in a goose in Santa Luzia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Clinical examinations showed dropping feathers and flaccid paralysis involving the muscles of the wings, legs and neck. post-mortem examination showed no significant gross or macroscopic lesions C. botulinum type C toxin was demonstrated in the serum of the affected animal through serum neutralization test in mice.

  4. Investigations into an Outbreak of Botulism Caused by Clostridium botulinum Type C/D in Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarin, Hanna; Lindgren, Ylva; Jansson, Désirée S

    2015-06-01

    This case report describes a recent botulism outbreak in commercial laying hens with a history of increased mortality and flaccid paralysis. Routine diagnostic gross examination and microscopy from seven hens were inconclusive, but botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) in peripheral blood was neutralized with both type C and type D antitoxins in the mouse bioassay. During a farm visit, 10 additional hens from a 34-wk-old flock on the farm were selected for clinical examination and further sampling. Nine hens were observed in sternal recumbency, with flaccid paralysis of the neck, drooping wings and tail, inability to escape, and bilateral ptosis, and one hen showed nonspecific clinical signs. Samples from cecum and liver were collected, and the gene coding for BoNT was detected by PCR in all 10 cecal samples and in four of the liver samples. Clostridium botulinum mosaic type C/D was isolated from 5 out of 10 hens from either cecum or liver, and the isolates were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis subtyping. All five isolates produced the same banding pattern, which was identical or showed >90% similarity to isolates from three different outbreaks on broiler farms in Sweden and Denmark during the 2007-10 period. However, they were clearly distinguishable from the predominantly reported pulsotype associated with avian botulism outbreaks in Europe. The authors are unaware of any previous report of C. botulinum mosaic type C/D isolates from laying hens.

  5. Beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A in trigeminal neuralgia Beneficio de la toxina botulínica tipo A en neuralgia del trigemino

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    Carlos Zúñiga

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin has been thoroughly studied as a potential tool in the treatment of several pain syndromes. Therefore, we assessed the clinical effects of botulinum toxin type A injections in 12 patients with otherwise unresponsive idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Patients were infiltrated with 20-50 units of botulinum toxin in trigger zones. Those who presented with mandibular involvement were also infiltrated in the masseter muscle. The patients were assessed on a weekly basis using the Visual Analogic Scale for pain. Ten of our patients reported a significant benefit from botulinum toxin injections, with reduction or even disappearance of pain, and remained pain free for as long as 60 days. Our findings suggest that botulinum toxin may represent a useful therapeutic tool in the management of patients with this entity.La toxina botulínica ha sido estudiada en forma exhaustiva como una potencial herramienta en el tratamiento de múltiples síndromes dolorosos. Por lo tanto, evaluamos los efectos clínicos de la aplicación de toxina botulínica tipo A en 12 sujetos con neuralgia trigeminal idiopática resistente a manejo farmacológico. Se aplicaron en dichos sujetos entre 20 y 50 unidades de toxina botulínica tipo A en las zonas gatillo. Además se infiltró el músculo masetero en aquellos que presentaban involucro mandibular. Los sujetos fueron evaluados semanalmente con una escala visual análoga para dolor. Diez de los sujetos reportaron un beneficio significativo con el uso de toxina botulínica, con reducción e incluso desaparición del dolor, permaneciendo libres de dolor por un periodo de hasta 60 días. Nuestros hallazgos sugieren que la toxina botulínica puede representar una herramienta terapéutica útil en el manejo de pacientes con esta entidad.

  6. Biodiversity of Clostridium botulinum type E associated with a large outbreak of botulism in wildlife from Lake Erie and Lake Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannett, George E; Stone, Ward B; Davis, Stephen W; Wroblewski, Danielle

    2011-02-01

    The genetic relatedness of Clostridium botulinum type E isolates associated with an outbreak of wildlife botulism was studied using random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Specimens were collected from November 2000 to December 2008 during a large outbreak of botulism affecting birds and fish living in and around Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. In our present study, a total of 355 wildlife samples were tested for the presence of botulinum toxin and/or organisms. Type E botulinum toxin was detected in 110 samples from birds, 12 samples from fish, and 2 samples from mammals. Sediment samples from Lake Erie were also examined for the presence of C. botulinum. Fifteen of 17 sediment samples were positive for the presence of C. botulinum type E. Eighty-one C. botulinum isolates were obtained from plants, animals, and sediments; of these isolates, 44 C. botulinum isolates produced type E toxin, as determined by mouse bioassay, while the remaining 37 isolates were not toxic for mice. All toxin-producing isolates were typed by RAPD; that analysis showed 12 different RAPD types and multiple subtypes. Our study thus demonstrates that multiple genetically distinct strains of C. botulinum were involved in the present outbreak of wildlife botulism. We found that C. botulinum type E is present in the sediments of Lake Erie and that a large range of bird and fish species is affected. PMID:21115703

  7. Qualidade de vida e custos diretos em pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, tratados com toxina botulínica-A

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    Osaki Midori Hentona

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os custos e a qualidade de vida dos pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, submetidos à terapia com a toxina botulínica-A. MÉTODOS: Vinte e oito pacientes, sendo 16 com blefaroespasmo essencial e 12 com espasmo hemifacial, tratados com toxina botulínica-A, foram avaliados por meio de dois instrumentos: o SF-36 e a Escala de Disfunção de Blefaroespasmo. Os custos foram calculados segundo o número de unidades da toxina utilizadas por cada paciente no período de um ano. RESULTADOS: O custo total direto foi estimado em 1081,62 reais por ano (±89,39 para blefaroespasmo essencial e 618,06 reais por ano (±60,06 para espasmo hemifacial, para tratamento ambulatorial (p<0,001. Antes do tratamento, todos os domínios do SF-36 foram significantemente piores em ambas as doenças. Sob tratamento efetivo com toxina botulínica-A, os aumentos nos índices do SF-36 evidenciaram mudanças nas taxas de saúde geral da população em estudo, com diferença estatisticamente significante entre as respostas pré e pós-tratamento (p<0,05. Relacionando-se o SF-36 com Escala de Disfunção de Blefaroespasmo, foram observadas nos casos de blefaroespasmo essencial, relações significantes positivas (capacidade funcional, estado geral, aspecto emocional e aspectos sociais, ao passo que nos pacientes com espasmo hemifacial não foi encontrada nenhuma correlação. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo demonstra notável impacto negativo das doenças na qualidade de vida desses pacientes, e uma significante melhora em ambas as doenças após tratamento com toxina botulínica-A. Além disso, os dados fornecem subsídios para justificar o alto custo da aquisição da toxina botulínica-A, devido a seus consideráveis benefícios para a qualidade de vida.

  8. Efecto protector de la toxina botulínica en colgajos cutáneos The protective effect of botulinum toxin on skin flaps

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    C.X. Astudillo Carrera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Los colgajos cutáneos de patrón vascular randomizado son de gran utilidad en Cirugía Reconstructiva; un aporte vascular adecuado es el factor más importante para la supervivencia de los mismos. Realizamos un estudio experimental levantando un total de 36 colgajos en el dorso de 9 conejos (4 en cada conejo: a 9 controles, b 9 con aplicación de toxina botulínica tipo A transoperatoria a lo largo del colgajo, c 9 con toxina botulínica tipo A aplicada 7 días antes del procedimiento quirúrgico, y, d 9 con aplicación de toxina botulínica tipo A transoperatoria más epinefrina. El análisis de los colgajos se realizó a través de imágenes digitales que se examinaron con el programa ImageJ. Efectuamos el análisis estadístico con la prueba T de Student. La evaluación final de los colgajos se realizó al séptimo día, tiempo en el cual se obtuvo: a una media de área necrótica en los controles del 72.17 ± 3.9% ; b en los que se aplicó toxina botulínica transoperatoria el porcentaje de aérea necrótica fue del 5.09 ± 1.2% p = 0.032; c en aquellos en los que la toxina botulínica se aplicó 7 días antes del procedimiento se reportó necrosis del 24.97 ± 2.7% p = 0.041 y d en los que se aplicó toxina botulínica transoperatoria más epinefrina el porcentaje de necrosis fue del 23.90 ± 3.9% p = 0.045. Concluimos que la toxina botulínica tipo A actúa como protector contra el proceso de sufrimiento-isquemia de los tejidos, debido a su acción vasodilatadora, recomendando su aplicación al inicio del procedimiento quirúrgico.Random-pattern cutaneous flaps are very useful in Reconstructive Surgery; an adequate vascular contribution is an important factor for the survival of the flaps. We designed an experimental study elevating a total of 36 dorsal flaps, divided in 4 groups: a 9 were controls, to which 0.9% physiological solution was applied, b 9 with a transoperatory application of type A botulinum toxin throughout the length of

  9. Echinoderm immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L Courtney; Ghosh, Julie; Buckley, Katherine M; Clow, Lori A; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haug, Tor; Henson, John H; Li, Chun; Lun, Cheng Man; Majeske, Audrey J; Matranga, Valeria; Nair, Sham V; Rast, Jonathan P; Raftos, David A; Roth, Mattias; Sacchi, Sandro; Schrankel, Catherine S; Stensvåg, Klara

    2010-01-01

    A survey for immune genes in the genome for the purple sea urchin has shown that the immune system is complex and sophisticated. By inference, immune responses of all echinoderms maybe similar. The immune system is mediated by several types of coelomocytes that are also useful as sensors of environmental stresses. There are a number of large gene families in the purple sea urchin genome that function in immunity and of which at least one appears to employ novel approaches for sequence diversification. Echinoderms have a simpler complement system, a large set of lectin genes and a number of antimicrobial peptides. Profiling the immune genes expressed by coelomocytes and the proteins in the coelomic fluid provide detailed information about immune functions in the sea urchin. The importance of echinoderms in maintaining marine ecosystem stability and the disastrous effects of their removal due to disease will require future collaborations between ecologists and immunologists working towards understanding and preserving marine habitats. PMID:21528703

  10. Botulism in Brazil, 2000-2008: epidemiology, clinical findings and laboratorial diagnosis Botulismo no Brasil, 2000-2008: epidemiologia, achados clínicos e diagnóstico laboratorial

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    Ruth Estela Gravato Rowlands

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a rare and potentially lethal illness caused by Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin. We describe the findings of a laboratorial investigation of 117 suspected cases of botulism reported to the surveillance system in Brazil from January 2000 to October 2008. Data on the number and type of samples analyzed, type of toxins identified, reporting of the number of botulism cases and transmission sources are discussed. A total of 193 clinical samples and 81 food samples were analyzed for detection and identification of the botulism neurotoxin. Among the clinical samples, 22 (11.4% presented the toxin (nine type A, five type AB and eight with an unidentified type; in food samples, eight (9.9% were positive for the toxin (five type A, one type AB and two with an unidentified type. Of the 38 cases of suspected botulism in Brazil, 27 were confirmed by a mouse bioassay. Laboratorial botulism diagnosis is an important procedure to elucidate cases, especially food-borne botulism, to confirm clinical diagnosis and to identify toxins in food, helping sanitary control measures.Botulismo é uma doença rara e potencialmente letal, resultante da ação de uma neurotoxina produzida pelo Clostridium botulinum. No presente estudo, estão descritos os resultados da investigação laboratorial de 117 casos suspeitos de botulismo notificados ao sistema de vigilância, ocorridos no Brasil no período de janeiro de 2000 a outubro de 2008. Os dados obtidos sobre as fontes de transmissão, os tipos de toxina identificados e de amostras analisadas serão discutidos. Foram analisadas 193 amostras clínicas e 81 amostras de alimentos para detecção e identificação de neurotoxina botulínica. Entre as amostras clínicas, 22 (11,4% amostras apresentaram resultado positivo para toxina (nove do tipo A, cinco do tipo AB e em oito o tipo não foi identificado e entre as amostras de alimentos, oito (9,9% foram positivas (cinco do tipo A, uma do tipo AB e em duas o tipo n

  11. Echinoderm immunity

    OpenAIRE

    JE García-Arrarás; F Ramírez-Gómez

    2010-01-01

    Echinoderms are exclusively marine animals that, after the chordates, represent the second largest group of deuterostomes. Their diverse species composition and singular ecological niches provide at the same time challenges and rewards when studying the broad range of responses that make up their immune mechanisms. Two types of responses comprise the immune system of echinoderms: a cellular response and a humoral one. Cell-based immunity is carried by the celomocytes, a morphologically hetero...

  12. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kistanguri, Gaurav; McCrae, Keith R

    2013-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common hematologic disorder characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. ITP presents as a primary form characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 × 109/L) in the absence of other causes or disorders that may be associated with thrombocytopenia, or a secondary form in which immune thrombocytopenia develops in association with another disorder that is usually immune or infectious. ITP may affect individuals of all ages, with peaks during ...

  13. Desarrollo de miastenia gravis tras administración de toxina botulínica en el síndrome de dolor miofascial

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    M.ª F. Muñoz Velázquez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de dolor miofascial (SDM es una patología muscular dolorosa que se define como dolor local o referido asociado a la presencia de nódulos palpables hipersensibles en el trayecto de ese músculo y constituye una patología frecuente en las consultas de dolor crónico. La toxina botulínica es una exotoxina producida por el Clostridium botulinum, cuyos serotipos A, B y F tienen utilidad clínica (fundamentalmente tipo A- Botox®, Dysport®. Se trata de una de las neurotoxinas más potentes que existen. Se utiliza como uso compasivo en el tratamiento del síndrome de dolor miofascial. El efecto beneficioso analgésico del uso de la toxina se origina de reducir la hiperactividad muscular pero estudios recientes sugieren que esta neurotoxina puede tener efectos analgésicos directos diferentes de sus acciones neuromusculares. Su uso no está exento de riesgos. Los efectos adversos se relacionan con la migración de la toxina y son en general leves o moderados y pasajeros. Se han descrito casos de debilidad muscular prolongada e incluso cuadros de miastenia gravis, síndrome de Eaton Lambert desencadenados por el uso de la toxina. Presentamos el caso clínico de un varón afecto de síndrome de dolor miofascial del cuadrado lumbar y psoas tratado con infiltraciones con toxina botulínica. Tras la mejoría del cuadro clínico muscular se desarrolla diplopía y ptosis palpebral reiterante, siendo diagnosticado de miastenia gravis. Revisamos la etiopatogenia del síndrome de dolor miofascial y de la miastenia gravis, así como el uso de la toxina botulínica y sus relaciones entre ellos. Concluimos que es necesaria una anamnesis detallada previa a la utilización de toxina botulínica sobre patología muscular o signos de debilidad muscular.

  14. Toxina botulínica en parálisis cerebral infantil: resultados en 27 sujetos a lo largo de un año

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Carpintero, R. (Rocío); NARBONA, J.

    1997-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos. Resultados positivos en el tratamiento de la parálisis cerebral infantil espástica con toxina botulínica, en estudios anglosajones de los últimos años, nos han llevado a iniciar este trabajo, cuyo objetivo es mostrar nuestra experiencia con la toxina en el tratamiento de esta enfermedad, establecer sus indicaciones, analizar los resultados obtenidos y plantear posibles aplicaciones futuras. Material y métodos. Incluimos 10 pacientes hemipléficos y 17 dipl...

  15. Tratamiento del Síndrome de Dolor Miofascial con Toxina Botulínica tipo A Botulinum toxin type A in the management of Myofascial pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    de Castro, M; L. Cánovas; B. García-Rojo; P. Morillas; J. Martínez-Salgado; A. Gómez-Pombo; A. Castro-Méndez

    2006-01-01

    Introducción: El síndrome de dolor miofascial (SDM) se caracteriza por áreas dolorosas de la musculatura esquelética y por la evidencia clínica y electromiográfica de contracción de bandas musculares sobre las cuales existe un punto cuya presión desencadena un dolor intenso local y referido (punto gatillo). La fisiopatología es incierta pero una posible explicación sería la lesión del músculo por microtraumatismos, sobreuso o espasmo prolongado. La toxina botulínica la produce el microorganis...

  16. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  17. Wound Botulism in Injection Drug Users: Time to Antitoxin Correlates with Intensive Care Unit Length of Stay

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    Offerman, Steven R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to identify factors associated with need for mechanical ventilation (MV, length of intensive care unit (ICU stay, length of hospital stay, and poor outcome in injection drug users (IDUs with wound botulism (WB.Methods: This is a retrospective review of WB patients admitted between 1991-2005. IDUs were included if they had symptoms of WB and diagnostic confirmation. Primary outcome variables were the need for MV, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, hospital-related complications, and death.Results: Twenty-nine patients met inclusion criteria. Twenty-two (76% admitted to heroin use only and seven (24% admitted to heroin and methamphetamine use. Chief complaints on initial presentation included visual changes, 13 (45%; weakness, nine (31%; and difficulty swallowing, seven (24%. Skin wounds were documented in 22 (76%. Twenty-one (72% patients underwent mechanical ventilation (MV. Antitoxin (AT was administered to 26 (90% patients but only two received antitoxin in the emergency department (ED. The time from ED presentation to AT administration was associated with increased length of ICU stay (Regression coefficient = 2.5; 95% CI 0.45, 4.5. The time from ED presentation to wound drainage was also associated with increased length of ICU stay (Regression coefficient = 13.7; 95% CI = 2.3, 25.2. There was no relationship between time to antibiotic administration and length of ICU stay.Conclusion: MV and prolonged ICU stays are common in patients identified with WB. Early AT administration and wound drainage are recommended as these measures may decrease ICU length of stay.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:251-256.

  18. Echinoderm immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JE García-Arrarás

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Echinoderms are exclusively marine animals that, after the chordates, represent the second largest group of deuterostomes. Their diverse species composition and singular ecological niches provide at the same time challenges and rewards when studying the broad range of responses that make up their immune mechanisms. Two types of responses comprise the immune system of echinoderms: a cellular response and a humoral one. Cell-based immunity is carried by the celomocytes, a morphologically heterogeneous population of free roaming cells that are capable of recognizing and neutralizing pathogens. Celomocytes present diverse morphologies and functions, which include phagocytosis, encapsulation, clotting, cytotoxicity, wound healing among others. Humoral immunity is mediated by a wide variety of secreted compounds that can be found in the celomic fluid and play important roles in defense against infection. Compounds such as lectins, agglutinins, perforins, complement and some cytokines make up some of the humoral responses of echinoderms. Recent advances in the field of molecular biology, genomics and transcriptomics have allowed for the discovery of new immune genes and their products. These discoveries have expanded our knowledge of echinoderm immunity and are setting up the stage for future experiments to better understand the evolution of the immune mechanisms of deuterostomes

  19. Immunity booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immunity booster is, according to its patent description, microbiologically pure water with an D/(D+H) isotopic concentration of 100 ppm, with physical-chemical characteristics similar to those of distilled water. It is obtained by sterilization of a mixture of deuterium depleted water, with a 25 ppm isotopic concentration, with distilled water in a volume ratio of 4:6. Unlike natural immunity boosters (bacterial agents as Bacillus Chalmette-Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum; lipopolysaccharides; human immunoglobulin) or synthetical products (levamysol; isoprinosyne with immunostimulating action), which cause hypersensitivity and shocks, thrill, fever, sickness and the immunity complex disease, the water of 100 ppm D/(D + H) isotopic concentration is a toxicity free product. The testing for immune reaction of the immunity booster led to the following results: - an increase of cell action capacity in the first immunity shielding stage (macrophages), as evidenced by stimulation of a number of essential characterizing parameters, as well as of the phagocytosis capacity, bactericide capacity, and opsonic capacity of serum; - an increase of the number of leucocyte particularly of the granulocyte in peripheral blood, produced especially when medullar toxic agents like caryolysine are used; - it hinders the effect of lowering the number of erythrocytes in peripheral blood produced by experimentally induced chronic inflammation; - an increase of nonspecific immunity defence capacity against specific bacterial aggression of both Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae558) and of the Gram-negative ones (Klebsiella pneumoniae 507); - an increase of immunity - stimulating activity (proinflamatory), like that of levamisole as evidenced by the test of stimulation of experimentally induced inflammation by means of carrageenan. The following advantages of the immunity booster are stressed: - it is toxicity free and side effect free; - can be orally administrated as food

  20. Avaliação da fenda palpebral após aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A em pacientes com distonias faciais

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    Mariana Eleonora Pereira Cunial

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a medida da fenda palpebral em pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial benigno (BEB e espasmo hemifacial (EHF após a aplicação periocular de toxina botulínica tipo A. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados pacientes portadores de BEB e EHF submetidos à injeção periocular de toxina botulínica tipo A pela técnica inner orbital de aplicação. Os pacientes foram fotografados em PPO antes da aplicação e catorze dias depois dela. A fenda palpebral foi mensurada nestas imagens por meio de processamento computadorizado de imagens, utilizando o programa ImageJ. As alterações da fenda palpebral foram observadas comparando-se as medidas obtidas no pré e pós-aplicação. RESULTADOS: Comparando-se as imagens obtidas com o programa ImageJ, houve aumento estatisticamente significante (p<0,001 da fenda palpebral em 14 olhos (51,8% após a aplicação de injeção periocular da toxina botulínica e nenhuma das imagens analisadas apresentou diminuição da fenda palpebral. CONCLUSÃO: No presente estudo, os pacientes portadores de distonias faciais apresentaram aumento de fenda palpebral estatisticamente significante após aplicação periocular de toxina botulínica tipo A.

  1. Immunity challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, R John

    2003-06-11

    As people get older, their immune systems falter. The elderly are more susceptible to infections than youngsters are, and hyperactive inflammatory responses appear to contribute to some age-associated illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. Investigating the effect of aging on the immune system was once a scientific stepchild, but card-carrying immunologists are now tackling the problem head-on. Despite the immune system's complexity, researchers have started to make sense of how its components change with age. As the research progresses, scientists hope to bolster elderly people's response to infectious diseases and quiet the inflammation that can make aging a painful experience. PMID:12844525

  2. Retargeting Clostridium difficile Toxin B to Neuronal Cells as a Potential Vehicle for Cytosolic Delivery of Therapeutic Biomolecules to Treat Botulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greice Krautz-Peterson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs deliver a protease to neurons which can cause a flaccid paralysis called botulism. Development of botulism antidotes will require neuronal delivery of agents that inhibit or destroy the BoNT protease. Here, we investigated the potential of engineering Clostridium difficile toxin B (TcdB as a neuronal delivery vehicle by testing two recombinant TcdB chimeras. For AGT-TcdB chimera, an alkyltransferase (AGT was appended to the N-terminal glucosyltransferase (GT of TcdB. Recombinant AGT-TcdB had alkyltransferase activity, and the chimera was nearly as toxic to Vero cells as wild-type TcdB, suggesting efficient cytosolic delivery of the AGT/GT fusion. For AGT-TcdB-BoNT/A-Hc, the receptor-binding domain (RBD of TcdB was replaced by the equivalent RBD from BoNT/A (BoNT/A-Hc. AGT-TcdB-BoNT/A-Hc was >25-fold more toxic to neuronal cells and >25-fold less toxic to Vero cells than AGT-TcdB. Thus, TcdB can be engineered for cytosolic delivery of biomolecules and improved targeting of neuronal cells.

  3. Distonia laríngea: relato de caso e tratamento com toxina botulínica Laryngeal dystonia: case report and treatment with botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor José Barbosa Santos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Distonia laríngea, ou disfonia espasmódica, é caracterizada por contrações involuntárias e inapropriadas da musculatura responsável pela fonação, sendo a do tipo adutora a mais comum. Caracteriza-se por quebras fonatórias, sendo seu diagnóstico confirmado por videolaringoestroboscopia. O tratamento de escolha é feito com a aplicação direta de toxina botulínica nos músculos responsáveis pelo movimento incoordenado. O objetivo desse trabalho é relatar o caso de uma paciente com diagnóstico de distonia laríngea do tipo adutora, tratada com toxina botulínica e discutir as vantagens e observações descritas na literatura a respeito desse tratamento.Laryngeal dystonia or spasmodic dysphonia is characterized by involuntary and innapropiate spasms of vocal muscles, having the adductor type as the most common one. It is chacterized by strain-strangled voice with pitch breaks. Diagnosis is made by means of videolaryngostroboscopic exam. The treatment of choice is done with botulinum toxin directly injected in the muscles responsible for the mismatched movement. The aim of this study is to report on an adductor- type dysphonia patient and to discuss the advantages and observations about this treatment reported in the literature.

  4. Botulismo em bovinos de corte e leite alimentados com cama de frango Botulism in beef and dairy cattle fed with poultry litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveraldo S. Dutra

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Surtos de botulismo causados pelos tipos C e D da toxina botulínica são freqüentes no país, estando originalmente associados à osteofagia e à ingestão de alimentos e água contaminados. No presente trabalho são descritos os aspectos epidemiológicos, clínico-patológicos e laboratoriais de sete surtos da intoxicação em bovinos de corte e leite alimentados com cama de frango, ocorridos nos estados de São Paulo e Minas Gerais entre 1989 e 2000. Cinco surtos ocorreram em rebanhos de corte confinados ou criados extensivamente e suplementados com o subproduto, e dois em propriedades leiteiras. De um total de 1.535 animais alimentados regularmente com a cama de frango, 455 (29,64% morreram em um período que variou de 2 a 4 semanas. A morbidade nos sete surtos estudados variou de 3,47 a 100%, da mesma forma que a mortalidade. Em uma das propriedades a letalidade foi de 60,52%, e em todos os outros surtos ela foi acima de 88,43%; em três propriedades o coeficiente foi de 100%. Os sinais clínicos de paralisia progressiva, dificuldade na locomoção, decúbito e estado mental aparentemente normal, diminuição do tônus da musculatura da língua e cauda, sialorréia e dificuldade respiratória caracterizaram o quadro clínico. À necropsia de 30 animais não foi observada qualquer alteração macroscópica digna de nota. A presença de esporos de Clostridium botulinum foi detectada em amostras de cama de frango colhidas nas sete propriedades. Nas amostras de fígado, líquido ruminal e intestinal, provenientes dos 30 animais necropsiados, foi possível detectar toxinas botulínicas tipos C (5 ou D (9, ou classificada como pertencente ao complexo CD (1, em pelos menos um dos materiais provenientes de 15 animais, confirmando assim o diagnóstico clínico-patológico e epidemiológico de botulismo.Outbreaks of botulism caused by type C and D of the botulinum toxin are frequent in Brazil, and are associated with bone chewing and ingestion of

  5. Adult Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Omer Coskun

    2008-01-01

    Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years) require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored t...

  6. Candida Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R. Naglik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is the predominant cause of both superficial and invasive forms of candidiasis. C. albicans primarily infects immunocompromised individuals as a result of either immunodeficiency or intervention therapy, which highlights the importance of host immune defences in preventing fungal infections. The host defence system utilises a vast communication network of cells, proteins, and chemical signals distributed in blood and tissues, which constitute innate and adaptive immunity. Over the last decade the identity of many key molecules mediating host defence against C. albicans has been identified. This review will discuss how the host recognises this fungus, the events induced by fungal cells, and the host innate and adaptive immune defences that ultimately resolve C. albicans infections during health.

  7. Immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistangari, Gaurav; McCrae, Keith R

    2013-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common hematologic disorder characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. ITP presents as a primary or a secondary form. ITP may affect individuals of all ages, with peaks during childhood and in the elderly, in whom the age-specific incidence of ITP is greatest. Bleeding is the most common clinical manifestation of ITP. The pathogenesis of ITP is complex, involving alterations in humoral and cellular immunity. Corticosteroids remain the most common first line therapy for ITP. This article summarizes the classification and diagnosis of primary and secondary ITP, as well as the pathogenesis and options for treatment. PMID:23714309

  8. The Changes and Significance of Electroencephalogram in the Alimentary Botulism%食物性肉毒中毒患者的脑电图改变及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕敏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To discuss the changes and significance of electroencephalogram in the alimentary botulism. Methods EEG data of 32 patients diagnosed with alimentary botulism were retrospectively analyzed. Results 22 among the 32 patients with alimentary botulism had abnormal EEG, the rate was 68. 75 %. The EEG abnormalities were characterized by the local or diffuse slow wave, a wave ante location, and low tension in the background activity. Conclusion EEG can be considered as one of the diagnostic instruments of the alimentary botulism, especially in the state of midrange and severe poisoning. EEG can be considered as valuable indicator to evaluate the severity of the alimentary botulism. EEG's dynamic monitoring can be considered as one of the indicators to judge the pathogen tic condition turnover of the alimentary botulism.%目的 探讨食物性肉毒中毒患者脑电图(EEG)的变化及其意义.方法 回顾性分析32例临床确诊为食物性肉毒中毒患者的EEG资料.结果 32例食物性肉毒中毒患者中有22例EEG异常,异常率为68.75%,主要表现为局限性或弥漫性慢波化、a波前移、背景活动呈低电压状态.不同程度食物性肉毒中毒患者EEG异常率间差异有统计学意义(P=0.025).结论 EEG可作为食物性肉毒中毒的诊断手段之一,尤其在中度、重度中毒时;EEG可作为判断食物性肉毒中毒严重程度的指标;EEG的动态监测可判断食物性肉毒中毒的病情转归.

  9. Tratamento da doença de Hailey-Hailey com toxina botulínica tipo A Hailey-Hailey disease treatment with Botulinum toxin type A

    OpenAIRE

    Giancarlo Rezende Bessa; Thaís Corsetti Grazziotin; Ana Paula Manzoni; Magda Blessmann Weber; Renan Rangel Bonamigo

    2010-01-01

    Duas irmãs com doença de Hailey-Hailey, com lesões recorrentes - uma em axilas e outra em região inguinal -, e resposta limitada aos tratamentos clássicos. Elas foram tratadas com aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A. Observamos que houve importante melhora na paciente tratada na região inguinal e remissão completa na paciente em cujas axilas sofreram tratamento. Além disso, foi possível poupar uso de antibióticos sistêmicos e corticoides tópicos. O alto custo é um fator restritivo para uso ...

  10. Adult Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored to meet individual variations in risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. In this study, we tried to review this important subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(2: 159-166

  11. Adult Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored to meet individual variations in risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. In this study, we tried to review this important subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 159-166

  12. Treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin in a patient with myasthenia gravis Tratamento de distonia cervical com toxina botulínica em uma paciente com miastenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCIA RUBIA R. GONÇALVES

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who has the rare combination of myasthenia gravis and cervical dystonia. She was treated with botulinum toxin type A with good response and no evidence of deterioration of the myasthenic symptoms. We therefore conclude that it is possible to use botulinum toxin in the presence of defective neuromuscular transmission.Relatamos o caso de uma mulher de 49 anos com rara combinação de miastenia gravis e distonia cervical tratada com toxina botulínica tipo A, apresentando boa resposta e nenhuma evidência de piora do quadro miastênico. A partir dessas observações concluimos que é possível o uso de toxina botulínica na presença de doença da transmissão neuromuscular.

  13. Botulinum toxin: mechanisms of action Toxina botulínica: mecanismos de ação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Dressler

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This review describes therapeutically relevant mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin (BT. BT's molecular mode of action includes extracellular binding to glycoproteine structures on cholinergic nerve terminals and intracellular blockade of the acetylcholine secretion. BT affects the spinal stretch reflex by blockade of intrafusal muscle fibres with consecutive reduction of Ia/II afferent signals and muscle tone without affecting muscle strength (reflex inhibition. This mechanism allows for antidystonic effects not only caused by target muscle paresis. BT also blocks efferent autonomic fibres to smooth muscles and to exocrine glands. Direct central nervous system effects are not observed, since BT does not cross the blood-brain-barrier and since it is inactivated during its retrograde axonal transport. Indirect central nervous system effects include reflex inhibition, normalisation of reciprocal inhibition, intracortical inhibition and somatosensory evoked potentials. Reduction of formalin-induced pain suggests direct analgesic BT effects possibly mediated through blockade of substance P, glutamate and calcitonin gene related peptide.O propósito deste artigo é uma revisão dos mecanismos de ação da toxina botulínica (TB relevantes para a compreensão do seu uso terapêutico. A ação da TB a nível molecular consiste na sua ligação extracelular a estruturas glicoprotéicas em terminais nervosos colinérgicos e no bloqueio intracelular da secreção de acetilcolina. A TB interfere no reflexo espinal de estiramento através do bloqueio de fibras musculares intrafusais causando redução da sinalização aferente veiculada por fibras Ia e II e do tono muscular. Portanto, o efeito da TB pode estar relacionado não somente à paresia muscular mas também à inibição reflexa espinal. A TB promove ainda o bloqueio de fibras autonômicas para músculos lisos e glândulas exócrinas. Apesar de ocorrer alguma difusão sistêmica após a aplica

  14. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Guide Reaching At-Risk Populations MedCon Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch Specific ...

  15. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  16. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  17. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Biological Warfare and Terrorism: The Military and Public Health Response," co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and ...

  18. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... for Emergency Health Professionals Clinician Outreach (COCA) Crisis & Risk Communication (CERC) Laboratory Information Health Alert Network (HAN) ... Cleaning Public Health Emergency Response Guide Reaching At-Risk Populations MedCon Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend ...

  19. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  20. Facts about Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Updates Subscribe Listen Page last reviewed October ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Download page Subscribe to RSS Get email ...

  1. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Chemical Release Bioterrorism Information for Specific Groups Older Adults Children and Their Caregivers People with Disabilities People ... Disaster Public Health Assessment and Surveillance Tools Training & Education Emergency Responder Health Monitoring & Surveillance (ERHMS) ERHMS Online ...

  2. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Reaching At-Risk Populations MedCon Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch Specific ...

  3. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Release Bioterrorism Information for Specific Groups Older Adults Children and Their Caregivers People with Disabilities People with ... people, they would cause the most illness and death. Watch this video to learn how some of ...

  4. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Controls Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC CDC A-Z Index MENU ... Controls Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response Note: ...

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    Full Text Available ... During Tree Removal Electrical Safety and Generators Handling Human Remains After a Disaster Public Health Assessment and ... 6348 Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov

  6. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Disaster Public Health Assessment and Surveillance Tools Training & Education Emergency Responder Health Monitoring & Surveillance (ERHMS) ERHMS Online ... co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food and ...

  7. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch ... Public Health Response," co-produced by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), the Food ...

  8. Study of Waterfowl Botulism

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A total of 55 invertebrate samples were collected from July 1, 1974 to June 30, 1975. Two samples were toxic out of five analyzed. The four year contract for...

  9. Immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, George M

    2014-10-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children is a relatively uncommon and generally benign condition presenting as abrupt onset of bruising, petechiae and thrombocytopenia in an otherwise healthy child due to production of anti-platelet autoantibodies. Diagnosis is largely clinical and laboratory investigation should be kept to a minimum. Indications for treatment have not been standardized and include bleeding, parental anxiety and quality of life. Multiple treatments are available that have been proven to increase the platelet count; the most commonly employed include IVIG, steroids and WinRho (anti-D). Intracranial hemorrhage is the most serious potential complication but is extremely rare and splenectomy is reserved for chronically symptomatic patients who have not responded to other modalities. Identification of molecular targets may be a promising avenue for future research. PMID:25423768

  10. Emergency treatment of botulism food poisoning:one case report%肉毒杆菌食物中毒急诊救治一例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周航亮; 邓腊明

    2014-01-01

    肉毒杆菌食物中毒是由肉毒杆菌释放的肉毒毒素引起严重的神经肌肉中毒症状。该病初期常因临床表现为急性胃肠道中毒症状引起误诊而耽误治疗,严重者导致患者死亡。及早明确诊断和临床对症治疗是成功救治该病的关键。该文总结分析1例肉毒杆菌食物中毒患者的急诊救治过程。经过详细询问该患者的发病史和进食史,进行全面的体格检查、常规检验、影像辅助检查和实验室血浆肉毒毒素检测分析并结合临床症状,该患者确诊为肉毒毒素中毒。在未明确肉毒毒素亚型情况下,对患者大剂量注射A、B型抗肉毒毒素,辅助抗感染和营养恢复神经功能的综合治疗取得较好的治疗效果。患者发病第7日症状好转,救治26 d后康复出院。%Botulism food poisoning is characterized with severe neurotoxic symptoms induced by botu-linum toxin released by botulinum. Constantly,patients with botulism food poisoning could be misdiagnosed or receive delayed treatment due to gastrointestinal symptoms as early clinical manifestations,even leading to death. Therefore,early diagnosis and effective treatment determine the success of fighting against this disease. In this article,the diagnosis and treatment of one case of botulism food poisoning were retrospectively reviewed. After detail inquiry of onset and dietary habit,comprehensive physical examination,routine and imaging test, plasma botulinum toxin detection and combined with clinical symptoms,the patient was diagnosed as botulinum toxin poisoning. In the absence of the exact subtype of botulinum toxin,combined therapy of a large-dose injec-tion of types A and B anti-botulinum toxin,anti-infection therapy and nutritional recovery of neurological func-tion can achieve desirable therapeutic effect. The symptoms were improved at 7th days after treatment. The pa-tient was discharged after 26 days treatment.

  11. Immunity and immunization in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourée, Patrice

    2003-12-01

    As the average life expectancy increases, retired people want to travel. Five to 8% of travellers in tropical areas are old persons. Immune system suffers of old age as the other organs. The number and the functions of the T-lymphocytes decrease, but the B-lymphocytes are not altered. So, the response to the vaccinations is slower and lower in the elderly. Influenza is a great cause of death rate in old people. The seroconversion, after vaccine, is 50% from 60 to 70 years old, 31% from 70 to 80 years old, and only 11% after 80 years old. But in public health, the vaccination reduced the morbidity by 25%, admission to hospital by 20%, pneumonia by 50%, and mortality by 70%. Antipoliomyelitis vaccine is useful for travellers, as the vaccines against hepatitis and typhoid fever. Pneumococcal vaccine is effective in 60%. Tetanus is fatal in at last 32% of the people above 80 years, therefore this vaccine is very important.

  12. Immune System Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode The Immune System and Psoriatic Disease What is an autoimmune disease? ... and painful joints and tendons. Treating the immune system The immune system is not only the key ...

  13. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A Text Size How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! View Survey ...

  14. Childhood Immunization Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get the ... See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of age ...

  15. Sequential immune responses: The weapons of immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Charles; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different te...

  16. Recording information about immunizations

    OpenAIRE

    Gadsby, Roger

    1980-01-01

    The recording of information on triple plus polio and rubella immunizations is reviewed and immunization rates determined for patients in a single-handed practice. Rates of triple plus polio immunizations are satisfactory but rates for rubella immunization are very poor. Immunization information is not exchanged between different sections of the Health Service in Stoke-on-Trent and so the general practitioner has no reliable immunization record for his patients.

  17. Tratamento da doença de Hailey-Hailey com toxina botulínica tipo A Hailey-Hailey disease treatment with Botulinum toxin type A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Rezende Bessa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Duas irmãs com doença de Hailey-Hailey, com lesões recorrentes - uma em axilas e outra em região inguinal -, e resposta limitada aos tratamentos clássicos. Elas foram tratadas com aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A. Observamos que houve importante melhora na paciente tratada na região inguinal e remissão completa na paciente em cujas axilas sofreram tratamento. Além disso, foi possível poupar uso de antibióticos sistêmicos e corticoides tópicos. O alto custo é um fator restritivo para uso rotineiro e estudos maiores são necessários para definir eficácia e relação custo-benefício dessa intervenção.Two sisters with recurrent lesions, one on axillae and other on the groin, and with limited response to classical treatments were treated with injections botulinum toxin type A. We observed marked improvement in the patient treated in the groin and complete remission in the patient treated in the axillae. It was possible to spare the use of systemic antibiotics and topical corticosteroids. The high cost is a restrictive factor to routine use and large studies are necessary to access efficacy and cost benefit profile.

  18. Toxina botulínica tipo A para el manejo del dolor en pacientes con síndrome de dolor miofascial crónico Botulinum toxin type A for the management of pain in patients with chronic myofascial pain

    OpenAIRE

    J.C. Torres Huerta; J.R. Hernández Santos; E.M. Ortiz Ramírez; S. Tenopala Villegas

    2010-01-01

    Introducción: El síndrome de dolor miofascial es uno de los principales problemas de dolor crónico en la práctica clínica, comúnmente asociado a un traumatismo o a microtraumatismos repetitivos. La toxina botulínica tipo A (Botox®) es una alternativa aceptada como opción terapéutica. Objetivo: Valorar la funcionalidad de las actividades diarias mejorando la intensidad del dolor con el uso de la toxina botulínica tipo A, infiltrada en puntos gatillo, en pacientes con síndrome de dolor miofasci...

  19. Tratamiento del Síndrome de Dolor Miofascial con Toxina Botulínica tipo A Botulinum toxin type A in the management of Myofascial pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Castro

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El síndrome de dolor miofascial (SDM se caracteriza por áreas dolorosas de la musculatura esquelética y por la evidencia clínica y electromiográfica de contracción de bandas musculares sobre las cuales existe un punto cuya presión desencadena un dolor intenso local y referido (punto gatillo. La fisiopatología es incierta pero una posible explicación sería la lesión del músculo por microtraumatismos, sobreuso o espasmo prolongado. La toxina botulínica la produce el microorganismo Clostridium botulinum en condiciones anaeróbicas y se trata de una de las sustancias más potentes que se conocen. Material y métodos: Se trata de un estudio observacional prospectivo en el que hemos estudiado la aplicación de la toxina botulínica tipo A en el tratamiento del síndrome de dolor miofascial en una serie de 20 pacientes. Todos los pacientes fueron sometidos a una infiltración diagnóstica de la musculatura lumbar o del músculo piramidal con 8 ml de ropivacaína al 0,2% y 6 mg de fosfato sódico de betametasona y 6 mg de acetato de betametasona. Para la localización de los músculos utilizamos referencias anatómicas y administramos de 3 a 5 ml de contraste hidro-soluble para asegurarnos mediante fluoroscopia de la correcta localización de la aguja. La administración de toxina botulínica se realizó siguiendo el mismo método utilizado en las infiltraciones diagnósticas. Decidimos utilizar una dosis de 250 U de Dysport® en cada músculo a infiltrar sin pasar en ningún caso de 1000 U para un mismo paciente. La eficacia del tratamiento se basó en el control del dolor según la Escala Visual Analógica basal (EVA 1, a los 15 días (EVA 15, a los 30 días (EVA 30 y a los 90 días (EVA 90 de las infiltraciones y el test de Lattinen evaluado antes del tratamiento (TLT 1 y al final del estudio (TLT 2. Todos los pacientes fueron preguntados acerca de posibles efectos secundarios. Finalmente se registró el grado de

  20. Our Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note from ... are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  1. Understanding Herd Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, C J E; Ferrari, M; Graham, A L; Grenfell, B T

    2015-12-01

    Individual immunity is a powerful force affecting host health and pathogen evolution. Importantly, the effects of individual immunity also scale up to affect pathogen transmission dynamics and the success of vaccination campaigns for entire host populations. Population-scale immunity is often termed 'herd immunity'. Here we outline how individual immunity maps to population outcomes and discuss implications for control of infectious diseases. Particular immunological characteristics may be more or less likely to result in a population level signature of herd immunity; we detail this and also discuss other population-level outcomes that might emerge from individual-level immunity.

  2. Efectividad del tratamiento conservador y/o toxina botulínica en la displasia de cadera en parálisis cerebral infantil espástica. Revisión sistemática

    OpenAIRE

    Busto Ruiz, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: Estudiar la efectividad del tratamiento conservador y/o toxina botulínica tipo A en la prevención o tratamiento de la displasia o dislocación de la cadera en PCI espástica. Material y métodos: Se realizó una búsqueda bibliográfica en las bases de datos de Pubmed, Web of Science (WOS), PEDro y Cochrane Library. Las palabras clave utilizadas fueron hip dysplasia, hip dislocation, hip subluxation, cerebral palsy, treatment, management, child. Se incluyeron todo tipo d...

  3. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. PMID:27312156

  4. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  5. Innate immunity and adjuvants

    OpenAIRE

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-01-01

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence aga...

  6. Immunizations for foreign travel.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of preparing travelers for destinations throughout the world is providing them with immunizations. Before administering any vaccines, however, a careful health and immunization history and travel itinerary should be obtained in order to determine vaccine indications and contraindications. There are three categories of immunizations for foreign travel. The first category includes immunizations which are routinely recommended whether or not the individual is tr...

  7. Biomarkers for immune thrombocytopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lingjia; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhang, Liping; Shi, Yongyu; Ji, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disease with abnormal biomarkers. Immune thrombocytopenia pathogenesis is a complicated process in which the patient’s immune system is activated by platelet autoantigens resulting in immune mediated platelet destruction or suppression of platelet production. The autoantibodies produced by autoreactive B cells against self antigens are considered to play a crucial role. In addition, biomarkers such as transforming growth factor-beta1,Toll-like receptor...

  8. Estudo comparativo entre toxina botulínica e bupivacaína para infiltração de pontos-gatilho em síndrome miofascial crônica Estudio comparativo entre toxina botulínica y bupivacaína para infiltración de puntos-gatillo en síndrome miofascial crónica Comparative study between botulin toxin and bupivacaine for triggering-points infiltration in chronic myofascial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Keiichi Unno

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Existem controvérsias sobre a eficácia da toxina botulínica em relação ao anestésico local para infiltração de pontos-gatilho. O objetivo deste estudo é comparar o efeito analgésico da toxina botulínica com o da bupivacaína, para infiltração em pontos-gatilho de síndrome miofascial crônica. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 20 pacientes, divididos em dois grupos. Os pacientes do G1 (n = 10 receberam 25U de toxina botulínica e os do G2 (n = 10, bupivacaína a 0,25%, em um a três pontos-gatilho, sendo 0,5 mL por ponto. Os pacientes foram avaliados semanalmente, durante 8 semanas. Foram associados 35 mg de orfenadrina, e 300 mg de dipirona, a cada 8 horas, e os pacientes foram submetidos à estimulação elétrica transcutânea, duas vezes por semana, durante 1 hora por sessão. A intensidade da dor foi avaliada através da escala numérica verbal e a qualidade da analgesia, pelo paciente, nos momentos zero (antes da injeção, e após 30 minutos, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 e 8 semanas. Os resultados foram submetidos à análise estatística (Mann-Whitney e Exato de Fisher. RESULTADOS: Após 30 minutos da aplicação e com 1 e 4 semanas, a intensidade da dor no G1 foi menor que no G2. Após 2, 3, 5, 7 e 8 semanas da infiltração, não houve diferença significativa entre os grupos. A qualidade da analgesia foi considerada melhor pelos pacientes do G1 que do G2, exceto após 2 semanas. CONCLUSÕES: O efeito analgésico foi melhor com toxina botulínica (25 U que com bupivacaína a 0,25% para infiltração de pontos-gatilho.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Existen controversias sobre la eficacia de la toxina botulínica con relación al anestésico local para infiltración de puntos-gatillo. El objetivo de este estudio es comparar el efecto analgésico de la toxina botulínica con el de la bupivacaína, para infiltración en puntos-gatillo de síndrome miofascial crónica. MÉTODO: Fueron evaluados 20 pacientes, divididos en

  9. Aging changes in immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keeps your immune system strong. DO NOT smoke. Smoking weakens your immune system. Limit your intake of alcohol . Ask your provider how much alcohol is safe for you. Look into safety measures to prevent falls and injuries. A weak immune system can ...

  10. The Immune System Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  11. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-09

    Immune Deficiency Disorders:; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorder:; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  12. Simultaneous immunization against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Z Tchilian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis, provides some protection against disseminated disease in infants but has little effect on prevention of adult pulmonary disease. Newer parenteral immunization prime boost regimes may provide improved protection in experimental animal models but are unproven in man so that there remains a need for new and improved immunization strategies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mice were immunized parenterally, intranasally or simultaneously by both routes with BCG or recombinant mycobacterial antigens plus appropriate adjuvants. They were challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb and the kinetics of Mtb growth in the lungs measured. We show that simultaneous immunization (SIM of mice by the intranasal and parenteral routes is highly effective in increasing protection over parenteral BCG administration alone. Intranasal immunization induces local pulmonary immunity capable of inhibiting the growth of Mtb in the early phase (the first week of infection, while parenteral immunization has a later effect on Mtb growth. Importantly, these two effects are additive and do not depend on priming and boosting the immune response. The best SIM regimes reduce lung Mtb load by up to 2 logs more than BCG given by either route alone. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish SIM as a novel and highly effective immunization strategy for Mtb that could be carried out at a single clinic visit. The efficacy of SIM does not depend on priming and boosting an immune response, but SIM is complementary to prime boost strategies and might be combined with them.

  13. Avaliação do filme lacrimal de pacientes com distonia facial durante tratamento com toxina botulínica tipo A Lacrimal film evaluation of patients with facial dystonia during botulinum toxin type A treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Grativol Costa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar o efeito da toxina botulínica no filme lacrimal em pacientes com distonia facial. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos 24 pacientes portadores de blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial que receberam aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A que foram submetidos à propedêutica do filme lacrimal previamente à aplicação e após, com 7 e 30 dias. RESULTADOS: Houve diminuição das queixas de olho seco trinta dias após a aplicação, entretanto, o tempo de ruptura do filme lacrimal e o teste de Schirmer não demonstraram variação significativa entre os períodos pré-tratamento e 1 mês da aplicação. Em relação ao teste de coloração com rosa bengala, todos os olhos que coraram no pré-tratamento, melhoraram na última avaliação. CONCLUSÃO: A injeção de toxina botulínica pode aliviar as queixas de olho seco nos pacientes com distonia facial pela provável ação de inibição do orbicular na sua função de bomba lacrimal.PURPOSE: To determine the effect of botulinum toxin injection in the eyelid on lacrimal film in patients with facial dystonia. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with essential blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm were submitted to botulinum toxin injection and lacrimal film tests were performed before the application and after seven and thirty days. RESULTS: There was improvement in symptoms of dry eye and rose bengal test, however, the breakup time and Schirmer's test did not show significant variation between pretreatment and after 1 month of follow-up. CONCLUSION: The dry eye symptoms in patients with facial dystonia may be attenuated by botulinum toxin due to its possible inhibitory effect on the orbicular muscle leading to a decrease in lacrimal pump.

  14. Botulinum toxin for treatment of cocontractions related to obstetrical brachial plexopathy Toxina botulínica para tratamento das co-contrações relacionadas à plexopatia braquial obstétrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O. Heise

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A was recently introduced for treatment of biceps - triceps muscle cocontraction, which compromises elbow function in children with obstetrical brachial plexopathy. This is our preliminary experience with this new approach. Eight children were treated with 2 - 3 U/kg of botulinum toxin injected in the triceps (4 patients and biceps (4 patients muscle, divided in 2 or 3 sites. All patients submitted to triceps injections showed a long-lasting improvement of active elbow flexion and none required new injections, after a follow-up of 3 to 18 months. Three of the patients submitted to biceps injections showed some improvement of elbow extension, but none developed anti-gravitational strength for elbow extension and the effect lasted only three to five months. One patient showed no response to triceps injections. Our data suggest that botulinum toxin can be useful in some children that have persistent disability secondary to obstetrical brachial plexopathy.A toxina botulínica do tipo A foi introduzida recentemente para o tratamento das co-contrações entre os músculos biceps e triceps, que comprometem a função do cotovelo nas crianças com plexopatia braquial obstétrica. Apresentamos nossa experiência preliminar com esta abordagem. Oito crianças foram tratadas com 2 - 3 U/kg de toxina botulínica injetada nos músculos triceps (4 pacientes e biceps (4 pacientes, divididas em 2 ou 3 sítios. Todos os pacientes submetidos a injeções no triceps apresentaram melhora persistente da flexão do cotovelo e nenhum precisou de novas aplicações após seguimento de 3 a 18 meses. Três pacientes submetidos a aplicações no biceps apresentaram melhora na extensão do cotovelo, mas nenhum adquiriu força antigravitacional e o efeito durou apenas 3 a 5 meses. Um paciente não respondeu às injeções. Nossos dados sugerem que a toxina botulínica pode ser útil no tratamento de algumas crianças com seqüelas de plexopatia braquial

  15. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  16. Proteomics and insect immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Shi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Insect innate immunity is both a model for vertebrate immunity as well as a key system that impactsmedically important pathogens that are transmitted by insects. Recent developments in proteomics andprotein identification techniques combined with the completion of genome sequences for Anophelesgambiae and Drosophila melanogaster provided the tools for examining insect immunity at a new level ofmolecular detail. Application of proteomics to insect immunity resulted in predictions of new roles inimmunity for proteins already known in other contexts (e.g. ferritin, transferrin, Chi-lectins and helped totarget specific members of multi-gene families that respond to different pathogens (e.g. serine proteases,thioester proteins. In addition, proteomics studies verify that post-translational modifications play a keyrole in insect immunity since many of the identified proteins are modified in some way. These studiescomplement recent work on insect transcriptomes and provide new directions for further investigation ofinnate immunity.

  17. Síndrome de Frey por submaxilectomía y tratamiento con toxina botulínica Frey syndrome secondary to submaxillectomy and botulinic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Baéz

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Frey (SF se caracteriza por rubor, calor y sudación en la región maseterina y geniana durante las comidas. El SF se observa en el 20-60% de los pacientes sometidos a parotidectomía. Presentamos un caso con SF secundario a la ablación de la glándula submaxilar en un varón de 30 años de edad, sin antecedentes patológicos, que consultó en el año 2000 por adenopatía cervical izquierda. La misma fue biopsiada y la anatomía patológica informó carcinoma medular de tiroides. El paciente presentaba múltiples metástasis hepáticas y pulmonares, motivo por el cual recibió tratamiento quimioterápico con cisplatino plus doxorrubicina (seis ciclos con respuesta completa, finalizando dicho esquema en marzo del 2002. En julio del 2002 se realizó tiroidectomía total más vaciamiento ganglionar izquierdo con resección de la glándula submaxilar. Durante la cirugía se lesionó la rama mentoniana del nervio cervicofacial, rama del VII par craneal. En septiembre del 2004 consultó por episodios de sudación durante las comidas en la región submaxilar izquierda. Se realizó prueba de Minor y luego se procedió a aplicar toxina botulínica tipo A en la región afectada, a razón de 2.5 UI por punto (cm², a un total de 17 puntos. El control a los 21 días demostró más de un 95% de efectividad en la resolución del SF. El efecto duró un año, y una segunda reinfiltración mostró similar respuesta. No hallamos descripciones anteriores de SF en región submaxilar; se presenta su tratamiento satisfactorio con toxina botulínica tipo A.A case of Frey syndrome (FS secondary to submaxillar gland exeresis is presented and the results of the treatment with botulinum toxin (BTX type A. FS is a condition of sweating cheek and preauricular area during mealtime as a sequel detected in about 20-60% of patients after parotidectomy. The clinical symptoms include swelling, flushing and hyperhidrosis. The treatment choice for this condition is

  18. A Fractal Immune Network

    OpenAIRE

    Bentley, Peter J.; Timmis, Jon

    2004-01-01

    Proteins are the driving force in development (embryogenesis) and the immune system. Here we describe how a model of proteins designed for evolutionary development in computers can be combined with a model of immune systems. Full details of a prototype system are provided, and preliminary experiments presented. Results show that evolution is able to adjust the mapping between input data and antigens and cause useful changes to the subnetworks formed by the immune algorithm.

  19. Correção de estrabismo paralítico por injeção de toxina botulínica Management of paralytic strabismus by injection of botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Wattiez

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a ação da toxina botulínica em paralisias adquiridas de VI e III nervos. Pacientes e métodos: Foram tratados com toxina botulínica 15 pacientes, com diagnóstico de paralisia de VI e III nervos, aguda ou crônica. Foram estudados de forma prospectiva, durante os meses de agosto de 1998 a maio de 1999. O estudo incluiu, além da avaliação do estrabismo, avaliação oftalmológica completa. Os pacientes foram acompanhados por um período de 2 a 7 meses após a última aplicação. Resultados: Onze pacientes (73% apresentaram paralisias do VI nervo e 4 pacientes (27%, paralisias de III nervo. Seis casos foram agudos (40% e 9 casos (60%, crônicos. Cinco dos 6 casos agudos (83% conseguiram controlar o desvio com a toxina botulínica como único tratamento e obter fusão. Dos 9 casos crônicos, 2 casos (22% corrigiram o desvio só com a toxina, os outros 7, além da aplicação, foram submetidos à cirurgia, dos quais 4 casos (46% foram corrigidos e os outros 3 casos (32% não. Conclusão: Concluímos que nos casos em que houve força muscular residual, após a paralisia, e bom potencial de fusão, a toxina botulínica foi o melhor tratamento, pois foi possível controlar o desvio e obter fusão, sem cirurgia.Purpose: To evaluate the treatment by injection of botulinum toxin in acquired sixth and third nerve palsies. Methods: Fifteen patients were treated with botulinum toxin. They were studied prospectively during nine months, between August, 1998 and May, 1999. In addition to the strabismus examination, a complete ophthalmological evaluation was performed. The patients were followed for 2 to 7 months after the last injection or surgical procedure. Results: Eleven patients (73% presented with sixth nerve palsy and four (27% with third nerve palsy. Six cases were acute (40% and 9 cases (60% were chronic. Five acute cases (83% obtained ocular alignment and controlled the deviation with toxin. Two of nine chronic cases (22

  20. Innate immunity and adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-10-12

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  1. Immunity and skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E.B.; Brysk, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Observations in humans and animal studies support the theory that immunologic surveillance plays an important role in limiting the development of skin malignancies. These immune responses undergo progressive diminution with age. In addition, other factors, such as bereavement, poor nutrition, and acute and chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, can further diminish immune mechanisms.

  2. Adaptive immunity to fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2014-11-06

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases.

  3. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Lefèvre

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied.

  4. Artificial Immune Systems (2010)

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    The human immune system has numerous properties that make it ripe for exploitation in the computational domain, such as robustness and fault tolerance, and many different algorithms, collectively termed Artificial Immune Systems (AIS), have been inspired by it. Two generations of AIS are currently in use, with the first generation relying on simplified immune models and the second generation utilising interdisciplinary collaboration to develop a deeper understanding of the immune system and hence produce more complex models. Both generations of algorithms have been successfully applied to a variety of problems, including anomaly detection, pattern recognition, optimisation and robotics. In this chapter an overview of AIS is presented, its evolution is discussed, and it is shown that the diversification of the field is linked to the diversity of the immune system itself, leading to a number of algorithms as opposed to one archetypal system. Two case studies are also presented to help provide insight into the m...

  5. Denmark: Botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pærregaard, A; Angen, Øystein; Lisby, M;

    2008-01-01

    with preformed neurotoxin could not be excluded. The food history revealed consumption of a commercially produced banana/peach puree which was suspected as a possible source, and based on a precautionary principle this product was recalled. The case description illustrates a risk-management dilemma between...

  6. Denmark: botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paerregaard, A; Angen, O; Lisby, M;

    2008-01-01

    A 4.5 months old, previously healthy Danish girl was admitted to a paediatric department after six days of passive behaviour and weak suck. Over the next days she became increasingly weak, developed bilateral ptosis, the muscle stretch reflexes were lost, and mydriasis with slow pupillary respons...

  7. Immunity in urogenital protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, N; Goyal, K; Dhanda, R S; Yadav, M

    2014-09-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity play a significant role in urogenital infections. Innate immunity is provided by the epithelial cells and mucus lining along with acidic pH, which forms a strong physical barrier against the pathogens in female reproductive tract. Cells of innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, chemokines and adaptive immunity in the reproductive tract are evolved during infection, and a pro-inflammatory response is generated to fight against the invading pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, a primary urogenital protozoa, the etiological agent of human trichomoniasis, a curable sexually transmitted infection. The involvement of the urogenital tract by other protozoal infections such as P. falciparum, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, Entamoeba histolytica and Acanthamoeba infection is rarely reported. Trichomonas induce pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses in infected subjects. Multifactorial pathogenic mechanisms including parasite adherence, cysteine proteases, lipophosphoglycan, free radical, cytokine generation and Toll-like receptors appear to interplay with the induction of local and systemic immune responses that ultimately determine the outcome of the infection. However, the involvement of urogenital pathogen-specific immune mechanisms and effect of normal local resident flora on the outcome (symptomatic vs. asymptomatic) of infection are poorly understood. Moreover, immune interactions in trichomoniasis subjects co-infected with bacterial and viral pathogens need to be elucidated.

  8. Immunization for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunization History Vaccine Safety Articles Resources Personal Stories Vaccine Education Videos Research Articles ACOG Resources Resources & Links ACOG Update on Zika Virus Pregnancy Attention pregnant women! Pregnant women, their ...

  9. HIV and Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV and Immunizations (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Vaccines are products that ... a disease outbreak. Is there a vaccine against HIV? Testing is underway on experimental vaccines to prevent ...

  10. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lock onto them. T cells are like the soldiers, destroying the invaders that the intelligence system has ... can't be prevented, you can help your child's immune system stay stronger and fight illnesses by ...

  11. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  12. Immunity of international organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Immunity rules are part and parcel of the law of international organizations. It has long been accepted that international organizations and their staff need to enjoy immunity from the jurisdiction of national courts. However, it is the application of these rules in practice that increasingly causes controversy. Claims against international organizations are brought before national courts by those who allegedly suffer from their activities. These can be both natural and legal persons such as companies. National courts, in particular lower courts, have often been less willing to recognize the immunity of the organization concerned than the organization s founding fathers. Likewise, public opinion and legal writings frequently criticize international organizations for invoking their immunity and for the lack of adequate means of redress for claimants. It is against this background that an international conference was organized at Leiden University in June 2013. A number of highly qualified academics and practit...

  13. Immune dysfunction in cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sipeki Nóra; Antal-Szalmás Péter (1968-) (laboratóriumi szakorvos, laboratóriumi hematológus és immunológus, klinikai farmakológus szakorvos); Lakatos Péter László; Papp Mária (1975-) (belgyógyász, gasztroenterológus)

    2014-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune dysfunction, also referred to as cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction syndrome, is a major component of cirrhosis, and plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of both the acute and chronic worsening of liver function. During the evolution of the disease, acute decompensation events associated with organ failure(s), so-called acute-on chronic liver failure, and chronic decompensation with progression of liver fibrosis and also development of disease specific comp...

  14. Adults Need Immunizations, Too!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-19

    In this podcast, Dr. Andrew Kroger from CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases discusses simple, safe, and effective ways adults can help protect themselves, their family, and their community from serious and deadly diseases.  Created: 3/19/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 3/19/2012.

  15. Immune effects of probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, Agnes E.

    2001-01-01

    Twenty papers concerning the effects on the immune system of ingestion of probiotic bacteria in humans have been reviewed. Several studies report that intake of probiotics stimulate cell-mediated immune effector functions. Thus, enhanced production of interferon-y by blood cells, enhanced phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and to a lesser extent monocytes, and enhanced expression of complement receptors on PMNs are effects quite consistently seen in subjects consuming probioti...

  16. Artificial Immune Systems Tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Aickelin, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    The biological immune system is a robust, complex, adaptive system that defends the body from foreign pathogens. It is able to categorize all cells (or molecules) within the body as self-cells or non-self cells. It does this with the help of a distributed task force that has the intelligence to take action from a local and also a global perspective using its network of chemical messengers for communication. There are two major branches of the immune system. The innate immune system is an unchanging mechanism that detects and destroys certain invading organisms, whilst the adaptive immune system responds to previously unknown foreign cells and builds a response to them that can remain in the body over a long period of time. This remarkable information processing biological system has caught the attention of computer science in recent years. A novel computational intelligence technique, inspired by immunology, has emerged, called Artificial Immune Systems. Several concepts from the immune have been extracted an...

  17. Artificial Immune Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Aickelin, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    The biological immune system is a robust, complex, adaptive system that defends the body from foreign pathogens. It is able to categorize all cells (or molecules) within the body as self-cells or non-self cells. It does this with the help of a distributed task force that has the intelligence to take action from a local and also a global perspective using its network of chemical messengers for communication. There are two major branches of the immune system. The innate immune system is an unchanging mechanism that detects and destroys certain invading organisms, whilst the adaptive immune system responds to previously unknown foreign cells and builds a response to them that can remain in the body over a long period of time. This remarkable information processing biological system has caught the attention of computer science in recent years. A novel computational intelligence technique, inspired by immunology, has emerged, called Artificial Immune Systems. Several concepts from the immune have been extracted an...

  18. Immunizations climb, then falter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, H

    1994-01-01

    The extended immunization campaign began in the mid 1980s and contributed to immunization of 4 out of every 5 infants worldwide, or 80% by the end of the 1980s. There was a slight relaxation of effort around 1990 and 1991, and declines occurred in 28 developing countries. In developing countries, 101 countries maintained or increased immunization in 1991. Rates dropped in Brazil and Venezuela and sub-Saharan Africa. Rates remained constant in 1992, except for the declines in women's tetanus immunization. Distribution is 4-5 times a year to 100 million infants. The savings in lives amounted to 3 million 1992, and further extension could have saved another 1.7 million. The cost in low income countries is $6 to $20, with an average of $15. Five visits are required for complete immunization into one dose; costs could then be reduced by 70%. Total annual costs amount to $2.2 to $2.4 billion for the United Nations Expanded Programme on Immunization. This sum amounts to 2% of public health expenditures in developing countries. The benefits are in reduction in health care costs and expanded productive potential of people. The measles vaccine alone reduced the death rate from 2.5 million in 1980 to 900,000 in 1990. Nonfatal measles morbidity was reduced from 75 million to 25 million for the same period. From averted measles incidents, the savings in treatment costs and productive potential are immeasurable. The first smallpox vaccine was developed in 1796 by Edward Jenner, but it took nearly two for final smallpox eradication in 1979 worldwide. Over the past 10 years, polio eradication has cost $1.4 billion, but without polio vaccines, the cost would reach $500 million annually. Refrigeration and transportation to remote areas has made immunization difficult. The development of low-dose vaccines that would maintain potency in tropical temperatures would be a welcome contribution.

  19. Tratamiento de epicondilitis refractaria con neurotoxina botulínica tipo A libre de complejo proteínico Treament of refractory epicondilitis with botulin neurotoxin type A free of protein complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Santos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La epicondilitis o "codo de tenista" es un cuadro que se caracteriza por dolor en la inserción proximal del músculo extensor radial corto del carpo. El tratamiento de este cuadro clásicamente se ha basado en fisioterapia e infiltración con corticoides, así como el uso de ortesis. La cirugía se recomienda cuando las estrategias conservadoras no controlan los síntomas después de 6-12 meses de tratamiento. La toxina botulínica es una opción terapéutica cuando fracasan medidas conservadoras. Material y métodos: Presentamos 3 pacientes diagnosticados previamente de epicondilitis de más de 6 meses de evolución y que habían sido sometidos de forma ambulatoria a los tratamiento habituales sin éxito, a los cuales se les administró toxina botulínica A libre de complejo proteico (50 UI en un solo punto de aplicación. Se evaluó la intensidad del dolor en ambos pacientes usando una escala analógica visual (EVA, en la que el 0 representa ningún dolor y 10 significa el dolor más intenso que han experimentado tanto a la palpación como con la maniobra de extensión resistida de la muñeca. Resultados: Se obtuvo una reducción importante del dolor en los 3 pacientes tratados al primer mes de su administración, con resolución total del mismo a los 3 meses. Este beneficio se mantuvo al menos durante los 6 meses de estudio. Conclusiones: La epicondilitis refractaria a tratamientos conservadores puede ser tratada eficazmente con toxina botulínica A libre de complejo proteínico.Introduction: Epicondylitis or "tennis elbow" is a condition characterized by pain in the proximal insertion of the extensor Carpi radialis brevis muscle. Treatment of this condition has classically been based on physiotherapy and infiltration with corticosteroids, as well as the use of orthoses. Surgery is recommended when the conservative strategies do not control symptoms after 6-12 months of treatment. Botulin toxin is a therapeutic option when

  20. Meningococcal C specific immune responses: immunity in an era of immunization with vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voer, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate immunization was introduced in the Dutch national immunization schedule at the age of 14 months, together with a large catch-up campaign in 2002. After introduction of this MenC immunization, the incidence of MenC completely disappeared from the immunized populati

  1. Tratamiento de la cefalea tensional con toxina botulínica tipo A Botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of tension-type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Arbaiza

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar el tiempo de inicio de la analgesia, la eficacia y la seguridad de la aplicación de la toxina botulínica tipo A (TB-A en pacientes con cefalea tensional (CT. Material y métodos: Criterios de inclusión: Edad de 18-70 años, diagnóstico de CT de acuerdo a la International Headache Society, dos o más episodios de CT por mes durante por lo menos 3 meses, CT no controlado con el tratamiento estándar, examen neurológico normal y firma de un consentimiento informado. Variables: Intensidad de la cefalea (IC, frecuencia de presentación de la cefalea (FC, duración de cefalea (DC, sensibilidad a la digitopresión (SDP de la musculatura pericraneal, número de puntos dolorosos (NPD de la musculatura pericraneal, tiempo de inicio de la analgesia (TIA, tiempo hasta el efecto máximo de la analgesia (TMA y disminución de la utilización de analgésicos (DUA. Evaluaciones en los días 0, 15 y 30. Se aplicaron 50 U TB-A en la musculatura pericraneal. Los pacientes pudieron continuar con su terapia analgésica previa de acuerdo a la evolución de la cefalea. Resultados: Se reclutaron 20 pacientes, todos de sexo femenino, con una edad promedio de 47 años. La IC de 2,15 en la primera evaluación disminuyó a 1,05 y 0,9 en la segunda y tercera evaluaciones (p=0,009 y 0,008. La FC de 10,25 días disminuyó a 3,6 y 2,75 días (p=0,008 y 0,012. La DC de 2,3 horas diarias disminuyó a 1,3 y 1,1 (p=0,009 en las dos. La SDP de 1,55 disminuyó a 0,5 y 0,55 (p=0,008 en las dos. El NPD de 2,65 disminuyó a 0,8 y 0,6 (p=0,010 y 0,006. El TIA fue de 8 días y el TMA fue de 25 días. La DUA de 5 disminuyó a 1,9 y 1,5. El 35% de los pacientes presentaron un evento adverso probable, y de una intensidad leve a moderada. Conclusiones: La TB-A es un tratamiento simple, efectivo y seguro para el control de la CT La técnica de aplicación estandarizada es un método fácil de reproducir. Se requieren estudios para valorar el número de punciones y

  2. Iron overload and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gra(c)a Porto; Maria De Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the characterization of genes involved in the control of iron homeostasis in humans and in mice has improved the definition of iron overload and of the cells affected by it. The cell involved in iron overload with the greatest effect on immunity is the macrophage.Intriguing evidence has emerged, however, in the last 12 years indicating that parenchymal iron overload is linked to genes classically associated with the immune system. This review offers an update of the genes and proteins relevant to iron metabolism expressed in cells of the innate immune system, and addresses the question of how this system is affected in clinical situations of iron overload. The relationship between iron and the major cells of adaptive immunity, the T lymphocytes,will also be reviewed. Most studies addressing this last question in humans were performed in the clinical model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Data will also be reviewed demonstrating how the disruption of molecules essentially involved in adaptive immune responses result in the spontaneous development of iron overload and how they act as modifiers of iron overload.

  3. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen K. Purcell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  4. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits. PMID:27474733

  5. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno......-informatics methods to allow the simulation of the cardinal events of the antigenic recognition, going from single peptides to whole proteomes. The recognition process accounts for B cell-epitopes prediction through Parker-scale affinity estimation, class I and II HLA peptide prediction and binding through position...... simulation. AVAILABILITY: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/C-ImmSim-10.1/ CONTACT: f.castiglione@iac.cnr.it...

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease related innate immunity and adaptive immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Zhonge

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic nonspecific intestinal inflammatory disease, including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). Its pathogenesis remains not yet clear. Current researchers believe that after environmental factors act on individuals with genetic susceptibility, an abnormal intestinal immune response is launched under stimulation of intestinal flora. However, previous studies only focused on adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of IBD. Currently, roles of innate immune response in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation have also drawn much attention. In this study, IBD related innate immunity and adaptive immunity were explained, especially the immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:27398134

  7. IL–18 AND IMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Yakushenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Interleukin–18 is one of the main cytokines, inducing production of IFNg. It is the important factor of anti–infectious and anti–tumor immunity. The review represent molecular–genetic and biochemical characteristics of IL–18. The data about producers, the structure of the receptor and of IL–18 binding protein, as well as signal transduction in the cell are considered. Besides that, the main immune effects of IL–18 are discussed. (Med. Immunol., 2005, vol.7, № 4, pp 355–364

  8. Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive growth of the malignancy but may even provide active growth signals upon which the tumor subsequently becomes dependent. In the past decade, the success of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer for relapsed or refractory lymphomas has validated immunotherapy as a possible treatment cornerstone. Here, we review the mechanisms by which lymphomas have been found to evade and even reprogram the immune system, including alterations in surface molecules, recruitment of immunosuppressive subpopulations, and secretion of anti-inflammatory factors. A fundamental understanding of the immune evasion strategies utilized by lymphomas may lead to better prognostic markers and guide the development of targeted interventions that are both safer and more effective than current standards of care

  9. Bed rest and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Aviles, Hernan; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.; Niesel, David; Pandya, Utpal; Allen, Christopher; Ochs, Hans D.; Blancher, Antoine; Abbal, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Space flight has been shown to result in altered immune responses. The current study was designed to investigate this possibility by using the bed rest model of some space flight conditions. A large number of women are included as subjects in the study. The hypothesis being tested is: 60 days head-down tilt bed rest of humans will affect the immune system and resistance to infection. Blood, urine and saliva samples will be obtained from bed rest subjects prior to, at intervals during, and after completion of 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest. Leukocyte blastogenesis, cytokine production and virus reactivation will be assessed. The ability of the subjects to respond appropriately to immunization with the neoantigen bacteriophage φX-174 will also be determined. Bed rest is being carried out at MEDES, Toulouse France, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. The studies to be carried out in France will also allow assessment of the effects of muscle/bone exercise and nutritional countermeasures on the immune system in addition to the effects of bed rest.

  10. Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Ranjan; Hammerich, Linda; Peng, Paul [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Brown, Brian [Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Merad, Miriam [Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Brody, Joshua D., E-mail: joshua.brody@mssm.edu [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2015-04-30

    While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive growth of the malignancy but may even provide active growth signals upon which the tumor subsequently becomes dependent. In the past decade, the success of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer for relapsed or refractory lymphomas has validated immunotherapy as a possible treatment cornerstone. Here, we review the mechanisms by which lymphomas have been found to evade and even reprogram the immune system, including alterations in surface molecules, recruitment of immunosuppressive subpopulations, and secretion of anti-inflammatory factors. A fundamental understanding of the immune evasion strategies utilized by lymphomas may lead to better prognostic markers and guide the development of targeted interventions that are both safer and more effective than current standards of care.

  11. Immune recovery vitritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dujić Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Immune recovery vitritis (IRV is symptomatic vitritis of > 1+ severity associated with inactive cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis. It is an opportunistic infection of the eye, in the patients who suffer from AIDS, and is treated with a highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. As a result of this therapy, there is an immune reconstitution in the body and inflammation of the vitreous body. Objective The aim of the study was to show the incidence of IRV in patients treated with HAART. Method A retrospective study was conducted in patients who suffered from CMV retinitis. Twenty-one were treated with HAART and had the diagnosis of CMV retinitis, as well. All of them were examined by the same ophthalmologist who peformed slit lamp examination with mydriasis and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Results Nine of 21 patients developed IRV as a complication of HAART, two had cystoid macular edema (CMO. Conclusion CMV retinitis develops when the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes drops below 50/mm3. This results in necrotic retinitis which, if untreated, leads to complete loss of vision. With the introduction of HAART, we learned that the reconstitution of immune status was achieved as well as life expectancy, but there was a dramatic decline in the opportunistic infection, including CMV retinitis, as well. With the immune reconstitution, the inflammation develops in the eye, known as IRV. Sometimes, it is necessary to treat this condition, but in the case of our patients, the inflammation was mild, and no treatment was necessary.

  12. Cytokines and antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ludmila; Pawelec, Graham

    2003-06-01

    Currently, the notion of immunosurveillance against tumors is enjoying something of a renaissance. Even if we still refuse to accept that tumors arising in the normal host are unable to trigger an immune response because of the lack of initiation ("danger") signals, there is no doubt that the immune system can be manipulated experimentally and by implication therapeutically to exert anti-tumor effects. For this activity to be successful, the appropriate cytokine milieu has to be provided, making cytokine manipulation central to immunotherapy. On the other hand, the major hurdle currently preventing successful immunotherapy is the ability of tumors to evolve resistant variants under the pressure of immune selection. Here, too, the cytokine milieu plays an essential role. The purpose of this brief review is to consider the current status of the application of cytokines in facilitating antitumor immunity, as well their role in inhibiting responses to tumors. Clearly, encouraging the former but preventing the latter will be the key to the effective clinical application of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:12779349

  13. Genetic Immunity to AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In an article on genetic immunity to AIDS published in Science magazine, American and Chinese scientists claim to have discovered why certain HIV carriers do not develop full-blown AIDS. They say that the key to this conundrum lies in a particular protein in the endocrine system that inhibits development of HIV.

  14. Photodynamic immune modulation (PIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, John R.; Hunt, David W. C.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Lui, Harvey; Levy, Julia G.

    1999-09-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is accepted for treatment of superficial and lumen-occluding tumors in regions accessible to activating light and is now known to be effective in closure of choroidal neovasculature in Age Related Macular Degeneration. PDT utilizes light absorbing drugs (photosensitizers) that generate the localized formation of reactive oxygen species after light exposure. In a number of systems, PDT has immunomodulatory effects; Photodynamic Immune Modulation (PIM). Using low- intensity photodynamic regimens applied over a large body surface area, progression of mouse autoimmune disease could be inhibited. Further, this treatment strongly inhibited the immunologically- medicated contact hypersensitivity response to topically applied chemical haptens. Immune modulation appears to result from selective targeting of activated T lymphocytes and reduction in immunostimulation by antigen presenting cells. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated skin condition, exhibits heightened epidermal cell proliferation, epidermal layer thickening and plaque formation at different body sites. In a recent clinical trial, approximately one-third of patients with psoriasis and arthritis symptoms (psoriatic arthritis) displayed a significant clinical improvement in several psoriasis-related parameters after four weekly whole-body PIM treatments with verteporfin. The safety profile was favorable. The capacity of PIM to influence other human immune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis is under extensive evaluation.

  15. Neuroendocrine-immune interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemenade, van Lidy; Cohen, Nicholas; Chadzinska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    It has now become accepted that the immune system and neuroendocrine system form an integrated part of our physiology. Immunological defense mechanisms act in concert with physiological processes like growth and reproduction, energy intake and metabolism, as well as neuronal development. Not only

  16. Maternal immune transfer in mollusc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingling; Yue, Feng; Song, Xiaorui; Song, Linsheng

    2015-02-01

    Maternal immunity refers to the immunity transferred from mother to offspring via egg, playing an important role in protecting the offspring at early life stages and contributing a trans-generational effect on offspring's phenotype. Because fertilization is external in most of the molluscs, oocytes and early embryos are directly exposed to pathogens in the seawater, and thus maternal immunity could provide a better protection before full maturation of their immunological systems. Several innate immune factors including pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) like lectins, and immune effectors like lysozyme, lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bacterial permeability-increasing proteins (LBP/BPI) and antioxidant enzymes have been identified as maternally derived immune factors in mollusc eggs. Among these immune factors, some maternally derived lectins and antibacterial factors have been proved to endue mollusc eggs with effective defense ability against pathogen infection, while the roles of other factors still remain untested. The physiological condition of mollusc broodstock has a profound effect on their offspring fitness. Many other factors such as nutrients, pathogens, environment conditions and pollutants could exert considerable influence on the maternal transfer of immunity. The parent molluscs which have encountered an immune stimulation endow their offspring with a trans-generational immune capability to protect them against infections effectively. The knowledge on maternal transfer of immunity and the trans-generational immune effect could provide us with an ideal management strategy of mollusc broodstock to improve the immunity of offspring and to establish a disease-resistant family for a long-term improvement of cultured stocks.

  17. Avaliação de um programa de aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A em crianças do Vale do Jequitinhonha com paralisia cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazielle Fernandes da Silva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar os efeitos de um programa público de aplicação de toxina botulínica tipo A (TBA na espasticidade muscular, amplitude de movimento, qualidade da marcha, independência funcional e qualidade de vida de crianças e adolescentes com paralisia cerebral (PC. Foi realizado um estudo quase experimental que avaliou os efeitos do emprego da TBA, aplicada três vezes, com intervalos de três meses, em 14 crianças com PC. Estas foram avaliadas através da Escala Modificada de Ashworth, Goniometria Manual, Physician Rating Scale, Inventário de Avaliação Pediátrica de Incapacidade (PEDI e Questionário do Cuidador da Criança (QCC. Foi observada redução da espasticidade, aumento da amplitude de movimento, melhora das habilidades funcionais de autocuidado e mobilidade do PEDI e das áreas de cuidado pessoal, conforto e interação/comunicação do QCC. O programa de aplicação de TBA em crianças e adolescentes com PC, realizado em um núcleo de reabilitação público do Vale do Jequitinhonha, foi efetivo para a população beneficiada.

  18. Actualización sobre aplicaciones de la toxina botulínica en estética facial Update on the use of botulinium toxin in facial aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Alcolea López

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad, la toxina botulínica (TB es parte importante en los tratamientos médico-estéticos de la cara. Este trabajo hace una aproximación didáctica, con fines prácticos formativos, sobre el manejo de la TB para el rejuvenecimiento facial en el ejercicio de la Cirugía Plástica y Estética. Entender la anatomía del envejecimiento es clave para manejar de forma integral la TB junto con otras técnicas de la especialidad destinadas a combatir el envejecimiento, considerándolo en su conjunto. Resumimos los conocimientos actuales sobre el empleo de las inyecciones de TB en el tercio superior de la cara.Currently, botulinum toxin (BT plays an important role in aesthetic-medical treatments of the face. This paper provides a didactical approach for practical training purposes, concerning the use of BT for facial rejuvenation when practising Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery. It is essential to understand the anatomy of ageing in order to integrate TB in combination with other techniques of the speciality employed to combat ageing by considering it as a whole. This paper resumes the current knowledge about the use of TB injections in the upper third of the face.

  19. Immune Vasculitis Induced Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between immune vasculitis and atherosclerosis was studied. The experimental model of weanling rabbits for immune vasculitis was reproduced by intravenous injection of 10 % bovine serum albumin. There were 6 groups: group A, 25 weanling rabbits with immune vasculitis subject to coronary arteriography; group B, 10 normal mature rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group C, 10 weanling rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group D, 8 weanling rabbits with vasculitis and cholesterol diet; group E, 8 weanling rabbits receiving single cholesterol diet; group F: 8 weanling rabbits receiving basic diet. Four weeks later, coronary arteriography was performed in groups A, B and C. The rabbits in groups D, E and F were sacrificed for the study of pathological changes in the coronary artery after 12 weeks. The results showed that the dilatation of coronary artery occurred in 6 rabbits of group A, but in groups B and C, no dilatation of coronary artery appeared. In comparison with group E, more severe atherosclerosis occurred in group D, showing the thickened plaque, fibrous sclerosis and atherosclerotic lesion. Percentage of plaques covering aortic intima, incidence of atherosclerosis of small coronary arteries and degree of stenosis of coronary arteries were significantly higher in group D than in group E (P<0.01). No atherosclerosis changes were found in group F. It was concluded that in the acute phase, the serum immune vasculitis can induce the dilatation of coronary artery of some weanling rabbits, and aggravate the formation of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with cholesterol diet. Immune vasculitis is a new risk factor of atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease.

  20. Innate immune memory in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer-Michalski, Eva-Maria; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The plant innate immune system comprises local and systemic immune responses. Systemic plant immunity develops after foliar infection by microbial pathogens, upon root colonization by certain microbes, or in response to physical injury. The systemic plant immune response to localized foliar infection is associated with elevated levels of pattern-recognition receptors, accumulation of dormant signaling enzymes, and alterations in chromatin state. Together, these systemic responses provide a memory to the initial infection by priming the remote leaves for enhanced defense and immunity to reinfection. The plant innate immune system thus builds immunological memory by utilizing mechanisms and components that are similar to those employed in the trained innate immune response of jawed vertebrates. Therefore, there seems to be conservation, or convergence, in the evolution of innate immune memory in plants and vertebrates. PMID:27264335

  1. Reabilitação funcional e analgesia com uso de toxina botulínica A na síndrome dolorosa regional complexa tipo I do membro superior: relato de casos Rehabilitación funcional y analgesia con uso de toxina botulínica A en el síndrome doloroso regional compleja tipo I del miembro superior: relato de casos Functional rehabilitation and analgesia with botulinum toxin A in upper limb complex regional pain syndrome type I: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Rocha Lauretti

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Freqüentemente, soma-se ao quadro de alodínia e hiperalgesia em pacientes portadores de Síndrome Dolorosa Regional Complexa (SDRC tipo I a incapacidade funcional do segmento acometido. Relatam-se dois casos de SDRC em que a aplicação de toxina botulínica-A como fármaco coadjuvante contribuiu na recuperação funcional motora do membro acometido. RELATO DOS CASOS: Duas pacientes portadoras de SDRC tipo I foram inicialmente avaliadas para controle da dor no membro superior direito. Ambas apresentavam incapacidade para abrir a mão e dor pela escala analógica numérica (EAN de 10 em repouso ou quando a mão ou os dedos eram passivamente manipulados. Iniciou-se seqüência de 5 bloqueios, do gânglio estrelado ipsilateral a intervalos semanais, com clonidina e lidocaína. Simultaneamente, durante a realização do terceiro bloqueio do gânglio estrelado, foram administrados 75 UI de toxina botulínica-A nos músculos flexores das falanges e da articulação do punho. Uma semana após a aplicação da toxina botulínica-A, as pacientes apresentavam relaxamento das falanges e punho, relatavam facilidade para execução da fisioterapia passiva e a dor classificada foi como 2 (EAN à manipulação passiva. Ao término da realização da seqüência de bloqueios do gânglio estrelado, as pacientes foram submetidas a 3 sessões semanais de administração por via venosa regional de clonidina, lidocaína e parecoxib. Após 8 meses de avaliação, as pacientes apresentaram 70% e 80% de recuperação motora e funcional do membro acometido. CONCLUSÕES: A aplicação por via muscular de toxina botulínica A resultou em melhora da movimentação do membro acometido, analgesia auxiliando na sua recuperação funcional.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Frecuentemente, se suman al cuadro de alodínia e hiperalgesia en pacientes portadores de Síndrome Doloroso Regional Complejo (SDRC tipo I la incapacidad funcional del segmento

  2. Diversity in the Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Borghans, J.A.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Diversity is one of the key characteristics of the vertebrate immune system. Lymphocyte repertoires of at least 3x10⁷ different clonotypes protect humans against infections, while avoiding unwanted immune responses against self-peptides and innocuous antigens. It is this lymphocyte diversity that forms the main difference between the immune systems of invertebrate and vertebrate species.

  3. Immune modulators with parasite infections

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xiangsheng

    2014-01-01

    SNPs in immune-related genes (IL-2 and IL-2R alpha) may used for future prospective studies examining disease susceptibility or may better elucidate various physiological responses. Distinctive immune response profiles could provide a better understanding of the immune response during disease progression or regression and improve the monitoring of alveolar echinococcosis patients.

  4. Humoral immunity in bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, A F; Craig, S; Bardana, E J

    1987-09-01

    Bronchiectasis occurs in patients with immunodeficiency and fungal hypersensitivity disorders. To assess the prevalence of abnormal humoral immune parameters in bronchiectasis, a retrospective study was carried out on sera from 30 patients. Studies included immunoglobulin quantitation and specific antibody to fungal species. Eleven patients were found to have immunodeficiency (nine with panhypoglobulinemia and two with selective IgM deficiency). Six patients had elevations of serum IgA and four patients had elevations of serum IgE. Six patients had elevated total antibody to Aspergillus or Candida species and six had precipitin bands to one or more fungal antigens. This study indicates that immunodeficiency is prevalent and plays a causative role in some patients with bronchiectasis. Hypersensitivity reactions to Aspergillus, Candida, and other ubiquitous environmental fungi may also play an etiopathogenic role in this disease (bronchiectasis, humoral immunity, immunodeficiency). PMID:3631652

  5. Immune interactions in endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    Herington, Jennifer L.; Bruner-Tran, Kaylon L.; Lucas, John A.; Osteen, Kevin G.

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, complex gynecologic disorder characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma at extrauterine (ectopic) sites. In women who develop this disease, alterations in specific biological processes involving both the endocrine and immune systems have been observed, which may explain the survival and growth of displaced endometrial tissue in affected women. In the past decade, a considerable amount of research has implicated a role for alterations in progester...

  6. Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjan Upadhyay; Linda Hammerich; Paul Peng; Brian Brown; Miriam Merad; Brody, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive grow...

  7. Immunity to amoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Barbara; Valdenegro-Vega, Victoria; Crosbie, Philip; Bridle, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Amoebic infections in fish are most likely underestimated and sometimes overlooked due to the challenges associated with their diagnosis. Amoebic diseases reported in fish affect either gills or internal organs or may be systemic. Host response ranges from hyperplastic response in gill infections to inflammation (including granuloma formation) in internal organs. This review focuses on the immune response of Atlantic salmon to Neoparamoeba perurans, the causative agent of Amoebic Gill Disease (AGD).

  8. Auto immune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gerven, Nicole Mf; de Boer, Ynto S; Mulder, Chris Jj; van Nieuwkerk, Carin Mj; Bouma, Gerd

    2016-05-21

    To provide an update of the latest trends in epidemiology, clinical course, diagnostics, complications and treatment of auto immune hepatitis (AIH). A search of the MEDLINE database was performed using the search terms: "auto immune hepatitis", "clinical presentation", "symptoms", "signs", "diagnosis", "auto antibodies", "laboratory values", "serology", "histopathology", "histology", "genetics", "HLA genes", "non-HLA genes", "environment", "epidemiology", "prevalence", "incidence", "demographics", "complications", "HCC", "PBC", "PSC", "corticosteroid", "therapy", "treatment", "alternative treatment". English-language full-text articles and abstracts were considered. Articles included reviews, meta-analysis, prospective retrospective studies. No publication date restrictions were applied. AIH is an immune meditated progressive inflammatory liver disease that predominantly affects middle-aged females but may affect people of all ages. The clinical spectrum of AIH is wide, ranging from absent or mild symptoms to fulminant hepatic failure. The aetiology of AIH is still unknown, but is believed to occur as the consequence of an aberrant immune response towards an un-known trigger in a genetically susceptible host. In the absence of a gold standard, diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical, biochemical and histopathological criteria. Immunosuppressive treatment has been the cornerstone of treatment since the earliest description of the disease in 1950 by Waldenström. Such treatment is often successful at inducing remission and generally leads to normal life expectancy. Nevertheless, there remain significant areas of unmet aetiological a clinical needs including fundamental insight in disease pathogenesis, optimal therapy, duration of treatment and treatment alternatives in those patients unresponsive to standard treatment regimens. PMID:27217697

  9. Mammalian gut immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit Chassaing; Manish Kumar; Mark T Baker; Vishal Singh; Matam Vijay-Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells) and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells) origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximit...

  10. Update on global immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carol J

    2007-10-01

    The international community recognizes that investing in the health development of poor and disadvantaged countries is central to reducing poverty. Immunization is one strategy in the global effort to reduce infant mortality, improve maternal health, and combat infectious disease. In this day of global interdependence, all countries are vulnerable to uncontrolled spread of disease through epidemics. Achieving the Millennium Development Goals will not only help developing countries, but it will also contribute to improving health and security for all. PMID:17990623

  11. Why parents refuse immunization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajetanowicz, Andrzej; Kajetanowicz, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Rates of child immunization are falling in many countries, leading to the increase of morbidity and mortality from diseases controlled by vaccinations. The simplified model of the natural history of immunization follows a sequence of fear of the disease before vaccination, followed by acceptance of the vaccination until plateau, where the population forgets the morbidity and mortality of pre-immunization. Historical factors including withdrawals of vaccines, and publications regarding the true or falsified dangers of vaccines still resonate with parents. Building on these historical factors, unscientific sources such as naturopaths, homeopaths, chiropractors, celebrities and lay-people with anecdotal evidence and even scientific sources such as some universities and some medical doctors push their views on anti-vaccination, which proves to make the decision to vaccinate more difficult on parents. The main reason that parents refuse vaccination is a desire to protect their children. These parents believe that vaccination is harmful, or that not vaccinated children are healthier than vaccinated children. Scientific data often will lose with pseudoscientific, false or anecdotal data that have higher sensational and emotional impact on parents. With so many sources giving so many factors which sometimes contradict themselves, it is indeed difficult for a parent to make a clear decision for their child. PMID:27486715

  12. Cystatins in immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magister, Spela; Kos, Janko

    2013-01-01

    Cystatins comprise a large superfamily of related proteins with diverse biological activities. They were initially characterised as inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases, however, in recent years some alternative functions for cystatins have been proposed. Cystatins possessing inhibitory function are members of three families, family I (stefins), family II (cystatins) and family III (kininogens). Stefin A is often linked to neoplastic changes in epithelium while another family I cystatin, stefin B is supposed to have a specific role in neuredegenerative diseases. Cystatin C, a typical type II cystatin, is expressed in a variety of human tissues and cells. On the other hand, expression of other type II cystatins is more specific. Cystatin F is an endo/lysosome targeted protease inhibitor, selectively expressed in immune cells, suggesting its role in processes related to immune response. Our recent work points on its role in regulation of dendritic cell maturation and in natural killer cells functional inactivation that may enhance tumor survival. Cystatin E/M expression is mainly restricted to the epithelia of the skin which emphasizes its prominent role in cutaneous biology. Here, we review the current knowledge on type I (stefins A and B) and type II cystatins (cystatins C, F and E/M) in pathologies, with particular emphasis on their suppressive vs. promotional function in the tumorigenesis and metastasis. We proposed that an imbalance between cathepsins and cystatins may attenuate immune cell functions and facilitate tumor cell invasion.

  13. Alarmins, inflammasomes and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najwane Saïd-Sadier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The elaboration of an effective immune response against pathogenic microbes such as viruses, intracellular bacteria or protozoan parasites relies on the recognition of microbial products called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Ligation of the PRRs leads to synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Infected cells and other stressed cells also release host-cell derived molecules, called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, danger signals, or alarmins, which are generic markers for damage. DAMPs are recognized by specific receptors on both immune and nonimmune cells, which, depending on the target cell and the cellular context, can lead to cell differentiation or cell death, and either inflammation or inhibition of inflammation. Recent research has revealed that DAMPs and PAMPs synergize to permit secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β: PAMPs stimulate synthesis of pro-IL-1β, but not its secretion; while DAMPs can stimulate assembly of an inflammasome containing, usually, a Nod-like receptor (NLR member, and activation of the protease caspase-1, which cleaves pro-IL-1β into IL-1β, allowing its secretion. Other NLR members do not participate in formation of inflammasomes but play other essential roles in regulation of the innate immune response.

  14. O uso da toxina botulínica no tratamento da distonia laríngea (disfonia espasmódica: estudo preliminar com doze pacientes Use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of laryngeal dystonia (spasmodic dysphonia: preliminary study of twelve patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A. G. Teive

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A distonia laríngea (disfonia espasmódica é distúrbio do movimento caracterizado por contrações involuntárias da musculatura laríngea envolvida no processo de vocalização. A utilização da toxina botulínica no tratamento da distonia laríngea trouxe consideráveis benefícios clínicos. Descrevemos os resultados preliminares do uso terapêutico da toxina botulínica no tratamento da distonia laríngea em 12 pacientes. Após investigação clínica, os pacientes foram submetidos a videolaringoestroboscopia para confirmação diagnóstica e as injeções de toxina botulínica foram realizadas através de punção da membrana cricotireóidea em direção ao músculo tireoaritenóideo, com uso de eletromiografia. A maioria dos pacientes submetidos ao tratamento com toxina botulínica apresentou melhora significativa da distonia laríngea (83% dos casos, com duração média do efeito de quatro meses, sem efeitos colaterais significativos.Laryngeal dystonia (spasmodic dysphonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary contractions of laryngeal muscles involved with vocalization. The introduction of botulinum toxin in the treatment of laryngeal dystonia had a major clinical impact due to the striking improvement of symptoms. We report the preliminary results of therapeutical use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of twelve patients with laryngeal dystonia. After an extensive clinical evaluation, the patients underwent a videostroboscopic exam for diagnostic confirmation. Botulinum toxin was injected in the cricothyreoid membrane, directed towards the thyreoaritenoid muscle, with the aid of eletromyography needles. Most of patients who underwent botulinum toxin injection had a significant improvement of their symptoms (83%, with effects lasting for four months in average and without important side effects.

  15. Efectividad de la toxina botulínica en la parálisis cerebral infantil, patología adquirida y patología idiopática en la población infanto-juvenil de un servicio de rehabilitación

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Hernández, María

    2015-01-01

    La presente tesis doctoral estudia la efectividad de la toxina botulínica en el tratamiento de la parálisis cerebral, la patología adquirida y la patología idiopática en una población infanto-juvenil. La incidencia de la patología a estudio es baja pero debido a las mejoras en la práctica clínica que permiten una mayor supervivencia tanto de prematuros como de pacientes con patología adquirida, se ha producido un aumento de la prevalencia de estos pacientes en las consultas. Los objetivos ...

  16. Comparative immune systems in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shaochun; Tao, Xin; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2014-02-01

    Animal immune systems can be classified into those of innate immunity and those of adaptive immunity. It is generally thought that the former are universal for all animals and depend on germline-encoded receptors that recognize highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), whereas the latter are vertebrate specific and are mediated primarily by lymphocytes bearing a unique antigen receptor. However, novel adaptive or adaptive-like immunities have been found in invertebrates and jawless vertebrates, and extraordinarily complex innate immunities, created through huge expansions of many innate gene families, have recently been found in the cephalochordate amphioxus and the echinoderm sea urchin. These studies not only inspire immunologists to seek novel immune mechanisms in invertebrates but also raise questions about the origin and evolution of vertebrate immunities. PMID:25384142

  17. Insect Immunity to Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H-L; St Leger, R J

    2016-01-01

    The study of infection and immunity in insects has achieved considerable prominence with the appreciation that their host defense mechanisms share many fundamental characteristics with the innate immune system of vertebrates. Studies on the highly tractable model organism Drosophila in particular have led to a detailed understanding of conserved innate immunity networks, such as Toll. However, most of these studies have used opportunistic human pathogens and may not have revealed specialized immune strategies that have arisen through evolutionary arms races with natural insect pathogens. Fungi are the commonest natural insect pathogens, and in this review, we focus on studies using Metarhizium and Beauveria spp. that have addressed immune system function and pathogen virulence via behavioral avoidance, the use of physical barriers, and the activation of local and systemic immune responses. In particular, we highlight studies on the evolutionary genetics of insect immunity and discuss insect-pathogen coevolution. PMID:27131327

  18. Sex Hormones and Immune Dimorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Aruna; Sekhon, Harmandeep Kaur; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2014-01-01

    The functioning of the immune system of the body is regulated by many factors. The abnormal regulation of the immune system may result in some pathological conditions. Sex hormones of reproductive system are one of the major factors that regulate immune system due to the presence of hormone receptors on immune cells. The interaction of sex hormones and immune cells through the receptors on these cells effect the release of cytokines which determines the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of different types of immunocytes and as a result the outcome of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. The different regulations of sex hormones in both sexes result in immune dimorphism. In this review article the mechanism of regulation of immune system in different sexes and its impact are discussed. PMID:25478584

  19. Sex Hormones and Immune Dimorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Bhatia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The functioning of the immune system of the body is regulated by many factors. The abnormal regulation of the immune system may result in some pathological conditions. Sex hormones of reproductive system are one of the major factors that regulate immune system due to the presence of hormone receptors on immune cells. The interaction of sex hormones and immune cells through the receptors on these cells effect the release of cytokines which determines the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of different types of immunocytes and as a result the outcome of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. The different regulations of sex hormones in both sexes result in immune dimorphism. In this review article the mechanism of regulation of immune system in different sexes and its impact are discussed.

  20. Benefícios da aplicação de toxina botulínica associada à fonoterapia em pacientes disfágicos graves Benefits of botulinum toxin associated to swallowing therapy in patients with severe dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Teixeira Menezes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudo de casos para caracterizar os benefícios da aplicação de toxina botulínica em glândulas salivares, associada à fonoterapia em pacientes disfágicos graves. Foram analisados cinco prontuários de pacientes neurológicos, em uso exclusivo de via alternativa de alimentação, com idades entre 17 e 70 anos, sendo quatro do gênero masculino e um do gênero feminino. Do total, quatro pacientes eram traqueostomizados. Foi considerado como critério de inclusão apresentar disfagia grave, com manifestações clínicas de escape extra oral e/ou acúmulo de saliva em cavidade oral e aspiração traqueal maciça de saliva, com limitação da fonoterapia. Quanto à avaliação clínica da deglutição, foram coletados dados pré e pós-fonoterapia associada à aplicação de toxina botulínica, quanto aos seguintes aspectos: mobilidade e força das estruturas orofaríngeas (lábios, língua, bochechas, elevação laríngea, grau da disfagia, uso de via alternativa de alimentação e traqueostomia. Quanto aos resultados pós- fonoterapia foi observado, em quatro pacientes, melhora da mobilidade e força de lábios, língua, bochechas e laringe. Quatro pacientes apresentaram deglutição funcional e um teve modificação do grau de gravidade da disfagia. Desta forma, a maioria foi capaz de receber dieta exclusiva por via oral e apenas um permaneceu com dieta mista, ou seja, gastrostomia e dieta via oral na consistência pastosa. Todos os pacientes traqueostomizados tiveram a cânula de traqueostomia removida. O estudo mostrou que o tratamento descrito acima contribui para a reabilitação da deglutição, reintrodução de alimentos por via oral e retirada da cânula de traqueostomia.Case report with the aim to characterize the benefits of botulinum toxin injection into salivary glands in association with swallowing therapy in patients with severe dysphagia. The medical records of five neurological patients (four male and one female, aged

  1. Botulismo bovino: comprovação laboratorial do diagnóstico clínico, período 1986-1989 Bovine botulism: laboratorial confirmation of clinical diagnosis during the period 1986-1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Baldassi

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Num período de 4 anos (1986-1989 foram processados 517 materiais correspodentes a 235 casos com diagnóstico clínico de botulismo de bovinos, dos Estados de São Paulo, Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Goiás, Bahia, Pará, Maranhão, Distrito Federal e Roraima (Brasil. Exames laboratoriais foram realizados com o intuito de confirmar a suspeita clínica, detectando a toxina nos materiais correspondentes aos casos supracitados. Os tipos de toxina verificados foram "C" e "D" presentes no fígado e conteúdos de estômago e intestinos, que perfaziam o maior número das amostras remetidas. O pequeno número de casos confirmados leva à suposição de que outras enfermidades devem estar envolvidas nessas mortes, ainda que se considere possíveis resultados falso negativos.Five hundred and seventeen specimens relating to a total of 235 clinical cases of bovine botulism occurring over period of four years (1986-1989 were studied. These samples came from the States of S. Paulo, Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Goiás, Bahia, Pará, Maranhão, Distrito Federal and Roraima. Laboratorial tests were performed on these samples with a view to toxin detection. Toxin types C and D were detected being found in the liver and in gastric and intestinal contents. The small number of confirmed cases led to the supposition of the participation of other diseases in these deaths reported, even if false negative cases are taken into account.

  2. The Immunization Programme In India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokhey J

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunization Programme was started in India in 1978 with the objective of reducing the mortality due to vaccine preventable diseases. Immunization coverage levels in infants and pregnant women have increased substantially over the last decade. Immunization coverage levels of 69 to 82% with various vaccines were reported in 1989-90. There is however, a wide disparity in the coverage levels in states and in the districts. While the priority to remains to increase immunization coverage levels, surveillance of vaccine preventable diseases is receiving high priority to identify weak pockets for intensification of immunization services and to document impact. Besides completeness of reporting., emphasis of the surveillance system in many areas has shifted to obtaining information on cases as early as possible to allow epidemiological investigations and effective follow-up action. The achievements in a large number of districts show that the goal of universal immunization, while difficult and challenging, is attainable.

  3. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brazdova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility.

  4. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanar, J. Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed. PMID:23964208

  5. Ozone and Pulmonary Innate Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Hollingsworth, John W.; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Foster, W. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Ambient ozone (O3) is a commonly encountered environmental air pollutant with considerable impact on public health. Many other inhaled environmental toxicants can substantially affect pulmonary immune responses. Therefore, it is of considerable interest to better understand the complex interaction between environmental airway irritants and immunologically based human disease. The innate immune system represents the first line of defense against microbial pathogens. Intact innate immunity requ...

  6. The Immune Microenvironment of Myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, Kimberly; Borrello, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The bone marrow (BM) is the site of disease in myeloma and possesses unique immune characteristics involved in the pathobiology of the disease. Interactions of plasma cells with stromal cells, osteoclasts, osteoblasts, myeloid and lymphoid cells make up the unique bone marrow milieu that mediates myeloma disease progression. Independently or through a complex network of interactions these cells impart immune changes leading to immune evasion and disease progression. The critical role of these...

  7. Herd Immunity: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M J; Rahman, M F

    2016-04-01

    Immunization is a means of protecting the greatest number of people. By reducing the number of susceptible in the community, it augments "herd immunity" making the infection more difficult to spread. It also reduces the risk for those individuals who have escaped vaccination or those who have not developed satisfactory protection. It is well to bear in mind that immunizations are not at all 100 per cent effective, particularly when an individual is exposed to a large dose of pathogenic organisms.

  8. The microbiome and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaiss, Christoph A; Zmora, Niv; Levy, Maayan; Elinav, Eran

    2016-07-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a signalling hub that integrates environmental inputs, such as diet, with genetic and immune signals to affect the host's metabolism, immunity and response to infection. The haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic cells of the innate immune system are located strategically at the host-microbiome interface. These cells have the ability to sense microorganisms or their metabolic products and to translate the signals into host physiological responses and the regulation of microbial ecology. Aberrations in the communication between the innate immune system and the gut microbiota might contribute to complex diseases. PMID:27383981

  9. Marathon training and immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, David C

    2007-01-01

    Many components of the immune system exhibit adverse change after marathon-type exertion. These immune changes occur in several compartments of the immune system and body (e.g. the skin, upper respiratory tract mucosal tissue, lung, peritoneal cavity, blood and muscle). Of all immune cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils and macrophages (of the innate immune system) exhibit the greatest changes in response to marathon competition, both in terms of numbers and function. Many mechanisms appear to be involved, including exercise-induced changes in stress hormone and cytokine concentrations, body temperature changes, increases in blood flow and dehydration. During this 'open window' of immune dysfunction (which may last between 3 and 72 hours, depending on the immune measure), viruses and bacteria may gain a foothold, increasing the risk of subclinical and clinical infection. Of the various nutritional and pharmacological countermeasures to marathon-induced immune perturbations that have been evaluated thus far, ingestion of carbohydrate beverages during intense and prolonged exercise has emerged as the most effective. However, carbohydrate ingestion during a marathon attenuates increases in plasma cytokines and stress hormones, but is largely ineffective against changes in other immune components including suppression of NK and T-cell function, and salivary IgA output. Other countermeasures, such as glutamine, antioxidant supplements and ibuprofen, have had disappointing results and thus the search for companion agents to carbohydrate continues. PMID:17465622

  10. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  11. Host Resistance and Immune Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaranayake, Thilinie; Shaw, Albert C

    2016-08-01

    Human immune system aging results in impaired responses to pathogens or vaccines. In the innate immune system, which mediates the earliest pro-inflammatory responses to immunologic challenge, processes ranging from Toll-like Receptor function to Neutrophil Extracellular Trap formation are generally diminished in older adults. Dysregulated, enhanced basal inflammation with age reflecting activation by endogenous damage-associated ligands contributes to impaired innate immune responses. In the adaptive immune system, T and B cell subsets and function alter with age. The control of cytomegalovirus infection, particularly in the T lineage, plays a dominant role in the differentiation and diversity of the T cell compartment. PMID:27394014

  12. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation

  13. Mosquito immunity against arboviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Shuzhen; Jupatanakul, Natapong; Dimopoulos, George

    2014-11-19

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) pose a significant threat to global health, causing human disease with increasing geographic range and severity. The recent availability of the genome sequences of medically important mosquito species has kick-started investigations into the molecular basis of how mosquito vectors control arbovirus infection. Here, we discuss recent findings concerning the role of the mosquito immune system in antiviral defense, interactions between arboviruses and fundamental cellular processes such as apoptosis and autophagy, and arboviral suppression of mosquito defense mechanisms. This knowledge provides insights into co-evolutionary processes between vector and virus and also lays the groundwork for the development of novel arbovirus control strategies that target the mosquito vector.

  14. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation

  15. Sculpting humoral immunity through dengue vaccination to enhance protective immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne eCrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are the most important mosquito transmitted viral pathogens infecting humans. DENV infection produces a spectrum of disease, most commonly causing a self-limiting flu-like illness known as dengue fever; yet with increased frequency, manifesting as life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Waning cross-protective immunity from any of the four dengue serotypes may enhance subsequent infection with another heterologous serotype to increase the probability of DHF. Decades of effort to develop dengue vaccines are reaching the finishing line with multiple candidates in clinical trials. Nevertheless, concerns remain that imbalanced immunity, due to the prolonged prime-boost schedules currently used in clinical trials, could leave some vaccinees temporarily unprotected or with increased susceptibility to enhanced disease. Here we develop a DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1 DNA vaccine with the immunodominant cross-reactive B cell epitopes associated with immune enhancement removed. We compare wild-type (WT with this cross-reactivity reduced (CRR vaccine and demonstrate that both vaccines are equally protective against lethal homologous DENV-1 challenge. Under conditions mimicking natural exposure prior to acquiring protective immunity, WT vaccinated mice enhanced a normally sub-lethal heterologous DENV-2 infection resulting in DHF-like disease and 95% mortality in AG129 mice. However, CRR vaccinated mice exhibited redirected serotype-specific and protective immunity, and significantly reduced morbidity and mortality not differing from naïve mice. Thus, we demonstrate in an in vivo DENV disease model, that non-protective vaccine-induced immunity can prime vaccinees for enhanced DHF-like disease and that CRR DNA immunization significantly reduces this potential vaccine safety concern. The sculpting of immune memory by the modified vaccine and resulting redirection of humoral immunity provide insight into DENV vaccine induced immune

  16. Modeling rejection immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Andrea De

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transplantation is often the only way to treat a number of diseases leading to organ failure. To overcome rejection towards the transplanted organ (graft, immunosuppression therapies are used, which have considerable side-effects and expose patients to opportunistic infections. The development of a model to complement the physician’s experience in specifying therapeutic regimens is therefore desirable. The present work proposes an Ordinary Differential Equations model accounting for immune cell proliferation in response to the sudden entry of graft antigens, through different activation mechanisms. The model considers the effect of a single immunosuppressive medication (e.g. cyclosporine, subject to first-order linear kinetics and acting by modifying, in a saturable concentration-dependent fashion, the proliferation coefficient. The latter has been determined experimentally. All other model parameter values have been set so as to reproduce reported state variable time-courses, and to maintain consistency with one another and with the experimentally derived proliferation coefficient. Results The proposed model substantially simplifies the chain of events potentially leading to organ rejection. It is however able to simulate quantitatively the time course of graft-related antigen and competent immunoreactive cell populations, showing the long-term alternative outcomes of rejection, tolerance or tolerance at a reduced functional tissue mass. In particular, the model shows that it may be difficult to attain tolerance at full tissue mass with acceptably low doses of a single immunosuppressant, in accord with clinical experience. Conclusions The introduced model is mathematically consistent with known physiology and can reproduce variations in immune status and allograft survival after transplantation. The model can be adapted to represent different therapeutic schemes and may offer useful indications for the optimization of

  17. Towards a Conceptual Framework for Innate Immunity

    CERN Document Server

    Twycross, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    Innate immunity now occupies a central role in immunology. However, artificial immune system models have largely been inspired by adaptive not innate immunity. This paper reviews the biological principles and properties of innate immunity and, adopting a conceptual framework, asks how these can be incorporated into artificial models. The aim is to outline a meta-framework for models of innate immunity.

  18. Child Indicators: Immunization of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Mullahy, John

    1994-01-01

    Focuses on the immunization status of children aged 19 to 35 months. Recommended immunizations are described and contrasted with the actual status of immunization. In response to unacceptably low levels of immunization among very young children, the government is aiming at 90% immunization by the year 2000. (SLD)

  19. Nutrition and immunity in ruminant animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The immune system can be generally separated into three broad components; natural immunity, innate immunity, and acquired immunity, all of which must be fully developed and functioning properly to provide adequate immunological protection. Natural and innate immunity are typically grouped together u...

  20. Questions of Mind Over Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the possibility of disturbed immunity among people experiencing either clinical depression or some type of severe stress. Psychoneuroimmunology, the study of psychological treatment and its ability to shore up a person's immunity and slow the spread of infectious disease, is reviewed. (KR)

  1. Immune evasion by pseudomonal proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardoel, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune system recognizes and rapidly kills invading bacteria via different mechanisms. Bacteria exploit several strategies to evade recognition by the immune system in order to survive within the host. An important strategy of bacteria is the secretion of proteins that block crucial funct

  2. Immune epitope database analysis resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yohan; Ponomarenko, Julia; Zhu, Zhanyang;

    2012-01-01

    The immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR: http://tools.iedb.org) is a collection of tools for prediction and analysis of molecular targets of T- and B-cell immune responses (i.e. epitopes). Since its last publication in the NAR webserver issue in 2008, a new generation of peptide:MH...

  3. Measuring the prevalence of immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, A; Vaessen, M

    1987-01-01

    The world's immunization programs have accelerated their efforts to realize the World Health Organization's (WHO) goal of providing full coverage for all children by 1990. The Demographic and Health Survey Program (DHS), in addition to WHO's Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI), is working to document the extent of immunization coverage. As a 5-year follow-on activity to the World Fertility Surveys and the Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys, the DHS program provides financial and technical assistance for 35 surveys in Africa, Asia, and Latin America and up to 25 further analysis studies. A significant proportion of DHS's data collection focuses on indicators of maternal and child health status. 2 standard questions on immunization are included in the DHS questionnaire. 1 question asks mothers if they have a health care for each of their children under age 5. If the response is affirmative and the mothers are willing to show the card to the interviewer, the dates of all immunizations received are recorded. The mother is asked a 2nd question if a child does not have a health card, i.e., has your child ever had a vaccination to prevent him/her from getting diseases. In some countries mothers who respond affirmatively to this question are asked to recall what immunizations their child received. A review of the findings on immunization coverage from recently completed DHS surveys raise several questions about both the collection and presentation of the data. Information taken from health cards would be a fairly accurate indicator of immunization coverage if all children who were immunized received a health card, and the information on the card were accurate and legible. Yet, this is not the case. The reliance on health cards as a source of immunization data will almost certainly underestimate the prevalence rate; reliance on mother's recall may result either in an underestimate or an overestimate. There are several ways to present DHS immunization data, but regardless

  4. Immune Mechanisms in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Glenthøj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a spectrum of diseases, characterized by debilitating cytopenias and a propensity of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Comprehensive sequencing efforts have revealed a range of mutations characteristic, but not specific, of MDS. Epidemiologically, autoimmune diseases are common in patients with MDS, fueling hypotheses of common etiological mechanisms. Both innate and adaptive immune pathways are overly active in the hematopoietic niche of MDS. Although supportive care, growth factors, and hypomethylating agents are the mainstay of MDS treatment, some patients—especially younger low-risk patients with HLA-DR15 tissue type—demonstrate impressive response rates after immunosuppressive therapy. This is in contrast to higher-risk MDS patients, where several immune activating treatments, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, are in the pipeline. Thus, the dual role of immune mechanisms in MDS is challenging, and rigorous translational studies are needed to establish the value of immune manipulation as a treatment of MDS.

  5. Immune Mechanisms in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Ørskov, Andreas Due; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Hadrup, Sine Reker; O’Connell, Casey; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a spectrum of diseases, characterized by debilitating cytopenias and a propensity of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Comprehensive sequencing efforts have revealed a range of mutations characteristic, but not specific, of MDS. Epidemiologically, autoimmune diseases are common in patients with MDS, fueling hypotheses of common etiological mechanisms. Both innate and adaptive immune pathways are overly active in the hematopoietic niche of MDS. Although supportive care, growth factors, and hypomethylating agents are the mainstay of MDS treatment, some patients—especially younger low-risk patients with HLA-DR15 tissue type—demonstrate impressive response rates after immunosuppressive therapy. This is in contrast to higher-risk MDS patients, where several immune activating treatments, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, are in the pipeline. Thus, the dual role of immune mechanisms in MDS is challenging, and rigorous translational studies are needed to establish the value of immune manipulation as a treatment of MDS. PMID:27314337

  6. Role of Leptin in Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Queenie Lai Kwan Lam; Liwei Lu

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, a protein hormone produced by the adipocytes, has long been recognized to regulate metabolism, neuroendorine and other physiological functions. Early findings of increased leptin production during infection and inflammation and dysregulated immune response in leptin signaling-deficient mice provide strong evidence for the involvement of leptin in the immune responses. Recent data have established the regulatory function for leptin in immunity similar to the function of a pro-inflammatory cytokine, while gene-targeting studies also demonstrated an essential role of leptin in regulating hematopoiesis and lymphopoiesis. Moreover, there has been increasing evidence that leptin is involved in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. This review discusses recent advances in understanding the role of leptin in immunity and leptin-signaling pathways involved in modulating immune homeostasis and autoimmune pathogenesis.

  7. Plant innate immunity multicomponent model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eAndolfo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of plant–pathogen interactions is making rapid advances in order to address issues of global importance such as improving agricultural productivity and sustainable food security. Innate immunity has evolved in plants, resulting in a wide diversity of defence mechanisms adapted to specific threats. The postulated PTI/ETI model describes two perception layers of plant innate immune system, which belong to a first immunity component of defence response activation. To better describe the sophisticated defence system of plants, we propose a new model of plant immunity. This model considers the plant’s ability to distinguish the feeding behaviour of their many foes, such as a second component that modulates innate immunity. This hypothesis provides a new viewpoint highlighting the relevance of hormone crosstalk and primary metabolism in regulating plant defence against the different behaviours of pathogens with the intention to stimulate further interest in this research area.

  8. Melatonin: Buffering the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Guerrero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin modulates a wide range of physiological functions with pleiotropic effects on the immune system. Despite the large number of reports implicating melatonin as an immunomodulatory compound, it still remains unclear how melatonin regulates immunity. While some authors argue that melatonin is an immunostimulant, many studies have also described anti-inflammatory properties. The data reviewed in this paper support the idea of melatonin as an immune buffer, acting as a stimulant under basal or immunosuppressive conditions or as an anti-inflammatory compound in the presence of exacerbated immune responses, such as acute inflammation. The clinical relevance of the multiple functions of melatonin under different immune conditions, such as infection, autoimmunity, vaccination and immunosenescence, is also reviewed.

  9. "Herd immunity": a rough guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Paul; Eames, Ken; Heymann, David L

    2011-04-01

    The term "herd immunity" is widely used but carries a variety of meanings. Some authors use it to describe the proportion immune among individuals in a population. Others use it with reference to a particular threshold proportion of immune individuals that should lead to a decline in incidence of infection. Still others use it to refer to a pattern of immunity that should protect a population from invasion of a new infection. A common implication of the term is that the risk of infection among susceptible individuals in a population is reduced by the presence and proximity of immune individuals (this is sometimes referred to as "indirect protection" or a "herd effect"). We provide brief historical, epidemiologic, theoretical, and pragmatic public health perspectives on this concept.

  10. Trained immunity: A smart way to enhance innate immune defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Riksen, Niels; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-11-01

    The innate arm of the immune system is generally viewed as primitive and non-specific and - in contrast to the adaptive immune arm - not to possess memory. However in plants and invertebrate animals that lack adaptive immunity, innate immunity will exhibit a prolonged enhanced functional state after adequate priming. A similar enhancement of function of the innate immunity has occasionally been described in vertebrates, including humans. Over the past few years we have studied this phenomenon in greater detail and we have coined the term 'Trained (innate) immunity' (TI). TI can be induced by a variety of stimuli, of which we have studied BCG and β-glucan in greater detail. The non-specific protective effects of BCG that have been observed in vaccination studies in the literature are probably due to TI. Monocytes and macrophages are among the main cells of the innate immune arm that can be trained. We have discovered that both BCG (via NOD2 signalling) and β-glucan (via dectin-1) induce epigenetic reprogramming, in particular stable changes in histone trimethylation at H3K4. These epigenetic changes lead to cellular activation, enhanced cytokine production and a change in the metabolic state of the cell with a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. TI is not only important for host defence and vaccine responses, but most probably also for diseases like atherosclerosis. Modulation of TI is a promising area for new treatments. PMID:26597205

  11. Immune Response of Amebiasis and Immune Evasion by Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of amebiasis. It is estimated approximately 1% of humans are infected with E. histolytica, resulting in an estimate of 100,000 deaths annually. Clinical manifestations of amebic infection range widely from asymptomatic to severe symptoms, including dysentery and extra-intestinal abscesses. Like other infectious diseases, it is assumed that only ~20% of infected individuals develop symptoms, and genetic factors of both the parasite and humans as well as the environmental factors, e.g., microbiota, determine outcome of infection. There are multiple essential steps in amebic infection: degradation of and invasion into the mucosal layer, adherence to the intestinal epithelium, invasion into the tissues, and dissemination to other organs. While the mechanisms of invasion and destruction of the host tissues by the amebae during infection have been elucidated at the molecular levels, it remains largely uncharacterized how the parasite survive in the host by evading and attacking host immune system. Recently, the strategies for immune evasion by the parasite have been unraveled, including immunomodulation to suppress IFN-γ production, elimination of immune cells and soluble immune mediators, and metabolic alterations against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to fend off the attack from immune system. In this review, we summarized the latest knowledge on immune reaction and immune evasion during amebiasis. PMID:27242782

  12. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can in...

  13. Powering the Immune System: Mitochondria in Immune Function and Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. Walker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are critical subcellular organelles that are required for several metabolic processes, including oxidative phosphorylation, as well as signaling and tissue-specific processes. Current understanding of the role of mitochondria in both the innate and adaptive immune systems is expanding. Concurrently, immunodeficiencies arising from perturbation of mitochondrial elements are increasingly recognized. Recent observations of immune dysfunction and increased incidence of infection in patients with primary mitochondrial disorders further support an important role for mitochondria in the proper function of the immune system. Here we review current findings.

  14. Slamf receptors : Modulators of Phagocyte Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Driel, Boaz Job

    2015-01-01

    Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule family (Slamf) receptors can operate in three distinct modes. Slamf receptors can dictate the extent of immune responses, thereby maneuvering immunity to the optimal zone between immunopathology or autoimmunity and weak, ineffective immune responses. A second

  15. Microbiota, Intestinal Immunity, and Mouse Bustle

    OpenAIRE

    Kruglov, A.; Nedospasov, S.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota is regulated by the immune system. This paper discusses the role of cytokines and innate immunity lymphoid cells in the intestinal immune regulation by means of IgA.

  16. Immune inhibitory receptors : regulated expression and suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steevels, T.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The immune system protects against disease by identifying and eliminating pathogens, while leaving healthy host cells unaffected. Regulatory mechanisms are required to prevent excess or inappropriate immune cell activation and to ultimately terminate the immune response, thereby restoring homeostasi

  17. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  18. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  19. Immune Exhaustion and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Fueyo, A; Markmann, J F

    2016-07-01

    Exhaustion of lymphocyte function through chronic exposure to a high load of foreign antigen is well established for chronic viral infection and antitumor immunity and has been found to be associated with a distinct molecular program and characteristic cell surface phenotype. Although exhaustion has most commonly been studied in the context of CD8 viral responses, recent studies indicate that chronic antigen exposure may affect B cells, NK cells and CD4 T cells in a parallel manner. Limited information is available regarding the extent of lymphocyte exhaustion development in the transplant setting and its impact on anti-graft alloreactivity. By analogy to the persistence of a foreign virus, the large mass of alloantigen presented by an allograft in chronic residence could provide an ideal setting for exhausting donor-reactive T cells. The extent of T cell exhaustion occurring with various allografts, the kinetics of its development, whether exhaustion is influenced positively or negatively by different immunosuppressants, and the impact of exhaustion on graft survival and tolerance development remains a fertile area for investigation. Harnessing or encouraging the natural processes of exhaustion may provide a novel means to promote graft survival and transplantation tolerance. PMID:26729653

  20. Pregnancy: an immune challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angelica Ehara Watanabe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies demonstrate the importance of immunological aspects of pregnancy. During pregnancy, the embryo is implanted in the womb, where it will develop until the end of pregnancy. Amongst the immune aspects, the importance of the modulation of T lymphocytes, natural killers (NK cells and many cytokines in maternal organism can be mentioned. The maternal tolerance to the fetus appears to be mediated by specific maternal hormones and by the expression of human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G - characteristic in pregnancy. Other studies suggest that fetal rejection and complications during pregnancy may occur because of the presence of minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAg, acquired by blood sharing of the mother with the fetus, and because of the presence of maternal antibodies against the sperm and against the fetus. The purpose of this review is to describe the immunological aspects that allow maternal tolerance to the fetus during pregnancy, as well as possible causes for rejection of the embryo and complications during pregnancy.

  1. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  2. Botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of hemifacial spasm: an 11-year experience Toxina botulínica tipo A no tratamento do espasmo hemifacial: 11 anos de experiência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egberto Reis Barbosa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the long-term effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX in the treatment of hemifacial spasm (HFS, a retrospective analysis of patients treated at the Movement Disorders Unit of the Division of Neurology, Clinical Hospital, University of São Paulo, School of Medicine from 1993 to 2004 was made. A total of 808 injections with BTX were administered to 54 patients with HFS. The mean duration of improvement per application was 3.46 months and the mean rate of improvement using subjective judgement by the patient was of 83%. Adverse effects, mostly minor, were observed in 64.8% of patients at least once along the period of follow-up and the most frequent of them was orbicularis oris paralysis (38.8%. There was no decrement in response when compared the first and the last injection recorded.Para avaliar o efeito em longo prazo da toxina botulínica tipo A (TXB no tratamento do espasmo hemifacial (EHF, foi feita uma análise retrospectiva de pacientes tratados no Ambulatório de Distúrbios do Movimento da Divisão de Clínica Neurológica - Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo no período de 1993 a 2004. Um total de 808 aplicações de TXB foram administradas a 54 pacientes com EHF. A duração média de melhora foi de 3,46 meses e a taxa média de melhora segundo avaliação subjetiva do paciente foi de 83%. Efeitos adversos, em sua maioria menores, foram observados em 64,8% dos pacientes ao menos uma vez durante o seguimento e o mais freqüente foi paralisia do orbicular da boca (38,3%. Não se observou decremento na resposta quando se comparou a primeira com a última aplicação anotada.

  3. Botulinum toxin type A in refractory chronic migraine: an open-label trial Toxina botulínica tipo A no tratamento da enxaqueca refratária: um estudo aberto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Menezes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin type A (BT-A has been described as an important strategy to various types of pain such as cervical dystonia, myofascial pain syndrome and headache. Although BT-A efficacy has not been proven in tension type headache, its use in migraine continues controversial. In this open trial, we evaluated the efficacy of BT-A in refractory migraine. BT-A was injected in patients diagnosed with migraine who had previously used three classes of prophylactic drugs by at least one year with no response. The most important improvement was observed within 30 days, but pain intensity and frequency of headache had been decreased until the end of three months of follow up. Side effects of BT-A were mild and self limited. We conclude that BT-A seems to be a safe and effective treatment to refractory migraine patients.Toxina botulínica tipo A (TB-A tem sido descrita como importante estratégia para diversos tipos de dor como cefaléia e dores relacionadas a distonia cervical ou síndrome miofascial. Embora a eficácia da TB-A não tenha sido demonstrada na cefaléia do tipo tensional, seu uso na enxaqueca continua controverso. Nesse estudo avaliamos a eficácia da TB-A na enxaqueca refratária. TB-A foi injetada em pacientes com enxaqueca que fizeram tratamento prévio com no mínimo três classes de medicamentos profiláticos, sem resultados satisfatórios. A melhora mais significativa dos pacientes foi observada após 30 dias de aplicação de TB-A, enquanto intensidade da dor e freqüência de cefaléia continuaram reduzidas até o final de três meses de seguimento. Os efeitos colaterais observados após a aplicação de TB-A foram moderados e auto-limitados. Os nossos dados mostram que TB-A parece ser um tratamento seguro e eficaz para pacientes com enxaqueca refratária.

  4. Immunization Schedules for Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunization Schedules Recommended Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedules History of the Vaccine Schedule Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's Vaccine Education Center Get Email Updates To receive email updates ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: common variable immune deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 links) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Immune System National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (8 links) Boston Children's ...

  6. Curating the innate immunity interactome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynn, David J

    2010-01-01

    The innate immune response is the first line of defence against invading pathogens and is regulated by complex signalling and transcriptional networks. Systems biology approaches promise to shed new light on the regulation of innate immunity through the analysis and modelling of these networks. A key initial step in this process is the contextual cataloguing of the components of this system and the molecular interactions that comprise these networks. InnateDB (http:\\/\\/www.innatedb.com) is a molecular interaction and pathway database developed to facilitate systems-level analyses of innate immunity.

  7. Immune Dysfunction in Aged Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Dianne

    2016-08-01

    The aging process in people is associated with changes in adaptive and innate immune responses. Similar changes occur in aged horses. Age-related progressive impairment in the ability to respond to pathogen challenge and an increased inflammatory reactivity may predispose geriatric horses to many diseases of old age. Specific recommendations for immune modification of older horses, including an age-appropriate vaccination schedule, are not currently available. In addition, the effect of old age on risk of infectious disease is poorly documented. More work is needed to better understand the interactions of age on immunity, vaccine response, and disease risk in horses. PMID:27329495

  8. Immune modulation following immunization with polyvalent vaccines in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Alois; May, Bettina; Teltscher, Andrea; Wistrela, Eva; Niedermüller, Hans

    2003-08-15

    A decline in T-cell-mediated immunity and transient state of immunosuppression after immunization has been reported in dogs. Nevertheless, dogs are still routinely vaccinated with polyvalent live vaccines and severe disease does not generally occur. In order to investigate these effects on the canine immune system and to elucidate possible mechanisms we determined the following immune parameters in the blood of 33 clinically sound German shepherd dogs before and after standard vaccination with a polyvalent vaccine against distemper, parvovirus, viral hepatitis, leptospirosis, kennel cough and rabies: white and differential blood cell count, the serum concentrations and/or activities of IL-1, IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, neopterin and IgG, natural killer (NK) cell activity, bactericidal activity and complement hemolytic activity, lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) and nitroblue tetrazolium test (NBT). Our major findings were that significant postvaccinal decreases in T-cell mitogenic response to PHA and in neutrophil function and neopterin serum concentration were accompanied by simultaneous increase in plasma IgG and hemolytic complement activity. This suggests a transient shift in the balance between cell-mediated and humoral (T(H)1/T(H)2) immunity rather than immunosuppression. These results do not imply that dogs should not receive live vaccines, as the response to vaccines just seems to create a state of altered homeostasis when immunization elicits protection by humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, these recognized compromises of immune function should be considered and vaccines still be applied only in healthy animals and strictly according to the rules and regulations given by the manufacturer. PMID:12909408

  9. Immune system modifications and feto-maternal immune tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Dan; Shi Yichao

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review aimed at understanding pregnancy-induced changes in the maternal immune response and mechanisms for the establishment of feto-maternal tolerance.Data sources Articles cited in this review were obtained from PubMed in English from 2000 to 2014,and the search string included keywords such as feto-maternal tolerance,dendritic cells,macrophage,T regulatory cells,natural killer cells,cytokines and hormone.Study selection Articles regarding altered maternal immune response,including the proliferation and differentiation of the altered cells,and the production of cytokines and regulation of hormones in the feto-maternal interface were retrieved,reviewed and analyzed.Results The changes in immune cells and cytokines in the local uterine microenvironment and peripheral blood are correlated with the establishment of feto-maternal tolerance.The endocrine system regulates the maternal immune system,promoting modifications during pregnancy.In these regulatory networks,every factor is indispensible for others.Conclusions The integration and balance of these immune factors during pregnancy give rise to an environment that enables the fetus to escape rejection by the maternal immune system.This progress is complicated,and needs more comprehensive exploration and explanation.

  10. Synthetic vaccines: Immunity without harm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Abhinav P.; Murthy, Niren

    2011-03-01

    Multilamellar lipid vesicles with crosslinked walls carrying protein antigens in the vesicle core and immunostimulatory drugs in the vesicle walls generate immune responses comparable to the strongest live vector vaccines.

  11. Immune Modulation by Volatile Anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollings, Lindsay M; Jia, Li-Jie; Tang, Pei; Dou, Huanyu; Lu, Binfeng; Xu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Volatile general anesthetics continue to be an important part of clinical anesthesia worldwide. The impact of volatile anesthetics on the immune system has been investigated at both mechanistic and clinical levels, but previous studies have returned conflicting findings due to varied protocols, experimental environments, and subject species. While many of these studies have focused on the immunosuppressive effects of volatile anesthetics, compelling evidence also exists for immunoactivation. Depending on the clinical conditions, immunosuppression and activation due to volatile anesthetics can be either detrimental or beneficial. This review provides a balanced perspective on the anesthetic modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses as well as indirect effectors of immunity. Potential mechanisms of immunomodulation by volatile anesthetics are also discussed. A clearer understanding of these issues will pave the way for clinical guidelines that better account for the impact of volatile anesthetics on the immune system, with the ultimate goal of improving perioperative management. PMID:27286478

  12. A route towards immune protection

    OpenAIRE

    Groot Nibbelink, Milou

    2016-01-01

    This work describes a route towards an immune protective device for islet of Langerhans transplantation. We developed a protocol to use MIN6 β cells aggregates as pseudo-islets to overcome the donor shortage issue (chapter 3). In this thesis we explored two different immune protective strategies; a multibore hollow fiber and flat microwell membranes. In chapter 4 we investigated the possibility to use a commercial multibore hollow fiber. In this chapter we showed that we were capable to physi...

  13. Alternative adaptive immunity in invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtz, Joachim; Armitage, Sophie Alice Octavia

    2006-01-01

    Vertebrate adaptive immunity is characterized by challenge-specific long-term protection. This specific memory is achieved through the vast diversity of somatically rearranged immunological receptors such as antibodies. Whether or not invertebrates are capable of a comparable phenotypic plasticit...... and memory has long been a matter of debate. A recent study on Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes now establishes Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) as a key immune surveillance factor with characteristics analogous to antibodies....

  14. Toxina botulínica no blefaroespasmo, no espasmo hemifacial e na distonia cervical: resultados em 33 pacientes Botulinum toxin in blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and cervical dystonia: results in 33 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Ap. Novis

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Avaliamos os resultados terapêuticos obtidos com o emprego de toxina botulínica do tipo A em 33 pacientes com distonia (12 com blefaroespamo; 10 com espasmo hemifacial e 11 com torcicolo espasmódico. Utilizamos uma escala de pontuação de gravidade antes de cada aplicação, sendo reavaliados duas semanas após, seguindo a mesma escala. Entre os com blefaroespasmo, oito eram mulheres e quatro homens; a média de idade foi 57,7 anos; a média do tempo de doença de quatro anos; três tinham história similar na família; nove eram essenciais e três fizeram uso de neurolépticos (distonia tardia. A dose média empregada ficou em 51,3 U, com a duração média do efeito benéfico de 2,8 meses. Do total de 22 aplicações (injeções e reinjeções, 14 (63,7% tiveram resultado ótimo, 5 (22,7% bom e três (13,6% nulo. Naqueles com espasmo hemifacial, oito eram mulheres e dois homens; a média de idade foi 52,6 anos; a média do tempo de doença 7,4 anos; oito eram essenciais e dois pós-páralíticos. A dose média empregada ficou em 32 U. Do total de 15 aplicações, todos (100% tiveram resultado ótimo, com a duração média do efeito benéfico de 3,4 meses. Nos pacientes com distonia cervical, oito eram homens e três mulheres; a média de idade foi 44,2 anos; a média do tempo de doença 12,2 anos; seis eram essenciais, três fizeram uso de neuroléptico e dois tinham história familiar. A dose média empregada ficou em 238,6 U, com a duração média do efeito benéfico de 4,7 meses. Do total de 20 aplicações, 18 (90% tiveram resultado bom, 1 (5% regular e 1 (5% nulo. Ptose palpebral, paresia facial e disfagia foram os efeitos colaterais mais encontrados. Concluímos que a toxina botulínica revelou-se eficaz no tratamento destas condições.The effects of botulinum toxin type A were studied in 33 patients with dystonia (12 blepharospasms, 10 hemifacial spasms and 11 spasmodic torticollis. A rate scale was used to evaluate the severity

  15. Toxina botulínica tipo A tópica con iontoforesis para el tratamiento de la hiperhidrosis axilar: Efecto y persistencia Topic type A botulinum toxin with iontophoresis in the treatment of armpit hyperhidrosis: effect and persistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F. Silva-Gavarrete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La sobreproducción de sudor se denomina hiperhidrosis (HH y frecuentemente conlleva en el ser humano tanto problemas dermatológicos como de índole social. En la actualidad, existen múltiples tratamientos para controlar la HH axilar, siendo entre ellos el uso de la terapia con Toxina Botulínica tipo A (TXB-A uno de los más efectivos, con la limitante de que la toxina tiene que ser inyectada mediante múltiples punciones en la axila, por lo que tiende a ser un tratamiento rechazado por los pacientes. La iontoforesis es un método que utiliza corriente galvánica y se emplea de forma clínica para la introducción transdermal de medicamentos. Realizamos un ensayo clínico simple ciego sobre 10 pacientes a los que se les aplicó gel inerte mezclado con Toxina Botulínica tipo A (TXB-A de la marca Dysport® mediante una sesión de iontoforesis en una axila al tiempo que en la otra axila se les aplicó la TXB-A de forma tradicional, inyectada. Los resultados fueron evaluados con el Minor Test (Test Yodo-almidón comparativamente en ambas axilas y en cada paciente a los 10 días, 2 meses y 5 meses de la aplicación. Empleamos el mismo número de unidades y la misma dilución de TXB-A tanto para la administrada vía tópica, como para la inyectada. Los resultados presentaron una disminución de la HH axilar en ambas axilas durante todo el estudio, siendo la forma inyectada la que más altos porcentajes de efecto presentó. En general un 74.67% de disminución de la secreción sudoral para la forma tópica con iontoforesis y un 90.33% para la forma inyectada. En cuanto a la duración del efecto, ambas aplicaciones tuvieron resultados estadísticamente significativos para la persistencia del efecto a los 5 meses. Por lo tanto, en base al presente trabajo, concluimos que la TXBA aplicada tópicamente mediante iontoforesis mejora la HH axilar y además presenta una persistencia del efecto de un mínimo de 5 meses.The overproduction of sweat by the

  16. Gut immunity in Lepidopteran insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai; Yang, Bing; Huang, Wuren; Dobens, Leonard; Song, Hongsheng; Ling, Erjun

    2016-11-01

    Lepidopteran insects constitute one of the largest fractions of animals on earth, but are considered pests in their relationship with man. Key to the success of this order of insects is its ability to digest food and absorb nutrition, which takes place in the midgut. Because environmental microorganisms can easily enter Lepidopteran guts during feeding, the innate immune response guards against pathogenic bacteria, virus and microsporidia that can be devoured with food. Gut immune responses are complicated by both resident gut microbiota and the surrounding peritrophic membrane and are distinct from immune responses in the body cavity, which depend on the function of the fat body and hemocytes. Due to their relevance to agricultural production, studies of Lepidopteran insect midgut and immunity are receiving more attention, and here we summarize gut structures and functions, and discuss how these confer immunity against different microorganisms. It is expected that increased knowledge of Lepidopteran gut immunity may be utilized for pest biological control in the future. PMID:26872544

  17. The algebraic immunity and the optimal algebraic immunity functions of a class of correlation immune H Boolean functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jinglian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We put forward an efficient method to study the algebraic immunity of H Boolean functions with Hamming weight of 2n-1 + 2n-2, getting the existence of the higher-order algebraic immunity functions with correlation immunity. We also prove the existing problem of the above 2-order algebraic immunity functions and the optimal algebraic immunity functions. Meanwhile, we solve the compatibility of algebraic immunity and correlation immunity. What is more, the main theoretical results are verified through the examples and are revealed to be correct. Such researches are important in cryptographic primitive designs, and have significance and role in the theory and application range of cryptosystems.

  18. Universal immunity to influenza must outwit immune evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Manuel Quinones-Parra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although an influenza vaccine has been available for 70 years, influenza virus still causes seasonal epidemics and worldwide pandemics. Currently available vaccines elicit strain-specific antibody responses to the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA proteins, but these can be ineffective against serologically-distinct viral variants and novel subtypes. Thus, there is a need for cross-protective or universal influenza vaccines to overcome the necessity for annual immunisation against seasonal influenza and to provide immunity to reduce the severity of infection with pandemic or outbreak viruses. It is well established that natural influenza infection can provide cross-reactive immunity that can reduce the impact of infection with distinct influenza type A strains and subtypes, including H1N1, H3N2, H2N2, H5N1 and H7N9. The key to generating universal influenza immunity via vaccination is to target functionally-conserved regions of the virus, which include epitopes on the internal proteins for cross-reactive T cell immunity or on the HA stem for broadly reactive antibody responses. In the wake of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, broadly neutralizing antibodies have been characterized and isolated from convalescent and vaccinated individuals, inspiring development of new vaccination techniques to elicit such responses. Induction of influenza-specific T cell responses through vaccination has also been examined in clinical trials. Strong evidence is available from human and animal models of influenza to show that established influenza-specific T cell memory can reduce viral shedding and symptom severity. However, the published evidence also shows that CD8+ T cells can efficiently select immune escape mutants early after influenza virus infection. Here, we discuss universal immunity to influenza viruses mediated by both cross-reactive T cells and antibodies, the mechanisms of immune evasion in influenza, and how to counteract commonly occurring

  19. Immune regulation of ovarian development: programming by neonatal immune challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luba eSominsky

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal immune challenge by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS produces enduring alterations in the development and activity of neuroendocrine, immune and other physiological systems. We have recently reported that neonatal exposure to an immune challenge by administration of LPS results in altered reproductive development in the female Wistar rat. Specifically, LPS-treated animals exhibited diminished ovarian reserve and altered reproductive lifespan. In the current study, we examined the cellular mechanisms that lead to the previously documented impaired ovulation and reduced follicular pool. Rats were administered intraperitoneally either 0.05mg/kg of LPS (Salmonella Enteritidis or an equivalent volume of non-pyrogenic saline on postnatal days (PNDs 3 and 5, and ovaries were obtained on PND 7. Microarray analysis revealed a significant upregulation in transcript expression (2-fold change; p<.05 for a substantial number of genes in the ovaries of LPS-treated animals, implicated in immune cell signalling, inflammatory responses, reproductive system development and disease. Several canonical pathways involved in immune recognition were affected by LPS treatment, such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-kB activation and LPS-stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling. Real-time PCR analysis supported the microarray results. Protein expression analysis of several components of the MAPK signalling pathway revealed a significant upregulation in the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 in the neonatal ovary of LPS-treated animals. These results indicate that neonatal immune challenge by administration of LPS has a direct effect on the ovary during the sensitive period of follicular formation. Given the pivotal role of inflammatory processes in the regulation of reproductive health, our findings suggest that early life immune activation via TLR signalling may have significant implications for the programming of ovarian development

  20. Alternative adaptive immunity strategies: coelacanth, cod and shark immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, Francesco; Gerdol, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The advent of high throughput sequencing has permitted to investigate the genome and the transcriptome of novel non-model species with unprecedented depth. This technological advance provided a better understanding of the evolution of adaptive immune genes in gnathostomes, revealing several unexpected features in different fish species which are of particular interest. In the present paper, we review the current understanding of the adaptive immune system of the coelacanth, the elephant shark and the Atlantic cod. The study of coelacanth, the only living extant of the long thought to be extinct Sarcopterygian lineage, is fundamental to bring new insights on the evolution of the immune system in higher vertebrates. Surprisingly, coelacanths are the only known jawed vertebrates to lack IgM, whereas two IgD/W loci are present. Cartilaginous fish are of great interest due to their basal position in the vertebrate tree of life; the genome of the elephant shark revealed the lack of several important immune genes related to T cell functions, which suggest the existence of a primordial set of TH1-like cells. Finally, the Atlantic cod lacks a functional major histocompatibility II complex, but balances this evolutionary loss with the expansion of specific gene families, including MHC I, Toll-like receptors and antimicrobial peptides. Overall, these data point out that several fish species present an unconventional adaptive immune system, but the loss of important immune genes is balanced by adaptive evolutionary strategies which still guarantee the establishment of an efficient immune response against the pathogens they have to fight during their life.

  1. Immune response to fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Jose L; Garcia, Marta E

    2008-09-15

    The immune mechanisms of defence against fungal infections are numerous, and range from protective mechanisms that were present early in evolution (innate immunity) to sophisticated adaptive mechanisms that are induced specifically during infection and disease (adaptive immunity). The first-line innate mechanism is the presence of physical barriers in the form of skin and mucous membranes, which is complemented by cell membranes, cellular receptors and humoral factors. There has been a debate about the relative contribution of humoral and cellular immunity to host defence against fungal infections. For a long time it was considered that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was important, but humoral immunity had little or no role. However, it is accepted now that CMI is the main mechanism of defence, but that certain types of antibody response are protective. In general, Th1-type CMI is required for clearance of a fungal infection, while Th2 immunity usually results in susceptibility to infection. Aspergillosis, which is a disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus, has been the subject of many studies, including details of the immune response. Attempts to relate aspergillosis to some form of immunosuppression in animals, as is the case with humans, have not been successful to date. The defence against Aspergillus is based on recognition of the pathogen, a rapidly deployed and highly effective innate effector phase, and a delayed but robust adaptive effector phase. Candida albicans, part of the normal microbial flora associated with mucous surfaces, can be present as congenital candidiasis or as acquired defects of cell-mediated immunity. Resistance to this yeast is associated with Th1 CMI, whereas Th2 immunity is associated with susceptibility to systemic infection. Dermatophytes produce skin alterations in humans and other animals, and the essential role of the CMI response is to destroy the fungi and produce an immunoprotective status against re-infection. The resolution

  2. Immune-priming in ant larvae: social immunity does not undermine individual immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B.; Malak, Tanya; MacKintosh, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Social insects deploy numerous strategies against pathogens including behavioural, biochemical and immunological responses. While past research has revealed that adult social insects can generate immunity, few studies have focused on the immune function during an insect's early life stages. We hypothesized that larvae of the black carpenter ant Camponotus pennsylvanicus vaccinated with heat-killed Serratia marcescens should be less susceptible to a challenge with an active and otherwise letha...

  3. Synthetic immunology: modulating the human immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Humans have manipulated the immune system to dampen or boost the immune response for thousands of years. As our understanding of fundamental immunology and biotechnological methodology accumulates, we can capitalize on this combined knowledge to engineer biological devices with the aim of rationally manipulating the immune response. We address therapeutic approaches based on the principles of synthetic immunology that either ameliorate disorders of the immune system by interfering with the immune response, or improve diverse pathogenic conditions by exploiting immune cell effector functions. We specifically highlight synthetic proteins investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, summarize studies that have used engineered immune cells, and finish with a discussion of possible future therapeutic concepts.

  4. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  5. Philippine campaign boosts child immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel-santana, R

    1993-03-01

    In 1989, USAID awarded the Philippines a 5-year, US $50 million Child Survival Program targeting improvement in immunization coverage of children, prenatal care coverage for pregnant women, and contraceptive prevalence. Upon successful completion of performance benchmarks at the end of each year, USAID released monies to fund child survival activities for the following year. This program accomplished a major program goal, which was decentralization of health planning. The Philippine Department of Health soon incorporated provincial health planning. The Philippine Department of Health soon incorporated provincial health planning in its determination of allocation of resources. Social marketing activities contributed greatly to success in achieving the goal of boosting the immunization coverage rate for the 6 antigens listed under the Expanded Program for Immunization (51%-85% of infants, 1986-1991). In fact, rural health officers in Tarlac Province in Central Luzon went from household to household to talk to mothers about the benefits of immunizing a 1-year-old child, thereby contributing greatly to their achieving a 95% full immunization coverage rate by December 1991. Social marketing techniques included modern marketing strategies and multimedia channels. They first proved successful in metro Manila which, at the beginning of the campaign, had the lowest immunization rate of all 14 regions. Every Wednesday was designated immunization day and was when rural health centers vaccinated the children. Social marketing also successfully publicized oral rehydration therapy (ORT), breast feeding, and tuberculosis control. Another contributing factor to program success in child survival activities was private sector involvement. For example, the Philippine Pediatric Society helped to promote ORT as the preferred treatment for acute diarrhea. Further, the commercial sector distributed packets of oral rehydration salts and even advertised its own ORT product. At the end of 2

  6. Immune pathogenesis of pediatric HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tiemessen, Caroline T.; Kuhn, Louise

    2006-01-01

    Vertical exposure to HIV occurs at a time when functional capacity of the infant’s immune system is attenuated through immaturity. Immune response capability is rooted in host genetic makeup, and the broad and fine specificity of innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively, shape the outcomes of HIV encounter in some instances and imprint viral changes through selective immune pressure in others. Findings from recent studies have profound implications for understanding immune pathogene...

  7. Sympathetic Modulation of Immunity: Relevance to Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bellinger, Denise L.; Millar, Brooke A.; Perez, Sam; Carter, Jeff; Wood, Carlo; ThyagaRajan, Srinivasan; Molinaro, Christine; Lubahn, Cheri; Lorton, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    Optimal host defense against pathogens requires cross-talk between the nervous and immune systems. This paper reviews sympathetic-immune interaction, one major communication pathway, and its importance for health and disease. Sympathetic innervation of primary and secondary immune organs is described, as well as evidence for neurotransmission with cells of the immune system as targets. Most research thus far as focused on neural-immune modulation in secondary lymphoid organs, and have reveale...

  8. Adaptive Immune Evolutionary Algorithms Based on Immune Network Regulatory Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hong; QIAN Feng

    2007-01-01

    Based on immune network regulatory mechanism, a new adaptive immune evolutionary algorithm (AIEA) is proposed to improve the performance of genetic algorithms (GA) in this paper. AIEA adopts novel selection operation according to the stimulation level of each antibody. A memory base for good antibodies is devised simultaneously to raise the convergent rapidity of the algorithm and adaptive adjusting strategy of antibody population is used for preventing the loss of the population adversity. The experiments show AIFA has better convergence performance than standard genetic algorithm and is capable of maintaining the adversity of the population and solving function optimization problems in an efficient and reliable way.

  9. The sea urchin immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LC Smith

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Metchnikoff’s use of sea star larvae to observe encapsulation and phagocytosis, which was followedmuch later by allograft rejection kinetics, revealed that echinoderms had an innate immune system thatwas lacking of adaptive attributes. Larval sea urchins mount defenses in response to contact withmicrobes, which are mediated by phagocytic blastocoelar cells and pigment cells. In the adult, thecoelomocytes mediate immune responses through phagocytosis and encapsulation of foreign particles inaddition to degranulation of antimicrobial molecules. Molecular analysis of immune functions in the seaurchin has demonstrated a complement system that appears to have multiple alternative pathways andseveral activators of the lectin pathway, but may be missing the terminal pathway. Other genes andproteins involved in the sea urchin immunity include expanded sets of lectins, proteins with scavengerreceptor cysteine-rich repeats, Toll-like receptors and associated signalling proteins. A vast array ofproteins belonging to the 185/333 family are expressed in coelomocytes in response to lipopolysaccharideand show a surprising level of diversity. The sea urchin innate immune system has a number of largegene families with unexpected complexities and elevated levels of diversification.

  10. Adipose Tissue Immunity and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eCatalan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and altered immune response are important components of obesity and contribute greatly to the promotion of obesity-related metabolic complications, especially cancer development. Adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of various types of immune cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrating immune cells secrete proinflammatory adipokines and cytokines providing a microenvironment favourable for tumour growth. Accumulation of B and T cells in adipose tissue precedes macrophage infiltration causing a chronic low-grade inflammation. Phenotypic switching towards M1 macrophages and Th1 T cells constitutes an important mechanism described in the obese state correlating with increased tumour growth risk. Other possible synergic mechanisms causing a dysfunctional adipose tissue include fatty acid-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and hypoxia. Recent investigations have started to unravel the intricacy of the cross-talk between tumour cell/immune cell/adipocyte. In this sense, future therapies should take into account the combination of anti-inflammatory approaches that target the tumour microenvironment with more sophisticated and selective anti-tumoural drugs.

  11. Immune Mechanisms in Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Ulrich; Turner, Jan Eric; Krebs, Christian; Kurts, Christian; Harrison, David G; Ehmke, Heimo

    2016-03-01

    Traditionally, arterial hypertension and subsequent end-organ damage have been attributed to hemodynamic factors, but increasing evidence indicates that inflammation also contributes to the deleterious consequences of this disease. The immune system has evolved to prevent invasion of foreign organisms and to promote tissue healing after injury. However, this beneficial activity comes at a cost of collateral damage when the immune system overreacts to internal injury, such as prehypertension. Renal inflammation results in injury and impaired urinary sodium excretion, and vascular inflammation leads to endothelial dysfunction, increased vascular resistance, and arterial remodeling and stiffening. Notably, modulation of the immune response can reduce the severity of BP elevation and hypertensive end-organ damage in several animal models. Indeed, recent studies have improved our understanding of how the immune response affects the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension, but the remarkable advances in basic immunology made during the last few years still await translation to the field of hypertension. This review briefly summarizes recent advances in immunity and hypertension as well as hypertensive end-organ damage.

  12. Apolipophorins and insects immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zdybicka-Barabas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Insect lipoproteins, called lipophorins, are non-covalent assemblies of lipids and proteins serving as lipid transport vehicles. The protein moiety of lipophorin comprises two glycosylated apolipoproteins, apolipophorin I (apoLp-I and apolipophorin II (apoLp-II, constantly present in a lipophorin particle, and an exchangeable protein, apolipophorin III (apoLp-III. ApoLp-III is an abundant protein occurring in hemolymph in lipid-free and lipid-bound state and playing an important role in lipid transport and insect innate immunity. In immune response apoLp-III serves as a pattern recognition molecule. It binds and detoxifies microbial cell wall components, i.e., lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, and β-1,3-glucan. ApoLp-III activates expression of antimicrobial peptides and proteins, stimulates their antimicrobial activity, participates in regulation of the phenoloxidase system and in hemolymph clotting. In addition, the protein is involved in cellular immune response, influencing hemocyte adhesion, phagocytosis and nodule formation, and in gut immunity. Although apoLp-III is the best studied apolipophorin in insect immunity so far, a literature review suggests that all the three apolipoproteins, apoLp-I, apoLp-II and apoLp-III, function together in a coordinated defense against pathogens

  13. Hepatitis B immunization in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, M H; Goldstein, M A

    1995-10-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology of hepatitis B in the United States, previous vaccination strategy, and reasons for its failure and issues leading to the recommendation to vaccinate all adolescents. A review of specific hepatitis B virus risk behaviors of adolescents and barriers to vaccinating adolescents is covered. Strategies that favor successful completion of the immunization series are also examined. Hepatitis B infection is an important public health concern for adolescents. The previous vaccine strategy to immunize only individuals though to be at high risk was unsuccessful, especially because providers of care could not identify these individuals. Furthermore, many individuals thought not to be at high risk for infection were exposed through contacts which could not be identified. Challenges to immunization of adolescents include logistical issues, patient education, cost of the vaccine, and patient compliance. Several of these issues can be addressed by a school-based hepatitis B immunization program. The body of evidence and national policy is rapidly changing to support the recommendation that all adolescents receive the hepatitis B immunization series. The series would be most effective if administered during the middle-school years. A universal adolescent hepatitis B vaccination program would result in the most immediate health benefits and acceleration toward the eradication of hepatitis B in the United States. PMID:8580124

  14. Monounsaturated fats and immune function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yaqoob

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies suggest that olive oil is capable of modulating functions of cells of the immune system in a manner similar to, albeit weaker than, fish oils. There is some evidence that the effects of olive oil on immune function in animal studies are due to oleic acid rather than to trace elements or antioxidants. Importantly, several studies have demonstrated effects of oleic acid-containing diets on in vivo immune responses. In contrast, consumption of a monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA-rich diet by humans does not appear to bring about a general suppression of immune cell functions. The effects of this diet in humans are limited to decreasing aspects of adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, although there are trends towards decreases in natural killer cell activity and proliferation. The lack of a clear effect of MUFA in humans may be attributable to the higher level of monounsaturated fat used in the animal studies, although it is ultimately of importance to examine the effects of intakes which are in no way extreme. The effects of MUFA on adhesion molecules are potentially important, since these molecules appear to have a role in the pathology of a number of diseases involving the immune system. This area clearly deserves further exploration

  15. GPCRs in invertebrate innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Jerome; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2016-08-15

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a privileged point of contact between cells and their surrounding environment. They have been widely adopted in vertebrates as mediators of signals involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. Invertebrates rely on innate immune defences to resist infection. We review here evidence from a number of different species, principally the genetically tractable Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster that points to an important role for GPCRs in modulating innate immunity in invertebrates too. In addition to examples of GPCRs involved in regulating the expression of defence genes, we discuss studies in C. elegans addressing the role of GPCR signalling in pathogen aversive behaviour. Despite the many lacunae in our current knowledge, it is clear that GPCR signalling contributes to host defence across the animal kingdom. PMID:27262554

  16. Dynamic Metabolism in Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Chakraborty, Paramita; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-01-01

    Cell, the basic unit of life depends for its survival on nutrients and thereby energy to perform its physiological function. Cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin are key in evoking an immune response against “self” or “non-self” antigens. The thymus derived lymphoid cells called T cells are a heterogenous group with distinct phenotypic and molecular signatures that have been shown to respond against an infection (bacterial, viral, protozoan) or cancer. Recent studies have unearthed the key differences in energy metabolism between the various T cell subsets, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid derived suppressor cells. While a number of groups are dwelling into the nuances of the metabolism and its role in immune response at various strata, this review focuses on dynamic state of metabolism that is operational within various cellular compartments that interact to mount an effective immune response to alleviate disease state.

  17. Insect immune resistance to parasitoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yves Carton; Marylène Poirié; Anthony J. Nappi

    2008-01-01

    Insect host-parasitoid interactions involve complex physiological, biochemical and genetic interactions. Against endoparasitoids, immune-competent hosts initiate a blood cell-mediated response that quickly destroys the intruders and envelops them in a multilayered melanotic capsule. During the past decade, considerable progress has been made in identifying some of the critical components of the host response, mainly because of the use of efficient molecular tools. This review examines some of the components of the innate immune response of Drosophila, an insect that has served as an exceptionally good experimental model for studying non-self recognition processes and immune cell signaling mechanisms. Topics considered in this review include hematopoiesis, proliferation and adhesion of hemocytes, melanogenesis and associated cytotoxic molecules, and the genetic aspects of the host-parasitoid interaction.

  18. Immune tolerance in radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishment of immune tolerance in radiation chimeras and the mechanism of maintaining it were discussed from certain points. Semiallogeneic radiation chimeras are mostly of long-living, and the hematopoietic organ of this individual consists mainly of the cells derived from the marrow donor, i. e., F1-type cells. F1-type lymphocytes can distinguish parental strain cells from themselves. In these chimeras, a F1-skin graft maintains to be fresh as long as the host is alive, showing immune tolerance effective through its life. In establishment and maintenance of this immune tolerance, the suppressing mechanism of host-type or F1-type seems to be involved. The allogeneic radiation chimera has very poor long-survival rate compared with that of the semiallogeneic radiation chimera. To raise this survival rate, efforts are now being made from the immunological point of view. (Ueda, J.)

  19. Skin Immunity to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashem, Sakeen W; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic commensal fungus that colonizes healthy human skin, mucosa, and the reproductive tract. C. albicans is also a predominantly opportunistic fungal pathogen, leading to disease manifestations such as disseminated candidiasis and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). The differing host susceptibilities for the sites of C. albicans infection have revealed tissue compartmentalization with tailoring of immune responses based on the site of infection. Furthermore, extensive studies of host genetics in rare cases of CMC have identified conserved genetic pathways involved in immune recognition and the response to the extracellular pathogen. We focus here on human and mouse skin as a site of C. albicans infection, and we review established and newly discovered insights into the cellular pathways that promote cutaneous antifungal immunity. PMID:27178391

  20. Immune response to H pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Suarez; Victor E Reyes; Ellen J Beswick

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer,attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium.

  1. Efectos de la toxina botulínica A (Botox® intraarticular en la artrosis de rodilla avanzada Effects of intraarticular Botulinum Toxin A (Botox® on refractory knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fenollosa Vázquez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: la osteoartritis es la enfermedad articular más común y una de los problemas de salud más frecuentes y sintomáticos en la madurez y senectud. Este trabajo describe nuestra experiencia clínica con inyecciones intraarticulares de toxina botulínica tipo A (TBA en dolor de rodilla artrósico y refractario. Materiales y métodos: doce mujeres con gonartrosis avanzada y refractaria, acudieron a consulta para el manejo del dolor de rodilla de moderado a severo. Las pacientes estuvieron en seguimiento 16 semanas, durante las que la mejoría de su estado fue valorado comparando el dolor basal respecto al dolor en el momento de la visita mediante diferentes escalas estandarizadas. Simultáneamente, se evaluaron la funcionalidad, la cantidad de medicación analgésica diaria y los efectos secundarios. Resultados: el consumo de medicación decreció de 3,6 a 2 tomas/día. No se observaron efectos secundarios. Conclusión: se evidenció un alivio del dolor que se inició en la semana 2 y se mantuvo hasta 12 semanas tras la inyección de TBA. La mediana del cambio de la escala total de WOMAC y de la EVA fue de -7,5 y -1,9 respectivamente, con una disminución significativa del dolor a las 16 semanas. No se registraron cambios en la escala WOMAC en 5 pacientes, mientras que 3 casos mostraron un descenso en dicha escala mayor del 20% y los en los 4 restantes fue superior al 40%. Las que respondieron a la infiltración notaron una mejora en las actividades de la vida diaria gracias a este alivio. El consumo de medicación decreció de 3,6 a 2 tomas/día. No se observaron efectos secundarios.Objective: osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease and it is among the most disabling health problems for middle aged and older people. Purpose: to test the effects of a single intraarticular injection of Botulinum Toxin A (BTA on refractory knee osteoarthritis. Material and method: twelve women (mean age: 72 with refractory knee osteoarthritis who

  2. Does botulinum toxin improve the function of the patient with spasticity after stroke? Toxina botulínica proporciona melhora funcional em pacientes com espasticidade secundária a acidente vascular cerebral?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Cardoso

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke spasticity is an important cause of disability in adults, due to muscle hyperactivity, which results in limb stiffness and muscle spasm. The prognosis for these patients depends on several features such as early management and adequate physical therapy to avoid muscle shortening, pain, and their consequences. Although several papers have shown that intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin type A (BT-A decreases spasticity in post-stroke patients, few authors have demonstrated functional improvement after this therapy. In order to assess if individualized BT-A injections improves upper limb function in post-stroke spastic patients, we prospectively followed 20 consecutive patients of 18 years of age or more with spastic hemiparesis secondary to stroke. Fulg-Meyer scale modified for upper limbs, measure of functional independence (MFI, Ashworth modified scale, and goniometry were applied in the beginning of the investigation and in the 16th and 32nd weeks. BT-A was applied at baseline and in the 16th week. All subjects were submitted to rehabilitation therapy. All patients showed improvement according to Ashworth modified scale and increase in the range of motion, which were sustained until the 32nd week (pEspasticidade secundária a acidente vascular cerebral (AVC é importante causa de incapacidade em adultos. O prognóstico para estes pacientes depende de vários fatores como tratamento precoce e terapia física adequada, evitando encurtamento muscular, dor e outras conseqüências. Vários estudos têm demonstrado que aplicacões intramusculares de toxina botulínica do tipo A (TxB-A reduzem a espasticidade após AVC, entretanto poucos autores observaram melhora funcional de membros superiores com esta terapêutica. Para determinar se aplicações individualizadas de TxB-A melhoram a função no membro superior espástico de pacientes com hemiparesia secundária a AVC, acompanhamos 20 pacientes com história de AVC entre 6 meses

  3. MAP Kinases in Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongliang Zhang; Chen Dong

    2005-01-01

    MAP kinases are evolutionarily conserved signaling regulators from budding yeast to mammals and play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. There are three main families of MAPKs in mammals. Each of them has its own activators, inactivators, substrates and scaffolds, which altogether form a fine signaling network in response to different extracellular or intracellular stimulation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding of the regulation of MAP kinases and the roles of MAP kinases in innate and adaptive immune responses.

  4. MAP Kinases in Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongliangZhang; ChenDong

    2005-01-01

    MAP kinases are evolutionarily conserved signaling regulators from budding yeast to mammals and play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. There are three main families of MAPKs in mammals. Each of them has its own activators, inactivators, substrates and scaffolds, which altogether form a fine signaling network in response to different extracellular or intracellular stimulation. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding of the regulation of MAP kinases and the roles of MAP kinases in innate and adaptive immune responses. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):20-27.

  5. Innate immunity in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Cheryl M

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder. T helper(h)1 and Th17 lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis through the release of inflammatory cytokines that promote further recruitment of immune cells, keratinocyte proliferation and sustained inflammation. The innate immune system is the first line of defence against infection and plays a crucial role in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. The presence of innate immune cells and their products in psoriatic skin plaques suggests a role for innate immunity in this disease. In addition, the innate immune system can direct the development of pathogenic Th cells in psoriasis. In this article, we will summarise the role of the innate immune system in psoriasis with particular emphasis on the role of cytokines, signalling pathways and cells of the innate immune system.

  6. Season of birth shapes neonatal immune function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil;

    2016-01-01

    Birth season has been reported to be a risk factor for several immune-mediated diseases. We hypothesized that this association is mediated by differential changes in neonatal immune phenotype and function with birth season. We sought to investigate the influence of season of birth on cord blood...... immune cell subsets and inflammatory mediators in neonatal airways. Cord blood was phenotyped for 26 different immune cell subsets, and at 1 month of age, 20 cytokines and chemokines were quantified in airway mucosal lining fluid. Multivariate partial least squares discriminant analyses were applied...... to determine whether certain immune profiles dominate by birth season, and correlations between individual cord blood immune cells and early airway immune mediators were defined. We found a birth season-related fluctuation in neonatal immune cell subsets and in early-life airway mucosal immune function...

  7. Immune regulation by pericytes: modulating innate and adaptive immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarro, Rocio; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis;

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes (PC) are mural cells that surround endothelial cells (EC) in small blood vessels. PC have traditionally been endowed with structural functions, being essential for vessel maturation and stabilization. However, accumulating evidence suggest that PC also display immune properties. They can...

  8. Fc receptors and immunity to parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleass, R J; Woof, J M

    2001-11-01

    Fc receptors (FcRs) are crucial in the immune system; they mediate a plethora of biological functions as diverse as antigen presentation, phagocytosis, cytotoxicity, induction of inflammatory cascades and modulation of immune responses. Parasites, in order to survive in the immunocompetent host, have devised ingenious methods to subvert this important aspect of the immune response. This article discusses the current thinking on FcRs, their role in immunity to parasites, and immune evasion strategies employed by parasites in their attempt to neutralize the important immune defense mechanisms mediated by these molecules. PMID:11872400

  9. Antitumor Immunity and Dietary Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalise R. Smith

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which natural dietary compounds exert their antitumor effects have been the focus of a large number of research efforts in recent years. Induction of apoptosis by inhibition of cell proliferative pathways is one of the common means of cell death employed by these dietary compounds. However, agents that can activate an antitumor immune response in addition to a chemotherapeutic effect may be useful adjuvants or alternative therapies for the treatment of cancer. The focus of this review is to highlight representative dietary compounds, namely Withania somnifera, Panax ginseng, curcumin and resveratrol with special emphasis on their antitumor immune mechanism of action. Each of these dietary compounds and their sources has a history of safe human use as food or in herbal medicine traditions, potentially making them ideal therapeutics. Here we report the recent advances in the cellular immune mechanisms utilized by these compounds to induce antitumor immunity. Taken together, these findings provide a new perspective for exploiting novel dietary compounds as chemoimmunotherapeutic anti-cancer agents.

  10. Hormonal crosstalk in plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Does, A.

    2012-01-01

    The plant hormones salicylic acid (SA), also known as plant aspirin, and jasmonic acid (JA) play major roles in the regulation of the plant immune system. In general, SA is important for defense against pathogens with a biotrophic lifestyle, whereas JA is essential for defense against insect herbivo

  11. [Breaking immune tolerance in cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Mélanie; Champiat, Stéphane; Chaput, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and understanding of complex cellular interactions that govern the immune system contributed to the pharmacological targeting of anti-tumor immunity. The activity of immune effector cells, such as NK and T-cells, is regulated by a wide range of activating and inhibiting receptors or ligands. Drugs that target these receptors or ligands can modulate the immune response by exerting antagonistic or agonistic effects. Over the past decade, several immunomodulators have demonstrated clinical effectiveness, and three of them have already been approved for use in oncology. The development of these immunotherapy approaches presented unique challenges for safety and efficacy, requiring revising clinical response criteria and the establishment of guidelines to help oncologists to manage properly inflammatory toxicities. The introduction of these immunotherapies is a revolution in oncology. However, additional efforts in terms of optimizing treatment administration and identification of biomarkers are needed. Identifying the immunodynamics of various immunomodulators should allow a better understanding of anti-tumor and inflammatory mechanisms, and certainly give the opportunity to develop effective therapeutic combinations without potentiating adverse events. PMID:25609492

  12. The Immune System in Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  13. Universal Child Immunization by 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, P. E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    The present volume endeavors to highlight the deeper significance and broader implications for development theory, policy and practice of the realization of the movement toward universal child immunization by 1990 (UCI-1990). Simultaneously, the volume collects and analyzes the most significant findings and experiences of the movement since 1984.…

  14. Immune Dysfunction in Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishraga Elamin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between immunity and neurodevelopmental disorders has been extensively investigated in autism, suggesting a potential involvement of both cellular and humoral immunity in the establishment of synaptic connectivity modulation during development. A similar link has been proposed also for Tourette syndrome (TS, a complex, multifactorial disorder, in which the interplay between genetic, environmental, hormonal and immunological factors might be relevant. Lymphocyte subpopulation analysis in TS suggests a possible systemic activation of several T- and B-cell subtypes, whereas the observed decreased numbers of T regulatory lymphocytes might predispose to autoimmunity. Genes related to both cell- and antibody-mediated immune responses may be over-expressed at specific ages in youngsters with TS. Data from cytokine measurements and transcriptomics profiles in TS patients are coherent with the systemic immune activation detected by studies on lymphocyte subpopulations. Moreover, TS patients have exhibited IgG3 and IgA dysgammaglobulinemia, which might predispose to recurrent infections and autoimmunity. To date, the association between TS and autoantibodies has not been demonstrated. Interestingly, however, there is a higher degree of maternal family history of autoimmune diseases among TS patients. Finally, TS patients could be prone to allergic illnesses (asthma, atopic dermatitis, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, but more work is needed in this area.

  15. Lamsiekte (botulism: Solving the aetiology riddle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph D. Bigalke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The reason or reasons why it took Sir Arnold Theiler so many years to unravel the riddle of the aetiology of lamsiekte in cattle and whether P.R. Viljoen’s lifelong grudge for receiving insufficient credit from Theiler for his research contribution was justified are analysed in this paper. By 1912, Theiler knew that Duncan Hutcheon had advocated the use of bonemeal as a prophylactic against the disease in the early 1880s. Hutcheon’s colleague, J.D. Borthwick, had shown conclusively in a field experiment in 1895 that lamsiekte did not occur in cattle fed a liberal allowance of bonemeal; and bone-craving had been identified by Hutcheon and several farmers as being associated with the occurrence of the disease (a ‘premonitory’ sign. Hutcheon regarded a phosphate deficiency of the pastures as the direct cause of lamsiekte. However, Theiler did not accept this, was convinced that intoxication was involved and developed a ‘grass toxin’ theory. Viljoen (1918 also latched onto the grass toxin theory. He did not believe that osteophagia existed, stating categorically that he had not observed it on the experimental farm Armoedsvlakte where > 100 cases of lamsiekte had occurred during the > 3 years that he spent there. Moreover, he did not believe in the prophylactic value of bonemeal. However, careful analysis of a subsequent publication, of which he was a co-author, revealed that in late 1918 and early 1919 he reproduced the disease by drenching cattle with blowfly pupae and larvae as well as with crushed bones from decomposing bovine carcasses. For this breakthrough he did not get proper credit from Theiler. Reappointed to study lamsiekte on Armoedsvlakte in the autumn of 1919, Theiler, probably already aware that the toxin he was seeking was in the decomposing bones or carcass material rather than the grass, deliberately ‘walked with the cattle’ on the farm to encounter a classic manifestation of bone-craving (osteophagia. The penny then immediately dropped. Theiler, actually rationalising an hypothesis that was about four decades old, did so with a vengeance. Within less than two years he had reproduced lamsiekte by exposing cattle with natural bone-craving to rotten carcass material, had chemical proof that the grazing was phosphorus-deficient, had developed a satisfactory bonemeal prophylactic dosage programme, and the bacterial toxin concerned – perhaps the trickiest contribution – had been produced in culture. Hence the table was set for the later development of an excellent lamsiekte vaccine.

  16. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  17. Immune-priming in ant larvae: social immunity does not undermine individual immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B; Malak, Tanya; Mackintosh, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Social insects deploy numerous strategies against pathogens including behavioural, biochemical and immunological responses. While past research has revealed that adult social insects can generate immunity, few studies have focused on the immune function during an insect's early life stages. We hypothesized that larvae of the black carpenter ant Camponotus pennsylvanicus vaccinated with heat-killed Serratia marcescens should be less susceptible to a challenge with an active and otherwise lethal dose of the bacterium. We compared the in vivo benefits of prior vaccination of young larvae relative to naive and ringer injected controls. Regardless of colony of origin, survival parameters of vaccinated individuals following a challenge were significantly higher than those of the other two treatments. Results support the hypothesis that ant larvae exhibit immune-priming. Based on these results, we can infer that brood care by workers does not eliminate the need for individual-level immunological responses. Focusing on these early stages of development within social insect colonies can start addressing the complex dynamics between physiological (individual level) and social (collective) immunity. PMID:24108675

  18. Immune-priming in ant larvae: social immunity does not undermine individual immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B; Malak, Tanya; Mackintosh, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Social insects deploy numerous strategies against pathogens including behavioural, biochemical and immunological responses. While past research has revealed that adult social insects can generate immunity, few studies have focused on the immune function during an insect's early life stages. We hypothesized that larvae of the black carpenter ant Camponotus pennsylvanicus vaccinated with heat-killed Serratia marcescens should be less susceptible to a challenge with an active and otherwise lethal dose of the bacterium. We compared the in vivo benefits of prior vaccination of young larvae relative to naive and ringer injected controls. Regardless of colony of origin, survival parameters of vaccinated individuals following a challenge were significantly higher than those of the other two treatments. Results support the hypothesis that ant larvae exhibit immune-priming. Based on these results, we can infer that brood care by workers does not eliminate the need for individual-level immunological responses. Focusing on these early stages of development within social insect colonies can start addressing the complex dynamics between physiological (individual level) and social (collective) immunity.

  19. Immune-Neuroendocrine Interactions and Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Jara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between immune-neuroendocrine system is firmly established. The messengers of this connection are hormones, neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and cytokines. The immune-neuroendocrine system have the capacity to synthesize and release these molecules, which, in turn, can stimulate or suppress the activity of immune or neuroendocrine cells by binding to receptors. In fact, hormones, neuropeptides and neurotransmitters participate in innate and adaptive immune response.

  20. The aging of the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Grubeck-Loebenstein, B.; Weinberger, B.; Weiskopf, D.

    2009-01-01

    An age-related decline in immune functions, referred to as immunosenescence, is partially responsible for the increased prevalence and severity of infectious diseases, and the low efficacy of vaccination in elderly persons. Immunosenescence is characterized by a decrease in cell-mediated immune function as well as by reduced humoral immune responses. Age-dependent defects in T- and B-cell function coexist with age-related changes within the innate immune system. In this review, we discuss the...

  1. Immunity-based diagnosis for a motherboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Haruki; Okamoto, Takeshi; Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2011-01-01

    We have utilized immunity-based diagnosis to detect abnormal behavior of components on a motherboard. The immunity-based diagnostic model monitors voltages of some components, CPU temperatures, and fan speeds. We simulated abnormal behaviors of some components on the motherboard, and we utilized the immunity-based diagnostic model to evaluate motherboard sensors in two experiments. These experiments showed that the immunity-based diagnostic model was an effective method for detecting abnormal behavior of components on the motherboard. PMID:22163857

  2. Immunity-Based Diagnosis for a Motherboard

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiteru Ishida; Takeshi Okamoto; Haruki Shida

    2011-01-01

    We have utilized immunity-based diagnosis to detect abnormal behavior of components on a motherboard. The immunity-based diagnostic model monitors voltages of some components, CPU temperatures, and fan speeds. We simulated abnormal behaviors of some components on the motherboard, and we utilized the immunity-based diagnostic model to evaluate motherboard sensors in two experiments. These experiments showed that the immunity-based diagnostic model was an effective method for detecting abnormal...

  3. Distance Concentration-Based Artificial Immune Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; WANG Yao-cai; WANG Zhi-jie; MENG Jiang

    2005-01-01

    The diversity, adaptation and memory of biological immune system attract much attention of researchers. Several optimal algorithms based on immune system have also been proposed up to now. The distance concentration-based artificial immune algorithm (DCAIA) is proposed to overcome defects of the classical artificial immune algorithm (CAIA) in this paper. Compared with genetic algorithm (GA) and CAIA, DCAIA is good for solving the problem of precocity,holding the diversity of antibody, and enhancing convergence rate.

  4. Immune regulation and CNS autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antel, J P; Owens, T

    1999-01-01

    The central nervous system is a demonstrated target of both clinical and experimental immune mediated disorders. Immune regulatory mechanisms operative at the levels of the systemic immune system, the blood brain barrier, and within the CNS parenchyma are important determinants of the intensity a...

  5. Multiple Limit Cycles in an Immune System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-cheng Huang; Le-min Zhu; Minaya Villasana

    2008-01-01

    The nonlinear oscillatory phenomenon has been observed in the system of immune response, which corresponds to the limit cycles in the mathematical models. We prove that the system simulating an immune response studied by Huang has at least three limit cycles in the system. The conditions for the multiple limit cycles are useful in analyzing the nonlinear oscillation in immune response.

  6. LAIR and collagens in immune regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebbink, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system constantly receives opposing signals that on the one side activate immune cells allowing them to eradicate diseased cells and pathogens, and on the other side inhibit these same cells to limit and ultimately terminate an immune response. A correct balance is crucial for effective d

  7. Cellular immune responses to respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    When a respiratory virus successfully infects the lungs, cascades of immune responses are initiated aimed to remove the pathogen. Immediate non-specific protection is provided by the innate immune system and this reduces the viral load during the first days of infection. The adaptive immune response

  8. Immune System Toxicity and Immunotoxicity Hazard Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to chemicals may alter immune system health, increasing the risk of infections, allergy and autoimmune diseases. The chapter provides a concise overview of the immune system, host factors that affect immune system heal, and the effects that xenobiotic exposure may have ...

  9. Tilapia show immunization response against Ich

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compares the immune response of Nile tilapia and red tilapia against parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) using a cohabitation challenge model. Both Nile and red tilapia showed strong immune response post immunization with live Ich theronts by IP injection or immersion. Blood serum...

  10. A genetic inference on cancer immune responsiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ena; Uccellini, Lorenzo; Marincola, Francesco M.

    2012-01-01

    A cancer immune signature implicating good prognosis and responsiveness to immunotherapy was described that is observed also in other aspects of immune-mediated, tissue-specific destruction (TSD). Its determinism remains, however, elusive. Based on limited but unique clinical observations, we propose a multifactorial genetic model of human cancer immune responsiveness.

  11. Comparação entre os métodos de injeção de toxina botulínica em músculo ocular externo com o uso do eletromiógrafo e com o uso da pinça de Mendonça Electromyograph assistance and Mendonça's forceps - a comparison between two methods of botulinum toxin A injection into the extraocular muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Fernando Scalamandré Mendonça

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar dois métodos de aplicação de toxina botulínica A (TBA em músculo ocular externo: com auxílio de eletromiógrafo (EMG e com a pinça de Mendonça. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados no Departamento de Oftalmologia da UNIFESP 29 pacientes que apresentavam estrabismo e baixa acuidade visual em um olho. Foram divididos em dois grupos: grupo I - 17 pacientes que receberam a toxina botulínica A por meio de injeção com auxílio da pinça de Mendonça e grupo II - 12 pacientes que receberam a toxina botulínica A por injeção guiada pelo eletromiógrafo. Os pacientes dos dois grupos foram avaliados no 7º e no 14º dia após aplicação. Compararam-se os resultados dos dois grupos neste período de tempo. Os testes de correlação de Friedman e Mann-Whitney foram usados para análise estatística. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença estatística entre as médias de desvio pré-aplicação e em pelo menos um período (7º ou 14º dia após aplicação, tanto no grupo dos pacientes em que foi utilizada a pinça, quanto no grupo de pacientes em que foi utilizado o eletromiógrafo. Não houve diferença estatística dos desvios pré-aplicação e pós-aplicação entre os dois grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Os dois métodos de aplicação da toxina botulínica A são equivalentes e portanto, o uso da pinça de Mendonça pode ser método alternativo ao uso do eletromiógrafo, para guiar a injeção de toxina botulínica A.PURPOSE: To compare two methods of botulinum toxin A (BTA injection into the extraocular muscle (EOM: the electromyographically (EMG guided injection and the injection using Mendonça's forceps. METHODS: Twenty-nine (29 patients with strabismus and low visual acuity in one eye were examined at the Department of Ophthalmology of UNIFESP. They were divided into 2 groups - group I with 17 patients receiving the botulinum toxin A injection using Mendonça's forceps, and group II with 12 patients receiving the toxin with electromyographical

  12. Immune regulation in gut and cord : opportunities for directing the immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roock, S.

    2012-01-01

    The gut is an important organ for the immune system. Microbes and immune cells interact directly or via epithelial cells. Both TH17 and Treg cells mature in this environment. The composition of the microbiota has an important influence on the immune homeostasis. Influencing the immune system via the

  13. Immunization against Small Ruminant Lentiviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Amorena

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Multisystemic disease caused by Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLV in sheep and goats leads to production losses, to the detriment of animal health and welfare. This, together with the lack of treatments, has triggered interest in exploring different strategies of immunization to control the widely spread SRLV infection and, also, to provide a useful model for HIV vaccines. These strategies involve inactivated whole virus, subunit vaccines, DNA encoding viral proteins in the presence or absence of plasmids encoding immunological adjuvants and naturally or artificially attenuated viruses. In this review, we revisit, comprehensively, the immunization strategies against SRLV and analyze this double edged tool individually, as it may contribute to either controlling or enhancing virus replication and/or disease.

  14. Innate immunity to Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Massis, Liliana M.; Zamboni, Dario S

    2011-01-01

    Innate immune cells, such as macrophages, are highly adapted to rapidly recognize infections by distinct pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa. This recognition is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which are found in host cell surface membranes and the host cell cytoplasm. PRRs include protein families such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), Nod-like receptors (NLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and sensors of cytosolic DNA. The activation of these PRRs by...

  15. Innate Immunity to Legionella Pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Massis, Liliana M.; Zamboni, Dario S

    2011-01-01

    Innate immune cells, such as macrophages, are highly adapted to rapidly recognize infections by distinct pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. This recognition is mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which are found in host cell surface membranes and the host cell cytoplasm. PRRs include protein families such as the toll-like receptors, nod-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, and sensors of cytosolic DNA. The activation of these PRRs by pathogen-associate...

  16. Immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; Shastri, Nilabh

    2013-01-01

    The ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, ERAAP (or ERAP1), is essential for trimming peptides that are presented by MHC class I molecules. ERAP1 is inhibited by human cytomegalovirus, and ERAP1 polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune diseases. How the immune system detects ERAAP dysfunction, however, is unknown. We have shown previously that ERAAP-deficient cells present an immunogenic pMHC I repertoire, that elicits CD8+ T cell response in WT mice. Additionally, we disc...

  17. Immune Response to Giardia duodenalis

    OpenAIRE

    Faubert, Gaétan

    2000-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan Giardia duodenalis is a widespread opportunistic parasite of humans and animals. This parasite inhabits the upper part of the small intestine and has a direct life cycle. After ingestion of cysts, which are the infective stage, the trophozoites emerge from the cysts in the duodenum and attach to the small intestinal mucosa of the host. Since the migration of trophozoites from the lumen of the intestine into surrounding tissues is an unusual occurrence, the immune resp...

  18. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; DeRousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R.; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P. Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-01-01

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried “nanomicroparticle” vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the form...

  19. Immunizations Part II: Shingles Vaccine

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-09-24

    This podcast discusses older adults and shingles, as well as the importance of getting the shingles vaccine. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 9/24/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) and National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/24/2008.

  20. 78 FR 60877 - Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... plans. Matters To Be Discussed: The agenda will include discussions on: child/adolescent immunization.... Recommendation votes are scheduled for child/ adolescent immunization schedule, adult immunization schedule, and... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Immunization...

  1. 76 FR 60500 - Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... will include discussions on: Child/adolescent immunization schedules; adult immunization schedule... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices...; pertussis; immunization coverage among children and adolescents; and vaccine supply. Agenda items...

  2. Oscillations in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Jaroslav; Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J T

    2007-04-01

    Oscillations are surprisingly common in the immune system, both in its healthy state and in disease. The most famous example is that of periodic fevers caused by the malaria parasite. A number of hereditary disorders, which also cause periodic fevers, have also been known for a long time. Various reports of oscillations in cytokine concentrations following antigen challenge have been published over at least the past three decades. Oscillations can also occur at the intracellular level. Calcium oscillations following T-cell activation are familiar to all immunologists, and metabolic and reactive oxygen species oscillations in neutrophils have been well documented. More recently, oscillations in nuclear factor kappaB activity following stimulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha have received considerable publicity. However, despite all of these examples, oscillations in the immune system still tend to be considered mainly as pathological aberrations, and their causes and significance remained largely unknown. This is partly because of a lack of awareness within the immunological community of the appropriate theoretical frameworks for describing and analyzing such behavior. We provide an introduction to these frameworks and give a survey of the currently known oscillations that occur within the immune system. PMID:17367345

  3. The Epitranscriptome and Innate Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary A O'Connell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge of the variety and abundances of RNA base modifications is rapidly increasing. Modified bases have critical roles in tRNAs, rRNAs, translation, splicing, RNA interference, and other RNA processes, and are now increasingly detected in all types of transcripts. Can new biological principles associated with this diversity of RNA modifications, particularly in mRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, be identified? This review will explore this question by focusing primarily on adenosine to inosine (A-to-I RNA editing by the adenine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR enzymes that have been intensively studied for the past 20 years and have a wide range of effects. Over 100 million adenosine to inosine editing sites have been identified in the human transcriptome, mostly in embedded Alu sequences that form potentially innate immune-stimulating dsRNA hairpins in transcripts. Recent research has demonstrated that inosine in the epitranscriptome and ADAR1 protein establish innate immune tolerance for host dsRNA formed by endogenous sequences. Innate immune sensors that detect viral nucleic acids are among the readers of epitranscriptome RNA modifications, though this does preclude a wide range of other modification effects.

  4. The commensal microbiota drives immune homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claire eArrieta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For millions of years, microbes have coexisted with eukaryotic cells at the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates in a complex, yet usually harmonious symbiosis. An ever-expanding number of reports describe how eliminating or shifting the intestinal microbiota has profound effects on the development and functionality of the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we examine some of the mechanisms by which bacterial signals affect immune homeostasis. Focusing on the strategies that microbes use to keep our immune system healthy, as opposed to trying to correct the immune imbalances caused by dysbiosis, may prove to be a more astute and efficient way of treating immune-mediated disease.

  5. Immune defence against Candida fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B; van der Meer, Jos W M; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; van de Veerdonk, Frank L

    2015-10-01

    The immune response to Candida species is shaped by the commensal character of the fungus. There is a crucial role for discerning between colonization and invasion at mucosal surfaces, with the antifungal host defence mechanisms used during mucosal or systemic infection with Candida species differing substantially. Here, we describe how innate sensing of fungi by pattern recognition receptors and the interplay of immune cells (both myeloid and lymphoid) with non-immune cells, including platelets and epithelial cells, shapes host immunity to Candida species. Furthermore, we discuss emerging data suggesting that both the innate and adaptive immune systems display memory characteristics after encountering Candida species.

  6. Epidemic spreading with immunization on bipartite networks

    CERN Document Server

    Tanimoto, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    Bipartite networks are composed of two types of nodes and there are no links between nodes of the same type. Thus the study of epidemic spread and control on such networks is relevant to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). When entire populations of two types cannot be immunized and the effect of immunization is not perfect, we have to consider the targeted immunization with immunization rates. We derive the epidemic thresholds of SIR and SIS models with immunization and illustrate the results with STDs on heterosexual contact networks.

  7. Self-consuming innate immunity in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    . However, it has been unclear by which molecular mechanisms plants execute PCD during innate immune responses. We recently examined HR PCD in autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis knockout mutants (atg) and find that PCD conditioned by one class of plant innate immune receptors is suppressed in atg mutants....... Intriguingly, HR triggered by another class of immune receptors with different genetic requirements is not compromised, indicating that only a specific subset of immune receptors engage the autophagy pathway for HR execution. Thus, our work provides a primary example of autophagic cell death associated...... with innate immune responses in eukaryotes as well as of prodeath functions for the autophagy pathway in plants....

  8. Toxina botulínica tipo A para el manejo del dolor en pacientes con síndrome de dolor miofascial crónico Botulinum toxin type A for the management of pain in patients with chronic myofascial pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Torres Huerta

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El síndrome de dolor miofascial es uno de los principales problemas de dolor crónico en la práctica clínica, comúnmente asociado a un traumatismo o a microtraumatismos repetitivos. La toxina botulínica tipo A (Botox® es una alternativa aceptada como opción terapéutica. Objetivo: Valorar la funcionalidad de las actividades diarias mejorando la intensidad del dolor con el uso de la toxina botulínica tipo A, infiltrada en puntos gatillo, en pacientes con síndrome de dolor miofascial crónico. Material y métodos: 30 pacientes con síndrome de dolor miofascial crónico con edad entre 25 y 50 años de ambos sexos. A todos se les realizó infiltración de puntos gatillo mediante equipo de electrosonomiografía para la aplicación de toxina botulínica tipo A a una dilución de las 100 Um de toxina en 1 ml de solución salina infiltrando de 200 a 400 Um totales, dependiendo del sitio del dolor. Se valoró la calidad analgésica mediante la escala visual analógica (EVA y el índice de funcionalidad con el cuestionario de Oswestry durante 4 semanas. Resultados: La valoración de la EVA promedio inicial fue de 7,23 y la final de 3,13 (p Introduction: Myofascial syndrome is one of the main chronic pain syndromes encountered in clinical practice and is commonly associated with trauma or repetitive microtrauma. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox® is an accepted therapeutic option. Objective: To evaluate the use of botulinum toxin type A (Botox®, infiltrated in trigger points, as an option in the management of pain in patients with chronic myofascial syndrome. Material and Methods: Thirty men and women with myofascial pain syndrome, aged between 25 and 50 years were included. In all patients, botulinum toxin type A (Botox® was infiltrated in trigger points by means of electrosonomyographic equipment. A dilution of 100 Um toxin in 1 cc saline solution was used and a total of 200 to 400 Um was administered depending on the site of the

  9. Vaccines and immunization against human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Neil D; Budgeon, Lynn R

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic immunization strategies are an effective method to control human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated diseases and cancers. Current protective virus-like particle and capsid-based vaccines are highly protective against vaccine-matched HPV types, and continued improvements in second-generation vaccines will lead to broader protection and cross-protection against the cancer-associated types. Increasing the effectiveness of broadly cross-protective L2-based immunogens will require adjuvants that activate innate immunity to thus enhance adaptive immunity. Therapeutic immunization strategies are needed to control and cure clinical disease and HPV-associated cancers. Significant advances in strategies to improve induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV early (and capsid) proteins have been pretested in preclinical animal papillomavirus models. Several of these effective protocols have translated into successful therapeutic immune-mediated clearance of clinical lesions. Nevertheless, there are significant challenges in activating immunity to cancer-associated lesions due to various immune downregulatory events that are triggered by persistent HPV infections. A better understanding of immune responses to HPV lesions in situ is needed to optimize immune effector T cells that efficiently locate to sites of infection and which should lead to an effective immunotherapeutic management of this important human viral pathogen. The most effective immunization strategy may well require combination antiviral and immunotherapeutic treatments to achieve complete clearance of HPV infections and associated cancers. PMID:24643192

  10. Lymphocyte GH-axis hormones in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigent, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    The production and utilization of common ligands and their receptors by cells of the immune and neuroendocrine systems constitutes a biochemical information circuit between and within the immune and neuroendocrine systems. The sharing of ligands and receptors allows the immune system to serve as the sixth sense notifying the nervous system of the presence of foreign entities. Within this framework, it is also clear that immune cell functions can be altered by neuroendocrine hormones and that cells of the immune system have the ability to produce neuroendocrine hormones. This review summarizes a part of this knowledge with particular emphasis on growth hormone (GH). The past two decades have uncovered a lot of detail about the actions of GH, acting through its receptor, at the molecular and cellular level and its influence on the immune system. The production and action of immune cell-derived GH is less well developed although its important role in immunity is also slowly emerging. Here we discuss the production of GH, GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their cognate receptors on cells of the immune system and their influence via endocrine/autocrine/paracrine and intracrine pathways on immune function. The intracellular mechanisms of action of immune cell-derived GH are still largely unexplored, and it is anticipated that further work in this particular area will establish an important role for this source of GH in normal physiology and in pathologic situations. PMID:24177252

  11. Immunity of multiplex networks via acquaintance vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Da-Wei; Wang, Lin; Sun, Gui-Quan; Jin, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    How to find the effective approach of immunizing a population is one open question in the research of complex systems. Up to now, there have been a great number of works focusing on the efficiency of various immunization strategies. However, the majority of these existing achievements are limited to isolated networks, how immunization affects disease spreading in multiplex networks seems to need further exploration. In this letter, we explore the impact of the acquaintance immunization in multiplex networks, where two kinds of immunization strategies, multiplex node-based acquaintance immunization and layer node-based acquaintance immunization, are proposed. With the generating function method, our theoretical framework is able to accurately calculate the critical immunization threshold which is one of the most important indexes to predict the epidemic regime. Moreover, we further uncover that, with the increment of degree correlation between network layers, the immunization threshold declines for multiplex node-based acquaintance immunization, but slowly increases for layer node-based acquaintance immunization.

  12. Immune Regulation by Self-Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2015-01-01

    Circulating T cells that specifically target normal self-proteins expressed by regulatory immune cells were first described in patients with cancer, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. The adaptive immune system is distinguished for its ability to differentiate between self-antigens ......Circulating T cells that specifically target normal self-proteins expressed by regulatory immune cells were first described in patients with cancer, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. The adaptive immune system is distinguished for its ability to differentiate between self...... reactions. This suggests that they may be involved in immune homeostasis. It is here proposed that these T cells should be termed antiregulatory T cells (anti-Tregs). The role of anti-Tregs in immune-regulatory networks may be diverse. For example, pro-inflammatory self-reactive T cells that react...... the direct targeting of cancer cells in addition to regulatory immune cells. Anti-Tregs provide the immune system with yet another level of immune regulation and contradict the notion that immune cells involved in the adjustment of immune responses only act as suppressor cells....

  13. Innate immune activation in intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Oliver J; Maloy, Kevin J

    2011-01-01

    Loss of intestinal immune regulation leading to aberrant immune responses to the commensal microbiota are believed to precipitate the chronic inflammation observed in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Innate immune receptors that recognize conserved components derived from the microbiota are widely expressed by both epithelial cells and leucocytes of the gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in host protection from infectious pathogens; yet precisely how pathogenic and commensal microbes are distinguished is not understood. Furthermore, aberrant innate immune activation may also drive intestinal pathology, as patients with IBD exhibit extensive infiltration of innate immune cells to the inflamed intestine, and polymorphisms in many innate immunity genes influence susceptibility to IBD. Thus, a balanced interaction between the microbiota and innate immune activation is required to maintain a healthy mutualistic relationship between the microbiota and the host, which when disturbed can result in intestinal inflammation. PMID:21912101

  14. Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Immune Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; JIAO Licheng

    2001-01-01

    A novel evolutionary algorithm,evolution-immunity strategies(EIS), is proposed with reference to the immune theory in biology, which constructs an immune operator accomplished by two steps, a vaccination and an immune selection. The aim of introducing the immune concepts and methods into ES is for finding the ways and means obtaining the optimal solution of difficult problems with locally characteristic information. The detail processes of realizing EIS are presented which contain 6 steps. EIS is analyzed with Markovian theory and it is approved to be convergent with probability 1. In EIS, an immune operator is an aggregation of specific operations and procedures, and methods of selecting vaccines and constructing an immune operator are given in this paper. It is shown with an example of the 442-city TSP that the EIS can restrain the degenerate phenomenon during the evolutionary process by simulated calculating result, improve the searching capability and efficiency, and therefore, increase the convergent speed greatly.

  15. Blurring Borders: Innate Immunity with Adaptive Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kvell

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive immunity has often been considered the penultimate of immune capacities. That system is now being deconstructed to encompass less stringent rules that govern its initiation, actual effector activity, and ambivalent results. Expanding the repertoire of innate immunity found in all invertebrates has greatly facilitated the relaxation of convictions concerning what actually constitutes innate and adaptive immunity. Two animal models, incidentally not on the line of chordate evolution (C. elegans and Drosophila, have contributed enormously to defining homology. The characteristics of specificity and memory and whether the antigen is pathogenic or nonpathogenic reveal considerable information on homology, thus deconstructing the more fundamentalist view. Senescence, cancer, and immunosuppression often associated with mammals that possess both innate and adaptive immunity also exist in invertebrates that only possess innate immunity. Strict definitions become blurred casting skepticism on the utility of creating rigid definitions of what innate and adaptive immunity are without considering overlaps.

  16. Immunization Coverage Among Juvenile Justice Detainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Gregory L; Glanz, Jason M; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Anoshiravani, Arash

    2015-07-01

    This study sought to (1) quantify the baseline immunization coverage of adolescents entering the juvenile justice system and (2) assess the effect of detention-based care on immunization coverage in youth. A cross-sectional retrospective chart review was performed of 279 adolescents detained at a large juvenile detention facility. Only 3% of adolescents had received all study immunizations prior to detention. Before detention, immunization coverage was significantly lower than that for the general adolescent population for all vaccines except the first doses of hepatitis A and varicella-zoster virus vaccines. Subsequent to detention, most individual immunization coverage levels increased and were significantly higher than in the general adolescent population. The routine administration of immunizations in the juvenile justice setting can help detained youth achieve levels of immunization coverage similar to their nondetained peers.

  17. Inverse targeting -- an effective immunization strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Christian M; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method to immunize populations or computer networks against epidemics which is more efficient than any method considered before. The novelty of our method resides in the way of determining the immunization targets. First we identify those individuals or computers that contribute the least to the disease spreading measured through their contribution to the size of the largest connected cluster in the social or a computer network. The immunization process follows the list of identified individuals or computers in inverse order, immunizing first those which are most relevant for the epidemic spreading. We have applied our immunization strategy to several model networks and two real networks, the Internet and the collaboration network of high energy physicists. We find that our new immunization strategy is in the case of model networks up to 14%, and for real networks up to 33% more efficient than immunizing dynamically the most connected nodes in a network. Our strategy is also numerically effic...

  18. Reinforcement Learning Based Artificial Immune Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karakose

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the widely used methods for classification that is a decision-making process is artificial immune systems. Artificial immune systems based on natural immunity system can be successfully applied for classification, optimization, recognition, and learning in real-world problems. In this study, a reinforcement learning based artificial immune classifier is proposed as a new approach. This approach uses reinforcement learning to find better antibody with immune operators. The proposed new approach has many contributions according to other methods in the literature such as effectiveness, less memory cell, high accuracy, speed, and data adaptability. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by simulation and experimental results using real data in Matlab and FPGA. Some benchmark data and remote image data are used for experimental results. The comparative results with supervised/unsupervised based artificial immune system, negative selection classifier, and resource limited artificial immune classifier are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed new method.

  19. Herd immunity: recent uses in vaccine assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Guilherme

    2008-12-01

    Human communities defend themselves against specific infectious agents in a way that extends beyond the simple sum of the immune status of its individuals. By analogy with individual immunity to specific agents, the community level of immunity may vary from complete susceptibility to full protection. Herd immunity has been used to name this community property, which is the result of evolution through natural selection, leading to relationships between two species, typical of prey-predator systems. Varying uses of the term herd immunity led to the use of other expressions, such as herd protection, herd effect and community immunity. Knowledge derived from observational studies and models on herd immunity has supported decisions on the choice of vaccines and vaccination strategies for the benefit of populations. This knowledge is most likely to be extended in the future, with far-reaching effects.

  20. Comparación de resultados obtenidos en el tratamiento del dolor miofascial de la cintura pélvica con toxina botulínica sola y asociada con lidocaína

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Velázquez Rivera

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: entre el 70 y el 85 % de la población adulta sufre de dolor de espalda alguna vez en su vida. El síndrome de dolor miofascial (SDM ha sido descrito recientemente definiéndose como dolor musculoesquelético no inflamatorio, localizado, desarrollado sin causa aparente, refractario a tratamientos farmacológicos y físicos, y se acompaña de la presencia de puntos gatillos y de bandas tensas palpables en el músculo. Su prevalencia se estima que varía entre un 30 y un 85 %. Los músculos psoas, cuadrado lumbar y piramidal son los más frecuentemente implicados en el SDM de cintura pélvica. Una de las principales alternativas para tratar el SDM es la toxina botulínica tipo A (TB, que actúa en la membrana sináptica en la placa neuromuscular, inhibiendo la liberación de acetilcolina, produciendo relajación muscular y alivio del dolor, aunque, en muchas ocasiones, su efecto no se hace evidente hasta transcurridos varios días. La lidocaína es un anestésico local (AL tipo amida con duración de acción intermedia que actúa impidiendo la propagación del impulso nervioso disminuyendo la permeabilidad de los canales de sodio. El objetivo de este estudio era comprobar si al añadir AL a ladosis de TB, conseguíamos un acortamiento en el tiempo dela reducción de la EVA y mejoría de la calidad de vida. Material y métodos: el diseño del estudio fue prospectivo, controlado, longitudinal y aleatorizado en el que se ha valorado la evolución de 20 pacientes divididos en dos grupos. Al primer grupo se les administró TB tipo A (grupo T. Al segundo grupo se les trató con TB tipo A y dosis adicional de lidocaína al 2% (grupo TL. Previamente, ambos grupos, habían respondido de forma positiva a un test con infiltración del músculo afecto con lidocaína al 2 %. El seguimiento de los pacientes se hizo secuencialmente a los 3, 7, 15 y 90 días de iniciado el tratamiento. Para el análisis estadístico se utilizó un análisis de la

  1. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970239 The effect of interleukin 6 against cytopeniaand suppressed phagocytosis of macrophage caused bychemotherapy. ZHANG Lichao(张利朝), et al.Tangdu Hosp, 4th Milit Med Univ, Xian, 710038. ChinJ Clin Oncol 1997; 24(4): 252-255. Objective: To explore The effect of interleukin 6against cytopenia and suppressed phagocytosis ofmacrophage caused by chemotherapy. Methods:Inter-

  2. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008024 Study on a 10-year protective effects of vaccination against hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. GONG Zhenyu(龚震宇), et al. Zhejiang Prov Dis Contr & Prev Center, Hangzhou 310009. Chin J Epidemiol 2007;28(12):1190-1193. Objective To evaluate the epidemiological and serological efficacy after 10 years of vaccination against

  3. Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... d love to go out and get a jab in the arm. But there are good reasons ... doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, ...

  4. Análise vocal em pacientes com disfonia espasmódica nos momentos pré e pós tratamento com toxina Botulínica A Vocal analysis in patients with spasmodic dysphonia before and after treatment with Botulinum toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Côrtes Gama

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar de forma objetiva e subjetiva a voz de pacientes com disfonia espasmódica nos momentos pré e pós aplicação de toxina botulínica A. MÉTODO: as emissões vocais de onze pacientes do sexo feminino foram registradas antes e após (15 dias o tratamento. As amostras vocais foram analisadas por duas fonoaudiólogas com experiência em voz por meio da análise perceptivo-auditiva (escala GRBASI e da análise espectrográfica. RESULTADOS: na análise perceptivo-auditiva com vogal sustentada os parâmetros que alteraram após o tratamento foram o grau de severidade, tensão e instabilidade, enquanto na fala encadeada foram o grau de severidade e a tensão. Na análise espectrográfica ocorreu melhora do traçado após o tratamento sem significância estatística entre os parâmetros. CONCLUSÃO: ocorreu melhora significante dos aspectos perceptivo-auditivos após o tratamento e, portanto, as injeções de toxina botulínica A mostraram-se eficazes no tratamento da disfonia espasmódica no grupo estudado.PURPOSE: to analyze in an objective and subjective manner the voice of patients with spasmodic dysphonia in the moments before and after botulinum toxin A. METHOD: the vocal emissions of eleven women patients were recorded before and after (15 days treatment. The vocal samples were analyzed by two experienced speech therapists through the perceptual analysis (GRBASI scale and spectrographic analysis. RESULTS: in the perceptual analysis with subtended vowel, the altered parameters were degree of severity, strain and instability, while in connected speech only degree of severity and strain changed after treatment. In the perceptual analysis with sustained vowel, the parameters that have changed, were the degree of severity, strain and instability, while in connected speech only degree of severity and strain changed after treatment. The spectrographic analysis was improved after treatment with no statistical significance found among

  5. Eficácia do resfriamento da pele no alívio da dor desencadeada pela injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A nas distonias faciais Skin cooling efficacy on pain relief in periocular injections with botulinum toxin A in facial dystonias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Barros Bandeira de Mello Monteiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a eficácia do resfriamento da pele com gelo no alívio da dor desencadeada pela injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A na região periocular em pacientes portadores de distonia facial. MÉTODOS: Neste estudo prospectivo, 13 pacientes receberam injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A em região glabelar (m. prócero e periocular (m. orbicular para tratamento de distonia facial. Antes das aplicações, um lado da região glabelar foi resfriado com gelo durante 5 minutos, enquanto no outro lado foi aplicada pomada Epitezan®, funcionando como placebo. A aplicação foi feita primeiramente no lado resfriado. Após a aplicação em cada um dos lados os pacientes foram instruídos a dar uma nota para a dor desencadeada pela injeção, em uma escala de 0 a 10 onde 0 era ausência de dor e 10 a dor mais intensa. RESULTADOS: A média das notas dadas pelos pacientes à dor desencadeada pela injeção no lado onde foi aplicado placebo foi 3,92 ± 3,28. No local onde foi aplicado gelo a média das notas foi de 2,92 ± 2,18 (p PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of skin cooling with ice on pain relief in periocular injection with botulinum toxin type A in patients with facial dystonias. METHODS: In this prospective study, 13 patients received botulinum toxin type A injection in glabela (procerus m. and periocular region (orbicular m. for facial dystonias treatment. Before the injections, one side of the glabela was submitted to a 5-minute cooling period, while the opposite side had Epitezan® cream applied, as a placebo. The application was done at the cooled side first. After the application on each side the patients were instructed to rate the pain associated with the injection on a scale from 0 to 10, with 0 indicating no pain and 10 the worst pain. RESULTS: The average pain score on the side where cold was applied was 3,92 ± 3,28, while on the control side the average pain score was 2,92 ± 2,18 (p < 0,0166. CONCLUSION: In this study

  6. Mucosal Vaccination Overcomes the Barrier to Recombinant Vaccinia Immunization Caused by Preexisting Poxvirus Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, Igor M.; Moss, Bernard; Strober, Warren; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    1999-04-01

    Overcoming preexisting immunity to vaccinia virus in the adult population is a key requirement for development of otherwise potent recombinant vaccinia vaccines. Based on our observation that s.c. immunization with vaccinia induces cellular and antibody immunity to vaccinia only in systemic lymphoid tissue and not in mucosal sites, we hypothesized that the mucosal immune system remains naive to vaccinia and therefore amenable to immunization with recombinant vaccinia vectors despite earlier vaccinia exposure. We show that mucosal immunization of vaccinia-immune BALB/c mice with recombinant vaccinia expressing HIV gp160 induced specific serum antibody and strong HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. These responses occurred not only in mucosal but also in systemic lymphoid tissue, whereas systemic immunization was ineffective under these circumstances. In this context, intrarectal immunization was more effective than intranasal immunization. Boosting with a second dose of recombinant vaccinia was also more effective via the mucosal route. The systemic HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response was enhanced by coadministration of IL-12 at the mucosal site. These results also demonstrate the independent compartmentalization of the mucosal versus systemic immune systems and the asymmetric trafficking of lymphocytes between them. This approach to circumvent previous vaccinia immunity may be useful for induction of protective immunity against infectious diseases and cancer in the sizable populations with preexisting immunity to vaccinia from smallpox vaccination.

  7. NEUROTRANSMITTERS AND IMMUNITY: 1. DOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is one of the principal neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNC, and its neuronal pathways are involved in several key functions such as behavior (Hefco et al., 2003a,b, control of movement, endocrine regulation, immune response (Fiserova et al., 2002; Levite et al., 2001, Hritcu et al., 2006a,b,c, and cardiovascular function. Dopamine has at least five G-protein, coupled receptor subtypes, D1-D5, each arising from a different gene (Sibley et al., 1993. Traditionally, these receptors have been classified into D1-like (the D1 and D5 and D2-like (D2, D3 and D4 receptors subtypes, primarily according to their ability to stimulate or inhibit adenylate cyclase, respectively, and to their pharmacological characteristics (Seeman et al., 1993. Receptors for dopamine (particularly of D2 subclass are the primary therapeutic target in a number of neuropathological disorders including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s chorea (Seeman et al., 1987. Neither dopamine by itself, nor dopaminergic agonists by themselves, has been shown to activate T cell function. Nevertheless, lymphocytes are most probably exposed to dopamine since the primary and secondary lymphoid organs of various mammals are markedly innervated, and contain nerve fibers which stain for tyrosine hydroxylase (Weihe et al., 1991, the enzyme responsible for dopamine synthesis. Moreover, cathecolamines and their metabolites are present in single lymphocytes and in extracts of T and B cell clones, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase reduces catecholamine levels, suggesting catecholamine synthesis by lymphocytes (Bergquist et al., 1994. The existence of putative dopamine receptors of D2, D3, D4 and D5 subtypes on immune cells has been proposed of several authors, primarily on the basis of dopaminergic ligand binding assays and specific mRNA expression as monitored by reverse transcription-PCR. Several experiments evoked the idea of a

  8. Clinical Development of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumu Ito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in cancer immunotherapy has been remarkable. Most striking are the clinical development and approval of immunomodulators, also known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. These monoclonal antibodies (mAb are directed to immune checkpoint molecules, which are expressed on immune cells and mediate signals to attenuate excessive immune reactions. Although mAbs targeting tumor associated antigens, such as anti-CD20 mAb and anti-Her2 mAb, directly recognize tumor cells and induce cell death, immune checkpoint inhibitors restore and augment the antitumor immune activities of cytotoxic T cells by blocking immune checkpoint molecules on T cells or their ligands on antigen presenting and tumor cells. Based on preclinical data, many clinical trials have demonstrated the acceptable safety profiles and efficacies of immune checkpoint inhibitors in a variety of cancers. The first in class approved immune checkpoint inhibitor is ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 mAb. Two pivotal phase III randomized controlled trials demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma. In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved ipilimumab for metastatic melanoma. Several clinical trials have since investigated new agents, alone and in combination, for various cancers. In this review, we discuss the current development status of and future challenges in utilizing immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  9. Immunity in arterial hypertension: associations or causalities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Baumann, Marcus; Tripepi, Giovanni; Mallamaci, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies describe associations between markers of inflammation and arterial hypertension (aHT), but does that imply causality? Interventional studies that reduce blood pressure reduced also markers of inflammation, but does immunosuppression improve hypertension? Here, we review the available mechanistic data. Aberrant immunity can trigger endothelial dysfunction but is hardly ever the primary cause of aHT. Innate and adaptive immunity get involved once hypertension has caused vascular wall injury as immunity is a modifier of endothelial dysfunction and vascular wall remodelling. As vascular remodelling progresses, immunity-related mechanisms can become significant cofactors for cardiovascular (CV) disease progression; vice versa, suppressing immunity can improve hypertension and CV outcomes. Innate and adaptive immunity both contribute to vascular wall remodelling. Innate immunity is driven by danger signals that activate Toll-like receptors and other pattern-recognition receptors. Adaptive immunity is based on loss of tolerance against vascular autoantigens and includes autoreactive T-cell immunity as well as non-HLA angiotensin II type 1 receptor-activating autoantibodies. Such processes involve numerous other modulators such as regulatory T cells. Together, immunity is not causal for hypertension but rather an important secondary pathomechanism and a potential therapeutic target in hypertension.

  10. Mathematical model of tumor-immune surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasa, Khaphetsi Joseph; Ouifki, Rachid; Eladdadi, Amina; Pillis, Lisette de

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel mathematical model involving various immune cell populations and tumor cell populations. The model describes how tumor cells evolve and survive the brief encounter with the immune system mediated by natural killer (NK) cells and the activated CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The model is composed of ordinary differential equations describing the interactions between these important immune lymphocytes and various tumor cell populations. Based on up-to-date knowledge of immune evasion and rational considerations, the model is designed to illustrate how tumors evade both arms of host immunity (i.e. innate and adaptive immunity). The model predicts that (a) an influx of an external source of NK cells might play a crucial role in enhancing NK-cell immune surveillance; (b) the host immune system alone is not fully effective against progression of tumor cells; (c) the development of immunoresistance by tumor cells is inevitable in tumor immune surveillance. Our model also supports the importance of infiltrating NK cells in tumor immune surveillance, which can be enhanced by NK cell-based immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27317864

  11. Determinants of immunization coverage in Lucknow district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunization remains one of the most important public health interventions and a cost-effective strategy to reduce both the morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases. Over two million deaths are delayed through immunization each year worldwide. Aims: This study sought to identify specific factors associated with immunization coverage in order to advance improved intervention, policies/strategies therefore raising overall immunization coverage. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among a total of 198 children aged 12-23 months at Urban Health and Training Centre (UHTC, Era′s Lucknow Medical College, Lucknow, over a period of 6 months i.e., from July 2012-December 2012. Data were collected, compiled and tabulated using Microsoft Excel and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 version. Results: A total of 198 children of age 12-23 months were included in this study, of which 74.7% of children were fully immunized, 11.1% were partially immunized and 14.1% were not immunized at all. The most common reason for partial or non-immunization was family problems (24% of the respondents followed by lack of knowledge of immunization (20%, and fear of side effects (16%. The odds of risk of partial/non-immunization in illiterate women is 5.78 more than the graduate women (P = 0.039. Conclusions: Although in the present study, majority of the children were immunized, it is still not up to the mark. We have to make it 100%, so that we can reduce mortality due to vaccine-preventable diseases. Increasing awareness and reducing fear of side effects of immunization among parents through health education, counseling, etc. can increase the percentage of immunized children.

  12. Molecular immune response of channel catfish immunized with live theronts of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De-Hai; Zhang, Qi-Zhong; Shoemaker, Craig A; Zhang, Dunhua; Moreira, Gabriel S A

    2016-07-01

    The parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) has been reported in various freshwater fishes worldwide and results in severe losses to both food and aquarium fish production. The fish surviving natural infections or immunized with live theronts develop strong specific and non-specific immune responses. Little is known about how these immune genes are induced or how they interact and lead to specific immunity against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. This study evaluated the differential expression of immune-related genes, including immunoglobulin, immune cell receptor, cytokine, complement factor and toll-like receptors in head kidney from channel catfish at different time points after immunization with live theronts of I. multifiliis. The immunized fish showed significantly higher anti-Ich antibody expressed as immobilization titer and ELISA titer than those of control fish. The vast majority of immunized fish (95%) survived theront challenge. Expression of IgM and IgD heavy chain genes exhibited a rapid increase from 4 hour (h4) to 2 days (d2) post immunization. Expression of immune cell receptor genes (CD4, CD8-α, MHC I, MHC II β, TcR-α, and TcR-β) showed up-regulation from h4 to d6 post immunization, indicating that different immune cells were actively involved in cellular immune response. Cytokine gene expression (IL-1βa, IL-1βb, IFN-γ and TNF-α) increased rapidly at h4 post immunization and were at an up-regulated level until d2 compared to the bovine serum albumin control. Expression of complement factor and toll-like receptor genes exhibited a rapid increase from h4 to d2 post immunization. Results of this study demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in the specific or non-specific immune response post immunization and that the vaccination against Ich resulted in protection against infection by I. multifiliis. PMID:27044331

  13. Innate Immune System and Preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Sepulveda, Alejandra; Torres, Maria Jose; Khoury, Maroun; Illanes, Sebastian E

    2014-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is considered as a Th2 type immunological state that favors an immune-tolerance environment in order to prevent fetal rejection. Preeclampsia (PE) has been classically described as a Th1/Th2 imbalance; however, the Th1/Th2 paradigm has proven insufficient to fully explain the functional and molecular changes observed during normal/pathological pregnancies. Recent studies have expanded the Th1/Th2 into a Th1/Th2/Th17 and regulatory T-cells paradigm and where dendritic cells co...

  14. Immunity Based Worm Detection System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Zheng; WU Li-fa; WANG Yuan-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Current worm detection methods are unable to detect multi-vector polymorphic worms effectively.Based on negative selection mechanism of the immune system,a local network worm detection system that detects worms was proposed.Normal network service requests were represented by self-strings,and the detection system used self-strings to monitor the network for anomaly.According to the properties of worm propagation,a control center correlated the anomalies detected in the form of binary trees to ensure the accuracy of worm detection.Experiments show the system to be effective in detecting the traditional as well as multi-vector polymorphic worms.

  15. Posttraumatic stress and immune dissonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jian-xin

    2008-01-01

    @@ Stress or neuroendocrine response usually occurs soon after trauma, which is central to the maintenance of posttraumatic homeostasis. Immune inflammatory response has been recognized to be a key element both in the pathogenesis of post-traumatic complications and in tissue repair. Despite the existence of multiple and intricate interconnected neuroendocrine pathways, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system have been considered to be the most important in trauma. Although the short-term and appropriate activation of these

  16. Reprogramming anti-tumor immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Joseph G.; Clever, David; Vizcardo, Raul; Rao, Mahendra; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine holds great promise in replacing tissues and organs lost to degenerative disease and injury. Applying principles of cellular reprogramming for the treatment of cancer, however, are not well established. Here we present an overview of cell-based reprogramming techniques (i.e. lineage reprogramming and stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency) used in regenerative medicine, and within this context, envision how the scope of regenerative medicine may be expanded to treat metastatic cancer by revitalizing an exhausted and senescent immune system. PMID:24661777

  17. CONSECUTIVE IMMUNIZATION WITH RECOMBINANT FOWLPOX VIRUS AND PLASMID DNA FOR ENHANCING CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗坤; 金宁一; 郭志儒; 秦云龙; 郭炎; 方厚华; 安汝国; 殷震

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the influence of consecutive immunization on cellular and humoral immunity in mice. Methods: We evaluated a consecutive immunization strategy of priming with recombinant fowlpox virus vUTALG and boosting with plasmid DNA pcDNAG encoding HIV-1 capsid protein Gag. Results: In immunized mice, the number of CD4+ T cells from splenic lymphocytes increased significantly and the proliferation response of splenocytes to ConA and LPS elevated markedly and HIV-1-specific antibody response could be induced. Conclusion: Consecutive immunization could increase cellular and humoral immunity responses in mice.

  18. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    in the planktonic state. Accordingly, much less is known about the immune responses to the presence of biofilm-based infections (which is probably also due to the relatively short period of time in which the immune response to biofilms has been studied). Nevertheless, more recent in vivo and in vitro studies have...... revealed both innate as well as adaptive immune responses to biofilms. On the other hand, measures launched by biofilm bacteria to achieve protection against the various immune responses have also been demonstrated. Whether particular immune responses to biofilm infections exist remains to be firmly...... established. However, because biofilm infections are often persistent (or chronic), an odd situation appears with the simultaneous activation of both arms of the host immune response, neither of which can eliminate the biofilm pathogen, but instead, in synergy, causes collateral tissue damage. Although...

  19. Immunization of networks with community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, an efficient method to immunize modular networks (i.e. networks with community structure) is proposed. The immunization of networks aims at fragmenting networks into small parts with a small number of removed nodes. Its applications include prevention of epidemic spreading, protection against intentional attacks on networks, and conservation of ecosystems. Although preferential immunization of hubs is efficient, good immunization strategies for modular networks have not been established. On the basis of an immunization strategy based on eigenvector centrality, we develop an analytical framework for immunizing modular networks. To this end, we quantify the contribution of each node to the connectivity in a coarse-grained network among modules. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed method by applying it to model and real networks with modular structure.

  20. Cardiac allograft immune activation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available David Chang, Jon Kobashigawa Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Heart transplant remains the most durable option for end-stage heart disease. Cardiac allograft immune activation and heart transplant rejection remain among the main complications limiting graft and recipient survival. Mediators of the immune system can cause different forms of rejection post-heart transplant. Types of heart transplant rejection include hyperacute rejection, cellular rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic rejection. In this review, we will summarize the innate and adaptive immune responses which influence the post-heart transplant recipient. Different forms of rejection and their clinical presentation, detection, and immune monitoring will be discussed. Treatment of heart transplant rejection will be examined. We will discuss potential treatment strategies for preventing rejection post-transplant in immunologically high-risk patients with antibody sensitization. Keywords: heart transplant, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, rejection, immunosuppression

  1. Immunity to Trichinella spiralis in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation prevented the accelerated expulsion of Trichinella spiralis from mice immunized by transfer of immune mesenteric lymph node cells (IMLNC) or by prior infection. Nevertheless, worms in irradiated immune mice were smaller and less fecund than those in controls. In adoptively immunized and irradiated mice expulsion could not be achieved by increasing the numbers of IMLNC transferred, although the effect upon worm length was more severe. Thus IMLNC express a direct, anti-worm immunity which is independent of their role in worm expulsion. IMLNC cause expulsion in irradiated mice only when adequate levels of bone marrow-derived cells are available. The results are discussed in terms of a possible antibody-mediated basis for direct anti-worm immunity. (author)

  2. Immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A; Shastri, Nilabh

    2013-09-01

    The ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, ERAAP (or ERAP1), is essential for trimming peptides that are presented by MHC class I molecules. ERAP1 is inhibited by human cytomegalovirus, and ERAP1 polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune diseases. How the immune system detects ERAAP dysfunction, however, is unknown. We have shown previously that ERAAP-deficient cells present an immunogenic pMHC I repertoire, that elicits CD8+ T cell response in WT mice. Additionally, we discovered that the WT CD8+ T cells recognized novel peptides presented by non-classical, or MHC class Ib, molecules on ERAAP-deficient cells. The MHC Ib restricted WT CD8 T cells eliminated ERAAP-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo. We identified the FL9 peptide, presented by Qa-1(b), a MHC class Ib molecule exclusively on ERAAP-deficient cells. Remarkably, T cells specific for the FL9-Qa-1(b) complex were frequent in naïve WT mice, and had an antigen-experienced phenotype. Thus, novel non-classical pQa-1(b) complexes direct cytotoxic T cells to target cells with defective peptide processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we discuss the implications of our findings, and the possible roles of pMHC Ib-specific T cells in immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction. PMID:23433779

  3. The insect cellular immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael R. Strand

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system of insects is divided into humoral defenses that include the production of soluble effector molecules and cellular defenses like phagocytosis and encapsulation that are mediated by hemocytes. This review summarizes current understanding of the cellular immune response. Insects produce several terminally differentiated types of hemocytes that are distinguished by morphology, molecular and antigenic markers, and function. The differentiated hemocytes that circulate in larval or nymphal stage insects arise from two sources: progenitor cells produced during embryogenesis and mesodermally derived hematopoietic organs. Regulation of hematopoiesis and hemocyte differentiation also involves several different signaling pathways. Phagocytosis and encapsulation require that hemocytes first recognize a given target as foreign followed by activation of downstream signaling and effector responses. A number of humoral and cellular receptors have been identified that recognize different microbes and multicellular parasites. In turn, activation of these receptors stimulates a number of signaling pathways that regulate different hemocyte functions. Recent studies also identify hemocytes as important sources of a number of humoral effector molecules required for killing different foreign invaders.

  4. Honeybee immunity and colony losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nazzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decline of honeybee colonies and their eventual collapse is a widespread phenomenon in the Northern hemisphere of the globe, which severely limits the beekeeping industry. This dramatic event is associated with an enhanced impact of parasites and pathogens on honeybees, which is indicative of reduced immunocompetence. The parasitic mite Varroa destructor and the vectored viral pathogens appear to play a key-role in the induction of this complex syndrome. In particular, the Deformed Wing Virus (DWV is widespread and is now considered, along with Varroa, one of the major causes of bee colony losses. Several lines of evidence indicate that this mite/DWV association severely affects the immune system of honeybees and makes them more sensitive to the action of other stress factors. The molecular mechanisms underpinning these complex interactions are currently being investigated and the emerging information has allowed the development of a new functional model, describing how different stress factors may synergistically concur in the induction of bee immune alteration and health decline. This provides a new logical framework in which to interpret the proposed multifactorial origin of bee colony losses and sets the stage for a more comprehensive and integrated analysis of the effect that multiple stress agents may have on honeybees.

  5. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; Derousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-03-25

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried "nanomicroparticle" vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the former provides alignment of the principal nanodimension particle axes with the direction of airflow. Particles formed with this combination of nano- and micrometer-scale dimensions possess a greater ability to aerosolize than particles of standard spherical isotropic shape and of similar geometric diameter. Here, we demonstrate effective application of this biomaterial by using the live attenuated tuberculosis vaccine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Prepared as a spray-dried nanomicroparticle aerosol, BCG vaccine exhibited high-efficiency delivery and peripheral lung targeting capacity from a low-cost and technically simple delivery system. Aerosol delivery of the BCG nanomicroparticle to normal guinea pigs subsequently challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis significantly reduced bacterial burden and lung pathology both relative to untreated animals and to control animals immunized with the standard parenteral BCG. PMID:18344320

  6. Epigenetics and the Adaptive Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Kondilis-Mangum, Hrisavgi D.; Wade, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Cells of the adaptive immune response undergo dynamic epigenetic changes as they develop and respond to immune challenge. Plasticity is a necessary prerequisite for the chromosomal dynamics of lineage specification, development, and the immune effector function of the mature cell types. The alterations in DNA methylation and histone modification that characterize activation may be integral to the generation of immunologic memory, thereby providing an advantage on secondary exposure to pathoge...

  7. Immune response inhibits associative learning in insects.

    OpenAIRE

    Mallon, Eamonn B.; Brockmann, Axel; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2003-01-01

    In vertebrates, it is well established that there are many intricate interactions between the immune system and the nervous system, and vice versa. Regarding insects, until now little has been known about the link between these two systems. Here, we present behavioural evidence indicating a link between the immune system and the nervous system in insects. We show that otherwise non-infected honeybees whose immune systems are challenged by a non-pathogenic immunogenic elicitor lipopolysacchari...

  8. Innate Immune Activation in Intestinal Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Maloy, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of intestinal immune regulation leading to aberrant immune responses to the commensal microbiota are believed to precipitate the chronic inflammation observed in the gastrointestinal tract of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Innate immune receptors that recognize conserved components derived from the microbiota are widely expressed by both epithelial cells and leucocytes of the gastrointestinal tract and play a key role in host prot...

  9. Endocrine Factors Modulating Immune Responses in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Schumacher, Anne; Costa, Serban-Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia

    2014-01-01

    How the semi-allogeneic fetus is tolerated by the maternal immune system remains a fascinating phenomenon. Despite extensive research activity in this field, the mechanisms underlying fetal tolerance are still not well understood. However, there are growing evidences that immune–immune interactions as well as immune–endocrine interactions build up a complex network of immune regulation that ensures fetal survival within the maternal uterus. In the present review, we aim to summarize emerging ...

  10. Immune Cells in the Female Reproductive Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sung Ki; Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Jee-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The female reproductive tract has two main functions: protection against microbial challenge and maintenance of pregnancy to term. The upper reproductive tract comprises the fallopian tubes and the uterus, including the endocervix, and the lower tract consists of the ectocervix and the vagina. Immune cells residing in the reproductive tract play contradictory roles: they maintain immunity against vaginal pathogens in the lower tract and establish immune tolerance for sperm and an embryo/fetus...

  11. Early Immune Senescence in HIV Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Seema; Landay, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Non-AIDS–defining comorbidities that occur despite viral suppression and immune reconstitution using antiretroviral therapy depict early aging process in HIV-infected individuals. During aging, a reduction in T-cell renewal, together with a progressive enrichment of terminally differentiated T cells, translates into a general decline of the immune system, gradually leading to immunosenescence. Inflammation is a hallmark of age-associated comorbidities, and immune activation is a hallmark of H...

  12. The Immune Self: Practicing Meaning in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Neuman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The immune self is our reified way to describe the processes through which the immune system maintains the differentiated identity of the organism and itself. This is an interpretative process, and to study it in a scientifically constructive way we should merge a long hermeneutical tradition asking questions about the nature of interpretation, together with modern understanding of the immune system, emerging sensing technologies and advanced computational tools for analyzing the sensors' data.

  13. The immune response to surgery and infection

    OpenAIRE

    Dąbrowska, Aleksandra M.; Słotwiński, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Surgical trauma affects both the innate and acquired immunity. The severity of immune disorders is proportional to the extent of surgical trauma and depends on a number of factors, including primarily the basic disease requiring surgical treatment (e.g. cancer), often coexisting infections and impaired nutritional status. Disorder of the immune response following surgical trauma may predispose to septic complications burdened with the highest mortality rate. Extensive surgery in cancer patien...

  14. Botulinum toxin A and physiotherapy intervention in the treatment of the painful shoulder after stroke: case report Toxina botulínica A e intervenção fisioterapêutica no tratamento do ombro doloroso pós acidente vascular cerebral: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen M. Marinho dos Santos Andrade

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of the painful shoulder is considered a common finding in patients who suffered stroke. Several therapeutic modalities are suggested for the improvement of the patients’ clinical condition. In this report, a case of syndrome of the painful shoulder will be discussed, whose treatment consisted of the use of botulinum toxin A associated to physiotherapy. After a four-month treatment, significant improvements occurred concerning pain, spasticity, range of motion and quality of life, suggesting that this therapeutic association is an efficient tool against the incapacitating effects related to this syndrome. A síndrome do ombro doloroso é considerada um achado comum em pacientes que sofreram acidente vascular cerebral. Várias modalidades terapêuticas são apontadas para melhoria do quadro clínico dos pacientes. Neste relato, será apresentado um caso de síndrome do ombro doloroso, cujo tratamento consistiu no emprego de toxina botulínica A associada à fisioterapia. Após quatro meses de tratamento, houve melhorias significativas quanto à dor, espasticidade, amplitude de movimento e qualidade de vida, e isso sugere ser essa associação terapêutica uma ferramenta eficaz contra os efeitos incapacitantes relacionados a esta síndrome.

  15. Utilización de la toxina botulínica para mejorar la funcionalidad y la expresión del labio en parálisis facial de larga evolución Use of botulinum toxin to improve the functionality and expression of the lip in long-term facial palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gómez Martín

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available La parálisis de la rama marginal del nervio facial en el contexto de una parálisis facial de larga evolución, produce una deformidad estética y funcional que puede ser mejorada con la inyección de toxina botulínica. Utilizamos esta técnica en 2 pacientes consiguiendo unos resultados casi inmediatos en lo que se refiere a la apertura bucal, a la expresión y a la continencia oral. Indicamos esta técnica en pacientes de edad avanzada, con múltiples operaciones previas y que aceptan este procedimiento no invasivo para mejorar su autoestima y su calidad de vida.Paralysis of the marginal branch of the facial nerve in the context of a long-term facial paralysis, produces an aesthetic and functional deformity that can be improved with botulinum toxin injection. We use this technique in 2 patients who achieved almost immediate results in terms of oral opening, oral expression and continence. Botulinum toxin injection can be used in elderly patients with multiple previous operations who accept this non-invasive procedure, improving their selfesteem and their quality of life.

  16. Bilateral lamellar keratoplasty in descemetocele treatment in dog with botulism by use of equine renal capsule and conjunctival pedicle graft Emprego de ceratoplastia lamelar bilateral no tratamento de descemetocele em cão com botulismo, utilizando-se cápsula renal eqüina e enxerto conjuntival pediculado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Laus

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old, male mixed breed dog with botulism and bilateral descemetocele was submitted to lamellar keratoplasty with equine renal capsule preserved in glycerin in the right eye and conjunctival pedicle graft in the left eye. The evolution was satisfactory in both eyes, but better in the eye receiving the equine renal capsule, because the corneal transparence was more evident in that eye. On the other hand, the surgical period was more quickly in the eye receiving the equine renal capsule because the preparation of the conjunctival pedicle before the keratoplasty was not necessary.Um animal da espécie canina, macho, de 3 anos de idade, com botulismo e descemetocele bilateral foi submetido à ceratoplastia lamelar com cápsula renal eqüina preservada em glicerina no olho direito, e enxerto conjuntival pediculado no olho esquerdo. Ambos os olhos mostraram evolução satisfatória porém, o olho receptor da cápsula renal eqüina apresentou transparência corneana mais evidente.

  17. Immunity-Based Diagnosis for a Motherboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiteru Ishida

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized immunity-based diagnosis to detect abnormal behavior of components on a motherboard. The immunity-based diagnostic model monitors voltages of some components, CPU temperatures, and fan speeds. We simulated abnormal behaviors of some components on the motherboard, and we utilized the immunity-based diagnostic model to evaluate motherboard sensors in two experiments. These experiments showed that the immunity-based diagnostic model was an effective method for detecting abnormal behavior of components on the motherboard.

  18. Immunization Schedules for Preteens and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traveling Internationally? Recommended Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedules History of the Vaccine Schedule Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's Vaccine Education Center Get Email Updates To receive email updates ...

  19. Immune cells in the female reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Ki; Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Jee-Hyun

    2015-02-01

    The female reproductive tract has two main functions: protection against microbial challenge and maintenance of pregnancy to term. The upper reproductive tract comprises the fallopian tubes and the uterus, including the endocervix, and the lower tract consists of the ectocervix and the vagina. Immune cells residing in the reproductive tract play contradictory roles: they maintain immunity against vaginal pathogens in the lower tract and establish immune tolerance for sperm and an embryo/fetus in the upper tract. The immune system is significantly influenced by sex steroid hormones, although leukocytes in the reproductive tract lack receptors for estrogen and progesterone. The leukocytes in the reproductive tract are distributed in either an aggregated or a dispersed form in the epithelial layer, lamina propria, and stroma. Even though immune cells are differentially distributed in each organ of the reproductive tract, the predominant immune cells are T cells, macrophages/dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils, and mast cells. B cells are rare in the female reproductive tract. NK cells in the endometrium significantly expand in the late secretory phase and further increase their number during early pregnancy. It is evident that NK cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells are extremely important in decidual angiogenesis, trophoblast migration, and immune tolerance during pregnancy. Dysregulation of endometrial/decidual immune cells is strongly related to infertility, miscarriage, and other obstetric complications. Understanding the immune system of the female reproductive tract will significantly contribute to women's health and to success in pregnancy. PMID:25713505

  20. An Immunization Strategy Based on Propagation Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the ubiquity of smart phones, wearable equipment, and wireless sensors, the topologies of networks composed by them change along with time. The immunization strategies in which network immune nodes are chosen by analyzing the static aggregation network topologies have been challenged. The studies about interaction propagations between two pathogens show that the interaction can change propagation threshold and the final epidemic size of each other, which provides a new thinking of immunization method. The eradication or inhibition of the virus can be achieved through the spread of its opposite party. Here, we put forward an immunization strategy whose implementation does not depend on the analysis of network topology. The immunization agents are randomly placed on a few of individuals of network and spread out from these individuals on network in a propagation method. The immunization agents prevent virus infecting their habitat nodes with certain immune success rate. The analysis and simulation of evolution equation of the model show that immune propagation has a significant impact on the spread threshold and steady-state density of virus on a finite size of BA networks. Simulations on some real-world networks also suggest that the immunization strategy is feasible and effective.

  1. Innate immune recognition of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yan; Liu; Xiao-Yong; Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV) is a hepatotropic DNA virus and its infection results in acute or chronic hepatitis. It is reported that the host innate immune system contributes to viral control and liver pathology, while whether and how HBV can trigger the components of innate immunity remains controversial. In recent years, the data accumulated from HBV-infected patients, cellular and animal models have challenged the concept of a stealth virus for HBV infection. This editorial focuses on the current findings about the innate immune recognition to HBV. Such evaluation could help us to understand HBV immunopathogenesis and develop novel immune therapeutic strategies to combat HBV infection.

  2. The Microbiome, Systemic Immune Function, and Allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellore, Anoma; Fishman, Jay A

    2016-01-01

    Diverse effects of the microbiome on solid organ transplantation are beginning to be recognized. In allograft recipients, microbial networks are disrupted by immunosuppression, nosocomial and community-based infectious exposures, antimicrobial therapies, surgery, and immune processes. Shifting microbial patterns, including acute infectious exposures, have dynamic and reciprocal interactions with local and systemic immune systems. Both individual microbial species and microbial networks have central roles in the induction and control of innate and adaptive immune responses, in graft rejection, and in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Understanding the diverse interactions between the microbiome and the immune system of allograft recipients may facilitate clinical management in the future. PMID:26656674

  3. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel; E; Norton; Kirsten; A; Ward-Hartstonge; Edward; S; Taylor; Roslyn; A; Kemp

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, par-ticularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship betweencancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  4. Feeding Our Immune System: Impact on Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Wolowczuk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous intestinal microflora and environmental factors, such as diet, play a central role in immune homeostasis and reactivity. In addition, microflora and diet both influence body weight and insulin-resistance, notably through an action on adipose cells. Moreover, it is known since a long time that any disturbance in metabolism, like obesity, is associated with immune alteration, for example, inflammation. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on how nutrients-derived factors (mostly focusing on fatty acids and glucose impact the innate and acquired immune systems, including the gut immune system and its associated bacterial flora. We will try to show the reader how the highly energy-demanding immune cells use glucose as a main source of fuel in a way similar to that of insulin-responsive adipose tissue and how Toll-like receptors (TLRs of the innate immune system, which are found on immune cells, intestinal cells, and adipocytes, are presently viewed as essential actors in the complex balance ensuring bodily immune and metabolic health. Understanding more about these links will surely help to study and understand in a more fundamental way the common observation that eating healthy will keep you and your immune system healthy.

  5. Immune Algorithm For Document Query Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangZiqiang; FengBoqin

    2005-01-01

    To efficiently retrieve relevant document from the rapid proliferation of large information collections, a novel immune algorithm for document query optimization is proposed. The essential ideal of the immune algorithm is that the crossover and mutation of operator are constructed according to its own characteristics of information retrieval. Immune operator is adopted to avoid degeneracy. Relevant documents retrieved am merged to a single document list according to rank formula. Experimental results show that the novel immune algorithm can lead to substantial improvements of relevant document retrieval effectiveness.

  6. Soluble Mediators Regulating Immunity in Early Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Aaron Pettengill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Soluble factors in blood plasma have a substantial impact on both the innate and adaptive immune responses. The complement system, antibodies, and antimicrobial proteins and peptides (APPs, can directly interact with potential pathogens, protecting against systemic infection. The extracellular environment also has a critical influence on immune cell maturation, activation, and effector functions, and many of the factors in plasma, including hormones, vitamins, and purines, have been shown to influence these processes for leukocytes of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this review we give particular consideration to soluble mediators in plasma for which age-dependent differences in abundance may influence the ontogeny of immune function.

  7. Targeting epidermal Langerhans cells by epidermal powder immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Immune reactions to foreign or self-antigens lead to protective immunity and, sometimes, immune disorders such as allergies and autoimmune diseases. Antigen presenting cells (APC) including epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) play an important role in the course and outcome of the immune reactions. Epidermal powder immunization (EPI) is a technology that offers a tool to manipulate the LCs and the potential to harness the immune reactions towards prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and immune disorders.

  8. Development of immune organs and functioning in humans and test animals: Implications for immune intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, C Frieke; van Bilsen, Jolanda; Cnossen, Hilde; Houben, Geert; Garthoff, Jossie; Wolterbeek, Andre

    2016-09-01

    A healthy immune status is mostly determined during early life stages and many immune-related diseases may find their origin in utero and the first years of life. Therefore, immune health optimization may be most effective during early life. This review is an inventory of immune organ maturation events in relation to developmental timeframes in minipig, rat, mouse and human. It is concluded that time windows of immune organ development in rodents can be translated to human, but minipig reflects the human timeframes better; however the lack of prenatal maternal-fetal immune interaction in minipig may cause less responsiveness to prenatal intervention. It is too early to conclude which immune parameters are most appropriate, because there are not enough comparative immune parameters. Filling these gaps will increase the predictability of results observed in experimental animals, and guide future intervention studies by assessing relevant parameters in the right corresponding developmental time frames. PMID:27282947

  9. Local immune response and protection in the guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis model following immunization with Shigella vaccines.

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, A B; Van De Verg, L L; Collins, H H; Tang, D B; Bendiuk, N O; Taylor, D N; Powell, C J

    1994-01-01

    This study used the guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis model to examine the importance of route of administration (mucosal versus parenteral), frequency and timing of immunization (primary versus boosting immunization), and form of antigen given (live attenuated vaccine strain versus O-antigen-protein conjugate) on the production of protective immunity against Shigella infection. Since local immune response to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen of Shigella spp. is thought to be important for...

  10. Immune regulation in gut and cord : opportunities for directing the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    de Roock, S.

    2012-01-01

    The gut is an important organ for the immune system. Microbes and immune cells interact directly or via epithelial cells. Both TH17 and Treg cells mature in this environment. The composition of the microbiota has an important influence on the immune homeostasis. Influencing the immune system via the microbiota has been a challenge for scientist and clinicians for several decades. Especially atopic disorders like asthma and eczema have been subject to prophylactic trials with probiotics, with ...

  11. Acquired and innate immunity to polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that are potent mutagens and carcinogens. Researchers have taken advantage of these properties to investigate the mechanisms by which chemicals cause cancer of the skin and other organs. When applied to the skin of mice, several carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons have also been shown to interact with the immune system, stimulating immune responses and resulting in the development of antigen-specific T-cell-mediated immunity. Development of cell-mediated immunity is strain-specific and is governed by Ah receptor genes and by genes located within the major histocompatibility complex. CD8+ T cells are effector cells in the response, whereas CD4+ T cells down-regulate immunity. Development of an immune response appears to have a protective effect since strains of mice that develop a cell-mediated immune response to carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons are less likely to develop tumors when subjected to a polyaromatic hydrocarbon skin carcinogenesis protocol than mice that fail to develop an immune response. With respect to innate immunity, TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice are more susceptible to polyaromatic hydrogen skin tumorigenesis than C3H/HeN mice in which TLR4 is normal. These findings support the hypothesis that immune responses, through their interactions with chemical carcinogens, play an active role in the prevention of chemical skin carcinogenesis during the earliest stages. Efforts to augment immune responses to the chemicals that cause tumors may be a productive approach to the prevention of tumors caused by these agents

  12. Innate immunity underlies symbiotic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisseleva, E P

    2014-12-01

    Here, the modern data regarding interactions between normal microbiota and barrier tissues in plants, humans and animals are reviewed. The main homeostatic mechanisms responsible for interactions between epithelium and innate immune cells with symbiotic bacteria are described. A key step in this process is recognition of soluble microbial products by ligation to pattern-recognition receptors expressed on the host cells. As a result, epithelial cells secrete mucus, antibacterial peptides and immunoregulatory molecules. The main outcomes from immunological reactions towards symbiotic bacteria involve development of conditions for formation and maintenance of microbial biocenosis as well as providing safety for the host. Also, it is considered important to preserve and transfer beneficial bacteria to progeny. PMID:25716721

  13. Resistant does not equal immune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, W. [Radian International LLC, Austin, TX (United States); Grinnan, M. [Jacksonville Electric Authority, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In the Fall of 1993, after less than two years of service, leaking tubes were detected in Feedwater Heater No. 2 at Jacksonville Electric Authority`s (JEA) Northside Generating Station (NS), Unit 3. During an outage in the Fall of 1994, indications were found in 93 of the feedwater heater tubes during eddy current inspection. Tubes from the initial leak incident and tubes with eddy current indications were analyzed by several laboratories. The cracking was concluded to be due to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC). While 6% molybdenum alloys and other super austenitic stainless steels are highly resistant to chloride-induced SCC, they are not immune to this failure mode. This paper discusses the analyses that led to the determination of chloride-induced SCC as the failure mode.

  14. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  15. Arabinoxylans, gut microbiota and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Mihiri; Leclerc, Estelle; Simsek, Senay

    2016-03-30

    Arabinoxylan (AX) is a non-starch polysaccharide found in many cereal grains and is considered as a dietary fiber. Despite their general structure, there is structural heterogeneity among AX originating from different botanical sources. Furthermore, the extraction procedure and hydrolysis by xylolytic enzymes can further render differences to theses AX. The aim of this review was to address the effects of AX on the gut bacteria and their immunomodulatory properties. Given the complex structure of AX, we also aimed to discuss how the structural heterogeneity of AX affects its role in bacterial growth and immunomodulation. The existing literature indicates the role of fine structural details of AX on its potential as polysaccharides that can impact the gut associated microbial growth and immune system. PMID:26794959

  16. Complement's participation in acquired immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2002-01-01

    B cell receptor for antigen (BCR), a complex composed of the iC3b/C3d fragment-binding complement type 2 receptor (CR2, CD21) and its signaling element CD19 and the IgG-binding receptor FcgammaRIIb (CD32). The positive or negative outcome of signaling through this triad is determined by the context...... in which antigen is seen, be it alone or in association with natural or induced antibodies and/or C3-complement fragments. The aim of this review is to describe the present status of our understanding of complement's participation in acquired immunity and the regulation of autoimmune responses.......The preliminary evidence for the involvement of complement in promoting primary humoral responses dates back over a quarter of a century. However, it is only in the course of the past decade or so that the detailed mechanisms underlying complement's influence have been characterized in depth. It is...

  17. Ubiquitination of plant immune receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinggeng; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin is a highly conserved regulatory protein consisting of 76 amino acids and ubiquitously expressed in all eukaryotic cells. The reversible ubiquitin conjugation to a wide variety of target proteins, a process known as ubiquitination or ubiquitylation, serves as one of the most important and prevalent posttranslational modifications to regulate the myriad actions of protein cellular functions, including protein degradation, vesicle trafficking, and subcellular localization. Protein ubiquitination is an ATP-dependent stepwise covalent attachment of one or more ubiquitin molecules to target proteins mediated by a hierarchical enzymatic cascade consisting of an E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, and E3 ubiquitin ligase. The plant plasma membrane resident receptor-like kinase Flagellin Sensing 2 (FLS2) recognizes bacterial flagellin and initiates innate immune signaling to defend against pathogen attacks. We have recently shown that two plant U-box E3 ubiquitin ligases PUB12 and PUB13 directly ubiquitinate FLS2 and promote flagellin-induced FLS2 degradation, which in turn attenuates FLS2 signaling to prevent excessive or prolonged activation of immune responses. Here, we use FLS2 as an example to describe a protocol for detection of protein ubiquitination in plant cells in vivo and in test tubes in vitro. In addition, we elaborate the approach to identify different types of ubiquitin linkages by using various lysine mutants of ubiquitin. The various in vivo and in vitro ubiquitination assays will provide researchers with the tools to address how ubiquitination regulates diverse cellular functions of target proteins. PMID:25117287

  18. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  19. Integrated Circuit Electromagnetic Immunity Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sketoe, J. G.

    2000-08-01

    This handbook presents the results of the Boeing Company effort for NASA under contract NAS8-98217. Immunity level data for certain integrated circuit parts are discussed herein, along with analytical techniques for applying the data to electronics systems. This handbook is built heavily on the one produced in the seventies by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC, MDC Report E1929 of 1 August 1978, entitled Integrated Circuit Electromagnetic Susceptibility Handbook, known commonly as the ICES Handbook, which has served countless systems designers for over 20 years). Sections 2 and 3 supplement the device susceptibility data presented in section 4 by presenting information on related material required to use the IC susceptibility information. Section 2 concerns itself with electromagnetic susceptibility analysis and serves as a guide in using the information contained in the rest of the handbook. A suggested system hardening requirements is presented in this chapter. Section 3 briefly discusses coupling and shielding considerations. For conservatism and simplicity, a worst case approach is advocated to determine the maximum amount of RF power picked up from a given field. This handbook expands the scope of the immunity data in this Handbook is to of 10 MHz to 10 GHz. However, the analytical techniques provided are applicable to much higher frequencies as well. It is expected however, that the upper frequency limit of concern is near 10 GHz. This is due to two factors; the pickup of microwave energy on system cables and wiring falls off as the square of the wavelength, and component response falls off at a rapid rate due to the effects of parasitic shunt paths for the RF energy. It should be noted also that the pickup on wires and cables does not approach infinity as the frequency decreases (as would be expected by extrapolating the square law dependence of the high frequency roll-off to lower frequencies) but levels off due to mismatch effects.

  20. Inside the mucosal immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R McGhee

    Full Text Available An intricate network of innate and immune cells and their derived mediators function in unison to protect us from toxic elements and infectious microbial diseases that are encountered in our environment. This vast network operates efficiently by use of a single cell epithelium in, for example, the gastrointestinal (GI and upper respiratory (UR tracts, fortified by adjoining cells and lymphoid tissues that protect its integrity. Perturbations certainly occur, sometimes resulting in inflammatory diseases or infections that can be debilitating and life threatening. For example, allergies in the eyes, skin, nose, and the UR or digestive tracts are common. Likewise, genetic background and environmental microbial encounters can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. This mucosal immune system (MIS in both health and disease is currently under intense investigation worldwide by scientists with diverse expertise and interests. Despite this activity, there are numerous questions remaining that will require detailed answers in order to use the MIS to our advantage. In this issue of PLOS Biology, a research article describes a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to determine precisely how the gut epithelium responds to an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, given by the intravenous route. This article reveals a previously unknown pathway in which several cell types and their secreted mediators work in unison to prevent epithelial cell death in the mouse small intestine. The results of this interesting study illustrate how in vivo systems biology approaches can be used to unravel the complex mechanisms used to protect the host from its environment.

  1. Immune response to Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Imtiaz A.; Moretto, Magali; Weiss, Louis M.

    2001-01-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites, which can cause complications in immunocompromised individuals. Very little is known about the host immune response generated against these infectious agents. Encephalitozoon cuniculi is the best studied microsporidian and the protective immune response against this parasite is mediated by cytotoxic CD8+ T cells.

  2. Nutritional support for the infant's immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niers, L.; Stasse-Wolthuis, M.; Rombouts, F.M.; Rijkers, G.T.

    2007-01-01

    Newborn babies possess a functional but immature immune system as a defense against a world teeming with microorganisms. Breast milk contains a number of biological, active compounds that support the infant's immune system. These include secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA), which confers specific prote

  3. Protein trafficking during plant innate immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ming Wang; Peng-Qiang Liu; Yong-Ju Xu; Shunyuan Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved a sophisticated immune system to fight against pathogenic microbes. Upon detection of pathogen invasion by immune receptors, the immune system is turned on, resulting in production of antimicrobial molecules including pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Conceivably, an efficient immune response depends on the capacity of the plant cell’s protein/membrane trafficking network to deploy the right defense-associated molecules in the right place at the right time. Recent research in this area shows that while the abundance of cell surface immune receptors is regulated by endocytosis, many intracellular immune receptors, when activated, are partitioned between the cytoplasm and the nucleus for induction of defense genes and activation of programmed cell death, respectively. Vesicle transport is an essential process for secretion of PR proteins to the apoplastic space and targeting of defense-related proteins to the plasma membrane or other endomembrane compartments. In this review, we discuss the various aspects of protein trafficking during plant immunity, with a focus on the immunity proteins on the move and the major compo-nents of the trafficking machineries engaged.

  4. Protein trafficking during plant innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Ming; Liu, Peng-Qiang; Xu, Yong-Ju; Xiao, Shunyuan

    2016-04-01

    Plants have evolved a sophisticated immune system to fight against pathogenic microbes. Upon detection of pathogen invasion by immune receptors, the immune system is turned on, resulting in production of antimicrobial molecules including pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Conceivably, an efficient immune response depends on the capacity of the plant cell's protein/membrane trafficking network to deploy the right defense-associated molecules in the right place at the right time. Recent research in this area shows that while the abundance of cell surface immune receptors is regulated by endocytosis, many intracellular immune receptors, when activated, are partitioned between the cytoplasm and the nucleus for induction of defense genes and activation of programmed cell death, respectively. Vesicle transport is an essential process for secretion of PR proteins to the apoplastic space and targeting of defense-related proteins to the plasma membrane or other endomembrane compartments. In this review, we discuss the various aspects of protein trafficking during plant immunity, with a focus on the immunity proteins on the move and the major components of the trafficking machineries engaged. PMID:26345282

  5. Increasing Immunization Compliance by Reducing Provisional Admittance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Wendy S; Varni, Susan E; Barry, Sara E; Frankowski, Barbara L; Harder, Valerie S

    2016-08-01

    Students in Vermont with incomplete or undocumented immunization status are provisionally admitted to schools and historically had a calendar year to resolve their immunization status. The process of resolving these students' immunization status was challenging for school nurses. We conducted a school-based quality improvement effort to increase student compliance with Vermont immunization regulations using a collaborative learning approach with public health school liaisons and school nurses from public schools to reduce provisional admittance in 2011-2012. Strategies included using a tracking system, accessing the immunization registry, promoting immunization importance, tracking immunization plans, and working with medical homes to update records. Participating school nurses observed decreases in the number of provisionally admitted students, although this reduction was not significantly different than matched comparison schools. We also found the number of provisionally admitted students fluctuated throughout the year and resolving the immunization status of New Americans and exchange students required special attention. Our approach supports the coordinated school health model and demonstrates the critical role school nurses play in improving population health outcomes. PMID:26699951

  6. Polarization of immune responses in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegertjes, Geert F.; Wentzel, Annelieke S.; Spaink, Herman P.; Elks, Philip M.; Fink, Inge R.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we support taking polarized immune responses in teleost fish from a 'macrophage first' point of view, a hypothesis that reverts the dichotomous T helper (TH)1 and TH2 driving forces by building on the idea of conservation of innate immune responses in lower v

  7. Immunizations in College Health: The Remaining Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Walter W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases continue to have an adverse impact on health on college campuses. Ways to eliminate measles and rubella from campus, the importance of accurate immunization records, the need to educate high-risk students about hepatitis B, and the immunization requirements of students traveling abroad are discussed. (Author/MT)

  8. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  9. Does Measles Immunization Reduce Diarrhoeal Morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddaiah V.P

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: 1. Will measles vaccination reduce the incidence and during of diarrhoeal episodes in children? 2. Will measles vaccination reduce the morbidity load because of diarrhoea? Objectives: 1. To provide measles immunization to rural children 9 to 24 months of age. 2. to study the occurrence of diarrhoeal episodes by domicillary visits every month for a period of 1 year. Design: Longitudinal study. Setting: Rural area in the state of Haryana. Participants: Children between the ages of 9 and 24 months with parental informed consent. Study variables: diarrhoeal episodes per child/year, duration of diarrhoea. Outcome Variable: the difference between the two groups (immunized and non- immunized of attack rate and duration of diarrhoeal episodes. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test. Results: immunization coverage was 75%. Attack rates of diarrhoea in immunized children (1.6/child/year was no different to that in the non- immunized (1.5/child/year. The mean duration of diarrhoea in both groups was 2.3 days. The prevalence diarrhoea in immunized and non-immunized was 3.85 and 3.67 respectively. Conclusion: Measles vaccination has no impact on diarrhoeal morbidity.

  10. Learning and Memory... and the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Ioana; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The nervous system and the immune system are two main regulators of homeostasis in the body. Communication between them ensures normal functioning of the organism. Immune cells and molecules are required for sculpting the circuitry and determining the activity of the nervous system. Within the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS),…

  11. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular, ...

  12. Immunity to Trichinella spiralis muscle infection

    OpenAIRE

    Fabre, M.V.; Beiting, D.P.; Bliss, S.K.; Appleton, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Trichinella spiralis larvae establish chronic infections in skeletal muscles of immunocompetent hosts. Muscle infection is crucial to transmission and survival of the parasite in nature. Chronic infections by this highly immunogenic parasite are associated with modulation or escape from potentially destructive immune responses. This review summarizes our current knowledge of immunity to muscle infection with T. spiralis.

  13. Immunity to Diphtheria in Haemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolreza S. Jahromi; Mortaza Pourahmd; Sara Azhdari; Gita Manshoori; Abdolhossain Madani; Seyed H. Moosavy

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The incidence of infectious diseases is increased in patients with chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure severely influences the immune functions of the host. Diphtheria is of great epidemiological concern. Although mainly observed during childhood, unvaccinated adults and relatively immunocompromised patients are at increased risk for acquiring diphtheria. Approach: To evaluate the anti-Diphtheria immunity level in southern Iranian patients ...

  14. Vaccination and herd immunity to infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roy M.; May, Robert M.

    1985-11-01

    An understanding of the relationship between the transmission dynamics of infectious agents and herd immunity provides a template for the design of effective control programmes based on mass immunization. Mathematical models of the spread and persistence of infection provide important insights into the problem of how best to protect the community against disease.

  15. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors.

  16. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors. PMID:22521848

  17. Regional specialization within the intestinal immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowat, Allan M.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    the intestine. We describe how the distribution of innate, adaptive and innate-like immune cells varies in different segments of the intestine and discuss the environmental factors that may influence this. Finally, we consider the implications of regional immune specialization for inflammatory disease...... implicated in controlling disease development elsewhere in the body. In this Review, we detail the anatomical and physiological distinctions that are observed in the small and large intestines, and we suggest how these may account for the diversity in the immune apparatus that is seen throughout......The intestine represents the largest compartment of the immune system. It is continually exposed to antigens and immunomodulatory agents from the diet and the commensal microbiota, and it is the port of entry for many clinically important pathogens. Intestinal immune processes are also increasingly...

  18. Spreading of multiple epidemics with cross immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekermann, Florian; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-09-01

    Pathogen-host relationships are the result of an ongoing coevolutionary race where the immune system of the host attempts to eliminate the pathogen, while the successful pathogen mutates to become invisible for the host's immune system. We here propose a minimal pathogen-host evolution model that takes into account cross immunization and allows for evolution of a spatially heterogeneous immune status of a population of hosts. With only the mutation rate as a determining parameter, the model allows us to produce an evolutionary tree of diseases which is highly branched, but hardly ever splits into separate long-lived trunks. Side branches remain short lived and seldom diverge to the extent of losing all cross immunizations. PMID:23030981

  19. An immune based dynamic intrusion detection model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tao

    2005-01-01

    With the dynamic description method for self and antigen, and the concept of dynamic immune tolerance for lymphocytes in network-security domain presented in this paper, a new immune based dynamic intrusion detection model (Idid) is proposed. In Idid, the dynamic models and the corresponding recursive equations of the lifecycle of mature lymphocytes, and the immune memory are built. Therefore, the problem of the dynamic description of self and nonself in computer immune systems is solved, and the defect of the low efficiency of mature lymphocyte generating in traditional computer immune systems is overcome. Simulations of this model are performed, and the comparison experiment results show that the proposed dynamic intrusion detection model has a better adaptability than the traditional methods.

  20. Anomaly Detection with Artificial Immune Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Lingxi; LI Tao; LIU Xiaojie; CHEN Yuefeng; LIU Caiming; LIU Sunjun

    2007-01-01

    Inspired by the immune network theory, an adaptive anomaly detection paradigm based on artificial immune network,referred as APAI, is proposed. The implementation of the paradigm includes: initially, the first is to create the initial antibody network; then, through the learning of each training antigen, the antibody network is evolved and updated by the optimal antibodies. Finally, anomaly detection process is accomplished by majority vote of the k nearest neighbor antibodies in the network. The experiments used the famous Sonar Benchmark dataset in our study, which is taken from the UCI machine learning database.The obtained detection accuracy of APAI was 97.7%, which was very promising with regard to the other classification applications in the literature for this problem. In addition to its nonlinear classification properties, APAI possesses biological immune networkproperties such as clonal selection, immune network, and immune memory, which can be applied to pattern recognition, classification, and etc.

  1. The geoepidemiology of immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Sean; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-03-01

    First described in 1735 (Watson-Williams et al., 1958), immune-mediated platelet destruction is a phenomenon of protean associations that has historically varied in its definition. Recently, consensus guidelines were proposed for a standardized system of nomenclature that preserves the acronym "ITP" but encompasses a number of causes of immune-mediated thrombocytopenias, including both primary immune thrombocytopenia as well as such entities as thrombocytopenia associated with connective tissue diseases or cancer. In this paper, we will focus on current aspects of geoepidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of adult and pediatric primary immune thrombocytopenia. It is clear that both genetic and extrinsic factors exist for ITP and are likely different between children and adults. Immune thrombocytopenia remains a challenging problem but our understanding of its pathophysiology has greatly improved. PMID:19945546

  2. Micronutrients influencing the immune response in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Maria Passos Vázquez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, an intracellular bacillus of airborne transmission. The disease affects the skin and peripheral nerves and can cause neurological sequelae. The bacillus multiplies slowly in the host and the disease probably occurs due to malfunctioning in host immune response. This review addresses the role of some specific micronutrients in the immune response, such as Vitamins A, D, E, C, Zinc and Selenium, detailing their mechanisms of actions in infectious diseases, and in leprosy. The immune response to pathogens releases harmful substances, which lead to tissue damage. This review discusses how a decreased level of antioxidants may contribute to an increased oxidative stress and complications of infectious diseases and leprosy. As the nutrients have a regulatory effect in the innate and adaptative immune responses, a perfect balance in their concentrations is important to improve the immune response against the pathogens.

  3. Plasticity of immunity in response to eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Rachel L; Butler, Michael W; Stahlschmidt, Zachary R

    2016-07-01

    Following a meal, an animal can exhibit dramatic shifts in physiology and morphology, as well as a substantial increase in metabolic rate associated with the energetic costs of processing a meal (i.e. specific dynamic action, SDA). However, little is known about the effects of digestion on another important physiological and energetically costly trait: immune function. Thus, we tested two competing hypotheses. (1) Digesting animals up-regulate their immune systems (putatively in response to the increased microbial exposure associated with ingested food). (2) Digesting animals down-regulate their immune systems (presumably to allocate energy to the breakdown of food). We assayed innate immunity (lytic capacity and agglutination) in cornsnakes (Pantherophis guttatus) during and after meal digestion. Lytic capacity was higher in females, and (in support of our first hypothesis) agglutination was higher during absorption. Given its potential energetic cost, immune up-regulation may contribute to SDA. PMID:27099367

  4. Kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoite neutralization by monoclonal antibodies, immune bovine serum, and immune bovine colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, L E; Riggs, M W; Mason, P H; Fayer, R

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, immune bovine serum, and immune bovine colostral whey neutralized infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites for mice in a time-dependent manner. Immune colostral whey neutralized sporozoites more rapidly and completely than immune serum, monoclonal antibody (MAb) 18.44, or a combination of MAb 18.44 and MAb 17.41. Mice were partially protected against oral challenge with C. parvum oocytes when treated with immune colostral whey, MAb 17.41, or a combination of MAb 17.41 and MAb 18.44. PMID:2294054

  5. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity. PMID:21796701

  6. Cell mediated immunity to fungi: a reassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Luigina

    2008-09-01

    Protective immunity against fungal pathogens is achieved by the integration of two distinct arms of the immune system, the innate and adaptive responses. Innate and adaptive immune responses are intimately linked and controlled by sets of molecules and receptors that act to generate the most effective form of immunity for protection against fungal pathogens. The decision of how to respond will still be primarily determined by interactions between pathogens and cells of the innate immune system, but the actions of T cells will feed back into this dynamic equilibrium to regulate the balance between tolerogenic and inflammatory responses. In the last two decades, the immunopathogenesis of fungal infections and fungal diseases was explained primarily in terms of Th1/Th2 balance. Although Th1 responses driven by the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis are central to protection against fungi, other cytokines and T cell-dependent pathways have come of age. The newly described Th17 developmental pathway may play an inflammatory role previously attributed to uncontrolled Th1 responses and serves to accommodate the seemingly paradoxical association of chronic inflammatory responses with fungal persistence in the face of an ongoing inflammation. Regulatory T cells in their capacity to inhibit aspects of innate and adaptive antifungal immunity have become an integral component of immune resistance to fungi, and provide the host with immune defense mechanisms adequate for protection, without necessarily eliminating fungal pathogens which would impair immune memory--or causing an unacceptable level of tissue damage. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan metabolites contribute to immune homeostasis by inducing Tregs and taming overzealous or heightened inflammatory responses.

  7. Immune checkpoint‑targeted cancer immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Swatler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells may express on their surface various characteristic antigens that can induce antitumor immunity. However, cancer in human body may induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment that limits immune response to its antigens. For many years scientists have tried to develop an immunotherapy which would induce a potent antitumor immune response and lead to an elimination of the disease. One of the most promising immunotherapies is blockade of immune checkpoints, i.e. a group of costimulatory molecules negatively regulating the immune system. Their blockade would overcome immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment and amplify antitumor immunity. What’s more, immune checkpoint blockade may turn out even more profitable, as some of immune checkpoints and their ligands are expressed on tumor surface and on tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, contributing to the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment. Phase III clinical trials have confirmed efficacy of an anti‑CTLA‑4 antibody ipilimumab, thereby leading to its acceptance for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Thanks to promising results of the phase I clinical trials, a breakthrough therapy designation and an early approval for the treatment have been granted to anti‑PD‑1 antibodies ‑ nivolumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma and advanced non‑small cell lung cancer and pembrolizumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma and, in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer, an anti‑PD‑L1 antibody ‑ MPDL3280A as well. Other immune checkpoints, such as LAG‑3, TIM‑3, BTLA, B7‑H3 and B7‑H4, are also under early evaluation.

  8. Oral immune regulation: a novel method for modulation of anti-viral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Maya; Ilan, Yaron

    2004-12-01

    Chronic viral infections, including hepatitis B and C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, afflict a significant part of the world's population. In many of these diseases, chronicity has been linked to defective anti-viral immunity that damages host tissues without producing viral clearance. Currently available therapeutic measures for chronic viral infections are limited. Oral immune regulation, the manipulation of immune responses towards antigens by their oral administration, is a relatively simple and antigen-specific immune-modulatory tool. Recent evidence suggests that induction of oral immune-regulation towards viral antigens may entail a complex immune effect, characterized by simultaneous enhancement and suppression of different elements of the immune response in a manner that benefits the host. Such manipulation of the immune response towards viruses may achieve a combination of upregulated specific anti-viral immunity and inhibition of immune-mediated damage. Oral immune regulation may prove to be an important addition to the available therapeutic arsenal for chronic viral infections. PMID:15567096

  9. Immune responses and immune-related gene expression profile in orange-spotted grouper after immunization with Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Tuan-Wei; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing

    2013-03-01

    In order to elucidate the immune-protective mechanisms of inactivated Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine, different doses of C. irritans theronts were used to immunize orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We measured serum immobilization titer, blood leukocyte respiratory burst activity, serum alternative complement activity, and serum lysozyme activity weekly. In addition, the expression levels of immune-related genes such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), major histocompatibility complexes I and II (MHC I and II), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined in spleen and gills. The results showed that the immobilization titer, respiratory burst activity, and alternative complement activity of immunized fish were significantly increased, and the levels of the last two immune parameters in the high-dose vaccine group were significantly higher than in the low-dose vaccine group. Serum lysozyme activity in the high-dose vaccine group was significantly higher than in the PBS control group. Vaccination also regulated host immune-related gene expression. For example, at 2- and 3- weeks post immunization, IL-1β expression in the high-dose vaccine group spleen was significantly increased. At 4-weeks post immunization, the fish were challenged with a lethal dose of parasite, and the survival rates of high-dose vaccine group, low-dose vaccine group, PBS control group, and adjuvant control group were 80%, 40%, 0%, and 10% respectively. These results demonstrate that inactivated C. irritans vaccination improves specific and nonspecific immune responses in fish, enhancing their anti-parasite ability. These effects are vaccine antigen dose-dependent.

  10. Aging in personal and social immunity: do immune traits senesce at the same rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavey, Catherine E; Warnock, Neil D; Garbett, Amy P; Cotter, Sheena C

    2015-10-01

    How much should an individual invest in immunity as it grows older? Immunity is costly and its value is likely to change across an organism's lifespan. A limited number of studies have focused on how personal immune investment changes with age in insects, but we do not know how social immunity, immune responses that protect kin, changes across lifespan, or how resources are divided between these two arms of the immune response. In this study, both personal and social immune functions are considered in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides. We show that personal immune function declines (phenoloxidase levels) or is maintained (defensin expression) across lifespan in nonbreeding beetles but is maintained (phenoloxidase levels) or even upregulated (defensin expression) in breeding individuals. In contrast, social immunity increases in breeding burying beetles up to middle age, before decreasing in old age. Social immunity is not affected by a wounding challenge across lifespan, whereas personal immunity, through PO, is upregulated following wounding to a similar extent across lifespan. Personal immune function may be prioritized in younger individuals in order to ensure survival until reproductive maturity. If not breeding, this may then drop off in later life as state declines. As burying beetles are ephemeral breeders, breeding opportunities in later life may be rare. When allowed to breed, beetles may therefore invest heavily in "staying alive" in order to complete what could potentially be their final reproductive opportunity. As parental care is important for the survival and growth of offspring in this genus, staying alive to provide care behaviors will clearly have fitness payoffs. This study shows that all immune traits do not senesce at the same rate. In fact, the patterns observed depend upon the immune traits measured and the breeding status of the individual. PMID:26664685

  11. Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease The Immune System & Its Link to Rheumatic Disease The Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Disease Fast ... cells. This leads to illnesses called autoimmune (self-immune) diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (inflammation of the joints), ...

  12. Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency Share | Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency This ... is the best tool for prevention of the flu, should patients with immune deficiency be given the ...

  13. Factors influencing childhood immunization in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bbaale, Edward

    2013-03-01

    This paper investigates the factors associated with childhood immunization in Uganda. We used nationally-representative data from Uganda Demographic and Health Survey (UDHS) of 2006. Both bivariate and multivariate approaches were employed in the analysis. The bivariate approach involved generating average percentages of children who were immunized, with analysis of pertinent background characteristics. The multivariate approach involved employing maximum likelihood probit technique and generating marginal effects to ascertain the probability of being immunized, given the same background characteristics. It revealed that slightly over 50% of children in Uganda were fully immunized. Additionally, 89%, 24%, 52%, and 64% received BCG, DPT, polio and measles vaccines respectively. Factors which have a significant association with childhood immunization are: maternal education (especially at post-secondary level), exposure to media, maternal healthcare utilization, maternal age, occupation type, immunization plan, and regional and local peculiarities. Children whose mothers had post-secondary education were twice as likely to be fully immunized compared to their counterparts whose mothers had only primary education (p < 0.01). Thus, gender parity in education enhancement efforts is crucial. There is also a need to increase media penetration, maternal healthcare utilization, and to ensure parity across localities and regions. PMID:23617212

  14. New insights into immune mechanisms of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniface, Katia; Taïeb, Alain; Seneschal, Julien

    2016-02-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting disorder, affecting 0.5% of the population. This stigmatizing disease has a major social impact with high unmet needs, and no real curative intervention has been reported so far. Vitiligo is characterized by the development of white macules resulting from a loss of epidermal melanocytes, which can result from cell destruction through melanocyte-specific cytotoxic immune response and melanocyte detachment through a defective adhesion system. Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to be involved in melanocyte disappearance: genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, metabolic abnormalities, altered inflammatory and immune responses. The autoimmune and inflammatory theory is the leading hypothesis. Indeed, vitiligo is often associated with autoimmune diseases; genome-wide association studies and functional pathway analyses have shown that most vitiligo susceptibility loci encode components of the immune system; and immune cells are found in the perilesional margin of actively depigmenting skin of vitiligo patients. However, studies support melanocytes intrinsic abnormalities in vitiligo associated with increased melanocytes stress leading to the release of dangers signals important for the activation of the immune system. This review aimed to overview the link between cellular stress, melanocyte function, and the abnormal inflammatory immune response in vitiligo. The involvement of innate and adaptive immune cells in the pathomechanisms leading to melanocyte loss observed in vitiligo will be discussed.

  15. Targeted Immune Therapy of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Keith L.; Karyampudi, Lavakumar; Lamichhane, Purushottam; Preston, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes, such as recurrence free survival and overall survival, in ovarian cancer are quite variable, independent of common characteristics such as stage, response to therapy and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration and therapeutic targeting into the interaction between the tumor and host. One compelling host characteristic that contributes both to the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer is the immune system. Hundreds of studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune regulatory cells present in the tumor microenvironment. Regulatory immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, in the future, research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will probably become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression. In this article, we summarize important immunological targets that influence ovarian cancer outcome as well as include an update on newer immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25544369

  16. Strategies for designing synthetic immune agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tom Y-H

    2016-08-01

    Enhancing the immune system is a validated strategy to combat infectious disease, cancer and allergy. Nevertheless, the development of immune adjuvants has been hampered by safety concerns. Agents that can stimulate the immune system often bear structural similarities with pathogen-associated molecular patterns found in bacteria or viruses and are recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Activation of these PRRs results in the immediate release of inflammatory cytokines, up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, and recruitment of innate immune cells. The distribution and duration of these early inflammatory events are crucial in the development of antigen-specific adaptive immunity in the forms of antibody and/or T cells capable of searching for and destroying the infectious pathogens or cancer cells. However, systemic activation of these PRRs is often poorly tolerated. Hence, different strategies have been employed to modify or deliver immune agonists in an attempt to control the early innate receptor activation through temporal or spatial restriction. These approaches include physicochemical manipulation, covalent conjugation, formulation and conditional activation/deactivation. This review will describe recent examples of discovery and optimization of synthetic immune agonists towards clinical application. PMID:27213842

  17. Adult immunization-Need of the hour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, P Srinivas; Ganta, Avani; Kattimani, Vivekanand S; Tiwari, Rahul V C

    2016-01-01

    Immunization is the process or the act of making individuals immune, which is usually done during childhood. Everyone is aware about immunization during childhood, however, very few know about adult immunization. This led us to review the adult immunization literature for the preventive strategies through various vaccination protocols. Adults do require vaccination protocols with booster doses for hepatitis B, Shingles, communicable diseases, traveler's diseases, etc. In this context, this article revises much of the available adult immunization literature and presents comprehensive guidelines. This article will increase the awareness regarding the importance of vaccination for adults to prevent a variety of conditions prevalent in our country as well as epidemics. The article comprehensively provides insights into the available vaccination and preventive strategy of human papilloma virus (HPV), hepatitis, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in this part of the review. We strongly recommend all the health care professionals to educate their co-professionals and the public to use the benefits of adult immunization. It is the need of the hour and reduces the burden of treatment and increases productivity. PMID:27583212

  18. Immune Escape Strategies of Malaria Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Pollyanna S.; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Freire-De-Lima, Celio G.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Immunity to malaria is slow and short-lived despite the repeated parasite exposure in endemic areas. Malaria parasites have evolved refined machinery to evade the immune system based on a range of genetic changes that include allelic variation, biomolecular exposure of proteins, and intracellular replication. All of these features increase the probability of survival in both mosquitoes and the vertebrate host. Plasmodium species escape from the first immunological trap in its invertebrate vector host, the Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites have to pass through various immunological barriers within the mosquito such as anti-microbial molecules and the mosquito microbiota in order to achieve successful transmission to the vertebrate host. Within these hosts, Plasmodium species employ various immune evasion strategies during different life cycle stages. Parasite persistence against the vertebrate immune response depends on the balance among virulence factors, pathology, metabolic cost of the host immune response, and the parasites ability to evade the immune response. In this review we discuss the strategies that Plasmodium parasites use to avoid the vertebrate host immune system and how they promote successful infection and transmission. PMID:27799922

  19. Nutritional strategies to optimize dairy cattle immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordillo, L M

    2016-06-01

    Dairy cattle are susceptible to increased incidence and severity of both metabolic and infectious diseases during the periparturient period. A major contributing factor to increased health disorders is alterations in bovine immune mechanisms. Indeed, uncontrolled inflammation is a major contributing factor and a common link among several economically important infectious and metabolic diseases including mastitis, retained placenta, metritis, displaced abomasum, and ketosis. The nutritional status of dairy cows and the metabolism of specific nutrients are critical regulators of immune cell function. There is now a greater appreciation that certain mediators of the immune system can have a reciprocal effect on the metabolism of nutrients. Thus, any disturbances in nutritional or immunological homeostasis can provide deleterious feedback loops that can further enhance health disorders, increase production losses, and decrease the availability of safe and nutritious dairy foods for a growing global population. This review will discuss the complex interactions between nutrient metabolism and immune functions in periparturient dairy cattle. Details of how either deficiencies or overexposure to macro- and micronutrients can contribute to immune dysfunction and the subsequent development of health disorders will be presented. Specifically, the ways in which altered nutrient metabolism and oxidative stress can interact to compromise the immune system in transition cows will be discussed. A better understanding of the linkages between nutrition and immunity may facilitate the design of nutritional regimens that will reduce disease susceptibility in early lactation cows. PMID:26830740

  20. New insights into immune mechanisms of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniface, Katia; Taïeb, Alain; Seneschal, Julien

    2016-02-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting disorder, affecting 0.5% of the population. This stigmatizing disease has a major social impact with high unmet needs, and no real curative intervention has been reported so far. Vitiligo is characterized by the development of white macules resulting from a loss of epidermal melanocytes, which can result from cell destruction through melanocyte-specific cytotoxic immune response and melanocyte detachment through a defective adhesion system. Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to be involved in melanocyte disappearance: genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, metabolic abnormalities, altered inflammatory and immune responses. The autoimmune and inflammatory theory is the leading hypothesis. Indeed, vitiligo is often associated with autoimmune diseases; genome-wide association studies and functional pathway analyses have shown that most vitiligo susceptibility loci encode components of the immune system; and immune cells are found in the perilesional margin of actively depigmenting skin of vitiligo patients. However, studies support melanocytes intrinsic abnormalities in vitiligo associated with increased melanocytes stress leading to the release of dangers signals important for the activation of the immune system. This review aimed to overview the link between cellular stress, melanocyte function, and the abnormal inflammatory immune response in vitiligo. The involvement of innate and adaptive immune cells in the pathomechanisms leading to melanocyte loss observed in vitiligo will be discussed. PMID:26512930

  1. Studies of Immune Responses in Candida vaginitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Graziani, Sofia; Norelli, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of vaginal candidiasis and the development of resistance against anti-fungal agents has stimulated interest in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. The aim of our work was to characterize, in an animal model of vaginal candidiasis, the mechanisms that play a role in the induction of mucosal immunity against C. albicans and the interaction between innate and adaptive immunity. Our studies evidenced the elicitation of cell-mediated immunity (CMIs) and antibody (Abs)-mediated immunity with a Th1 protective immunity. An immune response of this magnitude in the vagina was very encouraging to identify the proper targets for new strategies for vaccination or immunotherapy of vaginal candidiasis. Overall, our data provide clear evidence that it is possible to prevent C. albicans vaginal infection by active intravaginal immunization with aspartyl proteinase expressed as recombinant protein. This opens the way to a modality for anti-Candida protection at the mucosa. The recombinant protein Sap2 was assembled with virosomes, and a vaccine PEVION7 (PEV7) was obtained. The results have given evidence that the vaccine, constituted of virosomes and Secretory aspartyl proteinase 2 (Sap2) (PEV7), has an encouraging therapeutic potential for the treatment of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. PMID:26473934

  2. Addiction, adolescence, and innate immune gene induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulton T Crews

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Repeated drug use/abuse amplifies psychopathology, progressively reducing frontal lobe behavioral control and cognitive flexibility while simultaneously increasing limbic temporal lobe negative emotionality. The period of adolescence is a neurodevelopmental stage characterized by poor behavioral control as well as strong limbic reward and thrill seeking. Repeated drug abuse and/or stress during this stage increase the risk of addiction and elevate activator innate immune signaling in the brain. Nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB is a key glial transcription factor that regulates proinflammatory chemokines, cytokines, oxidases, proteases, and other innate immune genes. Induction of innate brain immune gene expression (e.g., NF-κB facilitates negative affect, depression-like behaviors, and inhibits hippocampal neurogenesis. In addition, innate immune gene induction alters cortical neurotransmission consistent with loss of behavioral control. Studies with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-depressant drugs as well as opiate antagonists link persistent innate immune gene expression to key behavioral components of addiction, e.g. negative affect-anxiety and loss of frontal cortical behavioral control. This review suggests that persistent and progressive changes in innate immune gene expression contribute to the development of addiction. Innate immune genes may represent a novel new target for addiction therapy.

  3. Fruit polyphenols, immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gallego, Javier; García-Mediavilla, M Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Tuñón, María J

    2010-10-01

    Flavonoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds widely present in fruits, vegetables and beverages derived from plants. These molecules have been reported to possess a wide range of activities in the prevention of common diseases, including CHD, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, gastrointestinal disorders and others. The effects appear to be related to the various biological/pharmacological activities of flavonoids. A large number of publications suggest immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of these compounds. However, almost all studies are in vitro studies with limited research on animal models and scarce data from human studies. The majority of in vitro research has been carried out with single flavonoids, generally aglycones, at rather supraphysiological concentrations. Few studies have investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of physiologically attainable flavonoid concentrations in healthy subjects, and more epidemiological studies and prospective randomised trials are still required. This review summarises evidence for the effects of fruit and tea flavonoids and their metabolites in inflammation and immunity. Mechanisms of effect are discussed, including those on enzyme function and regulation of gene and protein expression. Animal work is included, and evidence from epidemiological studies and human intervention trials is reviewed. Biological relevance and functional benefits of the reported effects, such as resistance to infection or exercise performance, are also discussed.

  4. Combined sensor noise-immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir A. Shchurov; Alexander V. Shchurov

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents statistical analysis of combined sensor noise-immunity while recording fluctuating tone against underwater dynamic noise background. The experimental data used for the analysis have been collected by a pair of four-component combined sensors centered at two depths, 150 and 300 m in deep water. Expressions for combined sensor signalto-noise ratio (SNR) for cross-spectral levels of signal and noise for both wide and narrow frequency bands have been derived. A combined sensor gain has been introduced in terms of ordinary single-point coherence function between acoustic pressure and particle velocity in acoustic wave. The estimates obtained experimentally evidence that SNR for a combined sensor with multiplicative data processing may exceed SNR for a hydrophone-based sensor by 15 to 16 dB at most for the horizontal channel of the combined sensor, and by 30 dB at most for the vertical channel (when opposite energy flows of signal and noise compensate one another).

  5. Probiotics and lung immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential for microbe-based therapeutic approaches to asthma and respiratory infection. However, to date, clinical trials of probiotics in the treatment of respiratory disease have met with limited success. It is becoming clear that to identify the true therapeutic potential of microbes we must move away from a purely empirical approach to clinical trials and adopt knowledge-based selection of candidate probiotics strains, dose, and means of administration. Animal models have played a key role in the identification of mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory capacity of specific bacteria. Microbe-induced changes in dendritic cell phenotype and function appear key to orchestrating the multiple pathways, involving inter alia, T cells, natural killer cells, and alveolar macrophages, associated with the protective effect of probiotics. Moving forward, the development of knowledge-based strategies for microbe-based therapeutics in respiratory disease will be aided by greater understanding of how specific bacterial structural motifs activate unique combinations of pattern recognition receptors on dendritic cells and thus direct desired immune responses.

  6. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  7. Developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Liu, Han-Xiao; Yan, Hui-Yi; Wu, Dong-Mei; Ping, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental animal studies show that suboptimal environments in fetal and neonatal life exert a profound influence on physiological function and risk of diseases in adult life. The concepts of the 'developmental programming' and Developmental Origins of Health and Diseases (DOHaD) have become well accepted and have been applied across almost all fields of medicine. Adverse intrauterine environments may have programming effects on the crucial functions of the immune system during critical periods of fetal development, which can permanently alter the immune function of offspring. Immune dysfunction may in turn lead offspring to be susceptible to inflammatory and immune diseases in adulthood. These facts suggest that inflammatory and immune disorders might have developmental origins. In recent years, inflammatory and immune disorders have become a growing health problem worldwide. However, there is no systematic report in the literature on the developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases and the potential mechanisms involved. Here, we review the impacts of adverse intrauterine environments on the immune function in offspring. This review shows the results from human and different animal species and highlights the underlying mechanisms, including damaged development of cells in the thymus, helper T cell 1/helper T cell 2 balance disturbance, abnormal epigenetic modification, effects of maternal glucocorticoid overexposure on fetal lymphocytes and effects of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the immune system. Although the phenomena have already been clearly implicated in epidemiologic and experimental studies, new studies investigating the mechanisms of these effects may provide new avenues for exploiting these pathways for disease prevention. PMID:27226490

  8. Cancer as an immune-mediated disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurin MR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael R ShurinDepartments of Pathology and Immunology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The link between oncology and immunology has a long history and its development is forced by the necessity to develop innovative and highly efficient modalities for immunological destruction of malignant cells. The limited efficacy of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation also exemplify these issues, as these treatments do not eliminate all cancerous cells, do not address the immunosuppressive nature of the disease and can further impair the patient's immune response weakening patient's resistance to the cancer. Multidisciplinary analysis of the interaction between the immune system and cancer in preclinical and clinical settings suggests that the immune system is closely intertwined with both cancer pathogenesis and treatment. On the one hand, cancer is a manifestation of malfunctions in immunity, as malignant cells manage to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. Chronic infections and inflammation associated with limited or polarized immune responses also contribute to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The tumor immunoenvironment represents specific conditions and elements that support cancerous cell survival, proliferation and spreading. On the other hand, the specificity and strength of antitumor immunity is a powerful and efficient tool that can be used to recognize and destroy neoplastic cells or their supporting microenvironment. Understanding the role of the immune system in controlling and supporting tumor initiation, formation, growth and progression has crucial implications for cancer therapy and will therefore guide the future development of cancer immunotherapy and its combination with conventional therapies to achieve optimal antitumor effects in patients with different types of cancer.Keywords: tumor immunology and immunotherapy, tumor immunoenvironment, cancer, immunosuppression

  9. Immune response from a resource allocation perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Mercedes Rauw

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The immune system is a life history trait that can be expected to trade off against other life history traits. Whether or not a trait is considered to be a life history trait has consequences for the expectation on how it responds to natural selection and evolution; in addition, it may have consequences for the outcome of artificial selection when included in the breeding objective. The immune system involved in pathogen resistance comprises multiple mechanisms that define a host’s defensive capacity. Immune resistance involves employing mechanisms that either prevent pathogens from invading or eliminate the pathogens when they do invade. On the other hand, tolerance involves limiting the damage that is caused by the infection. Both tolerance and resistance traits require (reallocation of resources and carry physiological costs. Examples of trade-offs between immune function and growth, reproduction and stress response are provided in this review, in addition to consequences of selection for increased production on immune function and vice versa. Reaction norms are used to deal with questions of immune resistance versus tolerance to pathogens that relate host health to infection intensity. In essence, selection for immune tolerance in livestock is a particular case of selection for animal robustness. Since breeding goals that include robustness traits are required in the implementation of more sustainable agricultural production systems, it is of interest to investigate whether immune tolerance is a robustness trait that is positively correlated with overall animal robustness. Considerably more research is needed to estimate the shapes of the cost functions of different immune strategies, and investigate trade-offs and cross-over benefits of selection for disease resistance and/or disease tolerance in livestock production.

  10. Developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Liu, Han-Xiao; Yan, Hui-Yi; Wu, Dong-Mei; Ping, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental animal studies show that suboptimal environments in fetal and neonatal life exert a profound influence on physiological function and risk of diseases in adult life. The concepts of the 'developmental programming' and Developmental Origins of Health and Diseases (DOHaD) have become well accepted and have been applied across almost all fields of medicine. Adverse intrauterine environments may have programming effects on the crucial functions of the immune system during critical periods of fetal development, which can permanently alter the immune function of offspring. Immune dysfunction may in turn lead offspring to be susceptible to inflammatory and immune diseases in adulthood. These facts suggest that inflammatory and immune disorders might have developmental origins. In recent years, inflammatory and immune disorders have become a growing health problem worldwide. However, there is no systematic report in the literature on the developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases and the potential mechanisms involved. Here, we review the impacts of adverse intrauterine environments on the immune function in offspring. This review shows the results from human and different animal species and highlights the underlying mechanisms, including damaged development of cells in the thymus, helper T cell 1/helper T cell 2 balance disturbance, abnormal epigenetic modification, effects of maternal glucocorticoid overexposure on fetal lymphocytes and effects of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the immune system. Although the phenomena have already been clearly implicated in epidemiologic and experimental studies, new studies investigating the mechanisms of these effects may provide new avenues for exploiting these pathways for disease prevention.

  11. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajikawa, A.; Satoh, E.; Leer, R.J.; Yamamoto, S.; Igimi, S.

    2007-01-01

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization

  12. Incomplete immune recovery in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, Julie C; Hartling, Hans J; Gerstoft, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of HIV-infected patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) usually results in diminished viral replication, increasing CD4⁺ cell counts, a reversal of most immunological disturbances, and a reduction in risk of morbidity and mortality. However, approximately 20% of all HIV...... tissue, perturbed frequencies of immune regulators such as regulatory T cells and Th17 cells, and increased immune activation, immunosenescence, and apoptosis. Importantly, INRs have an increased risk of morbidity and mortality compared to HIV-infected patients with an optimal immune reconstitution...... in HIV infection, including mechanisms, relevance for clinical care, and possible solutions....

  13. Mosquito gut antiparasitic and antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Raúl G; Kang, Seokyoung; Simões, Maria L; Angleró-Rodríguez, Yesseinia I; Dimopoulos, George

    2016-11-01

    Mosquitoes are responsible for the transmission of diseases with a serious impact on global human health, such as malaria and dengue. All mosquito-transmitted pathogens complete part of their life cycle in the insect gut, where they are exposed to mosquito-encoded barriers and active factors that can limit their development. Here we present the current understanding of mosquito gut immunity against malaria parasites, filarial worms, and viruses such as dengue, Chikungunya, and West Nile. The most recently proposed immune mediators involved in intestinal defenses are discussed, as well as the synergies identified between the recognition of gut microbiota and the mounting of the immune response. PMID:26827888

  14. Mucosal immunity in Toxoplasma gondii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulthess J.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that frequently infects a large spectrum of warm-blooded animals. This parasite induces abortion and establishes both chronic and silent infections, particularly in the brain. Parasite penetration into the host activates a strong anti-parasite immune response. In the present paper, we will discuss the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity that occurs within the infected intestine to clear the parasite and to maintain intestinal homeostasis despite the exacerbation of an inflammatory immune response.

  15. Development of immunization trials against Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek A. Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has recently crossed all lines once considered harmless, pushing its way as a nosocomial pathogen. It had acquired resistance to almost all available chemotherapies and mainly targets intensive care residents; causing pneumonia and major outbreaks with high mortality rates. This urged the need for preventive methods, which include infection control, non-specific immune-therapy, passive, and active immunization in order to offer vulnerable immune-compromised patients a flare in the dark. Several attempts were done for constructing effective vaccines with promising results. These are precisely classified, documented, and discussed in this up-to-date review.

  16. Exosomes in the Immune Response and Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    修方明; 曹雪涛

    2004-01-01

    Exosomes, secreted by many live cells, are small non-cell vesicles with nanoparticle-grade size. In addition to the original function of discarding the uselessful membrane molecules, exosomes are involved in a range of immunoregulatory functions. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes and tumor-derived exosomes are the best characterized vesicles with potent antitumor effect by efficienfly inducing immune response. Down-regtdation of immune response or induction of immune tolerance is another interesting function of exosomes, Further functional studies of the exosomes will shed light on the application of exosomes。

  17. Effect of cellular mobility on immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. B.; Mannion, R.; Ruskin, H. J.

    2000-08-01

    Mobility of cell types in our HIV immune response model is subject to an intrinsic mobility and an explicit directed mobility, which is governed by Pmob. We investigate how restricting the explicit mobility, while maintaining the innate mobility of a viral-infected cell, affects the model's results. We find that increasing the explicit mobility of the immune system cells leads to viral dominance for certain levels of viral mutation. We conclude that increasing immune system cellular mobility indirectly increases the virus’ inherent mobility.

  18. Obesity leptin and the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padiotis. K.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of obesity in developed and developing countries raises a major health concern due to the fact that obesity and nutrition are associated with impaired immune responses. Overconsumption of nutrients alters several functions of the immune defence mechanisms leading to severe infection and chronic diseases. The hormone leptin, known to regulate energy balance has been proved to activate several components of signalling pathways having thus immunoregulatory activity. The aim of this paper is to present the connections between obesity, immune system mechanisms and the role of the adipocyte hormone leptin

  19. Myeloid Cells' Evasion of Melanoma Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Chen, Lieping

    2015-01-01

    An immune-suppressive role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in melanoma has long been speculated, whereas molecular mechanisms underlying this role are not well understood. Here, Chung and colleagues show that dendritic cell-associated, heparan sulfate proteoglycans-dependent integrin ligand (DC-HIL), a cell surface immune-modulatory molecule, is highly expressed on tumor-associated MDSCs. Genetic ablation or antibody blockade of DC-HIL delays the growth of transplantable B16 melanoma in syngeneic mice, which is accompanied by enhanced antitumor T-cell activities. These findings support a role for DC-HIL in immune evasion within the melanoma microenvironment. PMID:25318429

  20. Immune Genetic Learning of Fuzzy Cognitive Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chun-mei; HE Yue; TANG Bing-yong

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid methodology of automatically constructing fuzzy cognitive map (FCM). The method uses immune genetic algorithm to learn the connection matrix of FCM. In the algorithm, the DNA coding method is used and an immune operator based on immune mechanism is constructed. The characteristics of the system and the experts' knowledge are abstracted as vaccine for restraining the degenerative phenomena during evolution so as to improve the algorithmic efficiency. Finally, an illustrative example is provided, and its results suggest that the method is capable of automatically generating FCM model.

  1. The immune system in space and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Space flight and models that created conditions similar to those that occur during space flight have been shown to affect a variety of immunological responses. These have primarily been cell-mediated immune responses including leukocyte proliferation, cytokine production, and leukocyte subset distribution. The mechanisms and biomedical consequences of these changes remain to be established. Among the possible causes of space flight-induced alterations in immune responses are exposure to microgravity, exposure to stress, exposure to radiation, and many more as yet undetermined causes. This review chronicles the known effects of space flight on the immune system and explores the possible role of stress in contributing to these changes.

  2. Native structure of rat liver immune proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, A A; Lyupina, Yu V; Sharova, N P; Erokhov, P A

    2016-05-01

    Native structure of active forms of rat liver immune proteasomes has been studied by two-dimensional electrophoresis method modified for analysis of unpurified protein fractions. The developed method allowed revealing the proteasome immune subunits LMP7 and LMP2 in 20S subparticles and in the structures bound to one or two PA28αβ activators, but not to the PA700 activator, which is involved in the hydrolysis of ubiquitinated proteins. The results obtained indicate the participation of the immune proteasomes in delicate regulatory mechanisms based on the production of biologically active peptides and exclude their participation in processes of crude degradation of "rotated" ubiquitinated proteins. PMID:27417720

  3. [Innate immunity primary immunodeficiencies and infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchamp, M; Miot, C; Bustamante, J C; Picard, C

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) is important for the early and adaptive care of patients and their families. Among the various known PIDs, a number of them concern the innate immune system, which involve a set of cells and mechanisms involved in the host defense by a nonspecific and fast response. The majority of patients with innate immunity defects have a predisposition to one isolated type of infection (bacterial, viral, or fungal), dependent on the genetic defect involved. This article describes the different PIDs involving innate immunity and the immunological investigations allowing for their diagnosis. PMID:27266636

  4. CRISPR-Cas immunity in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraffini, Luciano A

    2015-10-01

    Prokaryotic organisms are threatened by a large array of viruses and have developed numerous defence strategies. Among these, only clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems provide adaptive immunity against foreign elements. Upon viral injection, a small sequence of the viral genome, known as a spacer, is integrated into the CRISPR locus to immunize the host cell. Spacers are transcribed into small RNA guides that direct the cleavage of the viral DNA by Cas nucleases. Immunization through spacer acquisition enables a unique form of evolution whereby a population not only rapidly acquires resistance to its predators but also passes this resistance mechanism vertically to its progeny.

  5. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies

  6. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  7. Correlates of Immunity to Filovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Bavari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses can cause severe, often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans. Recent advances in vaccine and therapeutic drug development have provided encouraging data concerning treatment of these infections. However, relatively little is known about immune responses in fatal versus non-fatal filovirus infection. This review summarizes the published literature on correlates of immunity to filovirus infection, and highlights deficiencies in our knowledge on this topic. It is likely that there are several types of successful immune responses, depending on the type of filovirus, and the presence and timing of vaccination or drug treatment.

  8. Evolving Concepts: Immunity in Oncology from Targets to Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is associated with global immune suppression of the host. Malignancy-induced immune suppressive effect can be circumvented by blocking the immune checkpoint and tip the immune balance in favor of immune stimulation and unleash cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. Human antibodies directed against immune checkpoint proteins: cytotoxic T lymphocytes antigen-4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death-1 (PD-1, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1, have shown therapeutic efficacy in advanced melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer and other malignancies. Immune check point blockade antibodies lead to diminished tolerance to self and enhanced immune ability to recognize and eliminate cancer cells. As a class these agents have immune-related adverse events due to decreased ability of effector immune cells to discriminate between self and non-self. Seventy percent of patients participating in clinical trials have experienced anticancer activities and varying degrees of immune mediated dose-limiting side effects.

  9. Evolving Concepts: Immunity in Oncology from Targets to Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hina; Gucalp, Rasim; Shapira, Iuliana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is associated with global immune suppression of the host. Malignancy-induced immune suppressive effect can be circumvented by blocking the immune checkpoint and tip the immune balance in favor of immune stimulation and unleash cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. Human antibodies directed against immune checkpoint proteins: cytotoxic T lymphocytes antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), have shown therapeutic efficacy in advanced melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer and other malignancies. Immune check point blockade antibodies lead to diminished tolerance to self and enhanced immune ability to recognize and eliminate cancer cells. As a class these agents have immune-related adverse events due to decreased ability of effector immune cells to discriminate between self and non-self. Seventy percent of patients participating in clinical trials have experienced anticancer activities and varying degrees of immune mediated dose-limiting side effects. PMID:26060497

  10. Immune recognition of citrullinated epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai; James, Eddie A

    2016-10-01

    Conversion of arginine into citrulline is a post-translational modification that is observed in normal physiological processes. However, abnormal citrullination can provoke autoimmunity by generating altered self-epitopes that are specifically targeted by autoantibodies and T cells. In this review we discuss the recognition of citrullinated antigens in human autoimmune diseases and the role that this modification plays in increasing antigenic diversity and circumventing tolerance mechanisms. Early published work demonstrated that citrullinated proteins are specifically targeted by autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis and that citrullinated peptides are more readily presented to T cells by arthritis-susceptible HLA class II 'shared epitope' proteins. Emerging data support the relevance of citrullinated epitopes in other autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, whose susceptible HLA haplotypes also preferentially present citrullinated peptides. In these settings, autoimmune patients have been shown to have elevated responses to citrullinated epitopes derived from tissue-specific antigens. Contrasting evidence implicates autophagy or perforin and complement-mediated membrane attack as inducers of ectopic citrullination. In either case, the peptidyl deiminases responsible for citrullination are activated in response to inflammation or insult, providing a mechanistic link between this post-translational modification and interactions with the environment and infection. As such, it is likely that immune recognition of citrullinated epitopes also plays a role in pathogen clearance. Indeed, our recent data suggest that responses to citrullinated peptides facilitate recognition of novel influenza strains. Therefore, increased understanding of responses to citrullinated epitopes may provide important insights about the initiation of autoimmunity and recognition of heterologous viruses. PMID:27531825

  11. The immune system, adaptation, and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J. Doyne; Packard, Norman H.; Perelson, Alan S.

    1986-10-01

    The immune system is capable of learning, memory, and pattern recognition. By employing genetic operators on a time scale fast enough to observe experimentally, the immune system is able to recognize novel shapes without preprogramming. Here we describe a dynamical model for the immune system that is based on the network hypothesis of Jerne, and is simple enough to simulate on a computer. This model has a strong similarity to an approach to learning and artificial intelligence introduced by Holland, called the classifier system. We demonstrate that simple versions of the classifier system can be cast as a nonlinear dynamical system, and explore the analogy between the immune and classifier systems in detail. Through this comparison we hope to gain insight into the way they perform specific tasks, and to suggest new approaches that might be of value in learning systems.

  12. Exploiting Mucosal Immunity for Antiviral Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-20

    Mucosal surfaces provide a remarkably effective barrier against potentially dangerous pathogens. Therefore, enhancing mucosal immunity through vaccines-strengthening that first line of defense-holds significant promise for reducing the burden of viral diseases. The large and varied class of viral pathogens, however, continues to present thorny challenges to vaccine development. Two primary difficulties exist: Viruses exhibit a stunning diversity of strategies for evading the host immune response, and even when we understand the nature of effective immune protection against a given virus, eliciting that protection is technically challenging. Only a few mucosal vaccines have surmounted these obstacles thus far. Recent developments, however, could greatly improve vaccine design. In this review, we first sketch out our understanding of mucosal immunity and then compare the herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and influenza virus to illustrate the distinct challenges of developing successful vaccines and to outline potential solutions. PMID:27168245

  13. Vitamin-mediated regulation of intestinal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eKunisawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The intestine is exposed continuously to complex environments created by numerous injurious and beneficial non-self antigens. The unique mucosal immune system in the intestine maintains the immunologic homeostasis between the host and the external environment. Crosstalk between immunocompetent cells and endogenous (e.g., cytokines and chemokines as well as exogenous factors (e.g., commensal bacteria and dietary materials achieves the vast diversity of intestinal immune functions. In addition to their vital roles as nutrients, vitamins now also are known to have immunologically crucial functions, specifically in regulating host immune responses. In this review, we focus on the immunologic functions of vitamins in regulating intestinal immune responses and their roles in moderating the fine balance between physiologic and pathologic conditions of the intestine.

  14. A nonequilibrium phase transition in immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei; Qi An-Shen

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of immune response correlated to signal transduction in immune thymic cells (T cells) is studied.In particular, the problem of the phosphorylation of the immune-receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) is explored. A nonlinear model is established on the basis of experimental observations. The behaviours of the model can be well analysed using the concepts of nonequilibrium phase transitions. In addition, the Riemann-Hugoniot cusp catastrophe is demonstrated by the model. Due to the application of the theory of nonequilibrium phase transitions,the biological phenomena can be clarified more precisely. The results can also be used to further explain the signal transduction and signal discrimination of an important type of immune T cell.

  15. Immunity to VHS virus in rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Koch, C.

    1999-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is the rhabdovirus that causes most disease problems in farmed rainbow trout in Europe. Survivors of infection are usually immune to reinfection but as with other fish viruses, development of a modern recombinant vaccine has been complicated by the limited...... knowledge of the immune mechanisms and antigens involved in induction of immunity. Neutralizing and protective monoclonal antibodies recognize the envelope glycoprotein (G protein) which is the only viral protein known to be present on the surface of the virus particle. Immunoblotting analyses...... with monoclonal antibodies as well as with sera from immunized trout have indicated that protein conformation plays an important role in neutralization epitopes. The virus neutralizing activity often found in sera from convalescent trout is highly dependent on a poorly defined complementing activity in normal...

  16. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M Colombo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last twenty years we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacterias, archeas and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: i the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and ii the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  17. Immune effects of the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam J; Loveren H van; TOX

    2007-01-01

    Bifidobacterium breve, a probiotic, has beneficial effects on both allergy and autoimmunity - an immune reaction against the body's own constituents -in experimental animals. Probiotics are called 'friendly bacteria' in advertisements, in which manufacturers claim their beneficial effects on gut flo

  18. An immune origin of type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolb, H; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    and proinflammatory activity of macrophages in adipose tissue, and immune mediators may be important regulators of insulin resistance, mitochondrial function, ectopic lipid storage and beta cell dysfunction or death. Intervention studies targeting these pathways would help to determine the contribution......Subclinical, low-grade systemic inflammation has been observed in patients with type 2 diabetes and in those at increased risk of the disease. This may be more than an epiphenomenon. Alleles of genes encoding immune/inflammatory mediators are associated with the disease, and the two major...... environmental factors the contribute to the risk of type 2 diabetes-diet and physical activity-have a direct impact on levels of systemic immune mediators. In animal models, targeting of immune genes enhanced or suppressed the development of obesity or diabetes. Obesity is associated with the infiltration...

  19. Artificial Immune System Approaches for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    KrishnaKumar, Kalmanje; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) combine a priori knowledge with the adapting capabilities of biological immune system to provide a powerful alternative to currently available techniques for pattern recognition, modeling, design, and control. Immunology is the science of built-in defense mechanisms that are present in all living beings to protect against external attacks. A biological immune system can be thought of as a robust, adaptive system that is capable of dealing with an enormous variety of disturbances and uncertainties. Biological immune systems use a finite number of discrete "building blocks" to achieve this adaptiveness. These building blocks can be thought of as pieces of a puzzle which must be put together in a specific way-to neutralize, remove, or destroy each unique disturbance the system encounters. In this paper, we outline AIS models that are immediately applicable to aerospace problems and identify application areas that need further investigation.

  20. Elucidating Immune Mechanisms Causing Hypertension During Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    LaMarca, Babbette; Cornelius, Denise; Wallace, Kedra

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disease carrying high risks of mortality and morbidity among pregnant mothers and infants worldwide. Many immune mechanisms stimulated in response to reductions in uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) have been identified as key players in the disease progress.