WorldWideScience

Sample records for baby-friendly hospital initiative

  1. Effects of baby-friendly hospital initiative on breast-feeding practices in Sindh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Akram, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    To determine changes in the breastfeeding practices of mothers after receiving counseling on Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding as defined by the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative comparing baby friendly hospitals (BFHs) and non-baby-friendly hospitals in Sindh, Pakistan. Methods: The observational study was conducted from June 2007 to June 2009 in randomly selected baby-friendly and non-baby-friendly hospitals of Sindh, Pakistan. Non-probability purposive sampling was employed. The maternity staff was trained on Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. The changes in breastfeeding practices were analysed by SPSS version 15. Results: A total of 236 women were included in the study. Of them, 196 (83.05%) were from baby-friendly hospitals and 40 (16.94%) from non-baby-friendly hospitals. Besides, 174 (88.7%) mothers in baby-friendly hospitals and 5 (12.5%) in non-baby-friendly hospitals during antenatal care received counseling by healthcare providers. There was an increase in breastfeeding practice up to 194 (98.97%) in the first category compared to 12 (30%) in the other category. Conclusion: Counseling under the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative improved breastfeeding practices up to 98.97% in baby-friendly compared to non-baby-friendly hospitals. (author)

  2. CE: Beyond Maternity Nursing: The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Regina

    2017-08-01

    : The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a program developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) to promote breastfeeding in hospitals and birthing facilities worldwide. Since the program was launched in 1991, breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity have increased globally, a trend largely attributed to changes in hospital policies and practices brought about by the BFHI. This article provides an overview of these practices and policies, the institutional benefits of achieving BFHI certification, and the process through which health care facilities can do so. All nurses-whether they work in maternity care or another nursing specialty in a hospital, ambulatory, or community setting-can play a role in promoting societal health through their support of long-term breastfeeding as recommended by the WHO and UNICEF.

  3. Exploring the impact of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative on trends in exclusive breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labbok Miriam H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI seeks to support breastfeeding initiation in maternity services. This study uses country-level data to examine the relationship between BFHI programming and trends in exclusive breastfeeding (EBF in 14 developing countries. Methods Demographic and Health Surveys and UNICEF BFHI Reports provided EBF and BFHI data. Because country programs were initiated in different years, data points were realigned to the year that the first Baby-Friendly hospital was certified in that country. Pre-and post-implementation time periods were analyzed using fixed effects models to account for grouping of data by country, and compared to assess differences in trends. Results Statistically significant upward trends in EBF under two months and under six months, as assessed by whether fitted trends had slopes significantly different from 0, were observed only during the period following BFHI implementation, and not before. BFHI implementation was associated with average annual increases of 1.54 percentage points in the rate of EBF of infants under two months (p Conclusion BFHI implementation was associated with a statistically significant annual increase in rates of EBF in the countries under study; however, small sample sizes may have contributed to the fact that results do not demonstrate a significant difference from pre-BFHI trends. Further research is needed to consider trends according to the percentages of Baby-Friendly facilities, percent of all births occurring in these facilities, and continued compliance with the program.

  4. Barriers and facilitators to implementing the Baby-Friendly hospital initiative in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Britney; Semenic, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    To explore manager, educator, and clinical leader perceptions of barriers and facilitators to implementing Baby-Friendly practice in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Qualitative, descriptive design. Two university-affiliated level-III NICUs in Canada. A purposive sample of 10 medical and nursing managers, nurse educators, lactation consultants, and neonatal nurse practitioners. In-depth, semistructured interviews transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Participants valued breastfeeding and family-centered care yet identified numerous contextual barriers to Baby-Friendly care including infant health status, parent/infant separation, staff workloads and work patterns, gaps in staff knowledge and skills, and lack of continuity of breastfeeding support. Facilitators included breastfeeding education, breastfeeding champions, and interprofessional collaboration. Despite identifying numerous barriers, participants recognized the potential value of expanding the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) to the NICU setting. Recommendations include promoting BFHI as a facilitator of family-centered care, interdisciplinary staff education, increasing access to lactation consultants, and establishing a group of NICU champions dedicated to BFHI implementation. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  5. [Breast feeding in Tromsö before and after the baby-friendly-hospital initiative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, M; Bale, M; Kaaresen, P I; Dahl, L B

    2001-11-10

    "The-Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative" was introduced in the early 1990s by WHO/UNICEF to reverse a declining trend in breastfeeding worldwide. We wanted to investigate factors influencing breastfeeding and whether this initiative, introduced between 1993 and 1996, had improved breastfeeding in our region, Tromsø, a mid-sized city in northern Norway. Medical records at maternal and child health centres of 1,374 infants born 1992 (n = 653) and 1997 (n = 721) were studied. The number of mothers breastfeeding, duration of lactation, parents' age, their occupation and education, maternal marital status and parity were registered. In a multiple regression analysis, birth, year 1997, high parental level of education/occupational prestige, and higher maternal age significantly prolonged the total period of breastfeeding. Parental age, education/occupation, the number of women starting breastfeeding, the duration of exclusive breastfeeding and the total lactation period significantly increased from 1992 to 1997. When correcting for parental age and education/occupation in a multiple regression analysis we found an increase in exclusive breastfeeding and the total lactation period by 0.5 month (mean (95% CI)) 0.5 (0.2-0.8) and 1.1 month (0.6-1.5) respectively. This improvement might be due to "the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative", but also to unknown factors.

  6. Global baby-friendly hospital initiative monitoring data: update and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbok, Miriam H

    2012-08-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO)/UNICEF Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was developed to support the implementation of the Ten Steps for Successful Breastfeeding. The purpose of this study is to assess trends in the numbers facilities ever-designated "baby-friendly," to consider uptake of the new WHO/UNICEF BFHI materials, and to consider implications for future breastfeeding support. The national contacts from the 2006-2007 UNICEF BFHI update were recontacted, as were WHO and UNICEF officers worldwide, to ascertain the number of hospitals ever-designated "baby-friendly," presence of a government breastfeeding oversight committee, use of the new BFHI materials and, if yes, use of the new maternity or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) materials. Seventy countries reporting in 2010-2011 and the updates from an additional 61 reporting in 2006-2007 (n=131, or 66% of the 198 countries) confirm that there are at least 21,328 ever-designated facilities. This is 27.5% of maternities worldwide: 8.5% of those in industrialized countries and 31% in less developed settings. In 2010, government committees were reported by 18 countries, and 34 reported using the new BFHI materials: 14 reported using the maternity care and 11 reported using the HIV materials. Rates of increase in the number of ever-certified "baby-friendly" hospitals vary by region and show some chronological correlation with trends in breastfeeding rates. Although it is not possible to attribute this increase to the BFHI alone, there is ongoing interest in Ten Steps implementation and in BFHI. The continued growth may reflect the dedication of ministries of health and national BFHI groups, as well as increasing recognition that the Ten Steps are effective quality improvement practices that increase breastfeeding and synergize with community interventions and other program efforts. With renewed interest in maternal/neonatal health, revitalization of support for Ten Steps and their effective

  7. Factors associated with breastfeeding initiation time in a baby-friendly hospital in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnal, Sevil; Aydin, Yasemin; Canbulat, Nejla

    2016-11-01

    To investigate perinatal factors that affect breastfeeding of newborns delivered at a baby-friendly public hospital in Turkey, including the time of the first physical examination by a pediatrician, the first union with their mothers, and the first breastfeeding time after delivery. The research was conducted from May 2nd through June 30th, 2011, in a baby-friendly public hospital in Istanbul. The sample consisted of 194 mothers and their full-term newborns. The data were collected via an observation form developed by the researchers. In analyzing the data, the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum values, Chi-square, and percentages were used. The results revealed that the first physical examinations of the newborns were performed approximately 53.02±39min (range, 1-180 min) after birth. The newborns were given to their mothers approximately 69.75±41min (range, 3-190 min) after birth. Consequently, the first initiated breastfeeding took place approximately 78.58±44min following birth, and active sucking was initiated after approximately 85.90±54min. A large percentage of the newborns (64.4%) were not examined by a specialist pediatrician within half an hour of birth, and 74.7% were not united with their mothers within the same period. Also, the newborns who initiated breastfeeding within the first half hour had significantly earlier success with active sucking and required significantly less assistance to achieve successful breastfeeding. The newborns in our study met with their mothers late in the birth ward because examinations of the newborns were delayed. The newborns began initial sucking later, and this chain reaction negatively impacted the breastfeeding success of the newborns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative Implementation in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jawaldeh, Ayoub; Abul-Fadl, Azza

    2018-01-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a global program for promoting support and protection for breastfeeding. However, its impact on malnutrition, especially in countries of the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR) that are facing the turmoil of conflict and emergencies, deserves further investigation. Having said that, this paper aims to discuss the status and challenges to BFHI implementation in the EMR countries. Data on BFHI implementation, breastfeeding practices, and nutritional status were collected from countries through structured questionnaires, personal interviews, and databases. The 22 countries of the EMR were categorized as follows: 8 countries in advanced nutrition transition stage (group I), 5 countries in early nutrition transition stage (group II), 4 countries with significant undernutrition (group III), and 5 countries in complex emergency (group IV). The challenges to BFHI implementation were discussed in relation to malnutrition. BFHI was not implemented in 22.7% of EMR countries. Designated Baby-Friendly hospitals totaled 829 (group I: 78.4%, group II: 9.05%; group III: 7.36%; group: IV5.19%). Countries with advanced nutrition transition had the highest implementation of BFHI but the lowest breastfeeding continuity rates. On the other hand, poor nutritional status and emergency states were linked with low BFHI implementation and low exclusive breastfeeding rates but high continuity rates. Early initiation and longer duration of breastfeeding correlated negatively with overweight and obesity (p < 0.001). In countries with emergency states, breastfeeding continues to be the main source of nourishment. However, suboptimal breastfeeding practices prevail because of poor BFHI implementation which consequently leads to malnutrition. Political willpower and community-based initiatives are needed to promote breastfeeding and strengthen BFHI in the region. PMID:29534482

  9. Assessment of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative Implementation in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Al-Jawaldeh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI is a global program for promoting support and protection for breastfeeding. However, its impact on malnutrition, especially in countries of the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR that are facing the turmoil of conflict and emergencies, deserves further investigation. Having said that, this paper aims to discuss the status and challenges to BFHI implementation in the EMR countries. Data on BFHI implementation, breastfeeding practices, and nutritional status were collected from countries through structured questionnaires, personal interviews, and databases. The 22 countries of the EMR were categorized as follows: 8 countries in advanced nutrition transition stage (group I, 5 countries in early nutrition transition stage (group II, 4 countries with significant undernutrition (group III, and 5 countries in complex emergency (group IV. The challenges to BFHI implementation were discussed in relation to malnutrition. BFHI was not implemented in 22.7% of EMR countries. Designated Baby-Friendly hospitals totaled 829 (group I: 78.4%, group II: 9.05%; group III: 7.36%; group: IV5.19%. Countries with advanced nutrition transition had the highest implementation of BFHI but the lowest breastfeeding continuity rates. On the other hand, poor nutritional status and emergency states were linked with low BFHI implementation and low exclusive breastfeeding rates but high continuity rates. Early initiation and longer duration of breastfeeding correlated negatively with overweight and obesity (p < 0.001. In countries with emergency states, breastfeeding continues to be the main source of nourishment. However, suboptimal breastfeeding practices prevail because of poor BFHI implementation which consequently leads to malnutrition. Political willpower and community-based initiatives are needed to promote breastfeeding and strengthen BFHI in the region.

  10. The bumpy road to implementing the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in Austria: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Christina C; Schmied, Hermann; Dorner, Thomas E; Dür, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) aims to promote and support breastfeeding. Globally, around 20,000 facilities have been designated Baby-Friendly. In Austria, however, only 16% of the maternity units have received BFHI-certification. Internationally, few studies have investigated facilitating or hindering factors for BFHI implementation. The need to extend BFHI-certification rates has been investigated previously, but little is known about why maternity units decide to become BFHI-certified, how BFHI is installed at the unit level, and which factors facilitate or impede the operation of the BFHI in Austria and how barriers are overcome. Using a qualitative approach, (health) professionals' perceptions of the selection, installation, as well as facilitators of and barriers to the BFHI were investigated. 36 semi-structured interviews with persons responsible for BFHI implementation (midwives, nurses, physicians, quality manager) were conducted in three Austrian maternity units. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Interviewees mentioned several motives for selecting the BFHI, including BFHI as a marketing tool, improvement of existing services, as well as collaboration between different professional groups. In each hospital, "change agents" were identified, who promoted the BFHI, teamed up with the managers of other professional groups and finally, with the manager of the unit. Installation of BFHI involved the adoption of project management, development and dissemination of new standards, and training of all staff. Although multiple activities were planned to prepare for actually putting the BFHI into practice, participants mentioned not only facilitating, but also several hindering factors. Interpretations of what facilitated or impeded the operation of BFHI differed among and between professional groups. Successful implementation of the BFHI in Austria depends on a complex interplay of multiple factors including a consensual "bottom

  11. When is the use of pacifiers justifiable in the baby-friendly hospital initiative context? A clinician?s guide

    OpenAIRE

    Lubbe, Welma; ten Ham-Baloyi, Wilma

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of pacifiers is an ancient practice, but often becomes a point of debate when parents and professionals aim to protect and promote breastfeeding as most appropriately for nurturing infants. We discuss the current literature available on pacifier use to enable critical decision-making regarding justifiable use of pacifiers, especially in the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative context, and we provide practical guidelines for clinicians. Discussion Suck-swallow-breathe coordina...

  12. The New Zealand/aotearoa baby-friendly hospital initiative implementation journey: piki ake te tihi--"strive for excellence".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martis, Ruth; Stufkens, Julie

    2013-05-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was launched by the World Health Organization and United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund in 1991 following the Innocenti Declaration of 1990, of which New Zealand/Aotearoa was a signatory. After a number of unsuccessful attempts to implement BFHI by breastfeeding advocates, the New Zealand Breastfeeding Authority (NZBA) was established in 1999. Successful BFHI implementation was achieved through a number of factors, including the establishment of a national body (NZBA) with oversight of BFHI facility implementation and auditing, Māori and consumer participation at all levels, the recertification requirements for midwives of breastfeeding education by the Midwifery Council, and maternity facilities having paid BFHI coordinators. Once the NZBA was established, BFHI accreditation of maternity facilities had a rapid rise from 0% in 2000 to 96.1% in 2011 (74 of 77 facilities). Data collected over this period shows a 28.8-percentage-point increase of exclusive breastfeeding at discharge from maternity facilitates between 2001 (55.6%) and 2011 (84.4%). Future strategies focus on having all relevant community providers achieve Baby-Friendly Community Initiative accreditation and on the NZBA's lobbying the government for initiatives that support, promote, and protect breastfeeding.

  13. Application of the baby friendly hospital initiative to neonatal care: suggestions by Swedish mothers of very preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg; Kylberg, Elisabeth

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain suggestions from mothers of very preterm infants regarding modification of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) 10 Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Thirteen mothers were interviewed 2 to 6 months after their infants' discharge from the hospital. The interviews generated 13 steps, which partly agree with the BFHI steps. The new steps address respect for mothers' individual decisions about breastfeeding, education of staff in specific knowledge and skills, antenatal information about lactation in the event of preterm birth, skin-to-skin (kangaroo mother) care, breast milk expression, early introduction of breastfeeding, facilitation of mothers' 24-hour presence in the hospital, preference for mother's own milk, semi-demand feeding before transition to demand breastfeeding, special benefits of pacifier sucking, alternative strategies for reduction of supplementation, use of bottle-feeding when indicated, a family-centered and supportive physical environment, support of the father's presence, and early transfer of infants' care to parents.

  14. Expansion of the baby-friendly hospital initiative ten steps to successful breastfeeding into neonatal intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyqvist, Kerstin H; Häggkvist, Anna-Pia; Hansen, Mette N

    2013-01-01

    provision of antenatal information, that are specific to neonatal care. Facilitation of early, continuous, and prolonged skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo mother care), early initiation of breastfeeding, and mothers' access to breastfeeding support during the infants' whole hospital stay are important. Mother......In the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund document Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, Updated and Expanded for Integrated Care, neonatal care is mentioned as 1 area that would benefit from expansion of the original Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. The different...... situations faced by preterm and sick infants and their mothers, compared to healthy infants and their mothers, necessitate a specific breastfeeding policy for neonatal intensive care and require that health care professionals have knowledge and skills in lactation and breastfeeding support, including...

  15. When is the use of pacifiers justifiable in the baby-friendly hospital initiative context? A clinician's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbe, Welma; Ten Ham-Baloyi, Wilma

    2017-04-27

    The use of pacifiers is an ancient practice, but often becomes a point of debate when parents and professionals aim to protect and promote breastfeeding as most appropriately for nurturing infants. We discuss the current literature available on pacifier use to enable critical decision-making regarding justifiable use of pacifiers, especially in the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative context, and we provide practical guidelines for clinicians. Suck-swallow-breathe coordination is an important skill that every newborn must acquire for feeding success. In most cases the development and maintenance of the sucking reflex is not a problem, but sometimes the skill may be compromised due to factors such as mother-infant separation or medical conditions. In such situations the use of pacifiers can be considered therapeutic and even provide medical benefits to infants, including reducing the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. The argument opposing pacifier use, however, is based on potential risks such as nipple confusion and early cessation of breastfeeding. The Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding as embedded in the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative initially prohibited the use of pacifiers in a breastfeeding friendly environment to prevent potential associated risks. This article provides a summary of the evidence on the benefits of non-nutritive sucking, risks associated with pacifier use, an identification of the implications regarded as 'justifiable' in the clinical use of pacifiers and a comprehensive discussion to support the recommendations for safe pacifier use in healthy, full-term, and ill and preterm infants. The use of pacifiers is justifiable in certain situations and will support breastfeeding rather than interfere with it. Justifiable conditions have been identified as: low-birth weight and premature infants; infants at risk for hypoglyceamia; infants in need of oral stimulation to develop, maintain and mature the sucking reflex in preterm infants; and

  16. Expansion of the baby-friendly hospital initiative ten steps to successful breastfeeding into neonatal intensive care: expert group recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyqvist, Kerstin H; Häggkvist, Anna-Pia; Hansen, Mette N; Kylberg, Elisabeth; Frandsen, Annemi L; Maastrup, Ragnhild; Ezeonodo, Aino; Hannula, Leena; Haiek, Laura N

    2013-08-01

    In the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund document Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, Updated and Expanded for Integrated Care, neonatal care is mentioned as 1 area that would benefit from expansion of the original Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. The different situations faced by preterm and sick infants and their mothers, compared to healthy infants and their mothers, necessitate a specific breastfeeding policy for neonatal intensive care and require that health care professionals have knowledge and skills in lactation and breastfeeding support, including provision of antenatal information, that are specific to neonatal care. Facilitation of early, continuous, and prolonged skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo mother care), early initiation of breastfeeding, and mothers' access to breastfeeding support during the infants' whole hospital stay are important. Mother's own milk or donor milk (when available) is the optimal nutrition. Efforts should be made to minimize parent-infant separation and facilitate parents' unrestricted presence with their infants. The initiation and continuation of breastfeeding should be guided only by infant competence and stability, using a semi-demand feeding regimen during the transition to exclusive breastfeeding. Pacifiers are appropriate during tube-feeding, for pain relief, and for calming infants. Nipple shields can be used for facilitating establishment of breastfeeding, but only after qualified support and attempts at the breast. Alternatives to bottles should be used until breastfeeding is well established. The discharge program should include adequate preparation of parents, information about access to lactation and breastfeeding support, both professional and peer support, and a plan for continued follow-up.

  17. Self-reported breast feeding practices and the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Cynthia; Sarkar, Abdullah; Hashem, Alaa AbouBakr; Hamadah, Reem E; Alhoulan, Asma; AlMakadma, Yosra A; Khan, Tehreem A; Al-Hamdani, Abdurahman K; Senok, Abiola

    2016-12-16

    The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a practice guideline for healthcare providers to promote breastfeeding and increase breastfeeding rates. This study aimed to examine reported experiences and views on breastfeeding of women using prenatal and postnatal services, and opinions of staff, in the context of the BFHI programme in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Prospective cohort study. This prospective, longitudinal study was conducted from December 2013 to September 2015 at two healthcare facilities (BFHI and non-BFHI) in Riyadh Saudi Arabia. Women 36-40 weeks gestation receiving antenatal care at the hospitals were enrolled. Questionnaires were administered prenatally, at 1, 3 and 6 months postnatal and to the administrator and maternity staff. We recruited 277 women with an estimated 80% response rate. 156 (BFHI=78/139, non-BFHI=78/138, 56%) participants completed all questionnaires. Most BFHI-hospital participants (77.9%, n=8 for this question) acknowledged seeing the breast feeding policy compared to 23.5% (n=23) at the non-BFHI-hospital (p<0.01). Breast feeding education and encouragement was higher at the BFHI-hospital (93.3%) compared to the non-BFHI-hospital (48.2%; p<0.01). At postpartum discharge, 51% (n=53) of mothers in the BFHI-hospital were breast feeding exclusively versus 29.6% (n=29) at the non-BFHI-hospital. Where formula feed was introduced, women in the BFHI-hospital more often practiced mixed feeding rather than exclusive formula feeding with some switching from mixed feeding to exclusive breast feeding between 3 and 6 months postpartum. Exclusive breast feeding rates declined in both hospitals at 3 and 6 months postpartum with lack of community services for lactation being a major reason. Although BFHI-hospital staff (n=9) were more conversant with BFHI principles, defects in adherence to the BFHI 10 Steps were identified. This is the first study assessing the effectiveness of BFHI implementation in Saudi Arabia. Although women

  18. Hospital efforts to improve breastfeeding outcomes: becoming baby-friendly in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannel, Rebecca; Bacon, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    A key component of the Preparing for a Lifetime initiative to reduce infant mortality and improve infant outcomes in Oklahoma focuses on improving breastfeeding outcomes. The evidence is well-established on the short and long-term positive health impact of breastfeeding and lactation on both infant and mother. A new collaborative effort was launched in 2012 to support Oklahoma hospitals to achieve designation as a Baby-Friendly hospital, the Becoming Baby-Friendly in Oklahoma project. Baby-Friendly hospitals comply with the evidence-based Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and do not market formula products directly to patients. This article describes the progress of this statewide project.

  19. Pregnant & Lactating Mothers' Attitudes and Practice of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding at King Fahd Hospital of University (KFHU)--Khobar, Saudi Arabia: Appraisal of Baby Friendly Hospital Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Laila Younis Abu; Al Madani, Maha Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: World Health organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) have been recommended the application of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) in order to promote & support breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to assess pregnant and lactating mothers' attitudes…

  20. Effect on Baby-Friendly Hospital Steps When Hospitals Implement a Policy to Pay for Infant Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Marie; Lok, Kris Y W; Fong, Daniel Y T; Wu, Kendra M; Lee, Irene L Y; Sham, Alice; Lam, Christine; Bai, Dorothy Li; Wong, Ka Lun; Wong, Emmy M Y; Chan, Noel P T; Dodgson, Joan E

    2016-05-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative requires hospitals to pay market price for infant formula. No studies have specifically examined the effect of hospitals paying for infant formula on breastfeeding mothers' exposure to Baby-Friendly steps. To investigate the effect of hospitals implementing a policy of paying for infant formula on new mothers' exposure to Baby-Friendly steps and examine the effect of exposure to Baby-Friendly steps on breastfeeding rates. We used a repeated prospective cohort study design. We recruited 2 cohorts of breastfeeding mother-infant pairs (n = 2470) in the immediate postnatal period from 4 Hong Kong public hospitals and followed them by telephone up to 12 months postpartum. We assessed participants' exposure to 6 Baby-Friendly steps by extracting data from the medical record and by maternal self-report. After hospitals began paying for infant formula, new mothers were more likely to experience 4 out of 6 Baby-Friendly steps. Breastfeeding initiation within the first hour increased from 28.7% to 45%, and in-hospital exclusive breastfeeding rates increased from 17.9% to 41.4%. The proportion of mothers who experienced all 6 Baby-Friendly steps increased from 4.8% to 20.5%. The risk of weaning was progressively higher among participants experiencing fewer Baby-Friendly steps. Each additional step experienced by new mothers decreased the risk of breastfeeding cessation by 8% (hazard ratio = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.89-0.95). After implementing a policy of paying for infant formula, breastfeeding mothers were exposed to more Baby-Friendly steps, and exposure to more steps was significantly associated with a lower risk of breastfeeding cessation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Health Facility Staff Training for Improving Breastfeeding Outcome: A Systematic Review for Step 2 of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Olukunmi O; Dagvadorj, Amarjargal; Yourkavitch, Jennifer; da Silva Lopes, Katharina; Suto, Maiko; Takemoto, Yo; Mori, Rintaro; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Ota, Erika

    2017-11-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) implemented through the "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding" has been widely promoted as an intervention that improves breastfeeding rates. Step 2 requires the training of all healthcare staff in skills that are necessary to implement the policy. This systematic review provides evidence about the effect of training healthcare staff in hospitals and birth centers on breastfeeding outcomes. Randomized controlled trials (RCT), quasi-RCT, and controlled before and after (CBA) studies comparing training of healthcare staff on breastfeeding and supportive feeding practices with no training were included in this review. We searched CENTRAL PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the British Nursing Index for studies. Studies were screened against predetermined criteria, and risk of bias of included studies was assessed using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool for Non-Randomized Studies for non-RCT studies and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for RCT studies. Of the six studies included in this review, three were RCT whereas three were CBA studies. The studies were conducted in 5 countries and involved 390 healthcare staff. Provision of educational interventions aimed at increasing knowledge and practice of BFHI and support was found to improve health worker's knowledge, attitude, and compliance with the BFHI practices. In one study, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding increased at the intervention site but no differences were found for breastfeeding initiation rates. All included studies had methodological limitations, and study designs and methodologies lacked comparability.

  2. Is baby-friendly breastfeeding support in maternity hospitals associated with breastfeeding satisfaction among Japanese mothers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroko; Nanishi, Keiko; Shibanuma, Akira; Jimba, Masamine

    2015-06-01

    While the World Health Organization's Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative has increased breastfeeding duration and exclusivity, a survey found that only 8.5 % of maternity hospitals in 31 developed countries could be designated baby-friendly. Baby-friendly breastfeeding support is sometimes criticized as mother unfriendly. This study examined whether baby-friendly breastfeeding support was associated with breastfeeding satisfaction, duration, and exclusivity among Japanese mothers. In this cross-sectional study, 601 breastfeeding Japanese mothers completed questionnaires at their infants' 4-month health checkups at two wards in Yokohama, Japan; 363 were included in the analysis. Baby-friendly breastfeeding support was measured based on the WHO's "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding." We measured satisfaction using two subscales of the Japanese version of the Maternal Breastfeeding Evaluation Scale. The association of baby-friendly support with maternal satisfaction was assessed using multiple linear regression, while the prevalence ratios (PRs) for breastfeeding were estimated using Poisson regression. Mothers were stratified by prepartum exclusive breastfeeding intention (yes, n = 256; no, n = 107). Mothers who experienced early skin-to-skin contact with their infants were more likely to report breastfeeding satisfaction than those who did not. Among mothers without exclusive breastfeeding intention, those who were encouraged to feed on demand were more likely to be breastfeeding without formula at 1 month (PR 2.66 [95 % CI 1.32, 5.36]) and to perceive breastfeeding as beneficial for their baby (regression coefficient = 3.14 [95 % CI 0.11, 6.17]) than those who were not so encouraged. Breastfeeding satisfaction was a useful measure of breastfeeding outcome. Early skin-to-skin contact and encouragement to feed on demand in the hospital facilitate breastfeeding satisfaction.

  3. The struggle for inter-professional teamwork and collaboration in maternity care: Austrian health professionals' perspectives on the implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Christina C; Marent, Benjamin; Dorner, Thomas E; Dür, Wolfgang

    2016-03-14

    The health benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and babies are well documented in the scientific literature. Research suggests that support of breastfeeding during pre- and postnatal maternity care is an important determinant of breastfeeding initiation and duration. To support and promote breastfeeding on maternity units, the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was launched in 1991. In Austria, however, less than one fifth of hospitals with a maternity unit are currently BFHI-certified. Implementation of BFHI and adjunct changes in work practices seem to represent a major challenge to maternity units. This article builds upon previous research that has identified a number of facilitators of and barriers to BFHI implementation in Austria. A major barrier has been the lack of intra- and inter-professional collaboration. Therefore, this article investigates the ways in which different healthcare professionals struggle to work together to successfully integrate the BFHI into practice. In this study, a qualitative research approach was used. Thirty-six semi-structured interviews with 11 midwives, 11 nurses, 13 physicians, and one quality manager, working across three maternity units, were interviewed on-site. Data analysis followed thematic analysis. Midwives, nurses, and physicians had diverse approaches to childbirth and breastfeeding (medicalization vs. naturalness) and worked along different jurisdictions that became manifest in strict spatial divisions of maternity units. In their engagement within the BFHI, midwives, nurses, and physicians pursued different strategies (safeguarding vs. circumvention strategies). These differences hindered inter-professional teamwork and collaboration and, therefore, the integration of BFHI into practice. Differing approaches to childbirth and breastfeeding, deep seated professional jurisdictions, as well as spatial constraints, challenge inter-professional teamwork and collaboration on maternity units. Inter

  4. A transition strategy for becoming a baby-friendly hospital: exploring the costs, benefits, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliFraine, Jami; Langabeer, James; Delgado, Rigoberto; Williams, Janet F; Gong, Alice

    2013-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide an economic assessment as well as a calculated projection of the costs that typical U.S. tertiary-care hospitals would incur through policy reconfiguration and implementation to achieve the UNICEF/World Health Organization Baby-Friendly® Hospital designation and to examine the associated challenges and benefits of becoming a Baby-Friendly Hospital. We analyzed hospital resource utilization, focusing on formula use and staffing profiles at one U.S. urban tertiary-care teaching hospital, as well as conducted an online survey and telephone interviews with a selection of Baby-Friendly Hospitals to obtain their perspective on costs, challenges, and benefits. Findings indicate that added costs for a new Baby-Friendly Hospital will approximate $148 per birth, but these costs sharply decrease over time as breastfeeding rates increase in a Baby-Friendly environment.

  5. Do baby-friendly hospitals influence breastfeeding duration on a national level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Sonja; Dratva, Julia; Ackermann-Liebrich, Ursula

    2005-11-01

    In Switzerland, the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) proposed by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) was introduced in 1993 to promote breastfeeding nationwide. This study reports results of a national study of the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding in 2003 throughout Switzerland and analyzes the influence of compliance with UNICEF guidelines of the hospital where delivery took place on breastfeeding duration. Between April and September 2003, a random sample of mothers who had given birth in the past 9 months in Switzerland received a questionnaire on breastfeeding and complementary feeding. Seventy-four percent of the contacted mothers (n = 3032) participated; they completed a 24-hour dietary recall questionnaire and reported the age at first introduction of various foods and drinks. After excluding questionnaires with missing information relevant for the analyses, we analyzed data for 2861 infants 0 to 11 months of age, born in 145 different health facilities. Because it was known whether each child was born in a designated baby-friendly hospital (45 hospitals) or in a health facility in the process of being evaluated for BFHI inclusion (31 facilities), we were able to assess a possible influence of the BFHI on breastfeeding success. For this purpose, we merged individual data with hospital data on compliance with the UNICEF guidelines, from a data source collected on an annual basis for quality monitoring of designated baby-friendly hospitals and health facilities in the evaluation process. Information on actual compliance with the guidelines allowed us to investigate the relationship between breastfeeding outcomes and compliance with UNICEF guidelines. We were also able to compare the breastfeeding results with those for non-baby-friendly health facilities. The comparison was based on median durations of exclusive, full, and any breastfeeding calculated for each group. To allow for other known influencing factors, we calculated adjusted

  6. Impact of a Baby-Friendly hospital on breastfeeding indicators in Shaqlawa district in Erbil governorate, Kurdistan region of Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, N Z; Hasan, S S; Ismail, Z A

    2016-03-15

    This study aimed to assess the impact of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative on WHO-defined breastfeeding indicators in Shaqlawa district in Kurdistan region of Iraq. A household survey was carried out on a purposive non-probability sample of 200 mothers with a child aged < 30 months. Mothers were interviewed using a structured form to determine demographic data and feeding practices of the most recent child. The rate of early initiation of breastfeeding was 38.1%, exclusive breastfeeding was 15.4% and continued breastfeeding was 61.0% and 39.5% at 1 and 2 years of age respectively. A significant relationship was found between delivery at the Baby- Friendly accredited hospital and early initiation of breastfeeding but not with exclusive or continued breastfeeding. While continued breastfeeding at 1 year and 2 year was good, early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding indicators were not at an acceptable level, which indicates an ineffective role for the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.

  7. Investigation of the Effect of Training on Promoting Breast-feeding at Baby-Friendly Hospital Case Study; Tohid Hospital in Jam, Bushehr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Nickkhaha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative was launched in 1989 by World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund for the promotion of breastfeeding. This program was implemented in many departments of gynecology and obstetrics and resulted in reduced malnutrition, infection, morbidity and mortality in children. This program has introduced 10 specific steps to support successful breastfeeding. For instance, in the fourth step, skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding are promoted since the time of birth, and in the fifth step, mothers are instructed on how to breastfeed or persist in breastfeeding. In these ten steps, mothers are trained in various fields. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a standardized questionnaire was used to collect data at baby-friendly hospitals. To assess the difference between multiple nominal variables, variance analysis was performed, using SPSS version 17. Results: Based on the analysis, mothers' awareness of the benefits of breast milk and breastfeeding was 83% in a baby-friendly hospital. Also, their awareness of proper breastfeeding was estimated at 78.5%. In addition, mothers' knowledge about the frequency of breastfeeding was 70%. Conclusion: Given the role of Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in training mothers on the importance of breastfeeding and its persistence in future, careful monitoring of these hospitals, breastfeeding support services and breastfeeding training by midwives at healthcare centers are of great importance.

  8. Factors Associated with Breastfeeding in the First Hour after Birth, in Baby Friendly Hospitals, Shiraz-Iran

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    Mahnaz Haghighi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical policies of “10 steps of breast feeding” proposed by World Health Organization (WHO can promote breast feeding. The goal of this study was to evaluate breast feeding in the first hour after birth and its relation to the influencing factors. Material and methods: In this cross-sectional study, the data is related to mothers and infants referring to two baby friendly hospitals of Shiraz. The data were selected through convenience sampling method by interview, questionnaires and reviewing of medical records. Results : In this study 257 mothers and infants were studied. 94% of mothers were breast feeding and 5.8% of them were not able to breast feed. 63.8% of the infants had started breastfeeding an hour post delivery. 79% of the infants had been given to their mothers post delivery. 68.9% mothers given birth in public hospitals versus 52.2% of mothers given birth in private hospitals,75.5 % of mothers having gestational age greater than 37 weeks versus 38.9% of mothers  having gestational age less than 37 weeks, 60.1% of infants weighing more than 2500 grams versus 43.5% of infants weighing less than 2500 grams. 88% of mothers with vaginal delivery versus 40.2% of mothers with cesarean section all had started breast feeding in the first hour after birth. Conclusion: Initiation of breastfeeding in the first hour after birth was higher in mothers having diploma, gestational age greater than 37 weeks, previous history of breastfeeding, vaginal delivery, infant weighing more than 2500 gram, lack of infant disease, lack of hospitalization in NICU, rooming in, lack of prelactal feeding and delivery in public hospitals.

  9. A iniciativa hospital amigo da criança sob a ótica dos atores sociais que a vivenciam em Teresina, Piauí The baby-friendly hospital initiative as perceived by the social actors who experience it in Teresina, Piauí, Brazil

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    Carmen Viana Ramos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os reflexos da Iniciativa Hospital Amigo da Criança nos atores sociais que a vivenciam. MÉTODOS: Estudo qualitativo. Utilizaram-se entrevistas semiestruturadas, com auxílio de um roteiro temático, junto a vinte mulheres e dez profissionais de saúde em cinco hospitais amigos da criança em Teresina (PI. Para a análise dos dados foi utilizada a técnica de an��lise de conteúdo do tipo temática. RESULTADOS: A análise das falas levou à construção de dois eixos de discussão: um relacionado à tríade de sustentação da Iniciativa - promoção, proteção e apoio; e o outro a seu próprio modus operandi, os quais permitiram evidenciar dificuldades na implementação das normas e rotinas da Iniciativa Hospital Amigo da Criança desenvolvidas nas instituições. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados revelaram a necessidade de ajustes para melhorar a resolutividade do programa, com ênfase para: adoção de uma nova matriz ensino-aprendizagem pautada na educação reflexiva e na adoção dos referenciais da pedagogia da problematização; fortalecimento das redes de apoio à mulher; investimentos na melhoria do acolhimento, tornando a relação cliente-profissional mais respeitosa e definição de um processo de monitoramento contínuo que permita a adoção de medidas corretivas sempre que se fizer necessário.OBJECTIVE: This study analyzed the way the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative is perceived by the social actors involved in it. METHODS: This qualitative study administered semi-structured interviews aided by a thematic guide to twenty female patients and ten health professionals from five Baby-Friendly Hospitals in Teresina (PI, in Northeast Brazil. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Analysis of the testimonials led to two axes of discussion: one related to the foundation triad of the initiative - promotion, protection and support; and the other related to its own modus operandi, highlighting

  10. Bringing Baby-Friendly to the Indian Health Service: A Systemwide Approach to Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karol, Susan; Tah, Tina; Kenon, Clifton; Meyer, Jenna; Yazzie, Jeannette; Stephens, Celissa; Merewood, Anne

    2016-05-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) increases exclusive breastfeeding. Breastfeeding protects against obesity and diabetes, conditions to which American Indians and Alaska Natives are particularly prone. As part of the First Lady'sLet's Move! in Indian Countryinitiative, the US Department of Health and Human Services' Indian Health Service (IHS) began implementing the BFHI in 2011. The IHS administers 13 US birthing hospitals. There are 5 tribally administered hospitals in the lower 48 states that receive IHS funding, and the IHS encouraged them to seek Baby-Friendly designation also. In the 13 federally administered hospitals, the IHS implemented a Baby-Friendly infant feeding policy, extensive clinician training, and Baby-Friendly compatible medical records. All hospitals also became compliant with the World Health Organization's International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes. Strategies and solutions were shared systemwide via webinars and conference calls. Quality improvement methods, technical assistance, and site visits assisted with the implementation process. Between 2011 and December 2014, 100% (13 of 13) of IHS federally administered hospitals gained Baby-Friendly designation. The first Baby-Friendly hospitals in Arizona, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and South Dakota were all IHS sites; 6% of all US Baby-Friendly hospitals are currently IHS hospitals. One tribal site has also been Baby-Friendly designated and 3 of the 5 remaining tribally administered hospitals in the lower 48 states are pursuing Baby-Friendly status. Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative implementation systemwide is possible in a US government agency serving a high-risk, underprivileged population. Other systems looking to implement the BFHI can learn from the IHS model. © International Lactation Consultant Association 2015.

  11. Need for baby friendly commu- nity initiative to improve the low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... the later. The BFCI was developed by the United. Nations and UNICEF to expand on the BFHI, and aims at sustaining breastfeeding after mothers leave the hospi- tal.6 The initiative emphasises as community involve- ment, formation and training of mother support groups at the village level, close link to the ...

  12. The global epidemic of abuse and disrespect during childbirth: History, evidence, interventions, and FIGO's mother-baby friendly birthing facilities initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Suellen; Lalonde, Andre

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence indicates that disrespectful/abusive/coercive service delivery by skilled providers in facilities, which results in actual or perceived poor quality of care, is directly and indirectly associated with adverse maternal and newborn outcomes. The present article reviews the evidence for disrespectful/abusive care during childbirth in facilities (DACF), describes examples of DACF, discusses organizations active in a rights-based respectful maternity care movement, and enumerates some strategies and interventions that have been identified to decrease DACF. It concludes with a discussion of one strategy, which has been recently implemented by FIGO with global partners-the International Pediatrics Association, International Confederation of Midwives, the White Ribbon Alliance, and WHO. This strategy, the Mother and Baby Friendly Birth Facility (MBFBF) Initiative, is a criterion-based audit process based on human rights' doctrines, and modeled on WHO/UNICEF's Baby Friendly Facility Initiative. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. A meta-ethnographic study of health care staff perceptions of the WHO/UNICEF Baby Friendly Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Virginia; Thomson, Gillian; Byrom, Anna; Burns, Elaine; Sheehan, Athena; Dykes, Fiona

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of the Baby Friendly Health Initiative (BFHI) is associated with increases in breastfeeding initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding and 'any' breastfeeding. However, implementation of the BFHI is challenging. To identify and synthesise health care staff perceptions of the WHO/UNICEF BFHI and identify facilitators and barriers for implementation. Seven qualitative studies, published between 2003 and 2013 were analysed using meta-ethnographic synthesis. Three overarching themes were identified. First the BFHI was viewed variously as a 'desirable innovation or an unfriendly imposition'. Participants were passionate about supporting breastfeeding and improving consistency in the information provided. This view was juxtaposed against the belief that BFHI represents an imposition on women's choices, and is a costly exercise for little gain in breastfeeding rates. The second theme highlighted cultural and organisational constraints and obstacles to BFHI implementation including resource issues, entrenched staff practices and staff rationalisation of non-compliance. Theme three captured a level of optimism and enthusiasm amongst participants who could identify a dedicated and credible leader to lead the BFHI change process. Collaborative engagement with all key stakeholders was crucial. Health care staff hold variant beliefs and attitudes towards BFHI, which can help or hinder the implementation process. The introduction of the BFHI at a local level requires detailed planning, extensive collaboration, and an enthusiastic and committed leader to drive the change process. This synthesis has highlighted the importance of thinking more creatively about the translation of this global policy into effective change at the local level. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Breastfeeding in the neonatal transitional period at a Baby-Friendly Hospital

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    Jéssica Machado Teles

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to learn the breastfeeding rates in the neonatal transition period at a child-friendly hospital. A quantitative, exploratory, cross-sectional study was developed with 342 mother-baby pairs. Data were collected by means of interviews and analysis of medical records. Low breastfeeding rates were identified in the first hour of life of the newborns or neonatal reactivity period (53.2%. In the second transition period the rate was 20.7%, and 20.5% in the third period. Encouragement to breastfeeding is not appropriate for the phases of the neonatal transition period, as the rates for the first hour of life were expected to be higher than 90%, considering low risk newborns and births that occurred in a child-friendly hospital. Our findings indicate a need for adopting care strategies that favor the early contact and training of professionals at maternity hospitals toward the adequacy of breastfeeding to the neonatal transition period.

  15. Implementing baby-friendly practices: strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pat Bohling; Moore, Karen; Peters, Liz

    2012-01-01

    Breastfeeding is widely viewed as the optimal feeding method for infants among professional nursing and medical organizations. Its health benefits have been comprehensively studied and documented for both infants and mothers. Hospitals and birthing centers can strongly influence the outcomes for mothers who choose to breastfeed by establishing effective breastfeeding behaviors immediately after birth and during the hospital stay. The Baby-Friendly USA initiative outlines 10 steps to successful breastfeeding. Although these steps have been successfully supported in practice, they can be difficult to implement due to a variety of factors, including resistance to change. Specific steps generate more barriers to overcome than others--namely exclusive breastfeeding without supplementation or pacifiers, rooming-in for 23 out of 24 hours, and skin-to-skin contact with a parent immediately after birth and during the hospital stay. Our hospital spent 5 years implementing Baby-Friendly practices to prepare for a successful site visit. In the process, barriers to key Baby-Friendly steps were overcome through creative approaches and strategic education for staff, physicians, and parents. The purpose of this article is to outline specific actions taken that assisted our hospital in its successful journey. Those actions and strategies will hopefully be of value to others in their journey toward designation.

  16. Iniciativa Hospital Amigo da Criança: uma política de promoção, proteção e apoio ao aleitamento materno Iniciativa Hospital Amigo del Niño: una política de promoción, protección y apoyo a la lactancia materna Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative: a policy of promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Fontes Figueredo

    2012-01-01

    mostrado efectiva en el aumento de la práctica del amamantamiento en muchas regiones del mundo, contribuyendo con la reducción de la morbimortalidad infantil.OBJECTIVE: To conduct a literature review about the ten steps of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI. METHODS: We sought documents and scientific papers published in the databases of PubMED, Medline, SciELO and LILACS. RESULTS: We initially identified 110 references about the BFHI, between the years of 1979 to 2009. Approximately 21% were published in the 1990s and 79% between 2000 and 2009; 10.8% were published in books and official documents of the Ministry of Health, Pan American Health Organization and World Health Organization; and, 89.2% were in articles indexed in the consulted databases. Of these, 35 references were selected. The analyzed studies showed that changes in hospital practices according to the Ten Steps of BFHI increased the prevalence of breastfeeding. CONCLUSION: Through the studies analyzed, the BFHI showed effectiveness in increasing breastfeeding in many regions of the world, contributing to the reduction of infant morbidity and mortality.

  17. Justificativas para uso de suplemento em recém-nascidos de baixo risco de um Hospital Amigo da Criança Justifications for formula supplementation in low-risk newborns at a Baby-Friendly Hospital

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    Cynthia de Almeida Brandão Meirelles

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A Iniciativa Hospital Amigo da Criança preconiza que não se dê a recém-natos nenhum outro alimento ou líquido além do leite materno, a não ser que haja indicação clínica (passo 6. Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar a prevalência e identificar justificativas alegadas para suplementação ao aleitamento materno em recém-nascidos de alojamento conjunto. A amostra foi composta por 300 recém-nascidos de um Hospital Amigo da Criança do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, que usaram suplemento dentre os que permaneceram exclusivamente em alojamento conjunto. As justificativas alegadas para uso de suplemento foram classificadas como aceitáveis ou não segundo critérios da Iniciativa Hospital Amigo da Criança. A prevalência de uso de suplemento foi de 33,3%. As principais justificativas foram: hipogalactia/agalactia (36,8%, condições de risco para hipoglicemia (21,1%, parto cesáreo (7,9%, condições relativas ao sistema estomatognático (7,4%, condições maternas (6,3% e ausência de resultado de teste rápido anti-HIV (4,5%. O parto cesáreo esteve associado à maior risco de uso de suplemento (RP = 2,1; IC95%: 1,77-2,55 em relação ao parto vaginal. A prevalência do uso de suplemento foi elevada, sendo 9% das justificativas alegadas aceitáveis.The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative recommends not giving newborn infants any food or drink other than breast milk unless medically indicated. This study investigated the prevalence and alleged reasons for giving formula supplementation to rooming-in newborns at a Baby-Friendly Hospital. Participants were 300 formula-supplemented, exclusively rooming-in newborns at a Baby-Friendly Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Reasons for formula supplementation were classified as acceptable or unacceptable in accordance with the WHO/UNICEF Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative guidelines. A supplementation prevalence of 33.3% was found. The main allegations were: hypogalactia/ agalactia (36.8%, conditions

  18. Ten steps or climbing a mountain: A study of Australian health professionals' perceptions of implementing the baby friendly health initiative to protect, promote and support breastfeeding

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    Sheehan Athena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Baby Friendly Hospital (Health Initiative (BFHI is a global initiative aimed at protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding and is based on the ten steps to successful breastfeeding. Worldwide, over 20,000 health facilities have attained BFHI accreditation but only 77 Australian hospitals (approximately 23% have received accreditation. Few studies have investigated the factors that facilitate or hinder implementation of BFHI but it is acknowledged this is a major undertaking requiring strategic planning and change management throughout an institution. This paper examines the perceptions of BFHI held by midwives and nurses working in one Area Health Service in NSW, Australia. Methods The study used an interpretive, qualitative approach. A total of 132 health professionals, working across four maternity units, two neonatal intensive care units and related community services, participated in 10 focus groups. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Three main themes were identified: 'Belief and Commitment'; 'Interpreting BFHI' and 'Climbing a Mountain'. Participants considered the BFHI implementation a high priority; an essential set of practices that would have positive benefits for babies and mothers both locally and globally as well as for health professionals. It was considered achievable but would take commitment and hard work to overcome the numerous challenges including a number of organisational constraints. There were, however, differing interpretations of what was required to attain BFHI accreditation with the potential that misinterpretation could hinder implementation. A model described by Greenhalgh and colleagues on adoption of innovation is drawn on to interpret the findings. Conclusion Despite strong support for BFHI, the principles of this global strategy are interpreted differently by health professionals and further education and accurate information is required. It may be that the

  19. Trends in Baby-Friendly® Care in the United States: Historical Influences on Contemporary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salera-Vieira, Jean; Zembo, Cynthia T

    2016-01-01

    The protection that breast-feeding affords both mother and infant against acute and chronic illness is well documented. The grassroots, public health, and governmental supports for breast-feeding have influenced changes in maternal and newborn care. History indicates that the additional influence has come in the form of governmental workshops and initiatives, professional organizations, as well as The Joint Commission. This includes the influence that the Baby-Friendly® Hospital Initiative and the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding have had on infant care throughout the years. The requirements that hospitals must follow to implement all, or some, of the Ten Steps lead to change in care that not only increases breast-feeding rates but also leads to health improvements. This article reviews how an upward trend in the adoption of Baby-Friendly practices to support breast-feeding impacts infant care.

  20. Application of Kotter's Theory of Change to Achieve Baby-Friendly Designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Laura S; Christine Hansson, M; Haughton, Vivian C; Waite, Alyssa Livengood; Bowers, Margi; Siegrist, Vickie; Thompson, Elizabeth J

    Creating an environment that optimally supports exclusive breastfeeding can require a cultural transformation. Our initial attempt at obtaining Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) designation was unsuccessful when surveyors determined insufficient enculturation of BFHI practices. Using Kotter's theory of change, we overcame the barriers, enhanced our practices, and effectively transformed the culture, and our facility ultimately became the first maternity hospital in Pennsylvania to obtain BFHI designation. Nursing leadership was essential to this process. Our experience serves as a template for others seeking to achieve Healthy People 2020 goals related to breastfeeding. © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  1. Avaliação da promoção do aleitamento materno em Hospitais Amigos da Criança Evaluación de la promoción de la lactancia materna en hospitales amigos del niño Evaluation of breastfeeding promotion in Baby-Friendly Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Freire L Souza

    2011-12-01

    transversal. Fueron realizadas entrevistas con 100 puerperas en los dos hospitales acreditados en la IHAC en Salvador (Brasil. Se cuestionó sobre la historia obstétrica, lactancia materna anterior, atención prenatal y aspectos relacionados a los Pasos para el Éxito de la Lactancia Materna. Las cuestiones fueron elaboradas conforme a los Criterios Globales para la IHAC. Como mínimo, el 80% de las madres deberían contestar de modo satisfactorio a las preguntas correspondientes a cada paso para que se lo considerara cumplido. Se utilizó la descripción estadística de frecuencia en el SPSS 13.0 para evaluar las respuestas. No se incluyeron madres o recién nacidos que no podrían recibir lactancia materna exclusiva. RESULTADOS: El cumplimiento fue insatisfactorio para: Paso 4 (soporte a la lactancia materna después del parto - 58%, Paso 5 (lactancia materna exclusiva durante la internación - 77% y Paso 10 (encaminamiento al grupo de apoyo a la lactancia materna - 5%. Otros pasos demostraron buenos resultados: Paso 6 (oferta de sustitutos de la leche materna - 19%, Paso 7 (práctica del alojamiento conjunto - 91% y 9 (no utilización de chupos y biberones - 100%. CONCLUSIONES: Esos resultados demostraron buena adherencia a algunos aspectos de los Criterios Globales de IHAC. Se evidencia, sin embargo, la necesidad de ampliar las discusiones sobre los criterios para obtener y mantener el prestigioso título de «Hospital Amigo del Niño», una vez que los resultados fueron insatisfactorios respecto a los pasos 4, 5 y 10.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the compliance to steps 4 to 10 of the Ten Steps Program to Successful Breastfeeding recommended by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI, created by World Health Organization (WHO. METHODS: Cross-sectional descriptive study of 100 mothers in the immediate post-partum period admitted to both BFHI accredited hospitals in Salvador (Northeast Brazil. Newborns that could not be exclusively breastfed were not included. The mothers

  2. NEWBORN CONDITION AND ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASURES IN BABY FRIENDLY PROGRAM

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    Momcilo Djordjevic

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mother’s breast milk is the best product that the new born infant could be fed with. It contains nutritious matters necessary for growth and progress of the new born infants, ideally adapted for the baby. This is not only the food. It provides the support for protection against infections.The aim of the investigation was to establish whether the newborn condition right after the birth and anthropometric measures affect entering the baby friendly program. The study was conducted during 2003 in OGC CC Kragujevac and included 216 new born infants included in baby friendly program and 216 new born infants outside the program.The following parameters in newborn infants were observed: Apgar score, body mass, body length, head circumference.Significantly most often in both examined groups (73 up to 75%, the value of Apgar score of the new born infants was in the interval 9 – 10 and it did not affect the selection into baby friendly program.New born infants from baby friendly program statistically had significantly greater weight than the infants outside the program-on average for about 80 g. The greater weight positively affects entering the baby friendly program.Body length and infant head circumference did not statistically significantly differed between the examined groups.Statistically important difference in body mass can be justified by higher surveillance of pregnant women from the program. The treatment should reflect in controlled nourishment, avoidance of all harmful causes like consumption of cigarettes and alcoholic drinks, which are proven risks for the newborn infants from such pregnancies to have lesser body mass. The advantage of greater body mass lies in the fact that after the childbirth, the relative loss of the body weight is lesser compared to the infants outside the program.

  3. Key Program Findings and Insights From the Baby-Friendly Hawaii Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahin, Sahra A; McGurk, Meghan; Hansen-Smith, Heidi; West, Margaret; Li, Ruowei; Melcher, Carolyn Lopez

    2017-05-01

    Breastfeeding is the optimal method for infant feeding. In the United States, 81.1% of mothers initiate breastfeeding; however, only 44.4% and 22.3% of mothers are exclusively breastfeeding at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Research aim: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides guidance and funding to state health departments to support strategies to improve breastfeeding policies and practices in the hospital, community, and worksite settings. In 2010, the Hawaii State Department of Health received support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to launch the Baby-Friendly Hawaii Project (BFHP) to increase the number of Hawaii hospitals that provide maternity care consistent with the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and increase the rate of women who remain exclusively breastfeeding throughout their hospital stay. For this article, we examined the BFHP's final evaluation report and Hawaii breastfeeding and maternity care data to identify the role of the BFHP in facilitating improvements in maternity care practices and breastfeeding rates. Since 2010, 52 hospital site visits, 58 trainings, and ongoing technical assistance were administered, and more than 750 staff and health professionals from BFHP hospitals were trained. Hawaii's overall quality composite Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care score increased from 65 (out of 100) in 2009 to 76 in 2011 and 80 in 2013, and Newborn Screening Data showed an increase in statewide exclusive breastfeeding from 59.7% in 2009 to 77.0% in 2014. Implementation and findings from the BFHP can inform future planning at the state and federal levels on maternity care practices that can improve breastfeeding.

  4. A good start in life: breast-feeding in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A S; Darnton-Hill, I

    1994-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF introduced the Baby- Friendly Hospital Initiative in 1992 to foster breast feeding in hospitals. The balanced composition of breast milk fulfills the 4-6 month old infant's nutrient requirements. Colostrum is rich in antibodies and immunoglobulins, which protect the newborn against infection. As economic development progresses, more mothers use infant formulas while fewer mothers breast feed. Between 1960 and 1985 in Japan, the proportion of mothers breast feeding 1-2 month old infants fell from 68% to 50%. Between 1975 and 1968 in Western Samoa, it fell from 69% to 48% in urban areas and 78% to 59% in rural areas. Hospital practices that discourage breast feeding include separation of mother and newborn, prelacteal feedings, and free samples of infant formula. These practices occur even in areas, such as the Western Pacific Region, where most mothers deliver at home. Hospital baby-friendly criteria include a written breast-feeding policy, training of all health care staff in skills needed to implement this policy, informing all pregnant women about the benefits and management of breast feeding, assisting mothers to begin breast feeding within 30 minutes of delivery, demonstrating to mothers how to breast feed and to maintain lactation, no prelacteal feeds, newborn rooming-in with mother, promoting breast feeding on demand, no artificial teats or pacifiers, and breast-feeding support groups. The Western Pacific Region supports the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. Between March 1991 and March 1993, the number of baby-friendly hospitals in the Philippines rose from 4 to 103. Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital in Manila is a model baby-friendly hospital for other hospitals in the region. It does not release mothers until milk flow has been established. By late 1992, 21 Chinese hospitals were baby-friendly. The WHO Western Pacific Region distributes information about breast feeding and the Initiative and provides breast

  5. Caesarean section delivery and breastfeeding initiation at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Caesarean section (CS) presents a challenge for early breastfeeding of the newborn infant. It is expected that with the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI), mothers who deliver by CS can be helped to initiate breastfeeding early. Objectives: This study aims to determine the time of initiation of breastfeeding in ...

  6. The Massachusetts baby-friendly collaborative: lessons learned from an innovation to foster implementation of best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartick, Melissa; Edwards, Roger A; Walker, Marsha; Jenkins, Lucia

    2010-11-01

    Collaborative efforts among hospitals can facilitate the exchange of ideas, provide a forum for discussing the development of new policies or practices or changes to existing policies and practices, and increase the implementation of best practices. In November 2008, the Massachusetts Breastfeeding Coalition formed a collaborative of maternity facilities wishing to pursue Baby-Friendly designation. Members provided insights from experiences and shared models and examples from outside. We describe highlights from the first 15 months of the Collaborative and present 4 recommendations for overcoming barriers: (1) manage expectations of patients, family/friends, and staff; (2) restrict access to materials that can undermine breastfeeding; (3) adopt the appropriate perspectives to creatively implement change; and (4) bundle, reframe, and harness larger forces. The strategies can be applied across diverse hospital settings.

  7. Breastfeeding rates and hospital breastfeeding practices in Canada: a national survey of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Beverley; Levitt, Cheryl; Heaman, Maureen; O'Brien, Beverley; Sauve, Reg; Kaczorowski, Janusz

    2009-06-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative was launched by the World Health Organization and UNICEF in 1989 to promote, protect, and support breastfeeding worldwide. The objective of this study was to report breastfeeding rates and adherence to the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative of the World Health Organization and UNICEF in Canada, as reported by participants in the Maternity Experiences Survey of the Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System. Eligible women (n = 8,244) were identified from a randomly selected sample of infants born 3 months before the May 2006 Canadian Census, and stratified by province or territory. Birth mothers living with their infants at the time of interview were invited to participate in a computer-assisted telephone interview conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of the Public Health Agency of Canada. Interviews took approximately 45 minutes and were completed when infants were between 5 and 10 months old (between 9 and 14 months in the territories). Completed responses were obtained from 6,421 women (78% response rate). Nineteen of 309 questions concerned early mother-infant contact and breastfeeding practices. Breastfeeding intention (90.0%) and initiation (90.3%) rates were high, although exclusive breastfeeding rates at 6 months after birth (14.4%) were lower than desirable. The findings suggested a low adherence to several best practices advocated by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. Although breastfeeding initiation rates were relatively high in Canada, exclusive breastfeeding duration fell short of globally recommended standards.

  8. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  9. Hospital Quality Initiative - Outcome Measures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In the interest of promoting high-quality, patient-centered care and accountability, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and Hospital Quality...

  10. Implementing Patient Safety Initiatives in Rural Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Tupper, Judith; Coburn, Andrew; Wakefield, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety initiatives can be costly in time and energy. Because of small volumes and limited resources, rural hospitals often are not included in nationally driven patient safety initiatives. This article describes the Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Demonstration project, whose goal was to strengthen capacity for…

  11. Applying organisation theory to understand barriers and facilitators to the implementation of baby-friendly: A multisite qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Nathan C; Taylor, Emily C; Labbok, Miriam H; Weiner, Bryan J; Williamson, Nancy E

    2013-08-01

    (a) to apply an organisation-level, pre-implementation theory to identify and describe factors that may impact hospitals' readiness to achieve the Ten Steps and (b) to explore whether/how these factors vary across hospitals. a multisite, descriptive, qualitative study of eight hospitals that used semi-structured interviews of health-care professionals. Template analyses identified factors that related to organisation-level theory. Cross-site comparative analyses explored how factors varied across hospitals. thirty-four health-care professionals from eight North Carolina hospitals serving low-wealth populations. The hospitals are participating in a quality improvement project to support the implementation of the Ten Steps. This study occurred during the pre-implementation phase. several factors emerged relating to collective efficacy (i.e., the shared belief that the group, as a whole, is able to implement the Steps) and collective commitment (i.e., the shared belief that the group, as a whole, is committed to implementing the Steps) to implement the Ten Steps. Factors relating to both constructs included 'staff age/experience,' 'perceptions of forcing versus supporting mothers,' 'perceptions of mothers' culture,' and 'reliance on lactation consultants.' Factors relating to commitment included 'night versus day shift,' 'management support,' 'change champions,' 'observing mothers utilize breastfeeding support.' Factors relating to efficacy included 'staffing,' 'trainings,' and 'visitors in room.' Commitment-factors were more salient than efficacy-factors among the three large hospitals. Efficacy-factors were more salient than commitment-factors among the smaller hospitals. interventions focused on implementing the Ten Step may benefit from improving collective efficacy and collective commitment. Potential approaches could include skills-based, hands-on training highlighting benefits for mothers, staff, and the hospital, and addressing context-specific misconceptions

  12. Evaluation of an international benchmarking initiative in nine eye hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korne, Dirk F; Sol, Kees J C A; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; van Vliet, Ellen J; Custers, Thomas; Cubbon, Mark; Spileers, Werner; Ygge, Jan; Ang, Chong-Lye; Klazinga, Niek S

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking has become very popular among managers to improve quality in the private and public sector, but little is known about its applicability in international hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of an international benchmarking initiative in eye hospitals. To assess the applicability, an evaluation frame was constructed on the basis of a systematic literature review. The frame was applied longitudinally to a case study of nine eye hospitals that used a set of performance indicators for benchmarking. Document analysis, nine questionnaires, and 26 semistructured interviews with stakeholders in each hospital were used for qualitative analysis. The evaluation frame consisted of four areas with key conditions for benchmarking: purposes of benchmarking, performance indicators, participating organizations, and performance management systems. This study showed that the international benchmarking between eye hospitals scarcely met these conditions. The used indicators were not incorporated in a performance management system in any of the hospitals. Despite the apparent homogeneity of the participants and the absence of competition, differences in ownership, governance structure, reimbursement, and market orientation made comparisons difficult. Benchmarking, however, stimulated learning and exchange of knowledge. It encouraged interaction and thereby learning on the tactical and operational levels, which is also an incentive to attract and motivate staff. Although international hospital benchmarking seems to be a rational process of sharing performance data, this case study showed that it is highly dependent on social processes and a learning environment. It can be useful for diagnostics, helping local hospitals to catalyze performance improvements.

  13. Patient safety initiatives in Germany: The hospital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety has become a major focus in German socio-political awareness over the past decade. Efforts to improve patient safety have been increased nationwide and involve all stakeholders in the German health care system. The government aims to improve the quality of health care services both in the hospital and in the ambulatory care sector with a quality campaign. On one hand it strengthens patients' power and participation in decision-making and on the other hand it stresses the need for health care providers themselves to enhance patient safety and to ensure the nationwide provision of excellent health care, whereby hospitals play a vital role in providing a comprehensive system of locally available clinical treatment. This article focuses particularly on the numerous mandatory and voluntary initiatives provided by hospitals with respect to quality of care and patient safety, however further information about the context can be found in the online version cited in the footnote below.

  14. The effect of family policies and public health initiatives on breastfeeding initiation among 18 high-income countries: a qualitative comparative analysis research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubold, Amanda Marie

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effects of macro-level factors - welfare state policies and public health initiatives - on breastfeeding initiation among eighteen high-income countries. This study utilizes fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis methods to examine the combinations of conditions leading to both high and low national breastfeeding initiation rates among eighteen high-income countries. The most common pathway leading to high breastfeeding initiation is the combination of conditions including a high percentage of women in parliament, a low national cesarean section rate, and either low family spending, high rates of maternity leave, or high rates of women working part-time. The most common pathway leading to low breastfeeding initiation includes the necessary condition of low national adherence to the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. This research suggests that there is a connection between broad level welfare state polices, public health initiatives, and breastfeeding initiation. Compliance with the WHO/UNICEF initiatives depends on welfare regime policies and overall support for women in both productive and reproductive labor.

  15. Private finance initiative hospital architecture: towards a political economy of the Royal Liverpool University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Paul

    2018-02-01

    Sociological analysis has done much to illuminate the architectural contexts in which social life takes place. Research on care environments suggests that the built environment should not be understood as a passive backdrop to healthcare, but rather that care is conditioned by the architecture in which it happens. This article argues for the importance of going beyond the hospital walls to include the politics that underwrite the design and construction of hospital buildings. The article assesses the case of the yet-to-be-realised Liverpool Royal University Hospital, and the private finance initiative (PFI) funding that underpins the scheme, which is suggested as a salient 'external' context for understanding architecture's role in the provision of healthcare of many kinds for many years to come. PFI has major implications for democratic accountability and local economy, as well as for the architecture of the hospital as a site of care. Critical studies can illuminate these paradoxically visible-but-opaque hospital spaces by going beyond that which is immediately empirically evident, so as to reveal the ways in which hospital architecture is conditioned by political and economic forces. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  16. CDC Vital Signs-Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-10-06

    This podcast is based on the October 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Hospitals can implement the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding to be designated as "Baby-Friendly" and support more moms in a decision to breastfeed.  Created: 10/6/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/6/2015.

  17. HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A REVIEW OF GOVERNMENTAL AND PRIVATE AGENCY ENERGY CONSERVATION INITIATIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, Robert S.; Rainer, David

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the results of a recent research project originally concerned with review of governmental initiatives for changes to hospital design and operation standards at both the federal and state levels. However. it quickly became apparent that concern with energy conservation was not impacting hospital environmental standards, especially at the state level, irrespective of the energy implications. Consequently, the study was redirected to consider all energy conservation initiatives directed toward design and operating practices unique to the hospital environment. The scope was limited to agency programs (i.e., not undertaken at the initiative of individual hospitals), applicable to non-federal public and private hospitals.

  18. Impact of health professional training in breastfeeding on their knowledge, skills, and hospital practices: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Carvalho de Jesus

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To identify the impact of training in breastfeeding on knowledge, skills, and professional and hospital practices. Data source The systematic review search was carried out through the MEDLINE, Scopus, and LILACS databases. Reviews, studies with qualitative methodology, those without control group, those conducted in primary care, with specific populations, studies that had a belief and/or professional attitude as outcome, or those with focus on the post-discharge period were excluded. There was no limitation of period or language. The quality of the studies was assessed by the adapted criteria of Downs and Black. Summary of data The literature search identified 276 articles, of which 37 were selected for reading, 26 were excluded, and six were included through reference search. In total, 17 intervention articles were included, three of them with good internal validity. The studies were performed between 1992 and 2010 in countries from five continents; four of them were conducted in Brazil. The training target populations were nursing practitioners, doctors, midwives, and home visitors. Many kinds of training courses were applied. Five interventions employed the theoretical and practical training of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. All kinds of training courses showed at least one positive result on knowledge, skills, and/or professional/hospital practices, most of them with statistical significance. Conclusions Training of hospital health professionals has been effective in improving knowledge, skills, and practices.

  19. Evaluation of an international benchmarking initiative in nine eye hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korne, Dirk F.; Sol, Kees J. C. A.; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D. H.; van Vliet, Ellen J.; Custers, Thomas; Cubbon, Mark; Spileers, Werner; Ygge, Jan; Ang, Chong-Lye; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Benchmarking has become very popular among managers to improve quality in the private and public sector, but little is known about its applicability in international hospital settings. PURPOSE:: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of an international benchmarking

  20. Assessment of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative in Three Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Bairami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, based on the critical standards of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI. Materials and Methods:In this cross-sectional study, conducted in 2014, we used PSFHI assessment tool to evaluate the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences; these general referral hospitals were selected purposefully. PSFHI assessment tool is comprised of 140 patient safety standards in five domains, categorized in 24 sub-domains. The five major domains include leadership and management, patient and public involvement, safe evidence-based clinical practices, safe environment, and lifelong learning. Results: All three hospitals met more than 70% of the critical standards. The highest score in critical standards (> 80% was related to the domain of leadership and management in all hospitals. The average score in the domain of safe evidence-based clinical practices was 70% in the studied hospitals. Finally, all the hospitals met 50% of the critical standards in the domains of patient and public involvement and safe environment. Conclusion: Based on the findings, PSFHI is a suitable program for meeting patient safety goals. The selected hospitals in this survey all had a high managerial commitment to patient safety; therefore, they could obtain high scores on critical standards.

  1. Risk for alcoholic liver cirrhosis after an initial hospital contact with alcohol problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askgaard, Gro; Leon, David A; Kjaer, Mette S

    2017-01-01

    Alcoholic liver cirrhosis is usually preceded by many years of heavy drinking, in which cessation in drinking could prevent the disease. Alcohol problems are not consistently managed in hospital patients. We followed all Danish patients with an initial hospital contact with alcohol problems (into...

  2. Knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding early start of breastfeeding among pregnant, lactating women and healthcare workers in El-Minia University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Salem A; Babrs, Gihan M; Sadek, Refaat R; Mostafa, Amna M

    2013-06-01

    Breastfeeding within the first hour of life is a potential mechanism for health promotion and is considered to be an indicator of excellence of breastfeeding. This study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding early breastfeeding initiation within the first hour of life in both the Pediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics Departments of Minia University Hospital, Minia, Egypt. A study was conducted on four groups of participants from both the Pediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics Departments of Minia University Hospital, each of them consisting of 30 individuals, using a questionnaire to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding early breastfeeding initiation for each group. Sixty percent of women delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery and 16.7% of those delivered by cesarean section initiated breastfeeding within 30 minutes to 1 hour after birth. Forty percent of lactating women delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery, 83.3% of lactating women delivered by cesarean section, and 36.7% of healthcare workers used prelacteal feed instead of early breastfeeding initiation. The most important factors affecting the breastfeeding initiation were maternal illness followed by immediate skin-to-skin contact. Although the majority of women participating in this study exhibited knowledge about early breastfeeding initiation, actual application of this practice was clearly deficient. In order to improve the rates of breastfeeding initiation within the first hour of life we should enhance vaginal delivery and prenatal classes and implement Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative policies in both the Pediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics Departments of Minia University Hospital.

  3. Gestational age at initiation of antenatal care in a tertiary hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gestational age at initiation of antenatal care in a tertiary hospital, Southwestern Nigeria. ... care is still prevalent in our environment. Therefore, pregnant women should be adequately informed about the concept of early antenatal registration. Keywords: Antenatal care, gestational age, initiation, Nigeria, Southwestern ...

  4. Initial management of hospital evacuations caused by Hurricane Rita: a systematic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Erin L; Andress, Knox; Schultz, Carl H

    2013-06-01

    Hurricanes remain a major threat to hospitals throughout the world. The authors attempted to identify the planning areas that impact hospital management of evacuations and the challenges faced when sheltering-in-place. This observational, retrospective cohort study examined acute care institutions from one hospital system impacted by Hurricane Rita in 2005. Investigators used a standardized survey instrument and interview process, previously used in the hospital evacuation context, to examine hospitals' initial internal situational awareness and subsequent decision making that resulted in evacuation due to Hurricane Rita. Participants from each hospital included representatives from senior leadership and clinical and nonclinical staff that comprised the Incident Management Team (IMT). The main measured outcomes were responses to 95 questions contained in the survey. Seven of ten eligible hospitals participated in the study. All facilities evacuated the sickest patients first. The most significant factors prompting evacuation were the issuing of mandatory evacuation orders, storm dynamics (category, projected path, storm surge), and loss of regional communications. Hospitals that sheltered-in-place experienced staff shortages, interruptions to electrical power, and loss of water supplies. Three fully-evacuated institutions experienced understaffing of 40%-60%, and four hospitals sustained depressed staffing levels for over four weeks. Five hospitals lost electricity for a mean of 4.8 days (range .5-11 days). All facilities continued to receive patients to their Emergency Departments (EDs) while conducting their own evacuation. Hospital EDs should plan for continuous patient arrival during evacuation. Emergency Operation Plans (EOPs) that anticipate challenges associated with evacuation will help to maximize initial decision making and management during a crisis situation. Hospitals that shelter-in-place face critical shortages and must provide independent patient

  5. INTRODUCTION OF INNOVATIVE MEDICAL DEVICES AT FRENCH UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS: AN OVERVIEW OF HOSPITAL-BASED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT INITIATIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Billaux, Mathilde; Borget, Isabelle; Pineau, Judith; Prognon, Patrice; van den Brink, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Local health technology assessment (HTA) to determine whether new health technologies should be adopted is now a common practice in many healthcare organizations worldwide. However, little is known about hospital-based HTA activities in France. The objective of this study was to explore hospital-based HTA activities in French university hospitals and to provide a picture of organizational approaches to the assessment of new and innovative medical devices. Eighteen semi-structured interviews with hospital pharmacists were conducted from October 2012 to April 2013. Six topics were discussed in depth: (i) the nature of the institution concerned; (ii) activities relating to innovative medical devices; (iii) the technology assessment and decision-making process; (iv) the methodology for technology assessment; (v) factors likely to influence decisions and (vi) suggestions for improving the current process. The interview data were coded, collated and analyzed statistically. Three major types of hospital-based HTA processes were identified: medical device committees, innovation committees, and "pharmacy & management" processes. HTA units had been set up to support medical device and innovation committees for technology assessment. Slow decision making was the main limitation to both these committee-based approaches. As an alternative, "pharmacy & management" processes emerged as a means of rapidly obtaining a formal assessment. This study provides an overview of hospital-based HTA initiatives in France. We hope that it will help to promote hospital-based HTA activities in France and discussions about ways to improve and harmonize practices, through the development of national guidelines and/or a French mini-HTA tool, for example.

  6. Current legal initiative to integrated care - effects of outpatient care in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlgemuth, W.A.; Klinikum Augsburg; Mayer, J.; Nagel, E.; Klinikum Augsburg; Bohndorf, K.

    2004-01-01

    The strict separation of the out-patient and hospital-based health care delivery sectors in Germany leads to deficits in effectiveness and efficiency. Newly introduced legal initiatives to overcome this separation, namely 'Ambulantes Operieren' (Paragraph 115b SGB V), 'Ambulante Behandlung durch Krankenhaeuser' and Disease Management Programs (Paragraphen 116a-b SGB V) are described in detail in this article. Their impact on hospital-based health provision for out-patients is discussed. The aim of a better integration of different sectors with a better quality and a more efficient use of resources seems to be the target of these initiatives. (orig.) [de

  7. [Current legal initiative to integrated care - effects of outpatient care in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth, W A; Mayer, J; Nagel, E; Bohndorf, K

    2004-04-01

    The strict separation of the out-patient and hospital-based health care delivery sectors in Germany leads to deficits in effectiveness and efficiency. Newly introduced legal initiatives to overcome this separation, namely "Ambulantes Operieren" (section 115 b SGB V), "Ambulante Behandlung durch Krankenhäuser" and Disease Management Programs (sections 116a-b SGB V) are described in detail in this article. Their impact on hospital-based health provision for out-patients is discussed. The aim of a better integration of different sectors with a better quality and a more efficient use of resources seems to be the target of these initiatives.

  8. Effects of Implemented Initiatives on Patient Safety Culture in Fateme Al-zahra Hospital in Najafabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Izadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety improvement requires ongoing culture. This cultural change is the most important challenge that managers are faced with in creation of a safe system. This study aims to show the results of initiatives to improvement in patient safety culture in Fateme Al-zahra hospital. Method: In the quasi-experimental research, patient safety culture was measured using the Persian questionnaire on adaptation of the hospital survey on patient safety culture in 12 dimensions. The research was conducted before (January 2010 and after (September 2012 the improvement initiatives. In this study, all units were determined and no sampling method was used. Reliability of the questionnaire was tested by Alpha Chronbakh (0.83. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics indices and Independent T-Test by SPSS Software (version 18. Results: 350 questionnaires were distributed in each phaseand overall response rate was 58 and 56 percent, respectively. According to Independent T-test, Management expectations and actions, Organizational learning, Management support, Feedback and communication about error, Communication openness, Overall Perceptions of Safety, Non-punitive Response to Error, Frequency of Event Reporting, and Patient safety culture showed significant differences (P-value0.05. The mean score of Patient safety culture was 2.27 (from 5 and it was increased to 2.46 after initiatives that showed a significant difference (P-value<0.05. Conclusion: Although, improvement in patient safety culture needs teamwork and continuous attempts, the study showed that initiatives implemented in the case hospital had been effective in some dimensions. However, Teamwork within hospital units, Teamwork across units, Hospital handoffs and transitions, and Staffing dimensions were recognized for further intervention. Hospital could improve the patient safety culture with planning and measures in these dimensions.

  9. HOSPITAL-BASED HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT IN BRAZIL: AN OVERVIEW OF THE INITIAL EXPERIENCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Claudia Cristina de Aguiar; Rabello, Renata Dos Santos; Elias, Flávia Tavares Silva

    2017-01-01

    Hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA) has become increasingly important in Brazil due to its strategic importance to promote adoption, incorporation, dissemination, and disinvestment of technologies. A strategy to foster hospital-based HTA was implemented in 2009 by creating hospital-based HTA nuclei (NATS) at university hospitals and other strategic hospitals. Between 2011 and 2012, we interviewed board members in twenty-three NATS located in all geographic regions of Brazil to assess their general characteristics, scientific output, and challenges. Of the total, 65 percent of the NATS belonged to teaching institutions, with 44 percent associated with federal universities. The bulk of their output was in the form of mini-HTA reports. Centers in the Southeast and South of Brazil had the highest production compared with other regions. Lack of expertise and low levels of advanced training were identified as limiting factors in the majority of centers. The experience of the initial twenty-three NATS could be considered positive and has led to the creation of new ones around Brazil. Regional disparities in workload, production, and technical training should be targeted by new policies toward hospital-based HTA in Brazil. The limits and possibilities for intensifying the strategy relate to continuous investment in priority studies, which simultaneously, allow professionals who work in hospitals to receive continued education and produce relevant HTA work in a timely manner.

  10. Initial default among sputum-positive pulmonary TB patients at a referral hospital in Uttarakhand, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Darshan; Kaushik, Rajeev M; Kaushik, Reshma; Rawat, Jagdish; Kakkar, Rajesh

    2013-09-01

    Initial default is a serious issue which can enhance the transmission of TB. We determined the magnitude of and the causative factors for initial default among sputum-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) patients. In this prospective study, 2310 patients attending a referral hospital in Uttarakhand state, north India, with presumptive TB were investigated and 555 patients with sputum-positive PTB were followed-up for initiation of anti-TB treatment (ATT) during 2010-2012. The patients not confirmed as having started ATT were considered initial defaulters. Initial default was seen in 120 (21.6%) patients comprising 22 (18.3%) defaulters during diagnosis and 98 (81.6%) defaulters after referral for directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS). The initial default rate was significantly higher among patients from rural areas than urban areas, illiterate patients than literate patients and smokeless tobacco-users than non-users (pdefault among patients referred for DOTS were limited trust in DOTS (n = 44, 44.8%), adverse effects of previous ATT (n = 41, 41.8%), dissatisfaction with health services (n = 38, 38.7%), local deaths while taking DOTS (n = 28, 28.5%), advice by others against DOTS (n = 25, 25.5%), disbelief in the diagnosis (n = 18, 18.3%) and patient death before starting treatment (n = 4, 4.0%). A high initial default rate was seen among patients with PTB. There is an urgent need to promote public awareness to lower the initial default rate.

  11. Nutritional Competence and Resilience among Hemodialysis Patients in the Setting of Dialysis Initiation and Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Stephan; Wong, Michelle M Y; Usvyat, Len A; Xiao, Qingqing; Kotanko, Peter; Maddux, Franklin W

    2015-09-04

    Dialysis patients have a high risk for inadequate nutrition. Their nutritional status is particularly susceptible to deterioration when faced with intercurrent events such as hospitalization. This study was conducted to improve the understanding of the temporal evolution of nutritional parameters as a foundation for rational and proactive nutritional intervention. A retrospective cohort study was performed to investigate the temporal evolution of nutritional parameters (serum albumin, serum phosphate, serum creatinine, equilibrated normalized protein catabolic rate, and interdialytic weight gain) and a composite nutritional score derived from these parameters, in two populations: (1) incident hemodialysis (HD) patients who started HD between January 2006 and December 2011 and were followed for up to 54 months (median 16.3), and (2) prevalent patients with HD vintage ≥2.5 years who were hospitalized between January 2006 and December 2011 and followed from 6 months before to 6 months after hospitalization. In incident patients (n=126,964), each of the nutritional parameters improved after HD initiation, with a mean composite nutritional score at the 24th percentile at the start of HD and reaching a plateau at the 57th percentile toward the end of the second year on dialysis. Nutritional parameters increased more rapidly and reached higher values among patients who survived longer. In hospitalized patients (n=14,193), the nutritional parameters and the composite score began to decline 1-2 months before hospitalization, reached their lowest level in the month after hospitalization, and then partially recovered in the subsequent 5 months. The degree of recovery of the nutritional score was inversely related to the number of rehospitalizations. This study increases the understanding of nutritional resilience and its determinants in HD patients. Application of the nutritional score, pending further validation, may facilitate targeted and timely interventions to avert

  12. Telephone follow-up initiated by a hospital-based health professional for postdischarge problems in patients discharged from hospital to home.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mistiaen, P.; Poot, E.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of follow-up telephone calls (TFU) in the first month post discharge, initiated by hospital-based health professionals, to patients discharged from hospital to home, with regard to physical and psycho-social outcomes in the first three months post discharge. The

  13. Telephone follow-up initiated by a hospital-based health professional for postdischarge problems in patients discharged from hospital to home. (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mistiaen, P.; Poot, E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effects of follow-up telephone calls (TFU) in the first month post discharge, initiated by hospital-based health professionals, to patients discharged from hospital to home, with regard to physical and psycho-social outcomes in the first three months post discharge. The

  14. An Intervention to Increase Availability of Healthy Foods and Beverages in New York City Hospitals: The Healthy Hospital Food Initiative, 2010–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krepp, Erica M.; Johnson Curtis, Christine; Lederer, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitals serve millions of meals and snacks each year; however, hospital food is often unhealthy. Hospitals are ideal settings for modeling healthy eating, but few programs have sought to improve nutrition in all venues where food is served. Community Context The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene created the Healthy Hospital Food Initiative (HHFI) to improve the healthfulness of food served in hospitals. The HHFI built on prior work implementing mandatory nutrition standards for patient meals and vending in public hospitals. Public hospitals joined the HHFI by voluntarily adopting standards for cafeterias and cafés. Private hospitals joined by implementing nutrition standards for patient meals, food and beverage vending machines, and cafeterias and cafés. Methods Hospitals were recruited from 2010 through 2014 and provided technical assistance from health department staff. Implementation in each of the 4 areas was monitored through on-site assessments and menu review. Twenty-eight hospital cafeterias and cafés were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the HHFI to assess changes. Outcome Sixteen public hospitals and 24 private hospitals joined the HHFI. Most (n = 18) private hospitals implemented standards in at least 2 areas. In cafeterias, most hospitals introduced a healthy value meal (n = 19), removed unhealthy items from the entrance and checkout (n = 18), increased whole grains to at least half of all grains served (n = 17), and reduced calories in pastries and desserts (n = 15). Interpretation Most New York City hospitals joined the HHFI and voluntarily adopted rigorous nutrition standards. Partnerships between hospitals and local government are feasible and can lead to significant improvements in hospital food environments. PMID:27281392

  15. Community Priorities for Hospital-Based Prevention Initiatives: Results From a Deliberating Public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Marthe R; Realmuto, Lindsey; Scherer, Maya; Kamler, Alexandra; Weiss, Linda

    2017-06-21

    Internal revenue service provisions require not-for-profit hospitals to provide "community benefit." In addition, the Affordable Care Act requires these hospitals to conduct community health needs assessments that involve appropriate stakeholders. These requirements signal government interest in creating opportunities for developing programs that are well tailored and responsive to the needs of the communities served. Gaining meaningful input from residents is a critical aspect of these processes. To implement public deliberations that explore local resident priorities for use of a hospital's community benefit resources to prevent chronic disease. Public deliberation is a method of community engagement that can provide guidance to decision makers on value-laden issues when technical solutions alone are inadequate to provide direction or set priorities. Three deliberations featuring presentations by experts and discussions among participants were convened with a cross section of residents in Brooklyn, New York. Participants were asked whether new hospital initiatives should prioritize: clinical prevention, community-based interventions, or action on broader policies affecting population health. Pre- and postsurveys, as well as qualitative methods, were used to assess knowledge and attitudes. Postdeliberation, participants had significant changes in knowledge, particularly on the impact of education on health. Participants prioritized community-based and policy interventions over expanding clinical prevention capacity. Public deliberation offers a method to probe informed constituent views of how a hospital can best promote its community's health. Informed local residents felt that hospitals should frame health-promoting activities more broadly than is current practice. Not-for-profit hospitals gain significant tax advantages. Increased insurance rates suggest that some hospitals will experience savings in uncompensated care that can be used to promote health more

  16. Development of a comprehensive hospital-based elder abuse intervention: an initial systematic scoping review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Du Mont

    Full Text Available Elder abuse, a universal human rights problem, is associated with many negative consequences. In most jurisdictions, however, there are no comprehensive hospital-based interventions for elder abuse that address the totality of needs of abused older adults: psychological, physical, legal, and social. As the first step towards the development of such an intervention, we undertook a systematic scoping review.Our primary objective was to systematically extract and synthesize actionable and applicable recommendations for components of a multidisciplinary intersectoral hospital-based elder abuse intervention. A secondary objective was to summarize the characteristics of the responses reviewed, including methods of development and validation.The grey and scholarly literatures were systematically searched, with two independent reviewers conducting the title, abstract and full text screening. Documents were considered eligible for inclusion if they: 1 addressed a response (e.g., an intervention to elder abuse, 2 contained recommendations for responding to abused older adults with potential relevance to a multidisciplinary and intersectoral hospital-based elder abuse intervention; and 3 were available in English.The extracted recommendations for care were collated, coded, categorized into themes, and further reviewed for relevancy to a comprehensive hospital-based response. Characteristics of the responses were summarized using descriptive statistics.649 recommendations were extracted from 68 distinct elder abuse responses, 149 of which were deemed relevant and were categorized into 5 themes: Initial contact; Capacity and consent; Interview with older adult, caregiver, collateral contacts, and/or suspected abuser;physical/forensic, mental, psychosocial, and environmental/functional; and care plan. Only 6 responses had been evaluated, suggesting a significant gap between development and implementation of recommendations.To address the lack of evidence to

  17. Early rehospitalization after initial chronic kidney disease educational hospitalization relates with a multidisciplinary medical team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Eiji; An, Taesong; Kikkawa, Akihiko; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    It is well-documented that chronic kidney disease (CKD) often results in end-stage renal failure and puts patients at extremely high risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Educational hospitalization at medical institutions in Japan is important for patients with CKD because it facilitates treatment in earlier stages of CKD when subjective symptoms are not apparent. However, some patients who have achieved their educational targets tend to have poor compliance at home after discharge from the hospital, resulting in rehospitalization shortly. In this study, we examined the factors for early rehospitalization of patients after initial CKD educational hospitalization compared with non-rehospitalized patients. One hundred thirty-seven patients after discharge from CKD educational hospitalization in Japan between March 2011 and December 2012 were included in the analyses. The subjects were classified into two groups: the early rehospitalization group and control group. We adjusted for confounding variables and performed multiple logistic regression analysis with the presence or absence of early rehospitalization as a dependent variable to investigate the association of early rehospitalization with patient background features, laboratory data, vital signs, instruction-related items, and home environment. Study subjects included 22 patients in the early hospitalization group and 115 patients in control group. Multivariable analysis for early rehospitalization indicated that insufficient instruction by physician, pharmacist, and dietitians was independent explanatory variable. Analyzing by Kaplan-Meier method, the probability of non-rehospitalization in the instruction group was significantly higher than that in the non-instruction group. Therefore, we believe it is necessary to involve a competent, multidisciplinary medical team (consisting of physicians, pharmacists, and dietitians) in addressing the early rehospitalization issue in patients with CKD. These findings

  18. Social shaping of food intervention initiatives at worksites: canteen takeaway schemes at two Danish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse the social shaping of worksite food interventions at two Danish worksites. The overall aims are to contribute first, to the theoretical frameworks for the planning and analysis of food and health interventions at worksites and second, to a foodscape approach to worksite food interventions. The article is based on a case study of the design of a canteen takeaway (CTA) scheme for employees at two Danish hospitals. This was carried out as part of a project to investigate the shaping and impact of schemes that offer employees meals to buy, to take home or to eat at the worksite during irregular working hours. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews with stakeholders within the two change processes. Two focus group interviews were also carried out at one hospital and results from a user survey carried out by other researchers at the other hospital were included. Theoretically, the study was based on the social constitution approach to change processes at worksites and a co-evolution approach to problem-solution complexes as part of change processes. Both interventions were initiated because of the need to improve the food supply for the evening shift and the work-life balance. The shaping of the schemes at the two hospitals became rather different change processes due to the local organizational processes shaped by previously developed norms and values. At one hospital the change process challenged norms and values about food culture and challenged ideas in the canteen kitchen about working hours. At the other hospital, the change was more of a learning process that aimed at finding the best way to offer a CTA scheme. Worksite health promotion practitioners should be aware that the intervention itself is an object of negotiation between different stakeholders at a worksite based on existing norms and values. The social contextual model and the setting approach to worksite health interventions lack

  19. [Hospital practices and breastfeeding cessation risk within 6 months of delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callendret, M; Gelbert-Baudino, N; Raskovalova, T; Piskunov, D; Schelstraëte, C; Durand, M; Baudino, F; François, P; Equy, V; Labarere, J

    2015-09-01

    The impact of maternity ward practices on breastfeeding duration remains uncertain in France. This study aimed to determine whether compliance with an increasing number of Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative recommended practices was associated with a decreasing risk for breastfeeding cessation within 6 months of delivery. We analyzed the original data from a prospective cohort study carried out in eight maternity centers in France in 2005-2006. A pediatrician or a midwife prospectively collected data on breastfeeding initiation within 1h of birth, rooming-in 24h a day, pacifier non-use, and giving breast milk only for 908 mothers who were breastfeeding at discharge. Overall, 315 (34.7%), 309 (34.0%), 186 (20.5%), and 98 (10.8%) mothers experienced 4, 3, 2, or 0-1 maternity ward practices. The median breastfeeding duration was 18 weeks (25th-75th percentiles, 9 to >26), with 87.6% and 31.5% of mothers who were still breastfeeding by 4 and 26 weeks after delivery, respectively. After adjusting for study center and baseline characteristics, the hazard ratios of breastfeeding cessation associated with 3, 2, and 0-1 practices were 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.64), 1.54 (95% CI, 1.20-1.98), and 1.59 (95% CI, 1.13-2.25) as compared with compliance with four practices (p for trend prolonged breastfeeding and decrease the risk for early cessation after discharge to home. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Neonatal Hypothermia and Associated Risk Factors at Baby Friendly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between neonatal hypothermia and risk factors was determined using logistic regression. ... After delivery, the newborns were assessed and body temperature was measured using an axillary digital thermometer (Auxiliary Micro Life. MT 3001). .... transport (if necessary) and warm resuscitation were applied.

  1. Neonatal Hypothermia and Associated Risk Factors at Baby Friendly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temperatures were recorded immediately after birth and at the age of 1, 2 and 4 h after birth in order to estimate the prevalence of neonatal hypothermia, defined as axillary temperature less than ... Odds ratios (ORs) were assessed using maximum likelihood and associated 95% confidence intervals were computed.

  2. Treatment patterns of rheumatoid arthritis in Japanese hospitals and predictors of the initiation of biologic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlich, Joerg; Sruamsiri, Rosarin

    2017-01-01

    To describe the usage of different biologic agents for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Japan over time and to identify factors that affects the decision to initiate treatment with biologic agents. Determinants of a switch to another biologic agent for patients who are already on biologic treatment were also analyzed. We utilized a hospital claims database containing 36,504 Japanese patients with a confirmed RA diagnosis. To analyze the determinants of treatment choices, we applied logistic regression analysis taking into account socio-demographic and medical factors. Analyses determined that 11.8% of diagnoses and 25.4% of treated patients in Japan receive a biologic agent. Significant factors associated with biologic treatment initiation include younger age, female sex, and a higher comorbidity index. The route of administration plays a major role when it comes to a switch between different biologic agents. The lower likelihood of elderly patients to be initiated on biologic treatment might be explained by the risk aversion of Japanese physicians' and patients who are afraid of the potential side effects of biologics. This finding is also consistent with the notion of an age bias that impedes elderly patients from optimal access to biologic treatment. Because claims data does not contain clinical parameters such as disease activity the results should be validated in a clinical context.

  3. Medical identity theft: prevention and reconciliation initiatives at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Timothy; Haas, Mark; Lagu, Tara

    2014-07-01

    Medical identity theft refers to the misuse of another individual's identifying medical information to receive medical care. Beyond the financial burden on patients, hospitals, health insurance companies, and government insurance programs, undetected cases pose major patient safety challenges. Inaccuracies in the medical record may persist even after the theft has been identified because of restrictions imposed by patient privacy laws. Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH; Boston) has conducted initiatives to prevent medical identity theft and to better identify and respond to cases when they occur. Since 2007, MGH has used a notification tree to standardize reporting of red flag incidents (warning signs of identity theft, such as suspicious personal identifiers or account activity). A Data Integrity Dashboard allows for tracking and reviewing of all potential incidents of medical identity theft to detect trends and targets for mitigation. An identity-checking policy, VERI-(Verify Everyone's Identity) Safe Patient Care, requires photo identification at every visit and follow-up if it is not provided. Data from MGH suggest that an estimated 120 duplicate medical records are created each month, 25 patient encounters are likely tied to identity theft or fraud each quarter, and 14 patients are treated under the wrong medical record number each year. As of December 2013, 80%-85% of patients were showing photo identification at appointments. Although an organization's policy changes and educational campaigns can improve detection and reconciliation of medical identity theft cases, national policies should be implemented to streamline the process of correcting errors in medical records, reduce the financial disincentive for hospitals to detect and report cases, and create a single point of entry to reduce the burden on individuals and providers to reconcile cases.

  4. A Simulation-Based Quality Improvement Initiative Improves Pediatric Readiness in Community Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfill, Travis; Gawel, Marcie; Auerbach, Marc

    2017-07-17

    The National Pediatric Readiness Project Pediatric Readiness Survey (PRS) measured pediatric readiness in 4149 US emergency departments (EDs) and noted an average score of 69 on a 100-point scale. This readiness score consists of 6 domains: coordination of pediatric patient care (19/100), physician/nurse staffing and training (10/100), quality improvement activities (7/100), patient safety initiatives (14/100), policies and procedures (17/100), and availability of pediatric equipment (33/100). We aimed to assess and improve pediatric emergency readiness scores across Connecticut's hospitals. The aim of this study was to compare the National Pediatric Readiness Project readiness score before and after an in situ simulation-based assessment and quality improvement program in Connecticut hospitals. We leveraged in situ simulations to measure the quality of resuscitative care provided by interprofessional teams to 3 simulated patients (infant septic shock, infant seizure, and child cardiac arrest) presenting to their ED resuscitation bay. Assessments of EDs were made based on a composite quality score that was measured as the sum of 4 distinct domains: (1) adherence to sepsis guidelines, (2) adherence to cardiac arrest guidelines, (3) performance on seizure resuscitation, and (4) teamwork. After the simulation, a detailed report with scores, comparisons to other EDs, and a gap analysis were provided to sites. Based on this report, a regional children's hospital team worked collaboratively with each ED to develop action items and a timeline for improvements. The National Pediatric Readiness Project PRS scores, the primary outcome of this study, were measured before and after participation. Twelve community EDs in Connecticut participated in this project. The PRS scores were assessed before and after the intervention (simulation-based assessment and gap analysis/report-out). The average time between PRS assessments was 21 months. The PRS scores significantly improved 12

  5. Determinants of successful breastfeeding initiation in healthy term singletons: a Swiss university hospital observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubler, Tabea; Krähenmann, Franziska; Roos, Malgorzata; Zimmermann, Roland; Ochsenbein-Kölble, Nicole

    2013-05-01

    Breastfeeding significantly benefits mothers and infants. We aimed to identify the determinants of its successful initiation. A retrospective study of 1893 mothers delivering healthy term singletons at a Swiss university hospital from 1/2008 to 3/2009 determined the associations between multiple breastfeeding and early postpartum parameters by univariate and multiple regression analysis. Multiparity was associated with nursing exclusively at the breast at discharge (Ppacifier use (P<0.05). Among obese mothers, nursing exclusively at the breast at discharge was less frequent, and use of all feeding aids more frequent, than among normal-weight women (both P<0.001). Neuraxial anesthesia was associated with use of maltodextrin and bottle (both P<0.05) compared to no anesthesia. Delayed first skin-to-skin contact and rooming-in for <24 h/day were each associated with maltodextrin and cup (P<0.05). Nursing exclusively at the breast at discharge was less frequent (P<0.001), and bottle use more frequent (P<0.05), in women with sore nipples than in those without. Obesity is a potent inhibitor of breastfeeding initiation. Delivery without anesthesia by a multiparous normal-weight mother, followed by immediate skin-to-skin contact, rooming-in for 24 h/day, and dedicated nipple care, provides the best conditions for successful early postpartum breastfeeding without the need for feeding aids or nutritional supplements

  6. Risk of all-cause hospitalization in COPD patients initiating long-acting or short-acting beta agonist therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollu, Vamsi; Ejzykowicz, Flavia; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Karafilidis, John; Hay, Joel W

    2013-08-01

    This retrospective claims study investigated the rates of all-cause hospitalization among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients initiating treatment with short-acting beta agonists (SABA) or long-acting beta agonists (LABA). Data from the 5% national sample of Medicare enrollees for 2006-2008 were used. Patients initiating COPD therapy were identified as those with no COPD therapy for ≥ 6-months prior to initiating SABA or LABA (administered via dry-powder inhalers, metered-dose inhalers, or nebulizer) treatment. All patients were continuously eligible for Medicare Parts A, B, and D for 18 months. Those enrolled in Medicare Advantage, who had asthma, or were < 65 years old were excluded. Differences in the rates of all-cause hospitalizations and time to all-cause hospitalization during the 6-month follow-up period were examined, while adjusting for demographics, clinical indicators, and health service use. Among 3017 COPD patients who met the inclusion criteria, 883 (30%) were LABA users and 2134 (70%) were SABA users. Overall, 21% of patients (16% [144/883] of LABA and 23% [492/2134] of SABA) had a hospitalization during the follow-up period. Mean time to hospitalization was 86 days for LABA vs 64 days for SABA patients (p < 0.05). The adjusted hazard ratio for hospitalization in a Cox proportional hazards model was 0.74 (95% CI = 0.62-0.90) for patients treated with LABA vs. SABA. The analysis was adjusted for multiple background characteristics, but important measures of severity in COPD, such as measures of lung functioning, were not available and may have differed between patients treated with LABA or SABA. The results of this analysis indicate COPD patients initiating LABA treatment had a longer time to all-cause hospitalization and a 26% lower risk of hospitalization during the 6-months follow-up period compared to those initiating SABA therapy.

  7. Insulin Pump and Continuous Glucose Monitor Initiation in Hospitalized Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, David L; Spanakis, Elias K; Ryan, Kathleen A; Silver, Kristi D

    2018-01-01

    Insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) are commonly used by patients with diabetes mellitus in the outpatient setting. The efficacy and safety of initiating inpatient insulin pumps and CGM in the nonintensive care unit setting is unknown. In a prospective pilot study, inpatients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive standard subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin and blinded CGM (group 1, n = 5), insulin pump and blinded CGM (group 2, n = 6), or insulin pump and nonblinded CGM (group 3, n = 5). Feasibility, glycemic control, and patient satisfaction were evaluated among groups. Group 1 had lower mean capillary glucose levels, 144.5 ± 19.5 mg/dL, compared with groups 2 and 3, 191.5 ± 52.3 and 182.7 ± 59.9 mg/dL (P 1 vs. 2+3  = 0.05). CGM detected 19 hypoglycemic episodes (glucose insulin or percentage of time spent below target glucose range (180 mg/dL). On the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire-Change, group 3 reported increased hyperglycemia and decreased hypoglycemia frequency compared with the other two groups, although the differences did not reach statistical significance. Insulin pump and CGM initiation are feasible during hospitalization, although they are labor intensive. Although insulin pump initiation may not lead to improved glycemic control, there is a trend toward CGM detecting a greater number of hypoglycemic episodes. Larger studies are needed to determine whether use of this technology can lower inpatient morbidity and mortality.

  8. Association Between Initial Route of Fluoroquinolone Administration and Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized for Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belforti, Raquel K; Lagu, Tara; Haessler, Sarah; Lindenauer, Peter K; Pekow, Penelope S; Priya, Aruna; Zilberberg, Marya D; Skiest, Daniel; Higgins, Thomas L; Stefan, Mihaela S; Rothberg, Michael B

    2016-07-01

    Fluoroquinolones have equivalent oral and intravenous bioavailability, but hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) generally are treated intravenously. Our objectives were to compare outcomes of hospitalized CAP patients initially receiving intravenous vs oral respiratory fluoroquinolones. This was a retrospective cohort study utilizing data from 340 hospitals involving CAP patients admitted to a non-intensive care unit (ICU) setting from 2007 to 2010, who received intravenous or oral levofloxacin or moxifloxacin. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included clinical deterioration (transfer to ICU, initiation of vasopressors, or invasive mechanical ventilation [IMV] initiated after the second hospital day), antibiotic escalation, length of stay (LOS), and cost. Of 36 405 patients who met inclusion criteria, 34 200 (94%) initially received intravenous treatment and 2205 (6%) received oral treatment. Patients who received oral fluoroquinolones had lower unadjusted mortality (1.4% vs 2.5%; P = .002), and shorter mean LOS (5.0 vs 5.3; P fluoroquinolones for CAP, there was no association between initial route of administration and outcomes. More patients may be treated orally without worsening outcomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Use of Nutrition Standards to Improve Nutritional Quality of Hospital Patient Meals: Findings from New York City's Healthy Hospital Food Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Alyssa; Lederer, Ashley; Johnson Curtis, Christine

    2015-11-01

    Most hospital patient meals are considered regular-diet meals; these meals are not required to meet comprehensive nutrition standards for a healthy diet. Although programs exist to improve nutrition in hospital food, the focus is on retail settings such as vending machines and cafeterias vs patient meals. New York City's Healthy Hospital Food Initiative (HHFI) provides nutrition standards for regular-diet meals that hospitals can adopt, in addition to retail standards. This study was undertaken to describe regular-diet patient menus before and after implementation of the HHFI nutrition standards. The study involved pre- and post- menu change analyses of hospitals participating in the HHFI between 2010 and 2014. Eight New York City hospitals, selected based on voluntary participation in the HHFI, were included in the analyses. Nutritional content of regular-diet menus were compared with the HHFI nutrition standards. Nutrient analysis and exact Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for the analysis of the data. At baseline, no regular-diet menu met all HHFI standards, and most exceeded the daily limits for percentage of calories from fat (n=5), percentage of calories from saturated fat (n=5), and milligrams of sodium (n=6), and they did not meet the minimum grams of fiber (n=7). Hospitals met all key nutrient standards after implementation, increasing fiber (25%, Pdiet menus did not comply with the HHFI nutrition standards at baseline. Using the HHFI framework, hospitals significantly improved the nutritional quality of regular-diet patient menus. The standards were applied across hospitals of varying sizes, locations, menu types, and food service operations, indicating feasibility of this framework in a range of hospital settings. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pneumatic reduction of intussusception in children at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital: An initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Boateng Mensah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intussusception is a common abdominal emergency in children which necessitates prompt diagnosis and management. Nonsurgical methods of managing this condition are rapidly gaining popularity with fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction being one of such methods that has been used with great success in many countries. We present our initial experience with fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction of intussusception at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital which is also the first time the technique has been used in Ghana. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 children were enrolled in the study between August 2007 and February 2008 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were given air enema under fluoroscopic-guidance using locally assembled equipment. The intraluminal pressure was monitored with a pressure gauge and was not permitted to go above 120 mmHg. A total of three attempts of 3 min each were allowed. Results: There were 12 males and 6 females. The average age of the patients was 8.3 months (SD= 3 months. Twelve (67% of the cases were reduced successfully while 6 (33% failed to reduce. A majority of those that did not reduced had symptoms for at least 2 days. Bowel perforation occurred in three (16.7% cases. Conclusion: Pneumatic reduction of intussusception is a cost-effective and rapid method of management of intussusception. It however has limitations like high reported rate of bowel perforation and limited ability to identify lead points. The benefits however seem to outweigh these challenges, such as fluoroscopic-guided pneumatic reduction has a very high success rate. Fluoroscopic guided pneumatic reduction should be considered as one of the primary modes of reduction in Ghana and other neighbouring countries that are yet to practice it.

  11. The initiation of dialysis in undocumented aliens: the impact on a public hospital system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coritsidis, George N; Khamash, Hasan; Ahmed, Shaheena I; Attia, Abdel-Moneim; Rodriguez, Pedro; Kiroycheva, Melitza K; Ansari, Nahid

    2004-03-01

    Health and dialysis care of undocumented aliens often falls on public hospitals because the majority of these patients are uninsured and cannot afford private medical care. With an estimate of greater than 5 million undocumented aliens, the rate of such patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) approaches 1,000 patients/y. Although much attention has been focused on the financial and political impact of this group, little has been published on health care issues. Records of 55 undocumented alien patients initiating dialysis therapy from 2 public hospitals in the New York City metropolitan area were reviewed and compared with those of 223 American citizens. We interviewed patients in their native language to assess what predialysis care they had received. Undocumented aliens were primarily Hispanic (58%), poorly educated, and in the United States for 5.11 +/- 0.62 years before dialysis therapy. Four percent were aware of their renal disease before immigration, and fewer than one third had any pre-ESRD care. Undocumented aliens had greater creatinine levels and blood pressures and lower calculated glomerular filtration rates compared with Americans. Their admission lengths of stay and total costs for their first dialysis treatments were greater than those of American patients. Undocumented aliens were twice as likely to be employed. Undocumented aliens do not appear to migrate here for medical reasons, suggested by their greater employment rate. They are less inclined to seek pre-ESRD care and present relatively late for dialysis therapy. This study highlights the paucity of pre-ESRD care in these patients and in lower income communities in general. Providing early health care to undocumented aliens would avoid more expensive medical care later on.

  12. Neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: Initial experience of Hospital de São João

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rocha

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this series is to report the initial ECMO experience of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Hospital de São João. The first three clinical cases are reported. Case report 1: a 39 weeks gestational age girl with severe lung hypoplasia secondary to a bilateral congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case report 2: a 39 weeks gestational age girl with a right congenital diaphragmatic hernia and a tracheal stenosis. Case report 3: a 34 weeks gestational age boy, with 61 days of life, with a Bordetella pertussis pneumonia, severe pulmonary hypertension, shock, hyperleukocytosis and seizures. Resumo: O objetivo desta série é apresentar a experiência inicial da Unidade de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatais do Hospital de São João com ECMO no recém-nascido. São apresentados os 3 primeiros casos. Caso 1: recém-nascido de 39 semanas de idade gestacional, com hipoplasia pulmonar severa secundária a hérnia diafragmática congénita bilateral. Caso 2: recém-nascido de 39 semanas de idade gestacional, com hérnia diafragmática congénita direita e estenose traqueal. Caso 3: pré-termo de 34 semanas de idade gestacional, sexo masculino, com 61 dias de vida, com pneumonia por Bordetella pertussis, hipertensão pulmonar severa, choque, hiperleucocitose e convulsões. Keywords: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, Newborn, Congenital diaphragmatic hernia, Tracheal stenosis, Bordetella pertussis infection, Palavras-chave: Oxigenação por membrana extracorporal, Recém-nascido, Hérnia diafragmática congénita, Estenose traqueal, Infeção por Bordetella pertussis

  13. Variation in hospital costs and reimbursement for endovascular aneurysm repair: A Vascular Quality Initiative pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Gary W; Neal, Dan; DeMartino, Randall R; Schneider, Joseph R; Singh, Tej; Kraiss, Larry; Scali, Salvatore; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos; Hoel, Andrew; Cronenwett, Jack L

    2017-10-01

    Comparing costs between centers is difficult because of the heterogeneity of vascular procedures contained in broad diagnosis-related group (DRG) billing categories. The purpose of this pilot project was to develop a mechanism to merge Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) clinical data with hospital billing data to allow more accurate cost and reimbursement comparison for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures across centers. Eighteen VQI centers volunteered to submit UB04 billing data for 782 primary, elective infrarenal EVAR procedures performed by 108 surgeons in 2014. Procedures were categorized as standard or complex (with femoral-femoral bypass or additional arterial treatment) and without or with complications (arterial injury or embolectomy; bowel or leg ischemia; wound infection; reoperation; or cardiac, pulmonary, or renal complications), yielding four clinical groups for comparison. MedAssets, Inc, using cost to charge ratios, calculated total hospital costs and cost categories. Cost variation analyzed across centers was compared with DRG 237 (with major complication or comorbidity) and 238 (without major complication or comorbidity) coding. A multivariable model to predict DRG 237 coding was developed using VQI clinical data. Of the 782 EVAR procedures, 56% were standard and 15% had complications, with wide variation between centers. Mean total costs ranged from $31,100 for standard EVAR without complications to $47,400 for complex EVAR with complications and varied twofold to threefold among centers. Implant costs for standard EVAR without complications varied from $8100 to $28,200 across centers. Average Medicare reimbursement was less than total cost except for standard EVAR without complications. Only 9% of all procedures with complications in the VQI were reported in the higher reimbursed DRG 237 category (center range, 0%-21%). There was significant variation in hospitals' coding of DRG 237 compared with their expected rates. VQI clinical

  14. What’s Next? Sustaining Hospital-Initiated Nursing Home Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsen, Christina B; Barney, Grant; Ashley, Elizabeth Dodds; Dumyati, Ghinwa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The core elements provide a framework for nursing homes (NH) to establish antibiotic stewardship programs (ASP). We report on implementation and sustainability of ASP through a hospital-NH partnership. Methods Since 2014, a hospital-based team (HBT) assisted 9 NH in Monroe County, NY in implementing ASP. Enrollment was staggered; data are currently available from 2 NH: Facility X (470 beds, full-time medical director and Infection Preventionist (IP)) and Facility Y (288 beds, part-time medical director and IP). The HBT analyzed antibiotic data to develop initial interventions focusing on reducing urinary tract infection (UTI) treatment and quinolone use. Activities included (1) regular presentation of antibiotic days of therapy (DOT), urine culture rates and treatment appropriateness; (2) coaching on interpretation and use of data to expand interventions; (3) creation of citywide guideline for diagnosis and treatment of common infections; and (4) education of nurses, providers, and families. Results The HBT provided drug expertise and support throughout the project; however, involvement of NH staff varied. The Facility X IP assumed responsibility for the review and feedback of urine culture data and education and the medical director educated clinicians and families on treatment guidelines. Facility Y’s ASP was led by the medical director and focused mainly on education of clinicians. Facility X saw significant reductions in all metrics in 2016. Facility Y significantly reduced their quinolone use and urine culture rate; however, this did not translate into a reduction in DOT for UTI (Table 1). Table 1. Rates per 1,000 resident days Facility X Y 2014 2016 Rate Ratio (RR) (95% Confidence Interval [CI]) 2014 2016 RR 
(95% CI) UTI DOT 11.6 8.8 0.77 (0.71–0.82) 13.6 12.7 0.94 (0.87-1.01) Quinolone DOT 17.6 9.8 0.56 (0.52-0.59) 21.8 12.0 0.55 (0.51–0.59) Urine Cultures 5.7 2.7 0.48 (0.43-0.54) 5.1 3.0 0.59 (0.51–0.68) Conclusion Hospital

  15. Evaluation of early implementations of antibiotic stewardship program initiatives in nine Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Limburg, Maarten; Sinha, Bhanu; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia Ewc

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to patient safety and care. In response, hospitals start antibiotic stewardship programs to optimise antibiotic use. Expert-based guidelines recommend strategies to implement such programs, but local implementations may differ per hospital.

  16. Initiating Intrapartum Nitrous Oxide in an Academic Hospital: Considerations and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Laura; Lawton, Robyn; Leeman, Lawrence; Holbrook, Amanda

    2017-05-01

    A 50%-50% mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen has long been used for managing pain during labor in many countries, but only recently has this intrapartum analgesic technique become popular in the United States. Nitrous oxide is considered minimal sedation and a safe pain management alternative. Many facilities are now interested in providing laboring women this analgesic option. The process of establishing use of nitrous oxide in a large institution can be complicated and may seem daunting. This brief report describes the challenges that occurred during the process of initiating nitrous oxide for pain management during childbirth at an academic medical center and discusses various committee roles. Nurses at the University of New Mexico Hospital now directly oversee the administration of nitrous oxide to women in labor in accordance to an established guideline. Despite limited available research, the guideline also allows offering nitrous oxide as a pain management technique for women with opioid dependence. Key components of the guideline and specifics related to education, cost, and safety are reviewed. © 2017 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  17. Determinants of Mortality among HIV Positives after Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Western Ethiopia: A Hospital-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Ali, Ahmed; Dessie, Yadeta

    2013-01-01

    Studies revealed that there are various determinants of mortality among HIV positives after ART initiation. These determinants are so variable with context and dynamic across time with the advancement of cares and treatments. In this study we tried to identify determinants of mortality among HIV positives after initiating ART. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 416 ART attendees enrolled between July 2005 to January 2012 in Nekemte Referral Hospital, Western Ethiopia. Actuarial ...

  18. Teleradiology service for mission hospitals: initial experiences in Ethiopia and Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Larrison

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout their history, mission hospitals have provided high quality and lifesaving medical care to regions of the world where medical care is sparse. These hospitals are generally built and equipped through a combination of governmental and non-governmental sources. As advances in diagnostic medical imaging have progressed and become mainstream in the developed world, mission hospitals have adopted advanced imaging modalities. These modalities provide early diagnosis and treatment options for their patients. In addition to the installation and operation of advanced imaging equipment, the need for professional expert interpretation of these studies remains a challenge for mission hospitals. Historically these hospitals have used either voluntary services on site or paid for interpretations from local radiologists; however, with the introduction of high speed internet, teleradiology has become a possibility. This article describes the teleradiology experience of two mission hospitals in rural Africa.

  19. Teleradiology service for mission hospitals: initial experiences in Ethiopia and Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Larrison; Stanley G. Cheng; Stephen McManus

    2016-01-01

    Throughout their history, mission hospitals have provided high quality and lifesaving medical care to regions of the world where medical care is sparse. These hospitals are generally built and equipped through a combination of governmental and non-governmental sources. As advances in diagnostic medical imaging have progressed and become mainstream in the developed world, mission hospitals have adopted advanced imaging modalities. These modalities provide early diagnosis and treatment options ...

  20. Associations Between Nurse-Guided Variables and Plasma Oxytocin Trajectories in Premature Infants During Initial Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Ashley; Harrison, Tondi M; Sinnott, Loraine; Shoben, Abigail; Steward, Deborah

    2018-02-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a social hormone that may help researchers understand how nurse-guided interventions during initial infant hospitalization, such as supporting human milk expression, promoting comforting touch, and reducing exposure to stressors, affect preterm brain development. To determine whether factors related to human milk, touch, or stressor exposure are related to plasma OT trajectories in premature infants. Plasma from 33 premature infants, born gestational ages 25 to (Equation is included in full-text article.)weeks, was collected at 14 days of life and then weekly until 34 weeks' corrected gestational age (CGA). Variables related to feeding volumes of human milk and formula; touch, as indexed by skin-to-skin contact (SSC) and swaddled holding; and clinical stressors were extracted from the electronic medical record. Linear mixed-models tested associations between nurse-guided variables and plasma OT trajectories. In the final model, same-day SSC was positively related not only to plasma OT levels at 27 weeks' CGA (β= .938, P = .002) but also to a decline in plasma OT levels over time (β=-.177, P = .001). Volume of enteral feeds (mL/kg/d), its interaction with CGA, and number of stressful procedures were not statistically significant (β= .011, P = .077; β=-.002, P = .066; and β= .007, P = .062, respectively). Nurse-guided interventions are associated with infant plasma OT levels, suggesting nurses may impact the neurobiology of the developing premature infant. Replication with larger sample sizes and randomized controlled trial designs is needed to test effects of specific nursing interventions on infant OT.

  1. Evaluation of early implementations of antibiotic stewardship program initiatives in nine Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Limburg, A.H.M.; Sinha, Bhanu; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to patient safety and care. In response, hospitals start antibiotic stewardship programs to optimise antibiotic use. Expert-based guidelines recommend strategies to implement such programs, but local implementations may differ per hospital. Earlier

  2. The effectiveness of a 'Code Red' transfusion request policy initiated by pre-hospital physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Anne E; Hunter-Dunn, Ceri; Lyon, Richard M; Lockey, David; Krogh, Charlotte L

    2016-01-01

    Major trauma is a leading cause of mortality and serious morbidity. Recent approaches to life-threatening traumatic haemorrhage have emphasized the importance of early blood product transfusion. We have implemented a pre-hospital transfusion request policy where a pre-hospital physician can request the presence of a major transfusion pack on arrival at the destination trauma centre. This study was performed to establish whether three simple criteria (1) suspicion or evidence of active haemorrhage (2) systolic BPpre-hospital 'Code Red' transfusion request accurately identified seriously injured patients who required transfusion on arrival at hospital. Prospective evaluation of all pre-hospital 'Code Red' requests over a 30-month period (August 2008-May 2011) was performed for patients transported to a major trauma centre. Mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, hospital mortality, and use of blood products were recorded. Patients were followed up to hospital discharge. 176 'Code Red' activations were made in the study period. 129 patients were transported to the Trauma Centre. Mechanism of injury was penetrating trauma in 39 (30%) cases, road traffic collision in 58 (45%), falls in 18 (14%) and 'other' in 14 (10.8%). Complete data was available for 126 patients. Of the patients reaching hospital, 20 died in the emergency department or operating theatre, 22 died following admission and 84 survived to hospital discharge. Mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 29.1. (range 0-66). Overall, 115 (91%) of the patients declared 'Code Red' pre-hospital received blood product transfusion after arrival in hospital. Eleven patients did not receive any blood products following hospital admission. In patients declared 'Code Red' pre-hospital, mean packed red blood cell transfusion in the first 24-h was 10.4 unit (95% CI 8.4-12.3 unit). The use of simple pre-hospital criteria allowed physicians to successfully identify trauma patients with severe injury and a requirement for

  3. Proton Radiation Therapy in the Hospital Environment: Conception, Development, and Operation of the Initial Hospital-Based Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.; Wroe, Andrew J.

    The world's first hospital-based proton treatment center opened at Loma Linda University Medical Center in 1990, following two decades of development. Patients' needs were the driving force behind its conception, development, and execution; the primary needs were delivery of effective conformal doses of ionizing radiation and avoidance of normal tissue to the maximum extent possible. The facility includes a proton synchrotron and delivery system developed in collaboration with physicists and engineers at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and from other high-energy-physics laboratories worldwide. The system, operated and maintained by Loma Linda personnel, was designed to be safe, reliable, flexible in utilization, efficient in use, and upgradeable to meet demands of changing patient needs and advances in technology. Since the facility opened, nearly 14,000 adults and children have been treated for a wide range of cancers and other diseases. Ongoing research is expanding the applications of proton therapy, while reducing costs.

  4. Different usage of the same oncology information system in two hospitals in Sydney--lessons go beyond the initial introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Gandhidasan, Senthilkumar; Miller, Alexis A

    2010-06-01

    The experience of clinicians at two public hospitals in Sydney, Australia, with the introduction and use of an oncology information system (OIS) was examined to extract lessons to guide the introduction of clinical information systems in public hospitals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 of 15 radiation oncologists employed at the two hospitals. The personnel involved in the decision making process for the introduction of the system were contacted and their decision making process revisited. The transcribed data were analyzed using NVIVO software. Themes emerged included implementation strategies and practices, the radiation oncologists' current use and satisfaction with the OIS, project management and the impact of the OIS on clinical practice. The hospitals had contrasting experiences in their introduction and use of the OIS. Hospital A used the OIS in all aspects of clinical documentation. Its implementation was associated with strong advocacy by the Head of Department, input by a designated project manager, and use and development of the system by all staff, with timely training and support. With no vision of developing a paperless information system, Hospital B used the OIS only for booking and patient tracking. A departmental policy that data entry for the OIS was centrally undertaken by administrative staff distanced clinicians from the system. All the clinicians considered that the OIS should continuously evolve to meet changing clinical needs and departmental quality improvement initiatives. This case study indicates that critical factors for the successful introduction of clinical information systems into hospital environment were an initial clear vision to be paperless, strong clinical leadership and management at the departmental level, committed project management, and involvement of all staff, with appropriate training. Clinician engagement is essential for post-adoption evolution of clinical information systems. Copyright 2010

  5. Identifying the key personnel in a nurse-initiated hospital waste reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott-Levy, Ruth; Fazzini, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Hospitals in the United States generate more than 6600 tons of trash a day and approximately 85% of the waste is nonhazardous solid waste such as food, cardboard, and plastic. Treatment and management of hospital waste can lead to environmental problems for the communities that receive the waste. One health system's shared governance model provided the foundation to develop a nurse-led hospital waste reduction program that focused on point-of-care waste management. Waste reduction program development required working with a variety of departments within and external to the health system. The interdisciplinary approach informed the development of the waste reduction program. This article identifies the key departments that were necessary to include when developing a hospital waste reduction program.

  6. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  7. Risk factors for developing clinical infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) amongst hospital patients initially only colonized with MRSA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Coello; J.R. Glynn (Judith); J. J. Picazo; J. Fereres; C. Gaspar

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn hospital outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) many patients are initially colonized without infection. The reasons why some progress to infection while others do not are not known. A cohort of 479 hospital patients, initially only colonized with MRSA, was

  8. Social shaping of food intervention initiatives at worksites: Canteen takeaway schemes at two Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2011-01-01

    approach to worksite food interventions. METHODS: The article is based on a case study of the design of a canteen takeaway (CTA) scheme for employees at two Danish hospitals. This was carried out as part of a project to investigate the shaping and impact of schemes that offer employees meals to buy...... and values about food culture and challenged ideas in the canteen kitchen about working hours. At the other hospital, the change was more of a learning process that aimed at finding the best way to offer a CTA scheme. CONCLUSIONS: Worksite health promotion practitioners should be aware that the intervention...

  9. Diagnostic performance of initial serum albumin level for predicting in-hospital mortality among aspiration pneumonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosun; Jo, Sion; Lee, Jae Baek; Jin, Youngho; Jeong, Taeoh; Yoon, Jaechol; Lee, Jeong Moon; Park, Boyoung

    2018-01-01

    The predictive value of serum albumin in adult aspiration pneumonia patients remains unknown. Using data collected during a 3-year retrospective cohort of hospitalized adult patients with aspiration pneumonia, we evaluated the predictive value of serum albumin level at ED presentation for in-hospital mortality. 248 Patients were enrolled; of these, 51 cases died (20.6%). The mean serum albumin level was 3.4±0.7g/dL and serum albumin levels were significantly lower in the non-survivor group than in the survivor group (3.0±0.6g/dL vs. 3.5±0.6g/dL). In the multivariable logistic regression model, albumin was associated with in-hospital mortality significantly (adjusted odds ratio 0.30, 95% confidential interval (CI) 0.16-0.57). The area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) for in-hospital survival was 0.72 (95% CI 0.64-0.80). The Youden index was 3.2g/dL and corresponding sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive and negative likelihood ratio were 68.6%, 66.5%, 34.7%, 89.1%, 2.05 and 0.47, respectively. High sensitivity (98.0%) was shown at albumin level of 4.0g/dL and high specificity (94.9%) was shown at level of 2.5g/dL. Initial serum albumin levels were independently associated with in-hospital mortality among adult patients hospitalized with aspiration pneumonia and demonstrated fair discriminative performance in the prediction of in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Initial experience with transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy in an Irish hospital setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, J C

    2009-08-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy has gained widespread acceptance as a treatment for both benign and malignant conditions and is becoming increasingly popular in Irish hospitals. We report a single surgeon, single centre experience with 20 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomies comparing them to 20 open cases performed prior to the establishment of a laparoscopic service.

  11. Pre-hospital and initial management of head injury patients: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumul Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most of the bad outcomes in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI are related to the presence of a high incidence of pre-hospital secondary brain insults. Therefore, knowledge of these variables and timely management of the disease at the pre-hospital period can significantly improve the outcome and decrease the mortality. The Brain Trauma Foundation guideline on "Prehospital Management" published in 2008 could provide the standardized protocols for the management of patients with TBI; however, this guideline has included the relevant papers up to 2006. Methods: A PubMed search for relevant clinical trials and reviews (from 1 January 2007 to 31 March 2013, which specifically discussed about the topic, was conducted. Results: Based on the evidence, majority of the management strategies comprise of rapid correction of hypoxemia and hypotension, the two most important predictors for mortality. However, there is still a need to define the goals for the management of hypotension and inclusion of newer difficult airway carts as well as proper monitoring devices for ensuring better intubation and ventilatory management. Isotonic saline should be used as the first choice for fluid resuscitation. The pre-hospital hypothermia has more adverse effects; therefore, this should be avoided. Conclusion: Most of the management trials published after 2007 have focused mainly on the treatment as well as the prevention strategies for secondary brain injury. The results of these trials would be certainly adopted by new standardized guidelines and therefore may have a substantial impact on the pre-hospital management in patients with TBI.

  12. Integration of complementary and alternative medicine in a major pediatric teaching hospital: an initial overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, Ellen Silver; McLellan, Mary C; Kemper, Kathi J; Risko, Wanessa; Woolf, Alan D

    2005-04-01

    To describe the establishment of a multidisciplinary team of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers and educators in an urban pediatric hospital and affiliated medical school. Pediatric CAM use is increasing. Physicians are interested in CAM-related education but few programs had been developed in pediatrics. In 1998, Children's Hospital Boston established the Center for Holistic Pediatric Education and Research (CHPER), a CAM multidisciplinary team providing clinical services, education, and research. A retrospective review describing data from patient consultation notes, CAM lectures, clinical practice guidelines, curriculum materials, team meeting minutes, and team member manuscripts and publications. Over 5.5 years, CHPER staff provided over 2100 consults: acupuncture, massage, holistic pediatrician, relaxation therapies, biofeedback, hypnosis, and bio-pharmaceutics. Acupuncture and massage therapies were incorporated into a Clinical Practice Guideline. Formal education was delivered through didactic sessions, workshops, self-learning modules, clinical observation, and clinical practice. CHPER faculty published 1 book and 64 articles on CAM-related topics. An interdisciplinary team of CAM clinicians and educators can be integrated into an urban pediatric teaching hospital to provide CAM medical education and clinical services.

  13. Curitiba acute ischemic stroke protocol: a university hospital and EMS initiative in a large Brazilian city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Christiano Lange

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Few healthcare centers in Brazil perform thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe an interinstitutional protocol for the rapid identification and thrombolytic treatment of AIS patients at a public health hospital in a large Brazilian city. METHOD: Emergency medical services (EMS personnel evaluated 433 patients with possible stroke during a six-month period. After a standard checklist, patients with suspected AIS and symptoms onset of less than two hours were evaluated at our University Hospital (UH. RESULTS: Sixty-five (15% patients met the checklist criteria and had a symptom onset of less than two hours, but only 50 (11% patients were evaluated at the UH. Among them, 35 (70% patients had ischemic stroke, 10 (20% had hemorrhagic stroke, and 5 (10% had other diagnoses. Of the 35 ischemic stroke patients, 15 (43% underwent IV thrombolysis. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that trained EMS workers could help to improve the rate of thrombolytic treatment in large Brazilian cities. Permanent training programs for EMS and hospital staff, with quality control and correct identification of AIS patients, should be implemented to increase appropriate thrombolytic therapy rates in Brazil.

  14. Audit of feeding practices in the neonatal wards at the Charlotte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Breastfeeding is the preferred choice of infant feeding. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) is a ten-step plan to help establish successful breastfeeding and is adapted by public sector hospitals in Gauteng. Despite this, rates of breastfeeding in sick and preterm neonates remain low. Objective.

  15. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenge could be briefly seen in these terms: hospitals as places for treatment where there’s a technology focus and hospitals for healing where there’s a human focus. In the 60s - 70s wave of new hospital building, an emphasis on technology can be seen. It’s time to move from the technology....... Documentation exists in; well-being of patients and staff, sleep disorders, pain distraction, confidentiality and privacy, levels of errors in hospitals. Art and the use of color: Art can be context related so one should be aware whether it is in a private ward or the foyer and related to the experience...... of the patient. Art can be used as a stress reducing factor, pain distracter, and also to orientate and to provide landmarks in the hospital landscape. Air, the use of natural ventilation as much as possible, complemented by mechanical ventilation in most cases, particularly in northern Europe; the emphasis...

  16. Initiation of breastfeeding and prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding at hospital discharge in urban, suburban and rural areas of Zhejiang China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binns Colin W

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of exclusive breastfeeding in China are relatively low and below national targets. The aim of this study was to document the factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding initiation in Zhejiang, PR China. Methods A cohort study of infant feeding practices was undertaken in Zhejiang Province, an eastern coastal region of China. A total of 1520 mothers who delivered in four hospitals located in city, suburb and rural areas during late 2004 to 2005 were enrolled in the study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to explore factors related to exclusive breastfeeding initiation. Results On discharge from hospital, 50.3% of the mothers were exclusively breastfeeding their infants out of 96.9% of the mothers who had earlier initiated breastfeeding. Exclusive breastfeeding was positively related to vaginal birth, baby's first feed being breast milk, mother living in the suburbs or rural areas, younger age of mother, lower maternal education level and family income. Conclusion The exclusive breastfeeding rate in Zhejiang is only 50.3% on discharge and does not reach Chinese or international targets. A number of behaviours have been identified in the study that could be potentially incorporated into health promotion activities.

  17. Early administration of epinephrine (adrenaline) in patients with cardiac arrest with initial shockable rhythm in hospital: propensity score matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars W; Kurth, Tobias; Chase, Maureen; Berg, Katherine M; Cocchi, Michael N; Callaway, Clifton; Donnino, Michael W

    2016-04-06

    To evaluate whether patients who experience cardiac arrest in hospital receive epinephrine (adrenaline) within the two minutes after the first defibrillation (contrary to American Heart Association guidelines) and to evaluate the association between early administration of epinephrine and outcomes in this population. Prospective observational cohort study. Analysis of data from the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, which includes data from more than 300 hospitals in the United States. Adults in hospital who experienced cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, including patients who had a first defibrillation within two minutes of the cardiac arrest and who remained in a shockable rhythm after defibrillation. Epinephrine given within two minutes after the first defibrillation. Survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with a good functional outcome. A propensity score was calculated for the receipt of epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, based on multiple characteristics of patients, events, and hospitals. Patients who received epinephrine at either zero, one, or two minutes after the first defibrillation were then matched on the propensity score with patients who were "at risk" of receiving epinephrine within the same minute but who did not receive it. 2978 patients were matched on the propensity score, and the groups were well balanced. 1510 (51%) patients received epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, which is contrary to current American Heart Association guidelines. Epinephrine given within the first two minutes after the first defibrillation was associated with decreased odds of survival in the propensity score matched analysis (odds ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.82; P<0.001). Early epinephrine administration was also associated with a decreased odds of return of spontaneous circulation

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging - guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: an initial experience in a community hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, P.; Enis, S.; Pinyard, J.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness in diagnosing mammographically and sonographically occult breast lesions by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in patients who presented to a community-based hospital with a newly established breast MRI program. The records of 142 consecutive patients, median age of 55 years, who had undergone MRI-guided biopsy at our institution between July 2006 and July 2007 were reviewed. From these patients, 197 mammographically and sonographically occult lesions were biopsied at the time of discovery. The pathology was then reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. Cancer was present and subsequently discovered in 8% of the previously occult lesions (16/197) or 11% of the women studied (16/142). Of the cancerous lesions, 56% were invasive carcinomas (9/16) and 44% were ductal carcinomas in situ (7/16). Fourteen percent of the discovered lesions (28/197) were defined as high risk and included atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, and radial scar. In total, occult cancerous and high-risk lesions were discovered in 22% of the found lesions (44/197) or 31% of the women who underwent MRI-guided biopsy (44/142). This study demonstrated that detection of cancerous and high-risk lesions can be significantly increased when an MRI-guided biopsy program is introduced at a community-based hospital. We believe that as radiologists gain confidence in imaging and histologic correlation, community-based hospitals can achieve similar rates of occult lesion diagnosis as those found in data emerging from academic institutions. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging - guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: an initial experience in a community hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, P.; Enis, S.; Pinyard, J., E-mail: jpinyard@gmail.com [Morristown Memorial Hospital, The Carol W. and Julius A. Rippel Breast Center, The Carol G. Simon Cancer Centre, Morristown, New Jersey (United States)

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness in diagnosing mammographically and sonographically occult breast lesions by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in patients who presented to a community-based hospital with a newly established breast MRI program. The records of 142 consecutive patients, median age of 55 years, who had undergone MRI-guided biopsy at our institution between July 2006 and July 2007 were reviewed. From these patients, 197 mammographically and sonographically occult lesions were biopsied at the time of discovery. The pathology was then reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. Cancer was present and subsequently discovered in 8% of the previously occult lesions (16/197) or 11% of the women studied (16/142). Of the cancerous lesions, 56% were invasive carcinomas (9/16) and 44% were ductal carcinomas in situ (7/16). Fourteen percent of the discovered lesions (28/197) were defined as high risk and included atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, and radial scar. In total, occult cancerous and high-risk lesions were discovered in 22% of the found lesions (44/197) or 31% of the women who underwent MRI-guided biopsy (44/142). This study demonstrated that detection of cancerous and high-risk lesions can be significantly increased when an MRI-guided biopsy program is introduced at a community-based hospital. We believe that as radiologists gain confidence in imaging and histologic correlation, community-based hospitals can achieve similar rates of occult lesion diagnosis as those found in data emerging from academic institutions. (author)

  20. Alignment of an interprofessional student learning experience with a hospital quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Terri O; Wise, Holly H; Mauldin, Mary P; Ragucci, Kelly R; Scheurer, Danielle B; Su, Zemin; Mauldin, Patrick D; Bailey, Jennifer R; Borckardt, Jeffrey J

    2018-04-11

    Assessment of interprofessional education (IPE) frequently focuses on students' learning outcomes including changes in knowledge, skills, and/or attitudes. While a foundational education in the values and information of their chosen profession is critical, interprofessional learning follows a continuum from formal education to practice. The continuum increases in significance and complexity as learning becomes more relationship based and dependent upon the ability to navigate complex interactions with patients, families, communities, co-workers, and others. Integrating IPE into collaborative practice is critical to enhancing students' experiential learning, developing teamwork competencies, and understanding the complexity of teams. This article describes a project that linked students with a hospital-based quality-improvement effort to focus on the acquisition and practice of teamwork skills and to determine the impact of teamwork on patient and quality outcome measures. A hospital unit was identified with an opportunity for improvement related to quality care, patient satisfaction, employee engagement, and team behaviours. One hundred and thirty-seven students from six health profession colleges at the Medical University of South Carolina underwent TeamSTEPPS® training and demonstrated proficiency of their teamwork-rating skills with the TeamSTEPPS® Team Performance Observation Tool (T-TPO). Students observed real-time team behaviours of unit staff before and after staff attended formal TeamSTEPPS® training. The students collected a total of 778 observations using the T-TPO. Teamwork performance on the unit improved significantly across all T-TPO domains (team structure, communication, leadership, situation monitoring, and mutual support). Significant improvement in each domain continued post-intervention and at 15-month follow-up, improvement remained significant compared to baseline. Student engagement in TeamSTEPPS® training and demonstration of their

  1. [Rescue service: initial measures on the spot and in hospital (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    Improvement of any rescue service is inextricably bound up with the provision of optimal conditions with regard to first aid at the site of the accident, transport and immediate care in hospital. Only properly trained and experienced doctors are able to take appropriate life-saving action on the spot. Therefore ane should aim at getting the doctor to the site of the accident by helicopter or by ambulance as fast as possible. After immediate life-saving action has been taken, the various injuries should also be provisionally attended to as well as possible. The entire scope of these problems was discussed at the refresher course.

  2. Gestational age at initiation of antenatal care in a tertiary hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-02

    Jan 2, 2016 ... Aim: This study seeks to determine the time of initiation of antenatal care among pregnant women and possible factors influencing ... of safe motherhood, and it refers to the totality of health ... Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ekiti State University, Departments of 1Medical Social Services and.

  3. Nurses' Interest in Independently Initiating End-of-Life Conversations and Palliative Care Consultations in a Suburban, Community Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ambereen K; Wilks, Steven; Cheng, M Jennifer; Baker, Karen; Berger, Ann

    2018-03-01

    Patients who receive early palliative care consults have clinical courses and outcomes more consistent with their goals. Nurses have been shown to be advocates for early palliative care involvement and are able to lead advanced care planning discussions. The purpose of this study was to assess whether after a brief educational session, nurses at a suburban, community hospital could demonstrate knowledge of palliative care principles, would want to independently initiate end-of-life conversations with patients and families, and would want to place specialty palliative care consults. Four 1 hour presentations were made at 4 nursing leadership council meetings from November through December 2015. Anonymous pre- and post-presentation surveys were distributed and collected in person. Setting/Participant: Nonprofit, suburban, community hospital in Maryland. Participants were full-time or part-time hospital employees participating in a nursing leadership council who attended the presentation. We compared responses from pre- and post-presentation surveys. Fifty nurses (19 departments) completed pre-presentation surveys (100% response rate) and 49 nurses completed post-presentation surveys (98% response rate). The average score on 7 index questions increased from 71% to 90%. After the presentations, 86% strongly agreed or agreed that nurses should be able to independently order a palliative care consult and 88% strongly agreed or agreed with feeling comfortable initiating an end-of-life conversation. Brief educational sessions can teach palliative care principles to nurses. Most participants of the study would want to be able to directly consult palliative care and would feel comfortable initiating end-of-life conversations after this educational session.

  4. Rational use of antibiotics: a quality improvement initiative in hospital setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nausheen, S.; Hammad, R.; Khan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To minimise irrational use of antibiotics by implementing guidelines for antibiotic usage in obstetrics and Gynaecology. Methods: The observational study was conducted from January to December 2010 at the maternity unit of Aga Khan Hospital for Women and children, Kharadar, a secondary care facility in Karachi, Pakistan. Data was collected from medical records related to the study period. Prophylactic antibiotics were given according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists recommendation 2009. Surveillance was done by surgical site infection rates and infectious morbidity. Data was analysed on SPSS 13. Results: Therapeutic antibiotic use was rationalized, reducing the use of therapeutic antibiotics from 97% (n= 160/165) in January 2010 to 8% (n=10/125) in December 2010. Surgical site infection rates were less than 5%. Cost of antibiotics per patient decreased by 90%. Decrease in the length of stay and workload on nursing staff was also observed. Conclusion: Implementing guidelines for antibiotic use in obstetrics and gynaecology and translating it into our protocols was effective in decreasing the irrational antibiotic consumption and increasing the rational use of antibiotics in the hospital. (author)

  5. A systematic review of the methodologies used to evaluate telemedicine service initiatives in hospital facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDossary, Sharifah; Martin-Khan, Melinda G; Bradford, Natalie K; Smith, Anthony C

    2017-01-01

    The adoption of telemedicine into mainstream health services has been slower than expected. Many telemedicine projects tend not to progress beyond the trial phase; there are a large number of pilot or project publications and fewer 'service' publications. This issue has been noted since 1999 and continues to be acknowledged in the literature. While overall telemedicine uptake has been slow, some services have been successful. The reporting and evaluation of these successful services may help to improve future uptake and sustainability. The aim of this literature review was to identify peer-reviewed publications of deployed telemedicine services in hospital facilities; and to report, and appraise, the methodology used to evaluate these services. Computerised literature searches of bibliographic databases were performed using the MeSH terms for "Telemedicine" and "Hospital Services" or "Hospital", for papers published up to May 2016. A total of 164 papers were identified, representing 137 telemedicine services. The majority of reported telemedicine services were based in the United States of America (n=61, 44.5%). Almost two thirds of the services (n=86, 62.7%) were delivered by real time telemedicine. Of the reviewed studies, almost half (n=81, 49.3%) assessed their services from three different evaluation perspectives: clinical outcomes, economics and satisfaction. While the remaining half (n=83, 50.6%) described their service and its activities without reporting any evaluation measures. Only 30 (18.2%) studies indicated a two-step implementation and evaluation process. There was limited information in all reported studies regarding description of a structured planning strategy. Our systematic review identified only 137 telemedicine services. This suggests either telemedicine service implementation is still not a part of mainstream clinical services, or it is not being reported in the peer-reviewed literature. The depth and the quality of information were variable

  6. Association of public health initiatives with outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest at home and in public locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christopher B., Fordyce; Carolina M., Hansen; Kragholm, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Importance  Little is known about the influence of comprehensive public health initiatives according to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) location, particularly at home, where resuscitation efforts and outcomes have historically been poor.Objective  To describe temporal trends in bystander.......3%] in public) for whom resuscitation was attempted using data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014. The setting was 16 counties in North Carolina.Exposures  Patients were stratified by home vs public OHCA. Public health initiatives...... centers on recognition of cardiac arrest.Main Outcomes and Measures  Association of resuscitation efforts with survival and neurological outcomes from 2010 through 2014.Results  Among home OHCA patients (n = 5602), the median age was 64 years, and 62.2% were male; among public OHCA patients (n = 2667...

  7. Implementation of a Quality Improvement Initiative: Improved Congenital Muscular Torticollis Outcomes in a Large Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strenk, Mariann L; Kiger, Michelle; Hawke, Jesse L; Mischnick, Amy; Quatman-Yates, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) published a guideline for congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) in 2013. Our division adopted the guideline as the institutional practice standard and engaged in a quality improvement (QI) initiative to increase the percentage of patients who achieved resolution of CMT within 6 months of evaluation. The aims of this report are to describe the QI activities conducted to improve patient outcomes and discuss the results and implications for other institutions and patient populations. This was a quality improvement study. In alignment with the Chronic Care Model and Model of Improvement, an aim and operationally defined key outcome and process measures were established. Interventions were tested using Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles. A CMT registry was established to store and manage data extracted from the electronic record over the course of testing. Statistical process control charts were used to monitor progress over time. The QI initiative resulted in an increase in the percentage of patients who achieved full resolution of CMT within a 6-month episode of care from 42% to 61% over an 18-month period. Themes that emerged as key drivers of improvement included: (1) timely, optimal access to care, (2) effective audit and clinician feedback, and (3) accurate, timely documentation. The initiative took place at a single institution with a supportive culture and strong QI resources, which may limit direct translation of interventions and findings to other institutions and patient populations. Improvement science methodologies provided the tools and structure to improve division-wide workflow and increase consistency in the implementation of the APTA CMT guideline. In doing so, significant CMT population outcome improvements were achieved. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association

  8. Optimization of Initial Anesthesia in a One-Day Surgical Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Likhvantsev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to modify initial sevorane anesthesia so that the incidence of excitement and apnoea should be reduced. Subjects and methods. Seven hundred and sixty-three patients were examined and divided into 4 groups: total intravenous anesthesia (TIA with propofol and fentanyl and 3 inhalational sevorane-based anesthesia modes; one of them was modified by the authors. Initial anesthesia modes were compared by the following criteria: the time of consciousness loss (sec; that of creating the favorable conditions for laryngeal mask airway instillation (sec; the incidence of apnoea (% of the number of patients in this group; the duration of assisted ventilation (sec; excitement (% of the number of patients in this group; cough (% of the number of patients in this group. Results. The use of sevorane excludes the need for successive induction or breathing circuit prefilling. However, initial sevorane anesthesia is somewhat longer than intravenous induction with propofol and fentanyl and is more frequently accompanied by episodes of excitement, although the latter is insignificant. TIA in turn results in the development of apnoea more frequently, which is undesirable if anesthesia with preserved spontaneous breathing is to be further performed. The use of the subnarcotic doses of propofol (0.5 mg/kg and fentanyl (50-^g bolus during inhalation induction permits excitement to be prevented and a patient’s spontaneous breathing to be maintained. TIA modes and the authors’ modified inhalation induction procedure are comparable in the time of falling asleep and creating the optimal conditions for laryngeal mask airway instillation. Key words: inhalational anesthesia, sevofluorane, induction.

  9. Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burkitt's lymphoma of the head and neck region in a Nigerian tertiary. Hospital ... Some complications of treatment were noted. Discussion: ..... Cancer. Biother Radiopharm 1999 14: 251-62 (Medline). Reece DE. Evidence based management of Hodgkin's disease. The role of autologous stem cell transplantation. Cancer ...

  10. Use of the Joint British Society cardiovascular risk calculator before initiating statins for primary prevention in hospital medicine: experience from a large university teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Garg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pankaj Garg, Prashanth Raju, Ewa Sondej, Erwin Rodrigues, Gershan DavisAintree Cardiac Centre, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, UKIntroduction: Statin therapy is a well established treatment for hyperlipidemia. However, little is known about prescribing of statins for primary prevention in the real world, and even less about what happens to patients requiring primary prevention who are seen in a secondary care setting. The purpose of this research was to investigate the appropriateness of statin prescriptions by using the Joint British Society cardiovascular disease (JBS CVD risk score for primary prevention in a large secondary care center.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 500 consecutive patients in whom a statin prescription was initiated over a four-month period. We excluded patients who met secondary prevention criteria. We used the JBS CVD risk prediction chart to calculate 10-year composite risk. We also studied which statins were prescribed and their starting doses.Results: Of 500 patients consecutively started on statins in secondary care, 51 patients (10.2% were treated for primary prevention. Of these, seven (14% patients had a 10-year composite cardiovascular event risk of more than 20% (high-risk category, and were hence receiving appropriate therapy. Three main statins were prescribed for primary prevention, ie, atorvastatin (22 patients, 43%, simvastatin (25 patients, 49%, and pravastatin (four patients, 8%. The statins prescribed were initiated mainly at the 40 mg dose.Conclusions: Statin prescribing in secondary care for primary prevention is limited to about 10% of initiations. There is some overprescribing, because 86% of these patients did not require statins when risk-stratified appropriately. The majority of the prescriptions were for simvastatin 40 mg and atorvastatin 40 mg.Keywords: statins, primary prevention, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease, retrospective

  11. Initial Steps for Quality Improvement of Obesity Care Across Divisions at a Tertiary Care Pediatric Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Z. Chang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediatric subspecialists can participate in the care of obese children. Objective: To describe steps to help subspecialty providers initiate quality improvement efforts in obesity care. Methods: An anonymous patient data download, provider surveys and interviews assessed subspecialty providers’ identification and perspectives of childhood obesity and gathered information on perceived roles and care strategies. Participating divisions received summary analyses of quantitative and qualitative data and met with study leaders to develop visions for division/service-specific care improvement. Results: Among 13 divisions/services, subspecialists’ perceived role varied by specialty; many expressed the need for cross-collaboration. All survey informants agreed that identification was the first step, and expressed interest in obtaining additional resources to improve care. Conclusions: Subspecialists were interested in improving the quality and coordination of obesity care for patients across our tertiary care setting. Developing quality improvement projects to achieve greater pediatric obesity care goals starts with engagement of providers toward better identifying and managing childhood obesity.

  12. Reducing socioeconomic inequalities in COPD care in the hospital outpatient setting - A nationwide initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Lange, Peter; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2017-01-01

    socioeconomic differences. Methods: A mandatory national quality improvement initiative has since 2008 monitored the quality of COPD care at all national pulmonary specialized outpatient clinics in Denmark using six evidence-based process performance measures. We followed patients aged ≥30 years with a first......-ever outpatient contact for COPD during 2008–2012 (N = 23,741). Adjusted year-specific relative risks (RR) of fulfilling all relevant process performance measures was compared according to ethnicity, education, income, employment, and cohabitation using Poisson regression. Results: Quality of care improved.......18–0.74), disability pensioners (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.46–0.87) and patients living alone (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.60–0.97) were less likely to receive all relevant care processes, whereas those with highest education (RR 1.22, 95% CI 0.92–1.63) were more likely to receive these processes. These differences were eliminated...

  13. Determinants of Mortality among HIV Positives after Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Western Ethiopia: A Hospital-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Ali, Ahmed; Dessie, Yadeta

    2013-01-01

    Studies revealed that there are various determinants of mortality among HIV positives after ART initiation. These determinants are so variable with context and dynamic across time with the advancement of cares and treatments. In this study we tried to identify determinants of mortality among HIV positives after initiating ART. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 416 ART attendees enrolled between July 2005 to January 2012 in Nekemte Referral Hospital, Western Ethiopia. Actuarial table was used to estimate survival of patients after ART initiation and log rank test was used to compare the survival curves. Cox proportional-hazard regression was applied to determine the independent determinants of time to death. The estimated mortality was 4%, 5%, 6%, 7%, and 7% at 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months respectively with mortality incidence density of 1.89 deaths per 100 person years (95% CI 1.74, 3.62). Forty years and above AHR = 3.055 (95% CI 1.292, 7.223), low baseline hemoglobin level (AHR = 0.523 (95% CI .335, 0.816)), and poor ART adherence (AHR 27.848 (95% CI 8.928, 86.8)) were found to be an independent determinants of mortality. These determinants of mortality have to be taken into account to enhance better clinical outcomes of ART attendees.

  14. Histerectomia Laparoscópica em um Hospital Geral Comunitário Experiência Inicial e Comparação de Custos Hospitalares Laparoscopic Hysterectomy in a Community General Hospital Initial Experience and Comparison of Hospital Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randal Henrique de Oliveira

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: comparar os custos hospitalares entre a histerectomia vaginal assistida por laparoscopia (HVAL e a histerectomia total abdominal (HTA, relatando a experiência inicial com a nova abordagem em um hospital geral comunitário. Pacientes e Métodos: foram comparados 11 casos de HVAL e 23 de HTA, realizados de setembro de 1998 a julho de 1999. Prontuários e demonstrativos das despesas hospitalares de cada paciente foram revistos para coletar as variáveis analisadas. Resultados: não houve diferença estat��stica entre os grupos quanto à idade, paridade e cirurgia abdominal prévia. A principal indicação cirúrgica para ambos os grupos foi leiomiomatose uterina. O grupo das HVAL apresentou tempo de internação menor, com mediana de 1 dia e o das HTA, de 2 dias (pPurpose: to compare hospital costs between laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH and total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH, reporting the initial experience with the new approach in a communitary general hospital. Patients and Methods: eleven cases of LAVH and 23 of TAH, carried out from September 1998 to July 1999, were compared. Each patient's records and hospital charges were reviewed to collect the analyzed variables. Results: there was no statistical difference between the groups in relation to age, parity, and previous abdominal surgery. The main surgical indication for both groups was uterine leiomyomatosis. The LAVH group presented a shorter hospital stay with a median of one day, and the TAH group, of two days (p<0.01. LAVH showed to be 40.2% more expensive than TAH (p<0.01. Operating room charges contributed to the major part of hospital costs for both groups, corresponding to 79.8 and 57.9% of the total, for LAVH and TAH, respectively. LAVH infirmary charges were smaller than for TAH, with a statistically significant difference (p = 0.002. Conclusion: with shorter hospital stay and smaller infirmary costs, we demonstrated that LAVH provides better

  15. [Randomized Comparison of Two Approaches to Initial Warfarin Dosing: Time in Therapeutic Range of International Normalized Ratio During Hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, I G; Averkov, O V; Mishchenko, L N; Levchuk, N N; Vechorko, V I

    2017-09-01

    To perform a randomized, open-label comparison of average time in therapeutic range (TTR) of international normalized ratio (INR) using two approaches to initial warfarin dosing during hospitalization: the standard method and the one using individual patient characteristics (clinical algorithm - the studied approach). We randomly assigned 60 patients with different indications for vitamin K antagonist therapy to the studied approach (n=31, intervention group) or to the standard method (n=29, control group). А target INR range for all patients was 2.0 to 3.0. The average TTR and portions of INR values within target range during the whole time of drug dosing turned out to be small. TTR was 22.4% with standard method and 21.4% with clinical algorithm, which was well below desired 60%. The opportunities for achieving target INR in inpatient settings, regardless of warfarin dosing regimen, are limited.

  16. A "migrant friendly hospital" initiative in Geneva, Switzerland: evaluation of the effects on staff knowledge and practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hudelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: International migration poses important challenges to European health care systems. The development of "migrant friendly hospitals" has been identified as a priority in both Europe and Switzerland. METHODS: A multi-pronged initiative was developed at Geneva University Hospitals (HUG to improve staff knowledge and use of existing "migrant friendly" resources. A self-administered questionnaire was sent pre and post-intervention to random samples of 4 major professional groups with direct patient contact at the HUG. The questionnaire assessed staff knowledge, attitudes and reported practices regarding the care of migrant patients. RESULTS: Overall response rate was 51% (N = 1460 in 2010 but only 19% (N = 761 in 2013 owing to an institutionally imposed change in survey method. Despite these difficulties, and after adjusting for sample differences, we found that respondents in 2013 were significantly more likely to have received training in how to organize an appointment with an interpreter, how to work with an interpreter and about health and social services available for migrant patients. Respondents were also significantly more likely to have used several Migrant Friendly structures at the HUG. Use of, preference for and perceived skill at working with professional interpreters all improved, and respondents were both more likely to be encouraged by their supervisors to use professional interpreters, and less likely to be encouraged to look for alternative solutions for communicating with non francophone patients. Finally, 2013 respondents encountered fewer difficulties caring for migrant patients, although lack of time and language barriers continued to be the most important sources of difficulty. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that an institution-wide information campaign may contribute to increased awareness and use of migrant friendly resources by clinical staff. Hospital commitment and financing, along with inter

  17. Comparison of infant-feeding practices in two health subdistricts with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-14

    May 14, 2014 ... replacement feeding and mixed feeding rates, as well as the age at which complementary food was introduced. Results: There was a significantly ... Conclusion: Implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) in a health subdistrict was associated with more optimal infant- feeding practices in ...

  18. AWARENESS OF THE BENEFITS OF BREASTFEEDING AMONG ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    Breastfeeding is a cultural practice conferring important health and development benefits to. 1,2 children, families, communities and the nation. It is the fundamental component of the child-survival strategy. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative. (BFHI) was designed to support, protect and promote breastfeeding practices.

  19. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of nursing staff regarding the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI); to assess the knowledge of maternity obstetric unit (MOU) managers regarding BFHI principles and their attitude towards BFHI implementation; and to describe the ...

  20. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics 2013;40(2)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-08-21

    Aug 21, 2012 ... Abstract Background: Exclusive breastfeeding is the cornerstone of adequate early infant nutrition. De- spite the acknowledged gains of. Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative. (BFHI) and other interventional measures in ensuring optimal infant nutrition, it is still a common prac- tice for newborn babies to be given.

  1. Initial experience with intravenous pentobarbital sedation for children undergoing MRI at a tertiary care pediatric hospital: the learning curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, S.B. [Arkansas Children' s Hospital, Little Rock, AR (United States); Adams, R.C.; Aspinall, C.L. [St. Christopher' s Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2000-10-01

    Objective. Our purpose is to describe the initial experience with intravenous pentobarbital sedation in children undergoing MRI at a tertiary pediatric hospital to identify errors associated with inexperience. Subjects and methods. The study included the first 100 children sedated with intravenous pentobarbital prior to magnetic resonance examination at a tertiary pediatric hospital. The protocol included a maximum dose of 6 mg/kg administered in three divided doses with the total dose not to exceed 200 mg. Flow sheets documenting vital signs, administered drug doses, and adverse reactions were maintained contemporaneous to sedation. Results. Sedation was successful in 92 children. Of the eight children who failed sedation, three were at least 12 years old and three weighed more than 50 kg. {chi}{sup 2} tests identified significantly greater failure rates in children older than 11 years or weight greater than 50 kg. Two children had prolonged sedation after the maximum suggested dose was exceeded. Conclusions. The success rate was good, but could have been improved by restricting the use of pentobarbital to children less than 12 years of age and weighing less than 50 kg. Radiologists inexperienced with intravenous sedation should strictly observe the maximum suggested dose of pentobarbital to prevent prolonged sedation. (orig.)

  2. Impact of a hospital-wide hand hygiene initiative on healthcare-associated infections: results of an interrupted time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Kathryn B; Homa, Karen A; Lasky, Rosalind A; Ptak, Judy A; Taylor, Eileen A; Splaine, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    Evidence that hand hygiene (HH) reduces healthcare-associated infections has been available for almost two centuries. Yet HH compliance among healthcare professionals continues to be low, and most efforts to improve it have failed. To improve healthcare workers' HH, and reduce healthcare-associated infections. 3-year interrupted time series with multiple sequential interventions and 1-year post-intervention follow-up. Teaching hospital in rural New Hampshire. In five categories: (1) leadership/accountability; (2) measurement/feedback; (3) hand sanitiser availability; (4) education/training; and (5) marketing/communication. Monthly changes in observed HH compliance (%) and rates of healthcare-associated infection (including Staphylococcus aureus infections, Clostridium difficile infections and bloodstream infections) per 1000 inpatient days. The subset of S aureus infections attributable to the operating room served as a tracer condition. We used statistical process control charts to identify significant changes. HH compliance increased significantly from 41% to 87% (p<0.01) during the initiative, and improved further to 91% (p<0.01) the following year. Nurses achieved higher HH compliance (93%) than physicians (78%). There was a significant, sustained decline in the healthcare-associated infection rate from 4.8 to 3.3 (p<0.01) per 1000 inpatient days. The rate of S aureus infections attributable to the operating room rose, while the rate of other S aureus infections fell. Our initiative was associated with a large and significant hospital-wide improvement in HH which was sustained through the following year and a significant, sustained reduction in the incidence of healthcare-associated infection. The observed increased incidence of the tracer condition supports the assertion that HH improvement contributed to infection reduction. Persistent variation in HH performance among different groups requires further study.

  3. Association of Public Health Initiatives With Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest at Home and in Public Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, Christopher B; Hansen, Carolina M; Kragholm, Kristian; Dupre, Matthew E; Jollis, James G; Roettig, Mayme L; Becker, Lance B; Hansen, Steen M; Hinohara, Tomoya T; Corbett, Claire C; Monk, Lisa; Nelson, R Darrell; Pearson, David A; Tyson, Clark; van Diepen, Sean; Anderson, Monique L; McNally, Bryan; Granger, Christopher B

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about the influence of comprehensive public health initiatives according to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) location, particularly at home, where resuscitation efforts and outcomes have historically been poor. To describe temporal trends in bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first-responder defibrillation for OHCAs stratified by home vs public location and their association with survival and neurological outcomes. This observational study reviewed 8269 patients with OHCAs (5602 [67.7%] at home and 2667 [32.3%] in public) for whom resuscitation was attempted using data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014. The setting was 16 counties in North Carolina. Patients were stratified by home vs public OHCA. Public health initiatives to improve bystander and first-responder interventions included training members of the general population in CPR and in the use of automated external defibrillators, teaching first responders about team-based CPR (eg, automated external defibrillator use and high-performance CPR), and instructing dispatch centers on recognition of cardiac arrest. Association of resuscitation efforts with survival and neurological outcomes from 2010 through 2014. Among home OHCA patients (n = 5602), the median age was 64 years, and 62.2% were male; among public OHCA patients (n = 2667), the median age was 68 years, and 61.5% were male. After comprehensive public health initiatives, the proportion of patients receiving bystander CPR increased at home (from 28.3% [275 of 973] to 41.3% [498 of 1206], P public (from 61.0% [275 of 451] to 70.5% [424 of 601], P = .01), while first-responder defibrillation increased at home (from 42.2% [132 of 313] to 50.8% [212 of 417], P = .02) but not significantly in public (from 33.1% [58 of 175] to 37.8% [93 of 246], P = .17). Survival to discharge improved for arrests at home (from 5.7% [60 of 1057

  4. Side effects due to primary antituberculosis drugs during the initial phase of therapy in 1149 hospitalized patients for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülbay, Banu Eriş; Gürkan, Ozlem Ural; Yildiz, Oznur Akkoca; Onen, Zeynep Pinar; Erkekol, Ferda Oner; Baççioğlu, Ayşe; Acican, Turan

    2006-10-01

    Side effects of the most commonly used primary antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs may be mild as well as fatal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the side effects of and the risk factors for developing side effects against anti-TB drugs. Records of 1149 patients with established tuberculosis who initially received anti-TB therapy were evaluated retrospectively. The major side effects, which resulted in a definitive termination from 1 or more drugs related to anti-TB therapy, and the risk factors associated with these side effects, were analyzed. Ninety-five patients (8.3%), constituting 104 cases in total, experienced side effects. Although the frequency of drug reactions were increased from 0.6% at ages side effects. While asymptomatic liver function disturbance was established in 56 of the patients (4.9%) with initiation of anti-TB therapy, the rate of hepatotoxicity was found to be 2.4% in this present study. No age or gender differences were observed among those who had hepatotoxicity and who had not. The major side effects were ototoxicity (1.7%), hepatotoxicity (0.8%), neuropsychiatric manifestations (0.7%), and hyperuricemia (0.6%). It must be remembered that severe side effects associated with anti-TB drugs were encountered with different frequencies especially among patients hospitalized for pulmonary tuberculosis, and these patients should be followed up by closer monitoring for side effects related to anti-TB drugs.

  5. AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma: outcomes after initiation of antiretroviral therapy at a university-affiliated hospital in urban Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bradley C; Borok, Margaret Z; Mhlanga, Tafadzwa O; Makadzange, Azure T; Campbell, Thomas B

    2013-10-01

    To retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients with AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma (AIDS-KS) after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), under routine practice conditions, at a university-affiliated hospital in urban Zimbabwe. While studies from developed nations have demonstrated excellent outcomes for AIDS-KS patients treated with ART, few studies have examined the outcomes of African AIDS-KS patients after starting therapy. A retrospective cohort of 124 AIDS patients initiating ART under routine practice conditions was studied. Thirty-one patients with AIDS-KS were matched 1:3 to 93 AIDS patients without KS (non-KS). The primary outcome was loss-to-care after initiation of therapy. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify significant predictors of loss-to-care. The percent change in weight at 6 months after starting ART was a secondary outcome. A sub-group analysis evaluated differences in pre-treatment variables between AIDS-KS patients retained-in-care compared to those lost-to-care. AIDS-KS patients had significantly greater 2-year proportional loss-to-care than matched non-KS AIDS patients (26.4% vs. 9.5%; p = 0.01) after initiation of ART. In multivariate analysis, the presence of KS (p = 0.02) was the only significant predictor of loss-to-care. AIDS-KS patients had significantly less weight gain after starting ART than non-KS AIDS patients (+3.4% vs. +6.4%; p = 0.03). AIDS-KS patients retained-in-care had significantly higher pre-treatment CD4+ lymphocyte counts than AIDS-KS patients lost-to-care (223 vs. 110 cells/mm(3); p = 0.04). In this retrospective study, AIDS-KS patients experienced significantly worse outcomes than matched non-KS AIDS patients after initiation of ART. AIDS-KS patients with higher pre-treatment CD4+ lymphocyte counts were more likely to be retained in care. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Right ventricular stroke work index as a negative predictor of mortality and initial hospital stay after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Hilary F; Schulze, P Christian; Kato, Tomoko S; Bacchetta, Matthew; Thirapatarapong, Wilawan; Bartels, Matthew N

    2013-06-01

    Studies have shown that patients with poor pre-lung transplant (LTx) right ventricular (RV) function have prolonged post-operative ventilation time and intensive care stay as well as a higher risk of in-hospital death. RV stroke work index (RVSWI) calculates RV workload and contractility. We hypothesized that patients with higher RV workload capacity, indicated by higher RVSWI, would have better outcomes after LTx. A retrospective record review was performed on all LTx patients between 2005 and 2011 who had right heart catheterizations (RHC) 1-year before LTx. In addition, results for echocardiograms and cardiopulmonary exercise testing within 1-year of RHCs were gathered. Mean RVSWI was 9.36 ± 3.59 for 115 patients. There was a significant relation between mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), RVSWI, RV end-diastolic diameter (RVEDd), left atrial dimension (LAD), peak and resting pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide, minute ventilation /volume of carbon dioxide production, and 1-year mortality after LTx. Contrary to our hypothesis, those who survived had lower RVSWI than those who died within 1 year (8.99 ± 3.38 vs 11.6 ± 4.1, p = 0.026). Hospital length of stay significantly correlated with mPAP, RVSWI, left ventricular ejection fraction, percentage of fractional shortening, RVEDd, RV fractional area change, LAD, and RV wall thickness in diastole. Intensive care length of stay also significantly correlated with these variables and with body mass index. RVSWI was significantly different between groups of different RV function, indicating that increased RVSWI is associated with impairment of RV structure and function in patients undergoing LTx evaluation. This study demonstrates an association between 1-year mortality, initial hospital and intensive care length of stay, and pre-LTx RVSWI. Increased mPAP is a known risk for outcomes in LTx patients. Our findings support this fact and also show increased mortality with elevation of RVSWI, demonstrating the value

  7. Buprenorphine Initiation and Linkage to Outpatient Buprenorphine do not Reduce Frequency of Injection Opiate Use Following Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Phoebe A; Liebschutz, Jane M; Anderson, Bradley J; Moreau, Merredith R; Stein, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Buprenorphine has established effectiveness for outpatient treatment of opioid use disorder. Our previously published STOP (Suboxone Transition to Opiate Program) trial showed that buprenorphine induction, stabilization, and linkage to outpatient treatment in opioid-dependent inpatients (injection and non-injection drug users) decreased illicit opioid use over 6months. The present study was a planned subgroup analysis of injection opiate users from STOP. To determine if inpatient buprenorphine initiation and linkage to outpatient buprenorphine reduce injection opiate users' frequency of injection opiate use (IOU). Inpatient injection opiate users at a safety-net hospital were randomized to buprenorphine linkage (induction, stabilization, bridge prescription, and facilitated referral to outpatient treatment) or detoxification (5-day inpatient buprenorphine taper). Conditional fixed-effects Poisson regression was used to estimate the effects of intervention on 30-day (self-report) at 1, 3, and 6months, measured using 30-day timeline follow-back. The secondary outcome was linkage effectiveness, measured as % presenting to initial outpatient buprenorphine visits after hospital discharge. Analysis was limited to persons (n=62 randomized to detoxification and n=51 to linkage) with baseline IOU. There were no significant differences in age, ethnicity, or baseline IOU frequency. At follow-up, linkage patients (70.6%) were significantly more likely (pbuprenorphine visits than detoxification patients (9.7%). However, there was no significant between group difference in the rate of IOU at 1- (IRR=0.73, p=0.32), 3- (IRR=1.20, p=0.54), or 6-month (IRR=0.73, p=0.23) follow-ups. Using person-day analysis, participants self-reported IOU on 5.8% of follow-up days in which they used prescription buprenorphine and 37.5% of non-buprenorphine days. Using a generalized estimating equation, the estimated odds of IOU was 4.57 times higher (pbuprenorphine days. Despite STOP's success in

  8. Acute Kidney Injury in Burn Patients: Clinically Significant Over the Initial Hospitalization and 1 Year After Injury: An Original Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Samih Z; Kothari, Anai N; Kuo, Paul C; Mosier, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    To examine the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) after burn injury as an independent risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality over initial hospitalization and 1-year follow-up. Variability in fluid resuscitation and difficulty recognizing early sepsis are major barriers to preventing AKI after burn injury. Expanding our understanding of the burden AKI has on the clinical course of burn patients would highlight the need for standardized protocols. We queried the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases in the states of Florida and New York during the years 2009 to 2013 for patients over age 18 hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of burn injury using ICD-9 codes. We identified and grouped 18,155 patients, including 1476 with burns >20% total body surface area, by presence of AKI. Outcomes were compared in these cohorts via univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models. During initial hospitalization, AKI was associated with increased pulmonary failure, mechanical ventilation, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, length of stay, cost, and mortality, and also a lower likelihood of being discharged home. One year after injury, AKI was associated with development of chronic kidney disease, conversion to chronic dialysis, hospital readmission, and long-term mortality. AKI is associated with a profound and severe increase in morbidity and mortality in burn patients during initial hospitalization and up to 1 year after injury. Consensus protocols for initial burn resuscitation and early sepsis recognition and treatment are crucial to avoid the consequences of AKI after burn injury.

  9. High initiation and long duration of breastfeeding despite absence of early skin-to-skin contact in Karen refugees on the Thai-Myanmar border: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Adrienne L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early skin-to-skin contact (SSC after birth is recommended as part of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF baby friendly health initiative to promote optimum breastfeeding. This paper reports rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in a low resource environment, where early SSC is not practised, and explores views of pregnant women and midwives surrounding breastfeeding and swaddling. Methods Data from records from a single hospital on the Thai-Myanmar border where refugee women gave birth during a one-year period (2010 were used to determine breastfeeding initiation rates and the time of the first breastfeed, and duration of breastfeeding of the previous alive child in multigravidae. Focus group discussions (FGD were conducted to obtain information from pregnant women attending antenatal care about their intended or previous duration of breastfeeding and views on breastfeeding. Interviews with local midwives explored reasons for high rates of breastfeeding in this setting and the practice of newborn swaddling. Results Of 1404 live births in 2010 in Maela refugee camp there were 982 evaluable mother-newborn pairs, including 80 infants born before 37 weeks gestation. Initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour after birth and exclusive breastfeeding at discharge in term mother-newborn pairs was 91.2% (823/902 and 99.3% (896/902; and before 37 weeks gestation, 48.8% (39/80 and 98.8% (79/80. Reported duration of previous breastfeeding was 19 (range 2 to 72 months. During FGD all primigravidae (n = 17 intended to breastfeed and all multigravidae (n = 33 had previously breastfed; expected or previous duration of feeding was for more than one year or longer. The major theme identified during FGD was breastfeeding is “good”. Women stated their intention to breastfeed with certainty. This certainty was echoed during the interviews with midwifery staff. SSC requires a delay in early swaddling that in

  10. The Evolution of the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario Statement of Principles--A Successful Harmonization Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Katie; Lampson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    To improve efficiency, consistency and transparency in clinical trial contract negotiations with industry sponsors, a Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) committee facilitated the development of standard principles for member hospitals to follow during contract negotiation. Hospitals were encouraged to provide a link to the CAHO…

  11. Validating a hospital medicines formulary survey in the Western Pacific Region--a global hospital pharmacy initiative based on the Basel Statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penm, Jonathan; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, the Basel Statements were developed to reflect the future of hospital pharmacy worldwide. Included were a key set of statements regarding the expanding role of hospital pharmacists' influence on prescribing from the management of medicines formularies to being an active member of the therapeutic decision-making process. This study aimed to validate a survey to measure Basel Statement 26 regarding the role of medicines formularies and the factors that affect its use in the Western Pacific Region (WPR). The survey was developed in consultation with a WPR advisory group and current literature. The survey was translated using the forward-backward method into Chinese (simplified) and Vietnamese. The instrument was pilot tested in a stratified random sample of 260 hospital pharmacy directors in the WPR. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to the data to assess construct validity of the Medicines Formulary Scale that assessed responders' perceptions of their formulary and impact on utilization. The Medicines Formulary Survey was completed by 107 hospital pharmacy directors or equivalent. The survey contained the Medicines Formulary Scale in addition to questions regarding the content and review process of the hospital's formulary as well as demographic questions. Application of the PCA procedures resulted in a parsimonious 2-factor solution in which 33.8% of the variance was explained. The Cronbach alpha for the 17-item scale was found to be 0.70. The Cronbach alpha values for the first and second factor/subscales were 0.76 and 0.68, respectively. The Medicines Formulary Survey appears reliable and valid for assessing hospital pharmacy directors' perceptions of hospital medicine formularies in the WPR. Further development of validated instruments to assess other areas of hospital pharmacy practice will help track the progression of hospital pharmacy and aid in globalization of the profession. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of initial antibiotic therapy (linezolid, vancomycin, daptomycin) on hospital length of stay for complicated skin and soft tissue infections

    OpenAIRE

    Szczypinska, Ewa; Velazquez, Alexander; Salazar, Diana; DeRyke, C Andrew; Raczynski, Beata; Wallace, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    Background Empiric therapy of inpatient skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) generally require methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) coverage. Limited data are available to directly compare the effect of initial antibiotic choice on treatment outcomes and length of stay (LOS). Objective To assess potential differences in length of hospital stay when inpatients with complex skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) were initially treated with either vancomycin, linezolid, or dapt...

  13. U-curve association between timing of renal replacement therapy initiation and in-hospital mortality in postoperative acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chung Shiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI is associated with poor outcomes in surgical patients. This study aims to evaluate whether the timing of renal replacement therapy (RRT initiation affects the in-hospital mortality of patients with postoperative AKI. METHODOLOGY: This multicenter retrospective observational study, which was conducted in the intensive care units (ICUs in a tertiary hospital (National Taiwan University Hospital and its branch hospitals in Taiwan between January, 2002, and April, 2009, included adult patients with postoperative AKI who underwent RRT for predefined indications. The demographic data, comorbid diseases, types of surgery and RRT, and the indications for RRT were documented. Patients were categorized according to the period of time between the ICU admission and RRT initiation as the early (EG, ≦1 day, intermediate (IG, 2-3 days, and late (LG, ≧4 days groups. The in-hospital mortality rate censored at 180 day was defined as the endpoint. RESULTS: Six hundred forty-eight patients (418 men, mean age 63.0±15.9 years were enrolled, and 379 patients (58.5% died during the hospitalization. Both the estimated probability of death and the in-hospital mortality rates of the three groups represented U-curves. According to the Cox proportional hazard method, LG (hazard ratio, 1.527; 95% confidence interval, 1.152-2.024; P = 0.003, compared with IG group, age (1.014; 1.006-1.021, diabetes (1.279; 1.022-1.601; P = 0.031, cirrhosis (2.147; 1.421-3.242, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support (1.811; 1.391-2.359, initial neurological dysfunction (1.448; 1.107-1.894; P = 0.007, pre-RRT mean arterial pressure (0.988; 0.981-0.995, inotropic equivalent (1.006; 1.001-1.012; P = 0.013, APACHE II scores (1.055; 1.037-1.073, and sepsis (1.939; 1.536-2.449 were independent predictors of the in-hospital mortality (All P<0.001 except otherwise stated. CONCLUSIONS: The current study found a U

  14. Association of national initiatives to improve cardiac arrest management with rates of bystander intervention and patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K.; Folke, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    temporal changes in bystander resuscitation attempts and survival during a 10-year period in which several national initiatives were taken to increase rates of bystander resuscitation and improve advanced care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for which...

  15. The use of resource allocation approach for hospitals based on the initial efficiency by using data envelopment analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Yazdian Hossein Abadi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recourse allocation is very important in today’s highly competitive environment to enhance the quality and reduce costs due to limited resources and unlimited needs of the society. The aim of this study was to implement resource allocation in order to improve the efficiency of hospital. Method: This is a mixed method study. The data used in this paper are secondary data related to the 30 large acute and general hospitals in the US. Bed, service mix, full-time equivalent (FTE, and operational expenses are input indicators in hospital, and adjusted admissions and outpatient visits are output indicators. Using goal programming (GP model and data envelopment analysis (DEA model with a common weights, we suggest three scenarios for resource allocation and budget allocation. “Resource allocation based on efficiency”, “budget allocation based on efficiency” and “two stage allocation of budget”. The first scenario was used for allocating the resources and the second and third ones for allocating budget to decision making units (DMUs. The data were analyzed by LINGO software. Results: Before the allocation, four hospitals were efficient and the efficiency of six hospitals was less than 50%, but after allocation, in the first case of the first scenario 14 hospitals, 11 hospitals in the second case of the first scenario, 24 hospitals in the second scenario and 17 hospitals in the third scenario were efficient, and it is an important point that after the allocation, efficiency of all hospitals increased. Conclusion: This study can be useful for hospital administrators; it can help them to allocate their resource and budget and increase the efficiency of their hospitals.

  16. Not All Clefts Are Created Equal: Patterns of Hospital-Based Care Use among Children with Cleft Lip and Palate within 4 Years of Initial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligh, Cassandra A; Fox, Justin P; Swanson, Jordan; Yu, Jason W; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    This study compares hospital-based care and associated charges among children with cleft lip, cleft palate, or both, and identifies subgroups generating the greatest cumulative hospital charges. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of cleft lip, cleft palate, or cleft lip and palate who underwent initial surgery from 2006 to 2008 in four U.S. states. Primary outcome was hospital-based care-emergency, outpatient, inpatient-within 4 years of surgery. Regression models compared outcomes and classification tree analysis identified patients at risk for being in the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. The authors identified 4571 children with cleft lip (18.2 percent), cleft palate (39.2 percent), or cleft lip and palate (42.6 percent). Medical comorbidity was frequent across all groups, with feeding difficulty (cleft lip, 2.4 percent; cleft palate, 13.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 6.0 percent; p cleft lip, 1.8 percent; cleft palate, 9.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 3.6 percent; p cleft palate were most likely to return to the hospital (p cleft lip group, yet comparable among those with cleft palate and cleft lip and palate (p cleft palate cohort (cleft lip, $56,966; cleft palate, $106,090; cleft lip and palate, $91,263; p cleft lip versus cleft palate with or without cleft lip), and age at initial surgery were the most important factors associated with the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. Cleft lip and palate children experience a high rate of hospital-based care early in life, with degree of medical comorbidity being a significant burden. Understanding this relationship and associated needs may help deliver more efficient, patient-centered care.

  17. Improving acute patient flow and resolving emergency department overcrowding in New Zealand hospitals--the major challenges and the promising initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardagh, Michael W; Tonkin, Gary; Possenniskie, Clare

    2011-10-14

    To determine the most common challenges to improving acute patient flow and resolving emergency department (ED) overcrowding in New Zealand hospitals, and to share some of the promising initiatives that have been implemented in response to them. To facilitate progress towards achievement of the Shorter Stays in Emergency Departments Health Target (the Target), the authors visited every District Health Board (DHB) in New Zealand. These visits followed a standardised visit format and subsequent to each visit a report was produced that noted the observed challenges, initiatives and successes in relation to the DHB's pursuit of the Target. Using these reports, the significant challenges and the promising initiatives across all of the DHBs were collated. Access to hospital beds, access to diagnostic tests and inpatient team delays were the most common challenges, followed by increased demand for ED services, ED facility deficiencies, ED staff deficiencies, delay to discharge of inpatients, difficulty engaging hospital clinical staff in changes, difficulty accessing aged care beds, and problems at nights and weekends. Promising initiatives were noted in relation to each of these. To improve acute care, resolve ED overcrowding and achieve the Target we need a comprehensive, whole of system approach and some significant changes to the way we use our physical and human resources. To address common challenges we need to share our experiences and expertise.

  18. Disparities in initial presentation and treatment outcomes of diabetic foot ulcers in a public, private, and Veterans Administration hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Sheila N; Warren, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    Disparities in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) treatment outcomes are well described, although few studies identify risk factors contributing to disparate healing and amputation rates. In a unique academic center serving urban public, private, and veteran patients, we investigated amputation and healing rates and specific risk factors for disparate treatment outcomes. A retrospective chart review of diabetic patients with a new diagnosis of a foot ulcer at geographically adjacent, but independent public, private, and Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals was conducted. Healing and lower extremity amputation outcomes were assessed. Across the three hospitals, 234 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients at the VA hospital were older (mean 72.5 years; P ulcers (mean 14.1%; P diabetes (mean 12.8 years; P = 0.02), but were more poorly controlled than VA and private hospital patients (P ≤ 0.001). Prior amputation (odds ratio [OR] 1.97; P = 0.016) and non-Caucasian race (OR 2.42; P = 0.004) increased the risk of amputation on multivariate analysis. Osteomyelitis (P = 0.0371) and gangrene (P ulcers. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. [Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture: initial stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Claudia Tartaglia; Laguardia, Josué; Martins, Mônica

    2012-11-01

    Patient safety culture assessment allows hospitals to identify and prospectively manage safety issues in work routines. This article aimed to describe the cross-cultural adaptation of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) into Brazilian Portuguese. A universalist approach was adopted to assess conceptual, item, and semantic equivalence. The methodology involved the following stages: (1) translation of the questionnaire into Portuguese; (2) back-translation into English; (3) an expert panel to prepare a draft version; and (4) assessment of verbal understanding of the draft by a sample of the target population. The questionnaire was translated into Portuguese, and the scale's final version included 42 items. The target population sample assessed all the items as easy to understand. The questionnaire has been translated into Portuguese and adapted to the Brazilian hospital context, but it is necessary to assess its measurement equivalence, external validity, and reproducibility.

  20. Hospital readmissions following initiation of nebulized arformoterol tartrate or nebulized short-acting beta-agonists among inpatients treated for COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollu, Vamsi; Ernst, Frank R; Karafilidis, John; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Robinson, Scott B; Braman, Sidney S

    2013-01-01

    Background Inpatient admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represent a significant economic burden, accounting for over half of direct medical costs. Reducing 30-day readmissions could save health care resources while improving patient care. Recently, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act authorized reduced Medicare payments to hospitals with excess readmissions for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. Starting in October 2014, hospitals will also be penalized for excess COPD readmissions. This retrospective database study investigated whether use of arformoterol, a nebulized long-acting beta agonist, during an inpatient admission, had different 30-day all-cause readmission rates compared with treatment using nebulized short-acting beta agonists (SABAs, albuterol, or levalbuterol). Methods A US nationally representative hospital database was used to study adults aged ≥40 years, discharged between January, 2006 and March, 2010, and with a diagnosis of COPD. Patients receiving arformoterol on ≥80% of days following treatment initiation were compared with patients receiving a nebulized SABA during hospitalization. Arformoterol and nebulized SABA patients were matched (1:2) for age, sex, severity of inpatient admission, and primary/secondary COPD diagnosis. Logistic regression compared the odds of readmission while adjusting for age, sex, race, admission type, severity, primary/secondary diagnosis, other respiratory medication use, respiratory therapy use, oxygen use, hospital size, and teaching status. Results This retrospective study compared 812 arformoterol patients and 1,651 nebulized SABA patients who were discharged from their initial COPD hospital admission. An intensive care unit stay was more common among arformoterol patients (32.1% versus 18.4%, P<0.001), suggesting more severe symptoms during the initial admission. The observed readmission rate was significantly lower for arformoterol patients than

  1. Derivation and Internal Validation of a Mortality Prediction Tool for Initial Survivors of Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Mathias J; Moskowitz, Ari; Raymond, Tia T

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a clinical prediction score for predicting mortality in children following return of spontaneous circulation after in-hospital cardiac arrest. DESIGN: Observational study using prospectively collected data. SETTING: This was an analysis using data from the Get With The Guid...

  2. Predictors for total hospital and cardiology cost claims among patients with atrial fibrillation initiating dabigatran or acenocoumarol in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M S; van Leent, M W J; Tieleman, R G; Jansman, F G A; Cao, Q; Postma, M J; van Hulst, M

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) has increased over the past years due to aging of the population, and healthcare costs associated with AF reflect a significant financial burden. The aim of this study was to explore predictors for the real-world AF-related in-hospital costs in

  3. Implementation and evaluation of a multisite drug usage evaluation program across Australian hospitals - a quality improvement initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background With the use of medicines being a broad and extensive part of health management, mechanisms to ensure quality use of medicines are essential. Drug usage evaluation (DUE) is an evidence-based quality improvement methodology, designed to improve the quality, safety and cost-effectiveness of drug use. The purpose of this paper is to describe a national DUE methodology used to improve health care delivery across the continuum through multi-faceted intervention involving audit and feedback, academic detailing and system change, and a qualitative assessment of the methodology, as illustrated by the Acute Postoperative Pain Management (APOP) project. Methods An established methodology, consisting of a baseline audit of inpatient medical records, structured patient interviews and general practitioner surveys, followed by an educational intervention and follow-up audit, is used. Australian hospitals, including private, public, metropolitan and regional, are invited to participate on a voluntary basis. De-identified data collected by hospitals are collated and evaluated nationally to provide descriptive comparative analyses. Hospitals benchmark their practices against state and national results to facilitate change. The educational intervention consists of academic detailing, group education, audit and feedback, point-of-prescribing prompts and system changes. A repeat data collection is undertaken to assess changes in practice. An online qualitative survey was undertaken to evaluate the APOP program. Qualitative assessment of hospitals' perceptions of the effectiveness of the overall DUE methodology and changes in procedure/prescribing/policy/clinical practice which resulted from participation were elicited. Results 62 hospitals participated in the APOP project. Among 23 respondents to the evaluation survey, 18 (78%) reported improvements in the documentation of pain scores at their hospital. 15 (65%) strongly agreed or agreed that participation in APOP directly

  4. Implementation and evaluation of a multisite drug usage evaluation program across Australian hospitals - a quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Marion B

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the use of medicines being a broad and extensive part of health management, mechanisms to ensure quality use of medicines are essential. Drug usage evaluation (DUE is an evidence-based quality improvement methodology, designed to improve the quality, safety and cost-effectiveness of drug use. The purpose of this paper is to describe a national DUE methodology used to improve health care delivery across the continuum through multi-faceted intervention involving audit and feedback, academic detailing and system change, and a qualitative assessment of the methodology, as illustrated by the Acute Postoperative Pain Management (APOP project. Methods An established methodology, consisting of a baseline audit of inpatient medical records, structured patient interviews and general practitioner surveys, followed by an educational intervention and follow-up audit, is used. Australian hospitals, including private, public, metropolitan and regional, are invited to participate on a voluntary basis. De-identified data collected by hospitals are collated and evaluated nationally to provide descriptive comparative analyses. Hospitals benchmark their practices against state and national results to facilitate change. The educational intervention consists of academic detailing, group education, audit and feedback, point-of-prescribing prompts and system changes. A repeat data collection is undertaken to assess changes in practice. An online qualitative survey was undertaken to evaluate the APOP program. Qualitative assessment of hospitals' perceptions of the effectiveness of the overall DUE methodology and changes in procedure/prescribing/policy/clinical practice which resulted from participation were elicited. Results 62 hospitals participated in the APOP project. Among 23 respondents to the evaluation survey, 18 (78% reported improvements in the documentation of pain scores at their hospital. 15 (65% strongly agreed or agreed that

  5. Initial Results of the Master's Degree Programme in "Leadership in Medicine" – Impact on hospital-based follow-on training of doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulfert, Chris-Henrik; Hoitz, Joachim; Senger, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, which was jointly conducted by a hospital and a university, describes the development of the Master's Degree Programme in Leadership in Medicine, a course designed to supplement medical specialty training. The aim of the pilot project is to demonstrate how hospital-based projects on personnel and organisational development undertaken under academic supervision can be used to increase leadership responsibility among doctors whose duties include providing initial and follow-on training and to professionalise medical specialty training as a leadership task. This need arose from the nationwide requirements and an internal audit regarding follow-on training. The version of the degree programme described below aims to further the personnel development of the participants in the field of didactics. Method: Each of the nine modules is made up of two classroom-based phases and one distance learning phase. The distance learning phase involves undertaking hospital-based projects on personnel and organisational development under academic supervision. The pilot phase participants were hospital doctors who, as part of their duties, hold leadership responsibility or are involved in the follow-on training of doctors. Results: The 17 participants successfully implemented more than 30 hospital-based projects during the distance learning phases of the nine modules. These projects included the development of medical specialty curricula, relevant didactic methods and evaluation design and were subsequently presented and subjected to reflection in interdisciplinary groups. The project presentation together with the project report were regarded as proof of competency. Conclusion: In addition to enhancing participant competency, the degree model described, which interlinks theory and practice, promotes organisational development through the implementation of projects undertaken under academic supervision. This has a double impact on the quality of medical

  6. Initial Results of the Master's Degree Programme in "Leadership in Medicine" – Impact on hospital-based follow-on training of doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulfert, Chris-Henrik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This pilot project, which was jointly conducted by a hospital and a university, describes the development of the Master's Degree Programme in Leadership in Medicine, a course designed to supplement medical specialty training. The aim of the pilot project is to demonstrate how hospital-based projects on personnel and organisational development undertaken under academic supervision can be used to increase leadership responsibility among doctors whose duties include providing initial and follow-on training and to professionalise medical specialty training as a leadership task. This need arose from the nationwide requirements and an internal audit regarding follow-on training. The version of the degree programme described below aims to further the personnel development of the participants in the field of didactics. Method: Each of the nine modules is made up of two classroom-based phases and one distance learning phase. The distance learning phase involves undertaking hospital-based projects on personnel and organisational development under academic supervision. The pilot phase participants were hospital doctors who, as part of their duties, hold leadership responsibility or are involved in the follow-on training of doctors.Results: The 17 participants successfully implemented more than 30 hospital-based projects during the distance learning phases of the nine modules. These projects included the development of medical specialty curricula, relevant didactic methods and evaluation design and were subsequently presented and subjected to reflection in interdisciplinary groups. The project presentation together with the project report were regarded as proof of competency. Conclusion: In addition to enhancing participant competency, the degree model described, which interlinks theory and practice, promotes organisational development through the implementation of projects undertaken under academic supervision. This has a double impact on the

  7. Hospital length of stay in patients initiated on direct oral anticoagulants versus warfarin for venous thromboembolism: a real-world single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badreldin, Hisham

    2018-04-06

    This study was conducted to describe the real-world hospital length of stay in patients treated with all of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) versus warfarin for new-onset venous thromboembolism (VTE) at a large, tertiary, academic medical center. A retrospective cohort analysis of all adult patients diagnosed with acute onset VTE was conducted. Of the 441 patients included, 261 (57%) patients received DOACs versus 180 (41%) patients received warfarin. In the DOAC group, a total of 92 (35%) patients received rivaroxaban, followed by 83 (32%) patients received apixaban, 50 (19%) patients received dabigatran, and 36 (14%) patients received edoxaban. Patients initiated on DOACs had a statistically significant shorter hospital length of stay compared to patients initiated on warfarin (median 3 days, [IQR 0-5] vs. 8 days [IQR 5-11], P < 0.05). Despite the shorter hospital length of stay in patients receiving DOACs, the overall reported differences between the DOACs group and the warfarin group in terms of recurrent VTE, major bleeding, intracranial bleeding, and gastrointestinal bleeding at 3 and 6 months were deemed to be statistically insignificant.

  8. Enhancing Skills for Improved Infant and Young Child Nutrition : Baby Friendly Village Approach, Takhar Province, Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    Afghanistan has high rates of malnutrition and a high infant mortality rate of 77/1000 births. Infant and young child feeding practices are a key determinant of malnutrition in Afghanistan, and thus far, relatively little attention has been given to this issue. This report was prepared to inform the scaling up of infant and young child feeding through the Government of Afghanistan's Basic...

  9. Target temperature management of 33°C and 36°C in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial non-shockable rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydland, Martin; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Erlinge, David

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite a lack of randomized trials in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with an initial non-shockable rhythm (NSR), guidelines recommend induced hypothermia to be considered in these patients. We assessed the effect on outcome of two levels of induced hypothermia...... in comatose patient resuscitated from NSR. METHODS: Hundred and seventy-eight patients out of 950 in the TTM trial with an initial NSR were randomly assigned to targeted temperature management at either 33°C (TTM33, n=96) or 36°C (TTM36, n=82). We assessed mortality, neurologic function (Cerebral Performance...... Score (CPC) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS)), and organ dysfunction (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score). RESULTS: Patients with NSR were older, had longer time to ROSC, less frequently had bystander CPR and had higher lactate levels at admission compared to patients with shockable rhythm...

  10. Initial Management of Poisoned Patients in Emergency Medical Services and Non-poisoning Hospitals in Tehran: The Comparison between Expected and Performed Managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hassanian-Moghadam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no clear data on the adherence of emergency medical services (EMS paramedics and hospital staff rather than those working in poisoning centers to the guidelines for managing acutely poisoned patients in developing countries. Methods: During a 6-month period, all EMS-managed poisoned patients along with those initially managed in a non-poisoning center before being referred to a poisoning hospital in Tehran, Iran, were instructed. Then the indications for administrating the activated charcoal (AC as well as performing gastric lavage (GL and tracheal intubation were studied and compared to the recommended guidelines. Results: A total of 3347 cases, including 1859 males (55.6%, were evaluated. There were significant differences between expected and performed endotracheal intubations in both EMS and other medical centers (P-value = 0.002 and 0.001, respectively as well as the administration of GL and AC in other medical centers (P-values= 0.003 and 0.03, respectively. Conclusion: More extensive educational programs should be established to improve the preliminary management of poisoned patients performed by EMS paramedics and staff of hospitals other than poisoning centers.

  11. Initial presenting electrocardiogram as determinant for hospital admission in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain: a pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Prasanna K; Smith, Karen M; Conti, C Richard

    2007-11-01

    Evaluation of chest pain accounts for millions of costly Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospital admissions annually. Of these, approximately 10-20% are myocardial infarctions (MI). Patients with chest pain whose initial electrocardiogram (ECG) is normal do not require hospital admission for evaluation and management of a possible myocardial infarction. The medical records of a consecutive cohort of 250 patients who presented to the ED with chest pain and were admitted by the ED physician to a cardiology inpatient service of an academic tertiary care medical center were reviewed. Reasons for admission to hospital was to rule out an acute coronary syndrome, specifically, myocardial infarction. The initial ECG of each patient was evaluated for abnormalities and compared with the final diagnosis. Of the 75 patients presenting with normal ECGs (normal, upright T waves and isoelectric ST segments), 1 (1.3%) was subsequently diagnosed with a myocardial infarction by Troponin I elevation alone. Of the 55 patients presenting with abnormal ECGs but no clear evidence of ischemia [i.e., left bundle branch block (LBBB), right bundle branch block (RBBB), left anterior hemiblock (LAH)], 2 (3.6%) were diagnosed with MI. Of the 48 patients presenting with abnormal ECGs questionable for ischemia (nonspecific ST and T wave changes that were not clearly ST segment elevation or depression), 7 (14.6%) were diagnosed with an MI. Of the 72 patients who presented with abnormal ECGs showing ischemia (acute ST segment elevation and/or depression), 39 (54.2%) were shown to have evidence for MI. Patients who presented with normal ECGs (category 1) were extremely low risk for acute myocardial infarction. Patients with abnormal ECGs but no evidence of definite ischemia (category 2) had a relatively low incidence of MI. Patients with abnormal ECGs questionable for ischemia (category 3) had an intermediate risk of acute myocardial infarction. The majority of patients with abnormal ECGs

  12. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and model for end-stage liver disease score accurately predict the in-hospital mortality of black African patients with decompensated cirrhosis at initial hospitalization: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahassadi AK

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Alassan Kouamé Mahassadi,1 Justine Laure Konang Nguieguia,1 Henriette Ya Kissi,1 Anthony Afum-Adjei Awuah,2 Aboubacar Demba Bangoura,1 Stanislas Adjeka Doffou,1 Alain Koffi Attia1 1Medicine and Hepatogastroenterology Unit, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Yopougon, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire; 2Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine, Kumasi, Ghana Background: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD predict short-term mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Prediction of mortality at initial hospitalization is unknown in black African patients with decompensated cirrhosis.Aim: This study aimed to look at the role of MELD score and SIRS as the predictors of morbidity and mortality at initial hospitalization.Patients and methods: In this retrospective cohort study, we enrolled 159 patients with cirrhosis (median age: 49 years, 70.4% males. The role of Child–Pugh–Turcotte (CPT score, MELD score, and SIRS on mortality was determined by the Kaplan–Meier method, and the prognosis factors were assessed with Cox regression model.Results: At initial hospitalization, 74.2%, 20.1%, and 37.7% of the patients with cirrhosis showed the presence of ascites, hepatorenal syndrome, and esophageal varices, respectively. During the in-hospital follow-up, 40 (25.2% patients died. The overall incidence of mortality was found to be 3.1 [95% confidence interval (CI: 2.2–4.1] per 100 person-days. Survival probabilities were found to be high in case of patients who were SIRS negative (log-rank test= 4.51, p=0.03 and in case of patients with MELD score ≤16 (log-rank test=7.26, p=0.01 compared to the patients who were SIRS positive and those with MELD score >16. Only SIRS (hazard ratio (HR=3.02, [95% CI: 1.4–7.4], p=0.01 and MELD score >16 (HR=2.2, [95% CI: 1.1–4.3], p=0.02 were independent predictors of mortality in multivariate analysis except CPT, which was not relevant in our study

  13. Trends in care processes and survival following prehospital resuscitation improvement initiatives for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in British Columbia, 2006-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunau, Brian; Kawano, Takahisa; Dick, William; Straight, Ronald; Connolly, Helen; Schlamp, Robert; Scheuermeyer, Frank X; Fordyce, Christopher B; Barbic, David; Tallon, John; Christenson, Jim

    2018-04-01

    British Columbia (BC) Emergency Health Services implemented a strategy to improve outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), focusing on paramedic-led high-quality on-scene resuscitation. We measured changes in care metrics and survival trends. This was a post-hoc study of prospectively identified consecutive non-traumatic ambulance-treated adult OHCAs from 2006 to 2016 within BC's four metropolitan areas. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge; we also described available favourable neurological outcomes (mRS ≤3). We tested the significance of year-by-year trends in baseline characteristics, and calculated risk-adjusted survival rates using multivariable Poisson regression. We included 15 145 patients. In univariate analyses there were significant increases in bystander CPR, chest compression fraction, advanced life support attendance, duration of resuscitation until advanced airway placement, duration of resuscitation until termination, and overall scene time. There was a significant decrease in initial shockable rhythms, bystander witnessed arrests, and transports initiated prior to ROSC. Survival and the proportion of survivors with favourable neurological outcomes increased significantly. In adjusted analyses, there was an improvement in return of spontaneous circulation (risk-adjusted rate 41% in 2006 to 51% in 2016; adjusted rate ratio per year 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.02, p trend) and survival at hospital discharge (risk-adjusted rate 8.6% in 2006 to 16% in 2016; adjusted rate ratio per year 1.05, 95% CI 1.04-1.06, p trend). From 2006 to 2016 BC's provincial ambulance system prioritized paramedic-led on-scene resuscitation, during which time there were significant improvements in patient outcomes. Our data may assist other systems, providing a model for prehospital resuscitation quality improvement. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical predictors of cardiac syncope at initial evaluation in patients referred urgently to a general hospital: the EGSYS score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, A; Ungar, A; Maggi, R; Giada, F; Petix, N R; De Santo, T; Menozzi, C; Brignole, M

    2008-12-01

    To develop, in patients referred for syncope to an emergency department (ED), a diagnostic score to identify those patients likely to have a cardiac cause. Prospective cohort study. ED of 14 general hospitals. 516 consecutive patients with unexplained syncope. Subjects underwent a diagnostic evaluation on adherence to Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology. The clinical features of syncope were analysed using a standard 52-item form. In a validation cohort of 260 patients the predictive value of symptoms/signs was evaluated, a point score was developed and then validated in a cohort of 256 other patients. Diagnosis of cardiac syncope, mortality. Abnormal ECG and/or heart disease, palpitations before syncope, syncope during effort or in supine position, absence of autonomic prodromes and absence of predisposing and/or precipitating factors were found to be predictors of cardiac syncope. To each variable a score from +4 to -1 was assigned to the magnitude of regression coefficient. A score >or=3 identified cardiac syncope with a sensitivity of 95%/92% and a specificity of 61%/69% in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. During follow-up (mean (SD) 614 (73) days) patients with score >or=3 had a higher total mortality than patients with a score management of patients with syncope in an ED.

  15. [Initial experience in the laparoscopic treatment of benign and malignant gynaecological diseases in the Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad in Oaxaca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Ciriaco, Sergio; Isla-Ortiz, David; Palomeque-Lopez, Antonio; García-Espinoza, Jaime Aron; Jarquín-Arremilla, Arturo; Lechuga-García, Néstor Alonso

    The history of laparoscopic surgery in gynaecological diseases progressed with the advances of Semm, as well as with the development of tools, equipment, and energy that led to its development in all surgical areas, including oncology. To present the initial experience in the laparoscopic treatment of benign and malignant gynaecological disease in the Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad in Oaxaca. An analysis was performed on a total of 44 cases, distributed into: type III radical hysterectomy for invasive cervical cancer, hysterectomy type I cervical cancer in situ, extrafascial hysterectomy for benign disease, routine endometrium, ovary and routine salpingo-oophorectomy. The variables included age, BMI, surgical time, bleeding, intraoperative and postoperative complications, conversion, hospital stay, and pathology report. Hysterectomy type III; age 40.2 years, BMI 25.8kg/m 2 , 238ml bleeding, operative time 228min, 2.6-day hospital stay, intraoperative or postoperative complications, tumour size 1.1cm, 14 lymph nodes dissected, vaginal and negative parametrical edge. Type I hysterectomy cervical cancer in situ: 51 years, BMI 23.8kg/m 2 , 80ml bleeding, operative time 127minutes, uterus of 9cm, length of stay of 2 days, a conversion by external iliac artery injury, with bleeding of 1500ml. Routine endometrium: 50.3 years, BMI 30.3kg/m 2 , 83ml bleeding, operative time 180minutes, uterus 12.6cm, length of stay 2.3 days, no complications. The management of benign and malignant pelvic diseases using laparoscopy is feasible and safe, with shorter hospital stays and a prompt recovery to daily activities. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic effects of adrenaline (epinephrine) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial pulseless electrical activity (PEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordseth, Trond; Olasveengen, Theresa Mariero; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Wik, Lars; Steen, Petter Andreas; Skogvoll, Eirik

    2012-08-01

    In cardiac arrest, pulseless electrical activity (PEA) is a challenging clinical syndrome. In a randomized study comparing intravenous (i.v.) access and drugs versus no i.v. access or drugs during advanced life support (ALS), adrenaline (epinephrine) improved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in patients with PEA. Originating from this study, we investigated the time-dependent effects of adrenaline on clinical state transitions in patients with initial PEA, using a non-parametric multi-state statistical model. Patients with available defibrillator recordings were included, of whom 101 received adrenaline and 73 did not. There were significantly more state transitions in the adrenaline group than in the no-adrenaline group (rate ratio = 1.6, pAdrenaline markedly increased the rate of transition from PEA to ROSC during ALS and slowed the rate of being declared dead; e.g. by 20 min 20% of patients in the adrenaline group had been declared dead and 25% had obtained ROSC, whereas 50% in the no-adrenaline group have been declared dead and 15% had obtained ROSC. The differential effect of adrenaline could be seen after approx. 10 min of ALS for most transitions. For both groups the probability of deteriorating from PEA to asystole was highest during the first 15 min. Adrenaline increased the rate of transition from PEA to ventricular fibrillation or -tachycardia (VF/VT), and from ROSC to VF/VT. Adrenaline has notable clinical effects during ALS in patients with initial PEA. The drug extends the time window for ROSC to develop, but also renders the patient more unstable. Further research should investigate the optimal dose, timing and mode of adrenaline administration during ALS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Susceptibility to transmitting HIV in patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in rural district hospitals in Cameroon (Stratall ANRS 12110/ESTHER Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndziessi, Gilbert; Cohen, Julien; Kouanfack, Charles; Marcellin, Fabienne; Carrieri, Maria Patrizia; Carierri, Maria Patrizia; Laborde-Balen, Gabrièle; Protopopescu, Camélia; Aghokeng, Avelin Fobang; Moatti, Jean-Paul; Spire, Bruno; Delaporte, Eric; Laurent, Christian; Boyer, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Using cohort data nested in a randomized trial conducted in Cameroon, this study aimed to investigate time trends and predictors of the susceptibility to transmitting HIV during the first 24 months of treatment. The outcome, susceptibility to transmitting HIV, was defined as reporting inconsistent condom use and experiencing incomplete virological suppression. Mixed logistic regressions were performed to identify predictors of this outcome among 250 patients reporting to have had sexual relationships either with HIV-negative or unknown HIV status partner(s). Despite an initial decrease from 76% at M0 to 50% at M6, the rate of inconsistent condom use significantly increased from M12 (59%) to M24 (66%) (p = 0.017). However, the proportion of patients susceptible to transmitting HIV significantly decreased over follow-up from 76% at M0, to 50% at M6, 31% at M12 and 27% at M24 (p<0.001). After controlling for age, gender and intervention group, we found that perceiving healthcare staff's readiness to listen as poor (adjusted odds ratios (AOR) [95% Confidence Interval (CI)] = 1.87 [1.01-3.46]), reporting to have sexual relationships more than once per week (AOR [95%CI] = 2.52 [1.29-4.93]), having more than one sexual partner (AOR [95%CI] = 2.53 [1.21-5.30]) and desiring a/another child (AOR [95%CI] = 2.07 [1.10-3.87]) were all associated with a higher risk of being susceptible to transmitting HIV. Conversely, time since ART initiation (AOR [95%CI] = 0.66 [0.53-0.83] for an extra 6 months and ART adherence (AOR [95%CI] = 0.33 [0.15-0.72]) were significantly associated with a lower risk of being susceptible to transmitting HIV. The decrease observed in the susceptibility to transmitting HIV suggests that fear of behavioural disinhibition should not be a barrier to universal access to ART. However, developing adequate preventive interventions matching patients' expectations -like the desire to have children- and strengthening healthcare staff's counselling skills are

  18. Perspectives of staff nurses of the reasons for and the nature of patient-initiated call lights: an exploratory survey study in four USA hospitals

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    Tzeng Huey-Ming

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little research has been done on patient call light use and staff response time, which were found to be associated with inpatient falls and satisfaction. Nurses' perspectives may moderate or mediate the aforementioned relationships. This exploratory study intended to understand staff's perspectives about call lights, staff responsiveness, and the reasons for and the nature of call light use. It also explored differences among hospitals and identified significant predictors of the nature of call light use. Methods This cross-sectional, multihospital survey study was conducted from September 2008 to January 2009 in four hospitals located in the Midwestern region of the United States. A brief survey was used. All 2309 licensed and unlicensed nursing staff members who provide direct patient care in 27 adult care units were invited to participate. A total of 808 completed surveys were retrieved for an overall response rate of 35%. The SPSS 16.0 Window version was used. Descriptive and binary logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results The primary reasons for patient-initiated calls were for toileting assistance, pain medication, and intravenous problems. Toileting assistance was the leading reason. Each staff responded to 6 to 7 calls per hour and a call was answered within 4 minutes (estimated. 49% of staff perceived that patient-initiated calls mattered to patient safety. 77% agreed that that these calls were meaningful. 52% thought that these calls required the attention of nursing staff. 53% thought that answering calls prevented them from doing the critical aspects of their role. Staff's perceptions about the nature of calls varied across hospitals. Junior staff tended to overlook the importance of answering calls. A nurse participant tended to perceive calls as more likely requiring nursing staff's attention than a nurse aide participant. Conclusions If answering calls was a high priority among nursing tasks, staff

  19. Expansion of the ten steps to successful breastfeeding into neonatal intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg; Häggkvist, Anna-Pia; Hansen, Mette Ness

    2012-01-01

    and infants: 1. The staff attitude to the mother must focus on the individual mother and her situation. 2. The facility must provide family-centered care, supported by the environment. 3. The health care system must ensure continuity of care, that is, continuity of pre-, peri-, and postnatal care and post......The World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, Updated, and Expanded for Integrated Care (2009) identifies the need for expanding the guidelines originally developed for maternity units to include neonatal intensive care. For this purpose......-discharge care. The goal of the expert group is to create a final document, the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative for Neonatal Units, including standards and criteria for each of the 3 Guiding Principles, Ten Steps, and the Code; to develop tools for self-appraisal and monitoring compliance with the guidelines...

  20. [A scale for early assessment of risk of death and myocardial infarction during initial hospitalization of patients with acute coronary syndromes (based on data from the RECORD registry)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Érlikh, A D

    2010-01-01

    Independent predictors of death and death or myocardial infarction (MI) during initial hospitalization of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) were determined using database of Russian independent ACS registry RECORD. These predictors (admission Killip class II, ST-segment elevation 1 mm, systolic blood pressure 100 mm Hg, hemoglobin <110 g/L, age 65 years, history of diabetes) were attributed equal weight (1 point) and combined in a prognostic scale for assessment of risk of inhospital death and death or MI. The scale did not include markers of necrosis, and the most time consuming component was measurement of hemoglobin. Sensitivity and specificity of risk scores for prediction of death were 78.5%. The use of GRACE score in this group of patients gave similar results. These preliminary data require confirmation on larger populations of patients with ACS.

  1. Iniciativas para el control del tabaquismo: la Red Catalana de Hospitales Libres de Humo Initiatives for smoking control: The Catalan Network of Smoke-Free Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Méndez

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available La Red Catalana de Hospitales Libres de Humo, promovida por el Instituto Catalán de Oncología (ICO y en funcionamiento desde el año 2000, cuenta en la actualidad (diciembre, 2003 con 45 de los 66 hospitales de utilización pública de Cataluña. El funcionamiento organizativo mediante una red favorece y refuerza el intercambio de experiencias en tiempo real, el apoyo mutuo respecto a instrumentos educativos, de formación y evaluación, y posibilita la realización de una formación continuada común. Iniciativas de este tipo, a partir de un trabajo consensuado y en red, facilitan el avance en el control del consumo de tabaco.The Catalan Network of Smoke-Free Hospitals was created by the Catalan Institute of Oncology in 2000. Currently (December 2003, 45 of the 66 hospitals of the Public Health System in Catalonia are members of this network. Organization through a network promotes and strengthens the exchange of experiences in real time. It provides mutual support in education, training and evaluation and enables common continuing training. Such an initiative, based on consensual work through a network, facilitates progress in tobacco control.

  2. Breastfeeding practices and policies in WHO European Region Member States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci Bosi, Ayse Tulay; Eriksen, Kamilla Gehrt; Sobko, Tanja; Wijnhoven, Trudy M A; Breda, João

    2016-03-01

    To provide an update on current practices and policy development status concerning breastfeeding in the WHO European Region. National surveys and studies conducted by national health institutions were prioritized. Sub-national data were included where no national data or studies existed. Information on national breastfeeding policies was collected mainly from the WHO Seventh Meeting of Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative Coordinators and European Union projects. Owing to the different data sources and methods, any comparisons between countries must be made with caution. WHO European Member States. Data from fifty-three WHO European Member States were investigated; however, a large proportion had not reported any data. Rates of early initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding and continued breastfeeding to 1 year all varied considerably within the WHO European Region. Exclusive breastfeeding rates declined considerably after 4 months, and were low in infants under 6 months and at 6 months of age. The majority of the countries with existing data reported having a national infant and young child feeding policy and the establishment of a national committee on breastfeeding or infant and young child feeding. The majority of the countries with existing data reported having baby-friendly hospitals, although the proportion of baby-friendly hospitals to the total number of national hospitals with maternity units was low in most countries. Breastfeeding practices within the WHO European Region, especially exclusive breastfeeding rates, are far from complying with the WHO recommendations. There are marked differences between countries in breastfeeding practices, infant and young child feeding policy adoption and proportion of baby-friendly hospitals.

  3. Medical Errors Reduction Initiative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mutter, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The Valley Hospital of Ridgewood, New Jersey, is proposing to extend a limited but highly successful specimen management and medication administration medical errors reduction initiative on a hospital-wide basis...

  4. Long-term outcome of infective endocarditis: A study on patients surviving over one year after the initial episode treated in a Finnish teaching hospital during 25 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engblom Erik

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only a few previous studies have focused on the long-term prognosis of the patients with infective endocarditis (IE. Our purpose was to delineate factors potentially associated with the long-term outcome of IE, recurrences of IE and requirement for late valve surgery. Methods A total of 326 episodes of IE in 303 patients were treated during 1980–2004 in the Turku University Hospital. We evaluated the long-term outcome and requirement for late valve surgery for 243 of these episodes in 226 patients who survived longer than 1 year after the initial admission. Factors associated with recurrences were analysed both for the 1-year survivors and for all 303 patients. Results The mean (SD follow-up time for the 1-year survivors was 11.5 (7.3 years (range 25 days to 25.5 years. The overall survival was 95%, 82%, 66%, 51% and 45% at 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20 years. In age and sex adjusted multivariate analyses, significant predictors for long-term overall mortality were heart failure within 3 months of admission (HR 1.97, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.06; p = 0.003 and collagen disease (HR 2.54, 95% CI 1.25 to 5.19; p = 0.010 or alcohol abuse (HR 2.39, 95% CI 1.30 to 4.40; p = 0.005 as underlying conditions, while early surgery was significantly associated with lower overall mortality rates (HR 0.31, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.58; p Conclusion Heart failure during the index episode of IE was the complication, which significantly predicted a poor long-term outcome. Patients who underwent surgery during the initial hospitalisation for IE faired significantly better than those who did not.

  5. Gastrointestinal tolerance and plasma status of carotenoids, EPA and DHA with a fiber-enriched tube feed in hospitalized patients initiated on tube nutrition: Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, L H; Wirth, R; Smoliner, C; Klebach, M; Hofman, Z; Kondrup, J

    2017-04-01

    During the first days of tube feeding (TF) gastrointestinal (GI) complications are common and administration of sufficient nutrition is a challenge. Not all standard nutritionally complete formulas contain dietary fiber, fish oil or carotenoids, key dietary nutrients for health and wellbeing. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a fiber, fish oil and carotenoid enriched TF formula on diarrhea, constipation and nutrient bioavailability. A multi-center randomized, double-blind, controlled, parallel trial compared the effects of a dietary fiber, fish oil and carotenoid-enriched TF formula (test) with an isocaloric non-enriched formula (control) in 51 patients requiring initiation of TF. Incidence of diarrhea and constipation (based on stool frequency and consistency) was recorded daily. Plasma status of EPA, DHA and carotenoids was measured after 7 days. The incidence of diarrhea was lower in patients receiving the test formula compared with the control group (19% vs. 48%, p = 0.034). EPA and DHA status (% of total plasma phospholipids) was higher after 7 days in test compared with control group (EPA: p = 0.002, DHA: p = 0.082). Plasma carotenoid levels were higher after 7 days in the test group compared with control group (lutein: p = 0.024, α-carotene: p = 0.005, lycopene: p = 0.020, β-carotene: p = 0.054). This study suggests that the nutrient-enriched TF formula tested might have a positive effect on GI tolerance with less diarrhea incidence and significantly improved EPA, DHA and carotenoid plasma levels during the initiation of TF in hospitalized patients who are at risk of diarrhea and low nutrient status. This trial was registered at trialregister.nl; registration number 2924. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The Comparison Of The Efficacy Of Cefriaxon Monotherapy With Ceftazidim Plus Amikacin As Initial Empiric Antibiotic Therapy In Febrile Neutropenic Patients Emam Hospital (2000-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi S M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Neutropenic state with fever is exactly regarded as a medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity rate, unless treated urgently and correctly. Every attempt should be made to find and establish the offending organism, but postponing treatment until obtaining culture results is not advised. Controversy exist on which antibiotic regimen to be used while waiting for culture results. Many antibiotic regiments both monotherapy or combination treatments have been used with varying result. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of cefriaxon monothenapy with ceftazidim. Plus Amikacin as initial empiric antibiotic therapy in febrile neutropenic patients."nMaterials and Methods: We performed a randomized, single blind clinical trial in 57 adult (age>12 years, neutropenic (PMN<1000 patients with fever (Temperature, oral >38.5c in Hematology ward, Imam khomeini hospital. After careful physical exam and obtaining blood & urine samples for culture, the patients were randomized to each of the two arms: Cefriaxon 2 grams daily, intravenously (arm A and; Ceftazidim 2g thrice daily plus amikacin 500 mg twice daily (arm B. Patients with shock, organ failure or previous antibiotic intake (during 48 hour before fever were excluded. If needed, dose adjustment of drugs were allowed. Effervescence in 3 days following initiation of treatment, lasting 48 hours or more, were regarded as effective (positive result."nResults: During a twelve months period of study, a total of 57 patients (17female, 40male were included. They were randomly selected to each arm of empirical treatment. Of 28 pts in arm A, 19 (67 percent, the treatment was effective, compared to 15 of 29 (51.7 percent in groups B. The duration of fever after initiation of treatment was 37.9 ± 17 hours in arm A and 40. 1 ± 20 h in arm B. Blood and / or urine culture was equally positive in two arms (25 percent in arm A and 27.6 percent in arm B."nConclusion: Cefriaxon monotherapy is at

  7. Comparison of hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and costs in a historical cohort of Texas Medicaid patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, by initial medication regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascati, Karen L; Akazawa, Manabu; Johnsrud, Michael; Stanford, Richard H; Blanchette, Christopher M

    2007-06-01

    Limited information is available on the relative outcomes and treatment costs of various pharmacotherapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a Medicaid population. This study compared the effects of initial medication regimens for COPD on COPD-related and all-cause events (hospitalizations and/or emergency department [ED] visits) and COPD-related and all-cause costs. The study population was a historical cohort of Texas Medicaid beneficiaries aged 40 to 64 years with COPD-related medical costs (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 491.xx, 492.xx, 496.xx), 24 months of continuous Medicaid enrollment (12 months before and after the index prescription), and at least 1 prescription claim (index) for a combination product containing fluticasone propionate + salmeterol, an inhaled corticosteroid, salmeterol, or ipratropium between April 1, 2001, and March 31, 2003. The analyses of events employed Cox proportional hazards regression, controlling for baseline factors and preindex events. The analyses of costs used a 2-part model with logistic regression and generalized linear model to adjust for baseline characteristics and preindex utilization and costs. The study population included 6793 patients (1211 combination therapy, 968 inhaled corticosteroid, 401 salmeterol, and 4213 ipratropium). Only combination therapy was associated with a significantly lower risk for any COPD-related event (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.733; 95% CI, 0.650-0.826) and any all-cause event (HR = 0.906; 95% CI, 0.844-0.972) compared with ipratropium. COPD-related prescription costs were higher in all cohorts compared with the ipratropium cohort, but COPD-related medical costs were lower, offsetting the increase in prescription costs. For all-cause costs, prescription costs were higher in the combination-therapy cohort (+$415; P costs in the combination-therapy cohort (-$1735; P costs. In this historical population of Texas Medicaid

  8. The Belgian trial with azithromycin for acute COPD exacerbations requiring hospitalization: an investigator-initiated study protocol for a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeersch K

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kristina Vermeersch,1 Maria Gabrovska,2 Griet Deslypere,3 Ingel K Demedts,4 Hans Slabbynck,5 Joseph Aumann,3 Vincent Ninane,2 Geert M Verleden,1 Thierry Troosters,1,6 Kris Bogaerts,7,8 Guy G Brusselle,9 Wim Janssens1 On behalf of the BACE Trial Investigators 1KU Leuven, Laboratory of Respiratory Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Leuven, Belgium; 2Department of Pneumology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Pierre, Brussels, Belgium; 3Department of Pneumology, Jessa Ziekenhuis, Hasselt, Belgium; 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, AZ Delta Roeselare-Menen, Roeselare, Belgium; 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, ZNA Middelheim, Antwerpen, Belgium; 6KU Leuven, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences, Leuven, Belgium; 7KU Leuven, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, I-BioStat, Leuven, Belgium; 8Hasselt University, Hasselt, Belgium; 9Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium Background: Long-term use of macrolide antibiotics is effective to prevent exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. As risks and side effects of long-term intervention outweigh the benefits in the general COPD population, the optimal dose, duration of treatment, and target population are yet to be defined. Hospitalization for an acute exacerbation (AE of COPD may offer a targeted risk group and an obvious risk period for studying macrolide interventions.Methods/design: Patients with COPD, hospitalized for an AE, who have a smoking history of ≥10 pack-years and had ≥1 exacerbation in the previous year will be enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (NCT02135354. On top of a standardized treatment of systemic corticosteroids and antibiotics, subjects will be randomized to receive either azithromycin or placebo during 3 months, at an uploading dose of 500 mg once a day for

  9. Continuous exclusive breastfeeding and some related factors in the selected hospitals of Isfahan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Mitra Savabi; Fathizadeh, Nahid

    2011-01-01

    Exclusive nutrition with breastfeeding is the health provider of the infant and mothers and its continuing would provide more advantages. Exclusive nutrition on different communities is affected by different factors. This study aimed to determine continuous exclusive breastfeeding and some of the related factors. This was a descriptive-analysis prospective study. The study population included all the breastfed mothers admitted in the obstetrics wards of the selected hospitals. Selecting the hospitals also was done randomly. Data collection tools included a questionnaire completed by 291 mothers. To obtain the data about breastfeeding duration, mothers were phone called at the first and sixth postpartum months. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics and software SPSS. Estimation of mean and standard deviation of exclusive breastfeeding duration at the first and sixth months after the delivery, respectively, were 3.86 (0.55) and 23.67 (6.63) weeks. One month after the delivery, 93.1%, 6.2% and 0.7% of the mothers, respectively, had exclusive breastfeeding, breastfeeding with formula milk or other ingredients and discontinuation of breastfeeding; 6 months after the delivery, these values changed to 86.3, 12 and 1.7%, respectively. The most frequent period of breastfeeding discontinuation (6.9%) was related to 1-4 weeks. The results indicated that statistically there was a significant correlation between breastfeeding duration and age and the birth hospital. While the results of the study showed no association between breastfeeding duration and number of the children, duration of marriage, educational level and mothers' occupation. The findings of the present study represented a high continuous exclusive breastfeeding which perhaps was due to applied baby-friendly hospitals strategies. Furthermore, to prevent from discontinuation of exclusive breastfeeding, knowing the discontinuation time and its related factors, particularly the

  10. ¿Por qué los pacientes utilizan los servicios de urgencias hospitalarios por iniciativa propia? Why do patients use hospital emergency services on their own initiative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M Aranaz Andrés

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Se pretende describir el perfil de usuario y determinar su motivación para visitar el servicio de urgencias hospitalario (SUH por iniciativa propia. Método: Se elaboró un cuestionario ad hoc que se aplicó por selección consecutiva a los pacientes que podían esperar asistencia (nivel 1 del triage durante una semana de noviembre de 2002. Resultados: Respondieron el cuestionario 348 pacientes, acudiendo por iniciativa propia el 82,5%. De éstos, el 17,7% desconocía el funcionamiento de atención primaria respecto a urgencias; el 18,8% consultó con su centro de salud; el 55,0% refirió preferencia por el SUH y el 13,5% acudió por demora en otros niveles asistenciales. El 50,5% era menor de 40 años y el 9,2%, extranjero. Conclusiones: Los cambios en el patrón de consumo de servicios sanitarios pueden comprometer la organización del Sistema Nacional de Salud, si no se adapta la oferta a la necesidad expresada y/o se interviene modulando el uso racional de los recursos sanitarios.Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the reasons why patients use hospital emergency services (HES on their own initiative and the characteristics of these users. Method: An ad hoc questionnaire was designed and applied by consecutive selection to patients who could have waited for medical care (level 1 triage over a 1-week period in November 2002. Results: A total of 348 patients completed the questionnaire; 82.5% attended on their own initiative; of these, 17.7% reported they did not know how Primary Care worked in relation to the Emergency Services; 18.8% consulted a Primary Care physician; 55.0% preferred the HES and 13.5% attended because of a delay in another health care setting. Half the patients (50.5% were younger than 40 years old and 9.2% were foreigners. Conclusions: Changes in health services' consumption patterns could jeopardize the public health system unless supply is adapted to the demand expressed and

  11. The effectiveness of a nurse-initiated intervention to reduce catheter-associated bloodstream infections in an urban acute hospital: an intervention study with before and after comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Toshie; Makimoto, Kiyoko; Toki, Masayo; Sakai, Keiko; Onaka, Emiko; Otani, Yoshiko

    2007-11-01

    Catheter care is considered to be important for prevention of catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CABSIs) although epidemiological evidence is sparse. To identify problems associated with catheter care and evaluate the effectiveness of nurse-initiated interventions to reduce CABSIs. An intervention study with before and after comparison. CABSI surveillance was conducted in a 560-bed acute hospital located in a major urban area in Japan. Patients were enrolled in this study from April 2000 to December 2002 based on the following criteria: (1) adult inpatients; and (2) those in whom central venous lines or Swan-Ganz catheters were inserted for 2 days or longer. In the first year, risk factors for CABSI and problems associated with catheter care were identified by inspection of the infection control nurse (ICN) or four trained link nurses, and the laboratory results. In the subsequent 2 years, the following interventions based on the surveillance results were implemented: (1) enhanced skin preparation by scrubbing with regular bathing soap and tap water; (2) a new method for stabilisation of the catheter inserted into the internal jugular vein, where additional dressing was placed over the sterilised dressing; (3) educating the staff on maximal sterile precautions by teaching staff members at their section meetings and displaying posters; (4) use of a check list and observation of catheter insertion by link nurses to monitor compliance; and (5) selection of a disinfectant that requires shorter contact time and has longer residual effect. After these interventions were implemented, the overall bloodstream infection (BSI) rate declined from 4.0/1000 device-days to 1.1/1000 device-days (p<0.005). We identified four problems-those related to skin preparation, dressing, sterile precautions and disinfectant. We implemented a series of interventions to reduce CABSIs; the overall CABSI rate decreased significantly.

  12. Six-month outcome in patients with myocardial infarction initially admitted to tertiary and nontertiary hospitals. RESCATE Investigators. Recursos Empleados en el Síndrome Coronario Agudo y Tiempos de Espera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrugat, J; Sanz, G; Masiá, R; Valle, V; Molina, L; Cardona, M; Sala, J; Serés, L; Szescielinski, L; Albert, X; Lupón, J; Alonso, J

    1997-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether the degree of accessibility to coronary angiography and revascularization results in differing usages or outcomes, or both, in the setting of a high coverage national health system. The selective use of coronary angiography and revascularization procedures in the management of acute myocardial infarction (MI) remains controversial. A cohort of 1,460 consecutive patients with a first MI admitted to four referral teaching hospitals (one with tertiary facilities) were followed up for 6 months after admission. Only patients initially admitted to each of the study hospitals were retained for analysis in the original hospital's cohort. End points were 6-month mortality and readmission for reinfarction, unstable angina, heart failure or severe ventricular arrhythmia. Patients admitted to the tertiary hospital were more likely to undergo coronary angiography (adjusted relative risk 4.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.37 to 5.45) than those admitted to the nontertiary sites (use rate: 22.1% for nontertiary care, 55.5% for tertiary care). Revascularization procedures were performed in 21.2% of patients in the tertiary hospital and in 8.3% in the nontertiary hospitals (p < 0.0001). Median delay for emergency coronary angiography was shorter in the tertiary hospital (within 1 vs. 2 days, p < 0.0001). Six-month mortality or readmission rates were similar (23.7% and 24.7% for tertiary and nontertiary care, respectively). After adjustment for comorbidity and disease severity, the relative risk of death or readmission for the tertiary hospital was 1.03 (95% CI 0.69 to 1.53) times that of the nontertiary hospitals. Selective use of coronary angiography and revascularization procedures may be as effective as less restricted use in the management of acute MI.

  13. Rational and design of a stepped-wedge cluster randomized trial evaluating quality improvement initiative for reducing cardiovascular events among patients with acute coronary syndromes in resource-constrained hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenshen; Wu, Yangfeng; Du, Xin; Li, Xian; Patel, Anushka; Peterson, Eric D; Turnbull, Fiona; Lo, Serigne; Billot, Laurent; Laba, Tracey; Gao, Runlin

    2015-03-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality, yet effective ACS treatments are frequently underused in clinical practice. Randomized trials including the CPACS-2 study suggest that quality improvement initiatives can increase the use of effective treatments, but whether such programs can impact hard clinical outcomes has never been demonstrated in a well-powered randomized controlled trial. The CPACS-3 study is a stepped-wedge cluster-randomized trial conducted in 104 remote level 2 hospitals without PCI facilities in China. All hospitalized ACS patients will be recruited consecutively over a 30-month period to an anticipated total study population of more than 25,000 patients. After a 6-month baseline period, hospitals will be randomized to 1 of 4 groups, and a 6-component quality improvement intervention will be implemented sequentially in each group every 6months. These components include the following: establishment of a quality improvement team, implementation of a clinical pathway, training of physicians and nurses, hospital performance audit and feedback, online technical support, and patient education. All patients will be followed up for 6months postdischarge. The primary outcome will be the incidence of in-hospital major adverse cardiovascular events comprising all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction or reinfarction, and nonfatal stroke. The CPACS-3 study will be the first large randomized trial with sufficient power to assess the effects of a multifaceted quality of care improvement initiative on hard clinical outcomes, in patients with ACS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. HCAHPS Hospital Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Hospital Survey The intent of the HCAHPS initiative is to provide a standardized survey...

  15. Hospitality Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  16. [Quality management according to the new SN EN ISO-Norm 9001:2000--experiences from initial certification of a hospital department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Th; Hochberger, G; Eisner, L

    2002-04-24

    Those who want to implement a quality-management system at a hospital these days cannot fall back on a broad-based system proven over the years. Though quality management as defined by ISO norm 9001 has been established as the central standard in many industrial areas, applicability of this ISO norm in the hospital sector has stirred up much controversy during recent years. Introduction of the new ISO norm 9001:2000 has changed the situation. The 2000 version of the new standard seeks to meet the demand for service operations--especially by establishing a clear procedural orientation. This report describes the new standard and its introduction in the Department of Surgery at the Cantonal Hospital in Olten, Canton Solothurn, Switzerland. It indicates the steps taken, for instance in the spheres of top management, quality management, procedural guidance, as well as customer and staff counselling. It also discusses the project's cost/benefit ratio for the organization.

  17. Health service support for breastfeeding in the northern region of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Armah Aryee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI is a global effort to improve the role of maternity services and to enable mothers to breastfeed their infants, thus ensuring the best start in life for their infants. The foundation for the BFHI is the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding (BF. It has been shown, however, that there is the tendency of health facilities backsliding and even reverting to the old patterns of maternity care and practices and may be ineffective and discouraging to successful BF practices. The study was therefore conducted to ascertain and measure the extent of compliance with the Ten Steps to BF in designated Baby Friendly Health facilities in the Northern Region of Ghana. The study followed a cross-sectional design and was set in the Savelugu/Nanton, Tolon/Kunbungu Districts and Tamale Metropolis in the Northern Region. Nine (9 designated Baby Friendly facilities participated in the study; for which observation lists were completed and verified by interviewer-administered questionnaires to sixty-one (61 Health Care Workers (HCWs and two hundred and seventy (270 breastfeeding mothers. The overall compliance with the Ten Steps was 85.6% (S.E, 4.2% indicating high compliance, with 66.7% of the health facilities being highly compliant whilst 33.3% were moderately compliant. During the study there were no posters or other materials promoting breast-milk substitutes, bottles and pacifiers displayed in the facilities. The study highlighted a high degree of compliance with most of the BF policies (Ten Steps to successful breastfeeding and of the correct implementation of these policies in the designated baby friendly health facilities. Nevertheless, some elements relevant to Steps 4 and 5 require further work to make the needed improvement.

  18. Health service support for breastfeeding in the northern region of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Armah Aryee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI is a global effort to improve the role of maternity services and to enable mothers to breastfeed their infants, thus ensuring the best start in life for their infants. The foundation for the BFHI is the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding (BF. It has been shown, however, that there is the tendency of health facilities backsliding and even reverting to the old patterns of maternity care and practices and may be ineffective and discouraging to successful BF practices. The study was therefore conducted to ascertain and measure the extent of compliance with the Ten Steps to BF in designated Baby Friendly Health facilities in the Northern Region of Ghana. The study followed a cross-sectional design and was set in the Savelugu/Nanton, Tolon/Kunbungu Districts and Tamale Metropolis in the Northern Region. Nine (9 designated Baby Friendly facilities participated in the study; for which observation lists were completed and verified by interviewer-administered questionnaires to sixty-one (61 Health Care Workers (HCWs and two hundred and seventy (270 breastfeeding mothers. The overall compliance with the Ten Steps was 85.6% (S.E, 4.2% indicating high compliance, with 66.7% of the health facilities being highly compliant whilst 33.3% were moderately compliant. During the study there were no posters or other materials promoting breast-milk substitutes, bottles and pacifiers displayed in the facilities. The study highlighted a high degree of compliance with most of the BF policies (Ten Steps to successful breastfeeding and of the correct implementation of these policies in the designated baby friendly health facilities. Nevertheless, some elements relevant to Steps 4 and 5 require further work to make the needed improvement.

  19. Reporting of quality measures in gynecologic oncology programs at Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospitals: an early glimpse into a challenging initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, David E; Leitao, Mario; Levenback, Charles; Berkowitz, Ross; Roman, Lynda; Lucci, Joseph; Kim, Sarah; Lancaster, Johnathon; Odunsi, Kunle; Wakabayashi, Mark; Goff, Barbara A

    2013-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act mandates the Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospitals Quality Reporting program. These 11 hospitals (which are paid fee-for-service rather than on a DRG system) began reporting measures (2 general safety, 2 breast, 1 colon) in 2013. Given this reporting mandate, we set out to determine whether the PPS-exempt gynecologic oncology programs could identify quality measures specific to the care of our patients. A list of 12 quality measures specific to gynecologic oncology was created (from sources including the National Quality Forum and the SGO). Measures already in use were not included. The list was ranked by the gynecologic oncology program directors at the PPS-exempt hospitals. Descriptive statistics (including mean and SD for rankings) were utilized. Despite mandatory reporting of quality measures for PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, little consensus exists regarding specific gynecologic cancer measures. Documentation of debulking status, cancer survival, and offering minimally invasive surgery (for endometrial cancer) and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (for ovarian cancer) are important, but with widely variable responses (when ranked 1-12, standard deviations are 2-3). General issues regarding adherence to guidelines for the use of GCSF, documentation of functional status, and tracking of patient satisfaction scores were ranked the lowest. Three of the directors reported that their compensation is partially linked to quality outcomes. There is wide variability in ranking of quality measures, and may relate to provider or institutional factors. Despite the mandatory reporting in PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, work remains to define gynecologic cancer quality measures. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Initial and long-term evaluation of patients with Alzheimer's after hospitalization in cognitive and behavioural units: the EVITAL study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongan, Elodie; Freulon, Magalie; Delphin-Combe, Floriane; Dibie-Racoupeau, Florence; Martin-Gaujard, Géraldine; Federico, Denis; Waissi, Aziza; Richard, Gaëlle; Jacqueline, Sophie; Fabre, Florence; Trombert-Paviot, Béatrice; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Laurent, Bernard; Rouch, Isabelle

    2014-11-15

    Alzheimer's disease and related disorders are characterized by cognitive impairment associated with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. These symptoms have significant consequences for both the patient and his family environment. While risk factors for behavioral disorders have been identified in several studies, few studies have focused on the evolution of these disorders. Moreover, it is important to identify factors linked to the long-term evolution of behavioral disorders, as well as patients' and caregivers' quality of life. Our purpose is to present the methodology of the EVITAL study, which primary objective is to determine the factors associated with the evolution of behavioral disorders among patients with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders during the year following their hospitalization in cognitive and behavioral units. Secondary objectives were 1) to assess the factors related to the evolution of behavioral disorders during hospitalization in cognitive and behavioral units; 2) to identify the factors linked to patients' and caregivers' quality of life, as well as caregivers' burden; 3) to assess the factors associated with rehospitalization of the patients for behavioral disorders in the year following their hospitalization in cognitive and behavioral units. A multicenter, prospective cohort of patients with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders as well as behavioral disorders who are hospitalized in cognitive and behavioral units. The patients will be included in the study for a period of 24 months and followed-up for 12 months. Socio-demographic and environmental data, behavioral disorders, medications, patients and caregivers quality of life as well as caregivers burden will be assessed throughout hospitalization in cognitive and behavioral units. Follow-up will be performed at months 3, 6 and 12 after hospitalization. Socio-demographic and environmental data, behavioral disorders, medications, patients and caregivers

  1. District-level hospital trauma care audit filters: Delphi technique for defining context-appropriate indicators for quality improvement initiative evaluation in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Barclay T; Gyedu, Adam; Quansah, Robert; Addo, Wilfred Larbi; Afoko, Akis; Agbenorku, Pius; Amponsah-Manu, Forster; Ankomah, James; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer; Baffoe, Peter; Debrah, Sam; Donkor, Peter; Dorvlo, Theodor; Japiong, Kennedy; Kushner, Adam L; Morna, Martin; Ofosu, Anthony; Oppong-Nketia, Victor; Tabiri, Stephen; Mock, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Prospective clinical audit of trauma care improves outcomes for the injured in high-income countries (HICs). However, equivalent, context-appropriate audit filters for use in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) district-level hospitals have not been well established. We aimed to develop context-appropriate trauma care audit filters for district-level hospitals in Ghana, was well as other LMICs more broadly. Consensus on trauma care audit filters was built between twenty panellists using a Delphi technique with four anonymous, iterative surveys designed to elicit: (i) trauma care processes to be measured; (ii) important features of audit filters for the district-level hospital setting; and (iii) potentially useful filters. Filters were ranked on a scale from 0 to 10 (10 being very useful). Consensus was measured with average percent majority opinion (APMO) cut-off rate. Target consensus was defined a priori as: a median rank of ≥9 for each filter and an APMO cut-off rate of ≥0.8. Panellists agreed on trauma care processes to target (e.g. triage, phases of trauma assessment, early referral if needed) and specific features of filters for district-level hospital use (e.g. simplicity, unassuming of resource capacity). APMO cut-off rate increased successively: Round 1--0.58; Round 2--0.66; Round 3--0.76; and Round 4--0.82. After Round 4, target consensus on 22 trauma care and referral-specific filters was reached. Example filters include: triage--vital signs are recorded within 15 min of arrival (must include breathing assessment, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation if available); circulation--a large bore IV was placed within 15 min of patient arrival; referral--if referral is activated, the referring clinician and receiving facility communicate by phone or radio prior to transfer. This study proposes trauma care audit filters appropriate for LMIC district-level hospitals. Given the successes of similar filters in HICs and obstetric care filters in LMICs

  2. The association of admission heart rate and in-hospital cardiovascular events in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: results from 135 164 patients in the CRUSADE quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangalore, Sripal; Messerli, Franz H; Ou, Fang-Shu; Tamis-Holland, Jacqueline; Palazzo, Angela; Roe, Matthew T; Hong, Mun K; Peterson, Eric D

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the relationship between presenting heart rate (HR) and in-hospital events in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS). We evaluated 139 194 patients with NSTE-ACS in the CRUSADE quality improvement initiative. The presenting HR was summarized as 10 beat increments. Patients with systolic BP HR of 60-69 b.p.m. after controlling for baseline variables. Primary outcome was a composite of in-hospital events all-cause mortality, non-fatal re-infarction, and stroke. Secondary outcomes were each of these considered separately. From the cohort of 135 164 patients, 8819 (6.52%) patients had a primary outcome (death/re-infarction or stroke) of which 5271 (3.90%) patients died, 3578 (2.65%) patients had re-infarction, and 1038 (0.77%) patients had a stroke during hospitalization. The relationship between presenting HR and primary outcome, all-cause mortality, and stroke followed a 'J-shaped' curve with an increased event rate at very low and high HR even after controlling for baseline variables. However, there was no relationship between presenting HR and risk of re-infarction. In contrast to patients with stable CAD, in the acute setting, the relationship between presenting HR and in-hospital cardiovascular outcomes has a 'J-shaped' curve (higher event rates at very low and high HRs). These associations should be considered in ACS prognostic models.

  3. Volume-Outcome Relationships in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Association Between Hospital Pediatric and Pediatric Oncology Volume With Mortality and Intensive Care Resources During Initial Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Jennifer J; Hennessy, Sean; Xiao, Rui; Rheingold, Susan; Seif, Alix E; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Vendetti, Neika; Li, Yimei; Bagatell, Rochelle; Aplenc, Richard; Fisher, Brian T

    2016-07-01

    There are few contemporary studies of volume-outcome relationships in pediatric oncology. Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated at a wide variety of hospitals. We investigated if inpatient hospital volume influences outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between inpatient pediatric and pediatric oncology volume and mortality and intensive care resources (ICU care). We hypothesized an inverse relationship between volume and these outcomes. This was a retrospective cohort study. Patients 0 to 18 years of age in the Pediatric Health Information System or Perspective Premier Database from 2009 to 2011 with ALL were included. Exposures were considered as the average inpatient pediatric and pediatric oncology volume. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality; secondary outcome was need for ICU care. The included population comprised 3350 patients from 75 hospitals. The inpatient mortality rate was 0.86% (95% confidence interval, 0.58%-1.2%). In the unadjusted analysis, mortality increased as pediatric oncology volume increased from low (0%) to high volume (1.3%) (P = .009). The small number of deaths precluded multivariable analysis of this outcome. Pediatric and pediatric oncology volume was not associated with ICU care when we controlled for potential confounders. Induction mortality was low. We did not observe an inverse relationship between volume and mortality or ICU care. This suggests that in a modern treatment era, treatment at a low-volume center might not be associated with increased mortality or ICU care in the first portion of therapy. This relationship should be evaluated in other oncology populations with higher mortality rates and with longer-term outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Unplanned Hospital Visits - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  5. A comparison of correlates of suicidal ideation prior to initial hospitalization for first-episode psychosis with prior research on correlates of suicide attempts prior to initial treatment seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Peggy; Compton, Michael T

    2012-05-01

    Individuals with first-episode psychosis, like those with chronic psychotic disorders, are at elevated risk for suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. However, relatively little is known about suicidality among first-episode patients prior to their initial presentation for treatment. This analysis was designed as a US-based examination of recent findings on prior suicide attempts from Dublin, Ireland, here focusing on prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation during the weeks prior to initial treatment-seeking. Participants included 109 first-episode inpatients with primary psychotic disorders in public-sector settings that serve an urban, low-income, socially disadvantaged, predominantly African American population. Eligible patients had received 3 months prior to the index admission, though most were completely treatment naïve. Assessments included the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia, Birchwood Insight Scale, and a rigorous method for determining age at onset of first psychotic symptoms and duration of untreated psychosis. Disconcertingly, nearly one quarter of patients (23%) endorsed a history of suicidal ideation in the 2 weeks prior to first admission. In the model designed to replicate the prior study in Ireland, Calgary Depression score (calculated omitting hopelessness and suicidal ideation as these were separate variables in the analysis) was a predictor of suicidal ideation (P suicidal ideation. Findings suggest that depression, insight, and suicidality should be carefully monitored among first-episode patients initiating treatment and during the early course of illness. As insight improves, coping strategies should be enhanced with a goal of minimizing depression and preventing suicidality. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Nursing Facility Initiative Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This annual report summarizes impacts from the Initiative to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations among Nursing Facility Residents in 2014. This initiative is designed...

  7. Serum albumin levels in burn people are associated to the total body surface burned and the length of hospital stay but not to the initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; de Haro-Padilla, Jesús M; Rioja, Luis F; DeRosier, Leo C; de la Torre, Jorge I

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Serum albumin levels have been used to evaluate the severity of the burns and the nutrition protein status in burn people, specifically in the response of the burn patient to the nutrition. Although it hasn’t been proven if all these associations are fully funded. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the relationship of serum albumin levels at 3-7 days after the burn injury, with the total body surface area burned (TBSA), the length of hospital stay (LHS) and the initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition (IOEN). Subject and methods: It was carried out with the health records of patients that accomplished the inclusion criteria and were admitted to the burn units at the University Hospital of Reina Sofia (Córdoba, Spain) and UAB Hospital at Birmingham (Alabama, USA) over a 10 years period, between January 2000 and December 2009. We studied the statistical association of serum albumin levels with the TBSA, LHS and IOEN by ANOVA one way test. The confidence interval chosen for statistical differences was 95%. Duncan’s test was used to determine the number of statistically significantly groups. Results: Were expressed as mean±standard deviation. We found serum albumin levels association with TBSA and LHS, with greater to lesser serum albumin levels found associated to lesser to greater TBSA and LHS. We didn’t find statistical association with IOEN. Conclusion: We conclude that serum albumin levels aren’t a nutritional marker in burn people although they could be used as a simple clinical tool to identify the severity of the burn wounds represented by the total body surface area burned and the lenght of hospital stay. PMID:23875122

  8. Is initial excision of cutaneous melanoma by General Practitioners (GPs) dangerous? Comparing patient outcomes following excision of melanoma by GPs or in hospital using national datasets and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Peter; Amalraj Raja, Edwin; Brewster, David H; Iversen, Lisa; Lee, Amanda J

    2017-11-01

    Melanomas are initially excised in primary care, and rates vary internationally. Until now, there has been no strong evidence one way or the other that excising melanomas in primary care is safe or unsafe. European guidelines make no recommendations, and the United Kingdom (UK) melanoma guidelines require all suspicious skin lesions to be initially treated in secondary care based on an expert consensus, which lacks supporting evidence, that primary care excision represents substandard care. Despite this, studies have found that up to 20% of melanomas in the UK are excised by general practitioners (GPs). Patients receiving primary care melanoma excision may fear that their care is substandard and their long-term survival threatened, neither of which may be justified. Scottish cancer registry data from 9367 people diagnosed with melanoma in Scotland between 2005 and 2013 were linked to pathology records, hospital data and death records. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, adjusting for key confounders, explored the association between morbidity and mortality and setting of primary melanoma excision (primary versus secondary care). A pooled estimate of the relative hazard of death of having a melanoma excised in primary versus secondary care including 7116 patients from a similar Irish study was also performed. The adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) of death from melanoma for those having primary care excision was 0.82 (0.61-1.10). Those receiving primary care excision had a median (IQR) of 8 (3-14) out-patient attendances compared to 10 (4-17) for the secondary care group with an adjusted relative risk (RR) (95% CI) of 0.98 (0.96-1.01). Both groups had a median of 1 (0-2) hospital admissions with an adjusted rate ratio of 1.05 (0.98-1.13). In the meta-analysis, with primary care as the reference, the pooled adjusted hazard ratio (HR, 95% CI) was 1.26 (1.07-1.50) indicating a significantly higher all-cause mortality among those with excision in secondary care

  9. Hospitals; hospitals13

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — Hospital Facilities information was compiled from several various sources. Main source was the RI Department of Health Facilities Regulation database, License 2000....

  10. Initiation of effective postpartum contraceptive use in public hospitals in Guatemala Inicio de un método anticonceptivo eficaz durante el puerperio en hospitales públicos de Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Kestler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Low frequency of effective contraceptive use remains a challenging problem. This article examines the frequency of effective postpartum contraception and the methods used before discharge in public hospitals in Guatemala. It also discusses the need to implement best practices in providing family-planning and contraceptive services. METHODS: In March 2006, a surveillance system was implemented to collect data on the initiation of effective contraceptive methods. Postpartum women were monitored in 34 public hospitals. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed, and a chi-square test for linear trends was used to compare female surgical sterilization rates after vaginal delivery and cesarean section. RESULTS: Between 1 March 2006 and 31 December 2008, of the 218 656 women who had a postpartum event, 31% received an effective contraceptive method before hospital discharge. The frequency of initiation of effective postpartum methods varied across hospitals. Hospital results were consistent with national data on women of reproductive age. Among women who underwent surgical sterilization, differences between those who had delivered vaginally and those who had a cesarean section were statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: The overall frequency of initiation of effective postpartum contraceptive use is low in public hospitals in Guatemala. It is higher, however, in hospitals at lower health care levels with strong community ties. Routine data collection revealed specific areas for improvement, particularly the need to enhance health providers' knowledge of medical eligibility criteria for effective contraceptive use postpartum. The priority is to promote the provision of highquality family-planning and contraceptive services in Guatemala's public health system.OBJETIVO: La baja frecuencia del uso de métodos anticonceptivos eficaces sigue siendo un arduo problema. En este artículo se analiza la frecuencia con que se adopta un m

  11. HCAHPS - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  12. Hospital Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Compare has information about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. You can use Hospital Compare to find...

  13. Better Births Initiative

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ensuring that health professionals practise according to evidence-based standards is important since it affects the quality and cost of care patients receive. The purpose of this research was to use a focused change programme (the Better Births Initiative) to influence obstetric practice at 10 hospitals in Gauteng, South Africa.

  14. Norovirus - hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  15. Hospitality and hospitableness | Lashley | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Not long after the word hospitality emerged as a collective noun to describe the commercial provision of services associated with accommodation, drinking and eating, some academics began to investigate the meanings of hospitality and hospitableness. Whilst most academic programme provision related to developing ...

  16. A framework for quality improvement: an analysis of factors responsible for improvement at hospitals participating in the Can Rapid Risk Stratification of Unstable Angina Patients Suppress Adverse Outcomes with Early Implementation of the ACC/AHA Guidelines (CRUSADE) quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Seth W; Boulding, William; Staelin, Richard; Mulgund, Jyotsna; Roe, Matthew T; Lytle, Barbara L; Rumsfeld, John S; Gibler, W Brian; Ohman, E Magnus; Schulman, Kevin A; Peterson, Eric D

    2007-12-01

    Hospitals are under increasing pressure to improve their quality of care. However, a key question remains: how can hospitals best design and implement successful quality improvement (QI) programs? Hospitals currently employ a variety of QI initiatives but have little empirical evidence on which to base their quality efforts. We designed and applied a hospital cross-sectional survey to 212 hospitals participating in CRUSADE (Can Rapid Risk Stratification of Unstable Angina Patients Suppress Adverse Outcomes with Early Implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines), a voluntary QI initiative of patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS). We factor analysis and an ordinary least squares regression model to determine the key hospital factors most associated with unexpected improvements in institutional QI in the treatment of NSTE ACS. From 2002 to 2004, the following factors had a significant association with unexpected increases in the 2004 QI in NSTE ACS treatment: the use of CRUSADE QI tools, clinical commitment to quality by a cardiology coadvocate, institutional financial commitment to quality, and barriers to QI related to resource availability and cultural resistance to change (all P institutional factors associated with improved quality of care in the treatment of high-risk NSTE ACS. We hope that this evidence-based framework will help guide the development and implementation of future QI programs in order to improve the institutional quality of care for NSTE ACS.

  17. Enfoque inicial de los pacientes admitidos a hospitales de tercer nivel con síndrome de respuesta inflamatoria sistémica (SRIS Initial approach of patients admitted to third level hospitals with systemic inflamatory response syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    urgencias (p = 0.65. Conclusiones: no todos los signos definitorios de SRIS se determinan en los pacientes con sospecha de infección. El estado neurológico, determinado por la escala de Glasgow, y la toma de temperatura, a pesar de ser parámetros obligatorios de urgencias, se omiten en una cuarta parte de los pacientes. La solicitud de exámenes de laboratorio y los estudios microbiológicos no concuerdan en todos los casos con el diagnóstico de ingreso y la antibioterapia empírica. Objective: To know the initial approach of patients with diagnosis of SIRS from infectious origin in emergency rooms. Design: Analytic observational study of a concurrent cohort. Setting: Emergency rooms of Hospital Universitario San Vicente de Paúl (HUSVP and Hospital General de Medellín (HGM. Patients: Admitted through emergency rooms with non-traumatic SIRS between August, 1998, and March, 1999, older than 14 and with suspicion of infection as one of the main diagnosis at admission. Measurements: Description of the associated diseases frequency, the risk factors and findings on basic physical examination; also the usefulness of diagnostic tools, previous antibiotic use and empirical antibiotic therapy at the time of admission. We used chi2 or Fisher´s exact test to compare proportions. Results: 502 patients were admitted. The main antecedents were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (21.5% and trauma or previous surgery (18.7%; vital signs were determined as follows: heart rate in 100%, breath rate in 94.8%, blood pressure in 99.2%, temperature in 80.3%, Glasgow scale in 75.6% of the patients. Laboratory requests were done in the following proportions : white blood cell count in 98.4%, chest X rays in 71.1%, platelet count in 94.4% and creatinine determination in 89% of patients. In 26.5% of the patients cultures were not requested; blood cultures were done in 48.8% of the patients and results were positive in 19.2% of the specimens. In 22.3% of the patients antibiotics had

  18. Improving Conduct and Feasibility of Clinical Trials to Evaluate Antibacterial Drugs to Treat Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Recommendations of the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Antibacterial Drug Development Project Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirsch, Charles; Alemayehu, Demissie; Botgros, Radu; Comic-Savic, Sabrina; Friedland, David; Holland, Thomas L; Merchant, Kunal; Noel, Gary J; Pelfrene, Eric; Reith, Christina; Santiago, Jonas; Tiernan, Rosemary; Tenearts, Pamela; Goldsack, Jennifer C; Fowler, Vance G

    2016-08-15

    The etiology of hospital-acquired or ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) is often multidrug-resistant infections. The evaluation of new antibacterial drugs for efficacy in this population is important, as many antibacterial drugs have demonstrated limitations when studied in this population. HABP/VABP trials are expensive and challenging to conduct due to protocol complexity and low patient enrollment, among other factors. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) seeks to advance antibacterial drug development by streamlining HABP/VABP clinical trials to improve efficiency and feasibility while maintaining ethical rigor, patient safety, information value, and scientific validity. In 2013, CTTI engaged a multidisciplinary group of experts to discuss challenges impeding the conduct of HABP/VABP trials. Separate workstreams identified challenges associated with HABP/VABP protocol complexity. The Project Team developed potential solutions to streamline HABP/VABP trials using a Quality by Design approach. CTTI recommendations focus on 4 key areas to improve HABP/VABP trials: informed consent processes/practices, protocol design, choice of an institutional review board (IRB), and trial outcomes. Informed consent processes should include legally authorized representatives. Protocol design decisions should focus on eligibility criteria, prestudy antibacterial therapy considerations, use of new diagnostics, and sample size. CTTI recommends that sponsors use a central IRB and discuss trial endpoints with regulators, including defining a clinical failure and evaluating the impact of concomitant antibacterial drugs. Streamlining HABP/VABP trials by addressing key protocol elements can improve trial startup and patient recruitment/retention, reduce trial complexity and costs, and ensure patient safety while advancing antibacterial drug development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of

  19. Streamlining Safety Data Collection in Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia Trials: Recommendations of the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Antibacterial Drug Development Project Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Helen; Alemayehu, Demissie; Botgros, Radu; Comic-Savic, Sabrina; Eisenstein, Barry; Lorenz, Benjamin; Merchant, Kunal; Pelfrene, Eric; Reith, Christina; Santiago, Jonas; Tiernan, Rosemary; Wunderink, Richard; Tenaerts, Pamela; Knirsch, Charles

    2016-08-15

    Resistant bacteria are one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP). HABP/VABP trials are complex and difficult to conduct due to the large number of medical procedures, adverse events, and concomitant medications involved. Differences in the legislative frameworks between different regions of the world may also lead to excessive data collection. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) seeks to advance antibacterial drug development (ABDD) by streamlining clinical trials to improve efficiency and feasibility while maintaining ethical rigor, patient safety, information value, and scientific validity. In 2013, CTTI engaged a multidisciplinary group of experts to discuss challenges impeding the conduct of HABP/VABP trials. Separate workstreams identified challenges associated with current data collection processes. Experts defined "data collection" as the act of capturing and reporting certain data on the case report form as opposed to recording of data as part of routine clinical care. The ABDD Project Team developed strategies for streamlining safety data collection in HABP/VABP trials using a Quality by Design approach. Current safety data collection processes in HABP/VABP trials often include extraneous information. More targeted strategies for safety data collection in HABP/VABP trials will rely on optimal protocol design and prespecification of which safety data are essential to satisfy regulatory reporting requirements. A consensus and a cultural change in clinical trial design and conduct, which involve recognition of the need for more efficient data collection, are urgently needed to advance ABDD and to improve HABP/VABP trials in particular. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Drawing Hospital Foodscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    This poster presents a series of drawings depicting the initial considerations made with the Ph.D. project for an improved ‘Interior Design for Food’ in a Danish hospital ward. The project concerns a study on the ontological and symbolic interrelationship possibly existing between food and archit......This poster presents a series of drawings depicting the initial considerations made with the Ph.D. project for an improved ‘Interior Design for Food’ in a Danish hospital ward. The project concerns a study on the ontological and symbolic interrelationship possibly existing between food...

  1. Manufacturing Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of...

  2. [The founding of Zemun Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanović, Jasmina; Milenković, Sanja; Pavlović, Momcilo; Stojanović, Dragos

    2014-01-01

    This year Zemun Hospital--Clinical Hospital Center Zemun celebrates 230th anniversary of continuous work, thus becoming the oldest medical facility in Serbia.The exact date of the hospital founding has been often questioned in history. Various dates appeared in the literature, but the most frequent one was 25th of February 1784. Until now, the document which confirms this has never been published. This article represents the first official publication of the document which confirms that Zemun Hospital was indeed founded on this date. The first hospitals started emerging in Zemun when the town became a part of the Habsburg Monarchy. The first sanitary facility ever formed was the"Kontumac"--a quarantine established in 1730. Soon after, two more confessional hospitals were opened.The Serbian (Orthodox) Hospital was founded before 1769, whereas the German (Catholic) Hospital started working in 1758. Both hospitals were financed, amongst others, by the Town Hall--the Magistrate. In order to improve efficiency of these hospitals, a decision was made to merge them into a single City Hospital. It was founded on 25th February 1784, when the General Command ordered the Magistrate of Zemun to merge the financess of all existing hospitals and initiate the construction of a new building. Although financially united, the hospitals continued working in separate buildings over a certain period of time.The final, physical merging of these hospitals was completed in 1795.

  3. Hospitality and hospitableness | Lashley | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Hospital staffing and hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, R R

    1976-08-07

    A comparative study of costs per bed per day in teaching hospitals affiliated with Monash University compared with large non-teaching metropolitan hospitals (1964 to 1974) shows they are much higher in teaching hospitals. There is no evidence that this is due to the additional costs arising from the clinical schools. Research in the teaching hospitals and the accompanying high professional standards and demands on services are major factors accounting for the difference. Over the decade studied, the resident staff have increased by 77% and other salaried staff by 24%. The index of expenditure for the three teaching hospitals in the decade has increased by 386%.

  5. Medical decision, persistence of initial treatment, and glaucoma progression in a Brazilian reference hospital Decisão médica, persistência com o tratamento inicial e progressão do glaucoma em um hospital de referência no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva Paula

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the initial medical decision regarding primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG treatment in a referral center, and to assess the relationship between the persistence of treatment and the disease progression in cases managed exclusively with medication. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed for 65 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma referred to a tertiary hospital. The following clinical data were analyzed: initial medication, persistence of treatment, best corrected visual acuity, visual field mean deviation index, cup/disc ratio, and intraocular pressure. Patients were classified into four categories in order to verify the clinical evolution. RESULTS: The mean number of visits/ year was 4.4 ± 3.5, and the follow-up period was 40.7 ± 22.8 months. Mean persistence time was 12.9 ± 13.9 months. By six and twelve months, respectively, 39.1% and 62.5% of patients had discontinued the initially prescribed regimen, mainly by adding to (42% or changing (26% the course of treatment. Thirteen patients (21% were reclassified to a worse category of primary open-angle glaucoma, however, despite this trend, no significant correlation was found between shorter persistence and primary open-angle glaucoma worsening. CONCLUSIONS: Persistence rates with initial therapy schemes were low, as measured by medical decisions to change the course of treatment. Therefore, improvement in the initial medical decision is crucial in order to offer a more stable and effective treatment for primary open-angle glaucoma.OBJETIVO: Avaliar as mudanças terapêuticas, dadas por decisão médica, relativas ao tratamento do glaucoma primário de ângulo aberto em um centro de referência e a possível relação entre a persistência do tratamento e progressão da doença em casos controlados com medicação. MÉTODOS: Uma revisão de prontuários foi realizada em 65 pacientes com glaucoma primário de ângulo aberto encaminhados a um hospital

  6. Hospital Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Welcome to hospitalinspections.org, a website run by the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) that aims to make federal hospital inspection reports easier...

  7. Hospital outreach to support faith community nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerly, Sally; King, Michalene A; Hughes, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    A Faith Community Nurse (FCN) Program was initiated by a Magnet hospital and developed through collaboration between hospital departments and a university nurse educator. This article describes the program's development and activities that offer FCNs networking, free continuing education, and are an extension of the hospital's mission and values.

  8. Hospital philanthropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise.

  9. Hospital marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  10. Eradicating reliance on free artificial milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Ganga L; Swiler, Kristin B; Marsi, Vicki A; Taylor, Sarah N

    2015-02-01

    Hospitals that set forth to obtain Baby-Friendly Hospital designation often face considerable challenges in implementing the purchase of formula and supplies at a fair market rate as outlined in the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. Some of the challenges include difficulty tracking products in use and volumes used and obtaining pricing information from manufacturers of artificial milk. We report on our experience with assessing these factors, with an example of calculations used to arrive at fair market pricing, which might benefit other institutions seeking Baby-Friendly Hospital designation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Initial Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Congestion is a major problem in most cities and the problem is growing (Quiroga, 2000) (Faghri & Hamad, 2002). When the congestion level is increased the drivers notice this as delays in the traffic (Taylor, Woolley, & Zito, 2000), i.e., the travel time for the individual driver is simply...... increased. In the initial study presented here, the time it takes to pass an intersection is studied in details. Two major signal-controlled four-way intersections in the center of the city Aalborg are studied in details to estimate the congestion levels in these intersections, based on the time it takes...

  12. A role for pharmacists in community-based post-discharge warfarin management: protocol for the 'the role of community pharmacy in post hospital management of patients initiated on warfarin' study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bereznicki Luke RE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shorter periods of hospitalisation and increasing warfarin use have placed stress on community-based healthcare services to care for patients taking warfarin after hospital discharge, a high-risk period for these patients. A previous randomised controlled trial demonstrated that a post-discharge service of 4 home visits and point-of-care (POC International Normalised Ratio (INR testing by a trained pharmacist improved patients' outcomes. The current study aims to modify this previously trialled service model to implement and then evaluate a sustainable program to enable the smooth transition of patients taking warfarin from the hospital to community setting. Methods/Design The service will be trialled in 8 sites across 3 Australian states using a prospective, controlled cohort study design. Patients discharged from hospital taking warfarin will receive 2 or 3 home visits by a trained 'home medicines review (HMR-accredited' pharmacist in their 8 to 10 days after hospital discharge. Visits will involve a HMR, comprehensive warfarin education, and POC INR monitoring in collaboration with patients' general practitioners (GPs and community pharmacists. Patient outcomes will be compared to those in a control, or 'usual care', group. The primary outcome measure will be the proportion of patients experiencing a major bleeding event in the 90 days after discharge. Secondary outcome measures will include combined major bleeding and thromboembolic events, death, cessation of warfarin therapy, INR control at 8 days post-discharge and unplanned hospital readmissions from any cause. Stakeholder satisfaction will be assessed using structured postal questionnaire mailed to patients, GPs, community pharmacists and accredited pharmacists at the completion of their study involvement. Discussion This study design incorporates several aspects of prior interventions that have been demonstrated to improve warfarin management, including POC INR

  13. One-Year Outcomes of Out-of-Hospital Administration of Intravenous Glucose, Insulin, and Potassium (GIK) in Patients with Suspected Acute Coronary Syndromes (from the IMMEDIATE [Immediate Myocardial Metabolic Enhancement During Initial Assessment and Treatment in Emergency care] Trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selker, Harry P.; Udelson, James E.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Ruthazer, Robin; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Griffith, John L.; Sheehan, Patricia R.; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Rosenberg, Yves; Tian, Xin; Vickery, Ellen M.; Atkins, James M.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Sayah, Assaad J.; Pirrallo, Ronald G.; Levy, Michael K.; Richards, Michael E.; Braude, Darren A.; Doyle, Delanor D.; Frascone, Ralph J.; Kosiak, Donald J.; Leaming, James M.; Van Gelder, Carin M.; Walter, Gert-Paul; Wayne, Marvin A.; Woolard, Robert H.; Beshansky, Joni R.

    2014-01-01

    The IMMEDIATE Trial of very early intravenous glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in out-of-hospital emergency medical service (EMS) settings showed 80% reduction in infarct size at 30 days, suggesting potential longer-term benefit. Here we report 1-year outcomes. Pre-specified 1-year endpoints of this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, effectiveness trial included all-cause mortality, and composites including cardiac arrest, mortality, or hospitalization for heart failure (HF). Among 871 participants randomized to GIK vs. placebo, respectively, death occurred within 1 year in 11.6% vs. 13.5% (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; 95% CI 0.57, 1.23, P=0.36). The composite of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality was 12.8% vs. 17.0% (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.50, 1.02, P=0.06). The composite of hospitalization for HF or mortality within 1 year was 17.2% vs. 17.2% (HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.70, 1.37, P=0.92). The composite of mortality, cardiac arrest, or HF hospitalization within 1 year was 18.1% vs. 20.4% (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.62, 1.16, P=0.30). Among patients presenting with suspected ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), hazard ratios for 1-year mortality and the 3 composites were, respectively, 0.65 (95% CI 0.33, 1.27, P=0.21); 0.52 (95% CI 0.30, 0.92, P=0.03); 0.63 (95% CI 0.35, 1.16, P=0.14); and 0.51 (95% CI 0.30, 0.87, P=0.01). Among patients with suspected ACS, serious endpoints generally were lower with GIK than placebo, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, among those with STEMI, the composites of cardiac arrest or 1-year mortality, and of cardiac arrest, mortality, or HF hospitalization within 1 year, were significantly reduced. PMID:24792735

  14. [Counseling at the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, M

    1989-11-01

    In the counselling of patients by the hospital social service, personal assistance and initiation of medical, vocational and social rehabilitation measures are intertwined. Counselling methods, scope, contents and goals are determined by the objective medical facts at hand as well as the subjective needs present in the individual case, and are limited by the structure of the hospital and its responsibility for acute care. Complementary to person- and problem-centered counselling with patients and their relatives as the nucleus of psychosocial coping with illness and disability, the hospital social service cooperates with the whole range of clinical professions involved in the individual case in reintegrating the patient, in particular with the physicians in charge of establishing the indication for rehabilitative measure, as well as with the entire range of rehabilitation carriers, with extra-clinical facilities and services within the health care/social protection system. Evaluation, which would be necessary in view of outcome control and increased effectiveness of the counselling services provided in the hospital, does not occur so far. (Case examples are given to illustrate hospital-based counselling work.)

  15. Evaluation of supportive breastfeeding hospital practices: a community perspective Evaluación de prácticas hospitalarias de lactancia: una perspectiva comunitaria Avaliação de práticas hospitaleres de lactancia de apoio: uma perspectiva comunitária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MYUNGHAN CHOI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Study objectives: (1 describe the existing supportive hospital breastfeeding practices in a major urban region and (2 determine if supportive hospital breastfeeding practices are influenced by hospital characteristics. Methods: A cross-sectional telephone survey of all hospitals with maternity services (N = 21 in Maricopa County, Arizona (USA, was conducted between July 2009 and March 2010. This major urban county, which includes Phoenix, is the fourth largest city in the USA. Supportive breastfeeding practices were 12 maternity care practices consistent with WHO Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative Ten Steps. Hospital characteristics measured were professional breastfeeding services available, institutional ownership, number of births per year, births paid for by public funds, and the level of care provided. Descriptive and inferential statistics were conducted. Results: The total number of supportive practices ranged from 5 to 10 (M = 7.52; SD = 1.53. Two practices were uniformly implemented; the remainder varied from low (> 25% to moderate (50-75% levels of implementation. 86% of hospitals had widespread use of supplements and provided gift bags containing formula. The number of Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs employed by a hospital was the only variable predicting higher levels of supportive practices. Facility ownership status was significantly correlated with the number of IBCLCs. Discussion: The differences in supportive hospital practices among hospitals suggest the effectiveness of IBCLCs in changing practice; however, additional research is needed to further explore this thesis. Findings of this study, while unique to the community studied, were consistent with a number of findings reported by researchers around the globe.Objetivos del estudio: (1 describir las prácticas de lactancia hospitalaria de apoyo en una gran región urbana y (2 determinar si las prácticas de lactancia hospitalaria de apoyo están bajo la

  16. Openness initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  17. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  18. Breastfeeding, baby friendliness and birth in transition in North Western Russia: a study of women's perceptions of the care they receive when giving birth in six maternity homes in the cities of Archangelsk and Murmansk, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsing, E; Chalmers, B E; Dinekina, T J; Kondakova, N I

    2002-01-01

    Women's own views on the quality of the birthing care they received were recorded in a small study in the cities of Archangelsk and Murmansk in February 1999. Six maternity wards took part; one hospital had already been designated as a Baby Friendly Hospital (BFH) according to the strict global criteria of the WHO/UNICEF-recommended Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). Two of the hospitals had made profound changes in feeding routines and were by their own reckoning close to achieving this distinction, and were included in the BFH group. Three maternity wards were far from being in compliance with the BFHI approach and were grouped as the Non-Baby-Friendly Hospitals (NBFH). A total of 180 newly delivered mothers answered a 60-item questionnaire about their birthing and breastfeeding experiences. The questions were chosen from an existing protocol, the WEB (Women's Experiences of Birth) developed by one of the authors (BC). The study was part of an informal evaluation of five years of BFHI activities in the Barents Region, supported by Norway, and also aimed at recording any positive carry-over effect of the BFHI into obstetric routines as a whole. It was found that the project definitely had had an impact; feeding practices at the BFH were markedly closer to the international BFHI recommendations than at the NBFH. BFH mothers, however, reported suffering from breastfeeding problems just as often or more so than NBFH mothers. Possible explanations are discussed; it is concluded that this cross-sectional study may depict a transitory situation in the BFH. At the two hospitals not yet assessed, although staff felt that they had made profound changes, they may not yet have grasped the full extent and stringency of the changes required. The study shows that, despite good will, some practical details had not yet been worked out, resulting in a mixed outcome for the mothers. There was no noticeable carry-over of the attitudes and basic ideas of the project into

  19. Length of hospital stay and associated hospital costs with infliximab versus cyclosporine in severe ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löwenberg, Mark; Duijvis, Nicolette W.; Ponsioen, Cyriel; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Fockens, Paul; D'Haens, Geert R. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine and infliximab (IFX) seem equally effective as rescue therapy in hospitalized patients with severe ulcerative colitis (UC), although associated hospital stay and costs may differ. The aim of this study was to compare the duration of hospital stay and associated costs from initiation of

  20. Hospital Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition seen in hospitals usually occurs as some form of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). Primary PEM results from an acute or chronic deficiency of both protein and calories. Secondary PEM, or cachexia, results from a disease or medical condition such as cancer or gastrointestinal disease that alters requirements or impairs utilization of nutrients. This record was migrated from the OpenDepot repository service in June, 2017 before shutting down.

  1. Nevada Training Initiative Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Training Initiative dB Decibels O3 Ozone DNL Average Day-Night Sound Level or Ldn PM Particulate Matter DOE Department of Energy PSD Prevention...power stations) Railroad Station Humanitarian Buildings (multi-storied hospitals, schools, sports fields, churches, mosques ) Office Buildings...the decibel (dB). Sound on the decibel scale is referred to as a sound level. The threshold of human hearing is approximately 0 dB, and the

  2. Adaptação transcultural da versão brasileira do Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture: etapa inicial Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture: initial stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tartaglia Reis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A avaliação da cultura de segurança do paciente permite aos hospitais identificar e gerir prospectivamente questões relevantes de segurança em suas rotinas de trabalho. Este artigo descreve a adaptação transcultural do Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC para a Língua Portuguesa e contexto brasileiro. Adotou-se abordagem universalista para avaliar a equivalência conceitual, de itens e semântica. A metodologia incluiu os seguintes estágios: (1 tradução do questionário para o Português; (2 retradução para o Inglês; (3 painel de especialistas para elaboração da versão preliminar; (4 avaliação da compreensão verbal pela população-alvo. O questionário foi traduzido para o Português e sua versão final incluiu 42 itens. A população-alvo avaliou todos os itens como de fácil compreensão. O questionário encontra-se traduzido para o Português e adaptado para o contexto brasileiro, entretanto, faz-se necessário avaliar sua equivalência de mensuração, validade externa e reprodutibilidade.Patient safety culture assessment allows hospitals to identify and prospectively manage safety issues in work routines. This article aimed to describe the cross-cultural adaptation of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC into Brazilian Portuguese. A universalist approach was adopted to assess conceptual, item, and semantic equivalence. The methodology involved the following stages: (1 translation of the questionnaire into Portuguese; (2 back-translation into English; (3 an expert panel to prepare a draft version; and (4 assessment of verbal understanding of the draft by a sample of the target population. The questionnaire was translated into Portuguese, and the scale's final version included 42 items. The target population sample assessed all the items as easy to understand. The questionnaire has been translated into Portuguese and adapted to the Brazilian hospital context, but it is necessary to assess

  3. spine injury in mulago hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muiruri

    from arrival in hospital to review by a clinician. Figure i of adequate cervical spine X-rays(22, 25). High pick-up summarizes our findings. rates are only attained with adequate X-rays. Studies done elsewhere have shown that up to 45% of initial. Clinical evaluation: Not all patients were assessed for. X-rays are inadequate.

  4. SPINE INJURY IN MULAGO HOSPITAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    flt the remaining E? uncleared patients, iii'. Siiei had severe cervical spine injuries which had been missed. Conciu.-riorr.'This study concluded that the initial clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with suspected CSI in iiilulago Hospital ...

  5. Initiation devices, initiation systems including initiation devices and related methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Condit, Reston A.; Rasmussen, Nikki; Wallace, Ronald S.

    2018-04-10

    Initiation devices may include at least one substrate, an initiation element positioned on a first side of the at least one substrate, and a spark gap electrically coupled to the initiation element and positioned on a second side of the at least one substrate. Initiation devices may include a plurality of substrates where at least one substrate of the plurality of substrates is electrically connected to at least one adjacent substrate of the plurality of substrates with at least one via extending through the at least one substrate. Initiation systems may include such initiation devices. Methods of igniting energetic materials include passing a current through a spark gap formed on at least one substrate of the initiation device, passing the current through at least one via formed through the at least one substrate, and passing the current through an explosive bridge wire of the initiation device.

  6. The German hospital malnutrition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirlich, Matthias; Schütz, Tatjana; Norman, Kristina; Gastell, Sylvia; Lübke, Heinrich Josef; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bolder, Ulrich; Frieling, Thomas; Güldenzoph, Helge; Hahn, Kristian; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Schindler, Karin; Stein, Jürgen; Volkert, Dorothee; Weimann, Arved; Werner, Hansjörg; Wolf, Christiane; Zürcher, Gudrun; Bauer, Peter; Lochs, Herbert

    2006-08-01

    Malnutrition is frequently observed in chronic and severe diseases and associated with impaired outcome. In Germany general data on prevalence and impact of hospital malnutrition are missing. Nutritional state was assessed by subjective global assessment (SGA) and by anthropometric measurements in 1,886 consecutively admitted patients in 13 hospitals (n=1,073, university hospitals; n=813, community or teaching hospitals). Risk factors for malnutrition and the impact of nutritional status on length of hospital stay were analyzed. Malnutrition was diagnosed in 27.4% of patients according to SGA. A low arm muscle area and arm fat area were observed in 11.3% and 17.1%, respectively. Forty-three % of patients 70 years old were malnourished compared to only 7.8% of patients malnutrition was observed in geriatric (56.2%), oncology (37.6%), and gastroenterology (32.6%) departments. Multivariate analysis revealed three independent risk factors: higher age, polypharmacy, and malignant disease (all PMalnutrition was associated with an 43% increase of hospital stay (PMalnutrition is associated with increased length of hospital stay. Higher age, malignant disease and major comorbidity were found to be the main contributors to malnutrition. Adequate nutritional support should be initiated in order to optimize the clinical outcome of these patients.

  7. development of improved solid hospital waste management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... development of Hospital waste management plan, procurement of waste management materials, design and construction of special carte for on-site transportation. The initial successes from these steps facilitated the establishment of an Environmental Unit. Fortuitously, the Hospital became a recipient of.

  8. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care.

  9. Initial Egyptian ECMO experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Abdelbary

    2016-04-01

    Results: A total of twelve patients received ECMO between January 2014 and June 2015. The mean age was 35.9 years. (range 13–65 years, 8 males, with VV ECMO in 10 patients, and VA ECMO in 2 patients. Out of ten patients of VV ECMO, one had H1N1 pneumonia, one had advanced vasculitic lung, four had bacterial pneumonia, two traumatic lung contusions and one with organophosphorus poisoning, and one undiagnosed etiology leading to severe ARDS. Lung injury score range was 3–3.8, PaO2/FiO2 (20–76 mechanical ventilation duration before ECMO 1–14 days, Femoro-jugular cannulation in 7 patients and femoro-femoral in 2 patients and femoro-subclavian in 1 patient; all patients were initially sedated and paralyzed for (2–4 days and ventilated on pressure controlled ventilation with Pmax of 25 cm H2O and PEEP of 10 cm H2O. In VA ECMO patients were cannulated percutaneously using femoro-femoral approach. One patient showed no neurologic recovery and died after 24 h, the other had CABG on ECMO however the heart didn’t recover and died after 9 days. Heparin intravenous infusion was used initially in all patients and changed to Bivalirudin in 2 patients due to possible HIT. Pump flow ranged from 2.6 to 6.5 L/min. Average support time was 12 days (range 2–24 days. Seven patients (63.3% were successfully separated from ECMO and survived to hospital discharge. Hospital length of stay ranged from 3 to 42 days, tracheostomy was done percutaneously in 5 patients and surgically in 3. Gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in 6 patients, VAP in 7 patients, neurologic complications in 1 patient with complete recovery, cardiac arrhythmias in 3 patients, pneumothorax in 9 patients, and deep venous thrombosis in 2 patients.

  10. Benzodiazepine Initiation and Dose Escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Brian W; Johnston, Elizabeth V; Saum, Lindsay M

    2017-04-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) place patients at a significant risk of falling. The current literature does not address if this risk is increased during initiation or dose escalations of BZDs. To determine if initiation or dose escalations of BZD regimens are associated with an increased risk of falls in hospitalized patients compared with patients maintained on their home dose or who had their dose decreased from baseline. This retrospective case-control study evaluated hospitalized patients aged 45 years or older who received a BZD. Patients who did not fall were collected in a 3:1 ratio to patients who fell. Comparisons were made between BZD regimens prior to admission and those 48 hours prior to the index date. The date of fall served as the index date for patients who fell, and the median time-to-fall served as the index date for all other patients. A total of 132 patients were included in the study (33 falls and 99 without a fall). No significant differences were noted in demographics, baseline mobility, or past medical history. Patients who fell had a significantly longer median length of stay (15 vs 10 days; P = 0.025). Additionally, patients who fell were more likely to have had their BZD regimen initiated or dose escalated compared with patients who did not fall (63.6% vs 41.4%; P = 0.043). The risk of falling while on a BZD is increased on initiation and dose escalations. Hospitals should ensure judicious use of BZDs in inpatients to reduce the risk of falls.

  11. International Child Care Practices study: breastfeeding and pacifier use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E A S; Yu, Ly-Mee; Williams, Sheila

    2005-08-01

    Although the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative advises that no pacifiers be given to breastfeeding infants, both breastfeeding and pacifier use may protect against sudden infant death syndrome. The International Child Care Practice Study data set on child care practices associated with sudden infant death syndrome risk from 21 centers in 17 countries was used to describe infant-feeding practices and pacifier use and assess factors associated with breastfeeding. At approximately 3 months of age, rates of breastfeeding only (4%-80%) and pacifier use(12.5%-71%) varied between centers. Pacifier use was negatively associated with breastfeeding, and a dose-response effect was noted. Other negative (multiple birth, smoking by mother) and positive (intention to breastfeed, bed sharing, mothers' education) associations with breastfeeding only were identified. Although causality should not be inferred, these associations are consistent with previous studies. Advice on pacifiers should include potential benefits as well as risks.

  12. Future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotska, L; Armstrong, H

    2000-11-01

    Despite progress in promotion and support of breastfeeding over the past decade, the HIV pandemic necessitates new actions based on human rights, such as voluntary and confidential testing and counseling, offering HIV-positive women objective information on the risks and costs of all infant feeding options, and providing appropriate support for their decisions. Implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and the International Code of Marketing are essential components of a rights-based policy response to HIV and will lessen spillover of replacement feeding among HIV-negative women. Protective effects of nevirapine and exclusive breastfeeding, as well as the listed additional topics, require further research. We have yet to make exclusive breastfeeding easy and common when mothers choose to breastfeed.

  13. Developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dychtwald, K; Zitter, M

    1988-09-01

    The initial stages of developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals are explored in this excerpt from the book, The Role of the Hospital in an Aging Society: A Blueprint for Action. The elderly have unique perceptual, cognitive, social, and psychological needs and preferences, and a marketing strategy for eldercare services must reflect these factors, as well as the financial role of third-party payers and the decision-making influence of families and physicians. Among the elements the hospital must address when developing a marketing strategy are market selection and segmentation, targeting markets with specific services, pricing, and positioning the hospital for a maximum share of the eldercare market.

  14. Hospital Outpatient PPS Partial Hospitalization Program LDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Partial Hospitalization Program LDS This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 claims...

  15. The status of hospital information systems in Iranian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Sharifi, Mohammed; Ayat, Masar

    2014-08-01

    challenges and there is no proper long-term strategy plans for HIS initiation, development, and improvement in Iranian hospitals. In order to address these problems, six recommendations are provided. Hence, human resource and e-health professionals from third party consultancy companies along with medical university scholars have to assist such hospitals to undertake the proposed solutions in order to provide proper plans to overcome future challenges and have a mature HIS in accordance with expected HIS utilization from hospitals and medical universities.

  16. Structural Measures - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospitals and the availability of structural measures at that hospital. A structural measure reflects the environment in which hospitals care for patients....

  17. Patient survey (HCAHPS) - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  18. Understanding your hospital bill

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000881.htm Understanding your hospital bill To use the sharing features on this ... help you save money. Charges Listed on Your Hospital Bill A hospital bill will list the major ...

  19. Health initiatives conducted outside hospitals and other medical settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    it means to be healthy nowadays produces a number of problems for citizens who struggle to meet the standards of this changed ideal of health. Consequently, unhealthy citizens, such as overweight individuals, possess not only a biomedically defined unhealthy body or mind; they are also, in a broader sense...

  20. Innovations in health service delivery: the corporatization of public hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harding, April; Preker, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    ... hospitals play a critical role in ensuring delivery of health services, less is known about how to improve the efficiency and quality of care provided. Much can be learned in this respect from the experiences of hospital reforms initiated during the 1990s. Innovations in Health Service Delivery: The Corporatization of Public Hospitals is an a...

  1. Evaluation methods for hospital facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronczek-Munter, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    according to focus areas and proposes which evaluation methods to use in different building phases of healthcare facilities. Hospital evaluations with experts and users are also considered; their subjective view on space, function, technology, usability and aesthetics. Results & solutions: This paper...... presents the different methods for evaluating buildings in use in a new model, the Evaluation Focus Flower, and proposes which evaluation methods are suitable for various aims and building phases, i.e. which is giving best input for the initial briefing process of new hospital facilities with ambition...... of creating buildings with enhanced usability. Additionally various evaluation methods used in hospital cases in Denmark and Norway are presented. Involvement of users is proposed, not just in defining requirements but also in co-creation/design and evaluation of solutions. The theories and preliminary...

  2. Art in Hospitals Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baceviciute, Sarune; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Burelli, Paolo

    The idea of this pilot experiment within the context of the “Art in Hospitals” project was to explore the fruitfulness and future perspectives for integrating psychophysiological methods to the ethnographic approach so far implemented in the project. As a pilot study it serves to open the doors...... to experimental avenues that can support the ethnographic investigation. Therefore in order to form a basis for applications of these methodologies in future studies in the field, this pilot was concentrated in one of the initial premises of the project, which intended to challenge current recommendations for art...... in hospitals. Most of these guidelines favor figurative over abstract art, based on ideas leaning to the emotional congruence theory, which would claim that abstract art leads to ambiguity and therefore it could augment the current emotional base-line of an already stressed patient. The early ethnographic...

  3. The architecture of enterprise hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin; Zhao, Chenhui; An, Jiye

    2005-01-01

    Because of the complexity of the hospital environment, there exist a lot of medical information systems from different vendors with incompatible structures. In order to establish an enterprise hospital information system, the integration among these heterogeneous systems must be considered. Complete integration should cover three aspects: data integration, function integration and workflow integration. However most of the previous design of architecture did not accomplish such a complete integration. This article offers an architecture design of the enterprise hospital information system based on the concept of digital neural network system in hospital. It covers all three aspects of integration, and eventually achieves the target of one virtual data center with Enterprise Viewer for users of different roles. The initial implementation of the architecture in the 5-year Digital Hospital Project in Huzhou Central hospital of Zhejiang Province is also described.

  4. Hospital Library Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  5. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  6. The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich; Fassbender, Klaus; Hussain, M Shazam; Ebinger, Martin; Turc, Guillaume; Uchino, Ken; Davis, Stephen; Alexandrov, Anne; Grotta, James

    2017-12-01

    Background The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization was formed in 2016 as an international consortium of medical practitioners involved in pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute stroke. Aims PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization's mission is to improve stroke outcomes by supporting research and advocacy for pre-hospital stroke treatment in Mobile Stroke Units. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will provide a platform to enhance collaborative research across the spectrum of acute stroke management in the pre-hospital setting. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will also facilitate the appropriate proliferation and distribution of Mobile Stroke Units by providing a forum for professional communication, resource for public education, and stimulus for government, industry, and philanthropic support. Summary of review In this "white paper", we describe the evidence supporting pre-hospital stroke treatment, progress to date, practical issues such as application in various environments and staffing, planned research initiatives, and organizational structure. Conclusions PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization is not-for-profit, with membership open to anyone involved (or hoping to become involved) in pre-hospital stroke care. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization has a Steering Committee comprised of members from Europe, U.S., Canada, Australia, and other regions having a Mobile Stroke Unit in operation. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization convenes satellite meetings for membership at the International Stroke Conference and European Stroke Congress each year to address the PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization mission. The first research collaborations agreed upon are to: (1) develop a list of common data elements to be collected by all Mobile Stroke Unit programs and entered into a common research database, and (2) develop a protocol for investigating the natural history of hyper-acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

  7. Medical education and the quality improvement spiral: A case study from Mpumalanga, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bac

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The short timeframe of medical students’ rotations is not always conducive to successful, in-depth quality-improvement projects requiring a more longitudinal approach.Aim: To describe the process of inducting students into a longitudinal quality-improvement project,using the topic of the Mother- and Baby-Friendly Initiative as a case study; and to explore the possible contribution of a quality-improvement project to the development of student competencies.Setting: Mpumalanga clinical learning centres, where University of Pretoria medical students did their district health rotations.Method: Consecutive student groups had to engage with a hospital’s compliance with specific steps of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding that form the standards for the Mother- and Baby-Friendly Initiative. Primary data sources included an on-site PowerPoint group presentation (n = 42, a written group report (n = 42 and notes of individual interviews in an end-of-rotation objectively structured clinical examination station (n = 139.Results: Activities in each rotation varied according to the needs identified through the application of the quality-improvement cycle in consultation with the local health team. The development of student competencies is described according to the roles of a medical expert in the CanMEDS framework: collaborator, health advocate, scholar, communicator, manager and professional. The exposure to the real-life situation in South African public hospitals had a great influence on many students, who also acted as catalysts for transforming practice.Conclusion: Service learning and quality-improvement projects can be successfully integrated in one rotation and can contribute to the development of the different roles of a medical expert. More studies could provide insight into the potential of this approach in transforming institutions and student learning.

  8. Medical education and the quality improvement spiral: A case study from Mpumalanga, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bac

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The short timeframe of medical students’ rotations is not always conducive to successful, in-depth quality-improvement projects requiring a more longitudinal approach. Aim: To describe the process of inducting students into a longitudinal quality-improvement project,using the topic of the Mother- and Baby-Friendly Initiative as a case study; and to explore the possible contribution of a quality-improvement project to the development of student competencies. Setting: Mpumalanga clinical learning centres, where University of Pretoria medical students did their district health rotations. Method: Consecutive student groups had to engage with a hospital’s compliance with specific steps of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding that form the standards for the Mother- and Baby-Friendly Initiative. Primary data sources included an on-site PowerPoint group presentation (n = 42, a written group report (n = 42 and notes of individual interviews in an end-of-rotation objectively structured clinical examination station (n = 139. Results: Activities in each rotation varied according to the needs identified through the application of the quality-improvement cycle in consultation with the local health team. The development of student competencies is described according to the roles of a medical expert in the CanMEDS framework: collaborator, health advocate, scholar, communicator, manager and professional. The exposure to the real-life situation in South African public hospitals had a great influence on many students, who also acted as catalysts for transforming practice. Conclusion: Service learning and quality-improvement projects can be successfully integrated in one rotation and can contribute to the development of the different roles of a medical expert. More studies could provide insight into the potential of this approach in transforming institutions and student learning.

  9. The costs of acute readmissions to a different hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian M.; Kongstad, Line Planck

    2017-01-01

    in costs between different-hospital readmissions and same-hospital readmissions within the same DRG. Secondly, to investigate whether the effect of different-hospital readmission on costs vary depending of provider type (general versus teaching hospital). We use a rich Danish patient-level administrative...... to a different hospital. The change in hospital indicates that a progression of the illness has occurred since the initial hospitalisation. As a result, different-hospital readmissions might be more costly compared to same-hospital admissions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to analyse differences...... data set covering inpatient stays in the period 2008–2010. We exploit the fact that some patients are readmitted within the same DRG and that some of these readmissions occur at different hospitals in a propensity score difference-in-difference design. The estimates are based on a restricted sample...

  10. Improving hospital efficiency: a process model of organizational change commitments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Amit; Huising, Ruthanne; Golden, Brian R

    2014-02-01

    Improving hospital efficiency is a critical goal for managers and policy makers. We draw on participant observation of the perioperative coaching program in seven Ontario hospitals to develop knowledge of the process by which the content of change initiatives to increase hospital efficiency is defined. The coaching program was a change initiative involving the use of external facilitators with the goal of increasing perioperative efficiency. Focusing on the role of subjective understandings in shaping initiatives to improve efficiency, we show that physicians, nurses, administrators, and external facilitators all have differing frames of the problems that limit efficiency, and propose different changes that could enhance efficiency. Dynamics of strategic and contested framing ultimately shaped hospital change commitments. We build on work identifying factors that enhance the success of change efforts to improve hospital efficiency, highlighting the importance of subjective understandings and the politics of meaning-making in defining what hospitals change.

  11. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  12. Hospital volume and hospital mortality for esophagectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lanschot, J. J.; Hulscher, J. B.; Buskens, C. J.; Tilanus, H. W.; ten Kate, F. J.; Obertop, H.

    2001-01-01

    Hospital mortality after esophagectomy has decreased from 29% to 7.5% over the last decades because of improved surgical techniques and better perioperative care. Suggestions have been made that a further decrease in hospital mortality may be achieved by centralization of esophagectomies in high

  13. Coccidioidomycosis-associated hospitalizations, California, USA, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondermeyer, Gail; Lee, Lauren; Gilliss, Debra; Tabnak, Farzaneh; Vugia, Duc

    2013-10-01

    In the past decade, state-specific increases in the number of reported cases of coccidioidomycosis have been observed in areas of California and Arizona where the disease is endemic. Although most coccidioidomycosis is asymptomatic or mild, infection can lead to severe pulmonary or disseminated disease requiring hospitalization and costly disease management. To determine the epidemiology of cases and toll of coccidioidomycosis-associated hospitalizations in California, we reviewed hospital discharge data for 2000-2011. During this period, there were 25,217 coccidioidomycosis-associated hospitalizations for 15,747 patients and >$2 billion US in total hospital charges. Annual initial hospitalization rates increased from 2.3 initial hospitalizations/100,000 population in 2000 to 5.0 initial hospitalizations/100,000 population in 2011. During this period, initial hospitalization rates were higher for men than women, African Americans and Hispanics than Whites, and older persons than younger persons. In California, the increasing health- and cost-related effects of coccidioidomycosis-associated hospitalizations are a major public health challenge.

  14. Outcome of surgical implant generation network nail initiative in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in Uganda, was propagated in to Kenya mainly in resource poor hospitals, and has changed long bone fractures' management and outcomes. The goal of this study was to describe applicability of the SIGN initiative in fracture care in a Kenyan hospital. AbstrAct. Background: Closed interlocked intra-medullary nailing (IM), ...

  15. Using Quality Tools and Methodologies to Improve a Hospital's Quality Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Daniel; Wicks, Angela M; Visich, John K

    2017-01-01

    The authors identify the quality tools and methodologies most frequently used by quality-positioned hospitals versus nonquality hospitals. Northeastern U.S. hospitals in both groups received a brief, 12-question survey. The authors found that 93.75% of the quality hospitals and 81.25% of the nonquality hospitals used some form of process improvement methodologies. However, there were significant differences between the groups regarding the impact of quality improvement initiatives on patients. The findings indicate that in quality hospitals the use of quality improvement initiatives had a significantly greater positive impact on patient satisfaction and patient outcomes when compared to nonquality hospitals.

  16. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  17. Dioxin Exposure Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Dioxin Exposure Initiative (DEI) is no longer active. This page contains a summary of the dioxin exposure initiative with illustrations, contact and background information.Originally supported by scientist Matthew Lorber, who retired in Mar 2017.

  18. Clinical course of untreated tonic-clonic seizures in childhood: prospective, hospital based study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. van Donselaar (Cees); O.F. Brouwer (Oebele); A.T. Geerts (Ada); W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); H. Stroink (Hans); A.C.B. Peters (Boudewijn)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractTo assess declaration and acceleration in the disease process in the initial phase of epilepsy in children with new onset tonic-clonic seizures. STUDY DESIGN: Hospital based follow up study. SETTING: Two university hospitals, a general hospital, and a children's hospital in the

  19. Initial Results of Peripheral-Blood Stem-Cell Mobilization, Collection, Cryopreservation, and Engraftment After Autologous Transplantation Confirm That the Capacity-Building Approach Offers Good Chances of Success in Critical Contexts: A Kurdish-Italian Cooperative Project at the Hiwa Cancer Hospital, Sulaymaniyah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignazio Majolino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: At Hiwa Cancer Hospital (Sulaymaniyah, Iraqi Kurdistan after the center was started by a cooperative project in June 2016, autologous transplantation was developed. Patients and Methods: To develop the project, the capacity-building approach was adopted, with on-site training and coaching of personnel, educational meetings, lectures, on-the-job training, and the implementation of quality management planning. Results: Here, we report initial results of peripheral-blood stem-cell mobilization and collection of the first 27 patients (age 12 to 61 years; 19 males and 8 females; multiple myeloma, n = 10; plasma cell leukemia, n = 1; Hodgkin lymphoma, n = 12; non-Hodgkin lymphoma, n = 3; and acute myeloid leukemia, n = 1. Only three (11.5% of 26 patients experienced a failure of mobilization. A median of 6.1 × 106/kg CD34-positive cells per patient were collected (range, 2.4 to 20.8, with two apheretic runs. Twenty-four patients underwent autologous transplantation. All but one transplantation engrafted fully and steadily, with 0.5 and 1.0 × 109/L polymorphonucleates on day 10.5 (range, 8 to 12 and day 11 (range, 9 to 15, respectively, and with 20 and 50 × 109/L platelets on day 13 (range, 10 to 17 and day 17 (range, 2 to 44, respectively. More than 95% of patients are projected to survive 1 year after autograft. Conclusion: These data are the result of an Italian effort to establish in Iraqi Kurdistan a leading center for hemopoietic stem-cell transplantation. The capacity building approach was used, with on-site training and coaching as instruments for the development of provider ability and problem solving. With future limitations for immigration, this method will be helpful, especially in the field of high-technology medicine.

  20. Initial Results of Peripheral-Blood Stem-Cell Mobilization, Collection, Cryopreservation, and Engraftment After Autologous Transplantation Confirm That the Capacity-Building Approach Offers Good Chances of Success in Critical Contexts: A Kurdish-Italian Cooperative Project at the Hiwa Cancer Hospital, Sulaymaniyah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majolino, Ignazio; Mohammed, Dereen; Hassan, Dastan; Ipsevich, Francesco; Abdullah, Chra; Mohammed, Rebar; Palmas, Angelo; Possenti, Marco; Noori, Diana; Ali, Dlir; Karem, Harem; Salih, Salah; Vacca, Michele; Del Fante, Claudia; Ostuni, Angelo; Frigato, Andrea; Massei, Maria Speranza; Manna, Annunziata; Vasta, Stefania; Gabriel, Marcela; Verna, Marta; Rovelli, Attilio; Conter, Valentino; Ali, Kosar; Othman, Dosti

    2017-12-15

    Introduction At Hiwa Cancer Hospital (Sulaymaniyah, Iraqi Kurdistan) after the center was started by a cooperative project in June 2016, autologous transplantation was developed. Patients and Methods To develop the project, the capacity-building approach was adopted, with on-site training and coaching of personnel, educational meetings, lectures, on-the-job training, and the implementation of quality management planning. Results Here, we report initial results of peripheral-blood stem-cell mobilization and collection of the first 27 patients (age 12 to 61 years; 19 males and 8 females; multiple myeloma, n = 10; plasma cell leukemia, n = 1; Hodgkin lymphoma, n = 12; non-Hodgkin lymphoma, n = 3; and acute myeloid leukemia, n = 1). Only three (11.5%) of 26 patients experienced a failure of mobilization. A median of 6.1 × 10 6 /kg CD34-positive cells per patient were collected (range, 2.4 to 20.8), with two apheretic runs. Twenty-four patients underwent autologous transplantation. All but one transplantation engrafted fully and steadily, with 0.5 and 1.0 × 10 9 /L polymorphonucleates on day 10.5 (range, 8 to 12) and day 11 (range, 9 to 15), respectively, and with 20 and 50 × 10 9 /L platelets on day 13 (range, 10 to 17) and day 17 (range, 2 to 44), respectively. More than 95% of patients are projected to survive 1 year after autograft. Conclusion These data are the result of an Italian effort to establish in Iraqi Kurdistan a leading center for hemopoietic stem-cell transplantation. The capacity building approach was used, with on-site training and coaching as instruments for the development of provider ability and problem solving. With future limitations for immigration, this method will be helpful, especially in the field of high-technology medicine.

  1. Unplanned Hospital Visits - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the...

  2. The Hospitable Meal Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Overgaard, Svend Skafte

    2017-01-01

    -ended approach towards meal experiences. The underlying purpose of The Hospitable Meal Model is to provide the basis for creating value for the individuals involved in institutional meal services. The Hospitable Meal Model was developed on the basis of an empirical study on hospital meal experiences explored......This article presents an analytical model that aims to conceptualize how meal experiences are framed when taking into account a dynamic understanding of hospitality: the meal model is named The Hospitable Meal Model. The idea behind The Hospitable Meal Model is to present a conceptual model...... that can serve as a frame for developing hospitable meal competencies among professionals working within the area of institutional foodservices as well as a conceptual model for analysing meal experiences. The Hospitable Meal Model transcends and transforms existing meal models by presenting a more open...

  3. Unplanned Hospital Visits - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  4. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Elton

    2003-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  5. Hospital Compare - Archived Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Compare is a consumer-oriented website that provides information on how well hospitals provide recommended care to their patients. This information can help...

  6. The Hospitable Meal Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Overgaard, Svend Skafte

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an analytical model that aims to conceptualize how meal experiences are framed when taking into account a dynamic understanding of hospitality: the meal model is named The Hospitable Meal Model. The idea behind The Hospitable Meal Model is to present a conceptual model...... that can serve as a frame for developing hospitable meal competencies among professionals working within the area of institutional foodservices as well as a conceptual model for analysing meal experiences. The Hospitable Meal Model transcends and transforms existing meal models by presenting a more open......-ended approach towards meal experiences. The underlying purpose of The Hospitable Meal Model is to provide the basis for creating value for the individuals involved in institutional meal services. The Hospitable Meal Model was developed on the basis of an empirical study on hospital meal experiences explored...

  7. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Jr, Elton L

    2007-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  8. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  9. Ionizing radiation in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet is concerned with radiation safety of radiologist and other hospital personnel. Part 1 deals with properties of radiation in general (especially of ionizing radiation). In part 2, different applications of radiation in hospitals are discussed. Part 3 indicates what to do to make improvements to not totally safe situations in hospitals. (Auth./G.J.P.)

  10. Two Belgian University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huylebrouck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bevacizumab (BEV, a humanized immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF has demonstrated activity against recurrent high-grade gliomas (HGG in phase II clinical trials. Patients and Methods. Data were collected from patients with recurrent HGG who initiated treatment with BEV outside a clinical trial protocol at two Belgian university hospitals. Results. 19 patients (11 M/8 F were administered a total of 138 cycles of BEV (median 4, range 1–31. Tumor response assessment by MRI was available for 15 patients; 2 complete responses and 3 partial responses for an objective response rate of 26% for the intent to treat population were observed on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images; significant regressions on T2/FLAIR were documented in 10 out of 15 patients (67%. A reduced uptake on PET was documented in 3 out of 4 evaluable patients. The six-month progression-free survival was 21% (95% CI 2.7–39.5. Two patients had an ongoing tumor response and remained free from progression after 12 months of BEV treatment. Conclusions. The activity and tolerability of BEV were comparable to results from previous prospective phase II trials. Reduced uptake on PET suggests a metabolic response in addition to an antiangiogenic effect in some cases with favorable clinical outcome.

  11. Medicare Hospital Spending Per Patient - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The "Medicare hospital spending per patient (Medicare Spending per Beneficiary)" measure shows whether Medicare spends more, less or about the same per Medicare...

  12. Hospitality and prosumption | Ritzer | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. Referring physician satisfaction: toward a better understanding of hospital referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzurick, T G; France, K R; Logar, C M

    1998-01-01

    Customer satisfaction literature has contributed significantly to the development of marketing strategies in the health-care arena. The research has led to the development of hospital-driven relationship marketing programs. This study examines the inclusion of referring physicians as partners in the hospital's relationship marketing program. In exploring this relationship, medical and hospital facility characteristics that referring physicians find important in making patient referrals to specialty care hospitals are identified and analyzed. The results lead to the development of strategic initiatives which hospital marketers should consider when developing relationship marketing programs designed to satisfy their referring physicians.

  14. ELEMENTAL FORMS OF HOSPITALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Emanuel Korstanje

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern studies emphasized on the needs of researching the hospitality as relevant aspects of tourism and hospitality fields. Anyway, these approaches are inextricably intertwined to the industry of tourism and do not take seriously the anthropological and sociological roots of hospitality. In fact, the hotel seems to be a partial sphere of hospitality at all. Under this context, the present paper explores the issue of hospitality enrooted in the political and economic indo-European principle of free-transit which is associated to a much broader origin.  Starting from the premise etymologically hostel and hospital share similar origins, we follow the contributions of J Derrida to determine the elements that formed the hospitality up to date.

  15. Hospital ethnography: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Sjaak; Finkler, Kaja

    2004-11-01

    The introduction sets out two central ideas around which this collection of articles on hospital ethnography has been organised. The first is that hospitals are not identical clones of a global biomedical model. Hospitals take on different forms in different cultures and societies. Medical views and technical facilities may vary considerably leading to different diagnostic and therapeutic traditions. The second idea, related to the first, is that biomedicine and the hospital as its foremost institution is a domain where the core values and beliefs of a culture come into view. Hospitals both reflect and reinforce dominant social and cultural processes of their societies. The authors further discuss some methodological and ethical complexities of doing fieldwork in a hospital setting and present brief summaries of the contributions, which deal with hospitals in Ghana, South Africa, Bangladesh, Mexico, Italy, The Netherlands, Papua New Guinea, Egypt and Lebanon.

  16. Barriers to timely initiation of breastfeeding among mothers of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: (1) To determine the barriers to timely initiation of breastfeeding in mothers who Hospital. (2). To determine if there is any statistical association between the time of initiation of breastfeeding and certain socio-demographic, obstetric, psychosocial and environmental factors in the mother-baby pairs.

  17. Initial Evaluation of Patients with Presumed Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Can, MD

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a common clinical problem, but nevertheless is but one element of the broader issue of ‘transient loss of consciousness’ (TLOC. The first step is to ascertain whether the patient actually suffered a syncopal episode, and thereafter the goal must be to determine the basis of symptoms with sufficient confidence to assess prognosis and initiate an effective treatment strategy. The initial evaluation of these patients, which usually takes place in an emergency department (ED. or acute care facility, is challenging since patients are usually asymptomatic when they come for medical attention, may have little or no recall of the event, and witnesses, if any, often cannot provide reliable information. Given these circumstances, it is understandable that frontline physicians often tend to take a seemingly ‘safe’ approach, and admit both high-risk and intermediate-risk syncope patients to hospital. This strategy has many implications, including life-style and economic concerns for the patient, and health care management issues for physicians, hospital administrators and the overall health care system. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC. guidelines and several clinical studies provide helpful advice regarding “risk stratification” to help guide physicians in selecting patients for either early hospital admission or later oupatient subspeciality evaluation. The utility of syncope management units in the ED, and a guideline-based approach to the syncope patient, has tended to both diminish the number of undiagnosed cases and reduce the hospital admission rate. In this review, we have attempted to both highlight a cost-effective diagnostic pathway beginning with the initial evaluation of the patient with suspected syncope, and to provide criteria which may help frontline physicians better base their decisions regarding need for in-hospital versus outpatient clinic evaluation of syncope patients.

  18. Emerging Pathogens Initiative (EPI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Emerging Pathogens Initiative (EPI) database contains emerging pathogens information from the local Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). The EPI software...

  19. Mass casualty management: Jos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The classification recognises a category called “regional disaster” and attempts to enunciate a principle of initiation, mobilisation and co-ordination of management of such disasters among hospitals and human and material resources within the region. It is envisaged that coalescence of “regional disaster preparedness” ...

  20. Developing an Undergraduate Hospital Dentistry Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, G. B.; Swanson, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    The process used by the University of British Columbia to establish and improve an undergraduate hospital dentistry program is chronicled. The program's initial structure and objectives, use of student input for program improvement, and the success of the approach in developing an effective program are discussed. (MSE)

  1. Failing hospitals: mission statements to drive service improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Annabel; Sarfraz, Aamer

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to consider whether the hospital mission statement can be used as a management tool to improve service provision in failing hospitals. A literature search into the potential value and harm of hospital mission statements was done, followed by a survey of initial attitudes within a failing hospital. Do they indicate likely success of the tool? Mission statement is a potentially valuable leadership tool in the hospital environment. The success of its implementation is broadly dependent on its being developed with the support of stakeholders and its real application to all management decisions and questions of asset allocation. The potential danger lies in the fact that it can be seen as an expensive expression of politically correct platitudes which leads to cynical alienation of stakeholders. This was a small study within a single UK failing hospital, and extending its range will help to clarify whether its findings are typical of attitudes within such institutions. The likely success of the hospital mission statement as a management tool within a failing hospital is significantly limited by initial attitudes and preconceptions. Our research suggests that implementation is likely to be detrimental without preparatory involvement of the local community and hospital staff at all levels. Hospital management cannot be divorced from the local community where patient confidence must be maintained. This paper complements previous research, which has looked at mission statement acceptance among the upper echelons of hospital management.

  2. Care initiation area yields dramatic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The ED at Gaston Memorial Hospital in Gastonia, NC, has achieved dramatic results in key department metrics with a Care Initiation Area (CIA) and a physician in triage. Here's how the ED arrived at this winning solution: Leadership was trained in and implemented the Kaizen method, which eliminates redundant or inefficient process steps. Simulation software helped determine additional space needed by analyzing arrival patterns and other key data. After only two days of meetings, new ideas were implemented and tested.

  3. [Initiating psychiatric care for young, isolated foreigners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woestelandt, Laure; Touhami, Fatima; Radjack, Rahmeth; Moro, Marie Rose; Lachal, Jonathan

    The various traumatic events experienced by young isolated foreigners can weaken them psychologically and cause psychiatric decompensation. A qualitative study, carried out by the Maison de Solenn and the Avicenne hospital, aimed to provide better understanding of the conditions for initiating psychiatric care with these adolescents. The different results show that this type of care for these young migrants must be cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Hospital information system institutionalization processes in indonesian public, government-owned and privately owned hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, P W; Hidayanto, A N; Ayuningtyas, Dumilah; Budi, Indra

    2016-11-01

    The Hospital Information System (HIS) could help hospitals as a public entity to provide optimal health services. One of the main challenges of HIS implementation is an institutional change. Using institutional theory as the analytical lens, this study aims to explain the institutionalization of HIS as an instance of e-health initiatives in Indonesia. Furthermore, this paper aims for hospital management and researchers to improve the understanding of the social forces that influence hospital personnel's HIS acceptance within an organizational context. We use case studies from four public, government-owned hospitals and four privately owned (public and specialty) hospitals to explain the HIS institutionalization process by exploring the three concepts of institutional theory: institutional isomorphism, institutional logic, and institutional entrepreneurship. This study reveals that differences exist between public, government-owned and private hospitals with regard to the institutionalization process: public, government-owned hospitals' management is more motivated to implement HIS to comply with the regulations, while private hospitals' management views HIS as an urgent requirement that must be achieved. The study findings also reveal that various institutional isomorphism mechanisms and forms of institutional logic emerge during the process. Finally, three factors-self-efficacy, social influence, and management support-have a significant influence on the individual acceptance of HIS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hospital design for better infection control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lateef Fatimah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical design and infrastructure of a hospital or institution is an essential component of its infection control measure. Thus is must be a prerequisite to take these into consideration from the initial conception and planning stages of the building. The balance between designing a hospital to be an open, accessible and public place and the control to reduce the spread of infections diseases is a necessity. At Singapore General Hospital, many lessons were learnt during the SARS outbreak pertaining to this. During and subsequent to the SARS outbreak, many changes evolved in the hospital to enable us to handle and face any emerging infectious situation with calm, confidence and the knowledge that staff and patients will be in good stead. This paper will share some of our experiences as well as challenges

  6. Winning with Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Matthew J.

    2004-01-01

    A common complaint among high school coaches is the lack of initiative shown by some of their players. Coaches expect a certain level of decision-making and independence, and more so from team captains and senior players. Developing leadership skills is a major benefit to athletes who participate at a competitive level, and taking initiative can…

  7. Introducing research initiatives into healthcare: what do doctors think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyld, Lucy; Smith, Sian; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Long, Janet; Ward, Robyn L

    2014-04-01

    Current national and international policies emphasize the need to develop research initiatives within our health care system. Institutional biobanking represents a modern, large-scale research initiative that is reliant upon the support of several aspects of the health care organization. This research project aims to explore doctors' views on the concept of institutional biobanking and to gain insight into the factors which impact the development of research initiatives within healthcare systems. Qualitative research study using semi-structured interviews. The research was conducted across two public teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia where institutional biobanking was being introduced. Twenty-five participants were interviewed, of whom 21 were medical practitioners at the specialist trainee level or above in a specialty directly related to biobanking; four were key stakeholders responsible for the design and implementation of the biobanking initiative. All participants strongly supported the concept of institutional biobanking. Participants highlighted the discordance between the doctors who work to establish the biobank (the contributors) and the researchers who use it (the consumers). Participants identified several barriers that limit the success of research initiatives in the hospital setting including: the 'resistance to change' culture; the difficulties in engaging health professionals in research initiatives; and the lack of incentives offered to doctors for their contribution. Doctors positively valued the opportunity to advise the implementation team, and felt that the initiative could benefit from their knowledge and expertise. Successful integration of research initiatives into hospitals requires early collaboration between the implementing team and the health care professionals to produce a plan that is sensitive to the needs of the health professionals and tailored to the hospital setting. Research initiatives must consider incentives that

  8. Predicting hospitalization in children with acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuktiryaki, A Betul; Civelek, Ersoy; Can, Demet; Orhan, Fazıl; Aydogan, Metin; Reisli, Ismail; Keskin, Ozlem; Akcay, Ahmet; Yazicioglu, Mehtap; Cokugras, Haluk; Yuksel, Hasan; Zeyrek, Dost; Kocak, A Kadir; Sekerel, Bulent E

    2013-05-01

    Acute asthma is one of the most common medical emergencies in children. Appropriate assessment/treatment and early identification of factors that predict hospitalization are critical for the effective utilization of emergency services. To identify risk factors that predict hospitalization and to compare the concordance of the Modified Pulmonary Index Score (MPIS) with the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline criteria in terms of attack severity. The study population was composed of children aged 5-18 years who presented to the Emergency Departments (ED) of the tertiary reference centers of the country within a period of 3 months. Patients were evaluated at the initial presentation and the 1(st) and 4(th) hours. Of the 304 patients (median age: 8.0 years [interquartile range: 6.5-9.7]), 51.3% and 19.4% required oral corticosteroids (OCS) and hospitalization, respectively. Attack severity and MPIS were found as predicting factors for hospitalization, but none of the demographic characteristics collected predicted OCS use or hospitalization. Hospitalization status at the 1(st) hour with moderate/severe attack severity showed a sensitivity of 44.1%, specificity of 82.9%, positive predictive value of 38.2%, and negative predictive value of 86.0%; for MPIS ≥ 5, these values were 42.4%, 85.3%, 41.0%, and 86.0%, respectively. Concordance in prediction of hospitalization between the MPIS and the GINA guideline was found to be moderate at the 1(st) hour (κ = 0.577). Attack severity is a predictive factor for hospitalization in children with acute asthma. Determining attack severity with MPIS and a cut-off value ≥ 5 at the 1(st) hour may help physicians in EDs. Having fewer variables and the ability to calculate a numeric value with MPIS makes it an easy and useful tool in clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reassessment of antibiotic therapy in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, M; Germain, J-M; Rémy, E; Lottin, M; Etienne, M; Czernichow, P; Merle, V

    2017-09-01

    French national guidelines state that antibiotic therapies should be reassessed between 48 and 72hours after treatment initiation and that reassessment of antibiotic therapy (RA) must be recorded in patients' files. To determine whether RA is performed and recorded in patients' files in hospitals in a region of France. Setting: hospitals participating in the National nosocomial infection point- prevalence survey (NPS) in Upper-Normandy, France. Patients included those receiving antibiotic therapy (excluding antibiotic prophylaxis) on NPS day, started in the hospital in which the survey was conducted and ongoing for more than 72hours. Data collected included characteristics of participating hospitals and, for each included patient, characteristics of ward, infection and antibiotic therapy, and mention in the patients' files of explicit or implicit RA. The rate of explicit and implicit RA was calculated and factors associated with explicit or implicit RA were evaluated using a univariate analysis. Thirty-three hospitals representing 87% of hospital beds region-wide were included in the study. In addition, 933 prescriptions were assessed for 724 infections in 676 patients. The overall rate of RA was 67.6% (49.3% of explicit RA and 18.3% of implicit RA). The rate of RA differed significantly according to infection and antibiotic class but not according to hospital or ward characteristics. Our study provides new and reassuring results regarding reassessment of antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Sustainable Agricultural Marketing Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Adanacıoğlu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable marketing is a holistic approach that puts equal emphasis on environmental, social equity, and economic concerns in the development of marketing strategies. The purpose of the study is to examine and discuss the sustainable agricultural marketing initiatives practiced throughout the World and Turkey, and to put forth suggestions to further improve the performance of agricultural marketing initiatives in Turkey. Some of the sustainable agricultural marketing initiatives practiced around the world are carried out through civil organizations. Furthermore; some of these initiatives have also launched by farmers, consumers, food processors and retailers. The long-term strategies to increase these initiatives should be determined due to the fact that examples of successful sustainable agricultural marketing initiatives are inadequate and cannot be spread in Turkey. In this context, first of all, the supports provided by the government to improve agricultural marketing systems, such as EU funds for rural development should be compatible with the goals of sustainable marketing. For this purpose, it should be examined whether all proposed projects related to agricultural marketing meet the social, economic, and environmental principles of sustainable marketing. It is important that supporting organizations, especially civil society organisations, should take an active role for faster dissemination and adoption of sustainable agricultural marketing practices in Turkey. These organizations may provide technical assistance in preparing successful project proposals and training to farm groups. In addition, the other organizations, such as local administrations, producers' associations, cooperatives, can contribute to the success of sustainable agricultural marketing initiatives. The use of direct marketing strategies and vertical integration attempts in sustainable agricultural marketing initiatives that will likely be implemented in Turkey is

  11. Cost estimate of hospital stays for premature newborns in a public tertiary hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Maria Desgualdo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To estimate the direct costs of hospital stays for premature newborns in the Interlagos Hospital and Maternity Center in São Paulo, Brazil and to assess the difference between the amount reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System and the real cost of care for each premature newborn. METHODS: A cost-estimate study in which hospital and professional costs were estimated for premature infants born at 22 to 36 weeks gestation during the calendar year of 2004 and surviving beyond one hour of age. Direct costs included hospital services, professional care, diagnoses and therapy, orthotics, prosthetics, special materials, and blood products. Costs were estimated using tables published by the Unified Health System and the Brasindice as well as the list of medical procedures provided by the Brazilian Classification of Medical Procedures. RESULTS: The average direct cost of care for initial hospitalization of a premature newborn in 2004 was $2,386 USD. Total hospital expenses and professional services for all premature infants in this hospital were $227,000 and $69,500 USD, respectively. The costs for diagnostic testing and blood products for all premature infants totaled $22,440 and $1,833 USD. The daily average cost of a premature newborn weighing less than 1,000 g was $115 USD, and the daily average cost of a premature newborn weighing more than 2,500 g was $89 USD. Amounts reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System corresponded to only 27.42% of the real cost of care. CONCLUSIONS: The cost of hospital stays for premature newborns was much greater than the amount reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System. The highest costs corresponded to newborns with lower birth weight. Hospital costs progressively and discretely decreased as the newborns' weight increased.

  12. Hospitals, The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009 with the intent to map critical infrastructure in the Coastal Zone. The initial four parishes included Lafourche, Plaquemine, St. , Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Hospitals dataset current as of 2011. The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009...

  13. Hospitals, The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009 with the intent to map critical infrastructure in the Coastal Zone. The initial four parishes included Lafourche, Plaquemine, St., Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Hospitals dataset current as of 2011. The featured data collection is the USGS-LAGIC Coastal Parishes Structures Project. This ongoing project was started in 2009...

  14. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  15. Fraud in Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Musau, Steve; Vian, Taryn

    2008-01-01

    Hospitals are vulnerable to corruption. In the U.S., health care fraud has been stimated to cost $60 billion per year, or 3% of total health care expenditures - much of it in the hospital sector. Hospitals account for 50% or more of health care pending in many countries. Fraud and corruption in hospitals negatively affect access and quality, as public servants make off with resources which could have been used to reduce out-of-pocket expenditures for patients, or improve needed services. This...

  16. Moments of hospitality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2014-01-01

    Hospital meals have increasingly become part of the political and scientific agenda of the welfare discussions in Denmark and other European countries. This article employs non-representational theory to analyse hospitalityscapes in order to explore opportunities for adding value to the hospital...... meal experience. By drawing on research carried out in two Danish hospital wards, this article explores how hospitalityscapes are socio-materially constructed. The research strategy was based on performative participant observations, visual ethnography and semi-structured interviews. The empirical data...... that a focus on disruptive micro-events might create opportunities for hospitalityscapes and add value to future hospital meal experiences....

  17. Breast-feeding initiation in New York City, 1979 to 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, K D; McMurtrie, C; Kerker, B D; Na, Y; Graham, E H

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore changes in breast-feeding initiation from 1979 to 1996 among infants born in New York City hospitals. All New York City hospitals were surveyed every 2 years. Hospital staff reported feeding method at newborn discharge. New York City breast-feeding initiation rates increased consistently from 1979 to 1996 (from 29% to 58%, P < .0001), including 1984 to 1990, when rates decreased nationally. A 1984 New York State regulation requiring each hospital to designate a lactation coordinator may have been associated with the continuing increases in breast-feeding initiation.

  18. 1996 environmental initiatives report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Progress by Consumers Gas in addressing environmental challenges were reviewed. Proposed environmental initiatives for the next fiscal year and beyond were introduced. Proposed initiatives were placed into three priority categories, high, medium or low, which together with the environmental management framework form the the utility's overall environmental agenda. High on the list of environmental priorities for the company are atmospheric air emissions, planning and construction practices, energy conservation and efficiency, environmental compliance, and methane emissions. The present state of the initiatives by the various company divisions and regions, compiled from the respective business plans, were reported. 21 figs

  19. What accounting leaves out of hospital financial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, K E; Glenn, J K

    1986-01-01

    As PPS and other fixed-price initiatives replace cost-based reimbursement in the hospital industry, the burden of assuming the risk for business success or failure shifts from the payor to the hospital. As a consequence, theories of risk to the business firm which have found application in other industries now deserve attention by hospital management. Incorporating such risk concepts into hospital strategies and actions requires a view of financial management that goes beyond the generally accepted accounting principles of managing and assigning costs for maximum revenue and profitability. This article examines the financial theory of risk in business firms, illustrates the various components of risk as they apply to a hospital business, and discusses how the hospital management strategies of cost-reduction, marketing, diversification, and multiorganizational affiliation can alter the risk characteristics of a hospital business.

  20. Global Methane Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Global Methane Initiative promotes cost-effective, near-term methane recovery through partnerships between developed and developing countries, with participation from the private sector, development banks, and nongovernmental organizations.

  1. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapters Certified Centers and Clinics Support Groups About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate ... Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One ...

  2. Research Programs & Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH develops international initiatives and collaborates with other NCI divisions, NCI-designated Cancer Centers, and other countries to support cancer control planning, encourage capacity building, and support cancer research and research networks.

  3. Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI) website provides consumer and provider information regarding the quality of care in nursing homes. NHQI discusses quality...

  4. PESP Landscaping Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landscaping practices can positively or negatively affect local environments and human health. The Landscaping Initiative seeks to enhance benefits of landscaping while reducing need for pesticides, fertilizers, etc., by working with partners.

  5. Collaborative Procurement Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    GPP's Clean Energy Collaborative Procurement Initiative provides a platform for deploying clean energy technologies across multiple government and educational organizations for maximum impact on installed solar system capacity and local economic activity.

  6. Quality Initiatives - General Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has developed a standardized approach for the development of quality measures that it uses in its quality initiatives. Known as the Measures Management System...

  7. Initial external events: floods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumond, M.M.

    1989-12-01

    The initial external event, specifically flood in a Nuclear power plant, and the calculation necessary to determine the contribution of this type of event in a Probabilistic Safety Analysis, are presented. (M.I.)

  8. The Zambia Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Masaki Watabe

    2005-01-01

    In rural Zambia refugees and host communities are working together to move from relief dependence to self reliance. Could UNHCR’s Zambia Initiative (ZI) be a model for other countries struggling to cope with the protracted presence of refugees?

  9. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  10. RAS Initiative - Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  11. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  12. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  13. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  14. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  15. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider.

  16. Towards the collaborative hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Hasle, Peter; Edwards, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals are increasingly faced with conflicting demands as they have to respond to increasing patient demands as well as financial, clinical and quality challenges. To handle these demands the hospital need to reconfigure its organization, and we propose to build on a concept for the collaborat......Hospitals are increasingly faced with conflicting demands as they have to respond to increasing patient demands as well as financial, clinical and quality challenges. To handle these demands the hospital need to reconfigure its organization, and we propose to build on a concept...... for the collaborative hospital as new organizational form which is better equipped to respond to the challenges facing modern hospitals. The collaborative hospital is an ambidextrous organization that opens for pursuing both exploration and exploitation within the same organizational structure. The basic principles...... of the collaborative hospital concern the creation of an appropriate balance between standardization and local autonomy, shared purpose centred around providing the best possible care, and use of enabling structures that sustain the new ways of collaborative work. The chapter builds on the theoretical framework...

  17. Hospital 360°.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo Valencia, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Liliana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    There are forces that are greater than the individual performance of each hospital institution and of the health system structural of each country. The world is changing and to face up to the future in the best possible way, we need to understand how contexts and emerging trends link up and how they affect the hospital sector. The Columbian Association of Hospitals and Clinics, ACHC, has thus come up with the Hospital 360° concept which uses hospitals capable of anticipating changing contexts by means of the transition between present and future and takes on board the experience of global, socio-economic, demographic, political, environmental and technological fields as its model. Hospital 360° is an invitation to reinvent processes and institution themselves allowing them to adapt and incorporate a high degree of functional flexibility. Hospital 360° purses goals of efficiency, effectiveness and relevance, but also of impact and sustainability, and is coherent with the internal needs of hospital institutions and society for long-term benefits.

  18. The interstices of hospitality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jane.b

    interpersonal relationships, virtue, rites and commercial/non-commercial exchange. In doing so it ... aspects of hospitality, and the approach of the social sciences, which study the dynamics of hospitality within the context of relationships in ..... in the virtual media, the ritual always begins with an invitation or a request to be ...

  19. Management accounting for hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current state. Traditionally hospital systems. especially in the government sector, have been unable to provide management with the necessary timely and meaningful information with which to manage. In the public sector the hospitals are almost totally devoid of useful ongoing information. Managers are not in a position.

  20. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  1. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised on February ... GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D'Alessandro, M. ...

  2. Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management (RHM) is a peer-reviewed journal publishing articles that make an original contribution to the ... study for hospitality refers to a more disciplinary approach according to the quintessential managerial areas of Finance, Human Resources, Operations, Marketing & Sales, and Technology;.

  3. Official Centre Hospitality

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sylvain Dufour

    Corporate Policy. Approved by the Management Executive Committee. - 1 -. Version 3.0.1 effective 2016-05-01. Official Centre Hospitality. 1. Objective. 2. ... and social interaction. 4. Roles and Responsibilities ... Authorization. The prime level of managerial responsibility for authorizing hospitality expenses rests with the.

  4. Students in Action Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Theresa; Mottiar, Ziene; Quinn, Bernadette; Gorman, Catherine; Griffin, Kevin; Craggs, Ruth; Quinn, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    The Students in Action Project in the School of Hospitality Management and Tourism was established in 2012 as a way of engaging students and working with stakeholders in a destination. The overall aim of the project was to immerse students in an active collaborative learning environment within the destination to identify ways in which tourism could be enhanced. In the 2014/2015 academic year the project involved over 300 students from a variety of programmes and modules working with local sta...

  5. Are comparisons of patient experiences across hospitals fair? A study in Veterans Health Administration hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Paul D; Meterko, Mark; Wright, Steven M; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2014-07-01

    Surveys are increasingly used to assess patient experiences with health care. Comparisons of hospital scores based on patient experience surveys should be adjusted for patient characteristics that might affect survey results. Such characteristics are commonly drawn from patient surveys that collect little, if any, clinical information. Consequently some hospitals, especially those treating particularly complex patients, have been concerned that standard adjustment methods do not adequately reflect the challenges of treating their patients. To compare scores for different types of hospitals after making adjustments using only survey-reported patient characteristics and using more complete clinical and hospital information. We used clinical and survey data from a national sample of 1858 veterans hospitalized for an initial acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center during fiscal years 2003 and 2004. We used VA administrative data to characterize hospitals. The survey asked patients about their experiences with hospital care. The clinical data included 14 measures abstracted from medical records that are predictive of survival after an AMI. Comparisons of scores across hospitals adjusted only for patient-reported health status and sociodemographic characteristics were similar to those that also adjusted for patient clinical characteristics; the Spearman rank-order correlations between the 2 sets of adjusted scores were >0.97 across 9 dimensions of inpatient experience. This study did not support concerns that measures of patient care experiences are unfair because commonly used models do not adjust adequately for potentially confounding patient clinical characteristics.

  6. Hospital development plans: a new tool to break ground for strategic thinking in Tanzanian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessa, Steffen

    2005-12-01

    Tanzanian hospitals suffer from underfunding and poor management. In particular, planning and strategic thinking need improvement. Cultural values such as subordination, risk aversion, and high time preference, together with a long history of socialist government, result in lack of responsibility, accountability, and planning. This has been addressed by the health sector reform with its focus on decentralization, strengthened by the introduction of basket funding facilitated by the Comprehensive Council Health Plans. As a consequence of this the next logical step is to improve the authority of regional and district hospitals in the use of their resources by introducing hospital development plans. These strategic plans were introduced as tools of strategic planning in 2001 by the Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau in close collaboration with the Tanzanian Ministry of Health, binding the release of rehabilitation funds to presentation of a strategic hospital plan. This study examines the rationale and content of hospital development plans. Initial experiences are discussed. The quality of presented plans has steadily improved, but there is a tendency for hospitals with a close connection to development partners to present well prepared reports while other hospitals have severe problems fulfilling the requirements. For many hospitals it is in fact the first time that they have had to define their functions and future role, thus breaking ground for strategic thinking.

  7. On spaces of hospitality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anni

    Although specialists in hospitality have worked extensively on hospitality with respect to relations between different nations or between nations and individuals of a different nationality, for instance when they seek asylum, Jacques Derrida preferred to focus instead upon the relationship between...... the guest and the host. This has provided a much-needed rethinking of how to understand hospitality as a way of relating, as an ethics and as a politics. Within this work, there have often appeared discussions of ‘spaces of hospitality’, but these spaces have remained largely abstract. This is where...... this paper comes in: It will re open discussions of spaces of hospitality with an introduction into an on-going research project that studies the performative, structural and social dynamics of cultural encounters focusing on forms of hospitality that are related to particular sites in the city, namely...

  8. On spaces of hospitality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anni

    this paper comes in: It will re open discussions of spaces of hospitality with an introduction into an on-going research project that studies the performative, structural and social dynamics of cultural encounters focusing on forms of hospitality that are related to particular sites in the city, namely......Although specialists in hospitality have worked extensively on hospitality with respect to relations between different nations or between nations and individuals of a different nationality, for instance when they seek asylum, Jacques Derrida preferred to focus instead upon the relationship between...... the guest and the host. This has provided a much-needed rethinking of how to understand hospitality as a way of relating, as an ethics and as a politics. Within this work, there have often appeared discussions of ‘spaces of hospitality’, but these spaces have remained largely abstract. This is where...

  9. The impact of critical total quality management practices on hospital performance in the ministry of health hospitals in saudi arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraki, Mohammad Shamsuddin

    2014-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) offers a method for solving quality and patient safety problems and bringing significant improvement to hospital performance. However, only few studies have been conducted in this area in developing countries, particularly in Saudi Arabia. This research is carried out in an attempt to address this gap, exploring the impact of applying TQM practices on hospital performance in the Saudi Ministry of Health hospitals. The study has included 4 hospitals in Tabuk Region, namely, King Khaled Hospital, King Fahad Hospital, Maternity and Children Hospital, and Hagel General Hospital. The data collection was done by the researcher when 400 questionnaires were distributed using a convenient sampling technique to access the required data. The response rate was 67.25% of the total questionnaires distributed. The TQM practices used in the study were as follows: leadership, employee management, information analysis, training, customer focus, continuous improvement, process management, and supplier management. The findings of the research show a significant positive correlation between the 8 practices of TQM and hospital performance with a correlation coefficient r value of 0.9 (P = .0001). The study also reveals that Saudi hospitals are facing difficulties in engaging the clinical staff in their quality initiative. Moreover, our findings show that accredited hospitals have significantly applied TQM practices more than unaccredited hospitals.

  10. Measuring distance through dense weighted networks: The case of hospital-associated pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjibbe Donker

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hospital networks, formed by patients visiting multiple hospitals, affect the spread of hospital-associated infections, resulting in differences in risks for hospitals depending on their network position. These networks are increasingly used to inform strategies to prevent and control the spread of hospital-associated pathogens. However, many studies only consider patients that are received directly from the initial hospital, without considering the effect of indirect trajectories through the network. We determine the optimal way to measure the distance between hospitals within the network, by reconstructing the English hospital network based on shared patients in 2014-2015, and simulating the spread of a hospital-associated pathogen between hospitals, taking into consideration that each intermediate hospital conveys a delay in the further spread of the pathogen. While the risk of transferring a hospital-associated pathogen between directly neighbouring hospitals is a direct reflection of the number of shared patients, the distance between two hospitals far-away in the network is determined largely by the number of intermediate hospitals in the network. Because the network is dense, most long distance transmission chains in fact involve only few intermediate steps, spreading along the many weak links. The dense connectivity of hospital networks, together with a strong regional structure, causes hospital-associated pathogens to spread from the initial outbreak in a two-step process: first, the directly surrounding hospitals are affected through the strong connections, second all other hospitals receive introductions through the multitude of weaker links. Although the strong connections matter for local spread, weak links in the network can offer ideal routes for hospital-associated pathogens to travel further faster. This hold important implications for infection prevention and control efforts: if a local outbreak is not controlled in time

  11. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Adib Hajbaghery

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and until defibrillation, duration and result of CPR, frequency of tracheal intubations and time served for it were collected in a checklist. Results: In six months study, 206 cases of cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempted. The survival rate was similar for both sexes. Short-term survival observed in19.9% of cases and only 5.3% survived to discharge. Conclusions: Duration of CPR, time of the first defibrillation, response time and the location of cardiac arrest are the key predictors of survival to hospital discharge and in-hospital CPR strategies require improvement. This study promotes a national study on post CPR survival for accurate data on our performance in attention to chain of survival. KeyWords: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR, Survival rate, Iran

  12. A Strategic Framework for Improving the Patient Experience in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkelien, Natalie L

    Hospitals are taking new approaches to satisfy consumers and deliver on customer expectations by enhancing their patients' comprehensive experience. The HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) survey and value-based purchasing initiatives have tied reimbursement to patient satisfaction scores, bringing patient perspectives on care to the forefront of hospitals' strategic priorities. This essay reviews the patient experience literature and argues that hospitals should adopt an expanded approach beyond HCAHPS measures to enhance the patient experience. Such an approach allows providers to deliver quality outcomes that satisfy patients' wants and needs.

  13. Management of the hospitalized diabetes patient with an insulin pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    More than 375,000 Americans manage their diabetes with an insulin pump, and this number continues to increase. Many of these patients will want to remain on their insulin pump while hospitalized, so the nurse needs to know about how to care for the hospitalized patient wearing an insulin pump. This article discusses the benefits of intensive insulin therapy, how the insulin pump works, initial insulin-pump dosing, candidate selection, advantages and disadvantages of using an insulin pump, troubleshooting the pump, nursing care of the hospitalized patient wearing an insulin pump, and development of hospital protocols for the care of such patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hospital employee assault rates before and after enactment of the california hospital safety and security act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteel, Carri; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Nocera, Maryalice; Smith, Jamie B; Blando, James; Goldmacher, Suzi; O'Hagan, Emily; Valiante, David; Harrison, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This study examines changes in violent event rates to hospital employees before and after enactment of the California Hospital Safety and Security Act in 1995. We compared pre- and post-initiative employee assault rates in California (n = 116) emergency departments and psychiatric units with those in New Jersey (n = 50), where statewide workplace violence initiatives do not exist. Poisson regression with generalized estimating equations was used to compare assault rates between a 3-year pre-enactment period (1993-1995) and a 6-year post-enactment period (1996-2001) using New Jersey hospitals as a temporal control. Assault rates among emergency department employees decreased 48% in California post-enactment, compared with emergency department employee assault rates in New Jersey (rate ratio [RR] = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.31, 0.90). Emergency department employee assault rates decreased in smaller facilities (RR = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.96) and for-profit-controlled hospitals (RR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.19, 0.79) post-enactment. Among psychiatric units, for-profit-controlled hospitals (RR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.19, 0.85) and hospitals located in smaller communities (RR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.92) experienced decreased assault rates post-enactment. Policy may be an effective method to increase safety to health care workers.

  15. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  16. Patient Survey (PCH - HCAHPS) PPS-exempt Cancer Hospital - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  17. International EUREKA: Initialization Segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    The Initialization Segment creates the starting description of the uranium market. The starting description includes the international boundaries of trade, the geologic provinces, resources, reserves, production, uranium demand forecasts, and existing market transactions. The Initialization Segment is designed to accept information of various degrees of detail, depending on what is known about each region. It must transform this information into a specific data structure required by the Market Segment of the model, filling in gaps in the information through a predetermined sequence of defaults and built in assumptions. A principal function of the Initialization Segment is to create diagnostic messages indicating any inconsistencies in data and explaining which assumptions were used to organize the data base. This permits the user to manipulate the data base until such time the user is satisfied that all the assumptions used are reasonable and that any inconsistencies are resolved in a satisfactory manner

  18. The impact of HCA's 2006 leveraged buyout on hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Michael J; Thompson, Jon M

    2012-01-01

    Leveraged buyout (LBO) arrangements are a reorganization strategy whereby a firm assumes a substantial amount of debt to buy back its publicly held stock to become privately held. LBOs offer a firm several advantages and have the potential to increase efficiency. In the past 20 years, several healthcare firms have engaged in LBOs, but the literature on performance changes in healthcare organizations as a result of an LBO is limited. In this article, we report on a study that examined the performance of Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) hospitals before and after the LBO that was initiated in 2006. We used data from the Medicare Hospital Cost Report Information System and analyzed data from 130 HCA hospitals and 490 comparison hospitals. Findings show that HCA hospitals reduced expenses and their number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) relative to local competitor hospitals. HCA hospitals' cash-flow-margin ratio was substantially higher when adjusted for its local competing hospitals at the beginning of the LBO as well as at end of the LBO. When compared to local hospitals, HCA hospitals had a significant decrease in their capital investment in fixed assets from 2006 to 2009. These findings underscore the effectiveness of HCA's management strategies to repay debt and increase the value of the company, and they are informative for healthcare firms and their managers who are considering LBOs.

  19. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  20. Self-initiated expatriates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    by further studies, this exploratory research project may contribute to the understanding of the adjustment of adult third-culture kids as well as the role of experience and multicultural abilities. Few, if any, prior studies, have examined adjustment of this group of self-initiated expatriates....

  1. Global healthy backpack initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, Kapila; Jacobs, Karen; Fernando, Dulitha

    2012-01-01

    Schoolbag use by children is a global common concern.. Children carry school books and other amenities in their school bags. Global evidence indicates that daily load carried by school children may have negative health implications. Backpack as a school bag model, is the healthiest way of load carriage for school children. Several initiatives have been launched world over to minimize unhealthy consequences resulting from schoolbags. Based on a situation analysis, Sri Lanka implemented a national healthy schoolbag campaign by joint efforts of Ministries of Health and Education. Actions were contemplated on; strategies for bag weight reduction, introduction of an ergonomically modeled schoolbag and bag behaviour change. New strategies were introduced with awareness campaigns to policy makers, bag manufacturers, parents, teachers and children. Four million schoolchildren benefitted. In 2000, the backpack strategy of "Pack it Light, Wear it Right" was started as a public health initiative in the United States by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). Over the last eleven years, thousands of occupational therapy practitioners and students participated in educational programs and outreach activities. In 2004, modeled after the success AOTA initiative, the Icelandic Occupational Therapy Association launched a national backpack awareness initiative. This article shares examples of practices that could be implemented in any context to the promote health of children.

  2. Funds Fuel Graduation Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    In the first wave of funding under a revitalized high school graduation initiative, the U.S. Department of Education is betting nearly $50 million that it can help states and school districts find better ways to hang onto students who might drop out and bring back those who have disappeared without diplomas. Twenty-nine states and districts won…

  3. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  4. The Zambia Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Watabe

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In rural Zambia refugees and host communities are working together to move from relief dependence to self reliance. Could UNHCR’s Zambia Initiative (ZI be a model for other countries struggling to cope with the protracted presence of refugees?

  5. Major New Initiatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Major New Initiatives. Multi-party multi-rate video conferencing OOPS. Live Lecture OOPS. Rural ATM Machine Vortex. Finger print detection HP-IITM. Medical Diagnostic kit NeuroSynaptic. LCD projection system TeNeT. Web Terminal MeTeL Midas. Entertainment ...

  6. Ontario's Student Voice Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This article describes in some detail aspects of the Student Voice initiative funded and championed by Ontario's Ministry of Education since 2008. The project enables thousands of students to make their voices heard in meaningful ways and to participate in student-led research. Some students from grades 7 to 12 become members of the Student…

  7. Mexico: health promotion initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, D

    2000-01-01

    Mexico is currently undergoing a Health Sector Reform to address the country's epidemiologic and demographic changes, deep socio-economic inequalities and their consequences on health. The Government and a diversified set of actors, mainly NGOs, are taking up health promotion initiatives.

  8. Joint Programming Initiative Climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, R.J.; Berkhout, F.; Deelen, van C.L.; Driessen, P.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    From 2008 to 2011, Knowledge for Climate contributed to the development of the Joint Programming Initiative “Connecting Climate Knowledge for Europe” (JPI Climate). In 2010, a proposal was developed and accepted, followed in 2011 by the development and adoption of a governance structure and a

  9. The SEED Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Carolyn R.

    2011-01-01

    Committed to fulfilling the promise of the green economy, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) launched the Sustainability Education and Economic Development (SEED) initiative (www.theseedcenter.org) in October 2010. The project advances sustainability and clean energy workforce development practices at community colleges by…

  10. Transformative Change Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, D. D.; Kirby, C.; Witt, M. A.; Richie, D.; Mix, S.; Feldbaum, M.; Liu, S.; Mason, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Transformative Change Initiative (TCI) is dedicated to assisting community colleges to scale up innovation in the form of guided pathways, programs of study, and evidence-based strategies to improve student outcomes and program, organization, and system performance. The impetus for TCI is the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and…

  11. Hospitality and Institutional Meals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Strøjer, Anna-Lise

    2017-01-01

    on an experimental design, in which 10 bachelor students in Nutrition and Health organized and participated as both hosts and guests in four self-selected meal events. The events included a Housing Community event, a Children’s Birthday party, an Art Exhibition event and a Family Easter lunch. Based on a semi......Abstract: There is a growing interest in articulating institutional meal serving practices as a hospitality activity involving host and guest interactions. This study aims to qualify institutional hospitality and meal activities by exploring private hospitality events. The study is based...... was transformed into a guest. Information on purpose of the event and other information given in the invitation were part of this process. Furthermore, hospitality activities could be characterized by blurred host-guest relations and by being able to embrace unexpected events as well. The activities were...

  12. Physician-Owned Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 6001 of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 amended section 1877 of the Social Security Act to impose additional requirements for physician-owned hospitals to...

  13. Premier Hospital Historical Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — To provide a historical overview of the participating hospitals, before the first project report, Premier Healthcare Informatics has used data already available for...

  14. Hospital Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Hospital Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow you to...

  15. Hospital Outpatient PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4523 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) provides authority for CMS to implement a prospective payment system (PPS) under Medicare for hospital...

  16. VT Hospital Site Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This data layer contains point locations of all major community, regional, comprehensive health, and healthcare provider hospitals in the state of...

  17. Allegheny County Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The data on health care facilities includes the name and location of all the hospitals and primary care facilities in Allegheny County. The current listing of...

  18. Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  19. American Hospital Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Featured Resource Hospital-Community Partnerships to Build a Culture of Health: A Compendium of Case Studies ... Senate Republican Leaders Release Tax Bill (Members-Only) Special Bulletin: CMS Releases CY ...

  20. Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In October 2012, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for Inpatient Prospective Payment System hospitals with excess readmissions. Excess readmissions are measured...

  1. Hospital Readmission Reduction

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In October 2012, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for Inpatient Prospective Payment System hospitals with excess readmissions. Excess readmissions are measured...

  2. Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - provider data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical...

  5. Service Robots for Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan

    services to maintain the quality of healthcare provided. This thesis and the Industrial PhD project aim to address logistics, which is the most resource demanding service in a hospital. The scale of the transportation tasks is huge and the material flow in a hospital is comparable to that of a factory. We...... believe that these transportation tasks, to a great extent, can be and will be automated using mobile robots. This thesis consequently addresses the key technical issues of implementing service robots in hospitals. In simple terms, a robotic system for automating hospital logistics has to be reliable...... manual work and offer many advantages beyond robotics. Finally, this thesis outlines our contributions in representation of multi-floor buildings, which is a vital requirement to achieve robust and practical, real-world service robot applications....

  6. Corporate social responsibility and hospitals: US theory, Japanese experiences, and lessons for other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshiro; Ellen, Moriah; Brown, Adalsteinn

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the role that corporate social responsibility can play in advancing hospital management. Corporate social responsibility is the integration of social and environmental concerns within business operations. The authors discuss how corporate social responsibility can help hospitals and provide suggestions to hospitals in deciding which corporate social responsibility initiatives to pursue.

  7. 77 FR 3787 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Office of Hospital Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... administration and initial/final endorsement of projects undertaken by Office of Hospital Facilities. DATES... Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Office of Hospital Facilities Transactional Forms for FHA Programs... Lists the Following Information Title of Proposal: Office of Hospital Facilities Transactional Forms for...

  8. 78 FR 32663 - Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of Teaching Hospitals and Opportunity To Apply for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ...] Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of Teaching Hospitals and Opportunity To Apply for Available... announces the closure of two teaching hospitals and the initiation of an application process where hospitals... modifying language at section 1886(d)(5)(B)(v) of the Act, to instruct the Secretary to establish a process...

  9. Nutrition support in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Nutrition support in hospitals is becoming an area of focus because of the evidence showing improved clinical outcome with nutrition support, its status as a human rights issue and its integration into quality assurance.......Nutrition support in hospitals is becoming an area of focus because of the evidence showing improved clinical outcome with nutrition support, its status as a human rights issue and its integration into quality assurance....

  10. Critical Hospitality Management Research

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, A; Lynch, P; Lugosi, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of critical hospitality management research (CHMR) and explores key issues that such approaches raise. The paper is split into two parts. The first reviews contemporary writings that reflect the changing nature of hospitality management research and accounts for the emergence of a critical tradition. The second part identifies eight areas which are central concerns for the future development of CHMR: criticality, ethics and advocacy, scale, claims of legit...

  11. Ionizing radiation in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, K.; Ginkel, G. van; Leun, K. van der; Muller, H.; Oude Elferink, J.; Vesseur, A.

    1985-10-01

    This booklet dels with the risks of the use of ionizing radiation for people working in a hospital. It is subdivided in three parts. Part 1 treats the properties of ionizing radiation in general. In part 2 the various applications are discussed of ionizing radiation in hospitals. Part 3 indicates how a not completely safe situation may be improved. (H.W.). 14 figs.; 4 tabs

  12. Hospitality, Tourism, and Politics

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen W. Litvin

    2012-01-01

    Government policy has a significant impact on the hospitality and tourism industry, but it is unclear if political leaders fully understand this economic sector when crafting policies. This article offers new research about the direct involvement of industry practitioners in the political process, by analyzing the backgrounds of legislators in the six New England states. The data indicate that only 3% of these legislators have current or former careers related to hospitality and tourism. The ...

  13. Analisa Penerapan Sistem pada Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steeve Haryanto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis on the application of the system hospitality industry aims to determine whether the system from outside has a considerable influence on the number of luxury hotels in Jakarta as well as the factors that influence in picking the hospitality industry service system. The results of this survey are expected to be a consideration in implementing an information system in the field of hospitality industry. The method used in this paper is a literature review and analysis. The initial step in the analysis is to conduct a survey on the current system in hotels in Jakarta, and analysis of the survey results and the identification of the need for local companies to compete with foreign companies. Implementation of the system is no longer measured by how many facilities are available but the system is measured by how stable revenue generated calculations per dayrunning at a hotel with no lost posts.

  14. Planned Out-of-Hospital Birth and Birth Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Jonathan M.; Tilden, Ellen L.; Snyder, Janice; Quigley, Brian; Caughey, Aaron B.; Cheng, Yvonne W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency of planned out-of-hospital birth in the United States has increased in recent years. The value of studies assessing the perinatal risks of planned out-of-hospital birth versus hospital birth has been limited by cases in which transfer to a hospital is required and a birth that was initially planned as an out-of-hospital birth is misclassified as a hospital birth. Methods We performed a population-based, retrospective cohort study of all births that occurred in Oregon during 2012 and 2013 using data from newly revised Oregon birth certificates that allowed for the disaggregation of hospital births into the categories of planned in-hospital births and planned out-of-hospital births that took place in the hospital after a woman’s intrapartum transfer to the hospital. We assessed perinatal morbidity and mortality, maternal morbidity, and obstetrical procedures according to the planned birth setting (out of hospital vs. hospital). Results Planned out-of-hospital birth was associated with a higher rate of perinatal death than was planned in-hospital birth (3.9 vs. 1.8 deaths per 1000 deliveries, P = 0.003; odds ratio after adjustment for maternal characteristics and medical conditions, 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37 to 4.30; adjusted risk difference, 1.52 deaths per 1000 births; 95% CI, 0.51 to 2.54). The odds for neonatal seizure were higher and the odds for admission to a neonatal intensive care unit lower with planned out-of-hospital births than with planned in-hospital birth. Planned out-of-hospital birth was also strongly associated with unassisted vaginal delivery (93.8%, vs. 71.9% with planned in-hospital births; P<0.001) and with decreased odds for obstetrical procedures. Conclusions Perinatal mortality was higher with planned out-of-hospital birth than with planned in-hospital birth, but the absolute risk of death was low in both settings. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human

  15. Exposure measurement in the neighboring hospital beds during an x-ray procedure in hospitalization unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Rafael E.; Capeleti, Felipe F.; Cabete, Henrique V.

    2017-01-01

    There are lots of discussion about the exposure in hospitalization units in Brazil, especially around labor legislation and economic advantages of unhealthiness. With the attention focused on hospitalized patients, there were measured the exposure in neighboring beds of the patient submitted to an X-ray procedure with a mobile X-ray system that could be used to illustrate the discussion with consistent values. The most common X-ray procedure made in hospitalization units are chests images with techniques between 70 to 120 kV and 5 to 20 mAs. The measurement was made during routine exposure and simulations using a scattering phantom with Radcal AccuPro electrometer and 1800cc ionization chamber in a private hospital and a philanthropic hospital, both in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The ionization chambers are placed at 2 meters distance of the patient exposed of both sides during the routine procedure. During the simulation, a nylon phantom of 20 centimeters thick and 30 x 30 cm² size was placed on the bed, a typical exposure technique was used and the exposure was measured surrounding the phantom at 0.6, 1.0 and 2.0 meters distance for scattered radiation characterization. Initial results showed that the neighboring exposure at about 2 meters distance from the exposed patient bed have low values, even when exposure is integrated during the length of hospital stay. Therefore, the exposure in hospitalization units are very low compared to the exams doses. (author). (author)

  16. Exposure measurement in the neighboring hospital beds during an x-ray procedure in hospitalization unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Rafael E.; Capeleti, Felipe F.; Cabete, Henrique V., E-mail: rafael.goto@fcmsantacasasp.edu.br, E-mail: felipe.capeleti@fcmsantacasasp.edu.br, E-mail: henrique@gmpbrasil.com.br [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); GMP Consultoria em Radioprotecao e Fisica Medica e Assessoria LTDA, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    There are lots of discussion about the exposure in hospitalization units in Brazil, especially around labor legislation and economic advantages of unhealthiness. With the attention focused on hospitalized patients, there were measured the exposure in neighboring beds of the patient submitted to an X-ray procedure with a mobile X-ray system that could be used to illustrate the discussion with consistent values. The most common X-ray procedure made in hospitalization units are chests images with techniques between 70 to 120 kV and 5 to 20 mAs. The measurement was made during routine exposure and simulations using a scattering phantom with Radcal AccuPro electrometer and 1800cc ionization chamber in a private hospital and a philanthropic hospital, both in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The ionization chambers are placed at 2 meters distance of the patient exposed of both sides during the routine procedure. During the simulation, a nylon phantom of 20 centimeters thick and 30 x 30 cm² size was placed on the bed, a typical exposure technique was used and the exposure was measured surrounding the phantom at 0.6, 1.0 and 2.0 meters distance for scattered radiation characterization. Initial results showed that the neighboring exposure at about 2 meters distance from the exposed patient bed have low values, even when exposure is integrated during the length of hospital stay. Therefore, the exposure in hospitalization units are very low compared to the exams doses. (author). (author)

  17. Hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow City, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Manar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on the staffs of nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow from September 2012 to March 2013. A total of eight hospitals were chosen as the study sample size. Simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of the nonteaching hospitals. A pre-structured and pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to collect necessary information regarding the hospitals and biomedical waste (BMW management of the hospitals. The general information about the selected hospitals/employees of the hospitals was collected. Results: Mean hospital waste generated in the eight nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow was 0.56 kg/bed/day. About 50.5% of the hospitals did not have BMW department and colored dustbins. In 37.5% of the hospitals, there were no BMW records and segregation at source. Incinerator was used only by hospital A for treatment of BMW. Hospital G and hospital H had no facilities for BMW treatment. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate training of staffs, strict implementation of rules, and continuous surveillance of the hospitals of Lucknow to improve the BMW management and handling practices.

  18. Geriatrics and the triple aim: defining preventable hospitalizations in the long-term care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouslander, Joseph G; Maslow, Katie

    2012-12-01

    Reducing preventable hospitalizations is fundamental to the "triple aim" of improving care, improving health, and reducing costs. New federal government initiatives that create strong pressure to reduce such hospitalizations are being or will soon be implemented. These initiatives use quality measures to define which hospitalizations are preventable. Reducing hospitalizations could greatly benefit frail and chronically ill adults and older people who receive long-term care (LTC) because they often experience negative effects of hospitalization, including hospital-acquired conditions, morbidity, and loss of functional abilities. Conversely, reducing hospitalizations could mean that some people will not receive hospital care they need, especially if the selected measures do not adequately define hospitalizations that can be prevented without jeopardizing the person's health and safety. An extensive literature search identified 250 measures of preventable hospitalizations, but the measures have not been validated in the LTC population and generally do not account for comorbidity or the capacity of various LTC settings to provide the required care without hospitalization. Additional efforts are needed to develop measures that accurately differentiate preventable from necessary hospitalizations for the LTC population, are transparent and fair to providers, and minimize the potential for gaming and unintended consequences. As the new initiatives take effect, it is critical to monitor their effect and to develop and disseminate training and resources to support the many community- and institution-based healthcare professionals and emergency department staff involved in decisions about hospitalization for this population. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Initial management of breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinusas, K; Gagliardi, A

    2001-09-15

    Breast milk is widely accepted as the ideal source of nutrition for infants. In order to ensure success in breastfeeding, it is important that it be initiated as early as possible during the neonatal period. This is facilitated by skin-to-skin contact between the mother and infant immediately following birth. When possible, the infant should be allowed to root and latch on spontaneously within the first hour of life. Many common nursery routines such as weighing the infant, administration of vitamin K and application of ocular antibiotics can be safely delayed until after the initial breastfeeding. Postpartum care practices that improve breastfeeding rates include rooming-in, anticipatory guidance about breastfeeding problems and the avoidance of formula supplementation and pacifiers.

  20. The Yekaterinburg headache initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Olesen, Jes; Osipova, Vera V

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As major causes of global public ill-health and disability, headache disorders are paradoxically ignored in health policy and in planning, resourcing and implementing health services. This is true worldwide. Russia, where the prevalence of headache disorders and levels of attributed...... for a demonstrational interventional project in Russia, undertaken within the Global Campaign against Headache. The initiative proposes three actions: 1) raise awareness of need for improvement; 2) design and implement a three-tier model (from primary care to a single highly specialized centre with academic affiliation......) for efficient and equitable delivery of headache-related health care; 3) develop a range of educational initiatives aimed at primary-care physicians, non-specialist neurologists, pharmacists and the general public to support the second action. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: We set these proposals in a context...

  1. Global Marshall Plan initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkbeiner, F. [Global Contract Foundation, German Association of the Club of Rome (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The idea of a worldwide Marshall Plan is not new. The concept has already been promoted for a decade by personalities from a variety of backgrounds such as Franz Alt, Kofi Annan, Al Gore, Hans Kueng, Susan George, Mikhail Gorbachev, HRH Prince El Hassan of Jordan, George Soros, Lutz Wicke, and many more. On May 16{sup th}, 2003, 16 politicians and representatives from non-governmental organizations and business associations met in Frankfurt to start the Global Marshall Plan Initiative. This circle gave mandates to Franz Josef Radermacher for the scientific coordination and to the Global Contract Foundation for the organizational coordination of the Initiative to be started. The design the scientific concept was started in November 2003. It is an ongoing process where everyone is invited to contribute to. (orig.)

  2. Quantum Optics Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-30

    Quantum Cascade Laser", M. McCurdy, Y. Bakhirkin, A. Kosterev, R.F. Curl, M.G. Allen, and F. K. Tittel, Am. Acad. of Allergy , Asthma and Immunology...34Interactions of Nickel Phthalocyanine Molecules on řx20" Au(001) During the Initial Formation of Heteroepitaxy," Ken T. Park, Trinity Ellis, Steve L...Poster Presentation by Trinity Ellis. The following manuscripts have been either submitted or prepared for publication: * [4] "Interactions of Nickel

  3. Initial conditions for inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Artymowski, Michał

    2017-09-01

    Within the α-attractors framework we investigate scalar potentials with the same pole as the one featured in the kinetic term. We show that, in field space, this leads to directions without a plateau. Using this, we present a proposal, which manages to overcome the initial conditions problem of inflation with a plateau. An earlier period of proto-inflation, beginning at Planck scale, accounts for the Universe expansion and arranges the required initial conditions for inflation on the plateau to commence. We show that, if proto-inflation is power-law, it does not suffer from a sub-Planckian eternal inflationary stage, which would otherwise be a problem. A simple model realisation is constructed in the context of α-attractors, which can both generate the inflationary plateau and the exponential slopes around it, necessary for the two inflation stages. Our mechanism allows to assume chaotic initial conditions at the Planck scale for proto-inflation, it is generic and it is shown to work without fine-tuning.

  4. Hospitals look to hospitality service firms to meet TQM goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard, R

    1992-05-20

    Hospitals that hire contract service firms to manage one or all aspects of their hospitality service departments increasingly expect those firms to help meet total quality management goals as well as offer the more traditional cost reduction, quality improvement and specialized expertise, finds the 1992 Hospital Contract Services Survey conducted by Hospitals.

  5. The association of hospital governance with innovation in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen-Wei; Yan, Yu-Hua; Fang, Shih-Chieh; Inamdar, Syeda Noorein; Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Hospitals in Taiwan are facing major changes and innovation is increasingly becoming a critical factor for remaining competitive. One determinant that can have a significant impact on innovation is hospital governance. However, there is limited prior research on the relationship between hospital governance and innovation. The purpose of this study is to propose a conceptual framework to hypothesize the relationship between governance mechanisms and innovation and to empirically test the hypotheses in hospital organizations. We examine the relationship between governance mechanisms and innovation using data on 102 hospitals in Taiwan from the Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation and Quality Improvement. We model governance mechanisms using board structure, information transparency and strategic decision-making processes. For our modeling and data analysis we use measurement and structural models. We find that in hospital governance, information transparency and strategic decision making did impact innovation. However, governance structure did not. To facilitate innovation, hospital boards can increase information transparency and improve the decision-making process when considering strategic investments in innovative initiatives. To remain competitive, hospital boards need to develop and monitor indices that measure hospital innovation to ensure ongoing progress. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. [Quality management in a Swiss hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, E

    1997-09-01

    Although there are quite good examples of quality management in Swiss hospitals available (the guidelines of quality management in the Swiss hospital etc.), the distribution of measures of quality assurance in Swiss hospitals is insufficient and focuses more on Hotel services and technical equipment rather than on the care by physicians and nurses. Beginning with Jan. 1, 1998, contracts of quality assurance between health care providers and sponsors have to be presented according to the new health insurance act. These contracts are proofed periodically by a national office. This necessitates a country-wide introduction of statistics (ICD-codes) and computerization. This is currently only in the process of realization. Additionally, hospitals and medical practices already undertake a comprehensive quality control due to local and regional initiatives. The society of Swiss physicians FMH supports mainly three areas: compulsory continuing medical education (80 hours annually, including 50 hours in recognized meetings), the development of guidelines by medical societies, and data collection including the development of a network for measures of quality assurance. The ISO-standard 9000 was changed for health care as ordered by the NAQ (National workshop for quality assurance) and the FMH. It is supposed to be used mainly for the certification of facilities for continuing medical education, perhaps also for the certification of hospitals.

  7. Quantitative tools for addressing hospital readmissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagoe Ronald J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased interest in health care cost containment is focusing attention on reduction of hospital readmissions. Major payors have already developed financial penalties for providers that generate excess readmissions. This subject has benefitted from the development of resources such as the Potentially Preventable Readmissions software. This process has encouraged hospitals to renew efforts to improve these outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe quantitative tools such as definitions, risk estimation, and tracking of patients for reducing hospital readmissions. Findings This study employed the Potentially Preventable Readmissions software to develop quantitative tools for addressing hospital readmissions. These tools included two definitions of readmissions that support identification and management of patients. They also included analytical approaches for estimation of the risk of readmission for individual patients by age, discharge status of the initial admission, and severity of illness. They also included patient specific spreadsheets for tracking of target populations and for evaluation of the impact of interventions. Conclusions The study demonstrated that quantitative tools including the development of definitions of readmissions, estimation of the risk of readmission, and patient specific spreadsheets could contribute to the improvement of patient outcomes in hospitals.

  8. [Communication among hospital leaders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberey-Knuessi, Véronique; Heeb, Jean-Luc; De Morgan, Paula Emilie

    2013-12-01

    New management styles imposed on hospital institutions in recent years, have fundamentally changed the organization of the latter. Many texts discuss the consequences, specifically on the field of communication. The aim of this study was to understand the real impact of new management methods on communication by managers in hospital, but also on care teams in termes of satisfaction and/or stress. This two-year study was conducted among 900 executives in hospitals in Western Switzerland using a mixed methodology. A first phase of questionnaires highlighted the problematic areas, while a second phase in the form of organized group interviews in each hospital, had the objective of achieving a better understanding of the relationship between management and communication. The latter proved to be particularly significant in terms of results, and this is the one we focused on in this article.These results indeed show that a crucial role is given to communication by carers, and, at the same time a lessening of the time devoted to relationships, both among peers and with patients. Frustration then arises, which is not without consequences both for the management of patients and the institutions themselves. It is by means of these results that awareness is raised of the omnipresence of communication at all levels and the major advantages that positive dynamic supports. And, on the contrary, of the serious problems which may arise from management practice that do not give due importance to the dimension of communication, present in all sectors of the hospital.

  9. Trick questions: cosmopolitan hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Byrne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Byrne’s paper consists of two parallel texts. The first explores the limits of cosmopolitanism in practice, taking as its subject the Life in the UK Citizenship Test, inaugurated under the Labour Government in 2005. It argues that the test exemplifies the predicament of all attempts at cosmopolitan hospitality as unconditional welcoming, through a discussion of the relation between questioning and welcoming the stranger. Establishing the relationship between cosmopolitanism and hospitality as envisaged in Derrida’s reading of Kant it asks what kind of cosmopolitan hospitality is either possible or desirable by exploring what Derrida calls the ‘perversions’ inherent in the structures of hospitality. It focuses on the concept of the ‘trick questions’ that the state asks the foreigner observed by Derrida in his reading of The Apology of Socrates; questions that seem to invite answers but foreclose the possibilities of a free response. The second text asks how this logic that Derrida identifies can be pushed or coaxed into new ways of addressing the perceived threats of ‘unconditional’ hospitality through a reading of ‘unconditional hospitality’ as queer in the work of Tove Jansson.

  10. Maternal obesity, psychological factors, and breastfeeding initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ushma J; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Herring, Amy H; Adair, Linda S; Bentley, Margaret E

    2011-12-01

    Maternal obesity has been associated with lower initiation of breastfeeding, but reasons for why this association exists have not been well studied. In this study, we examined associations among prepregnancy obesity, psychological factors during pregnancy, and breastfeeding initiation. Data came from the postpartum component of the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition study, a prospective cohort study. Pregnant women were recruited from the University of North Carolina hospitals between January 2001 and June 2005. This analysis used data from 688 women followed from pregnancy to 3 months postpartum. Multivariable binomial regression was used to determine the association between having a body mass index (BMI) >26 kg/m(2) before pregnancy and breastfeeding initiation. We tested for mediation of the association between pregravid BMI and breastfeeding initiation by certain psychological factors during pregnancy (depressive symptoms, perceived stress, anxiety, and self-esteem). Women who began pregnancy overweight or obese (BMI >26 kg/m(2)) had almost four times the risk of not initiating breastfeeding compared with underweight or normal weight women (BMI ≤26 kg/m(2)) (risk ratio = 3.94 [95% confidence interval 2.17, 7.18]) after adjusting for race, poverty level, education level, and marital status. Depressive symptoms, perceived stress, anxiety, and self-esteem levels during pregnancy were not found to mediate the association between pregravid BMI and breastfeeding initiation. Women who started pregnancy either overweight or obese were more likely to not initiate breastfeeding. Contrary to expectations, pregnancy-related psychological factors did not influence this relationship.

  11. Migrant-friendly hospitals: a paediatric perspective--improving hospital care for migrant children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Fabienne N; Kiss, Ligia; Hossain, Mazeda; Zimmerman, Cathy

    2013-10-05

    The European Union (EU) Migrant-Friendly Hospital (MFH) Initiative, introduced in 2002, promotes the adoption of care approaches adapted to meet the service needs of migrants. However, for paediatric hospitals, no specific recommendations have been offered for MFH care for children. Using the Swiss MFH project as a case study, this paper aims to identify hospital-based care needs of paediatric migrants (PMs) and good service approaches. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with principal project leaders of five paediatric hospitals participating in the Swiss MFH project. A review of the international literature on non-clinical hospital service needs and service responses of paediatric MFHs was conducted. Paediatric care can be complex, usually involving both the patient and the patient's family. Key challenges include differing levels of acculturation between parents and children; language barriers; cultural differences between patient and provider; and time constraints. Current service and infrastructural responses include interpretation services for PMs and parents, translated information material, and special adaptations to ensure privacy, e.g., during breastfeeding. Clear standards for paediatric migrant-friendly hospitals (P-MFH) are lacking. International research on hospital care for migrant children is scarce. The needs of paediatric migrants and their families may differ from guidance for adults. Paediatric migrant needs should be systematically identified and used to inform paediatric hospital care approaches. Hospital processes from admission to discharge should be revised to ensure implementation of migrant-sensitive approaches suitable for children. Staff should receive adequate support, such as training, easily available interpreters and sufficient consultation time, to be able to provide migrant-friendly paediatric services. The involvement of migrant groups may be helpful. Improving the quality of care for PMs at both policy and service levels

  12. Nurturing mission. A case study of a hospital's cultural growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, F H

    1991-11-01

    Recognizing the need to enhance his hospital's fulfillment of its mission as a religious organization, the chief executive officer of Lutheran Hospital of Indiana, Inc., Fort Wayne, initiated a process to change the institution's corporate culture to reflect the mission. After assessing hospital managers' perceptions of the hospital's mission, a planning committee drafted a mission statement. The statement was condensed into an easily remembered motto, "Reach out and reflect God's love!" to guide employees' actions. The hospital expanded its position descriptions to include the facility's expectations for employee behavior that is consistent with the mission. An orientation program for new employees emphasizes incorporating the mission concepts of courtesy and compassion into all activities. To establish the mission firmly as part of the corporate culture, the hospital established three recognition programs and redesigned its pay plan to recognize performance that reflects the hospital's mission. Redecorating the drab facility has improved employees' attitudes toward their work environment. Five years into the change process, the hospital now has clear direction for strategic decisions, a more cooperative atmosphere, and increased admissions. The process continues, and assessment of the mission establishment process will lead to the initiation of continuous quality improvement concepts.

  13. Hospital Views of Factors Affecting Telemedicine Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Kimberly A S; Ward, Marcia M; Mueller, Keith J

    2015-04-01

    Telemedicine (also known as telehealth) is a means to increase access to care, one of the foundations of the Triple Aim. However, the expansion of telemedicine services in the United States has been relatively slow. We previously examined the extent of uptake of hospital based telemedicine using the 2013 HIMSS (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society) Analytics national database of 4,727 non-specialty hospitals. Our analysis indicated that the largest percentage of operational telemedicine implementations (15.7 percent) was in radiology departments, with a substantial number in emergency/trauma care (7.5 percent) and cardiology/stroke/heart attack programs (6.8 percent). However, existing databases are limited because they do not identify whether a respondent hospital is a "hub" (providing telemedicine services) or a "spoke" (receiving telemedicine services). Therefore, we used data from interviews with hospital representatives to deepen the research and understanding of telemedicine use and the factors affecting that use. Interviews were conducted with key informants at 18 hub hospitals and 18 spoke hospitals to explore their perceptions of barriers and motivators to telemedicine adoption and expansion. Key Findings. (1) Respondents from both hub and spoke hospitals reported that telemedicine helps them meet their mission, enhances access, keeps lower-acuity patients closer to home, and helps head off competition. (2) Respondents from both hub and spoke hospitals reported licensing and credentialing to be significant barriers to telemedicine expansion. Thus, half of hubs provide services only within their state. (3) A variety of one-time funding sources have been used to initiate and grow telemedicine services among hubs and spokes. However, reimbursement issues have impeded the development of workable business models for sustainability. Hub hospitals shoulder the responsibility for identifying sustainable business models. (4) Although respondents

  14. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service; CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, in a record-time of 9 months, the magnets of the g-2 experiment were modified and used to build a proton/antiproton storage ring: the "Initial Cooling Experiment" (ICE). It served for the verification of the cooling methods to be used for the "Antiproton Project". Stochastic cooling was proven the same year, electron cooling followed later. Also, with ICE the experimental lower limit for the antiproton lifetime was raised by 9 orders of magnitude: from 2 microseconds to 32 hours. For its previous life as g-2 storage ring, see 7405430. More on ICE: 7711282, 7809081, 7908242.

  15. Sustaining Participatory Design Initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While many participatory design (PD) projects succeed in establishing new organisational initiatives or creating technology that is attuned to the people affected, the issue of how such results are sustained after the project ends remains an important challenge. We explore the challenge...... these various forms of sustainability may be pursued in PD practice and how they can become a resource in reflecting on PD activities. Finally, we discuss implications for PD practice, suggesting that a nuanced conception of sustainability and how it may relate to PD practice are useful resources for designers...... and researchers before, during and after design processes. View full text Download full text...

  16. Feedback stabilization initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes

  17. UNLV Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hechanova, Anthony E.; Johnson, Allen; O' Toole, Brendan; Trabia, Mohamed; Peterson, Per

    2012-10-25

    Evaluation of the Crack growth rate (CGR) of Alloy 617 and Alloy 276 under constant K at ambient temperature has been completed. Creep deformation of Alloy 230 at different temperature range and load level has been completed and heat to heat variation has been noticed. Creep deformation study of Alloy 276 has been completed under an applied initial stress level of 10% of yield stress at 950ºC. The grain size evaluation of the tested creep specimens of Alloy 276 has been completed.

  18. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System's tank waste retrieval Program

  19. Stirling to Flight Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbard, Kenneth E.; Mason, Lee S.; Ndu, Obi; Smith, Clayton; Withrow, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Flight (S2F) initiative with the objective of developing a 100-500 We Stirling generator system. Additionally, a different approach is being devised for this initiative to avoid pitfalls of the past, and apply lessons learned from the recent ASRG experience. Two key aspects of this initiative are a Stirling System Technology Maturation Effort, and a Surrogate Mission Team (SMT) intended to provide clear mission pull and requirements context. The S2F project seeks to lead directly into a DOE flight system development of a new SRG. This paper will detail the proposed S2F initiative, and provide specifics on the key efforts designed to pave a forward path for bringing Stirling technology to flight.

  20. Initiation of slug flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanratty, T.J.; Woods, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    The initiation of slug flow in a horizontal pipe can be predicted either by considering the stability of a slug or by considering the stability of a stratified flow. Measurements of the shedding rate of slugs are used to define necessary conditions for the existence of a slug. Recent results show that slugs develop from an unstable stratified flow through the evolution of small wavelength waves into large wavelength waves that have the possibility of growing to form a slug. The mechanism appears to be quite different for fluids with viscosities close to water than for fluids with large viscosities (20 centipoise)

  1. Feedback stabilization initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  2. Hospitality, Tourism, and Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Litvin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Government policy has a significant impact on the hospitality and tourism industry, but it is unclear if political leaders fully understand this economic sector when crafting policies. This article offers new research about the direct involvement of industry practitioners in the political process, by analyzing the backgrounds of legislators in the six New England states. The data indicate that only 3% of these legislators have current or former careers related to hospitality and tourism. The author suggests that practitioners should seek election to political office, to better influence government policy.

  3. Marketing the hospital library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Many librarians do not see themselves as marketers, but marketing is an essential role for hospital librarians. Library work involves education, and there are parallels between marketing and education as described in this article. It is incumbent upon hospital librarians actively to pursue ways of reminding their customers about library services. This article reinforces the idea that marketing is an element in many of the things that librarians already do, and includes a list of suggested marketing strategies intended to remind administrators, physicians, and other customers that they have libraries in their organizations.

  4. Hospital mergers: a panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Hospital mergers in Europe and North America have been launched to scale down expenditure, enhance the delivery of health care and elevate quality. However, the outcome of mergers suggest that they neither generated cost savings nor improved the quality of care. Almost all consolidations fall short, since those in leadership positions lack the necessary understanding and appreciation of the differences in culture, values and goals of the existing facilities. In spite of these shortcomings, hospital mergers will continue to be pursued in order to improve market share, eliminate excess capacity, gain access to capital and enhance the personal egos of the organizations' leaders.

  5. [Standardization of hospital feeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracuel García, Ángel Manuel

    2015-05-07

    Normalization can be understood as the establishing measures against repetitive situations through the development, dissemination, and application of technical design documents called standards. In Andalusia there are 45 public hospitals with 14,606 beds, and in which 11,700 full pensions / day are served. The Working Group on Hospital Food Standardization of the Andalusian Society for Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, started in 2010, working on the certification of suppliers, product specifications, and meals technical card. - Develop a specific tool to help improving food safety through the certification of their suppliers. - Develop a standardized technical specifications of foodstuffs necessary for the development of menus established codes diets Andalusian hospitals document. - Develop a catalog of data sheets plates of hospital meals, to homogenize menus, respecting local and unifying criteria for qualitative and quantitative ingredients. - Providing documentation and studying of several public hospitals in Andalusia: • Product specifications and certification of suppliers. • International standards certification and distribution companies. • Legislation. • Data sheets for the menu items. • Specifications of different product procurement procedures. - Development of the draft standard HOSPIFOOD®, and approval of the version “0.0”. - Training course for auditors to this standard. - Development of a raw materials catalog as technical cards. - Meals Technical cards review and election of the ones which will be part of the document. After nearly three years of work, we have achieved the following products: - Standardized database of technical specifications for the production of food dietary codes for: fish, seafood, meat and meat products, meats and pates, ready meals, bread and pastries, preserves, milk and dairy products, oils, cereals, legumes , vegetables, fruits, fresh and frozen vegetables, condiments and spices. - Standardized database of

  6. Hospitals as food arenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2010-01-01

    also identified. Research limitations: The assessment of the dietary changes based on the canteen take-away food was only based on indirect assessments based on interviews with users and non-users and furthermore based on a questionnaire at one of the hospitals. Value/originality: Canteen take......Purpose: To analyse the interaction between hospital employees’ working conditions, and their health and dietary habits, including the role of canteen take-away schemes. Design/Methodology/approach: An international literature review combined with case studies based on stakeholder research...

  7. Characteristics of Hospitals Associated with Complete and Partial Implementation of Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhounsule, Prajakta; Peterson, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    (1) To determine the proportion of hospitals with and without implementation of electronic health records (EHRs). (2) To examine characteristics of hospitals that report implementation of EHRs partially or completely versus those that report no implementation. (3) To identify hospital characteristics associated with nonimplementation to help devise future policy initiatives. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study using the 2012 American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. The outcome variable was the implementation of EHRs completely or partially. Independent variables were hospital characteristics, such as staffing, organization structure, accreditations, ownership, and services and facilities provided at the hospitals. Descriptive frequencies were determined, and multinomial logistic regression was used to determine variables independently associated with complete or partial implementation of EHRs. In this study, 12.6 percent of hospitals reported no implementation of EHRs, while 43.9 percent of hospitals implemented EHRs partially and 43.5 percent implemented EHRs completely. Overall characteristics of hospitals with complete and partial implementation were similar. The multinomial regression model revealed a positive association between the number of licensed beds and complete implementation of EHRs. A positive association was found between children's general medical, surgical, and heart hospitals and complete implementation of EHRs. Conversely, psychiatric and rehabilitation hospitals, limited service hospitals, hospitals participating in a network, service hospitals, government nonfederal hospitals, and nongovernment not-for-profit hospitals showed less likelihood of complete implementation of EHRs. Study findings suggest a disparity of EHR implementation between larger, for-profit hospitals and smaller, not-for-profit hospitals. Low rates of implementation were observed with psychiatric and rehabilitation hospitals. EHR policy initiatives

  8. The LHCb Starterkit initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of high-energy physicists use and produce software every day. Software skills are usually acquired on the go and dedicated training courses are rare. The LHCb Starterkit is a new training format for getting LHCb collaborators started in effectively using software to perform their research. The initiative, combining courses and online tutorials, focuses on teaching basic skills for research computing, as well as LHCb software specifics. Unlike traditional tutorials we focus on starting with basics, performing all the material live, with a high degree of interactivity, giving priority to understanding the tools as opposed to handing out recipes that work “as if by magic”. The LHCb Starterkit was started by young members of the collaboration inspired by the principles of Software Carpentry, and the material is created in a collaborative fashion using the tools we teach. Three successful entry-level workshops, as well as two advanced ones, have taken place since the start of the initiative i...

  9. Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzio, Adalberto

    2015-03-01

    In Brazil there is intense research activity in nanotechnology, most of these developed in universities and research institutes. The Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative (BNI) aims to integrate government actions to promote the competitiveness of the Brazilian industry. This initiative is founded on support for research and development in the laboratories of the National Laboratories for Nanotechnology (SisNANO), starting from an improvement in infrastructure and opening of laboratories for users of academia and business, promoting interaction and transfer knowledge between academia and business. Country currently has 26 thematic networks of nanotechnology, 16 -Virtual-National Institutes of Technology, seven National- Laboratories and 18 Associate Laboratories, which comprise the SisNANO. Seeking to expand and share governance with other government actors, the Interministries Committee for Nanotechnology was set up, composed of 10 ministries, and has the task of coordinating the entire program of the Federal Government Nanotechnology.Cooperation activities are an important part of BNI. Currently Brazil has cooperation programs with U.S., China, Canada and European Union among others. Recently, Brazil decided to join the European NanoReg program where 60 research groups are joining efforts to provide protocols and standards that can help regulatory agencies and governments.

  10. Initiatives for proliferation prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    Preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a central part of US national security policy. A principal instrument of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) program for securing weapons of mass destruction technology and expertise and removing incentives for scientists, engineers and technicians in the newly independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union to go to rogue countries or assist terrorist groups is the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP). IPP was initiated pursuant to the 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act. IPP is a nonproliferation program with a commercialization strategy. IPP seeks to enhance US national security and to achieve nonproliferation objectives by engaging scientists, engineers and technicians from former NIS weapons institutes; redirecting their activities in cooperatively-developed, commercially viable non-weapons related projects. These projects lead to commercial and economic benefits for both the NIS and the US IPP projects are funded in Russian, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. This booklet offers an overview of the IPP program as well as a sampling of some of the projects which are currently underway

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Barriers to initiating insulin therapy in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    oral medication by MOs in community health centres (CHCs). Barriers to ... diabetes mellitus in public-sector primary health care centres in Cape .... responsibility for initiation of insulin therapy to tertiary hospitals. 'There's not always somebody to ask [for advice] and there's no protocol, so the easiest thing is to just send [the.

  12. Time Interval to Initiation of Contraceptive Methods Following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine factors affecting the interval between a woman's last childbirth and the initiation of contraception. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study. Family planning clinic records of the Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital Kaduna from January 2000 to March 2014 ...

  13. Acceptability of surgery as initial treatment for primary open angle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and fifty four new glaucoma patients at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital were interviewed to determine the acceptance of surgery, reasons for refusal, and factors affecting acceptability of surgery as an initial treatment option. Fifty patients (32.5%) accepted surgery while 89 (57.8%) refused. The main ...

  14. Time Interval to Initiation of Contraceptive Methods Following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine factors affecting the interval between a woman's last childbirth and the initiation of contraception. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study. Family planning clinic records of the Barau Dikko Teaching Hospital Kaduna from January 2000 ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care Initiative in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Yaşar Çeliker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer care with curative intent remains difficult to manage in many resource-limited settings such as Cambodia. Cambodia has a small workforce with limited financial and health-care resources resulting in delayed diagnoses and availability of limited therapeutic tools. Thus, palliative care becomes the primary form of care in most cases. Although palliative care is becoming an integral part of medical care in developed countries, this concept remains poorly understood and utilized in developing countries. Angkor Hospital for Children serves a relatively large pediatric population in northern Cambodia. According to the modern definition of palliative care, approximately two-thirds of the patients admitted to the hospital were deemed candidates to receive palliative care. In an effort to develop a pediatric palliative care team utilizing existing resources and intensive training, our focus group recruited already existing teams with different health-care expertise and other motivated members of the hospital. During this process, we have also formed a palliative care training team of local experts to maintain ongoing palliative care education. Feedback from patients and health-care providers confirmed the effectiveness of these efforts. In conclusion, palliative and sustainable care was offered effectively in a resource-limited setting with adequately trained and motivated local providers. In this article, the steps and systems used to overcome challenges in Cambodia are summarized in the hope that our experience urges governmental and non-governmental agencies to support similar initiatives.

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care Initiative in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çeliker, Mahmut Yaşar; Pagnarith, Yos; Akao, Kazumi; Sophearin, Dim; Sorn, Sokchea

    2017-01-01

    Cancer care with curative intent remains difficult to manage in many resource-limited settings such as Cambodia. Cambodia has a small workforce with limited financial and health-care resources resulting in delayed diagnoses and availability of limited therapeutic tools. Thus, palliative care becomes the primary form of care in most cases. Although palliative care is becoming an integral part of medical care in developed countries, this concept remains poorly understood and utilized in developing countries. Angkor Hospital for Children serves a relatively large pediatric population in northern Cambodia. According to the modern definition of palliative care, approximately two-thirds of the patients admitted to the hospital were deemed candidates to receive palliative care. In an effort to develop a pediatric palliative care team utilizing existing resources and intensive training, our focus group recruited already existing teams with different health-care expertise and other motivated members of the hospital. During this process, we have also formed a palliative care training team of local experts to maintain ongoing palliative care education. Feedback from patients and health-care providers confirmed the effectiveness of these efforts. In conclusion, palliative and sustainable care was offered effectively in a resource-limited setting with adequately trained and motivated local providers. In this article, the steps and systems used to overcome challenges in Cambodia are summarized in the hope that our experience urges governmental and non-governmental agencies to support similar initiatives. PMID:28804708

  17. Hospital Prices Increase in California, Especially Among Hospitals in the Largest Multi-hospital Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn A. Melnick PhD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A surge in hospital consolidation is fueling formation of ever larger multi-hospital systems throughout the United States. This article examines hospital prices in California over time with a focus on hospitals in the largest multi-hospital systems. Our data show that hospital prices in California grew substantially (+76% per hospital admission across all hospitals and all services between 2004 and 2013 and that prices at hospitals that are members of the largest, multi-hospital systems grew substantially more (113% than prices paid to all other California hospitals (70%. Prices were similar in both groups at the start of the period (approximately $9200 per admission. By the end of the period, prices at hospitals in the largest systems exceeded prices at other California hospitals by almost $4000 per patient admission. Our study findings are potentially useful to policy makers across the country for several reasons. Our data measure actual prices for a large sample of hospitals over a long period of time in California. California experienced its wave of consolidation much earlier than the rest of the country and as such our findings may provide some insights into what may happen across the United States from hospital consolidation including growth of large, multi-hospital systems now forming in the rest of the rest of the country.

  18. Tygerberg Hospital, 1980

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    haematocrit, cord bilirubin, number of liveborn babies, birth weight, neonatal death, hyaline membrane disease .... report the outcome of babies of mothers with severe. Rh disease treated at Tygerberg Hospital since 1980 by ..... Walker W. Haemolytic disease of the newborn. In: Gairdner D, Hull 0, eds. Recent Advances iD ...

  19. Responsible Hospitality. Prevention Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colthurst, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Responsible Hospitality (RH)--also called Responsible Beverage Service (RBS)--encompasses a variety of strategies for reducing risks associated with the sale and service of alcoholic beverages. RH programs have three goals: (1) to prevent illegal alcohol service to minors; (2) to reduce the likelihood of drinkers becoming intoxicated; and (3) to…

  20. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the mattress end Subscribe: FDA Consumer Health Information "Hospital beds are found in nearly all patient care settings or environments," says Joan Ferlo Todd, RN, a senior nurse-consultant at the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH). " ...

  1. Nigerian Hospital Practice: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also publishes miscellaneous articles – hospital administration, business practice, accounting, Law for health practitioners and letters about published papers. All manuscript will be subject to blinded peer-review and the decision of the editor would be final. Articles submitted for consideration by the author should not have ...

  2. Innovations in Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhandzhugazova, Elena A.; Blinova, Ekaterina A.; Orlova, Liubov N.; Romanova, Marianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the study of the role and importance of innovation, its classification, the problems of its application in the hotel industry with emphasis on the application of sensory marketing tools in the development of the innovative marketing mix within the hospitality industry. The article provides an analysis of the "seven…

  3. Optimal Hospital Layout Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Malene Kirstine

    This PhD project presents a design model that generates and evaluates hospital designs with respect to long-term performances and functionalities. By visualizing and quantifying costs and performances in the early design phases, it is possible to make design choices based on a qualified, profound...

  4. Nigerian Hospital Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. Journal Homepage Image. The aim of the Nigerian Hospital Practice Journal is to aid in enhancing the advancement of medicine globally by acting as a medium for disseminating information on current clinical and drug practices in ...

  5. Nuevo hospital Ulster, Belfast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibberd, Frederick

    1958-05-01

    Full Text Available En los alrededores de Belfast, en Dundonals (Inglaterra, se construirá en breve el nuevo hospital Ulster. El nuevo edificio, de cuya maqueta mostramos unas fotos, está formado por diversos cuerpos de distinta función enlazados por pasillos cubiertos que determinan la creación de patios íntimos y zonas ajardinadas.

  6. PLANNING OF HOSPITAL ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Tihomira Zlatanova; Ralitsa Zlatanova-Velikova; Angelina Cheshmedzieva; Natalia Shtereva

    2014-01-01

    In this article are presented and analyzed planning of hospital activity. Introduced planning process depending on the type of health care system - countries with national health systems there is a tendency to set targets backed by norms, while in countries with fully or partially liberalized system developed a variety of techniques for strategic planning.

  7. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the case of mountainous terrain or secondary roads). This provision excludes Rural Health Clinics, as defined under 405.2401(b), ... HUD Section 242: Hospital Mortgage Insurance Program – helps rural healthcare facilities finance new construction, refinance debt, or purchase new equipment such as ...

  8. Hacking the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Boisen, Anne Bank; Thomsen, Stine Legarth

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for youth-friendly hospital environments as the ward environment may affect both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To involve young people in designing youth-friendly ward environment. METHODS: We arranged a design competition lasting 42 h (Hackathon...

  9. Official Centre Hospitality

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sylvain Dufour

    Approved by the Management Executive Committee. - 1 -. Version 3.1.0 effective 2017-06-28. Official Centre Hospitality. 1. Objective. 2. Application. 3. Definitions. 4. Roles and Responsibilities. 5. Authorization. 6. Consultants and Contractors. 7. Reimbursement. 1. Objective. To define the circumstances under which ...

  10. Going to the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have playrooms, where you'll find toys, books, arts and crafts, and games. Someone will be there to help you find something to do. If you can't go to the playroom, someone can bring toys to your room. Most hospitals have TVs or video games, and many have computers (with games!) that ...

  11. A quality control exercise of radionuclide calibrators among Belgian hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reher, D.F.G.; Merlo, P.

    1990-01-01

    On the initiative of the Belgian Association of Hospital Physicists, eleven Belgian hospitals participated in a quality control of radionuclide calibrators conducted in collaboration with the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements of the Commission of the European Communities. For practical reasons the nuclide 57 Co was chosen. The results from 20 different radionuclide calibrators show a fair agreement with a similar comparison carried out in 1980 in the UK. (orig.)

  12. Factors Influencing Hospital Stay for Pulmonary Embolism. A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Ruano-Raviña, Alberto; Abelleira, Romina; Ferreiro, Lucía; Lama, Adriana; González-Barcala, Francisco J; Golpe, Antonio; Toubes, María E; Álvarez-Dobaño, José M; Valdés, Luis

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing hospital stay due to pulmonary embolism. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients hospitalized between 2010 and 2015. Patients were identified using information recorded in hospital discharge reports (ICD-9-CM codes 415.11 and 415.19). We included 965 patients with a median stay of 8 days (IQR 6-13 days). Higher scores on the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI) were associated with increased probability of longer hospital stay. The probability of a hospital stay longer than the median was 8.65 (95% CI 5.42-13.79) for patients referred to the Internal Medicine Department and 1.54 (95% CI 1.07-2.24) for patients hospitalized in other departments, compared to those referred to the Pneumology Department. Patients with grade 3 on the modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale had an odds ratio of 1.63 (95% CI: 1.07-2.49). The likelihood of a longer than median hospital stay was 1.72 (95% CI: 0.85-3.48) when oral anticoagulation (OAC) was initiated 2-3 days after admission, and 2.43 (95% CI: 1.16-5.07) when initiated at 4-5 days, compared to OAC initiation at 0-1 days. sPESI grade, the department of referral from the Emergency Department, the grade of dyspnea and the time of initiating OAC were associated with a longer hospital stay. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Pattern of Poisoning Cases in a Tertiary Hospital in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    AKM Rafique Uddin; Md Imran Ali; Nazmul Haque; Naser Ahmed; Rukhsana Parvin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Poisoning with various substances is a global problem. It is one of the most important reasons for emergency admission in the hospital. The earlier the initial resuscitations, gastric decontamination and use of specific antidotes, the better is the outcome. Epidemiology of poisoning differs from region to region. This study was carried out to determine the pattern and severity of poisoning in a tertiary care hospital. Objective: To characterize the poisoning cases admitted in Enam...

  14. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1982-09-01

    Report III, Volume 1 contains those specifications numbered A through J, as follows: General Specifications (A); Specifications for Pressure Vessels (C); Specifications for Tanks (D); Specifications for Exchangers (E); Specifications for Fired Heaters (F); Specifications for Pumps and Drivers (G); and Specifications for Instrumentation (J). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project, and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available to the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors. Report III, Volume 1 also contains the unique specifications prepared for Plants 8, 15, and 27. These specifications will be substantially reviewed during Phase I of the project, and modified as necessary for use during the engineering, procurement, and construction of this project.

  15. Instrumented Pipeline Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Piro; Michael Ream

    2010-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative agreement between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and U.S. Department of Energy to address the need for a for low-cost monitoring and inspection sensor system as identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Gas Infrastructure Research & Development (R&D) Delivery Reliability Program Roadmap.. The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI) achieved the objective by researching technologies for the monitoring of pipeline delivery integrity, through a ubiquitous network of sensors and controllers to detect and diagnose incipient defects, leaks, and failures. This report is organized by tasks as detailed in the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO). The sections all state the objective and approach before detailing results of work.

  16. The Ombudperson Initiative Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Laura Stewart

    Following many discussions that took place at some of the ATLAS Women's Network lunch gatherings, a few ATLAS women joined forces with similarly concerned CERN staff women to form a small group last Fall to discuss the need for a CERN-wide Ombudsperson. This has since evolved into the Ombudsperson Initiative Group (OIG) currently composed of the following members: Barbro Asman, Stockholm University; Pierre Charrue, CERN AB; Anna Cook, CERN IT; Catherine Delamare, CERN and IT Ombudsperson; Paula Eerola, Lund University; Pauline Gagnon, Indiana University; Eugenia Hatziangeli, CERN AB; Doreen Klem, CERN IT; Bertrand Nicquevert, CERN TS and Laura Stewart, CERN AT. On June 12, members of the OIG met with representatives of Human Resources (HR) and the Equal Opportunity Advisory Panel (EOAP) to discuss the proposal drafted by the OIG. The meeting was very positive. Everybody agreed that the current procedures at CERN applicable in the event of conflict required a thorough review, and that a professionnally trai...

  17. The climate technology initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Adam

    2000-01-01

    The CTI (Climate Technology Initiative) aims to promote those technologies which cause the minimum of harm to the environment: reducing emissions of greenhouse gases and supporting those countries most vulnerable to climate change are priorities. A strong case for cogeneration is made and it is pointed out that both the European Union and the USA aim to double their cogeneration capacity by 2010. The CTI holds training courses and seminars all over the world where the barriers to the expansion of climate-friendly technology are discussed. The article also mentions the CTI Co-operation Technology Implementation Plan, research and development, its website and search engine, its presence at all UNFCCC events and its awards programme

  18. Initial brain aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten; Yokota, Takashi; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    Brain aging is accompanied by declining mitochondrial respiration. We hypothesized that mitochondrial morphology and dynamics would reflect this decline. Using hippocampus and frontal cortex of a segmental progeroid mouse model lacking Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSBm/m) and C57Bl/6 (WT) controls...... and comparing young (2–5 months) to middle-aged mice (13–14 months), we found that complex I-linked state 3 respiration (CI) was reduced at middle age in CSBm/m hippocampus, but not in CSBm/m cortex or WT brain. In hippocampus of both genotypes, mitochondrial size heterogeneity increased with age. Notably...... content was lower, and hypoxia-induced factor 1α mRNA was greater at both ages in CSBm/m compared to WT brain. Our findings show that decreased CI and increased mitochondrial size heterogeneity are highly associated and point to declining mitochondrial quality control as an initial event in brain aging....

  19. Evaluation Program initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the Department of Energy's (DOE) safeguards and security community with some insights on an important management initiative by the Office of Security Evaluations (OSE). The paper will present the ''what, where, who, when, and why'' of a new Evaluation Program. The Evaluation Program will be comprised of a continuing series of regular and special evaluations of DOE safeguards and security programs and policies. The evaluations will be integrative and ''crosscutting,'' i.e. will extend across DOE organizational lines. Evaluations will be offered as positive advisories to DOE managers with safeguards and security responsibilities and will not be rated. They will complement the ongoing OSE Inspection Program of inspections conducted by OSE's Inspection Division. The purpose for the evaluations is to establish an accurate and current assessment of the effectiveness and status of safeguards and security programs and policies and to provide DOE managers with required information on program and policy effectiveness

  20. Green Power Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Patrick Barry [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2013-01-28

    National energy policy supports the gathering of more detailed and authoritative data on the introduction of renewable bio-based fuels into new and existing district energy systems via the application of biomass gasification. The University of Iowa developed a biomass-fueled, university-scale steam generation system based on biomass gasification technologies. The system serves as a state-of-the-art research and educational facility in the emerging application of gasification in steam generation. The facility, which includes a smaller down-draft gasifier and a larger multi-stage biomass boiler, was designed to operate primarily on wood-based fuels, but has provisions for testing other biomass fuel sources produced within a 100-mile radius, providing enough flexibility to meet the fluctuating local supply of biomass from industry and Midwest agriculture. The equipment was installed in an existing, staffed facility. The down-draft gasifier unit is operated by College of Engineering staff and students, under the direct technical supervision of qualified Utilities plant staff. The Green Power Initiative also includes a substantial, innovative educational component. In addition to an onsite, graduate-level research program in biomass fuels, the investigators have integrated undergraduate and graduate level teaching – through classroom studies and experiential learning – and applied research into a biomass-based, university-scale, functioning power plant. University of Iowa is unique in that it currently has multiple renewable energy technologies deployed, including significant biomass combustion (oat hulls) at its Main Power Plant and a new reciprocating engine based renewable district energy system. This project complements and supports the national energy policy and State of Iowa initiatives in ethanol and biodiesel. Byproducts of ethanol and biodiesel processes (distiller grains) as well as industry residues (oat hulls, wood chips, construction and demolition

  1. El hospital universitario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Félix Patiño-Restrepo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Según el Diccionario de la Real Academia Española (1, el vocablo hospital viene del latín hospitālis y en su primera acepción se define como: “1. m. Establecimiento destinado al diagnóstico y tratamiento de enfermos, donde a menudo se practican la investigación y la docencia”. Sin embargo, las otras acepciones se refieren a sus orígenes medievales: “2. m. Casa que servía para recoger pobres y peregrinos por tiempo limitado. 3. adj. ant. Afable y caritativo con los huéspedes. 4. adj. ant. Perteneciente o relativo al buen hospedaje”. El hospital moderno, en realidad, es la combinación de ciencia, tecnología, hospedaje y humanitarismo. ¿Cuándo nació el hospital y cuál es su historia? En la Edad Media temprana surgieron los xenodochia, albergues para pobres y peregrinos fundados por la iglesia católica en el marco del sentido humanitario del cristianismo. En los comienzos del siglo XIII, cuando las ciudades acumularon riqueza para sostener sus propios ejércitos, se presentó un fenómeno de crecimiento en el número de albergues y estos empezaron a caracterizarse por atender enfermos; ya para esta época no eran solo fundados por la iglesia, sino también por autoridades civiles. Aunque se siguió el modelo del Hospital del Santo Spirito de Roma, construido por orden del papa Inocencio III (1161-1216, en Francia se fundaron los Hôtel-Dieu, generalmente en la vecindad de las catedrales, que aún conservaban la característica de ser más bien albergues para los más necesitados y desamparados.

  2. What Are Nursing Facilities Doing to Reduce Potentially Avoidable Hospitalizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daras, Laura Coots; Wang, Joyce M; Ingber, Melvin J; Ormond, Catherine; Breg, Nathaniel W; Khatutsky, Galina; Feng, Zhanlian

    2017-05-01

    Hospitalizations among nursing facility residents are frequent and often potentially avoidable. A number of initiatives and interventions have been developed to reduce excessive hospitalizations; however, little is known about the specific approaches nursing facilities use to address this issue. The objective of this study is to better understand which types of interventions nursing facilities have introduced to reduce potentially avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay nursing facility residents. Cross-sectional survey. 236 nursing facilities from 7 states. Nursing facility administrators. Web-based survey to measure whether facilities introduced any policies or procedures designed specifically to reduce potentially avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay nursing facility residents between 2011 and 2015. We surveyed facilities about seven types of interventions and quality improvement activities related to reducing avoidable hospitalizations, including use of Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) and American Medical Directors Association tools. Ninety-five percent of responding nursing facilities reported having introduced at least one new policy or procedure to reduce nursing facility resident hospitalizations since January 2011. The most common practice reported was hospitalization rate tracking or review, followed by standardized communication tools, such as Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation (SBAR). We found some variation in the extent and types of these reported interventions. Nearly all facilities surveyed reported having introduced a variety of initiatives to reduce potentially avoidable hospitalizations, likely driven by federal, state, and corporate initiatives to decrease hospital admissions and readmissions. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. [Using SWOT to analyze breastfeeding education results in a medical center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Shan; Huang, Chiu-Mieh

    2005-08-01

    The breastfeeding rate within the first month after postpartum dropped from 95% in 1962 to 25% in 1989. As a result, the Department of Health, Executive Yuan, has made a lot of effort to promote a baby-friendly hospital policy since 2001, with the aim of increasing the breastfeeding rate. However, many studies have pointed out that the Department of Health is encountering difficulties when implementing this policy. This study is designed to use the Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) Analysis to evaluate the development of breastfeeding education in a certain medical center. We divide those factors that influence the effect of this policy into extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic environmental factors. The intrinsic environmental factors are the strengths and weaknesses of the baby-friendly hospital policy. The extrinsic environmental factors are the opportunities and threats. The SWOT Matrix is also applied to develop appropriate strategies to take the greatest possible advantage of opportunities available. With the SWOT approach, managers can not only readily extinguish intrinsic advantages from intrinsic disadvantages, but also recognize external opportunities and threats. Furthermore, it assists managers in resolving problems and turning adversity into opportunity. In providing the SWOT analysis, we hope clinical nursing staff will gain a better understanding of the baby-friendly hospital policy and deliver higher quality of health care for postpartum mothers, thus increasing the breastfeeding rate.

  4. Hospital pharmacy workforce in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Thiago R; Penm, Jonathan; Baldoni, André O; Ayres, Lorena Rocha; Moles, Rebekah; Sanches, Cristina

    2018-01-04

    This study aims to describe the distribution of the hospital pharmacy workforce in Brazil. Data were acquired, during 2016, through the Brazilian National Database of Healthcare Facilities (CNES). The following variables were extracted: hospital name, registry number, telephone, e-mail, state, type of institution, subtype, management nature, ownership, presence of research/teaching activities, complexity level, number of hospital beds, presence of pharmacists, number of pharmacists, pharmacist specialization. All statistical analyses were performed by IBM SPSS v.19. The number of hospitals with a complete registry in the national database was 4790. The majority were general hospitals (77.9%), managed by municipalities (66.1%), under public administration (44.0%), had no research/teaching activities (90.5%), classified as medium complexity (71.6%), and had no pharmacist in their team (50.6%). Furthermore, almost 60.0% of hospitals did not comply with the minimum recommendations of having a pharmacist per 50 hospital beds. The Southeast region had the highest prevalence of pharmacists, with 64.4% of hospitals having a pharmaceutical professional. This may have occurred as this region had the highest population to hospital ratio. Non-profit hospitals were more likely to have pharmacists compared to those under public administration and private hospitals. This study mapped the hospital pharmacy workforce in Brazil, showing a higher prevalence of hospital pharmacists in the Southeast region, and in non-profit specialized hospitals.

  5. How does wireless phones effect communication and treatment in hospitals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Bettina Sletten

    The use of wireless phones in hospital units are increasing, inducing practitioners to carry a working phone each. A study performed in a medical hospital unit demonstrates that wireless phones can impair communication between health care practitioners and patients (Paasch, in press). Also wirele...... approach, focusing on central mediated actions carried out by social actors. Initial participant observations and interviews, will help define situations for video...... participant observations, ethnographic interviews and video observations. The study will explore how wireless phones mediate and is mediated by practitioners communication with each other and patients. As hospitals are constructed and reconstructed by all communication within, this insight will enable...

  6. “... And Gladly Teach”: The American Hospital Association's Experience in Conducting Institutes on Hospital Librarianship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yast, Helen

    1964-01-01

    As part of its overall educational program, the American Hospital Association has since 1959 conducted three institutes on hospital librarianship to meet the demand for more competent librarians in medical, nursing school, and patients' libraries. The purpose of such institutes is to teach the basic elements of library science to untrained personnel in hospital libraries. Discussed are steps in initiating an institute; factors determining length, date, and place; financing; publicity; choice and responsibility of local advisory committee; program content; qualifications of instructors; characteristics of registrants; materials for distribution; evaluations. Details of the most recent institute are outlined. A summary of problems still facing this type of educational program and suggestions for future improvements conclude the paper. PMID:14119309

  7. MONTANA PALLADIUM RESEARCH INITIATIVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, John; McCloskey, Jay; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Snyder, Stuart; Gurney, Brian

    2012-05-09

    Project Objective: The overarching objective of the Montana Palladium Research Initiative is to perform scientific research on the properties and uses of palladium in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The purpose of the research will be to explore possible palladium as an alternative to platinum in hydrogen-economy applications. To achieve this objective, the Initiatives activities will focus on several cutting-edge research approaches across a range of disciplines, including metallurgy, biomimetics, instrumentation development, and systems analysis. Background: Platinum-group elements (PGEs) play significant roles in processing hydrogen, an element that shows high potential to address this need in the U.S. and the world for inexpensive, reliable, clean energy. Platinum, however, is a very expensive component of current and planned systems, so less-expensive alternatives that have similar physical properties are being sought. To this end, several tasks have been defined under the rubric of the Montana Palladium Research Iniative. This broad swath of activities will allow progress on several fronts. The membrane-related activities of Task 1 employs state-of-the-art and leading-edge technologies to develop new, ceramic-substrate metallic membranes for the production of high-purity hydrogen, and develop techniques for the production of thin, defect-free platinum group element catalytic membranes for energy production and pollution control. The biomimetic work in Task 2 explores the use of substrate-attached hydrogen-producing enzymes and the encapsulation of palladium in virion-based protein coats to determine their utility for distributed hydrogen production. Task 3 work involves developing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a real-time, in situ diagnostic technique to characterize PGEs nanoparticles for process monitoring and control. The systems engineering work in task 4

  8. The initial experience of trans-rectal ultrasound and biopsy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The initial experience of trans-rectal ultrasound and biopsy in diagnosis of carcinoma prostate in Gezira Hospital for Renal Disease and Surgery (GHRDS). Walaa Eldin Ibraheem, Sami Mahjoub Taha, Mustafa Omran Mansour, Mohammed El Imam Mohamed Ahmed ...

  9. Reflexiones iniciales = Initial Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Romanos de Tiratel

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Se establece el significado de los sustantivos que forman el título de la revista: información, cultura y sociedad. Luego se reflexiona sobre la significación e importancia que tiene la creación de una revista especializada para el Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliotecológicas de la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras de la Universidad de Buenos Aires y se delinean sus principales características. Para finalizar se presentan los artículos del fascículo inicial y se agradece a personas e instituciones que posibilitaron la publicación de la revista = The editor provides the meaning of nouns that form the title of the journal: information, culture and society. Then she reflects on the significance and importance of creating a scientific journal for the Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliotecológicas at the Facultad de Filosofía y Letras at the Universidad de Buenos Aires and outlines its main features. In the end, she presents the articles making up the initial issue and thanked individuals and institutions that made possible the publication of the journal

  10. Moon-Mars Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    On 27 May, the AGU Council unanimously adopted a position statement on NASA's strategic plan released in February 2005:: "A New Age of Exploration: NASA's Direction for 2005 and Beyond". This strategy incorporates U.S. President Bush's vision for manned space flight to Moon and Mars as described in "A Renewed Spirit of Discovery: The President's Vision for U.S. Space Exploration" announced in January 2004. The statement was drafted by a panel chaired by Eric Barron of Penn State University. AGU calls for the U.S. Administration, Congress, and NASA to continue their commitment to innovative Earth and space science programs. This commitment has placed the U.S. in an international leadership position. It enables environmental stewardship, promotes economic vitality, engages the next generation of scientists and engineers, protects life and property, and fosters exploration. It is, however, threatened by new financial demands placed on NASA by the return to human space flight using the space shuttle, finishing the space station, and launching the Moon-Mars initiative.

  11. ALOS-2 initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaku, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) was launched from Tanegashima Space Center by H-IIA rocket successfully on 24th May 2014. ALOS-2 carries the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) as the state-of-the-art L-band SAR system which succeeds to PALSAR onboard ALOS. PALSAR-2 uses almost whole bandwidth allocated for L-band active sensor of Earth Exploration Satellites Service specified by the Radio Regulation in order to realize the high resolution observation, and also, it transmits more than 6 kW power for lower Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero using 180 TRMs driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN) amplifier which is the first use in space. Furthermore, because ALOS-2 carries the SAR system only, PALSAR-2 antenna can be mounted under the satellite body. It enables to observe right-/left-looking observation by satellite maneuvering. And the high accuracy orbit control to maintain the satellite within 500 m radius tube against the reference orbit enables high coherence for the InSAR processing. Using these new technologies, ALOS-2 has been operating to fulfill the mission requirements such as disaster monitoring and so on. This document introduces the initial result of ALOS-2 from the first year operation.

  12. The new childcare initiative

    CERN Multimedia

    Cigdem Issever

    The ATLAS Women's Network recently sent out a general mailing to all ATLAS and CMS members to announce a new initiative aimed at improving childcare facilities for Users coming to CERN. Several people have expressed the need that CERN should provide or facilitate affordable day care for children of temporary visitors at CERN. The ATLAS Women's Network is now forming a child care task force from concerned people and invites all those interested to join this effort. You can do so by either adding your name to the mailing list cern-users-childcare@cern.ch in Simba or by contacting Cigdem.Issever@cern.NOSPAM.ch and Pauline.Gagnon@cern.NOSPAM.ch. More than 50 people have already joined this effort. Those who have joined the mailing list will soon receive all the details about the next conference call meeting which has been scheduled for Thursday October 25th from 16:30 to 18:00 CERN time. The preliminary agenda is the following: Summary of our first contact of ATLAS and CMS (5 min) Discussion about the co-conv...

  13. AECL's new environmental initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, F.N.

    1993-01-01

    AECL's research and development expenditures in environmental sciences and waste management technology are about $50 M per year. The main focus of these programs is the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. This research is supplemented by activities in support of laboratory, Environmental Authority and internal waste management requirements, as well as provision of non-nuclear services. AECL intends to become more involved in performing environmental research and development with broader application. The goal is to achieve a relationship with Canadian industry that would involve a substantial portion of AECL's environmental research capabilities. The research directions and priorities of the resulting partnership would be set by the private sector in accordance with their needs and requirements. It is expected that the activities associated with this new environmental initiative will start small and grow in response to perceived needs. AECL is now increasing its non-nuclear research efforts by targeting those markets that appear most attractive. The thrust can be divided into three broad categories: environmental research, environmental services, and environmental products. (Author)

  14. Perspective: Autonomic care systems for hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J; Dong, Chunming; Rhodes, Nancy M; McNeill, Diana B; Adams, Martha B; Gilliss, Catherine L; Cuffe, Michael S; Califf, Robert M; Peterson, Eric D; Lubarsky, David A

    2009-12-01

    With advancements of medical technology and improved diagnostic and treatment options, children with severe birth defects who would otherwise have no chance of surviving post birth survive to go home every day. The average lifespan in the United States has increased substantially over the last century. These successes and many other medical breakthroughs in managing complex illnesses, particularly in frail, elderly patients, have resulted in an increasing percentage of patients with comorbidities. This, coupled with a policy change by Medicare (i.e., Medicare will no longer reimburse hospitals for costs associated with treating preventable errors and injuries that a patient acquires while in the hospital), creates an enormous challenge to health care providers. To meet the challenge, the authors propose a new model of health care--the autonomic care system (ACS)--a concept derived from the intensive care unit and the autonomic computing initiative in the computer industry. Using wound care as an example, the authors examine the necessity, feasibility, design, and challenges related to ACS. Specifically, they discuss the role of the human operator, the potential combination of ACS and existing hospital information technology (e.g., electronic medical records and computerized provider order entry), and the costs associated with ACS. ACS may serve as a roadmap to revamp the health care system, bringing down the barriers among different specialties and improving the quality of care for each problem for all hospitalized patients.

  15. Diabetic foot ulcer teams in Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberstad, Mari; Bentsen, Signe Berit; Berg, Tore Julsrud; Iversen, Marjolein M

    2017-09-19

    The national clincial guidelines for diabetes recommend that diabetic foot ulcers be treated by interdisciplinary diabetic foot ulcer teams. This study aims to survey the extent of diabetic foot ulcer teams in the specialist health service in Norwegian hospitals and to describe their clinical composition, organisation and working routines. The study is cross-sectional with the use of a questionnaire survey. The criteria for participating were somatic hospitals with 24-hour operations and a specialist function for patients with diabetes mellitus. A total of 41 hospitals participated of the 51 that fulfilled the criteria. Altogether 17 of 41 hospitals had diabetic foot ulcer teams. The teams had a broad clinical composition and followed national recommendations for surveying risk factors and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Nine foot ulcer teams had written routines for assessment, five used the Noklus diabetes patient records to document ulcer treatment, and ten had planned interdisciplinary meetings. Only one-quarter of the teams included both medical and surgical competence in the planned interdisciplinary collaboration. The diabetic foot ulcer teams had broad clinical competence and followed national clinical guidelines. The teams had a short waiting time for the initial consultation, half had written guidelines, and 60 % had planned interdisciplinary meetings. Far fewer had included both medical and surgical competence in the planned interdisciplinary collaboration.

  16. The Hospital Information Planning Study at Groote Schuur Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information is an increasingly important resource in an academic hospital. Effective planning and control of this resource are essential in order to maximize its usefulness. Tile HOspital Information Planning Study (HIPS) undertaken at Groote Schuur Hospital, and based on. the Business Systems Planning (BSP) ...

  17. Pediatric out-of-hospital deaths following hospital discharge: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Out-of-hospital death among children living in resource poor settings occurs frequently. Little is known about the location and circumstances of child death following a hospital discharge. Objectives: This study aimed to understand the context surrounding out-of-hospital deaths and the barriers to accessing ...

  18. Hospital nurses' work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge surrounding nurses' work motivation is currently insufficient, and previous studies have rarely taken into account the role of many influential background factors. This study investigates the motivation of Estonian nurses in hospitals, and how individual and organisational background factors influence their motivation to work. The study is quantitative and cross-sectional. An electronically self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection. The sample comprised of 201 Registered Nurses working in various hospital settings in Estonia. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test, Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test and Spearman's correlation. Both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were noted among hospital nurses. Nurses were moderately externally motivated (M = 3.63, SD = 0.89) and intrinsically strongly motivated (M = 4.98, SD = 1.03). A nurses' age and the duration of service were positively correlated with one particular area of extrinsic work motivation, namely introjected regulation (p motivation (p = 0.016) and intrinsic work motivation (p = 0.004). The findings expand current knowledge of nurses' work motivation by describing the amount and orientation of work motivation among hospital nurses and highlighting background factors which should be taken into account in order to sustain and increase their intrinsic work motivation. The instrument used in the study can be an effective tool for nurse managers to determine a nurse's reasons to work and to choose a proper motivational strategy. Further research and testing of the instrument in different countries and in different contexts of nursing is however required. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. HSIP Hospitals in New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Hospitals in New Mexico The term "hospital" ... means an institution which- (1) is primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of physicians, to...

  20. Parametric Optimization of Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Malene Kirstine; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Christoffersen, L.D.

    2013-01-01

    Present paper presents a parametric performancebased design model for optimizing hospital design. The design model operates with geometric input parameters defining the functional requirements of the hospital and input parameters in terms of performance objectives defining the design requirements...

  1. The general NFP hospital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the past 30 years, there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the proliferation of new forms of health care delivery organizations that challenge and compete with general NFP community hospitals. Traditionally, the health care system in the United States has been dominated by general NFP (NFP) voluntary hospitals. With the number of for-profit general hospitals, physician-owned specialty hospitals, and ambulatory surgical centers increasing, a question arises: “Why is the general NFP community hospital the dominant model?” In order to address this question, this paper reexamines the history of the hospital industry. By understanding how the “general NFP hospital” model emerged and dominated, we attempt to explain the current dominance of general NFP hospitals in the ever changing hospital industry in the United States.

  2. European nuclear education initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatz, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Whatever option regarding their future nuclear energy development is chosen by European Union Member States, the availability of a sufficient number of well trained and experienced staff is key for the responsible use of nuclear energy. This is true in all areas including design, construction, operation, decommissioning, fuel cycle and waste management as well as radiation protection. Given the high average age of existing experts leading to a significant retirement induce a real risk of the loss of nuclear competencies in the coming years. Therefore the demand of hiring skilled employees is rising. The challenge of ensuring a sufficient number of qualified staff in the nuclear sector has been acknowledged widely among the different stakeholders, in particular the nuclear industry, national regulatory authorities and Technical Support Organisations (TSOs). Already the EURATOM Treaty refers explicitly to the obligation for the Commission to carry out training actions. Recently initiatives have been launched at EU level to facilitate and strengthen the efforts of national stakeholders. The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association aims at preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear field by higher education and training. The goal of the European Nuclear Energy Leadership Academy (ENELA) is to educate future leaders in the nuclear field to ensure the further development of sustainable European nuclear energy solutions The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) is a platform operated by the European Commission for a broad discussion on the opportunities and risks of nuclear energy. The nuclear programs under investigation in the Joint Research Center (JRC) are increasingly contributing to Education and Training (E and T) initiatives, promoting a better cooperation between key players and universities as well as operators and regulatory bodies in order to mutually optimise their training programmes. Another objective is to increase

  3. Initial Cladding Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M andO 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  4. The MEGAPIE Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvatores, M. [CEA Cadarache (France); Bauer, G.S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (Switzerland); Heusener, G. [Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2000-10-01

    MEGAPIE (Megawatt Pilot Experiment) is a joint initiative by Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), France, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Germany, and Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Switzerland, to design, build, operate and explore a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target for 1MW of beam power, taking advantage of the existing spallation neutron facility SINQ at PSI. Such a target based on an eutectic mixture with a melting point as low as 125 {sup o}C and a boiling point as high as 1670 {sup o}C is the preferred concept in several studies aiming at utilising accelerators to drive subcritical assemblies in order to transmute long lived nuclear waste into shorter lived isotopes in an effort to ease problems of long term storage and final disposal. MEGAPIE will be an essential step towards demonstrating the feasibility of the coupling of a high power accelerator, a spallation target and a subcritical assembly. It will specifically address one of the most critical issues, namely the behaviour of a liquid metal target under realistic operating conditions. As an intensely instrumented pilot experiment it will provide valuable data for benchmarking of frequently used computer codes and will allow to gain important experience in the safe handling of components that have been irradiated with PbBi. It will be installed at the ring cyclotron at PSI with 590 MeV proton energy and a continuous current of 1.8 mA. The basic concept of the MEGAPIE target as well as the definition of the project phases and of the supporting research and development activities at the participating laboratories are described in the present report.

  5. Hazardous material reduction initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, D.H.

    1995-02-01

    The Hazardous Material Reduction Initiative (HMRI) explores using the review of purchase requisitions to reduce both the use of hazardous materials and the generation of regulated and nonregulated wastes. Based on an 11-month program implemented at the Hanford Site, hazardous material use and waste generation was effectively reduced by using a centralized procurement control program known as HMRI. As expected, several changes to the original proposal were needed during the development/testing phase of the program to accommodate changing and actual conditions found at the Hanford Site. The current method requires a central receiving point within the Procurement Organization to review all purchase requisitions for potentially Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) hazardous products. Those requisitions (approximately 4% to 6% of the total) are then forwarded to Pollution Prevention personnel for evaluation under HMRI. The first step is to determine if the requested item can be filled by existing or surplus material. The requisitions that cannot filled by existing or surplus material are then sorted into two groups based on applicability to the HMRI project. For example, laboratory requests for analytical reagents or standards are excluded and the purchase requisitions are returned to Procurement for normal processing because, although regulated, there is little opportunity for source reduction due to the strict protocols followed. Each item is then checked to determine if it is regulated or not. Regulated items are prioritized based on hazardous contents, quantity requested, and end use. Copies of these requisitions are made and the originals are returned to Procurement within 1-hr. Since changes to the requisition can be made at later stages during procurement, the HMRI fulfills one of its original premises in that it does not slow the procurement process

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa from hospital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind Davane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hospital acquired infection is an additional affliction to the patient admitted to the hospital for some serious illness and is caused by pathogens which are prevalent in hospital environment. In the hospital, microbes are ubiquitous; and can reach the sick patient through various sources, such as air, water, food, contaminated equipments, linen, catheters, scopes, ventilators, contaminated disinfectants and other preparations used for treatment, visitors, infected patients, etc.

  7. Exploring hospitality within hospital meals by means of visual methodologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper reflects the application of visual methodologies adapted in an explorative study on hospitality and hospital meals. It takes point of departure in a multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork placed at a general hospital in 2012. Visual methodologies were applied in multiple ways....... This includes visual methodologies as part of observation and interview strategies. The paper presents and discusses how the application of different visual methodologies can contribute to the construction of ethnographical knowledge on hospitality and hospital meals. Finally ethical considerations as well...

  8. On Hospital Design – Identifying Building Attributes of Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Malene Kirstine; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Christoffersen, Lars D.

    The present paper surveys the input parameters in hospital design and describes them formally as building attributes in preparation for facilitating planning and designing of hospitals with the aim of a more optimal design process. The overview of the hospital functionalities, bonds, logistics...... and needs is based on an approach of understanding the complexity of the hospital functionalities based on capacities, qualities and times beforehand specific department or units are described. This approach attempts to create an overview of the hospital functionalities respecting capacities, qualities...

  9. National Take-Back Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physicians Drug Disposal Information Drug and Chemical Information E-commerce Initiatives Federal Agencies & Related Links Federal Register Notices ... Physicians Drug Disposal Information Drug and Chemical Information E-commerce Initiatives Federal Agencies & Related Links Federal Register Notices ...

  10. Library Hospitality: Some Preliminary Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric D. M.; Kazmer, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Library scholars and practitioners have frequently reflected on the various factors that in combination make up a hospitable library, but there has been little theoretical synthesis of the notion of the library as a place of hospitality. The hospitality industry provides a rich vein of theoretical material from which to draw definitions of…

  11. Hospitality Studies: Escaping the Tyranny?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashley, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore current strands in hospitality management education and research, and suggest that future programs should reflect a more social science informed content. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews current research in hospitality management education and in the study of hospitality and…

  12. Hospitality in College Composition Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haswell, Janis; Haswell, Richard; Blalock, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    There has been little discussion of hospitality as a practice in college writing courses. Possible misuses of hospitality as an educational and ethical practice are explored, and three traditional and still tenable modes of hospitality are described and historicized: Homeric, Judeo-Christian, and nomadic. Application of these modes to…

  13. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  14. Grass roots initiation of a national certification initiative: peer-to-peer motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Carie E

    2009-03-01

    Despite multiple organizational incentives, the neonatal ICU (NICU) in an urban teaching hospital remained below the national average for certified nurses. A peer-to-peer program was developed to motivate, support, and encourage participants throughout the process of obtaining a national specialty certification. A detailed promotion campaign, certification packet, and process map were developed and implemented. At completion of this first-year initiative, the program yielded a 38% increase in certified unit nurses. The organization's unit total is now 59% of eligible certified neonatal nurses, well above the national average.

  15. Hospitality within hospital meals—Socio-material assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Mikkelsen, Bent E.

    2016-01-01

    Hospital meals and their role in nutritional care have been studied primarily from a life and natural science perspective. This article takes a different approach and explores the idea of hospitality inspired by Jacques Derrida’s work on the ontology of hospitality. By drawing on ethnographic fie...... and management involved in hospital food service and in nutritional care to work more systematically with the environment for improved hospital meal experiences in the future......Hospital meals and their role in nutritional care have been studied primarily from a life and natural science perspective. This article takes a different approach and explores the idea of hospitality inspired by Jacques Derrida’s work on the ontology of hospitality. By drawing on ethnographic...... fieldwork in a Danish hospital, hospitality practices were studied using a socio-material assemblage approach. The study showed that rethinking the meal event could change the wards into temporary “pop-up-restaurants,” transcending the hospital context and providing a scene for shifting host...

  16. Nursing magnet hospitals have better CMS hospital compare ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been conflicting data on whether Nursing Magnet Hospitals (NMH provide better care. Methods: NMH in the Southwest USA (Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Nevada, and New Mexico were compared to hospitals not designated as NMH using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS hospital compare star designation. Results: NMH had higher star ratings than non-NMH hospitals (3.34 + 0.78 vs. 2.86 + 0.83, p<0.001. The hospitals were mostly large, urban non-critical access hospitals. Academic medical centers made up a disproportionately large portion of the NMH. Conclusions: Although NMH had higher hospital ratings, the data may favor non-critical access academic medical centers which are known to have better outcomes.

  17. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement

  18. Analysis of Shahid Rajaee hospital administrative data on injuries resulting from car accidents in Shiraz, Iran: 2011–2014 data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Yadollahi

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Hospital administrative databases of this hospital could be used as reliable sources of information in providing epidemiologic reports of car accidents in terms of severity and outcomes. Improving the quality of recordings at hospital databases is an important initial step towards more comprehensive injury surveillance in Fars, Iran.

  19. Promising Practices for Improving Hospital Patient Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Joanne; Famolaro, Theresa

    2018-01-01

    Patient safety culture has a positive influence on the effectiveness of patient safety and quality improvement interventions. A study was conducted to gain knowledge about promising best practices used by hospitals to improve patient safety culture hospitalwide. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Surveys on Patient Safety Culture™ (SOPS) Hospital Survey longitudinal results from 536 hospitals that submitted data to the Hospital SOPS database from 2007 to 2014 were analyzed. Composite-level and aggregate improvement was measured, resulting in the identification of "top-improving," large hospitals (400 + beds). Semistructured interviews were conducted with one to three interviewees (for example, Vice President of Clinical Quality, Patient Safety Officer, Chief Medical Officer) from six top-improving hospitals. The transcripts of the interviews were analyzed to identify common themes and best practices among the hospitals. The mean change in the all-composite percent positive culture score was a 1.7 percentage point increase. The six hospitals interviewed had an average increase of 8.6 percentage points (range, 6.5-10.6) in their culture score. The three most common practices for improving culture as described by the hospital quality leaders from the six hospitals were (1) goal setting and strong action planning for quality improvement, (2) implementation of well-known patient safety initiatives and programs, and (3) rigorous survey administration methods. Among six large hospitals that improved their hospitalwide culture score, the common best practices were the implementation of routine culture measurement with a wide dissemination of results, strong action planning for improvement that includes leadership support and involvement from all staff levels, and multifaceted patient safety programs and education. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. All rights reserved.

  20. Beyond the clinic: redefining hospital ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogut, L

    1997-07-01

    Responding to changes in health care financing, government policy, technology, and clinical judgment, and the rise of managed care, hospitals are shifting services from inpatient to outpatient settings and moving them into the community. Institutions are evolving into integrated delivery systems, developing the capacity to provide a continuum of coordinated services in an array of settings and to share financial risk with physicians and managed care organizations. Over the past several years, hospitals in New York City have shifted considerable resources into ambulatory care. In their drive to expand and enhance services, however, they face serious challenges, including a well-established focus on hospitals as inpatient centers of tertiary care and medical education, a heavy reliance upon residents as providers of medical care, limited access to capital, and often inadequate physical plants. In 1995, the United Hospital Fund awarded $600,000 through its Ambulatory Care Services Initiative to support hospitals' efforts to meet the challenges of reorganizing services, compete in a managed care environment, and provide high-quality ambulatory care in more efficient ways. Through the initiative, 12 New York City hospitals started projects to reorganize service delivery and build an infrastructure of systems, technology, and personnel. Among the projects undertaken by the hospitals were:--broad-based reorganization efforts employing primary care models to improve and expand existing ambulatory care services, integrate services, and better coordinate care;--projects to improve information management, planning and testing new systems for scheduling appointments, registering patients, and tracking ambulatory care and its outcomes;--training programs to increase the supply of primary care providers (both nurse practitioners and primary care physicians), train clinical and support staff in the skills needed to deliver more efficient and better ambulatory care, prepare staff